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Sample records for carbonate wash solutions

  1. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  2. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  3. Soil washing of fluorine contaminated soil using various washing solutions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Jo, Raehyun; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-03-01

    Bench-scale soil washing experiments were conducted to remove fluoride from contaminated soils. Five washing solutions including hydrochloric acid (HCl), nitric acid (HNO3), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and tartaric acid (C4H6O6) were tested. The concentration of the washing solutions used ranged from 0.1 to 3 M with a liquid to solid ratio of 10. The soil washing results showed that the most effective washing solution for the removal of fluoride from contaminated soils was HCl. The highest fluoride removal results of approximately 97 % from the contaminated soil were obtained using 3 M HCl. The fluoride removal efficiency of the washing solution increases in the following order: C4H6O6 < NaOH < H2SO4 < HNO3 < HCl.

  4. Potential of activated carbon to recover randomly-methylated-β-cyclodextrin solution from washing water originating from in situ soil flushing.

    PubMed

    Sniegowski, K; Vanhecke, M; D'Huys, P-J; Braeken, L

    2014-07-01

    Despite the overall high efficacy of cyclodextrins to accelerate the treatment of soil aquifer remediation by in-situ soil flushing, the use in practice remains limited because of the high costs of cyclodextrin and high concentrations needed to significantly reduce the treatment time. The current study tested the potential of activated carbon to treat washing water originating from soil flushing in order to selectively separate hydrocarbon contaminants from washing water containing cyclodextrin and subsequently reuse the cyclodextrin solution for reinfiltration. A high recovery of the cyclodextrin from the washing water would reduce the costs and would make the technique economically feasible for soil remediation. This study aimed to investigate whether cyclodextrin can pass through the activated carbon filter without reducing the cyclodextrin concentration when the contaminated washing water is treated and whether the presence of cyclodextrin negatively affects the purification potential of activated carbon to remove the organic pollutants from the pumped soil water. Lab-scale column experiments showed that with the appropriate activated carbon 100% of cyclodextrin (randomly-methylated-β-cyclodextrin) can be recovered from the washing water and that the effect on the efficiency of activated carbon to remove the hydrocarbon contaminants remains limited. These results show that additional field tests are useful to make in-situ soil flushing with cyclodextrin both a technical and an economical interesting technique. These results might stimulate the application of cyclodextrin in soil treatment technology.

  5. 7 CFR 2902.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 2902.51 Section 2902.51... Items § 2902.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  6. 7 CFR 3201.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 3201.51 Section 3201.51... Designated Items § 3201.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  7. 7 CFR 3201.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 3201.51 Section 3201.51... Designated Items § 3201.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  8. 7 CFR 3201.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 3201.51 Section 3201.51... Designated Items § 3201.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  9. 7 CFR 2902.51 - Parts wash solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parts wash solutions. 2902.51 Section 2902.51... Items § 2902.51 Parts wash solutions. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to clean parts in... wash solutions. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  10. Recovery of plutonium from solvent wash solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.A.

    1992-03-31

    A number of potential alternatives to the acid hydrolysis recovery of Pu were investigated. The most promising alternative for short-term use appears to be an anion exchange process that would eliminate the long boiling times and the multiple-pass concentration steps needed with the solvent extraction process because it separates the Pu from the dibutyl phosphate (DBP) while at the same time concentrating the Pu. However, restart of the Primary Recovery Column (PRC) to process this solution would require significant administrative effort. The original boiling recovery by acid hydrolysis followed by solvent extraction is probably the most expedient way to process the Pu-DBP-carbonate solution currently stored in tank 13.5 even with its long processing times and dilute product concentration. Anion exchange of a heat stabilized acidified solution is a more efficient process, but requires restart of the PRC. Extended-boiling acid hydrolysis or anion exchange of a heat stabilized acidified solution provide two well developed alternatives for recovery of the Pu from the tank 13.5 carbonate. Further work defining additional recovery processes is not planned at this time.

  11. [Washing copper (II)-contaminated soil using surfactant solutions].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bao-wei; Wu, Yong-qi; Ma, Chan-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-jia

    2009-10-15

    The batch equilibrium washing of copper (II) in the soil matrix by anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzyl sulfonate (SDBS), nonionic surfactant, octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (TX100), and their mixture (SDBS-TX100), was studied and compared. The influences of surfactant concentrations, washing time, pH values of solutions, ratios of soil to water and inorganic salts on washing efficiency were investigated. It was shown that the washing efficiency differed with the kinds of surfactants. Given the initial surfactant concentrations, the washing of copper (II) by single SDBS was greater than those by single TX100 and the mixed SDBS-TX100. The washing efficiency by 6 000 mg x L(-1) of SDBS was up to 46.3%, which was 5.8, 10.8, 10.8 and 19.3 times as those by SDBS-TX100 (3:1), SDBS-TX100 (1:1), SDBS-TX100 (1:3) and single TX100 respectively. When the ratio of soil to water was 1 to 10 and washing time reached 24 h, the washing efficiency achieved the maximum. pH values of solutions had obvious effect on the washing of copper (II). The washing efficiency of copper decreased sharply with the increase of pH. At the high acidity (pH = 1.50), the washing efficiency of copper (II) was up to 95%. The smaller the ratios of soil to water were, the higher the washing efficiencies would be. The existence of inorganic salts with the certain concentrations, such as Na+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, could not influence the washing capacity of surfactants, but the excessive Mg2+ (more than 500 mg x L(-1)) could resulted in the precipitation of SDBS. The results will make an implication for surfactant-enhanced remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals.

  12. Fresh produce washing aid, T-128, enhances inactivation of salmonella and pseudomonas biofilms on stainless steel in chlorinated wash solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of chlorine wash solutions, with/without the washing aid, T-128, on inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas populations in biofilms on stainless steel coupons was evaluated under conditions of increasing organic matter loads in the wash water. Biofilms were formed statically on stai...

  13. Soil washing using various nonionic surfactants and their recovery by selective adsorption with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ahn, C K; Kim, Y M; Woo, S H; Park, J M

    2008-06-15

    The performance of activated carbon in soil washing and subsequent selective adsorption for surfactant recovery from the washed solution was investigated. Sandy loam soil contaminated with phenanthrene at 200 mg kg(-1) was washed with four different nonionic surfactants: Tween 40, Tween 80, Brij 30 and Brij 35. The efficiency of soil washing was highest when using Brij 30 with the highest solubilizing ability for phenanthrene and low adsorption onto soil. In the selective adsorption step, surfactant recovery was quite effective for all surfactants ranging from 85.0 to 89.0% at 1 g L(-1) of activated carbon (Darco 20-40 mesh). Phenanthrene removal from the solution washed with Brij 30 was only 33.9%, even though it was 54.1-56.4% with other surfactants. The selectivity was larger than 7.02 except for Brij 30 (3.60). The overall performance considering both the washing and surfactant recovery step was effective when using Tween 80 and Brij 35. The results suggest that higher solubilizing ability of surfactants is a requirement for soil washing but causes negative effects on phenanthrene removal in the selective adsorption. Therefore, if a surfactant recovery process by selective adsorption is included in soil remediation by washing, the overall performance including the two steps should be considered for properly choosing the surfactant.

  14. Effect of different soil washing solutions on bioavailability of residual arsenic in soils and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-11-01

    The effect of soil washing used for arsenic (As)-contaminated soil remediation on soil properties and bioavailability of residual As in soil is receiving increasing attention due to increasing interest in conserving soil qualities after remediation. This study investigates the effect of different washing solutions on bioavailability of residual As in soils and soil properties after soil washing. Regardless of washing solutions, the sequential extraction revealed that the residual As concentrations and the amount of readily labile As in soils were reduced after soil washing. However, the bioassay tests showed that the washed soils exhibited ecotoxicological effects - lower seed germination, shoot growth, and enzyme activities - and this could largely be attributed to the acidic pH and/or excessive nutrient contents of the washed soils depending on washing solutions. Overall, this study showed that treated soils having lower levels of contaminants could still exhibit toxic effects due to changes in soil properties, which highly depended on washing solutions. This study also emphasizes that data on the As concentrations, the soil properties, and the ecotoxicological effects are necessary to properly manage the washed soils for reuses. The results of this study can, thus, be utilized to select proper post-treatment techniques for the washed soils.

  15. Effect of Variations of Washing Solution Chemistry on Nanomaterial Physicochemical Changes in the Laundry Cycle.

    PubMed

    Mitrano, Denise M; Arroyo Rojas Dasilva, Yadira; Nowack, Bernd

    2015-08-18

    Engineered nanoparticle (ENP) life cycles are strongly dependent on the life-cycle of the nanoenhanced products in which they are incorporated. An important phase for ENP associated with textiles is washing. Using a set of liquid and powdered commercially available detergents that span a wide range of different chemistries, washing studies were performed with one "standard" nanoparticle suspended in wash solution to systematically investigate (changes to) particle size distribution, dissolution, reprecipitation (i.e., "new" particle formation), and complexation to particulate matter. Au ENPs were used as a "tracer" through the system. TEM and EDX analysis were performed to observe morphological and chemical changes to the particles, and single-particle ICP-MS was used to build a size distribution of particles in solution. Varying the washing solution chemistry was found to dictate the extent and rate of dissolution, particle destruction, surface chemistry change(s), and new particle formation. Detergent chemistry, dominated by oxidizing agents, was a major factor. The detergent form (i.e., powder vs liquid) was the other decisive factor, with powder forms providing available surfaces for precipitation and sorption reactions. Control experiments with AgNO3 indicated metallic Ag particles formed during the washing process from dissolved Ag, implying not all Ag-NPs observed in a textile washing study are indicative of released Ag-ENPs but can also be the result of sequential dissolution/reduction reactions.

  16. Electrolytic arsenic removal for recycling of washing solutions in a remediation process of CCA-treated wood.

    PubMed

    Nanseu-Njiki, Charles-Péguy; Alonzo, Véronique; Bartak, Duane; Ngameni, Emmanuel; Darchen, André

    2007-10-01

    The remediation of chromated copper arsenate or CCA-treated wood is a challenging problem in many countries. In a wet remediation, the recycling of the washing solutions is the key step for a successful process. Within this goal, owing to its solubility and its toxicity, the removal of arsenic from washing solution is the most difficult process. The efficiency of arsenic removal from As(III) solutions by electrolysis was investigated in view of the recycling of acidic washing solutions usable in the remediation of CCA-treated wood. Electrochemical reduction of As(III) is irreversible and thus difficult to perform at carbon electrodes. However the electrolytic extraction of arsenic can be performed by the concomitant reduction of the cupric cation and arsenite anion. The cathodic deposits obtained by controlled potential electrolysis were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. XRD diffraction data indicated that these deposits were mixtures of copper and copper arsenides Cu(3)As and Cu(5)As(2). Electrolysis was carried out in an undivided cell with graphite cathode and copper anode, under a controlled nitrogen atmosphere. The evolution of arsine gas AsH(3) was not observed under these conditions.

  17. Changes in soil toxicity by phosphate-aided soil washing: effect of soil characteristics, chemical forms of arsenic, and cations in washing solutions.

    PubMed

    Jho, Eun Hea; Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-01-01

    This study was set to investigate the changes in the toxicity of arsenic (As)-contaminated soils after washing with phosphate solutions. The soil samples collected from two locations (A: rice paddy and B: forest land) of a former smelter site were contaminated with a similar level of As. Soil washing (0.5 M phosphate solution for 2 h) removed 24.5% As, on average, in soil from both locations. Regardless of soil washing, Location A soil toxicities, determined using Microtox, were greater than that of Location B and this could be largely attributed to different soil particle size distribution. With soils from both locations, the changes in As chemical forms resulted in either similar or greater toxicities after washing. This emphasizes the importance of considering ecotoxicological aspects, which are likely to differ depending on soil particle size distribution and changes in As chemical forms, in addition to the total concentration based remedial goals, in producing ecotoxicologically-sound soils for reuse. In addition, calcium phosphate used as the washing solution seemed to contribute more on the toxic effects of the washed soils than potassium phosphate and ammonium phosphate. Therefore, it would be more appropriate to use potassium or ammonium phosphate than calcium phosphate for phosphate-aided soil washing of the As-contaminated soils.

  18. Electrochemical treatment of spent solution after EDTA-based soil washing.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2012-04-15

    The use of EDTA in soil washing technologies to remediate soils contaminated with toxic metals is prohibitive because of the large volumes of waste washing solution generated, which must be treated before disposal. Degradation of EDTA in the waste solution and the removal of Pb, Zn and Cd were investigated using electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOP) with a boron-doped diamond anode (BDDA), graphite and iron anodes and a stainless-steel cathode. In addition to EAOP, the efficiency of electro-Fenton reactions, induced by the addition of H(2)O(2) and the regulation of electrochemical systems to pH 3, was also investigated. Soil extraction with 15 mmol kg(-1) of soil EDTA yielded waste washing solution with 566 ± 1, 152 ± 1 and 5.5 ± 0.1 mg L(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively. Treatments of the waste solution in pH unregulated electrochemical systems with a BDDA and graphite anode (current density 67 mA cm(-2)) were the most efficient and removed up to 98 ± 1, 96 ± 1, 99 ± 1% of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively, by electrodeposition on the cathode and oxidatively degraded up to 99 ± 1% of chelant. In the electrochemical system with an Fe anode operated at pH 3, the chelant remained preserved in the treated solution, while metals were removed by electrodeposition. This separation opens up the possibility of a new EDTA recycling method from waste soil washing solution.

  19. Wash Solution Bath Life Extension for the Space Shuttle Rocket Motor Aqueous Cleaning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Chad; Evans, Kurt; Sagers, Neil

    1999-01-01

    A spray-in-air aqueous cleaning system, which replaced 1,1,1 trichloroethane (TCA) vapor degreasing, is used for critical cleaning of Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) metal parts. Small-scale testing demonstrated that the alkaline-based wash solution possesses adequate soil loading and cleaning properties. However, full-scale testing exhibited unexpected depletion of some primary components of the wash solution. Specifically, there was a significant decrease in the concentration of sodium metasilicate which forced change-out of the wash solution after eight days. Extension of wash solution bath life was necessary to ease the burden of frequent change-out on manufacturing. A laboratory study supports a depletion mechanism that is initiated by the hydrolysis of sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) lowering the pH of the solution. The decrease in pH causes polymerization and subsequent precipitation of sodium metasilicate (SM). Further investigation showed that maintaining the pH was the key to preventing the precipitation of the sodium metasilicate. Implementation to the full scale operation demonstrated that periodic additions of potassium hydroxide (KOH) extended the useful bath life to more than four months.

  20. Efficacy of different washing solutions and contact times on the microbial quality and safety of fresh-cut paprika.

    PubMed

    Das, B Kumar; Kim, Ji Gang; Choi, Ji Weon

    2011-10-01

    The role of different washing solutions and contact times was investigated to determine their use as potential sanitizers for maintaining the microbial quality and food safety of fresh-cut paprika. Samples were cut into small pieces, washed for both 90 and 180 s by different washing solutions: tap water, chlorinated water (100 mg/L and pH 6.5-7), electrolyzed water (pH 7.2) and ozonized water (4 mg/L). Then, samples were packaged in 50 µm polypropylene bags and stored at 5 °C for 12 days, followed by an evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of the treatments. Various quality and safety parameters, such as gas composition, color, off-odor, electrical conductivity and microbial numbers, were evaluated during storage. Results revealed insignificant differences in gas composition, and no off-odor was observed in any of the samples during the storage period. However, longer contact time resulted in slightly lower hue angle value than a short one for all washing solutions. Moreover, samples washed with ozone washings showed lower electrolyte leakage than other washing solutions. Samples washed for longer contact time except those washed in ozonized water showed increased microbial numbers during storage. Hence, it has been concluded that longer contact time with ozone has positive effects, whereas the other washing solutions adversely affect the microbial quality and safety aspects of fresh-cut paprika.

  1. Modified sodium diuranate process for the recovery of uranium from uranium hexafluoride transport cylinder wash solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Austin Dean

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF6) containment cylinders must be emptied and washed every five years in order to undergo recertification, according to ANSI standards. During the emptying of the UF6 from the cylinders, a thin residue, or heel, of UF6 is left behind. This heel must be removed in order for recertification to take place. To remove it, the inside of the containment cylinder is washed with acid and the resulting solution generally contains three or four kilograms of uranium. Thus, before the liquid solution can be disposed of, the uranium must be separated. A modified sodium diuranate (SDU) uranium recovery process was studied to support development of a commercial process. This process was sought to ensure complete uranium recovery, at high purity, in order that it might be reused in the nuclear fuel cycle. An experimental procedure was designed and carried out in order to verify the effectiveness of the commercial process in a laboratory setting. The experiments involved a small quantity of dried UO2F2 powder that was dosed with 3wt% FeF3 and was dissolved in water to simulate the cylinder wash solution. Each experiment series started with a measured amount of this powder mixture which was dissolved in enough water to make a solution containing about 120 gmU/liter. The experiments involved validating the modified SDU extraction process. A potassium diuranate (KDU) process was also attempted. Very little information exists regarding such a process, so the task was undertaken to evaluate its efficacy and determine whether a potassium process yields any significant differences or advantages as compared to a sodium process. However, the KDU process ultimately proved ineffective and was abandoned. Each of the experiments was organized into a series of procedures that started with the UO2F2 powder being dissolved in water, and proceeded through the steps needed to first convert the uranium to a diuranate precipitate, then to a carbonate complex solution, and finally

  2. Mathematical evaluation of activated carbon adsorption for surfactant recovery in a soil washing process.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chi K; Lee, Min W; Lee, Dae S; Woo, Seung H; Park, Jong M

    2008-12-15

    The performances of various soil washing processes, including surfactant recovery by selective adsorption, were evaluated using a mathematical model for partitioning a target compound and surfactant in water/sorbent system. Phenanthrene was selected as a representative hazardous organic compound and Triton X-100 as a surfactant. Two activated carbons that differed in size (Darco 20-40 mesh and >100 mesh sizes) were used in adsorption experiments. The adsorption isotherms of the chemicals were used in model simulations for various washing scenarios. The optimal process conditions were suggested to minimize the dosage of activated carbon and surfactant and the number of washings. We estimated that the requirement of surfactant could be reduced to 33% of surfactant requirements (from 265 to 86.6g) with a reuse step using 9.1g activated carbon (>100 mesh) to achieve 90% removal of phenanthrene (initially 100mg kg-soil(-1)) with a water/soil ratio of 10.

  3. Fresh-cut product sanitation and wash water disinfection: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Gil, Maria I; Selma, Maria V; López-Gálvez, Francisco; Allende, Ana

    2009-08-31

    It is well known that fresh-cut processors usually rely on wash water sanitizers to reduce microbial counts in order to maintain quality and extend shelf-life of the end product. Water is a useful tool for reducing potential contamination but it can also transfer pathogenic microorganisms. Washing with sanitizers is important in fresh-cut produce hygiene, particularly removing soil and debris, but especially in water disinfection to avoid cross-contamination between clean and contaminated product. Most of the sanitizing solutions induce higher microbial reduction after washing when compared to water washing, but after storage, epiphytic microorganisms grow rapidly, reaching similar levels. In fact, despite the general idea that sanitizers are used to reduce the microbial population on the produce, their main effect is maintaining the microbial quality of the water. The use of potable water instead of water containing chemical disinfection agents for washing fresh-cut vegetables is being advocated in some European countries. However, the problems of using an inadequate sanitizer or even none are considered in this manuscript. The need for a standardized approach to evaluate and compare the efficiency of sanitizing agents is also presented. Most new alternative techniques accentuate the problems with chlorine suggesting that the industry should move away from this traditional disinfection agent. However, the use of chlorine based sanitizers are presented as belonging to the most effective and efficient sanitizers when adequate doses are used. In this review improvements in water disinfection and sanitation strategies, including a shower pre-washing step and a final rinse of the produce, are suggested.

  4. Optimal operational conditions for the electrochemical regeneration of a soil washing EDTA solution.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Raffaele; Esposito, Giovanni

    2009-02-01

    The present research deals with the optimization of the operating parameters (cathode replacement time, hydraulic retention time, current intensity and pH) of an electrochemical process aimed at the regeneration of a soil washing EDTA solution used for heavy metal extraction from a natural contaminated soil (excavated from Bellolampo, Palermo, Italy), which was vastly polluted with Cu (59 261.0 mg kg(-1)), Pb (14 178.1 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (14 084.9 mg kg(-1)). The electrolytic regeneration of the exhausted washing solution was performed in a laboratory scale electrolytic cell with 50 ml each cathodic and anodic chambers divided by a cation exchange membrane. Experiments II and III showed maximum Cu and Zn removal efficiencies from the EDTA solution, of 99.2+/-0.2 and 31.5+/-9.3%, respectively, when a current intensity of 0.25 A and a hydraulic retention time of 60 min were applied to the electrolytic cell, while the maximum Pb removal efficiency of 70.9+/-4.6% was obtained with a current intensity of 1.25 A and a hydraulic retention time of 60 min. During Experiment I the overall heavy metals removal efficiency was stable and close to 90% up to 20 h, while decreased to values lower than 80% after 40 h, indicating the occurrence of a significant saturation of the cathode graphite bed between 20 and 40 h. The capability of the regenerated EDTA solution to treat heavy metals polluted soils was tested in further experiments applying both a single and a multi-step washing treatment procedure. In particular, the latter showed the feasibility to increase heavy metal soil extractions over subsequent washing steps with Cu, Pb and Zn total removal efficiencies of 52.6, 100.0 and 41.3%, respectively.

  5. Impact of electrochemical treatment of soil washing solution on PAH degradation efficiency and soil respirometry.

    PubMed

    Mousset, Emmanuel; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Oturan, Nihal; Guibaud, Gilles; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-04-01

    The remediation of a genuinely PAH-contaminated soil was performed, for the first time, through a new and complete investigation, including PAH extraction followed by advanced oxidation treatment of the washing solution and its recirculation, and an analysis of the impact of the PAH extraction on soil respirometry. The study has been performed on the remediation of genuine PAH-contaminated soil, in the following three steps: (i) PAH extraction with soil washing (SW) techniques, (ii) PAH degradation with an electro-Fenton (EF) process, and (iii) recirculation of the partially oxidized effluent for another SW cycle. The following criteria were monitored during the successive washing cycles: PAH extraction efficiency, PAH oxidation rates and yields, extracting agent recovery, soil microbial activity, and pH of soil. Two representative extracting agents were compared: hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPCD) and a non-ionic surfactant, Tween(®) 80. Six PAH with different numbers of rings were monitored: acenaphthene (ACE), phenanthrene (PHE), fluoranthene (FLA), pyrene (PYR), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), and benzo(g,h,i)perylene (BghiP). Tween(®) 80 showed much better PAH extraction efficiency (after several SW cycles) than HPCD, regardless of the number of washing cycles. Based on successive SW experiments, a new mathematical relation taking into account the soil/water partition coefficient (Kd*) was established, and could predict the amount of each PAH extracted by the surfactant with a good correlation with experimental results (R(2) > 0.975). More HPCD was recovered (89%) than Tween(®) 80 (79%), while the monitored pollutants were completely degraded (>99%) after 4 h and 8 h, respectively. Even after being washed with partially oxidized solutions, the Tween(®) 80 solutions extracted significantly more PAH than HPCD and promoted better soil microbial activity, with higher oxygen consumption rates. Moreover, neither the oxidation by-products nor the acidic media (p

  6. Changes in the bacterial flora of skin of processed broiler chickens washed in solutions of salicylic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in the number of bacteria recovered from the skin of processed broilers after each of five consecutive washings in salicylic acid (SA) solutions was examined. Skin samples from commercially processed broiler carcasses were divided into 3 groups and washed in distilled water (control), 10% S...

  7. Application of an electrochemical treatment for EDDS soil washing solution regeneration and reuse in a multi-step soil washing process: Case of a Cu contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Alberto; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Huguenot, David; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Soil washing is an extensively used process for remediation of heavy metals contaminated soils. However the amount of fresh washing solution to be used represents a significant economical drawback of this process. This paper investigates the application of an electrochemical process (Fe/Fe electrodes couple) for the regeneration of a spent EDDS solution, containing Cu and major competitor cations (Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn). The effect of current density, pH and conductivity of the washing solution on the recovery process performances was investigated. Current density showed the highest influence on Cu, Mg and Mn removal yields. Maximum removal yields reached 99% for Cu, 77% for Mn and 49% for Mg. No influence of the investigated parameters on Ca removal was observed, while an increase of Fe concentration due to anode dissolution occurred. Characterization of sludge produced from the 2 h electrochemical test (5 mA cm(-2), pH = 8, 8 mS cm(-1)) displayed concentrations of 2.8 g kg(-1) for Ca, 0.4 g kg(-1) for Cu, 535.6 g kg(-1) for Fe, 2.6 g kg(-1) for Mg. TCLP tests at pH 2.88 and 4.93 showed a low leaching percentage (Ca, 10-21%; Cu, 6-12%; Fe, 0.22% Mg, 27-36%). Multi-washing tests were carried out to assess the decrease of the chelating ability of the regenerated washing solution and the Cu extraction efficiency.

  8. Enhanced inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas biofilms on stainless steel by use of T-128, a fresh-produce washing aid, in chlorinated wash solutions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cangliang; Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Bauchan, Gary; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Qin; Millner, Patricia

    2012-10-01

    The effect of the washing aid T-128 (generally recognized as safe [GRAS] formulation, composed mainly of phosphoric acid and propylene glycol) on inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas populations in biofilms on stainless steel was evaluated under conditions of increasing organic matter loads in chlorinated wash solutions dominated by hypochlorous acid. Biofilms were formed statically on stainless steel coupons suspended in 2% lettuce extract after inoculation with Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson or Newport or with Pseudomonas fluorescens. Coupons with biofilms were washed in chlorine solutions (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, or 20 mg/liter at pH 6.5, 5.0 and 2.9), with or without T-128, and with increasing loads of organic matter (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0% lettuce extract). Cell populations on coupons were dispersed using intermittent, pulsed ultrasonication and vortexing and enumerated by colony counts on XLT-4 or Pseudomonas agars. Cell responses to fluorescent viability staining of biofilm treatment washing solutions were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results showed that 0.1% T-128 (without chlorine) reduced P. fluorescens biofilm populations by 2.5 log(10) units but did not reduce Salmonella populations. For both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, the sanitizing effect of free chlorine (1.0 to 5.0 mg/liter) was enhanced (P < 0.05) when it was combined with T-128. Application of T-128 decreased the free chlorine depletion rate caused by increasing organic matter in wash waters and significantly (P < 0.05) augmented inactivation of bacteria in biofilms compared to treatments without T-128. Image analysis of surfaces stained with SYTO and propidium iodide corroborate the cultural assay results showing that T-128 can aid in reducing pathogen viability in biofilms and thus can aid in sanitizing stainless steel contact surfaces during processing of fresh-cut produce.

  9. Enhanced Inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas Biofilms on Stainless Steel by Use of T-128, a Fresh-Produce Washing Aid, in Chlorinated Wash Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cangliang; Luo, Yaguang; Nou, Xiangwu; Bauchan, Gary; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the washing aid T-128 (generally recognized as safe [GRAS] formulation, composed mainly of phosphoric acid and propylene glycol) on inactivation of Salmonella and Pseudomonas populations in biofilms on stainless steel was evaluated under conditions of increasing organic matter loads in chlorinated wash solutions dominated by hypochlorous acid. Biofilms were formed statically on stainless steel coupons suspended in 2% lettuce extract after inoculation with Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson or Newport or with Pseudomonas fluorescens. Coupons with biofilms were washed in chlorine solutions (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, or 20 mg/liter at pH 6.5, 5.0 and 2.9), with or without T-128, and with increasing loads of organic matter (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, or 1.0% lettuce extract). Cell populations on coupons were dispersed using intermittent, pulsed ultrasonication and vortexing and enumerated by colony counts on XLT-4 or Pseudomonas agars. Cell responses to fluorescent viability staining of biofilm treatment washing solutions were examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results showed that 0.1% T-128 (without chlorine) reduced P. fluorescens biofilm populations by 2.5 log10 units but did not reduce Salmonella populations. For both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, the sanitizing effect of free chlorine (1.0 to 5.0 mg/liter) was enhanced (P < 0.05) when it was combined with T-128. Application of T-128 decreased the free chlorine depletion rate caused by increasing organic matter in wash waters and significantly (P < 0.05) augmented inactivation of bacteria in biofilms compared to treatments without T-128. Image analysis of surfaces stained with SYTO and propidium iodide corroborate the cultural assay results showing that T-128 can aid in reducing pathogen viability in biofilms and thus can aid in sanitizing stainless steel contact surfaces during processing of fresh-cut produce. PMID:22752180

  10. Comparison between supercritical carbon dioxide extraction and aqueous surfactant washing of an oily machining waste.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Matthews, M A

    1999-06-11

    Mathematical models are developed to compare aqueous surfactant washing to supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) extraction. These two cleaning processes are potentially competitive technologies which can be used to remove oily contaminants from a solid waste. In both processes, the cleaning efficiency for a batch of waste is evaluated by quantifying the residual oil content in the treated sample. A mass transfer model is used to simulate a semi-continuous washing process, and the experimental data, obtained in a batch operation, are used to estimate the equilibrium parameters in the model. For SCCO2 extraction, a linear desorption model is used to describe the supercritical desorption of oil from the solid phase into the CO2 phase and the simulated results agreed very well with the experimental data. The oil removal in aqueous surfactant washing is viewed to be controlled primarily by the diffusional transport of oil from the interiors of the waste elements to the surface, thus, it can be significantly affected by the size of the particles. A pre-cleaning pulverization is then recommended to improve the cleaning efficiency without increasing any other operation costs. In SCCO2 extraction, the desorption of oil from the solid waste is the controlling step and consequently, the solvent flow rate has no influence on oil removal. Our theoretical studies show that the difference between the cleaning efficiencies of these two technologies is not significant, with the oil concentration in the washing products approximately 5% lower than that in the extraction products.

  11. Effect of alfalfa seed washing on the organic carbon concentration in chlorinated and ozonated water.

    PubMed

    Rajkowski, Kathleen T; Rice, Eugene W

    2004-04-01

    The bioassays assimilable organic carbon (AOC) and coliform growth response are better indexes than biological oxygen demand to determine water quality and water's ability to support the growth of bacteria. Ozonated (5 mg/liter) and chlorinated tap water were used to wash alfalfa seeds for 30 min. After washing in the ozonated tap water, the AOC concentration increased 25-fold, whereas the dissolved ozone decreased to undetectable levels. The AOC levels for the chlorinated water after washing the seeds also increased. These increases are due to ozone's strong oxidizing ability to break down refractory, large-molecular-weight compounds, forming smaller ones, which are readily used as nutrient sources for microorganisms. This same phenomenon was observed when using ozone in the treatment of drinking water. The AOC value increased from 1,176 to 1,758 micrograms C-eq/liter after the reconditioned wastewater was ozonated. When the ozonated wastewater was inoculated with Salmonella serotypes, the cells survived and increased generation times were observed. The increased nutrients would now become more readily available to any pathogenic microorganisms located on alfalfa seed surface as seen with the increase in the inoculated levels of Salmonella in the ozonated wastewater. If the washing process using ozonated water is not followed by the recommended hypochlorite treatment or continually purged with ozone, pathogen growth is still possible.

  12. Effect of number and washing solutions on functional properties of surimi-like material from duck meat.

    PubMed

    Ramadhan, Kurnia; Huda, Nurul; Ahmad, Ruzita

    2014-02-01

    Duck meat is less utilized than other meats in processed products because of limitations of its functional properties, including lower water holding capacity, emulsion stability, and higher cooking loss compared with chicken meat. These limitations could be improved using surimi technology, which consists of washing and concentrating myofibrillar protein. In this study, surimi-like materials were made from duck meat using two or three washings with different solutions (tap water, sodium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and sodium phosphate buffer). Better improvement of the meat's functional properties was obtained with three washings versus two washings. Washing with tap water achieved the highest gel strength; moderate elevation of water holding capacity, pH, lightness, and whiteness; and left a small amount of fat. Washing with sodium bicarbonate solution generated the highest water holding capacity and pH and high lightness and whiteness values, but it resulted in the lowest gel strength. Processing duck meat into surimi-like material improves its functional properties, thereby making it possible to use duck meat in processed products.

  13. Physicochemical and microbial quality of stored green slender pepper treated with different washing solutions and packaging films.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Dulal; Kim, Ji Gang; Kim, Yong Phil

    2014-03-01

    The effects of different washing solutions and packaging films on textural, biochemical and microbial quality of green slender peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) were evaluated. Fresh pepper samples were packaged either in 35 µm polypropylene or polyethylene bag without washing or after washing in tap water (TW), 100-ppm chlorine solution, 0.5% calcinated calcium solution followed by 25% ethanol rinsing (CC+E) and 1% citric acid solution followed by 50% ethanol spray (CA+E) and then stored at 10  for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found in gas composition between the two packaging films. Changes in skin puncture force, hue angle, soluble solid content, titratable acidity and pH were statistically insignificant. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll content declined significantly (P < 0.05) in all treatments during storage. Significant reduction (P < 0.05) in aerobic plate count was found in all washing treatments compared to unwashed sample except in TW. Yeast and mold count of chlorine and CC+E-treated samples were lower than other treatments. Samples of these two treatments also received marketable limit of visual quality scores until 4 weeks of storage in polypropylene film. Results suggest that CC+E could be a potential sanitizer and alternative to chlorine washing and polypropylene film would provide a little better advantage than polyethylene for green slender pepper.

  14. Using electrocoagulation for metal and chelant separation from washing solution after EDTA leaching of Pb, Zn and Cd contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pociecha, Maja; Lestan, Domen

    2010-02-15

    Electrocoagulation with an Al sacrificial anode was tested for the separation of chelant and heavy metals from a washing solution obtained after leaching Pb (3200 mg kg(-1)), Zn (1100 mg kg(-1)), and Cd (21 mg kg(-1)) contaminated soil with EDTA. In the electrochemical process, the sacrificial anode corroded to release Al(3+) which served as coagulant for precipitation of chelant and metals. A constant current density of 16-128 mAc m(-2) applied between the Al anode and the stainless-steel cathode removed up to 95% Pb, 68% Zn and 66% Cd from the soil washing solution. Approximately half of the initial EDTA remained in the washing solution after treatment, up to 16.3% of the EDTA was adsorbed on Al coagulant and precipitated, the rest of the EDTA was degraded by anodic oxidation. In a separate laboratory-scale remediation experiment, we leached a soil with 40 mmol EDTA per kg of soil and reused the washing solution (after electrocoagulation) in a closed loop. It removed 53% of Pb, 26% of Zn and 52% of Cd from the soil. The discharge solution was clear and colourless, with pH 7.52 and 170 mg L(-1) Pb, 50 mg L(-1) Zn, 1.5 mg L(-1) Cd and 11 mM EDTA.

  15. Formulating essential oil microemulsions as washing solutions for organic fresh produce production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linhan; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-12-15

    Applications of plant-derived organic essential oils (EOs) as antimicrobials for post-harvest produce operations are limited by their low water solubility. To dissolve EOs in water, microemulsions were studied using two surfactants permitted for organic production, sucrose octanoate ester (SOE) and soy lecithin that were mixed at various mass ratios before dilution with water to 40% w/w. EOs were then mixed with the surfactant solution by hand shaking. Based on visual transparency, intermediate lecithin:SOE mass ratios favoured the formation of microemulsions, e.g., up to 4.0% clove bud oil at ratios of 2:8 and 3:7, and 4.0% cinnamon bark oil and 3.0% thyme oil at ratios of 2:8 and 1:9, respectively. Microemulsions with intermediate lecithin:SOE mass ratios had a relatively low viscosity and better ability to wet fresh produce surfaces. The microemulsions established in this work may be used as washing solutions to enhance the microbial safety of organic fresh produce.

  16. The source of groundwater and solutes to Many Devils Wash at a former uranium mill site in Shiprock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Andrew J.; Ranalli, Anthony J.; Austin, Stephen A.; Lawlis, Bryan R.

    2016-04-21

    The Shiprock Disposal Site is the location of the former Navajo Mill (Mill), a uranium ore-processing facility, located on a terrace overlooking the San Juan River in the town of Shiprock, New Mexico. Following the closure of the Mill, all tailings and associated materials were encapsulated in a disposal cell built on top of the former Mill and tailings piles. The milling operations, conducted at the site from 1954 to 1968, created radioactive tailings and process-related wastes that are now found in the groundwater. Elevated concentrations of constituents of concern—ammonium, manganese, nitrate, selenium, strontium, sulfate, and uranium—have also been measured in groundwater seeps in the nearby Many Devils Wash arroyo, leading to the inference that these constituents originated from the Mill. These constituents have also been reported in groundwater that is associated with Mancos Shale, the bedrock that underlies the site. The objective of this report is to increase understanding of the source of water and solutes to the groundwater beneath Many Devils Wash and to establish the background concentrations for groundwater that is in contact with the Mancos Shale at the site. This report presents evidence on three working hypotheses: (1) the water and solutes in Many Devils Wash originated from the operations at the former Mill, (2) groundwater in deep aquifers is upwelling under artesian pressure to recharge the shallow groundwater beneath Many Devils Wash, and (3) the groundwater beneath Many Devils Wash originates as precipitation that infiltrates into the shallow aquifer system and discharges to Many Devils Wash in a series of springs on the east side of the wash. The solute concentrations in the shallow groundwater of Many Devils Wash would result from the interaction of the water and the Mancos Shale if the source of water was upwelling from deep aquifers or precipitation.In order to compare the groundwater from various wells to groundwater that has been

  17. Morphological alteration, lysosomal membrane fragility and apoptosis of the cells of Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Dutta, Manab Kumar; Acharya, Avanti; Mukhopadhyay, Sandip Kumar; Ray, Sajal

    2015-12-01

    Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is a component of laundry detergent. Domestic effluent, drain water and various anthropogenic activities have been identified as major routes of sodium carbonate contamination of the freshwater ecosystem. The freshwater sponge, Eunapius carteri, bears ecological and evolutionary significance and is considered as a bioresource in aquatic ecosystems. The present study involves estimation of morphological damage, lysosomal membrane integrity, activity of phosphatases and apoptosis in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Exposure to washing soda resulted in severe morphological alterations and damages in cells of E. carteri. Fragility and destabilization of lysosomal membranes of E. carteri under the sublethal exposure was indicative to toxin induced physiological stress in sponge. Prolonged exposure to sodium carbonate resulted a reduction in the activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases in the cells of E. carteri. Experimental concentration of 8 mg/l of washing soda for 192 h yielded an increase in the physiological level of cellular apoptosis among the semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, which was suggestive to possible shift in apoptosis mediated immunoprotection. The results were indicative of an undesirable shift in the immune status of sponge. Contamination of the freshwater aquifers by washing soda thus poses an alarming ecotoxicological threat to sponges.

  18. Effects of Washing Produce Contaminated with the Snail and Slug Hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with Three Common Household Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms. PMID:23901391

  19. Effects of washing produce contaminated with the snail and slug hosts of Angiostrongylus cantonensis with three common household solutions.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Norine W; Hayes, Kenneth A; Cowie, Robert H

    2013-06-01

    The emerging infectious disease angiostrongyliasis (rat lungworm disease) is caused by ingesting snails and slugs infected by the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The definitive hosts of A. cantonensis are rats and the obligatory intermediate hosts are slugs and snails. Many cases result from accidentally ingesting infected snails or slugs on produce (eg, lettuce). This study assessed three readily available household products as washing solutions for removing snails and slugs from produce (romaine lettuce) to lower the probability of accidentally ingesting them. The solutions were acetic acid (vinegar), sodium hypochlorite (bleach), and sodium chloride (domestic salt). Snail and slug species known to be intermediate hosts and that are common in the Hawaiian Islands were used in the experiments: the alien snail Succinea tenella, the alien semi-slug Parmarion martensi, and the alien slugs Veronicella cubensis and Deroceras laeve. None of the products was any more effective than washing and rinsing with tap water alone. Most snails and slugs were removed after treatment but some remained on the lettuce even after washing and rinsing the produce. Only washing, rinsing, and then rinsing each leaf individually resulted in complete removal of all snails and slugs. The study did not address removal of any remaining slime left by the snails and slugs, nor did it address killing of worms.

  20. Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, C.; Kono, J.

    2015-04-01

    This report provides results from a second-phase research study of a phenomenon generally referred to as wind washing. Wind washing is the movement of unconditioned air around or through building thermal barriers in such a way as to diminish or nullify the intended thermal performance. In some cases, thermal and air barriers are installed very poorly or not at all, and air can readily move from unconditioned attic spaces into quasi-conditioned interstitial spaces. This study focused on the impact of poorly sealed and insulated floor cavities adjacent to attic spaces in Florida homes. In these cases, unconditioned attic air can be transferred into floor cavities through pathways driven by natural factors such as wind, or by thermal differences between the floor cavity and the attic. Air can also be driven into a floor cavity through mechanical forces imposed by return duct leakage in the floor cavity.

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes: Phase 2, Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-01

    In many two-story homes, there are attic spaces above the first-floor of the home that border portions of the second-story conditioned space. These spaces have breaches of the air and thermal boundaries, creating a phenomenon known as wind washing. This can cause attic air above the first-floor space to be driven into the cavity between the first and second floors by wind, thermal buoyancy forces, or mechanical driving forces as well as circulation of hot attic air against the wallboard because of gaps between insulation batts installed on knee walls and the gypsum wallboard. In this project, the U.S. Department of Energy team Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC) investigated wind washing in 56 homes. The goals were to identify the failure mechanisms that lead to wind washing, characterize the pathways for air and heat to enter the house, and evaluate the seasonal energy savings and peak demand reduction that can result from repairing these wind washing problems. Based on this research, the team developed recommendations for cost-effective retrofit solutions and information that can help avoid these problems in new construction.

  2. Investigating Solutions to Wind Washing Issues in Two-Story Florida Homes, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, Charles R.; Kono, Jamie

    2015-04-13

    With U.S. Department of Energy goals of reducing existing home energy use by 30% and new home energy use by 50%, it is imperative to focus on several energy efficiency measures, including the quality of air and thermal barriers. This report provides results from a second-phase research study of a phenomenon generally referred to as wind washing. Wind washing is the movement of unconditioned air around or through building thermal barriers in such a way as to diminish or nullify the intended thermal performance. In some cases, thermal and air barriers are installed very poorly or not at all, and air can readily move from unconditioned attic spaces into quasi-conditioned interstitial spaces. This study focused on the impact of poorly sealed and insulated floor cavities adjacent to attic spaces in Florida homes. In these cases, unconditioned attic air can be transferred into floor cavities through pathways driven by natural factors such as wind, or by thermal differences between the floor cavity and the attic. Air can also be driven into a floor cavity through mechanical forces imposed by return duct leakage in the floor cavity.

  3. Shift in aggregation, ROS generation, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activities in the cells of an Indian freshwater sponge exposed to washing soda (sodium carbonate).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-09-01

    Washing soda, chemically identified as anhydrous sodium carbonate, is a popular cleaning agent among the rural and urban populations of India which often contaminates the freshwater ponds and lakes, the natural habitat of sponge Eunapius carteri. Present investigation deals with estimation of cellular aggregation, generation of ROS and activities of antioxidant enzymes, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase in the cells of E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Prolonged treatment of washing soda inhibited the degree of cellular aggregation. Experimental exposure of 8 and 16mg/l of sodium carbonate for 48h elevated the physiological level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the agranulocytes, semigranulocytes and granulocytes of E. carteri, whereas, treatment of 192h inhibited the ROS generation in three cellular morphotypes. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were recorded to be inhibited under prolonged exposure of washing soda. Washing soda mediated inhibition of ROS generation and depletion in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were indicative to an undesirable shift in cytotoxic status and antioxidative defense in E. carteri. Inhibition in the activity of lysozyme under the treatment of sodium carbonate was suggestive to a severe impairment of the innate immunological efficiency of E. carteri distributed in the washing soda contaminated habitat. Washing soda mediated inhibition in the activity of acetylcholinesterase indicated its neurotoxicity in E. carteri. Washing soda, a reported environmental contaminant, affected adversely the immunophysiological status of E. carteri with reference to cellular aggregation, oxidative stress, antioxidative defense, lysozyme and acetylcholinesterase activity.

  4. Fresh produce washing aid, T-128, enhances inactivation of Salmonella and pseudomonas biofilms on stainless steel coupons in chlorinated wash solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Bacterial biofilms on food processing equipment can protect pathogens against sanitizers. When chlorine is rapidly depleted by organic materials present in process wash water, inactivation of biofilm pathogens is further challenging. Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the e...

  5. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing.

  6. Sustainable Soil Washing: Shredded Card Filtration of Potentially Toxic Elements after Leaching from Soil Using Organic Acid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Christopher; Drábek, Ondřej; Tejnecký, Václav; Jehlička, Jan; Michon, Ninon; Borůvka, Luboš

    2016-01-01

    Shredded card (SC) was assessed for use as a sorbent of potentially toxic elements (PTE) carried from contaminated soil in various leachates (oxalic acid, formic acid, CaCl2, water). We further assessed SC for retention of PTE, using acidified water (pH 3.4). Vertical columns and a peristaltic pump were used to leach PTE from soils (O and A/B horizons) before passing through SC. Sorption onto SC was studied by comparing leachates, and by monitoring total PTE contents on SC before and after leaching. SC buffers against acidic soil conditions that promote metals solubility; considerable increases in solution pH (+4.49) were observed. Greatest differences in solution PTE content after leaching with/without SC occurred for Pb. In oxalic acid, As, Cd, Pb showed a high level of sorption (25, 15, and 58x more of the respective PTE in leachates without SC). In formic acid, Pb sorption was highly efficient (219x more Pb in leachate without SC). In water, only Pb showed high sorption (191x more Pb in leachate without SC). In desorption experiments, release of PTE from SC varied according to the source of PTE (organic/mineral soil), and type of solvent used. Arsenic was the PTE most readily leached in desorption experiments. Low As sorption from water was followed by fast release (70% As released from SC). A high rate of Cd sorption from organic acid solutions was followed by strong retention (~12% Cd desorption). SC also retained Pb after sorption from water, with subsequent losses of ≤8.5% of total bound Pb. The proposed use of this material is for the filtration of PTE from extract solution following soil washing. Low-molecular-mass organic acids offer a less destructive, biodegradable alternative to strong inorganic acids for soil washing. PMID:26900684

  7. Natural laccase mediators separated from water-washed solution of steam exploded corn straw by nanofiltration and organic solvent fractionation.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weihua; Zhang, Wenyan; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-03-01

    Artificially synthetic mediators of laccase had the limitation of high cost and possible toxicity. The separation of natural laccase mediators from water-washed solution (WWS) of steam exploded corn straw (SECS) was studied using nano-filtration and successive organic solvents extraction. Results indicated that the UV absorption intensity of nano-filtrated WWS was significantly enhanced. The UV absorption intensity of each extractive from WWS could be ranked as ether extractive (EE)>ethyl acetate extractive (EAE)>chloroform extractive (CE). Decoloration of crystal violet catalyzed by laccase/EE was higher than that by laccase/ABTS, which was 66.95% and 61.9% at 8h, respectively. All the decoloration rates of malachite green at 60min using EE, EAE and ABTS as mediator were both more than 80%. This research would benefit for broaden the source of laccase mediator and reduce the using cost of laccase/mediator system.

  8. Washing of platelets can be fully automated using a closed-system cell processor and BRS-A platelet additive solution.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Minegishi, M; Endo, K; Kawashima, W; Suzuki, K; Shimizu, H

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro properties of platelets (PLTs) washed with BRS-A additive solution in the Haemonetics ACP215 automated processing system. Two washing modes, 'manually/automatically adding ACD-A to BRS before/during the washing process', represented the control and test groups, respectively. Outcomes were compared over 7 days of storage (n = 7, for both). PLT recovery following washing processing (26-27 min) was 86·2 ± 1·7% and 86·0 ± 2·2% and plasma protein removal was 98·8 ± 0·3% and 99·0 ± 0·2% in the control and test groups, respectively (not significant). Both groups exhibited comparable in vitro properties.

  9. CATALYZED OXIDATION OF URANIUM IN CARBONATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Clifford, W.E.

    1962-05-29

    A process is given wherein carbonate solutions are employed to leach uranium from ores and the like containing lower valent uranium species by utilizing catalytic amounts of copper in the presence of ammonia therein and simultaneously supplying an oxidizing agent thereto. The catalysis accelerates rate of dissolution and increases recovery of uranium from the ore. (AEC)

  10. Effect of Nitrite/Nitrate concentrations on Corrosivity of Washed Precipitate

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    2001-03-28

    Cyclic polarization scans were performed using A-537 carbon steel in simulated washed precipitate solutions of various nitrite and nitrate concentrations. The results of this study indicate that nitrate is an aggressive anion in washed precipitate. Furthermore, a quantitative linear log-log relationship between the minimum effective nitrite concentration and the nitrate concentration was established for washed precipitate with other ions at their average compositions.

  11. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  12. Estimating the Contributions of Surface Wash-off and Channel Erosion to Total Sediment and Solute Loads in a Small Mixed Land Use Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nipper, J.; Bowden, W. B.

    2009-12-01

    Watershed sediment and solute loads originate from many different sources. These can include point sources, soil erosion, impervious surface wash-off, channel bank and bed erosion, and other sources depending on the land use activities within the watershed. However, the difficulties encountered in quantifying the contributions of specific nonpoint sources to watershed loads magnifies the uncertainty in watershed management efforts aimed at mitigating the pollutants. The goal of this research is to quantify the contribution of wash-off from residentially developed land and stream channel erosion to total watershed sediment and solute loadings within a 103 ha tributary watershed of Potash Brook, in Chittenden County, Vermont. To do so we deployed autosamplers at two stream cross sections and within two representative storm drain outfalls to sample TSS, TN, NO3-, TKN, TP, and Cl-. Samples were collected during storm events on a flow weighted composite basis, and by periodic base flow sampling. In stream sampling was conducted over a total 5 years and storm drain sampling covered a total of 2 years. Preliminary analysis of these data suggests that surface wash-off from developed portions of the watershed can generate greater than 90% of the TSS and greater than 50% of the Cl- loads measured at the watershed outlet sampling location. Currently, these data are being incorporated into an EPA-SWMM model of the watershed coupled with an evolutionary strategies parameter search algorithm. The model generated and measured wash-off data will be used with the measured load data at the watershed outlet to estimate the contribution of the stream channel by difference over all sampled events.

  13. Part 2. Comparison of emergency washing solutions in 70% hydrofluoric acid-burned human skin in an established ex vivo explants model

    PubMed Central

    Burgher, François; Mathieu, Laurence; Lati, Elian; Gasser, Philippe; Peno-Mazzarino, Laurent; Blomet, Joël; Hall, Alan H; Maibach, Howard I

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hydrofluoric acid (HF) is a small and partially dissociated acid (pKa 3.2), able to deeply penetrate into human skin in addition to the corrosiveness of the hydrogen ion (H+) and the toxicity of the fluoride ion (F-). However, there has been a lack of experimental studies to objectively characterize the results of human HF skin exposure decontamination. Methodology/principal findings: A previously established experimental method using a human skin explants ex vivo model (Part 1. Experimental 70% hydrofluoric acid (HF) burns: Histological observations in an established human skin explants ex vivo model) described the lesions that appeared following 70% HF penetration. Within 5min, 70% HF penetrates to the dermis. Using the same experimental conditions, a comparison study of two different washing protocols was performed: water + topical calcium gluconate (CaG) versus Hexafluorine®. In these conditions, washing for 15min with running tap water followed by topical CaG ointment only delayed burn onset, while severe tissue damage appeared later. In contrast, after washing with Hexafluorine® over 10 min, no histological lesions developed. These results are in accordance with the results of accidental human industrial case reports. Conclusion/significance: Amphoteric and hypertonic Hexafluorine® can deactivate H+ and chelate F- ions. Based on these results, it should be considered as a promising first-aid decontamination solution to prevent or minimize significant local and systemic consequences of concentrated HF skin exposures. PMID:21083510

  14. Kinetics of dodecanoic acid adsorption from caustic solution by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Phillip; Wu, Sophie Hua

    2003-10-15

    This study examines the influences of adsorbent porosity and surface chemistry and of carbon dosage on dodecanoic acid adsorption kinetics from aqueous and 2 M NaOH solutions as batch adsorption processes. Both adsorbents are steam-activated carbons prepared from either coconut or coal precursors. Prior to use the adsorbents were washed in deionized water or 2 M NaOH. Mass transfer coefficients and effective overall diffusion coefficients indicate a minor contribution from adsorbent porosity. In contrast, high surface oxygen content impedes transport to and into the adsorbent structure. Carbon dosage shows a proportional increase in transport coefficients with increasing mass; these coefficients are constant when normalized per unit mass. Neither water nor NaOH treatment of the adsorbents has a significant influence on dodecanoic acid adsorption kinetics. Molecular and Knudsen diffusion coefficients are defined to demonstrate that the overall effective diffusion coefficient values and the diffusion process are controlled by surface diffusion.

  15. Treatment of distillery spent-wash by ozonation and biodegradation: significance of pH reduction and inorganic carbon removal before ozonation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Saroj, Devendra P; Tare, Vinod; Bose, Purnendu

    2006-09-01

    This study is aimed at exploring strategies for mineralization of refractory compounds in distillery effluent by anaerobic biodegradation/ozonation/aerobic biodegradation. Treatment of distillery spent-wash used in this research by anaerobic-aerobic biodegradation resulted in overall COD removal of 70.8%. Ozonation of the anaerobically treated distillery spent-wash was carried out as-is (phase I experiments) and after pH reduction and removal of inorganic carbon (phase II experiments). Introduction of the ozonation step resulted in an increase in overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, with the highest COD removals of greater than 95% obtained when an ozone dose of approximately 5.3 mg ozone absorbed/mg initial total organic carbon was used. The COD removal during phase II experiments was slightly superior compared with phase I experiments at similar ozone doses. Moreover, efficiency of ozone absorption from the gas phase into distillery spent-wash aliquots was considerably enhanced during phase II experiments.

  16. Effectiveness of an anaerobic granular activated carbon fluidized-bed bioreactor to treat soil wash fluids: a proposed strategy for remediating PCP/PAH contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Koran, K M; Suidan, M T; Khodadoust, A P; Sorial, G A; Brenner, R C

    2001-07-01

    An integrated system has been developed to remediate soils contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This system involves the coupling of two treatment technologies, soil-solvent washing and anaerobic biotreatment of the extract. Specifically, this study evaluated the effectiveness of a granular activated carbon (GAC) fluidized-bed reactor to treat a synthetic-waste stream of PCP and four PAHs (naphthalene, acenaphthene, pyrene, and benzo(b)fluoranthene) under anaerobic conditions. This waste stream was intended to simulate the wash fluids from a soil washing process treating soils from a wood-preserving site. The reactor achieved a removal efficiency of greater than 99.8% for PCP with conversion to its dechlorination intermediates averaging 46.5%. Effluent, carbon extraction, and isotherm data also indicate that naphthalene and acenaphthene were removed from the liquid phase with efficiencies of 86 and 93%, respectively. Effluent levels of pyrene and benzo(b)fluoranthene were extremely low due to the high-adsorptive capacity of GAC for these compounds. Experimental evidence does not suggest that the latter two compounds were biochemically transformed within the reactor.

  17. Biodiesel production by two-stage transesterification with ethanol by washing with neutral water and water saturated with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Mendow, G; Veizaga, N S; Sánchez, B S; Querini, C A

    2012-08-01

    Industrial production of ethyl esters is impeded by difficulties in purifying the product due to high amounts of soap formed during transesterification. A simple biodiesel wash process was developed that allows successful purification of samples containing high amounts of soap. The key step was a first washing with neutral water, which removed the soaps without increasing the acidity or affecting the process yield. Afterward, the biodiesel was washed with water saturated with CO(2), a mild acid that neutralized the remaining soaps and extracted impurities. The acidity, free-glycerine, methanol and soaps concentrations were reduced to very low levels with high efficiency, and using non-corrosive acids. Independently of the initial acidity, it was possible to obtain biodiesel within EN14214 specifications. The process included the recovery of soaps by hydrolysis and esterification, making it possible to obtain the theoretical maximum amount of biodiesel.

  18. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BloGenesis™ soil washing technology uses a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soil to wastewater. The surfactant used in the soil washing process wa...

  19. Immobilization of trace elements in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash by producing calcium sulphoaluminate cement after carbonation and washing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Jamro, Imtiaz Ali; Chen, Qi; Li, Shaobai; Luan, Jingde; Yang, Tianhua

    2016-03-01

    The possibility of producing calcium sulphoaluminate cement (CSA) by adding municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash to raw meal was investigated. After subjecting MSWI fly ash to accelerated carbonation and washing with water (ACW), various amounts (i.e., 5, 10 and 15 wt%) of the treated ash were added to raw meal composed of a mixture of bauxite, limestone and gypsum. The mixtures were sintered in a laboratory-scale muffle furnace at temperatures of 1250°, 1300°, 1325° and 1350 °C for various durations. The influence of different quantities of MSWI fly ash on the mineralogy, major phase composition and strength development of the resulting clinker was studied, as was the effect of ash treatments on leaching and volatilization of trace elements. The ACW treatment reduced the volatilization ratio of trace elements during the clinkerization process. Volatilization ratios for lead, cadmium and zinc were 21.5%, 33.6% and 16.3%, respectively, from the ACW fly ash treatment, compared with ratios of 97.5%, 93.1% and 85.2% from untreated fly ash. The volatilization ratios of trace elements were ordered as follows: untreated fly ash > carbonated fly ash > carbonated and water-washed fly ash. The ACW process also reduced the chloride content in the MSWI fly ash by 90 wt% and prevented high concentrations of trace elements in the effluents.

  20. Reduction of Plutonium in Acidic Solutions by Mesoporous Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Jones, Stephen; Wang, Jinxiu; Wu, Zhangxiong; Uribe, Eva; Zhao, Dongyuan; Nitsche, Heino

    2015-12-19

    Batch contact experiments with several porous carbon materials showed that carbon solids spontaneously reduce the oxidation state of plutonium in 1-1.5 M acid solutions, without significant adsorption. The final oxidation state and rate of Pu reduction varies with the solution matrix, and also depends on the surface chemistry and surface area of the carbon. It was demonstrated that acidic Pu(VI) solutions can be reduced to Pu(III) by passing through a column of porous carbon particles, offering an easy alternative to electrolysis with a potentiostat.

  1. Adsorption of Paraquat dichloride from aqueous solution by activated carbon derived from used tires.

    PubMed

    Hamadi, Nadhem K; Sri Swaminathan; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2004-08-09

    The removal of pesticide from wastewater under different batch experimental conditions, using a car tire derived activated carbon was investigated. The pesticide utilized in the study was Paraquat dichloride (1,1-dimethyl-4,4-bipyridyl dichloride), which is a well known herbicide. The adsorbent was produced from the pyrolysis and activation of used tires (TAC). The performances of this adsorbent and a commercial activated carbon F300 (CAC) have been compared. It was determined that the adsorption of Paraquat was weakly pH dependent. The effects of particle size, carbon dosage, temperature and the initial concentration of the Paraquat were studied. Further experiments investigating the regeneration capabilities of the tire-supplied carbon were performed. The regenerated carbons that were washed with basic pH solution were found to have the best sorption capacity recovery. It was found that the rate of sorption of Paraquat onto the carbon is very fast with almost 90% of the maximum possible adsorption taking place in the first 5 min. Nevertheless, the batch sorption kinetics was fitted for a first-order reversible reaction, a pseudo-first-order reaction and a pseudo-second-order reaction. The pseudo-second-order chemical reaction model appears to provide the best correlation. The applicability of the Langmuir isotherm for the present system has been evaluated at different temperatures. The isotherms show that the sorption capacity of CAC decreases with temperature and the dominant mechanism of CAC adsorption is physical sorption.

  2. Process for obtaining molybdenum as a useful product from molybdeniferous solutions containing alkali metal carbonate, sulphate, hydroxide or hydrogen carbonate and possibly uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, P.

    1984-02-21

    A process is claimed for obtaining molybdenum as a useful product from aqueous solutions to be purified, according to claim 1 of French patent No. 2,404,601, which contain, besides molybdenum, alkali metal carbonate, sulphate, hydroxide or hydrogen carbonate and which may also contain uranium, and inorganic and/or organic impurities. These solutions are treated at a temperature which is at most equal to the boiling temperature by means of lime to convert the alkali metal carbonate into hydroxide and to precipitate the insoluble calcium salts formed, then separating and washing the first precipitate which essentially contains calcium carbonate, from an alkali metal hydroxide-enriched liquor, which is concentrated by evaporation at the same time as the washing liquor of the first precipitate, to produce an alkali metal hydroxide content which is at most equal to 50%, to produce a second precipitate formed by a mixture of alkali metal molybdate and sulphate, characterized in that said solid mixture is dispersed in an acid aqueous liquor which is heated at from 120/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C under pressure to cause precipitation of anhydrous Mo0/sub 3/ which is subsequently separated from the mother liquor which essentially contains alkali metal sulphate.

  3. The comparative photodegradation activities of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) using UV alone and TiO2-derived photocatalysts in methanol soil washing solution.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zeyu; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Hongtao; Chen, Tan; Lu, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical treatment is increasingly being applied to remedy environmental problems. TiO2-derived catalysts are efficiently and widely used in photodegradation applications. The efficiency of various photochemical treatments, namely, the use of UV irradiation without catalyst or with TiO2/graphene-TiO2 photodegradation methods was determined by comparing the photodegadation of two main types of hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic pollutants, namely, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Results show that photodegradation in methanol solution under pure UV irradiation was more efficient than that with either one of the catalysts tested, contrary to previous results in which photodegradation rates were enhanced using TiO2-derived catalysts. The effects of various factors, such as UV light illumination, addition of methanol to the solution, catalyst dosage, and the pH of the reaction mixture, were examined. The degradation pathway was deduced. The photochemical treatment in methanol soil washing solution did not benefit from the use of the catalysts tested. Pure UV irradiation was sufficient for the dechlorination and degradation of the PCP and PCBs.

  4. The Comparative Photodegradation Activities of Pentachlorophenol (PCP) and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Using UV Alone and TiO2-Derived Photocatalysts in Methanol Soil Washing Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zeyu; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Hongtao; Chen, Tan; Lu, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical treatment is increasingly being applied to remedy environmental problems. TiO2-derived catalysts are efficiently and widely used in photodegradation applications. The efficiency of various photochemical treatments, namely, the use of UV irradiation without catalyst or with TiO2/graphene-TiO2 photodegradation methods was determined by comparing the photodegadation of two main types of hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic pollutants, namely, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Results show that photodegradation in methanol solution under pure UV irradiation was more efficient than that with either one of the catalysts tested, contrary to previous results in which photodegradation rates were enhanced using TiO2-derived catalysts. The effects of various factors, such as UV light illumination, addition of methanol to the solution, catalyst dosage, and the pH of the reaction mixture, were examined. The degradation pathway was deduced. The photochemical treatment in methanol soil washing solution did not benefit from the use of the catalysts tested. Pure UV irradiation was sufficient for the dechlorination and degradation of the PCP and PCBs. PMID:25254664

  5. Influence of EDTA washing on the species and mobility of heavy metals residual in soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Huang, Hao; Tan, Fenfang; Wang, Hong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2010-01-15

    Aiming to estimate the potential risk of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-enhanced soil washing, the heavy metal species and their mobility in the washed soil under different combinations were investigated by batch leaching tests and the sequential extraction procedure. Results demonstrate that the metal removal efficiency was rather low (less than 12%), partially due to the significant Ca dissolution and strong bonding between metals and the soil as well as the insufficient EDTA dosage. The washing combination of 0.0005 M EDTA and half-an-hour washing can enhance the instant mobility of Ni, Zn and Pb possibly owing to the slow detachment of EDTA-destabilized metals. Metal fractionation also exhibits the corresponding increase in their labile exchangeable fractions. Therefore, a more concentrated EDTA solution for a longer duration often decreased their mobility. The increase in some fractions of a curtain metal implies the redistribution of this metal during the EDTA soil washing. The pathway of such a redistribution may vary for different metals, but the redistribution to organic matter is often a slow process, while that to carbonates or Fe/Mn oxides is a faster one and even may occur in a half hour washing with 0.0005 M EDTA solution. These redistribution processes may also increase the metal chemical availability. Therefore, we should prudently control the chelating reagent concentration and washing duration to finally minimize the mobility and availability of the remaining heavy metals when designing the soil washing for the remediation of metal-contaminated soils.

  6. Ultrasonic washing of textiles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junhee; Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of experimental investigation of ultrasonic washing of textiles. The results demonstrate that cavitation bubbles oscillating in acoustic fields are capable of removing soils from textiles. Since the washing performance is mitigated in a large washing bath when using an ultrasonic transducer, we propose a novel washing scheme by combining the ultrasonic vibration with a conventional washing method utilizing kinetic energy of textiles. It is shown that the hybrid washing scheme achieves a markedly enhanced performance up to 15% in comparison with the conventional washing machine. This work can contribute to developing a novel laundry machine with reduced washing time and waste water.

  7. Adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-song; Yang, Xiao-juan; Mao, Yan-peng; Chen, Yu; Long, Xiang-li; Yuan, Wei-kang

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions has been investigated in a batch stirred cell. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of temperature, EDTA concentration, pH, activated carbon mass and particle size on EDTA adsorption. The experimental results manifest that the EDTA adsorption rate increases with its concentration in the aqueous solutions. EDTA adsorption also increases with temperature. The EDTA removal from the solution increases as activated carbon mass increases. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models are found to provide a good fitting of the adsorption data, with R(2) = 0.9920 and 0.9982, respectively. The kinetic study shows that EDTA adsorption on the activated carbon is in good compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters (E(a), ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0)) obtained indicate the endothermic nature of EDTA adsorption on activated carbon.

  8. Dissolution of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Carbonate-Peroxide Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2010-01-31

    This study shows that spent UO2 fuel can be completely dissolved in a carbonate-peroxide solution apparently without attacking the metallic Mo-Tc-Ru-Rh-Pd fission product phase. Samples of spent nuclear fuel were pulverized and sieved to a uniform size, then duplicate aliquots were weighed into beakers for analysis. One set was dissolved in near-boiling 10M nitric acid, and the other set was dissolved in a solution of ammonium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide at room temperature. All the resulting fuel solutions were then analyzed for Sr-90, Tc-99, Cs-137, plutonium, and Am-241. For all the samples, the concentrations of Cs-137, Sr-90, plutonium, and Am-241 were the same for both the nitric acid dissolution and the ammonium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide dissolution, but the technetium concentration of the ammonium carbonate-hydrogen peroxide fuel solution was only about 25% of the same fuels dissolved in hot nitric acid.

  9. Crystallization characteristics of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) in ammonium carbonate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tae-Joon, Kim; Kyung-Chai, Jeong; Jin-Ho, Park; In-Soon, Chang; Cheong-Song, Choi

    1994-05-01

    Ammonium carbonate solutions with an excessive amount of NH 3 were produced in a commercial AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) conversion plant. In this study the AUC crystals, precipitated with uranyl nitrate and ammonium carbonate solutions prepared in the laboratory, were characterized to determine the feasibility of recycling ammonium carbonate solution. The AUC crystals were easily agglomerated with the increasing concentration of CO 32- and mole ratio of {NH 4+}/{CO 32-} in ammonium carbonate solution. Effects of a mixing system for the solution in the AUC crystallizer and the feed location of the solution on the agglomeration of AUC crystals were also studied along with the effects of agglomerated AUC powders on UO 2 powders. Finally, the feasibility of manufacturing UO 2 fuel with a sintered pellet density of 10.52 g/cm 3, using the AUC powders generated in this experiment, was demonstrated.

  10. Quantum conductance steps in solutions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Urbina, A; Echeverría, I; Pérez-Garrido, A; Díaz-Sánchez, A; Abellán, J

    2003-03-14

    We have prepared solutions of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in Aroclor 1254, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls. The solutions are stable at room temperature. Transport measurements were performed using a scanning-tunneling probe on a sample prepared by spin coating the solution on gold substrates. Conductance steps were clearly seen. A histogram of a high number of traces shows maximum peaks at integer values of the conductance quantum G(0)=2e(2)/h, demonstrating ballistic transport at room temperature along the carbon nanotube over distances longer than 1.4 microm.

  11. Electroreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions at metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Augustynski, J.; Jermann, B.; Kedzierzawski, P.

    1996-12-31

    The quantities of carbon stored in the form of atmospheric carbon dioxide, CO{sub 2} in the hydrosphere and carbonates in the terrestrial environment substantially exceed those of fossil fuels. In spite of this the industrial use of carbon dioxide as a source of chemical carbon is presently limited to preparation of urea and certain carboxylic acids as well as organic carbonates and polycarbonates. However, the situation is expected to change in the future, if effective catalytic systems allowing to activate carbon dioxide will become available. In this connection, the electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2}, requiring only an additional input of water and electrical energy, appears as an attractive possibility. For more than 100 years formic acid and formates of alkali metals were considered as the only significant products of the electroreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions. The highest current efficiencies, exceeding 90 %, were obtained either with mercury or with amalgam electrodes. The only comprehensive study regarding kinetics of CO{sub 2} reduction in aqueous solution has been performed by Eyring et al. using a mercury cathode. This paper describes electrolysis studies.

  12. Effect of extraction solutions on carbonation of cementitious materials in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Jo, Hwanju; Jo, Ho Young; Jang, Young-Nam

    2012-06-01

    Carbonation efficiency was evaluated for three cementitious materials having different CaO-bearing minerals (lime, Portland cement and waste concrete) using various extraction reagents (HCl, CH3COOH, NH4Cl and deionized water). The cementitious materials were subjected to Ca extraction and carbonation tests under ambient pressure and temperature conditions. The Ca extraction efficiency generally decreased in the order lime, Portland cement and waste concrete, regardless of the extraction solution. Among the extraction solutions, NH4Cl was the most effective for Ca extraction and carbonation. The results of this study suggest that the types of extraction solution and CaO-bearing mineral of the materials are primary factors affecting carbonation efficiency.

  13. Adsorptive removal of antibiotics from aqueous solution using carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Li, Yong; Han, Sheng; Ma, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics, an important type of environmental contamination, have attracted many researchers to the study of their removal from aqueous solutions. Adsorption technology is a fast, efficient, and economical physicochemical method that is extensively used in wastewater treatment. From original activated carbon and carbon nanotubes to the latest graphene-based materials, carbon-based materials have been widely used as highly effective adsorbents for contaminant removal from aqueous solution because of their large specific surface area, high porosity, and high reaction activity. In this article, adsorption removal methods for four major types of antibiotic (tetracyclines, sulfonamides, macrolides, and quinolones) are reviewed. We also provide an overview of the application development of carbon materials as adsorbents for antibiotic removal from aqueous solution. The most promising works are discussed, and the main challenges in preparing high-performance adsorbents and the development tendency of adsorbents are also analyzed. This work provides theoretical guidance for subsequent research in the design and modification of carbon materials for applications in the adsorption removal of antibiotics from aqueous solution.

  14. Wash Your Hands

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Wash Your Hands Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... facilities and hospitals . When should you wash your hands? You can help yourself and others stay healthy ...

  15. Synthesis of magnetic nanoporous carbon from metal-organic framework for the fast removal of organic dye from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Caina; Wang, Yanen; Li, Menghua; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a magnetic nanoporous carbon (Fe3O4/NPC) was successfully synthesized by using MOF-5 as carbon precursor and Fe salt as magnetic precursor. The texture properties of the as-synthesized nanocomposite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibration sample magnetometer (VSM), and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The Fe3O4/NPC had a high surface area with strong magnetic strength. Its adsorption behavior was tested by its adsorption capacity for the removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution. The results demonstrated that the Fe3O4/NPC had a high adsorption capacity, rapid adsorption rate, and easy magnetic separabilty. Moreover, the adsorbent could be easily regenerated by washing it with ethanol. The Fe3O4/NPC can be used as a good alternative for the effective removal of organic dyes from wastewater.

  16. Optimization of anaerobically digested distillery molasses spent wash decolorization using soil as inoculum in the absence of additional carbon and nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Adikane, H V; Dange, M N; Selvakumari, K

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve maximum decolorization of molasses spent wash (MSW) in absence of any additional carbon or nitrogen source using soil as inoculum. Soil samples were collected from the MSW disposal site. Colored soil samples exhibited higher pH, sugar and protein as compare to less colored samples. A decolorization of 69% was obtained using 10% (w/v) soil and 12.5% (v/v) MSW after 7 days incubation. Optimized parameters including days--6 days, pH--6, MSW--12.5% and soil concentration--40%, were obtained for maximum decolorization. A decolorization of 81% was achieved using 10% soil and 12.5% MSW after 18 days incubation in absence of any media supplement. Nearly 12% reduction in decolorization activity of the soil sample was observed over a period of 12 months when stored at 6 degrees C. It could be concluded that the decolorization of MSW might be achieved using soil as inoculum without addition of chemical amendments.

  17. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution by wood millet carbon optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Nasiri Kokhdan, Syamak

    2015-02-05

    The use of cheep, non-toxic, safe and easily available adsorbent are efficient and recommended material and alternative to the current expensive substance for pollutant removal from wastewater. The activated carbon prepared from wood waste of local tree (millet) extensively was applied for quantitative removal of methylene blue (MB), while simply. It was used to re-used after heating and washing with alkaline solution of ethanol. This new adsorbent was characterized by using BET surface area measurement, FT-IR, pH determination at zero point of charge (pHZPC) and Boehm titration method. Response surface methodology (RSM) by at least the number of experiments main and interaction of experimental conditions such as pH of solution, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage was optimized and set as pH 7, contact time 18 min, initial dye concentration 20 ppm and 0.2 g of adsorbent. It was found that variable such as pH and amount of adsorbent as solely or combination effects seriously affect the removal percentage. The fitting experimental data with conventional models reveal the applicability of isotherm models Langmuir model for their well presentation and description and Kinetic real rate of adsorption at most conditions efficiently can be represented pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion. It novel material is good candidate for removal of huge amount of MB (20 ppm) in short time (18 min) by consumption of small amount (0.2 g).

  18. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution by wood millet carbon optimization using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Kokhdan, Syamak Nasiri

    2015-02-01

    The use of cheep, non-toxic, safe and easily available adsorbent are efficient and recommended material and alternative to the current expensive substance for pollutant removal from wastewater. The activated carbon prepared from wood waste of local tree (millet) extensively was applied for quantitative removal of methylene blue (MB), while simply. It was used to re-used after heating and washing with alkaline solution of ethanol. This new adsorbent was characterized by using BET surface area measurement, FT-IR, pH determination at zero point of charge (pHZPC) and Boehm titration method. Response surface methodology (RSM) by at least the number of experiments main and interaction of experimental conditions such as pH of solution, contact time, initial dye concentration and adsorbent dosage was optimized and set as pH 7, contact time 18 min, initial dye concentration 20 ppm and 0.2 g of adsorbent. It was found that variable such as pH and amount of adsorbent as solely or combination effects seriously affect the removal percentage. The fitting experimental data with conventional models reveal the applicability of isotherm models Langmuir model for their well presentation and description and Kinetic real rate of adsorption at most conditions efficiently can be represented pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion. It novel material is good candidate for removal of huge amount of MB (20 ppm) in short time (18 min) by consumption of small amount (0.2 g).

  19. Simultaneous leaching and carbon sequestration in constrained aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Won; Cho, Kyu-Seong; Moberly, James G; Roh, Yul; Phelps, Tommy J

    2011-12-01

    The behavior of metal ions' leaching and precipitated mineral phases of metal-rich fly ash (FA) was examined in order to evaluate microbial impacts on carbon sequestration and metal immobilization. The leaching solutions consisted of aerobic deionized water (DW) and artificial eutrophic water (AEW) that was anaerobic, organic- and mineral-rich, and higher salinity as is typical of bottom water in eutrophic algae ponds. The Fe- and Ca-rich FAs were predominantly composed of quartz, mullite, portlandite, calcite, hannebachite, maghemite, and hematite. After 86 days, only Fe and Ca contents exhibited a decrease in leaching solutions while other major and trace elements showed increasing or steady trends in preference to the type of FA and leaching solution. Ca-rich FA showed strong carbon sequestration efficiency ranging up to 32.3 g CO(2)/kg FA after 86 days, corresponding to almost 65% of biotic carbon sequestration potential under some conditions. Variations in the properties of FAs such as chemical compositions, mineral constituents as well as the type of leaching solution impacted CO(2) capture. Even though the relative amount of calcite increased sixfold in the AEW and the relative amount of mineral phase reached 37.3 wt% using Ca-rich FA for 86 days, chemical sequestration did not accomplish simultaneous precipitation and sequestration of several heavy metals.

  20. Simultaneous leaching and carbon sequestration in constrained aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Tommy Joe; Moon, Ji Won; Roh, Yul; Cho, Kyu Seong

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of metal ions leaching and precipitated mineral phases of metal-rich fly ash (FA) was examined in order to evaluate microbial impacts on carbon sequestration and metal immobilization. The leaching solutions consisted of aerobic deionized water (DW) and artificial eutrophic water (AEW) that was anaerobic, organic- and mineral-rich, and higher salinity as is typical of bottom water in eutrophic algae ponds. The Fe- and Ca-rich FAs were predominantly composed of quartz, mullite, portlandite, calcite, hannebachite, maghemite, and hematite. After 86 days, only Fe and Ca contents exhibited a decrease in leaching solutions while other major and trace elements showed increasing or steady trends in preference to the type of FA and leaching solution. Ca-rich FA showed strong carbon sequestration efficiency ranging up to 32.3 g CO(2)/kg FA after 86 days, corresponding to almost 65% of biotic carbon sequestration potential under some conditions. Variations in the properties of FAs such as chemical compositions, mineral constituents as well as the type of leaching solution impacted CO(2) capture. Even though the relative amount of calcite increased sixfold in the AEW and the relative amount of mineral phase reached 37.3 wt% using Ca-rich FA for 86 days, chemical sequestration did not accomplish simultaneous precipitation and sequestration of several heavy metals.

  1. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  2. Nanostructure modification to carbon nanowall surface employing hydrogen peroxide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoeda, Hironao; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanowalls (CNWs), which are three-dimensional carbon nanomaterials consisting of stacks of graphene sheets vertically standing on substrates, possess a mazelike architecture containing high-density graphene edges and large-area plane surfaces. A selective morphological modification technique for the surfaces of CNWs after their growth has been developed employing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution. It was found that oxidative radicals in H2O2 solution formed characteristic nanometer-scale asperities on the CNW surface without etching from the top edges. Photoelectron spectra indicate that hydroxyl adsorption and subsequent reactions at the edge and plane of graphene contribute to the selective morphological change on the CNW surface.

  3. Sorption of cobalt on activated carbons from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Paajanen, A.; Lehto, J.; Santapakka, T.; Morneau, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The efficiencies of 15 commercially available activated carbons were tested for the separation of trace cobalt ({sup 60}Co) in buffer solutions at pH 5.0, 6.7, and 9.1. On the basis of the results four carbon products, Diahope-006, Eurocarb TN5, Hydraffin DG47, and Norit ROW Supra, were selected for further study. These carbons represented varying (low, medium and high) cobalt removal efficiencies and were prepared of three typical raw materials: peat, coconut shell, or coal. Study was made of the effects on sorption efficiencies of factors of interest in metal/radionuclide-bearing waste effluents. These factors were pH, sodium ions, borate, and citrate.

  4. Wash water recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckman, G.; Rousseau, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The Wash Water Recovery System (WWRS) is intended for use in processing shower bath water onboard a spacecraft. The WWRS utilizes flash evaporation, vapor compression, and pyrolytic reaction to process the wash water to allow recovery of potable water. Wash water flashing and foaming characteristics, are evaluated physical properties, of concentrated wash water are determined, and a long term feasibility study on the system is performed. In addition, a computer analysis of the system and a detail design of a 10 lb/hr vortex-type water vapor compressor were completed. The computer analysis also sized remaining system components on the basis of the new vortex compressor design.

  5. Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Bijeljic, Branko; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    [1] We study and explain the origin of early breakthrough and long tailing plume behavior by simulating solute transport through 3-D X-ray images of six different carbonate rock samples, representing geological media with a high degree of pore-scale complexity. A Stokes solver is employed to compute the flow field, and the particles are then transported along streamlines to represent advection, while the random walk method is used to model diffusion. We compute the propagators (concentration versus displacement) for a range of Peclet numbers (Pe) and relate it to the velocity distribution obtained directly on the images. There is a very wide distribution of velocity that quantifies the impact of pore structure on transport. In samples with a relatively narrow spread of velocities, transport is characterized by a small immobile concentration peak, representing essentially stagnant portions of the pore space, and a dominant secondary peak of mobile solute moving at approximately the average flow speed. On the other hand, in carbonates with a wider velocity distribution, there is a significant immobile peak concentration and an elongated tail of moving fluid. An increase in Pe, decreasing the relative impact of diffusion, leads to the faster formation of secondary mobile peak(s). This behavior indicates highly anomalous transport. The implications for modeling field-scale transport are discussed. Citation: Bijeljic, B., P. Mostaghimi, and M. J. Blunt (2013), Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates, Water Resour. Res., 49, 2714–2728, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20238. PMID:24223444

  6. Development assessment of wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical study assessment of state-of-the-art wash water reclamation technology is presented. It covers all non-phase-change unit operations, unit processes and subsystems currently under development by NASA. Each approach to wash water reclamation is described in detail. Performance data are given together with the projected weights and sizes of key components and subsystems. It is concluded that a simple multifiltration subsystem composed of surface-type cartridge filters, carbon adsorption and ion exchange resins is the most attractive approach for spacecraft wash water reclamation in earth orbital missions of up to 10 years in duration.

  7. Soil washing enhancement with solid sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    El-Shoubary, Y.M.; Woodmansee, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    Soil washing is a dynamic, physical process that remediates contaminated soil through two mechanisms: particle size separation and transfer of the contaminant into the (mostly) liquid stream. The performance of different sorbents and additives to remove motor oil from sea sand was tested. Hydrocyclone, attrition scrubber, and froth flotation equipment were used for the decontamination study. Sorbents and additives were mixed with soils in the attrition scrubber prior to flotation. Sorbents used were granular activated carbon, powder activated carbon, and rubber tires. Chemical additives used were calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, Alconox{reg_sign}, Triton{reg_sign} X-100 and Triton{reg_sign} X-114. When a froth flotation run was performed using no additive, washed soils {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained 4000 ppm of total oil and grease (TOG). However, when carbon or rubber (6% by weight) was added to the contaminated soils the washed soils {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained 4000 ppm of total oil and grease (TOG). The addition of sodium carbonate or calcium hydroxide (6% by weight) had same effects as sorbents. In both cases washed soil {open_quotes}tails{close_quotes} contained total oil and grease of less than 1000 ppm. The use of these non-hazardous additives or sorbent can enhance the soil washing process and consequently saves on time (residence time in equipment design) required to achieve the target clean up levels. 18 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Inhibition Of Washed Sludge With Sodium Nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J. W.; Lozier, J. S.

    2012-09-25

    This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

  9. Solubilities of carbon dioxide in aqueous potassium carbonate solutions mixed with physical solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.B.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.H.

    1998-09-01

    The removal of acidic gases such as CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and COS from gas streams is a very important operation for petrochemical, oil refineries, ammonia manufacture, coal gasification, and natural gas purification plants. Here, the solubilities of carbon dioxide in aqueous potassium carbonate (K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) solutions mixed with physical solvents were measured at 298.2 and 323.2 K with a CO{sub 2} partial-pressure range of 5 kPa to 2 MPa. 1,2-propanediol and propylene carbonate were selected as physical solvents. The aqueous solutions treated in this study were 5 mass% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-15 mass% 1,2-propanediol and propylene carbonate were selected as physical solvents. The aqueous solutions treated in this study were 5 mass% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-15 mass% propylene carbonate. The experimental solubility results were presented by the mole ratio of CO{sub 2} and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} contained in the liquid mixture. The addition of 1,2-propanediol to 5 mass% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution lowered the solubility of CO{sub 2} at constant temperature and pressure conditions when CO{sub 2} partial-pressure range of 5 kPa to 2 MPa. In the case of propylene carbonate the addition of propylene carbonate increased the experimental solubilities in the region of low CO{sub 2} partial pressures and decreased as the CO{sub 2} partial pressure was increased above atmospheric. The solubilities of CO{sub 2} decreased with increasing temperature in the range of 298.2 to 323.2 K.

  10. Adsorption of dyes on carbon nanomaterials from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Ovejero, G; Sotelo, J L; Mestanza, M; García, J

    2010-10-01

    The removal of methylene blue (MB), a cationic dye and orange II (OII), an anionic dye, from aqueous solution by using carbon nanomaterials as multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) as adsorbents was studied in batch experiments. The effect of pH, temperature and surface modification of adsorbent on the removal of MB and OII was also investigated. The removals of OII and MB by adsorption on MWNT were maximum at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0, respectively. However, in the case CNF was employed as adsorbent, the optimum values of pH were 9.0 and 5.0 for OII and MB, respectively. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms are applied to fit the adsorption data of both dyes. Equilibrium data were well described by the typical Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Overall, the study demonstrated that MWNTs and CNFs can effectively remove cationic and anionic dyes as MB and OII from aqueous solutions under these experimental conditions.

  11. Methylene blue adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon: effect of acidic and alkaline solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Chun, Ji I; Han, Da H; Cho, Hye Y; O, Se J; Kim, Dong S

    2010-01-01

    The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution using activated carbon (AC) has been investigated. Adsorption experiments were conducted and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, dye concentration and temperature were studied on the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were mathematically modeled using the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models to describe the equilibrium isotherms at different dye concentrations and temperature. Parameters of best-fit model were calculated and discussed. To understand the mechanism of adsorption, kinetic models were employed to follow the adsorption processes; the pseudo-first-order best described the adsorption of MB onto AC. It was found that pH plays a major role in the adsorption process; adsorption capacity was influenced by the physical and surface chemical properties of carbon and the pH of the solution. 99.0% MB removal was achieved at equilibrium.

  12. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT CHINA WASH FLUME SHOWING WASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH AT CHINA WASH FLUME SHOWING WASH - San Carlos Irrigation Project, China Wash Flume, Main (Florence-Case Grande) Canal at Station 137+00, T4S, R10E, S14, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  13. Hand Washing: Do's and Dont's

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Adult health Hand-washing is an easy way to prevent infection. Understand when to wash your ... 14, 2016 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/hand-washing/art-20046253 . ...

  14. Dispersion of denatured carbon nanotubes by using a dimethylformamide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Uan Nguyen, Sy; Tam Phuong, Dinh; Chien Nguyen, Duc; Mai, Anh Tuan

    2011-09-01

    The dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in liquid plays an important role in fundamental research and applied science. The most common technique applied to disperse CNTs is ultrasonication. The surfactants used for CNT dispersion are ethanol, sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS), dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DATB), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS). This paper presents the dispersion of denatured CNTs by using a dimethylformamide (DMF) solution. The DMF is adsorbed on the surface of the nanotubes by a hydrophobic or π-π interaction. Ultrasonication helps DMF debundle the nanotubes by Coulombic or hydrophilic interaction, allowing the Van der Waals forces among the individual nanotubes to be overcome. UV-Vis spectra of dispersed CNTs in solution showed a maximum at 260 nm and decreased from UV to near IR. The vibration properties of the carbon samples were characterized with Raman spectroscopy, which illustrated the D and G bands of denatured CNTs at 1354 and 1581 cm-1, respectively, different from the values of 1352 cm-1 and 1580 cm-1, respectively, for undenatured CNTs. Finally, the interaction between surfactants and nanotubes was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  15. Reclamation of zinc-contaminated soil using a dissolved organic carbon solution prepared using liquid fertilizer from food-waste composting.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Tong, Ou-Yang; Chiou, Chyow-San; Lin, Yu-An; Wang, Ming-Kuang; Liu, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-15

    A liquid fertilizer obtained through food-waste composting can be used for the preparation of a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) solution. In this study, we used the DOC solutions for the remediation of a Zn-contaminated soil (with Zn concentrations up to 992 and 757 mg kg(-1) in topsoil and subsoil, respectively). We then determined the factors that affect Zn removal, such as pH, initial concentration of DOC solution, and washing frequency. Measurements using a Fourier Transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) revealed that carboxyl and amide were the major functional groups in the DOC solution obtained from the liquid fertilizer. Two soil washes using 1,500 mg L(-1) DOC solution with a of pH 2.0 at 25°C removed about 43% and 21% of the initial Zn from the topsoil and subsoil, respectively. Following this treatment, the pH of the soil declined from 5.4 to 4.1; organic matter content slightly increased from 6.2 to 6.5%; available ammonium (NH4(+)-N) content increased to 2.4 times the original level; and in the topsoil, the available phosphorus content and the exchangeable potassium content increased by 1.65 and 2.53 times their initial levels, respectively.

  16. Carbon dioxide capture capacity of sodium hydroxide aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Miran; Han, Sang-Jun; Wee, Jung-Ho

    2013-01-15

    The present paper investigates the various features of NaOH aqueous solution when applied as an absorbent to capture carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emitted with relatively high concentration in the flue gas. The overall CO(2) absorption reaction was carried out according to consecutive reaction steps that are generated in the order of Na(2)CO(3) and NaHCO(3). The reaction rate and capture efficiency were strongly dependent on the NaOH concentration in the Na(2)CO(3) production range, but were constant in the NaHCO(3) production step, irrespective of the NaOH concentration. The amount of CO(2) absorbed in the solution was slightly less than the theoretical value, which was ascribed to the low trona production during the reaction and the consequent decrease in CO(2) absorption in the NaOH solution. The mass ratio of absorbed CO(2) that participated in the Na(2)CO(3), NaHCO(3), and trona production reactions was calculated to be 20:17:1, respectively.

  17. Adsorption of methylene blue and Congo red from aqueous solution by activated carbon and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Szlachta, M; Wójtowicz, P

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the adsorption removal of dyes by powdered activated carbon (PAC, Norit) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, Chinese Academy of Science) from an aqueous solution. Methylene blue (MB) and Congo red (CR) were selected as model compounds. The adsorbents tested have a high surface area (PAC 835 m(2)/g, MWCNTs 358 m(2)/g) and a well-developed porous structure which enabled the effective treatment of dye-contaminated waters and wastewaters. To evaluate the capacity of PAC and MWCNTs to adsorb dyes, a series of batch adsorption experiments was performed. Both adsorbents exhibited a high adsorptive capacity for MB and CR, and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model, with the maximum adsorption capacity up to 400 mg/g for MB and 500 mg/g for CR. The separation factor, RL, revealed the favorable nature of the adsorption process under experimental conditions. The kinetics of adsorption was studied at various initial dye concentrations and solution temperatures. The pseudo-second-order model was used for determining the adsorption kinetics of MB and CR. The data obtained show that adsorption of both dyes was rapid in the initial stage and followed by slower processing to reach the plateau. The uptake of dyes increased with contact time, irrespective of their initial concentration and solution temperature. However, changes in the solution temperature did not significantly influence dye removal.

  18. Ethylbenzene Removal by Carbon Nanotubes from Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Bina, Bijan; Pourzamani, Hamidreza; Rashidi, Alimorad; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    The removal of ethylbenzene (E) from aqueous solution by multiwalled, single-walled, and hybrid carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, SWCNTs, and HCNTs) was evaluated for a nanomaterial dose of 1 g/L, concentration of 10–100 mg/L, and pH 7. The equilibrium amount removed by SWCNTs (E: 9.98 mg/g) was higher than by MWCNTs and HCNTs. Ethylbenzene has a higher adsorption tendency on CNTs, so that more than 98% of it adsorbed in first 14 min, which is related to the low water solubility and the high molecular weight. The SWCNTs performed better for ethylbenzene sorption than the HCNTs and MWCNTs. Isotherms study indicates that the BET isotherm expression provides the best fit for ethylbenzene sorption by SWCNTs. Carbon nanotubes, specially SWCNTs, are efficient and rapid adsorbents for ethylbenzene which possess good potential applications to maintain high-quality water. Therefore, it could be used for cleaning up environmental pollution to prevent ethylbenzene borne diseases. PMID:22187576

  19. Prediction of adsorption from multicomponent solutions by activated carbon using single-solute parameters.

    PubMed

    Wurster, D E; Alkhamis, K A; Matheson, L E

    2000-08-31

    The adsorption of 3 barbiturates--phenobarbital, mephobarbital, and primidone--from simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), without pancreatin, by activated carbon was studied using the rotating bottle method. The concentrations of each drug remaining in solution at equilibrium were determined with the aid of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system employing a reversed-phase column. The competitive Langmuir-like model, the modified competitive Langmuir-like model, and the LeVan-Vermeulen model were each fit to the data. Excellent agreement was obtained between the experimental and predicted data using the modified competitive Langmuir-like model and the LeVan-Vermeulen model. The agreement obtained from the original competitive Langmuir-like model was less satisfactory. These observations are not surprising because the competitive Langmuir-like model assumes that the capacities of the adsorbates are equal, while the other 2 models take into account the differences in the capacities of the components. The results of these studies indicate that the adsorbates employed are competing for the same binding sites on the activated carbon surface. The results also demonstrate that it is possible to accurately predict multicomponent adsorption isotherms using only single-solute isotherm parameters. Such prediction is likely to be useful for improving in vivo/in vitro correlations.

  20. Method of producing UO2 wherein methanol wash is provided

    SciTech Connect

    Sondermann, T.

    1981-03-24

    In the production of UO2, ammonium uranyl carbonate is an intermediate product wet with water and contaminated with ammonium carbonate and is washed with methanol to remove water and ammonium carbonate. The spent methanol containing 50% water and up to 10% ammonium carbonate is subjected to rectification in a column under subatmospheric pressure with cooling the top of the tower to a low temperature to retard decomposition of ammonium carbonate and condense a liquid water fraction. Clogging of the column, vapor lines and condenser by recombination of the decomposition products is prevented. The purified methanol contains less than 5% water and may be returned for further washing of ammonium uranyl carbonate.

  1. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  2. Lead removal via soil washing and leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. K.; Man, X. D.; Walsh, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    A soil washing and leaching process was tested for removing lead from soils. A soil-washing circuit, including size and gravity separations, was employed to remove the coarse metallic lead particles, while the leaching was applied to remove fine metallic lead particles and other lead species. The soil-washing tests proved that the metallic lead particles larger than 0.15 mm (100 mesh) could be effectively removed. The sodium-chloride-based leaching solution with ferric chloride or sodium hypochlorite as oxidants was adopted in the leaching. The leaching experimental results indicated that under the pH of 2 and Eh of 1,300 mV, the metallic lead particles smaller than 0.15 mm and other lead species can be dissolved in the leaching solution within 60 minutes.

  3. The effects of alkalinity and acidity of process water and hydrochar washing on the adsorption of atrazine on hydrothermally produced hydrochar.

    PubMed

    Flora, Justine F R; Lu, Xiaowei; Li, Liang; Flora, Joseph R V; Berge, Nicole D

    2013-11-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization of simulated food waste was performed at 250 °C for 20 h using deionized water (DI) and 0.01 N solutions of HCl, NaCl, and NaOH. The hydrochars produced were washed with acetone and the adsorptive capacity of the washed and unwashed hydrochars for atrazine were characterized. Using a generalized linear model, it was shown that the adsorptive capacity of the washed hydrochar was significantly higher than that of the unwashed hydrochars. The HCl processed unwashed hydrochar has a slightly higher adsorptive capacity compared to the DI processed hydrochar while both the NaOH processed washed and unwashed hydrochars were slightly lower than the corresponding DI processed hydrochars. (13)C solid-state NMR results showed no discernible differences in surface functional groups among the washed hydrochars and among the unwashed hydrochars. A clear decrease in alkyl groups and an increase in aromatic/olefinic-C groups were observed after acetone washing. (1)H liquid-phase NMR showed carbon alkyl chains were present in the acetone wash. Interaction energies calculated using dispersion corrected density functional theory show that atrazine is more strongly adsorbed to surfaces without weakly associated alkyl groups.

  4. Carbon Footprint of Telemedicine Solutions - Unexplored Opportunity for Reducing Carbon Emissions in the Health Sector

    PubMed Central

    Holmner, Åsa; Ebi, Kristie L.; Lazuardi, Lutfan; Nilsson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The healthcare sector is a significant contributor to global carbon emissions, in part due to extensive travelling by patients and health workers. Objectives To evaluate the potential of telemedicine services based on videoconferencing technology to reduce travelling and thus carbon emissions in the healthcare sector. Methods A life cycle inventory was performed to evaluate the carbon reduction potential of telemedicine activities beyond a reduction in travel related emissions. The study included two rehabilitation units at Umeå University Hospital in Sweden. Carbon emissions generated during telemedicine appointments were compared with care-as-usual scenarios. Upper and lower bound emissions scenarios were created based on different teleconferencing solutions and thresholds for when telemedicine becomes favorable were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to pinpoint the most important contributors to emissions for different set-ups and use cases. Results Replacing physical visits with telemedicine appointments resulted in a significant 40–70 times decrease in carbon emissions. Factors such as meeting duration, bandwidth and use rates influence emissions to various extents. According to the lower bound scenario, telemedicine becomes a greener choice at a distance of a few kilometers when the alternative is transport by car. Conclusions Telemedicine is a potent carbon reduction strategy in the health sector. But to contribute significantly to climate change mitigation, a paradigm shift might be required where telemedicine is regarded as an essential component of ordinary health care activities and not only considered to be a service to the few who lack access to care due to geography, isolation or other constraints. PMID:25188322

  5. Experimental fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during degassing of carbon dioxide and precipitation of calcite from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Winde, V.; Escher, P.; von Geldern, R.; Böttcher, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    Processes in the carbonate system of surface waters are in particular sensitive to variations of boundary conditions as, for instance, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the aqueous solution. Examples range from streams, rivers, to coastal marine waters. The flux of carbon dioxide from continental flowing waters was recently included into calculations of the global carbon budget (Butman & Raymond, 2011, Nature Geo.). These solutions, are often supersaturated in carbon dioxide with respect to the atmosphere. The degassing of carbon dioxide is associated with a kinetically controlled fractionation of the stable carbon isotopes, which has to be considered in balancing water-air carbon dioxide fluxes. The degassing process additionally leads to the super-saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to calcium carbonate. Stable isotope fractionation is of particular value to identify and quantify processes at the water-gas phase interface and link these non-equilibrium processes to the formation mechanisms of calcite and the hydrodynamics of surface waters. Experiments were carried out with or without inert N2 gas flow to degas carbon dioxide from initially supersaturated solutions. Natural solutions used are from different stations of the Elbe estuary, the Jade Bay, the backbarrier tidal area of Spiekeroog Island, carbonate springs of Rügen Island, and the Baltic Sea coastline. Results are compared experiments using bottled mineral waters. By following the (physico) chemical changes in the solutions (pH, TA, Ca PHREEQC modeling) it was found, that two evolutionary stages can be differentiated. Reaction progress led to the preferential liberation of carbon dioxide containing the light carbon isotope, following a Rayleigh-type process. After an induction period, where only degassing of carbon dioxide took place, a second stage was observed where calcite began to form from the highly supersaturated solutions. In this stage the carbonate

  6. Domestic wash water reclamation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    System consists of filtration unit, reverse-osmosis module, tanks, pumps, plumbing, and various gauges, meters, and valves. After water is used in washing machine or shower, it is collected in holding tank. Water is pumped through series of five particulate filters. Pressure tank supplies processed water to commode water closet.

  7. Soil washing treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstich, M.

    1995-12-01

    Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

  8. Polyelectrolyte and carbon nanotube multilayers made from ionic liquid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Takuya; Zhu, Jian; Qin, Ming; Ho, Szushen; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2010-10-01

    The inevitable contact of substrates with water during the traditional practice of layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) creates problems for multiple potential applications of LBL films in electronics. To resolve this issue, we demonstrate here the possibility of a LBL process using ionic liquids (ILs), which potentially eliminates corrosion and hydration processes related to aqueous media and opens additional possibilities in structural control of LBL films. ILs are also considered to be one of the best ``green'' processing solvents, and hence, are advantageous in respect to traditional organic solvents. Poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) (PSS) were dispersed in a hydrophilic IL and successfully deposited in the LBL fashion. To produce electroactive thin films with significance to electronics, a similar process was realized for PSS-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT-PSS) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA). Characterization of the coating using standard spectroscopy and microscopy techniques typical of the multilayer field indicated that there are both similarities and differences in the structure and properties of LBL films build from ILs and aqueous solutions. The films exhibited electrical conductivity of 102 S m-1 with transparency as high as 98% for visible light, which is comparable to similar parameters for many carbon nanotube and graphene films prepared by both aqueous LBL and other methods.The inevitable contact of substrates with water during the traditional practice of layer-by-layer assembly (LBL) creates problems for multiple potential applications of LBL films in electronics. To resolve this issue, we demonstrate here the possibility of a LBL process using ionic liquids (ILs), which potentially eliminates corrosion and hydration processes related to aqueous media and opens additional possibilities in structural control of LBL films. ILs are also considered to be one of the best ``green'' processing solvents, and hence, are

  9. Metal Nanoparticles Preparation In Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Harry W. Rollins

    2004-04-01

    The novel optical, electronic, and/or magnetic properties of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles have resulted in extensive research on new methods for their preparation. An ideal preparation method would allow the particle size, size distribution, crystallinity, and particle shape to be easily controlled, and would be applicable to a wide variety of material systems. Numerous preparation methods have been reported, each with its inherent advantages and disadvantages; however, an ideal method has yet to emerge. The most widely applied methods for nanoparticle preparation include the sonochemical reduction of organometallic reagents,(1&2) the solvothermal method of Alivisatos,(3) reactions in microemulsions,(4-6) the polyol method (reduction by alcohols),(7-9) and the use of polymer and solgel materials as hosts.(10-13) In addition to these methods, there are a variety of methods that take advantage of the unique properties of a supercritical fluid.(14&15) Through simple variations of temperature and pressure, the properties of a supercritical fluid can be continuously tuned from gas-like to liquid-like without undergoing a phase change. Nanoparticle preparation methods that utilize supercritical fluids are briefly reviewed below using the following categories: Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solutions (RESS), Reactive Supercritical Fluid Processing, and Supercritical Fluid Microemulsions. Because of its easily accessible critical temperature and pressure and environmentally benign nature, carbon dioxide is the most widely used supercritical solvent. Supercritical CO2 is unfortunately a poor solvent for many polar or ionic species, which has impeded its use in the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. We have developed a reactive supercritical fluid processing method using supercritical carbon dioxide for the preparation of metal and metal sulfide particles and used it to prepare narrowly distributed nanoparticles of silver (Ag) and silver sulfide

  10. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY - BIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesisSM soil washing technology was developed by BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. to remove organic compounds from soil. The technology uses a proprietary solution (BioGenesisSM cleaner) to transfer organic compounds from the soil matrix to a liquid phase. BioGenesis claims...

  11. Bromate removal from aqueous solutions by ordered mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunhua; Wang, Xiaohong; Shi, Xiaolei; Lin, Sheng; Zhu, Liujia; Che, Yaming

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) for bromate removal from water. Batch experiments were performed to study the influence of various experimental parameters such as the effect of contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial bromate concentration, temperature, pH and effect of competing anions on bromate removal by OMC. The adsorption kinetics indicates that the uptake rate ofbromate was rapid at the beginning: 85% adsorption was completed in 1 h and equilibrium was achieved within 3 h. The sorption process was well described with pseudo-second-order kinetics. The maximum adsorption capacity of OMC for bromate removal was 17.6 mg g(-1) at 298 K. The adsorption data fit the Freundlich model well. The amount of bromate removed was found to be proportional to the influent bromate concentration. The effects of competing anions and solution pH (3-11) were negligible. These limited data suggest that OMC can be effectively utilized for bromate removal from drinking water.

  12. Nitroimidazoles adsorption on activated carbon cloth from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Pérez, R; Orellana-Garcia, F; Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Velo-Gala, I; López-Ramón, M V; Alvarez-Merino, M A

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the equilibrium and adsorption kinetics of nitroimidazoles on activated carbon cloth (ACC), determining the main interactions responsible for the adsorption process and the diffusion mechanism of these compounds on this material. The influence of the different operational variables, such as ionic strength, pH, temperature, and type of water (ultrapure, surface, and waste), was also studied. The results obtained show that the ACC has a high capacity to adsorb nitroimidazoles in aqueous solution. Electrostatic interactions play an important role at pH<3, which favors the repulsive forces between dimetridazole or metronidazole and the ACC surface. The formation of hydrogen bonds and dispersive interactions play the predominant role at higher pH values. Modifications of the ACC with NH3, K2S2O8, and O3 demonstrated that its surface chemistry plays a predominant role in nitroimidazole adsorption on this material. The adsorption capacity of ACC is considerably high in surface waters and reduced in urban wastewater, due to the levels of alkalinity and dissolved organic matter present in the different types of water. Finally, the results of applying kinetic models revealed that the global adsorption rate of dimetridazole and metronidazole is controlled by intraparticle diffusion.

  13. Solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, J.I.; Yoon, J.H.

    1998-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (AMPD) has been measured at (30, 40, and 60) C and the partial pressure of carbon dioxide ranging from (0.5 to 3065) kPa. The concentrations of the aqueous solutions were (10 and 30) mass % AMPD. The tendency of the solubility of carbon dioxide in 30 mass % AMPD aqueous solution at 40 C was found to be similar to that in 30 mass % N-methyldiethanolamine aqueous solution.

  14. On the black carbon problem and its solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) warms air temperatures in at least seven major ways: (a) directly absorbing downward solar radiation, (b) absorbing upward reflected solar radiation when it is situated above bright surfaces, such as snow, sea ice, and clouds, (c) absorbing some infrared radiation, (d) absorbing additional solar and infrared radiation upon obtaining a coating, (e) absorbing radiation multiply reflected within clouds when situated interstitially between cloud drops, (f) absorbing additional radiation when serving as CCN or scavenged inclusions within cloud drops, and (g) absorbing solar radiation when deposited on snow and sea ice, reducing the albedos of both. Modeling of the climate effects of BC requires treatment of all these processes in detail. In particular, treatment of BC absorption interstitially between cloud drops and from multiply-dispersed cloud drop BC inclusions must be treated simultaneously with treatment of cloud indirect effects to determine the net effects of BC on cloud properties. Here, results from several simulations of the effects of BC from fossil fuel and biofuel sources on global and regional climate and air pollution health are summarized. The simulations account for all the processes mentioned. Results are found to be statistically significant relative to chaotic variability in the climate system. Over time and in steady state, fossil-fuel soot plus biofuel soot are found to enhance warming more than methane. The sum of the soots causes less steady-state warming but more short term warming than does carbon dioxide. Thus eliminating soot emissions from both sources may be the fastest method of reducing rapid climate warming and possibly the only method of saving the Arctic ice. Eliminating such emissions may also reduce over 1.5 million deaths worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Short term mitigation options include the targeting of fossil-fuel and biofuel BC sources with particle traps, new stove technologies, and rural

  15. Washing Out the Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    AJT Associates, Inc. (AJT) worked with NASA to develop a revolutionary ozone-based laundry system. AJT's TecH2Ozone(R) wash system presents its customers with an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe way to perform commercial laundering. TecH2Ozone significantly reduces the amount of water and chemical used as compared to traditional commercial laundry systems. This reduction has resulted in lower cost and shorter wash cycles. And due to the reduced use of chemicals, a significant portion of the rinse water is recycled back into the system for reuse. TecH2Ozone customers, such as hotels and other large commercial laundry facilities, have felt the benefits of this equipment. Because of the reduced cycle times, fewer washers are needed and there is a notable increase in the cleanliness of the laundry. The reduction in chemical residues is a boon to customers with allergies and those prone to skin irritation from chemicals retained in regular laundry. AJT Associates, Inc. (AJT) worked with NASA to develop a revolutionary ozone-based laundry system. AJT's TecH2Ozone(R) wash system presents its customers with an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally safe way to perform commercial laundering.

  16. Kinetics Studies in a Washing Bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teggins, John; Mahaffy, Chris

    1997-05-01

    The kinetics of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide using iodide ion in aqueous solution is studied in sealed completely-filled washing bottles. Oxygen gas produced by the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide forces liquid out of a bottom feeding washing bottle. After an initiation period of a few minutes at room temperature, the rate at which the liquid is expelled from the spout of the of the washing bottle stabilizes. A comparison of the rates for different reaction concentrations results in a rate law that is approximately first-order with respect to both hydrogen peroxide and iodide concentrations. Because the need for a gas buret to measure oxygen volumes is not necessary, the experiment can be conveniently performed by a student seated in a wheelchair.

  17. Relation Between the Adsorbed Quantity and the Immersion Enthalpy in Catechol Aqueous Solutions on Activated Carbons

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Diego; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An activated carbon, CarbochemTM—PS230, was modified by chemical and thermal treatment in flow of H2, in order to evaluate the influence of the activated carbon chemical characteristics in the adsorption of the catechol. The catechol adsorption in aqueous solution was studied along with the effect of the pH solution in the adsorption process of modified activated carbons and the variation of immersion enthalpy of activated carbons in the aqueous solutions of catechol. The interaction solid-solution is characterized by adsorption isotherms analysis, at 298 K and pH 7, 9 and 11 in order to evaluate the adsorption value above and below that of the catechol pKa. The adsorption capacity of carbons increases when the solution pH decreases. The retained amount increases slightly in the reduced carbon to maximum adsorption pH and diminishes in the oxidized carbon. Similar conclusions are obtained from the immersion enthalpies, whose values increase with the solute quantity retained. In granular activated carbon (CAG), the immersion enthalpies obtained are between 21.5 and 45.7 J·g−1 for catechol aqueous solutions in a range of 20 at 1500 mg·L−1. PMID:22312237

  18. Relation between the adsorbed quantity and the immersion enthalpy in catechol aqueous solutions on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Blanco, Diego; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An activated carbon, Carbochem(TM)-PS230, was modified by chemical and thermal treatment in flow of H(2), in order to evaluate the influence of the activated carbon chemical characteristics in the adsorption of the catechol. The catechol adsorption in aqueous solution was studied along with the effect of the pH solution in the adsorption process of modified activated carbons and the variation of immersion enthalpy of activated carbons in the aqueous solutions of catechol. The interaction solid-solution is characterized by adsorption isotherms analysis, at 298 K and pH 7, 9 and 11 in order to evaluate the adsorption value above and below that of the catechol pK(a). The adsorption capacity of carbons increases when the solution pH decreases. The retained amount increases slightly in the reduced carbon to maximum adsorption pH and diminishes in the oxidized carbon. Similar conclusions are obtained from the immersion enthalpies, whose values increase with the solute quantity retained. In granular activated carbon (CAG), the immersion enthalpies obtained are between 21.5 and 45.7 J·g(-1) for catechol aqueous solutions in a range of 20 at 1500 mg·L(-1).

  19. Stable aqueous colloidal solutions of intact surfactant-free graphene nanoribbons and related graphitic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Dimiev, Ayrat M; Gizzatov, Ayrat; Wilson, Lon J; Tour, James M

    2013-04-04

    Here we demonstrate a simple, nondestructive method for the preparation of stable aqueous colloidal solutions of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes. The method includes sonication of carbon nanomaterials in hypophosphorous acid, filtration accompanied by washing the solids with water and dispersion of the solids in a fresh portion of water to form colloidal solutions.

  20. Heterogeneity of activated carbons in adsorption of aniline from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podkościelny, P.; László, K.

    2007-08-01

    The heterogeneity of activated carbons (ACs) prepared from different precursors is investigated on the basis of adsorption isotherms of aniline from dilute aqueous solutions at various pH values. The APET carbon prepared from polyethyleneterephthalate (PET), as well as, commercial ACP carbon prepared from peat were used. Besides, to investigate the influence of carbon surface chemistry, the adsorption was studied on modified carbons based on ACP carbon. Its various oxygen surface groups were changed by both nitric acid and thermal treatments. The Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equation and Langmuir-Freundlich (LF) one have been used to model the phenomenon of aniline adsorption from aqueous solutions on heterogeneous carbon surfaces. Adsorption-energy distribution (AED) functions have been calculated by using an algorithm based on a regularization method. Analysis of these functions for activated carbons studied provides important comparative information about their surface heterogeneity.

  1. Hydrothermal Carbonization: a feasible solution to convert biomass to soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesch, Walter; Tesch, Petra; Pfeifer, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    The erosion of fertile soil is a severe problem arising right after peak oil (Myers 1996). That this issue is not only a problem of arid countries is shown by the fact that even the European Commission defined certain milestones to address the problem of soil erosion in Europe (European Commission 2011). The application of bio-char produced by torrefaction or pyrolysis for the remediation, revegetation and restoration of depleted soils started to gain momentum recently (Rillig 2010, Lehmann 2011, Beesley 2011). Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a promising thermo-chemical process that can be applied to convert organic feedstock into fertile soil and water, two resources which are of high value in regions being vulnerable to erosion. The great advantage of HTC is that organic feedstock (e.g. organic waste) can be used without any special pretreatment (e.g. drying) and so far no restrictions have been found regarding the composition of the organic matter. By applying HTC the organic material is processed along a defined pathway in the Van Krevelen plot (Behrendt 2006). By stopping the process at an early stage a nutritious rich material can be obtained, which is known to be similar to terra preta. Considering that HTC-coal is rich in functional groups and can be derived from the process under "wet" conditions, it can be expected that it shall allow soil bacteria to settle more easily compared to the bio-char derived by torrefaction or pyrolysis. In addition, up to 10 tons process water per ton organic waste can be gained (Vorlop 2009). Thus, as organic waste, loss of fertile soil and water scarcity becomes a serious issue within the European Union, hydrothermal carbonization can provide a feasible solution to address these issues of our near future. The presentation reviews the different types of feedstock investigated for the HTC-Process so far and gives an overview on the current stage of development of this technology. References Beesley L., Moreno-Jiménez E

  2. Effect of solution conductivity and electrode shape on the deposition of carbon nanotubes from solution using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Naieni, A Kashefian; Nojeh, A

    2012-12-14

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a popular technique for fabricating carbon nanotube (CNT) devices. The electric current passing through the solution during DEP creates a temperature gradient, which results in electrothermal fluid flow because of the presence of the electric field. CNT solutions prepared with various methods can have different conductivities and the motion of the solution because of the electrothermal phenomenon can affect the DEP deposition differently in each case. We investigated the effect of this movement in solutions with various levels of conductivity through experiments as well as numerical modeling. Our results show that electrothermal motion in the solution can alter the deposition pattern of the nanotubes drastically for high conductivity solutions, while DEP remains the dominant force when a low conductivity (surfactant-free) solution is used. The extent of effectiveness of each force is discussed in the various cases and the fluid movement model is investigated using two- and three-dimensional finite element simulations.

  3. THE SOLAR NEBULA ON FIRE: A SOLUTION TO THE CARBON DEFICIT IN THE INNER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Bergin, Edwin A.; Nomura, Hideko E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu

    2010-02-10

    Despite a surface dominated by carbon-based life, the bulk composition of the Earth is dramatically carbon poor when compared to the material available at formation. Bulk carbon deficiency extends into the asteroid belt representing a fossil record of the conditions under which planets are born. The initial steps of planet formation involve the growth of primitive sub-micron silicate and carbon grains in the Solar Nebula. We present a solution wherein primordial carbon grains are preferentially destroyed by oxygen atoms ignited by heating due to stellar accretion at radii <5 AU. This solution can account for the bulk carbon deficiency in the Earth and meteorites, the compositional gradient within the asteroid belt, and for growing evidence for similar carbon deficiency in rocks surrounding other stars.

  4. Characterization of carbon nanotube thin films formed using electronic-grade carbon nanotube aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuliang; Janzen, Daniel C.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of great interests for a wide range of applications because of their unique structural, mechanical, electrical, optical, thermal, and chemical properties. Particularly, CNT thin films can be used as mechanically flexible, electrically conductive, and broadband optically transparent electrodes in various optoelectronic devices. However, one crucial obstacle to implementing CNT-based applications has been the unavailability of pure CNTs suitable for direct industrial use. The as-produced CNTs are very fluffy soot, and thus extremely difficult to be handled in the device fabrication process. Although CNTs can be grown directly on a substrate from the catalyst deposited on the substrate surface, the growing temperature is very high, typically > 900°C, which represents a big challenge to device fabrication and integration. Another issue is that the catalyst on the substrate surface must be removed without affecting the grown CNTs. In the raw CNT soot, there is always a considerable amount of impurities, including metallic particles from the catalyst and carbonaceous impurities from the chemical reaction by-products. Such impurities can greatly degrade the properties of CNT thin films. The production of electronic-grade CNT aqueous solutions, which contain only individually suspended pure CNTs without any kind of surfactant, is a critical milestone for implementing CNT-based applications. By using such solutions, pure CNT thin films of various densities can be formed through common solution-casting processes, such as spin coating, spray coating, micro-dispensing, and ink-jet printing. The properties of these pure CNT thin films will be discussed in this paper.

  5. Nonionic Organic Solute Sorption to two Organobentonites as a Function of Organic-Carbon Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelt-Hunt, S. L.; Burns, S. E.; Smith, J. A.

    2002-05-01

    Sorption of three nonionic organic solutes (benzene, trichloroethene, and 1,2-dichlorobenzene) to hexadecyltrimethylammonium-bentonite (HDTMA-bentonite) and benzyltrimethylammonium-bentonite (BTEA-bentonite) was measured as a function of organic-carbon content at quaternary ammonium cation loadings ranging from 30 to 130% of the clay's cation-exchange capacity. Sorption of all three solutes to HDTMA-bentonite was linear and sorptive capacity of the HDTMA-bentonite increased as the organic-carbon content of the clay increased. 1,2-Dichlorobenzene sorbed most strongly to HDTMA-bentonite, followed by benzene and TCE. The stronger sorption of benzene to HDTMA-bentonite compared to TCE was unexpected based on a partition mechanism of sorption and consideration of solute solubility. This result may be caused by interactions between the pi electrons of benzene and the negatively charged surface of the clay. Log Koc values for all three solutes increased with organic-carbon content. This suggests that the increased organic-carbon content alone may not explain the observed increase in sorption capacity. Sorption of the three solutes to BTEA-bentonite was nonlinear and solute sorption decreased with increasing organic-carbon content. Surface area measurements indicate that the surface area of both organobentonites generally decreased with increasing organic-carbon content. Since nonionic organic solute sorption to BTEA-bentonite occurs by adsorption, the reduced sorption is likely caused by the reduction in surface area corresponding to increased organic cation loading.

  6. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  7. Washing treatment of automotive shredder residue (ASR).

    PubMed

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana

    2013-08-01

    Worldwide, the amount of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) reaches 50 million units per year. Once the ELV has been processed, it may then be shredded and sorted to recover valuable metals that are recycled in iron and steelmaking processes. The residual fraction, called automotive shredder residue (ASR), represents 25% of the ELV and is usually landfilled. In order to deal with the leachable fraction of ASR that poses a potential threat to the environment, a washing treatment before landfilling was applied. To assess the potential for full-scale application of washing treatment, tests were carried out in different conditions (L/S = 3 and 5L/kgTS; t = 3 and 6 h). Moreover, to understand whether the grain size of waste could affect the washing efficiency, the treatment was applied to ground (<4 mm) and not-ground samples. The findings obtained revealed that, on average, washing treatment achieved removal rates of more than 60% for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN). With regard to metals and chlorides, sulphates and fluoride leachable fraction, a removal efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained, as confirmed also by EC values. The comparison between the results for ground and not-ground samples did not highlight significant differences.

  8. Removal of oxyfluorfen from ex-situ soil washing fluids using electrolysis with diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Elisama Vieira; Sáez, Cristina; Martínez-Huitle, Carlos Alberto; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel Andres

    2016-04-15

    In this research, firstly, the treatment of soil spiked with oxyfluorfen was studied using a surfactant-aided soil-washing (SASW) process. After that, the electrochemical treatment of the washing liquid using boron doped diamond (BDD) anodes was performed. Results clearly demonstrate that SASW is a very efficient approach in the treatment of soil, removing the pesticide completely by using dosages below 5 g of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) per Kg of soil. After that, complete mineralization of organic matter (oxyflourfen, SDS and by-products) was attained (100% of total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand removals) when the washing liquids were electrolyzed using BDD anodes, but the removal rate depends on the size of the particles in solution. Electrolysis of soil washing fluids occurs via the reduction in size of micelles until their complete depletion. Lower concentrations of intermediates are produced (sulfate, chlorine, 4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenol and ortho-nitrophenol) during BDD-electrolyzes. Finally, it is important to indicate that, sulfate (coming from SDS) and chlorine (coming from oxyfluorfen) ions play an important role during the electrochemical organic matter removal.

  9. Surface heterogeneity effects of activated carbons on the kinetics of paracetamol removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, B.; Cabrita, I.; Mestre, A. S.; Parra, J. B.; Pires, J.; Carvalho, A. P.; Ania, C. O.

    2010-06-01

    The removal of a compound with therapeutic activity (paracetamol) from aqueous solutions using chemically modified activated carbons has been investigated. The chemical nature of the activated carbon material was modified by wet oxidation, so as to study the effect of the carbon surface chemistry and composition on the removal of paracetamol. The surface heterogeneity of the carbon created upon oxidation was found to be a determinant in the adsorption capability of the modified adsorbents, as well as in the rate of paracetamol removal. The experimental kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. The parameters obtained were linked to the textural and chemical features of the activated carbons. After oxidation the wettability of the carbon is enhanced, which favors the transfer of paracetamol molecules to the carbon pores (smaller boundary layer thickness). At the same time the overall adsorption rate and removal efficiency are reduced in the oxidized carbon due to the competitive effect of water molecules.

  10. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2012-10-25

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

  11. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  12. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  13. Study of the reuse of treated wastewater on waste container washing vehicles.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Mentore; Gialdini, Francesca; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2013-02-01

    The wheelie bins for the collection of municipal solid waste (MSW) shall be periodically washed. This operation is usually carried out by specific vehicles which consume about 5000 L of water per day. Wastewater derived from bins washing is usually stored on the same vehicle and then discharged and treated in a municipal WWTP. This paper presents a study performed to evaluate the reuse of the wastewater collected from bins washing after it has been treated in a small plant mounted on the vehicle; the advantage of such a system would be the reduction of both vehicle dimension and water consumption. The main results obtained by coagulation-flocculation tests performed on two wastewater samples are presented. The addition of 2 mL/L of an aqueous solution of aluminum polychloride (18% w/w), about 35 mL/L of an aqueous solution of CaO (4% w/w) and 25 mL/L of an aqueous solution of an anionic polyelectrolyte (1 ‰ w/w) can significantly reduce turbidity and COD in treated water (to about 99% and 42%, respectively); the concomitant increase of UV transmittance at 254 nm (up to 15%) enables UV disinfection application by a series of two ordinary UV lamps. Much higher UV transmittance values (even higher than 80%) can be obtained by dosing powdered activated carbon, which also results in a greater removal of COD.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of carbon in b.c.c. and f.c.c. iron-silicon-carbon solid solutions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chraska, P.; Mclellan, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    The equilibrium between hydrogen-methane gas mixtures and Fe-Si-C solid solutions has been investigated both as a function of temperature and carburizing gas composition. The thermodynamic properties of the carbon atoms in both b.c.c. and f.c.c. solid solution have been derived from the equilibrium measurements. The results found have been compared with those of earlier investigations and with the predictions of recent theoretical models on ternary solid solutions containing both substitutional and interstitial solute atoms.

  15. Removal of nitrate from aqueous solutions by activated carbon prepared from sugar beet bagasse.

    PubMed

    Demiral, Hakan; Gündüzoğlu, Gül

    2010-03-01

    In this study, activated carbons were prepared from sugar beet bagasse by chemical activation and the prepared activated carbons were used to remove nitrate from aqueous solutions. In chemical activation, ZnCl(2) was used as chemical agent. The effects of impregnation ratio and activation temperature were investigated. The produced activated carbons were characterized by measuring their porosities and pore size distributions. The microstructure of the activated carbons was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The maximum specific surface area of the activated carbon was about 1826m(2)/g at 700 degrees C and at an impregnation ratio of 3:1. The resulting activated carbon was used for removal of nitrate from aqueous solution. The effects of pH, temperature and contact time were investigated. Isotherm studies were carried out and the data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. Three simplified kinetic models were tested to investigate the adsorption mechanism.

  16. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS BY REDUCTION-PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, D.A.; Lindblom, R.O.

    1957-09-24

    A process employing carbonate leaching of ores and an advantageous methcd of recovering the uranium and vanadium from the leach solution is described. The uranium and vanadium can be precipitated from carbonate leach solutions by reaction with sodium amalgam leaving the leach solution in such a condition that it is economical to replenish for recycling. Such a carbonate leach solution is treated with a dilute sodium amalgam having a sodium concentration within a range of about 0.01 to 0.5% of sodium. Efficiency of the treatment is dependent on at least three additional factors, intimacy of contact of the amalgam with the leach solution, rate of addition of the amalgam and exclusion of oxygen (air).

  17. Solution Deposition Methods for Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    solution prior to spin - coating . A comparison of the results for each deposition method will help to determine which conditions are useful for producing CNT devices for chemical sensing and electronic applications.

  18. Inhibitive effects of palm kernel oil on carbon steel corrosion by alkaline solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkafli, M. Y.; Othman, N. K.; Lazim, A. M.; Jalar, A.

    2013-11-01

    The behavior of carbon steel SAE 1045 in 1 M NaOH solution containing different concentrations of palm kernel oil (PKO) has been studied by weight loss and polarization measurement. Results showed that the corrosion of carbon steel in NaOH solution was considerably reduced in presence of such inhibitors. The inhibition efficiency increases when concentration of inhibitor increase. Maximum inhibition efficiency (≈ 96.67%) is obtained at PKO concentration 8 v/v %. This result revealed that palm kernel oil can act as a corrosion inhibitor in an alkaline medium. Corrosion rates of carbon steel decrease as the concentration of inhibitor is increased.

  19. Solution-based carbohydrate synthesis of individual solid, hollow, and porous carbon nanospheres using spray pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yuan; Graser, Jake; Zhao, Ran; Gao, Fei; O'Connell, Michael J

    2013-12-23

    A facile and scalable solution-based, spray pyrolysis synthesis technique was used to synthesize individual carbon nanospheres with specific surface area (SSA) up to 1106 m(2)/g using a novel metal-salt catalyzed reaction. The carbon nanosphere diameters were tunable from 10 nm to several micrometers by varying the precursor concentrations. Solid, hollow, and porous carbon nanospheres were achieved by simply varying the ratio of catalyst and carbon source without using any templates. These hollow carbon nanospheres showed adsorption of to 300 mg of dye per gram of carbon, which is more than 15 times higher than that observed for conventional carbon black particles. When evaluated as supercapacitor electrode materials, specific capacitances of up to 112 F/g at a current density of 0.1 A/g were observed, with no capacitance loss after 20,000 cycles.

  20. Immunotoxicity of washing soda in a freshwater sponge of India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2015-03-01

    The natural habitat of sponge, Eunapius carteri faces an ecotoxicological threat of contamination by washing soda, a common household cleaning agent of India. Washing soda is chemically known as sodium carbonate and is reported to be toxic to aquatic organisms. Domestic effluent, drain water and various human activities in ponds and lakes have been identified as the major routes of washing soda contamination of water. Phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules are important immunological responses offered by the cells of sponges against environmental toxins and pathogens. Present study involves estimation of phagocytic response and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase in E. carteri under the environmentally realistic concentrations of washing soda. Sodium carbonate exposure resulted in a significant decrease in the phagocytic response of sponge cells under 4, 8, 16 mg/l of the toxin for 96h and all experimental concentrations of the toxin for 192h. Washing soda exposure yielded an initial increase in the generation of the superoxide anion and nitric oxide followed by a significant decrease in generation of these cytotoxic agents. Sponge cell generated a high degree of phenoloxidase activity under the experimental exposure of 2, 4, 8, 16 mg/l of sodium carbonate for 96 and 192 h. Washing soda induced alteration of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses of E. carteri was indicative to an undesirable shift in their immune status leading to the possible crises of survival and propagation of sponges in their natural habitat.

  1. Additive approach for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Shigella spp. on contaminated fresh fruits and vegetables using bacteriophage cocktail and produce wash.

    PubMed

    Magnone, Joshua P; Marek, Patrick J; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Senecal, Andre G

    2013-08-01

    The incidence of foodborne outbreaks involving fresh produce is of worldwide concern. Lytic bacteriophage cocktails and a levulinic acid produce wash were investigated for their effectiveness against the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella spp., and Salmonella on broccoli, cantaloupe, and strawberries. Inoculated samples were treated with bacteriophage cocktails (BC) before storage at 10°C for 24 h, a levulinic acid produce wash (PW) after storage at 10°C for 24 h, or a combination of the washes (BCPW) before and after storage. All three treatments were compared against a 200-ppm free available chlorine wash. Wash solutions were prepared using potable water and water with an increased organic content of 2.5 g/liter total dissolved solids and total organic carbon. BCPW was the most effective treatment, producing the highest log reductions in the pathogens. Produce treated with BCPW in potable water with a PW exposure time of 5 min resulted in the highest reduction of each pathogen for all samples tested. The type of produce and wash solution had significant effects on the efficacy of the individual treatments. The chlorine wash in water with higher organic content was the least effective treatment tested. An additive effect of BCPW was seen in water with higher organic content, resulting in greater than 4.0-log reductions in pathogens. Our findings indicate that the combination of antimicrobial BC with a commercial produce wash is a very effective method for treating produce contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, Shigella spp., and Salmonella even in the presence of high loads of organic matter.

  2. The influence of sodium carbonate on sodium aluminosilicate crystallisation and solubility in sodium aluminate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Kali; Gerson, Andrea R.; Addai-Mensah, Jonas; Smart, Roger St. C.

    1997-01-01

    Isothermal batch precipitation experiments have been carried out in synthetic Bayer liquors to investigate the effects of sodium carbonate concentration on both silica solubility and the crystallisation of sodium aluminosilicates. At both 90 and 160°C cancrinite (generically defined as a sodium aluminosilicate of space group P6 3) is the stable solid phase. Sodalite (generically defined as a sodium aluminosilicate with space group P4¯3n seed transforms to cancrinite at both these temperatures. A high concentration of sodium carbonate in the synthetic liquor causes a decrease in the rate of conversion of sodalite to cancrinite. The solubility of both cancrinite and sodalite decreases as the concentration of sodium carbonate in the synthetic liquor is increased. For instance at 90°C and with 40.0 g dm -3 sodium carbonate in the synthetic liquor after 13 days the sodium aluminosilicate concentration is 0.52 g dm -3 compared to 0.85 g dm -3 with 4.6 g dm -3 of sodium carbonate in solution. At 160°C the sodium aluminosilicate concentration is 0.47 g dm -3 with 40.0 g dm -3 sodium carbonate in solution after 13 days and 0.79 g dm -3 with 4.6 g dm -3 sodium carbonate in solution. Throughout all these experiments a progressive loss of carbonate from the sodium aluminosilicate crystallisation products was observed as a function of time.

  3. Mechanism of adsorption and electrosorption of bentazone on activated carbon cloth in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ania, Conchi O; Béguin, François

    2007-08-01

    An electrochemical technique has been applied to enhance the removal of a common herbicide (bentazone) from aqueous solutions using an activated carbon cloth as electrode. A pH increase from acidic to basic reduces the uptake, with capacities going from 127 down to 80 mg/g at pH 2 and 7, respectively. Increasing the oxygen content of the carbon cloth causes a decrease in the bentazone loading capacity at all pH values. This indicates that adsorption is governed by both dispersive and electrostatic interactions, the extent of which is controlled by the solution pH and the nature of the adsorbent. Anodic polarization of the carbon cloth noticeably enhances the adsorption of bentazone, to an extent depending on the current applied to the carbon electrode. The electrosorption is promoted by a local pH decrease provoked by anodic decomposition of water in the pores of the carbon cloth.

  4. Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

  5. Fabrication of carbon nanowires by pyrolysis of aqueous solution of sugar within asbestos nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butko, V. Yu.; Fokin, A. V.; Nevedomskii, V. N.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon nanowires have been fabricated by pyrolysis of an aqueous solution of sugar in nanochannels of asbestos fibers. Electron microscopy demonstrates that the diameter of these nanochannels corresponds to the diameter of the thinnest of the carbon nanowires obtained. Some of these nanowires have a graphite crystal lattice and internal pores. After asbestos is etched out, the carbon nanowires can retain the original shape of the asbestos fibers. Heating in an inert atmosphere reduces the electrical resistivity of the carbon nanowires to ˜0.035 Ω cm.

  6. Evaluation of solution-processable carbon-based electrodes for all-carbon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ramuz, Marc P; Vosgueritchian, Michael; Wei, Peng; Wang, Chenggong; Gao, Yongli; Wu, Yingpeng; Chen, Yongsheng; Bao, Zhenan

    2012-11-27

    Carbon allotropes possess unique and interesting physical, chemical, and electronic properties that make them attractive for next-generation electronic devices and solar cells. In this report, we describe our efforts into the fabrication of the first reported all-carbon solar cell in which all components (the anode, active layer, and cathode) are carbon based. First, we evaluate the active layer, on standard electrodes, which is composed of a bilayer of polymer sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes and C(60). This carbon-based active layer with a standard indium tin oxide anode and metallic cathode has a maximum power conversion efficiency of 0.46% under AM1.5 Sun illumination. Next, we describe our efforts in replacing the electrodes with carbon-based electrodes, to demonstrate the first all-carbon solar cell, and discuss the remaining challenges associated with this process.

  7. Effect of carbon and alloying solute atoms on helium behaviors in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yange; You, Yu-Wei; Xu, Yichun; Liu, C. S.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-02-01

    Helium bubbles could strongly degrade the mechanical properties of ferritic steels in fission and fusion systems. The formation of helium bubble is directly affected by the interactions between helium and the compositions in steels, such as solute atoms, carbon and irradiation defects. We thereby performed systematical first-principles calculations to investigate the interactions of solute-helium and carbon-solute-helium. It is found that substitutional helium is more attractive than interstitial helium to all the considered 3p, 4p, 5p and 6p solutes. The attraction between carbon and substitutional helium suggests the carbon-solute-helium complex can be formed stably. By examining the charge density difference and thermal stability, it is found that the ternary complex shows stronger attraction with He than that of solute-helium pair for some solutes (S, Se, In, Te, Pb and Bi) and the complex could existed in iron stably at 700 K. The present theoretical results may be helpful for exploring alloy additions to mitigate the formation of large helium bubbles.

  8. Extraction of actinides into aqueous polyethylene glycol solutions from carbonate media in the presence of alizarin complexone

    SciTech Connect

    Molochnikova, N.P.; Frenkel', V.Ya.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Shkinev, V.M.; Spivakov, B.Ya.; Zolotov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Actinide extraction in a two-phase aqueous system based on polyethylene glycol from carbonate solutions of various compositions in presence of alizarin complexone is studied. It is shown that the nature of the alkali metals affects actinide extraction into the polyethylene glycol phase. Tri- and tetravalent actinides are extracted maximally from sodium carbonate solutions. Separation of actinides in different oxidation states is more effective in potassium carbonate solutions. The behavior of americium in different oxidation states in the system carbonate-polyethylene glycol-complexone is studied. The possibility of extraction separation of microamount of americium(V) from curium in carbonate solutions in presence of alizarin complexone is shown.

  9. Prototype wash water renovation system integration with goverment-furnished wash fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A total renovation concept for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water to make the water reusable was developed. This concept included ferric chloride pretreatment to coagulate suspended solids such as soap and lint, pressure filtration, and carbon adsorption and ion exchange to remove trace dissolved organics and inorganic salts. A breadboard model which was developed to demonstrate the design adequacy of the various system components and the limits on system capacities and efficiencies.

  10. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson [Castro Valley, CA

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  11. Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Raymond

    2012-11-06

    Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

  12. Decolorization of anaerobically digested molasses spent wash by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, M; Ganguli, A; Tripathi, A K

    2009-01-01

    The distillery wastewater (spent wash) contains dark-brown colored recalcitrant organic compounds that are not amenable to conventional biological treatment. The characteristic recalcitrance to decolorization is due to the presence of brown melanoidin polymers. In the present study, feasibility of using Pseudomonas putida strain U for decolorization of spent wash was demonstrated. Batch cultures of P. putida decolourized spent wash by 24%, 2- fold higher decolorization was achieved following immobilization in calcium alginate beads. Glucose concentration was critical for decolourization and improved color removal efficiency was obtained by periodic replenishment of glucose. Decolourization was also observed with lactose or whey as alternative carbon sources. The results of our study suggest that P. putida could be used for biological decolorization of molasses spent washes and that supplementation with whey (a by-product from cheese industry) can offer economical viability to the process.

  13. Optoelectronically automated system for carbon nanotubes synthesis via arc-discharge in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Debasis; Brinley, Erik; Kuiry, Suresh C.; McCutchen, Matthew; Seal, Sudipta; Heinrich, Helge; Kabes, Bradley

    2005-03-01

    The method of arc discharge in the solution is unique and inexpensive route for synthesis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon onions, and other carbon nanostructures. Such a method can be used for in situ synthesis of CNTs decorated with nanoparticles. Herein, we report a simple and inexpensive optoelectronically automated system for arc discharge in solution synthesis of CNTs. The optoelectronic system maintains a constant gap between the two electrodes allowing a continuous synthesis of the carbon nanostructures. The system operates in a feedback loop consisting of an electrode-gap detector and an analog electronic unit, as controller. This computerized feeding system of the anode was used for in situ nanoparticles incorporated CNTs. For example, we have successfully decorated CNTs with ceria, silica, and palladium nanoparticles. Characterizations of nanostructures are performed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Carbonized material adsorbents for the removal of mercury from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, S.; Pulido, L.L.; Kajimoto, T.

    1996-12-31

    Although wood has essentially been excluded as a starting material for the production of granular activated carbon because of the poor strength and friability of the products, powdered wood based activated carbons are still being used in water treatment and other liquid phase applications. However, the capability of powdered wood-based charcoal which in itself porous has not been fully known. Few studies have been conducted in harnessing its potential for adsorption purposes especially in water treatment. This study was conducted to investigate the possibility of using wood based carbonized materials from Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) as adsorption materials in aqueous solutions of heavy metals like mercury, zinc, lead, cadmium and arsenic. However, of all the heavy metals investigated, mercury is considered to be the most toxic so this paper describes only the adsorption ability of the carbonized materials in adsorbing this metal from aqueous solutions of different concentrations.

  15. Adsorption of Basic Violet 14 in aqueous solutions using KMnO4-modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qianqian; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Chenglu; Nie, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Huayong

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, an activated carbon was prepared from Typha orientalis and then treated with KMnO(4) and used for the removal of Basic Violet 14 from aqueous solutions. KMnO(4) treatment influenced the physicochemical properties of the carbon and improved its adsorption capacity. Adsorption experiments were then conducted with KMnO(4)-modified activated carbon to study the effects of carbon dosage (250-1500 mg/L), pH (2-10), ion strength (0-0.5 mol/L), temperature, and contact time on the adsorption of Basic Violet 14 from aqueous solutions. The equilibrium data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms and fitted well with the Langmuir model. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to evaluate the kinetic data and the pseudo-second-order kinetics was the best with good correlation.

  16. Fabrication of macroporous carbonate apatite foam by hydrothermal conversion of alpha-tricalcium phosphate in carbonate solutions.

    PubMed

    Wakae, H; Takeuchi, A; Udoh, K; Matsuya, S; Munar, M L; LeGeros, R Z; Nakasima, A; Ishikawa, K

    2008-12-15

    Bone consists of a mineral phase (carbonate apatite) and an organic phase (principally collagen). Cancellous bone is characterized by interconnecting porosity necessary for tissue ingrowth and nourishment of bone cells. The purpose of the present study was to fabricate macroporous carbonate apatite (CAP) blocks with interconnecting porosity as potential bone substitute biomaterials by hydrothermal conversion of alpha-TCP foam in carbonate solution. The fabrication of the macroporous CAP was accomplished in two steps: (1) preparation of alpha-TCP foams using polyurethane foams as templates, and (2) hydrothermal conversion at 200 degrees C of alpha-TCP foam in the presence of ammonium carbonate solutions of different concentrations. The maximum carbonate content of the resultant CAP foam was approximately 7.4 wt %. The mean porosity of the CAP foam was as high as 93 vol %. The macroporous CAP blocks or granules prepared in this manner has properties similar to that of bone in mineral composition and in having interconnecting macroporosity necessary for osteoconductivity and tissue ingrowth. On the basis of composition and interconnecting macroporosity, the CAP foam materials could be ideal biomaterials for bone repair and as scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  17. Density and viscosity of some partially carbonated aqueous alkanolamine solutions and their blends

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, R.H.; Dingman, J.C.; Cronin, D.B.; Browning, G.J.

    1998-05-01

    Very little information is available concerning the effect of acid gas loading on the physical properties of amine-treating solutions flowing through the absorption and regeneration columns used in gas processing. The densities and viscosities of partially carbonated monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions were measured at 298 K. With increasing carbon dioxide loadings, significant increases in both density and viscosity were observed. These results were combined with literature data to produce correlations for alkanolamine solution density and viscosity as a function of amine concentration, carbon dioxide loading, and temperature. The resulting single-amine correlations were used to predict the densities and viscosities of DEA + MDEA and MEA + MDEA blends. Predictions are compared with data measured for these blends.

  18. Aragonite nanorods in calcium carbonate/polymer hybrids formed through self-organization processes from amorphous calcium carbonate solution.

    PubMed

    Kajiyama, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Kato, Takashi

    2014-04-24

    Nanostructured inorganic/polymer hybrid thin films comprising aragonite nanorods derived from aqueous suspensions of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) are prepared. For the formation of calcium carbonate (CaCO₃)/polymer hybrids, spincoated and annealed films of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) that function as polymer matrices are soaked in aqueous colloidal solutions dispersing ACC stabilized by poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). In the initial stage, calcite thin films form on the surface. Subsequently, aragonite crystals start to form inside the PVA matrix that contains PVA crystallites which induce aragonite nucleation. Nanostructured hybrids composed of calcite thin films consisting of nanoparticles and assembled aragonite nanorods are formed in the matrices of PVA.

  19. Efficacy of Post-Wash Shell Egg Sanitizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorine (Cl) solutions of 100-200 ppm are the standard by which post-wash shell egg sanitizers are measured. Any facility that packages eggs with the USDA grade shields must use a comparable sanitizer. While chlorine solutions are inexpensive, non-corrosive, and safe to handle, they are not very ...

  20. Effects of dilute substitutional solutes on interstitial carbon in α-Fe: Interactions and associated carbon diffusion from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peitao; Xing, Weiwei; Cheng, Xiyue; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi; Chen, Xing-Qiu

    2014-07-01

    By means of first-principles calculations coupled with the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we have systematically investigated the effects of dilute substitutional solutes on the behaviors of carbon in α-Fe. Our results uncover the following. (i) Without the Fe vacancy the interactions between most solutes and carbon are repulsive due to the strain relief, whereas Mn has a weak attractive interaction with its nearest-neighbor carbon due to the local ferromagnetic coupling effect. (ii) The presence of the Fe vacancy results in attractive interactions of all the solutes with carbon. In particular, the Mn-vacancy pair shows an exceptionally large binding energy of -0.81 eV with carbon. (iii) The alloying addition significantly impacts the atomic-scale concentration distributions and chemical potential of carbon in the Fe matrix. Among them, Mn and Cr increase the carbon chemical potential, whereas Al and Si reduce it. (iv) Within the dilute scale of the alloying solution, the solute concentration- and temperature-dependent carbon diffusivities demonstrate that Mn has a little impact on the carbon diffusion, whereas Cr (Al or Si) remarkably retards the carbon diffusion. Our results provide a certain implication for better understanding the experimental observations related with the carbon solubility limit, carbon microsegregation, and carbide precipitations in the ferritic steels.

  1. Direct Imaging of Carbon Nanotube Liquid-Crystalline Phase Development in True Solutions.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, Olga; Liberman, Lucy; Behabtu, Natnael; Pasquali, Matteo; Cohen, Yachin; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2017-04-13

    Using direct-imaging cryogenic transmission and scanning electron microscopy, we show different stages of liquid-crystalline phase development in progressively more concentrated solutions of carbon nanotubes in chlorosulfonic acid: a dilute phase of individually dissolved carbon nanotubes; semidilute and concentrated isotropic phases; coexisting concentrated isotropic and nematic phases in local equilibrium with each other; and a fully liquid-crystalline phase. Nanometric resolution of cryogenic electron microscopy reveals carbon nanotube self-assembly into liquid-crystalline domains of several nanometers in width at very early stages. We find significant differences in carbon nanotube liquid-crystalline domain morphology as a function of the carbon nanotube aspect ratio, diameter, and degree of purity.

  2. Anomalously enhanced hydration of aqueous electrolyte solution in hydrophobic carbon nanotubes to maintain stability.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Tomonori

    2014-02-24

    An understanding of the structure and behavior of electrolyte solutions in nanoenvironements is crucial not only for a wide variety of applications, but also for the development of physical, chemical, and biological processes. We demonstrate the structure and stability of electrolyte in carbon nanotubes using hybrid reverse Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray diffraction patterns. Hydrogen bonds between water are adequately formed in carbon nanotubes, although some hydrogen bonds are restricted by the interfaces of carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen bonding network of water in electrolyte in the carbon nanotubes is further weakened. On the other hand, formation of the ion hydration shell is significantly enhanced in the electrolyte in the carbon nanotubes in comparison to ion hydration in bulk electrolyte. The significant hydrogen bond and hydration shell formation are a result of gaining stability in the hydrophobic nanoenvironment.

  3. Removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions using iron-oxide-coated modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Gao, Nai-Yun; Lin, Y C; Xu, Bin; Le, Lin-sheng

    2007-08-01

    Removal of arsenic(V) from aqueous solutions was evaluated with the following three different sorption materials: coal-based activated carbon 12 x 40 (activated carbon), iron(II) oxide (FeO)/activated carbon-H, and iron oxide. The apparent characteristics and physical chemistry performances of these adsorbents were investigated by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, and scanning electronic microscope. Also, batch experiments for arsenic removal were performed, and the effects of pH value on arsenic(V) removal were studied. The results suggest that the main phases of the iron oxide surface are magnetite, maghemite, hematite, and goethite; fine and uniform iron oxide particles can cover activated carbon surfaces and affect the surface area or pore structures of activated carbon; adsorption kinetics obey a pseudo-first-order rate equation; and adsorption capacities of adsorbents are affected by the values of pH. The optimum value of pH for iron oxide lies in a narrow range between 4.0 and 5.5, and arsenic(V) removal by FeO/activated carbon-H is ideal and stable in the pH range 3 to 7, while activated carbon has the lowest adsorption capacity in the entire pH range. Also, the adsorption characteristics of FeO/activated carbon-H composites and virgin activated carbon match well the Langmuir adsorption model, while those of iron oxide fit well the Freundlich adsorption model.

  4. Solution and shock-induced exsolution of argon in vitreous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, Carey; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    To add to the knowledge of noble gas solution and exsolution in carbonaceus material, experiments were performed on vitreous carbon. Ar-rich vitreous carbon samples were prepared under vapor-saturated conditions using argon as the pressurizing medium. Solubility data were obtained for temperatures of 773 to 973 K and pressures of 250 to 1500 bars. Up to 7 wt pct Ar was dissolved in the carbon. The solubility data were compared to a thermodynamic model of argon atoms dissolving into a fixed population of 'holes' in the carbon. Two variations of the model yielded estimates of the enthalpy of solution of Ar in vitreous carbon equal to about -4700 cal/mole. Preliminary shock experiments showed that 28 percent of the total argon was released by driving 4 GPa shocks into the argon-rich carbon. It was demonstrated that shock-induced argon loss is not simply caused by the impact-induced diminution of grain size. The present value of shock pressure required for partial impact devolatilization of Ar from carbon is below the range (5-30 GPa) at which H2O is released from phyllosilicates.

  5. Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

    2012-08-14

    A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-0-3 wt % La.sub.2O.sub.3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO.sub.2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO.sub.4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-3-40% TiO.sub.2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al.sub.2O.sub.3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

  6. Defect studies on as-synthesized and purified carbon nanostructures produced by arc-discharge in solution process.

    PubMed

    Bera, Debasis; Perrault, Jean-Philippe; Heinrich, Helge; Seal, Sudipta

    2006-04-01

    Carbon nanostructures are synthesized using a novel arc-discharge in solution process. A multitude of defects on nanotubes and nanostructures is found. Evidence of these defects in as-synthesized carbon nanostructures is explored using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, heptagonal, toroidal, oval, and spherical nanoshells are found in HRTEM investigation along with carbon nanotubes, carbon nanohorns, carbon rods, nanoporous carbon, dislodged graphene sheets, and amorphous carbon. Purifications are carried out through two oxidation methods to eliminate the amorphous carbon. Several different defects caused by oxidations are also found in purified samples.

  7. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.W.

    1980-06-01

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 313/sup 0/K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

  8. [The effectiveness of ozonated water for hand washing before surgery].

    PubMed

    Isosu, T; Kan, K; Hayashi, T; Fujii, M

    2001-06-01

    Using an ozonated water-dispensing machine for sterilization of hands (Mediaqua MA-III; Core Medical Co., Ltd, Tokyo, Japan), we investigated the effectiveness of ozonated water as a disinfectant for hand washing before surgery. The effectiveness of this new hand-washing method, using 4 ppm of ozonated water, which is expected to have a short-term bactericidal effect, and 0.2% benzalkonium chloride/83% ethanol solution (Welpas), which is expected to have a long-term bactericidal effect, was compared with that of the conventional hand-washing method (Fürbringer's method using a scrubbing agent containing povidone-iodine). The results showed no significant differences in the numbers of live bacteria and exponential reduction rates in live bacteria. Thus, this new method for hand washing using ozonated water is an effective method for sterilization of the hands before surgery.

  9. Binder for Carbon-Fiber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; Ramohalli, K. N.; Yen, S. P. S.; Mueller, W. A.; Harper, J.

    1984-01-01

    Insoluble, even coating formed by soaking in polyacrylic acid. Carbon fiber material prepared by soaking in solution of 20 percent polyacrylic acid in water. Material blotted and dried at 120 degrees C for at least 2 hours. Dried material reacted with boiling aqueous solution of calcium acetate. Treated material removed from boiling solution, blotted, dried at 120 degrees C, washed with distilled water, and dried again.

  10. Studies on adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution on activated carbons prepared from walnut shell.

    PubMed

    Zabihi, M; Haghighi Asl, A; Ahmadpour, A

    2010-02-15

    The adsorption ability of a powdered activated carbons (PAC) derived from walnut shell was investigated in an attempt to produce more economic and effective sorbents for the control of Hg(II) ion from industrial liquid streams. Carbonaceous sorbents derived from local walnut shell, were prepared by chemical activation methods using ZnCl(2) as activating reagents. Adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions was carried out under different experimental conditions by varying treatment time, metal ion concentration, pH and solution temperature. It was shown that Hg(II) uptake decreases with increasing pH of the solution. The proper choice of preparation conditions were resulted in microporous activated carbons with different BET surface areas of 780 (Carbon A, 1:0.5 ZnCl(2)) and 803 (Carbon B, 1:1 ZnCl(2))m(2)/g BET surface area. The monolayer adsorption capacity of these particular adsorbents were obtained as 151.5 and 100.9 mg/g for carbons A and B, respectively. It was determined that Hg(II) adsorption follows both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms as well as pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  11. The Anion Effect on Li(+) Ion Coordination Structure in Ethylene Carbonate Solutions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Ponnuchamy, Veerapandian; Shen, Yuneng; Yang, Xueming; Yuan, Kaijun; Vetere, Valentina; Mossa, Stefano; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Zhang, Yufan; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-09-15

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are an attractive alternative power source for a wide variety of applications. To optimize their performances, a complete description of the solvation properties of the ion in the electrolyte is crucial. A comprehensive understanding at the nanoscale of the solvation structure of lithium ions in nonaqueous carbonate electrolytes is, however, still unclear. We have measured by femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy the orientational correlation time of the CO stretching mode of Li(+)-bound and Li(+)-unbound ethylene carbonate molecules, in LiBF4, LiPF6, and LiClO4 ethylene carbonate solutions with different concentrations. Surprisingly, we have found that the coordination number of ethylene carbonate in the first solvation shell of Li(+) is only two, in all solutions with concentrations higher than 0.5 M. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the presence of anions in the first coordination shell modifies the generally accepted tetrahedral structure of the complex, allowing only two EC molecules to coordinate to Li(+) directly. Our results demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the anion influence on the overall structure of the first solvation shell of the Li(+) ion. The formation of such a cation/solvent/anion complex provides a rational explanation for the ionic conductivity drop of lithium/carbonate electrolyte solutions at high concentrations.

  12. Sorption of metal ions from multicomponent aqueous solutions by activated carbons produced from waste

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonova, L.P.; Goba, V.E.; Kovtun, M.F.; Tarasenko, Y.A.; Khavryuchenko, V.D.; Lyubchik, S.B.; Boiko, A.N.

    2008-08-15

    Activated carbons produced by thermal treatment of a mixture of sunflower husks, low-grade coal, and refinery waste were studied as adsorbents of transition ion metals from aqueous solutions of various compositions. The optimal conditions and the mechanism of sorption, as well as the structure of the sorbents, were studied.

  13. Electrochemical studies of the film formation on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions under open circuit conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geronov, Y.; Schwager, F.; Muller, R. H.

    1981-06-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of and at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements. The results are consistent with the fast formation of a compact thin layer resulting from the reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionic conductor. Slow corrosion or decomposition processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  14. Computer simulation of cascade damage in -iron with carbon in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, Andrew F; Bacon, David J; Barashev, Aleksandr; Osetsky, Nickolai

    2008-01-01

    Computer simulation of cascade damage in -iron with carbon in solution Original Research Article Journal of Nuclear Materials, Volume 382, Issues 2 3, 1 December 2008, Pages 91-95 Andrew F. Calder, David J. Bacon, Alexander V. Barashev, Yuri N. Osetsky

  15. Radiolysis of Bicarbonate and Carbonate Aqueous Solutions: Product Analysis and Simulation of Radiolytic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Zhongli; Li Xifeng; Katsumura, Yosuke; Urabe, Osamu

    2001-11-15

    An understanding of the radiation-induced effects in groundwater is essential to evaluate the safe geological disposal of spent fuel. In groundwater, the bicarbonate ion is the predominant and common anion; this work investigated radiation-induced chemical reactions of (bi)carbonate aqueous solutions with steady-state irradiation and pulse radiolysis methods. Aqueous solutions of sodium (bi)carbonate as high as 50 mmol.dm{sup -3} were used. The formation of formate, oxalate, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were measured under different conditions. A complete set of reaction steps and reliable kinetic data for the radiolysis of (bi)carbonate aqueous solutions at ionic strength close to the groundwater were proposed. Kinetic calculations were completed based on the proposed reaction steps and the kinetic data obtained in the present work. The results from the calculation are in good agreement with the experimental results. With these proposed reaction steps and kinetic data, computer simulation can be performed to predict the yield of radiolytic products of (bi)carbonate aqueous solutions as a function of irradiation time and used to evaluate the safety of geological disposal options of spent fuel.

  16. Adsorption Behavior of Ferromagnetic Carbon Nanotubes for Methyl Orange from Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Zhang, Mingyu; Zhao, Chenxi; Yang, Shan

    2016-03-01

    The ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes which can be easily separated from aqueous solution were prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the adsorption behavior of ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes for removing methyl orange (MO). The results showed that these ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes were richer in surface function groups than the carbon nanotubes did, furthermore, both γ-Fe2O3 and Fe with ferromagnetism were found on the surface of carbon nanotubes. The results also demonstrated that ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes possessed stronger adsorption ability for MO than carbon nanotubes did. The adsorption isotherms followed Langmuir isotherm equation and the adsorption kinetics could be well described with the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process involved an intraparticle diffusion, while it was not the only rate-controlling step. The values of AG were negative and the value of ΔH is -12.37 kJ/mol, proving that the adsorption of MO onto ferromagnetic carbon nanotubes was a spontaneous and exothermic process.

  17. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  18. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  19. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  20. 27 CFR 19.328 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 19.328 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production Chemical By-Products § 19.328 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits therefrom may be run into a wash tank or a...

  1. 27 CFR 19.310 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wash water. 19.310 Section 19.310 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Byproducts § 19.310 Wash water. Water used in washing chemicals to remove spirits may be run into a wash...

  2. Adsorption of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes: Effects of background solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Bekaroglu, S Sule Kaplan; Karanfil, Tanju

    2010-03-01

    With the significant increase in the production and use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), they will be inevitably released into aquatic environments. Therefore, the fate and transport of CNTs in aqueous solutions have attracted extensive attention. In the present work, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM), solution pH and ionic strength on adsorption of three synthetic organic chemicals (SOCs) by both pristine and surface functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were investigated. The three SOCs (phenanthrene, biphenyl, and 2-phenylphenol) with different planarity, polarity, and hydrogen/electron-donor/acceptor ability, representing typical scenarios for the SOC-CNT interactions, were employed as probe molecules. Among the three background solution characteristics examined, NOM showed the most significant effect on SOC adsorption, while solution pH and ionic strength exhibited minimal or negligible impacts. The presence of NOM greatly suppressed the SOC adsorption by CNTs, and the impact on the SWNTs was higher than that on the MWNTs. The planarity and hydrophobicity of SOCs were two important factors determining the effects of NOM, solution pH and ionic strength on their adsorption by CNTs.

  3. Synthesis of finely divided molybdenum sulfide nanoparticles in propylene carbonate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasiev, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum sulfide nanoparticles have been prepared from the reflux solution reaction involving ammonium heptamolybdate and elemental sulfur in propylene carbonate. Addition to the reaction mixture of starch as a natural capping agent leads to lesser agglomeration and smaller size of the particles. Nanoparticles of MoS{sub x} (x≈4) of 10–30 nm size are highly divided and form stable colloidal suspensions in organic solvents. Mo K edge EXAFS of the amorphous materials shows rapid exchange of oxygen to sulfur in the molybdenum coordination sphere during the solution reaction. Thermal treatment of the amorphous sulfides MoS{sub x} under nitrogen or hydrogen flow at 400 °C allows obtaining mesoporous MoS{sub 2} materials with very high pore volume and specific surface area, up to 0.45 cm{sup 3}/g and 190 m{sup 2}/g, respectively. The new materials show good potential for the application as unsupported hydrotreating catalysts. - Graphical abstract: Solution reaction in propylene carbonate allows preparing weakly agglomerated molybdenum sulfide with particle size 20 nm and advantageous catalytic properties. - Highlights: • Solution reaction in propylene carbonate yields MoS{sub x} particles near 20 nm size. • Addition of starch as capping agent reduces particles size and hinder agglomeration. • EXAFS at Mo K edge shows rapid oxygen to sulfur exchange in the solution. • Thermal treatment leads to MoS{sub 2} with very high porosity and surface area.

  4. Enhanced sludge washing evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford Site waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium/cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. The scope of the TWRS Waste Pretreatment Program is to treat tank waste and separate that waste into HLW and LLW fractions and provide additional treatment as required to feed LLW and HLW immobilization facilities. Enhanced sludge washing was chosen as the baseline process for separating Hanford tank waste sludge. Section 1.0 briefly discusses the purpose of the evaluation plan and provides the background that led to the choice of enhanced sludge washing as the baseline process. Section 2.0 provides a brief summary of the evaluation plan details. Section 3.0 discusses, in some detail, the technical work planned to support the evaluation of enhanced sludge washing. Section 4.0 briefly discusses the potential important of policy issues to the evaluation. Section 5.0 discusses the methodology to be used in the evaluation process. Section 6.0 summarizes the milestones that have been defined to complete the enhanced sludge washing evaluation and provides a summary schedule to evaluate the performance of enhanced sludge washing. References are identified in Section 7.0, and additional schedule and milestone information is provided in the appendices.

  5. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in pure and aqueous ionic solutions.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep; Bauer, Brad A

    2012-07-19

    Carbon nanotubes are a promising platform across a broad spectrum of applications ranging from separations technology, drug delivery, to bio(electronic) sensors. Proper dispersion of carbon nanotube materials is important to retaining the electronic properties of nanotubes. Experimentally it has been shown that salts can regulate the dispersing properties of CNTs in aqueous system with surfactants (Niyogi, S.; Densmore, C. G.; Doorn, S. K. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131, 1144-1153); details of the physicochemical mechanisms underlying such effects continue to be explored. We address the effects of inorganic monovalent salts (NaCl and NaI) on dispersion stability of carbon nanotubes.We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations using nonpolarizable interaction models to compute the potential of mean force between two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the presence of NaCl/NaI and compare to the potential of mean force between SWNTs in pure water. Addition of salts enhances stability of the contact state between two SWNT's on the order of 4 kcal/mol. The ion-specific spatial distribution of different halide anions gives rise to starkly different contributions to the free energy stability of nanotubes in the contact state. Iodide anion directly stabilizes the contact state to a much greater extent than chloride anion. The enhanced stability arises from the locally repulsive forces imposed on nanotubes by the surface-segregated iodide anion. Within the time scale of our simulations, both NaI and NaCl solutions stabilize the contact state by equivalent amounts. The marginally higher stability for contact state in salt solutions recapitulates results for small hydrophobic solutes in NaCl solutions (Athawale, M. V.; Sarupria, S.; Garde, S. J. Phys. Chem. B2008, 112, 5661-5670) as well as single-walled carbon nanotubes in NaCl and CaCl2 aqueous solutions.

  6. Adsorption of carbon dioxide by solution-plasma-synthesized heteroatom-doped carbon nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongwichit, Nanthiya; Li, Oi Lun Helena; Yaowarat, Wattanachai; Saito, Nagahiro; Suriyapraphadilok, Uthaiporn

    2016-01-01

    Porous carbon nanospheres (CNSs) synthesized by a plasma-in-liquid technique were applied as an adsorbent for CO2 adsorption. Two different types of aromatic solvents, benzene and pyridine, were used as precursors to generate CNSs. The prepared CNSs were carbonized and then activated with CO2 to obtain carbon materials with a suitable porous structure for CO2 adsorption. To improve CO2 adsorption capacity, activated CNSs were then chemically modified using different approaches of surface treatment, namely, HNO3 oxidation, amination without HNO3 preoxidation, and amination with HNO3 preoxidation. The CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were investigated at 1 atm and 40 °C using a simultaneous thermal analyzer. It was found that the CO2 adsorption of CNSs was enhanced through the development of textural properties. All of the surface treatment approaches led to the increase in CO2 adsorption capacity of the activated CNSs owing to the presence of nitrogen or oxygen functional groups introduced onto the carbon surface during the treatment.

  7. Polysaccharide from Plantago as a green corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in 1M HCl solution.

    PubMed

    Mobin, Mohammad; Rizvi, Marziya

    2017-03-15

    Polysaccharide from Plantago ovata was investigated for its inhibition characteristics for carbon steel corrosion in 1M HCl. The mucilage of the Plantago is comprised of a highly branched polysaccharide, arabinosyl (galaturonic acid) rhamnosylxylan (AX), which is mainly responsible for the corrosion inhibition of the carbon steel. The techniques that were used to assess the inhibition and adsorption properties of the AX in the acid solution are gravimetric method, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-vis spectroscopy and FTIR. Thermodynamic and activation parameters revealed that the spontaneous adsorption of AX on carbon steel was mixed type and predominantly chemical in nature. Quantum chemical analysis supports the proposed mechanism of inhibition. AX from Plantago could serve as a green corrosion inhibitor for the carbon steel in hydrochloric medium with good inhibition efficiency but low risk of environmental pollution.

  8. First Molecular Dynamics simulation insight into the mechanism of organics adsorption from aqueous solutions on microporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Zieliński, Wojciech; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Wesołowski, Radosław P.; Klimek, Kamil K.

    2011-10-01

    The results of 84 MD simulations showing the influence of porosity and carbon surface oxidation on adsorption of three organic compounds from aqueous solutions on carbons are reported. Based on a model of 'soft' activated carbon, three carbon structures with gradually changed microporosity were created. Next, different number of surface oxygen groups was introduced. We observe quantitative agreement between simulation and experiment i.e. the decrease in adsorption from benzene down to paracetamol. Simulation results clearly demonstrate that the balance between porosity and carbon surface chemical composition in organics adsorption on carbons, and the pore blocking determine adsorption properties of carbons.

  9. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-07-01

    A system for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizes a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide.

  10. Fabrication of carbonate apatite blocks from set gypsum based on dissolution-precipitation reaction in phosphate-carbonate mixed solution.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shunsuke; Tsuru, Kanji; Maruta, Michito; Matsuya, Shigeki; Takahashi, Ichiro; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap), fabricated by dissolution-precipitation reaction based on an appropriate precursor, is expected to be replaced by bone according to bone remodeling cycle. One of the precursor candidates is gypsum because it shows self-setting ability, which then enables it to be shaped and molded. The aim of this study, therefore, was to fabricate CO3Ap blocks from set gypsum. Set gypsum was immersed in a mixed solution of 0.4 mol/L disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na2HPO4) and 0.4 mol/L sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaHCO3) at 80-200°C for 6-48 h. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns and Fourier transform infrared spectra showed that CO3Ap block was fabricated by dissolution-precipitation reaction in Na2HPO4-NaHCO3 solution using set gypsum in 48 h when the temperature was 100°C or higher. Conversion rate to CO3Ap increased with treatment temperature. CO3Ap block containing a larger amount of carbonate was obtained when treated at lower temperature.

  11. Performance evaluation of trimethylamine-carbon dioxide thermolytic draw solution for engineered osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boo, C; Khalil, YF; Elimelech, M

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of trimethylamine-carbon dioxide (TMA-CO2) as a potential thermolytic draw solution for engineered osmosis. Water flux and reverse solute flux with TMA-CO2 draw solution were measured in forward osmosis (FO) and pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) modes using thin-film composite (TFC) and cellulose triacetate (CTA) FO membranes. Water flux with the TMA-CO2 draw solution was comparable to that obtained with the more common ammonia-carbon dioxide (NH3-CO2) thermolytic draw solution at similar (1 M) concentration. Using a TFC-FO membrane, the water fluxes produced by 1 M TMA-CO2 and NH3-CO2 draw solutions with a DI water feed were, respectively, 33.4 and 35.6 L m(-2) h(-1) in PRO mode and 14.5 and 152 L m(-2) h(-1) in FO mode. Reverse draw permeation of TMA-CO2 was relatively low compared to NH3-CO2, ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 mol m(-2) h(-1) in all experiments, due to the larger molecular size of TMA. Thermal separation and recovery efficiency for TMA-CO2 was compared to NH3-CO2 by modeling low-temperature vacuum distillation utilizing low-grade heat sources. We also discuss possible challenges in the use TMA-CO2, including potential adverse impact on human health and environments. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Controls of carbonate mineralogy and solid-solution of Mg in calcite: evidence from spelean systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, L.A.; Lohmann, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    Precipitation of carbonate minerals in spelean systems occurs under a wide range of fluid chemistry, Mg-Ca ratios, alkalinities, pH and temperatures; thus, spelean systems provide ideal settings to determine factors controlling the mineralogy of precipitated carbonates and solid-solution of Mg in calcite. Cave waters and actively-precipitating carbonate speleothems were collected from Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico and the Mammoth-Flint Cave System, Kentucky. Carbonate mineralogy of precipitated phases was determined by x-ray diffraction, and major and minor element composition of waters and accompanying minerals were determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Results demonstrate that at a constant CO3 concentration the precipitation threshold for calcite to aragonite is controlled dominantly by the Mg/Ca ratio of the ambient fluid. Aragonite precipitation is favored by high Mg/Ca ratios. Conversely, with increasing CO3 concentration at constant fluid Mg/Ca ratios, calcite is preferentially precipitated. Solid-solution of Mg in calcite is positively correlated with both increased Mg/Ca ratios and CO3 concentrations. These data suggest that Mg contents of calcite can not be defined solely in terms of a homogeneous distribution coefficient. Rather, Mg concentrations can be also be affected by the CO3 concentration and degree of calcite saturation, suggesting that the rate of crystal growth also plays and important role in Mg solid-solution in calcites.

  13. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions and Diethylenetriamine Species from Solutions by Magnetic Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaiwen

    Even though activated carbon is widely used in the removal of contaminants from effluents, it is difficult to be completely recovered by screening or classification. In this project, we prepared a magnetic form of activated carbon (M-AC) by co-precipitation of iron oxides onto activated carbon surface. M-AC can be separated from solutions by applying an external magnetic field and regenerated for reuse. The synthesized M-AC was characterized by X-ray diffraction, specific surface area measurement, and scanning electron microscope. Characterization results show that the major phase of coated iron oxides is magnetite (Fe 3O4). Batch adsorption experiments were carried out for single-component and multi-component solutions. M-AC shows a better adsorption capacity for singlecomponent of Cu (II), Ni (II), or diethylenetriamine (DETA) and for multiple-components of Cu-DETA and Ni-DETA complexes in deionized water than activated carbon. M-AC also shows the potential application in carbon-in-pulp process for gold recovery.

  14. Sorption of As(V) from aqueous solution using acid modified carbon black.

    PubMed

    Borah, Dipu; Satokawa, Shigeo; Kato, Shigeru; Kojima, Toshinori

    2009-03-15

    The sorption performance of a modified carbon black was explored with respect to arsenic removal following batch equilibrium technique. Modification was accomplished by refluxing the commercial carbon black with an acid mixture comprising HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4). Modification resulted in the substantial changes to the inherent properties like surface chemistry and morphology of the commercial carbon black to explore its potential as sorbent. The suspension pH as well as the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the material was found to be highly acidic. The material showed excellent sorption performance for the removal of arsenic from a synthetic aqueous solution. It removed approximately 93% arsenic from a 50mg/L solution at equilibration time. The modified carbon black is capable of removing arsenic in a relatively broad pH range of 3-6, invariably in the acidic region. Both pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetics were applied to search for the best fitted kinetic model to the sorption results. The sorption process is best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic. It has also been found that intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step for the initial phases of the reaction. Modelling of the equilibrium data with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms revealed that the correlation coefficient is more satisfactory with the Langmuir model although Freundlich model predicted a good sorption process. The sorption performance has been found to be strongly dependent on the solution pH with a maximum display at pH of 5.0. The temperature has a positive effect on sorption increasing the extent of removal with temperature up to the optimum temperature. The sorption process has been found to be spontaneous and endothermic in nature, and proceeds with the increase in randomness at the solid-solution interface. The spent sorbent was desorbed with various acidic and basic extracting solutions with KOH demonstrating the best result ( approximately 85% desorption).

  15. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  16. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-10-01

    "Clumped-isotope" thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope "clumps"). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals. We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect. Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3- and CO32-. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many natural systems. The two

  17. RADIATION CHEMISTRY OF HIGH ENERGY CARBON, NEON AND ARGON IONS: INTEGRAL YIELDS FROM FERROUS SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, E.A.; Appleby, A.; Jayko, M.

    1980-07-01

    Chemical yields of Fe{sup 3+} have been measured from FeSO{sub 4} solutions irradiated in the presence and absence of oxygen with carbon, neon, and argon ions from the Berkeley Bevalac facility. G(Fe{sup 3+}) decreases with increasing beam penetration and with increasing atomic number of the incident ion. The results are compared with current theoretical expectations of the behavior of these particles in an aqueous absorber. The chemical yields are consistently higher than theoretically predicted, by amounts varying from <6.2% (carbon ions) to <13.2% (argon ions). The additional yields are possibly attributable to fragmentation of the primary particle beams.

  18. Solution and precipitation hardening in carbon-doped two-phase {gamma}-titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, F.; Christoph, U.; Wagner, R.

    1997-12-31

    A two-phase titanium aluminide alloy was systematically doped with carbon to improve its high temperature strength. Solid solutions and precipitates of carbon were formed by different thermal treatments. A fine dispersion of perovskite precipitates was found to be very effective for improving the high temperature strength and creep resistance of the material. The strengthening mechanisms were characterized by flow stresses and activation parameters. The investigations were accompanied by electron microscope observation of the defect structure which was generated during deformation. Special attention was paid on the interaction mechanisms of perfect and twinning dislocations with the carbide precipitates.

  19. Raman studies of solutions of single-wall carbon nanotube salts.

    PubMed

    Anglaret, E; Dragin, F; Pénicaud, A; Martel, R

    2006-03-09

    Polyelectrolyte solutions of Na-doped single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) salts are studied by Raman spectroscopy. Their Raman signature is first compared to undoped SWNT suspensions and dry alkali-doped SWNT powders, and the results indicate that the nanotube solutions consist of heavily doped (charged) SWNT. Raman signature of doping is then used to monitor in situ the oxidation reaction of the nanotube salt solutions upon exposure to air and to an acceptor molecule (benzoquinone). The results indicate a direct charge-transfer reaction from the acceptor molecule to the SWNT, leading to their gradual charge neutralization and eventual precipitation in solution. The results are consistent with a simple redox titration process occurring at the thermodynamical equilibrium.

  20. A Window-Washing Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Skyscrapers sure do have a lot of windows, and these windows are cleaned and checked regularly. All this takes time, money, and puts workers at potential risk. Might there be a better way to do it? In this article, the author discusses a window-washing challenge and describes how students can tackle this task, pick up the challenge, and creatively…

  1. Abdominopelvic washings: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Erika F.; Monaco, Sara E.; Khalbuss, Walid; Austin, R. Marshall; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2013-01-01

    Intraperitoneal spread may occur with gynecological epithelial neoplasms, as well as with non-gynecological malignancies, which may result in serosal involvement with or without concomitant effusion. Therefore, washings in patients with abdominopelvic tumors represent important specimens for cytologic examination. They are primarily utilized for staging ovarian cancers, although their role has decreased in staging of endometrial and cervical carcinoma. Abdominopelvic washings can be positive in a variety of pathologic conditions, including benign conditions, borderline neoplastic tumors, locally invasive tumors, or distant metastases. In a subset of cases, washings can be diagnostically challenging due to the presence of co-existing benign cells (e.g., mesothelial hyperplasia, endosalpingiosis, or endometriosis), lesions in which there is only minimal atypia (e.g., serous borderline tumors) or scant atypical cells, and the rarity of specific tumor types (e.g., mesothelioma). Ancillary studies including immunocytochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization may be required in difficult cases to resolve the diagnosis. This article provides a comprehensive and contemporary review of abdominopelvic washings in the evaluation of gynecologic and non-gynecologic tumors, including primary peritoneal and mesothelial entities. PMID:23858317

  2. Electro-adsorption of tetracycline from aqueous solution by carbonized pomelo peel and composite with aniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Yang, Shaogui; Chen, Jian; Gao, Jia; He, Huan; Sun, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Tetracycline is an important broad-spectrum antibiotic. Its overuse can easily cause water and soil pollution. In this study, a carbon electrode was successfully prepared by simple carbonization of a natural material pomelo peel to remove tetracycline from aqueous solution through electro-adsorption. Then the carbon electrode was modified by aniline to improve its mechanical strength. These materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, FT-IR and Zeta Potential, and all these characterizations demonstrated aniline coated on the carbon electrode perfectly. CV tests of electrodes demonstrated that carbon electrode was more inclined to the double layer capacitance, and composite electrode exhibited more properties of the pseudo capacitance. Adsorption experiments showed that adsorption efficiency of the carbon electrode was 95.11% after 3000 s and that of the composite electrode was 92.32% after 5000 s; polyaniline greatly improved the mechanical stability of the composite electrode. The composite electrode with high adsorbability and strong mechanical stability, has potential to treat tetracycline-containing wastewaters.

  3. Carbon Nanotube-Quantum Dot Nanohybrids: Coupling with Single-Particle Control in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Attanzio, Antonio; Sapelkin, Andrei; Gesuele, Felice; van der Zande, Arend; Gillin, William P; Zheng, Ming; Palma, Matteo

    2017-02-10

    A strategy is reported for the controlled assembly of organic-inorganic heterostructures consisting of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) selectively coupled to single semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The assembly in aqueous solution was controlled towards the formation of monofunctionalized SWCNT-QD structures. Photoluminescence studies in solution, and on surfaces at the single nanohybrid level, showed evidence of electronic coupling between the two nanostructures. The ability to covalently couple heterostructures with single particle control is crucial for the design of novel QD-based optoelectronic and light-energy conversion devices.

  4. Separation of surfactant functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes via free solution electrophoresis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, Blazej; Rümmeli, Mark; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Kalenczuk, Ryszard

    2011-04-01

    This work presents the application of the free solution electrophoresis method (FSE) in the metallic / semiconductive (M/S) separation process of the surfactant functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The SWCNTs synthesized via laser ablation were purified through high vacuum annealing and subsequent refluxing processes in aqua regia solution. The purified and annealed material was divided into six batches. First three batches were dispersed in anionic surfactants: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium cholate (SC) and sodium deoxycholate (DOC). The next three batches were dispersed in cationic surfactants: cetrimonium bromide (CTAB), benzalkonium chloride (BKC) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). All the prepared SWCNTs samples were subjected to FSE separation process. The fractionated samples were recovered from control and electrode areas and annealed in order to remove the adsorbed surfactants on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) surface. The changes of the van Hove singularities (vHS) present in SWCNTs spectra were investigated via UV-Vis-NIR optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS).

  5. Nanofiltration of Electrolyte Solutions by Sub-2nm Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Kim, S; In, J B; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-13

    Both MD simulations and experimental studies have shown that liquid and gas flow through carbon nanotubes with nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast. For applications in separation technology, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In this work, we use pressure-driven filtration experiments to study ion exclusion in silicon nitride/sub-2-nm CNT composite membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion at low salt concentration. Our results support a rejection mechanism dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  6. Removal of Lead (II) Ions from Aqueous Solutions onto Activated Carbon Derived from Waste Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Murat; Ucar, Suat; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay

    2013-01-01

    The removal of lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions was carried out using an activated carbon prepared from a waste biomass. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, initial concentration of lead (II) ions, and temperature on the adsorption process were investigated. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis after adsorption reveals the accumulation of lead (II) ions onto activated carbon. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to analyze equilibrium data. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of activated carbon was found to be 476.2 mg g−1. The kinetic data were evaluated and the pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation. Thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous. PMID:23853528

  7. Boron removal from aqueous solutions by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Celik, Z Ceylan; Can, B Z; Kocakerim, M Muhtar

    2008-03-21

    In this study, the removal of boric acid from aqueous solution by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid was studied in batch system. pH, adsorbent amount, initial boron concentration, temperature, shaking rate and salicylic acid film thickness were chosen as parameters. Boron removal efficiencies increased with increasing adsorbent amount, temperature and pH, decreasing initial boron concentration. As thickness of salicylic acid film on activated carbon becomes thin up to 0.088nm, the efficiency increased, and then, the efficiency decreased with becoming thinner than 0.088nm of salicylic acid film. Shaking rate was no effect on removal efficiency. In result, it was determined that the use of salicylic acid as an impregnant for activated carbon led to the increase of the amount of boron adsorbed. A lactone ring, being the most appropriate conformation, forms between boric acid and -COOH and -OH groups of salicylic acid.

  8. Mechanism of Pitting Corrosion Prevention by Nitrite in Carbon Steel Exposed to Dilute Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Philip E. Zapp; John W. Van Zee

    2002-02-01

    The research has developed a broad fundamental understanding of the inhibition action of nitrite ions in preventing nitrate pitting corrosion of carbon steel tanks containing high-level radioactive waste. This fundamental understanding can be applied to specific situations during waste removal for permanent disposition and waste tank closure to ensure that the tanks are maintained safely. The results of the research provide the insight necessary to develop solutions that prevent further degradation.

  9. Changing fluxes of carbon and other solutes from the Mekong River

    PubMed Central

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Rivers are an important aquatic conduit that connects terrestrial sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other elements with oceanic reservoirs. The Mekong River, one of the world’s largest rivers, is firstly examined to explore inter-annual fluxes of dissolved and particulate constituents during 1923–2011 and their associated natural or anthropogenic controls. Over this period, inter-annual fluxes of dissolved and particulate constituents decrease, while anthropogenic activities have doubled the relative abundance of SO42−, Cl− and Na+. The estimated fluxes of solutes from the Mekong decrease as follows (Mt/y): TDS (40.4) > HCO3− (23.4) > Ca2+ (6.4) > SO42− (3.8) > Cl− (1.74)~Na+ (1.7) ~ Si (1.67) > Mg2+ (1.2) > K+ (0.5). The runoff, land cover and lithological composition significantly contribute to dissolved and particulate yields globally. HCO3− and TDS yields are readily predicted by runoff and percent of carbonate, while TSS yield by runoff and population density. The Himalayan Rivers, including the Mekong, are a disproportionally high contributor to global riverine carbon and other solute budgets, and are of course underlined. The estimated global riverine HCO3− flux (Himalayan Rivers included) is 34014 × 109 mol/y (0.41 Pg C/y), 3915 Mt/y for solute load, including HCO3−, and 13553 Mt/y for TSS. Thereby this study illustrates the importance of riverine solute delivery in global carbon cycling. PMID:26522820

  10. Changing fluxes of carbon and other solutes from the Mekong River.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T

    2015-11-02

    Rivers are an important aquatic conduit that connects terrestrial sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other elements with oceanic reservoirs. The Mekong River, one of the world's largest rivers, is firstly examined to explore inter-annual fluxes of dissolved and particulate constituents during 1923-2011 and their associated natural or anthropogenic controls. Over this period, inter-annual fluxes of dissolved and particulate constituents decrease, while anthropogenic activities have doubled the relative abundance of SO4(2-), Cl(-) and Na(+). The estimated fluxes of solutes from the Mekong decrease as follows (Mt/y): TDS (40.4) > HCO3(-) (23.4) > Ca(2+) (6.4) > SO4(2-) (3.8) > Cl(-) (1.74)~Na(+) (1.7) ~ Si (1.67) > Mg(2+) (1.2) > K(+ 0.5). The runoff, land cover and lithological composition significantly contribute to dissolved and particulate yields globally. HCO3(-) and TDS yields are readily predicted by runoff and percent of carbonate, while TSS yield by runoff and population density. The Himalayan Rivers, including the Mekong, are a disproportionally high contributor to global riverine carbon and other solute budgets, and are of course underlined. The estimated global riverine HCO3(-) flux (Himalayan Rivers included) is 34,014 × 10(9) mol/y (0.41 Pg C/y), 3915 Mt/y for solute load, including HCO3(-), and 13,553 Mt/y for TSS. Thereby this study illustrates the importance of riverine solute delivery in global carbon cycling.

  11. FILM FORMATION ON LITHIUM IN PROPYLENE CARBONATE SOLUTIONS UNDER OPEN CIRCUIT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Geronov, Y.; Schwager, F.; Muller, R.H.

    1980-06-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of LiClO{sub 4} and LiAsF{sub 6} at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements. The results are consistent with the fastformation of a compact thin layer resulting from the reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionicconductor. Slow corrosion or decomposition processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  12. Competitive adsorption of ibuprofen and amoxicillin mixtures from aqueous solution on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Hayet; Carmona, Rocio J; Gomis-Berenguer, Alicia; Souissi-Najar, Souad; Ouederni, Abdelmottaleb; Ania, Conchi O

    2015-07-01

    This work investigates the competitive adsorption under dynamic and equilibrium conditions of ibuprofen (IBU) and amoxicillin (AMX), two widely consumed pharmaceuticals, on nanoporous carbons of different characteristics. Batch adsorption experiments of pure components in water and their binary mixtures were carried out to measure both adsorption equilibrium and kinetics, and dynamic tests were performed to validate the simultaneous removal of the mixtures in breakthrough experiments. The equilibrium adsorption capacities evaluated from pure component solutions were higher than those measured in dynamic conditions, and were found to depend on the porous features of the adsorbent and the nature of the specific/dispersive interactions that are controlled by the solution pH, density of surface change on the carbon and ionization of the pollutant. A marked roll-up effect was observed for AMX retention on the hydrophobic carbons, not seen for the functionalized adsorbent likely due to the lower affinity of amoxicillin towards the carbon adsorbent. Dynamic adsorption of binary mixtures from wastewater of high salinity and alkalinity showed a slight increase in IBU uptake and a reduced adsorption of AMX, demonstrating the feasibility of the simultaneous removal of both compounds from complex water matrices.

  13. Removal of hexavalent chromium from acidic aqueous solutions using rice straw-derived carbon.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nai-Hua; Wang, Shan-Li; Liao, Yi-Huei; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Tzou, Yu-Min; Huang, Yuh-Ming

    2009-11-15

    This study evaluates the removal of Cr(VI) from water by carbon derived from the burning of rice straw. Rice straw was burned in the air to obtain rice carbon (RC), and then the removal of Cr(VI) by RC was investigated under various pHs and ionic strengths. After the experiments, the oxidation state of Cr bound to RC was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which revealed that Cr bound to RC was predominately in the trivalent form. The results showed that upon reacting with RC, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), which was either adsorbed on RC or released back into solution. The extent and rate of Cr(VI) removal increased with decreasing solution pH because the Cr(VI) adsorption and the subsequent reduction of adsorbed Cr(VI) to Cr(III) both occur preferentially at low pH. The minimal effect of ionic strength on the rates of Cr(VI) removal and Cr(III) adsorption indicated specific interactions between Cr(VI)/Cr(III) and their surface binding sites on RC. These results suggest that rice straw-based carbon may be effectively used at low pH as a substitute for activated carbon for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated water.

  14. Metastable equilibrium solubility behavior of carbonated apatite in the presence of solution strontium.

    PubMed

    Heslop, D D; Bi, Y; Baig, A A; Higuchi, W I

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the concept of metastable equilibrium solubility (MES) to describe the anomalous solubility behavior of carbonated apatite (CAP) in the presence of solution strontium. A CAP sample (4.8 wt% CO(3), synthesized at 70 degrees C) was prepared by precipitation. Baseline MES distributions were determined in a series of 0.1 M acetate buffers containing only calcium and phosphate (no strontium) over a broad range of solution conditions. In order to assess the influence of strontium, MES profiles were then determined in a similar fashion with 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80% of the solution calcium being replaced on an equal molar basis by solution strontium. From the compositions of the equilibrating buffer solutions, ion activity products (IAPs) of the form Ca(10-n)Sr(n)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2) (n = 0-10) were calculated in an attempt to determine the correct function governing the dissolution of the CAP preparation. The results demonstrate the following important findings: (a) at high solution strontium/calcium ratios (i.e., when 60% or more of the solution calcium was replaced by strontium), the MES profiles in all the experiments were found to be essentially superimposable when the solution IAPs were calculated using the stoichiometry of Ca(6)Sr(4)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2), and (b), at low solution strontium/calcium ratios (i.e., when 40% or less of the solution calcium was replaced by strontium), the stoichiometry yielding MES data superpositioning was found to be that of hydroxyapatite. When other stoichiometries were assumed, good superpositioning of the data was not possible.

  15. Preparation and characterization of carbonated barium-calcium hydroxyapatite solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Akemi; Ueda, Eiichi; Kandori, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Tatsuo

    2005-08-15

    Particles of carbonated barium-calcium hydroxyapatite solid solutions (BaCaHap) with different Ba/(Ba+Ca) (X(Ba)) atomic ratios were prepared by a wet method at 100 degrees C and characterized by various means. The crystal phases and structures of the products strongly depended on the composition of the starting solution, that is, the Ba/(Ba+Ca) atomic ratio ([X(Ba)]) and H3PO4 concentration ([H3PO4]) in the solution. BaCaHap with X(Ba)0.43 could be prepared at [X(Ba)]0.7 by changing [H3PO4], but could never be obtained at [X(Ba)]=0.8-0.95 regardless of [H3PO4]. The carbonated calcium hydroxyapatite particles prepared at [X(Ba)]=0 were fine and short rod-shaped particles (ca. 14x84 nm). With increasing [X(Ba)] from 0 to 0.8, the particles obtained became large spherical agglomerates. The carbonated barium hydroxyapatite particles formed at [X(Ba)]=1 were long rod-shaped agglomerates (ca. 0.2x2 microm) of fine primary particles. The amount of CO2 adsorbed irreversibly on a series of BaCaHaps showed a minimum at (Ba+Ca)/(P+C) atomic ratio of around 1.56, which agreed well with the minimum cation/P ratio obtained for the other hydroxyapatites, as already reported.

  16. Adsorption of bisphenol-A from aqueous solution onto minerals and carbon adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Tien; Lai, Chi-Wei; Su, Ting-Yi

    2006-06-30

    The adsorption behaviors of bisphenol-A, which has been listed as one of endocrine disrupting chemicals, from aqueous solution onto four minerals including andesite, diatomaceous earth, titanium dioxide, and activated bleaching earth, and two activated carbons with coconut-based and coal-based virgins were examined in this work. Based on the adsorption results at the specified conditions, the adsorption capacities of activated carbons are significantly larger than those of mineral adsorbents, implying that the former is effective for removal of the highly hydrophobic adsorbate from the aqueous solution because of its high surface area and low surface polarity. The adsorption capacities of bisphenol-A onto these mineral adsorbents with different pore properties are almost similar in magnitude mainly due to the weakly electrostatic interaction between the mineral surface with negative charge and the target adsorbate with hydrophobic nature. Further, a simplified kinetic model, pseudo-second-order, was tested to investigate the adsorption behaviors of bisphenol-A onto the two common activated carbons at different solution conditions. It was found that the adsorption process could be well described with the pseudo-second-order model. The kinetic parameters of the model obtained in the present work are in line with the pore properties of the two adsorbents.

  17. Application of a novel magnetic carbon nanotube adsorbent for removal of mercury from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Homayoon, Farshid; Faghihian, Hossein; Torki, Firoozeh

    2017-04-01

    In this research, multiwall carbon nanotube was magnetized and subsequently functionalized by thiosemicarbazide. After characterization by FTIR, BET, SEM, EDAX, and VSM techniques, the magnetized adsorbent (multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/Fe3O4) was used for removal of Hg(2+) from aqueous solutions and the experimental conditions were optimized. The adsorption capacity of 172.83 mg g(-1) was obtained at 25 °C and pH = 3 which was superior to the value obtained for initial multiwall carbon nanotube, magnetized sample, and many previously reported values. In the presence of Pb(+2) and Cd(+2), the adsorbent was selective towards mercury when their concentration was respectively below 50 and 100 mg L(-1). The adsorption process was kinetically fast and the equilibration was attained within 60 min with 69.5% of the capacity obtained within 10 min. The used adsorbent was regenerated by HNO3 solution, and the regenerated adsorbent retained 92% of its initial capacity. The magnetic sensitivity of the adsorbent allowed the simple separation of the used adsorbent from the solution by implying an appropriate external magnetic field. The adsorption data was well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model, indicating homogeneous and monolayer adsorption of mercury by the adsorbent.

  18. Removal of copper and cadmium from aqueous solution using switchgrass biochar produced via hydrothermal carbonization process.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Garcia Moscoso, Jose Luis; Kumar, Sandeep; Cao, Xiaoyan; Mao, Jingdong; Schafran, Gary

    2012-10-30

    Biochar produced from switchgrass via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) was used as a sorbent for the removal of copper and cadmium from aqueous solution. The cold activation process using KOH at room temperature was developed to enhance the porous structure and sorption properties of the HTC biochar. The sorption efficiency of HTC biochar and alkali activated HTC biochar (HTCB) for removing copper and cadmium from aqueous solution were compared with commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC). The present batch adsorption study describes the effects of solution pH, biochar dose, and contact time on copper and cadmium removal efficiency from single metal ion aqueous solutions. The activated HTCB exhibited a higher adsorption potential for copper and cadmium than HTC biochar and PAC. Experiments conducted with an initial metal concentration of 40 mg/L at pH 5.0 and contact time of 24 h resulted in close to 100% copper and cadmium removal by activated HTCB at 2 g/L, far greater than what was observed for HTC biochar (16% and 5.6%) and PAC (4% and 7.7%). The adsorption capacities of activated HTCB for cadmium removal were 34 mg/g (0.313 mmol/g) and copper removal was 31 mg/g (0.503 mmol/g).

  19. Functionalized carbon nanotubes based filters for chromium removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Elsehly, Emad M; Chechenin, N G; Makunin, A V; Motaweh, H A; Leksina, E G

    2017-04-01

    This investigation examines the filtration efficiency of chromium from aqueous solution using two types of commercial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) (Taunit-M (TM) and Taunit-MD (TMD)). These MWCNTs were modified using two complementary treatments, purification (using a mixture of hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide) and functionalization (using nitric acid). The effect of these treatments on the morphology of MWCNT Taunit filters was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to estimate the outer diameter distribution and element content deposited on filters. Effects of different parameters, i.e., carbon nanotube filter mass, concentration of chromium in aqueous solution, and pH of aqueous solution, on removal of this heavy metal were determined. From these investigations, the removal efficiency of chromium could reach 97% for modified TM and 70% for modified TMD at concentration of 10 ppm, suggesting that modified TM is an excellent adsorbent for chromium removal from aqueous solutions and more efficient than modified TMD. A significant increase in chromium removal by modified TM at pH = 2 has been observed compared with higher pH values. It was found that modified TM filters can be reused through many cycles of regeneration with high performance. Modified TM filters may be a promising candidate for heavy metal ion removal from industrial wastewater.

  20. The adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds from aqueous solutions onto activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Rakić, Vesna; Rac, Vladislav; Krmar, Marija; Otman, Otman; Auroux, Aline

    2015-01-23

    In this study, the adsorption of pharmaceutically active compounds - salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, atenolol and diclofenac-Na onto activated carbons has been studied. Three different commercial activated carbons, possessing ∼650, 900 or 1500m(2)g(-1) surface areas were used as solid adsorbents. These materials were fully characterized - their textural, surface features and points of zero charge have been determined. The adsorption was studied from aqueous solutions at 303K using batch adsorption experiments and titration microcalorimetry, which was employed in order to obtain the heats evolved as a result of adsorption. The maximal adsorption capacities of investigated solids for all target pharmaceuticals are in the range of 10(-4)molg(-1). The obtained maximal retention capacities are correlated with the textural properties of applied activated carbon. The roles of acid/base features of activated carbons and of molecular structures of adsorbate molecules have been discussed. The obtained results enabled to estimate the possibility to use the activated carbons in the removal of pharmaceuticals by adsorption.

  1. Solid / solution interaction: The effect of carbonate alkalinity on adsorbed thorium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFlamme, Brian D.; Murray, James W.

    1987-02-01

    Elevated activities of dissolved Th have been found in Soap Lake, an alkaline lake in Eastern Washington. Dissolved 232Th ranges from less than 0.001 to 4.9 dpm/L compared to about 1.3 × 10 -5 dpm/ L in sea water. The enhanced activity in the lake coincides with an increase in carbonate alkalinity. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of pH, ionic strength and carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption on goethite. Thorium (10 -13 M total) in the presence of 5.22 mg/L α-FeOOH and 0.1 M NaNO 3 has an adsorption edge from pH 2-5. At pH 9.0 ± 0.6 the percent Th absorbed on the solid began to decrease from 100% at 100 meq/L carbonate alkalinity and exhibited no adsorption above 300 meq/L. The experimental data were modeled to obtain the intrinsic adsorption equilibrium constants for Th hydrolysis species. These adsorption constants were incorporated in the model to interpret the observed effect of carbonate alkalinity on Th adsorption. There are two main effects of the alkalinity. To a significant degree the decrease in Th adsorption is due to competition of HCO -3 and CO 2-3 ions for surface sites. Dissolved Th carbonate complexes also contribute to the increase of Th in solution.

  2. Solution-phase synthesis of heteroatom-substituted carbon scaffolds for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhong; Sun, Zhengzong; Simpson, Lin J; O'Neill, Kevin J; Parilla, Philip A; Li, Yan; Stadie, Nicholas P; Ahn, Channing C; Kittrell, Carter; Tour, James M

    2010-11-03

    This paper reports a bottom-up solution-phase process for the preparation of pristine and heteroatom (boron, phosphorus, or nitrogen)-substituted carbon scaffolds that show good surface areas and enhanced hydrogen adsorption capacities and binding energies. The synthesis method involves heating chlorine-containing small organic molecules with metallic sodium at reflux in high-boiling solvents. For heteroatom incorporation, heteroatomic electrophiles are added to the reaction mixture. Under the reaction conditions, micrometer-sized graphitic sheets assembled by 3-5 nm-sized domains of graphene nanoflakes are formed, and when they are heteroatom-substituted, the heteroatoms are uniformly distributed. The substituted carbon scaffolds enriched with heteroatoms (boron ∼7.3%, phosphorus ∼8.1%, and nitrogen ∼28.1%) had surface areas as high as 900 m(2) g(-1) and enhanced reversible hydrogen physisorption capacities relative to pristine carbon scaffolds or common carbonaceous materials. In addition, the binding energies of the substituted carbon scaffolds, as measured by adsorption isotherms, were 8.6, 8.3, and 5.6 kJ mol(-1) for the boron-, phosphorus-, and nitrogen-enriched carbon scaffolds, respectively.

  3. Effect of sodium carbonate solution on self-setting properties of tricalcium silicate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Zhiguang Huan; Jiang Chang

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the effects of sodium carbonate (Na(2)CO(3) ) solution with different concentrations (10, 15, 20, and 25 wt%) as liquid phase on the setting time and compressive strength of tricalcium silicate bone cements are investigated. The in vitro bioactivity and degradability of the resultant Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution paste was also studied. The results indicate that as the concentration of Na(2)CO(3) solution varies from 0 to 25 wt%, the initial and final setting time of the cement decrease significantly from 90 to 20 min and from 180 to 45 min, respectively. After setting for 24 h, the compressive strength of Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution paste reaches 5.1 MPa, which is significantly higher than that of Ca( 3)SiO(5)-water cement system. The in vitro bioactivity of the cements is investigated by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days. The results show that the Ca(3)SiO(5)-Na(2)CO( 3) solution bone cement has a good bioactivity and can degrade in Ringer's solution. The results indicate that Na(2)CO(3) solution as a liquid phase significantly improves the self-setting properties of Ca( 3)SiO(5) cement as compared to water. The Ca(3)SiO( 5) cement paste prepared using Na(2)CO(3) solution shows good bioactivity and moderate degradability, and the Ca(3)SiO( 5)-Na(2)CO(3) solution system may be used as degradable and bioactive bone defect filling materials.

  4. Unusually high dispersion of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes in DNA solution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Kataoka, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Tojo, Tomohiro; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Vega-Díaz, Sofía M; Tristán-López, F; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-12-08

    The dispersibility in a DNA solution of bundled multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), having different chemical functional groups on the CNT sidewall, was investigated by optical spectroscopy. We observed that the dispersibility of nitrogen (N)-doped MWCNTs was significantly higher than that of pure MWCNTs and MWCNTs synthesized in the presence of ethanol. This result is supported by the larger amount of adsorbed DNA on N-doped MWCNTs, as well as by the higher binding energy established between nucleobases and the N-doped CNTs. Pure MWCNTs are dispersed in DNA solution via van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions; in contrast, the nitrogenated sites within N-doped MWCNTs provided additional sites for interactions that are important to disperse nanotubes in DNA solutions.

  5. External-Noise-Induced Small-Signal Detection with Solution-Gated Carbon Nanotube Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamata, Yasufumi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-04-01

    A solution-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) based on stochastic resonance (SR) was investigated in order to enhance small-signal detection under ambient noise conditions. When noise of optimal intensity was introduced at the reference electrode in a nonlinear CNTFET, the electric double layer in the solution was modulated, resulting in SR behavior. Moreover, when the CNTFET was used as a pH sensor, high sensitivity was achieved, which enabled the detection of small differences in pH. The best results were obtained in a noisy environment; therefore, a solution-gated SR-based CNTFET operated in the subthreshold regime is a promising high-sensitivity sensor.

  6. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions on sulfurized activated carbon prepared from nut shells.

    PubMed

    Fouladi Tajar, Amir; Kaghazchi, Tahereh; Soleimani, Mansooreh

    2009-06-15

    Low-cost activated carbon, derived from nut shells, and its modified sample have been used as replacements for the current expensive methods of removing cadmium from aqueous solutions and waste waters. Adsorption of cadmium onto four kinds of activated carbons has been studied; prepared activated carbon (PAC), commercial activated carbon (CAC), and the sulfurized ones (SPAC & SCAC). The activated carbon has been derived, characterized, treated with sulfur and then utilized for the removal of Cd(2+). Sulfurizing agent (SO(2) gas) was successfully used in adsorbents' modification process at the ambient temperature. Samples were then characterized and tested as adsorbents of cadmium. Effect of some parameters such as contact time, initial concentration and pH were examined. With increasing pH, the adsorption of cadmium ions was increased and maximum removal, 92.4% for SPAC, was observed in pH>8.0 (C(0)=100mg/L). The H-type adsorption isotherms, obtained for the adsorbents, indicated a favorable process. Adsorption data on both prepared and commercial activated carbon, before and after sulfurization, followed both the Frendlich and Langmuir models. They were better fitted by Frendlich isotherm as compared to Langmuir. The maximum adsorption capacities were 90.09, 104.17, 126.58 and 142.86 mg/g for CAC, PAC, SCAC and SPAC, respectively. Accordingly, surface modification of activated carbons using SO(2) greatly enhanced cadmium removal. The reversibility of the process has been studied in a qualitative manner and it shows that the spent SPAC can be effectively regenerated for further use easily.

  7. Fabrication of carbon nanotube high-frequency nanoelectronic biosensor for sensing in high ionic strength solutions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Girish S; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2013-07-22

    The unique electronic properties and high surface-to-volume ratios of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and semiconductor nanowires (NW) make them good candidates for high sensitivity biosensors. When a charged molecule binds to such a sensor surface, it alters the carrier density in the sensor, resulting in changes in its DC conductance. However, in an ionic solution a charged surface also attracts counter-ions from the solution, forming an electrical double layer (EDL). This EDL effectively screens off the charge, and in physiologically relevant conditions ~100 millimolar (mM), the characteristic charge screening length (Debye length) is less than a nanometer (nm). Thus, in high ionic strength solutions, charge based (DC) detection is fundamentally impeded. We overcome charge screening effects by detecting molecular dipoles rather than charges at high frequency, by operating carbon nanotube field effect transistors as high frequency mixers. At high frequencies, the AC drive force can no longer overcome the solution drag and the ions in solution do not have sufficient time to form the EDL. Further, frequency mixing technique allows us to operate at frequencies high enough to overcome ionic screening, and yet detect the sensing signals at lower frequencies. Also, the high transconductance of SWNT transistors provides an internal gain for the sensing signal, which obviates the need for external signal amplifier. Here, we describe the protocol to (a) fabricate SWNT transistors, (b) functionalize biomolecules to the nanotube, (c) design and stamp a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-fluidic chamber onto the device, and (d) carry out high frequency sensing in different ionic strength solutions.

  8. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-06-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions.

  9. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions. PMID:26066704

  10. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  11. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  12. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  13. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  14. 7 CFR 58.429 - Washing machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Washing machine. 58.429 Section 58.429 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....429 Washing machine. When used, the washing machine for cheese cloths and bandages shall be...

  15. Alternative antimicrobial commercial egg washing procedures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial table eggs are washed prior to packaging. Standard wash procedures use an alkaline pH and warm water. If a cool water method could be developed that would still provide a microbiologically safe egg, the industry may save energy costs associated with water heating. Four wash procedures ...

  16. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  17. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  18. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  19. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  20. 21 CFR 1250.87 - Wash water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wash water. 1250.87 Section 1250.87 Food and Drugs... Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.87 Wash water. Where systems installed on vessels for wash water, as defined in § 1250.3(n), do not comply with the requirements of a potable water...

  1. Partition Coefficients of Organics between Water and Carbon Dioxide Revisited: Correlation with Solute Molecular Descriptors and Solvent Cohesive Properties.

    PubMed

    Roth, Michal

    2016-12-06

    High-pressure phase behavior of systems containing water, carbon dioxide and organics has been important in several environment- and energy-related fields including carbon capture and storage, CO2 sequestration and CO2-assisted enhanced oil recovery. Here, partition coefficients (K-factors) of organic solutes between water and supercritical carbon dioxide have been correlated with extended linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs). In addition to the Abraham molecular descriptors of the solutes, the explanatory variables also include the logarithm of solute vapor pressure, the solubility parameters of carbon dioxide and water, and the internal pressure of water. This is the first attempt to include also the properties of water as explanatory variables in LSER correlations of K-factor data in CO2-water-organic systems. Increasing values of the solute hydrogen bond acidity, the solute hydrogen bond basicity, the solute dipolarity/polarizability, the internal pressure of water and the solubility parameter of water all tend to reduce the K-factor, that is, to favor the solute partitioning to the water-rich phase. On the contrary, increasing values of the solute characteristic volume, the solute vapor pressure and the solubility parameter of CO2 tend to raise the K-factor, that is, to favor the solute partitioning to the CO2-rich phase.

  2. [Comparison of antibacterial effects of different antiseptics after hand washing].

    PubMed

    Buluş, Nesrin; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 4% chlorhexidine gluconate, 7.5% povidone iodine and liquid soap, which are used as hand washing solutions for the immediate, cumulative and residual effects in bacterial growth. For this purpose, 18 volunteers washed their hands with 7.5% povidone iodine, 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and liquid soap by applying standard hygienic hand washing technique. In order to find out the bacterial amount in the hands of study group, glove liquid test was used. For the evaluation of immediate effects, samples were collected just after the washing procedure, for the residual effects samples were collected from gloved hands after 3 hours, and for the cumulative effects, samples were collected after 5 days with daily hand washings. It is found that the immediate effects of 4% chlorhexidine gluconate was superior than others, and 7.5% povidone iodine was superior to liquid soap. There was no difference between 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and 7.5% povidone iodine for residual effects. The cumulative effects were observed for 4% chlorhexidine gluconate and 7.5% povidone iodine, while there was no cumulative effect for liquid soap. According to these results, it can be suggested that 4% chlorhexidine gluconate can be used as a reliable antiseptic agent in the hospitals, especially for laboratories, intensive care units and operating rooms, owing to its favourable immediate, residual and cumulative effects.

  3. Precipitation of Co(2+) carbonates from aqueous solution: insights on the amorphous to crystalline transformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Ángeles; Jiménez, Amalia

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt is toxic metal that is present only as a trace in the Earth crust. However, Co might concentrate on specific areas due to both natural and anthropogenic factors and thus, soils and groundwater can be contaminated. It is from this perspective that we are interested in the precipitation of cobalt carbonates, since co-precipitation with minerals phases is a well-known method for metal immobilization in the environment. In particular, the carbonates are widely used due to its reactivity and natural abundance. In order to evaluate the cobalt carbonate precipitation at room temperature, a simple experimental work was carried out in this work. The precipitation occurred via reaction of two common salts: 0.05M of CoCl2 and 0.05M of Na2CO3 in aqueous solution. After reaction, the precipitated solid was kept in the remaining water at 25 oC and under constant stirring for different aging times of 5 min, 1 and 5 hours, 1, 2, 4, 7, 30 and 60 days. In addition to the aging and precipitation experiments, we carried out experiments to determine the solubility of the solids. In these experiments each precipitate was dissolved in Milli-Q water until equilibrium was reached and then the aqueous solution was analyzed regarding Co2+ and total alkalinity. Furthermore, acid solution calorimetry of the products were attained. Finally, we modeled the results using the PHREEQC code. Solid and aqueous phase identification and characterization have been extensively reported in a previous work (González-López et al., 2015). The main results of our investigation were the initial precipitation of an amorphous cobalt carbonate that evolve towards a poorly crystalline cobalt hydroxide carbonate with aging treatment. Solubility of both phases have been calculated under two different approaches: precipitation and dissolution. Values of solubility from each approach were obtained with a general error due to differences in experiment conditions, for instance, ionic strength, temperature and

  4. Lead and copper removal from aqueous solutions using carbon foam derived from phenol resin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Jeon, Jun-Woo; Hwang, Min-Jin; Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2015-07-01

    Phenolic resin-based carbon foam was prepared as an adsorbent for removing heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The surface of the produced carbon foam had a well-developed open cell structure and the specific surface area according to the BET model was 458.59m(2)g(-1). Batch experiments showed that removal ratio increased in the order of copper (19.83%), zinc (34.35%), cadmium (59.82%), and lead (73.99%) in mixed solutions with the same initial concentration (50mgL(-1)). The results indicated that the Sips isotherm model was the most suitable for describing the experimental data of lead and copper. The maximum adsorption capacity of lead and copper determined to Sips model were 491mgg(-1) and 247mgg(-1). The obtained pore diffusion coefficients for lead and copper were found to be 1.02×10(-6) and 2.42×10(-7)m(2)s(-1), respectively. Post-sorption characteristics indicated that surface precipitation was the primary mechanism of lead and copper removal by the carbon foam, while the functional groups on the surface of the foam did not affect metal adsorption.

  5. Wash resistance of insecticide-treated materials.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez González, José; Kroeger, Axel; Aviña, Ana Isabel; Pabón, Eulides

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of insecticide-treated materials (ITMs) for malaria control is reduced by washing them. This research in Colombia and Bolivia investigated the resistance of different insecticide formulations and, in particular, a commercially available impregnated bednet (PermaNet) which provides chemical protection for the insecticide. The fabrics studied were all polyester; the pyrethroids used for impregnation were deltamethrin (tablet and suspension concentrate both at 25 mg/m2 target dose), lambdacyhalothrin (capsule suspension at 15 mg/m2; laboratory study only), alphacypermethrin (suspension concentrate at 40 mg/m2) and, in the case of PermaNet, deltamethrin (55 mg/m2). The indicator of wash resistance was Anopheles spp. mortality (using the bioassay cone method) before and after different numbers and intensities of washing. When the fabrics were washed under controlled conditions, gently with water and a bar of soap, the wash resistance of all formulations was good (100% Anopheles mortality after 3 washes). However, when the impregnated nets were soaked for 30-60 min and washed with soap powder and tap water by local women in the usual way, the mortality after 4 washes declined considerably (43.5% and 41.3% for deltamethrin tablets and liquid respectively when washing every second day). Alphacypermethrin showed slightly better results after 3 washes every 7th day compared to deltamethrin tablets (63.8% and 43.3% mortality, respectively). The wash resistance offered by PermaNet was much better and longer lasting: Anopheles mortality after 4 washes was 92.6%, after 10 washes 83.7% and after 20 washes 87.1%. The limitations of commercially available wash-resistant nets are, however, their limited accessibility and the difficulty of replacing all existing bednets with a new product.

  6. Dissolution of Uranium(IV) Oxide in Solutions of Ammonium Carbonate and Hydrogen Peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven C.; Peper, Shane M.; Douglas, Matthew; Ziegelgruber, Kate L.; Finn, Erin C.

    2009-09-12

    Understanding the dissolution characteristics of uranium oxides is of fundamental scientific interest. Bench scale experiments were conducted to determine the optimal dissolution parameters of uranium(IV) oxide (UO2) powder in solutions of ammonium carbonate [(NH4)2CO3] and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental parameters included variable peroxide and carbonate concentrations, and temperature. Results indicate the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 increases linearly with peroxide concentration ranging from 0.05 – 2 M (1:1 to 40:1 mol ratio H2O2:U), with no apparent maximum rate reached under the limited conditions used in our study. Temperature ranging studies show the dissolution rate of UO2 in 1 M (NH4)2CO3 and 0.1 M H2O2 (2:1 mol ratio H2O2:U) increases linearly from 15 °C to 60 °C, again with no apparent maximum rate reached. Dissolution of UO2 in solutions with constant [H2O2] and [(NH4)2CO3] ranging from 0.5 to 2 M showed no difference in rate; however dissolution was significantly reduced in 0.05 M (NH4)2CO3 solution. The results of this study demonstrate the influence of [H2O2], [(NH4)2CO3], and temperature on the dissolution of UO2 in peroxide-containing (NH4)2CO3 solutions. Future studies are planned to elucidate the solution and solid state complexes in these systems.

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy of DNA-wrapped Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Takuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated hybrids of DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution and in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Although intensive AFM observations of these hybrids were previously carried out for samples in air, this is the first report on AFM observations of these hybrids in solution. As expected, diameters of DNA-SWNT hybrids dramatically increased in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer solution. The data suggest that DNA molecules maintain their structures even on the SWNT surfaces. Furthermore, we simultaneously observed single DNA-SWNT hybrids using three different AFM modes in air and in the TE buffer solution. Height value of the hybrids was largest in the solution, and lowest for the mode that repulsive force is expected in air. For the bare SWNT molecules, height differences among the three AFM modes were much lower than those of the DNA-SWNT hybrids. DNA molecules adsorbed on SWNT surfaces flexibly changed their morphology as well as DNA molecules on flat surfaces such as mica. This is hopeful results for biological applications of DNA-SWNT hybrids. In addition, our results revealed the importance of the single-molecule approach to evaluate DNA structures on SWNT surfaces.

  8. Carbon nanotube-templated assembly of regioregular poly(3-alkylthiophene) in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Stevens, Eric; He, Youjun; Hong, Kunlun; Ivanov, Ilia

    2016-09-01

    Control of structural heterogeneity by rationally encoding of the molecular assemblies is a key enabling design of hierarchical, multifunctional materials of the future. Here we report the strategies to gain such control using solution- based assembly to construct a hybrid nano-assembly and a network hybrid structure of regioregular poly(3- alkylthiophene) - carbon nanotube (P3AT-CNT). The opto-electronic performance of conjugated polymer (P3AT) is defined by the structure of the aggregate in solution and in the solid film. Control of P3AT aggregation would allow formation of broad range of morphologies with very distinct electro-optical. We utilize interactive templating to confine the assembly behavior of conjugated polymers, replacing poorly controlled solution processing approach. Perfect crystalline surface of the single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT/MWCNT) acts as a template, seeding P3AT aggregation of the surface of the nanotube. The seed continues directional growth through pi-pi stacking leading to the formation of to well-defined P3AT-CNT morphologies, including comb-like nano-assemblies, super- structures and gel networks. Interconnected, highly-branched network structure of P3AT-CNT hybrids is of particular interest to enable efficient, long-range, balanced charge carrier transport. The structure and opto-electionic function of the intermediate assemblies and networks of P3AT/CNT hybrids are characterized by transmission election microscopy and UV-vis absorption.

  9. Kinetics and thermodynamic study of aniline adsorption by multi-walled carbon nanotubes from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Al-Johani, Hind; Abdel Salam, Mohamed

    2011-08-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used in the adsorptive removal of aniline, an organic pollutant, from an aqueous solution. It was found that carbon nanotubes with a higher specific surface area adsorbed and removed more aniline from an aqueous solution. The adsorption was dependent on factors, such as MWCNTs dosage, contact time, aniline concentration, solution pH and temperature. The adsorption study was analyzed kinetically, and the results revealed that the adsorption followed pseudo-second order kinetics with good correlation coefficients. In addition, it was found that the adsorption of aniline occurred in two consecutive steps, including the slow intra-particle diffusion of aniline molecules through the nanotubes. Various thermodynamic parameters, including the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°), enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), were calculated. The results indicated that the spontaneity of the adsorption, exothermic nature of the adsorption and the decrease in the randomness reported as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°, respectively, were all negative.

  10. Carbon-dot organic surface modifier analysis by solution-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippidis, Aggelos; Spyros, Apostolos; Anglos, Demetrios; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Zbořil, Radek; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2013-07-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots) represent a new class of carbon-based materials that were discovered recently and have drawn the interest of the scientific community, particularly because of their attractive optical properties and their potential as fluorescent sensors. Investigation of the chemical structure of C-dots is extremely important for correlating the surface modifier composition with C-dot optical properties and allow for structure-properties fine tuning. In this article, we report the structural analysis of the surface modifiers of three different types of C-dot nanoparticles (Cwax, Cws, and Csalt) by use of 1D- and 2D-high-resolution NMR spectroscopy in solution. We unambiguously verify that the structure of the modifier chains remains chemically unchanged during the passivation procedure, and confirm the covalent attachment of the modifiers to the nanoparticle core, which contributes no signal to the solution-state NMR spectra. To our knowledge, this is the first study confirming the full structural assignment of C-dot organic surface modifiers by use of solution NMR spectroscopy.

  11. The Electrochemical Behavior of Zn-Mn Alloy Coating in Carbonated Concrete Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touazi, S.; Bučko, M.; Makhloufi, L.; Legat, A.; Bajat, J. B.

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the protective performance of Zn coating on reinforcing steel in concrete, the electrochemical deposition of Zn-Mn coatings was conducted on steel surface. The morphology, chemical and phase compositions of Zn-Mn coatings obtained from sulfate-citrate bath were investigated in the first part of paper. In the second part, the obtained deposits were tested in solution simulating carbonated concrete, consisting of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3. Data obtained from Tafel analysis showed higher corrosion resistance for Zn-Mn alloy deposits obtained at -1700 and -1800mV versus SCE, when compared to pure Zn deposit. Impedance spectroscopy investigations revealed that the total impedance of Zn-Mn coatings increased steadily with time, and was significantly higher as compared to pure Zn after 24h in corrosion solution. On the contrary, for pure Zn, the impedance increased in the first 12h, and then decreased during prolonged exposure time, which can be explained by rapid growth of nonprotective white rust and the degradation of zinc coating, as was confirmed by optical microscope after 24h of immersion in carbonated concrete pore solution.

  12. Computer Simulation of Cascade Damage in α-Iron with Carbon in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, Calder F; Bacon, David J; Barashev, Aleksandr; Osetskiy, Yury N

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation method is used to investigate defect production by displacement cascades in iron with carbon (C) in solution. This is the first study of cascade damage in a metal containing interstitial solute. Iron is of particular interest because of the use of ferritic steels in plant for nuclear power generation. Cascades are simulated with energy in the range 5 to 20keV in iron at either 100 or 600K containing carbon with concentration in the range 0 to 1at%. C in solution has no discernible effect on the number of defects produced in cascades under any of the conditions simulated, nor on the clustered fraction of either self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) or vacancies. However, significant fractions of single SIAs and vacancies are trapped by C in the cascade process, irrespective of cascade energy. The fraction is independent of temperature for vacancies, but increases strongly with temperature for SIAs: this is a consequence of the higher mobility of the SIA.

  13. Role of PF6- in the radiolytical and electrochemical degradation of propylene carbonate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Daniel; Jimenez Gordon, Isabel; Legand, Solène; Dauvois, Vincent; Baltaze, Jean-Pierre; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Martin, Jean-Frédéric; Belloni, Jacqueline; Mostafavi, Mehran; Le Caër, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The behavior under irradiation of neat propylene carbonate (PC), a co-solvent usually used in Li-ion batteries (LIB), and also of Li salt solutions is investigated. The decomposition of neat PC is studied using radiolysis in the pulse and steady state regime and is assigned to the ultrafast formation, in the reducing channel, of the radical anion PCrad - by electron attachment, followed by the ring cleavage, leading to CO. In the oxidative channel, the PC(sbnd H)rad radical is formed, generating CO2. The CO2 and CO yields are both close to the ionization yield of PC. The CO2 and CO productions in LiClO4, LiBF4 and LiN(CF3)2(SO2)2 solutions are similar as in neat PC. In contrast, in LiPF6/PC a strong impact on PC degradation is measured with a doubling of the CO2 yield due to the high reactivity of the electron towards PF6- observed in the picosecond range. A small number of oxide phosphine molecules are detected among the various products of the irradiated solutions, suggesting that most of them, observed in carbonate mixtures used in LIBs, arise from linear rather than from cyclical molecules. The similarity between the degradation by radiolysis or electrolysis highlights the interest of radiolysis as an accelerated aging method.

  14. Mass-transfer in solution: on the context and cause of spherulitic lacustrine carbonate deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogerson, Michael; Mercedes-Martin, Ramon; Brasier, Alex; Vonhof, Hubert; Prior, Tim; Fellows, Simon; Reijmer, John; Pedley, Martyn; McGill, Rona

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how laterally extensive spherulitic carbonate deposits originated in the 'Pre-Salt' Aptian volcanic-influenced lacustrine basins of Brazil and Angola is challenging, especially as few good analog systems are known to compare the Pre-Salt to. Here, we report a particularly good analog system in the Carboniferous of the Scotland (the East Kirkton Limestone), and examine the geochemical and sedimentological context in which spherular radial calcite has developed. Using empirical and theoretical approaches, we analyse the link between metal mobilization from sub-surface volcaniclastic rocks, and the potential precipitation of carbonates, Mg-Si minerals and chalcedony in a lacustrine spherulitic carbonate setting. This suite of minerals at the surface can be explained by CO2 ingassing to a springwater derived from reaction of alkali igneous rocks in the subsurface with meteoric groundwater. This forms a 'source-to-sink' system occurring entirely in solution in the subsurface, but demonstrably capable of forming significant depositional units at the surface. We hypothesise that analogous processes occurring on a larger scale are implicated in the development of the 'Pre-Salt' spherulitic carbonate deposits.

  15. The effects of water on the passive behavior of 1018 carbon steel in organic solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shifler, D.A.; Kruger, J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Moran, P.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The passivation and breakdown behavior of 1018 carbon steel in propylene carbonate (PC) or dimethoxyethane (DME) mixtures with water and containing 0.5M LiAsF[sub 6] were studied. The behavior of the steel in the organic solvent/water mixtures was highly dependent on the organic solvent. The anodic polarization of carbon steel displayed active-passive behavior in 10--90 mole percent (m/o) PC/H[sub 2]O mixtures and a tenuous degree of stability within the passive range. The anodic polarization of carbon steel displayed no active-passive behavior in 50--90 m/o DME/H[sub 2]O mixtures and displayed active-passive behavior in 10--30 m/o DME/H[sub 2]O mixtures. The steel was stable within the passive range of these DME/H[sub 2]O solutions. The breakdown potential of the steel in DME/H[sub 2]O mixtures is more electropositive than the oxidation potential of the DME solvent at all molar ratios.

  16. Role of the surface chemistry of activated carbons in dye removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua-lei; Zhen, Wen-juan; Zhu, Qian; Wu, Xiao-bin; Chang, Zhi-dong; Li, Wen-jun

    2015-07-01

    Commercial activated carbons were modified by a series of chemical or physical treatments using H2O2, NH3, and heating under N2 flow without notably changing their pore structures. The resultant carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and Bohem titration and then used to remove Ponceau 4R, methyl orange and brilliant blue from aqueous solutions. Surface chemistry was found to play a significantly different role in removing these three compounds. The removal of anionic Ponceau 4R increases with increasing carbon surface basicity due to the predominant dispersive interaction mechanism. In contrast, surface chemistry has little effect on the removal of anionic methyl orange, which can be explained by two parallel mechanisms involving electrostatic and dispersive interactions due to the basic amine group in a dye molecule. The influence of surface chemistry on the removal of amphoteric brilliant blue dye can also be ignored due to a weak interaction between the carbons and dye molecules, which is resulted from strong cohesive energy from electrostatic forces inside amphoteric dye molecules.

  17. The removal of uranium (VI) from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon developed from grinded used tire.

    PubMed

    Belgacem, Ahmed; Rebiai, Rachid; Hadoun, Hocine; Khemaissia, Sihem; Belmedani, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this study, activated carbon was prepared from waste tire by KOH chemical activation. The pore properties including the BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and average pore diameter were characterized. BET surface area of the activated carbon was determined as 558 m(2)/g. The adsorption of uranium ions from the aqueous solution using this activated carbon has been investigated. Various physico-chemical parameters such as pH, initial metal ion concentration, and adsorbent dosage level and equilibrium contact time were studied by a batch method. The optimum pH for adsorption was found to be 3. The removal efficiency has also been determined for the adsorption system as a function of initial concentration. The experimental results were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. A comparison of best-fitting was performed using the coefficient of correlation and the Langmuir isotherm was found to well represent the measured sorption data. According to the evaluation using the Langmuir equation, the saturated monolayer sorption capacity of uranium ions onto waste tire activated carbon was 158.73 mg/g. The thermodynamic equilibrium constant and the Gibbs free energy were determined and results indicated the spontaneous nature of the adsorption process. Kinetics data were best described by pseudo-second-order model.

  18. Carbon enters silica forming a cristobalite-type CO2-SiO2 solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico A.; Bini, Roberto; Salamat, Ashkan; Garbarino, Gaston; Levelut, Claire; Cambon, Olivier; Haines, Julien

    2014-04-01

    Extreme conditions permit unique materials to be synthesized and can significantly update our view of the periodic table. In the case of group IV elements, carbon was always considered to be distinct with respect to its heavier homologues in forming oxides. Here we report the synthesis of a crystalline CO2-SiO2 solid solution by reacting carbon dioxide and silica in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (P=16-22 GPa, T>4,000 K), showing that carbon enters silica. Remarkably, this material is recovered to ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction shows that the crystal adopts a densely packed α-cristobalite structure (P41212) with carbon and silicon in fourfold coordination to oxygen at pressures where silica normally adopts a sixfold coordinated rutile-type stishovite structure. An average formula of C0.6(1)Si0.4(1)O2 is consistent with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy results. These findings may modify our view on oxide chemistry, which is of great interest for materials science, as well as Earth and planetary sciences.

  19. Carbon enters silica forming a cristobalite-type CO2-SiO2 solid solution.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico A; Bini, Roberto; Salamat, Ashkan; Garbarino, Gaston; Levelut, Claire; Cambon, Olivier; Haines, Julien

    2014-04-30

    Extreme conditions permit unique materials to be synthesized and can significantly update our view of the periodic table. In the case of group IV elements, carbon was always considered to be distinct with respect to its heavier homologues in forming oxides. Here we report the synthesis of a crystalline CO2-SiO2 solid solution by reacting carbon dioxide and silica in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (P = 16-22 GPa, T>4,000 K), showing that carbon enters silica. Remarkably, this material is recovered to ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction shows that the crystal adopts a densely packed α-cristobalite structure (P4(1)2(1)2) with carbon and silicon in fourfold coordination to oxygen at pressures where silica normally adopts a sixfold coordinated rutile-type stishovite structure. An average formula of C0.6(1)Si0.4(1)O2 is consistent with X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy results. These findings may modify our view on oxide chemistry, which is of great interest for materials science, as well as Earth and planetary sciences.

  20. ANIONIC EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM AND VANADIUM FROM CARBONATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.; Long, R.S.

    1958-12-16

    Uranium and vanadium can be economically purified and recovered from non- salt roast carbonate leach liquors by adsorption on a strongly basic anionic exchange resin and subsequent selective elution by one of three alternative methods. Method 1 comprises selectively eluting uranium from the resin with an ammonium sulfate solution followed by eluting vanadium from the resin with either 5 M NaCl, saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, saturated NaHCO/sub 3/, 1 M NaOH, or saturated S0/sub 2/ solutions. Method II comprises selectively eluting vanadium from the resin with either concentrated NaCl or S0/sub 2/ solutions subsequent to pretreatment of the column with either S0/sub 2/ gas, 1 N HCl, or 0.1 N H/sub 2/8O/sub 4/ followed by eluting uranium from the resin with solutions containing 0.9 M NH/sub 4/Cl or NaCl and 0.1 Cl. Method III comprises flowing the carbonate leac solutlon through a first column of a strongly basic anlonlc exchange resin untll vanadium breakthrough occurs, so that the effluent solution is enriched ln uranium content and the vanadium is chiefly retalned by the resln, absorbing the uranlum from the enriched effluent solution on a second column of a strongly basic anionic exchange resin, pretreating the first column with either 0.1 N HCl, 0.1 H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, C0/sub 2/ gas, or ammonium sulfate, selectively eluting the vanadlum from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, pretreatlng the second column with either 0.1 N HCl or S0/sub 2/ gas, selectively eluting residual vanadium from the column with saturated S0/sub 2/ solution, and then eluting the uranium from the column with either 0.1 N HCl and 1 N NaCl orO.l N HCl and 1 N NH/sub 4/Cl.

  1. Constant-distance mode scanning potentiometry. 1. Visualization of calcium carbonate dissolution in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Mathieu; Schulte, Albert; Mann, Stefan; Jordan, Guntram; Dietzel, Irmgard D; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2004-07-01

    Constant-distance mode scanning potentiometry was established by integrating potentiometric microsensors as ion-selective scanning probes into a SECM setup that was equipped with a piezoelectric shear force-based tip-to-sample distance control. The combination of specially designed micrometer-sized potentiometric tips with an advanced system for tip positioning allowed simultaneous acquisition of both topographic and potentiometric information at solid/liquid interfaces with high spatial resolution. The performance of the approach was evaluated by applying Ca(2+)-selective constant-distance mode potentiometry to monitor the dissolution of calcium carbonate occurring either at the (104) surface of calcite crystals or in proximity to the more complex surface of cross sections of a calcium carbonate shell of Mya arenaria exposed to slightly acidic aqueous solutions. Micrometer-scale heterogeneities in the apparent calcium activity profiles have successfully been resolved for both samples.

  2. Removal of Ni (II) from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto Ricinus communis seed shell activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Thamilarasu, P; Karunakaran, K

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption studies on the removal of Ni(II) from aqueous solution using Ricinus communis seed shells activated carbon and polypyrrole coated Ricinus communis seed shells activated carbon were carried out under various experimental conditions. The effects of various process parameters have been investigated by following the batch adsorption technique. Adsorption data was modeled with Freundlich, Langmuir and tempkin adsorption isotherms. Thermodynamics parameters such as DeltaH0, DeltaS0, and DeltaG0 were calculated indicating that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic nature. A mechanism, involving intra particle diffusion and surface adsorption, has been proposed for the adsorption of Ni(II) onto the adsorbent. Adsorbent used in this study is characterized by FTIR and SEM before and after the adsorption of metal ions.

  3. Macromolecular conformation in solution. Study of carbonic anhydrase by the positron annihilation technique.

    PubMed Central

    Handel, E D; Graf, G; Glass, J C

    1980-01-01

    The structural features of carbonic anhydrase (carbonate hydro-lyase; EC 4.2.1.1) in aqueous solution were probed by the positron annihilation technique. The data obtained under varying conditions of temperature, pH, and enzyme concentration were interpreted in terms of the free volume model. The change of enzymic activity with temperature is accompanied by a change in free volume of the protein. Upon thermal denaturation an irreversible change in free volume of the molecule occurred. At low temperatures the protein-water interactions were investigated. These results are discussed in terms of current concepts of structure-function relationships in proteins. This study shows the sensitivity of the positron annihilation method toward the structure of proteins related to their overall conformation and to the nature of bound water. PMID:6789901

  4. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    PubMed

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  5. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; Fernandes, Thais H M; Lima, Eder C; Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana; Fagan, Solange B

    2011-09-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298K was fixed at 1h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment.

  6. Confinement and surface effects of aqueous solutions within charged carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Calixte, Emvia I; Samoylova, Olga N; Shuford, Kevin L

    2016-04-28

    We have examined the structure of water and aqueous solutions in carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. We find confinement changes the structure of water as well as the interactions between ions and their solvation shells. The density and orientation of water at the nanotube walls are strongly dependent on the surface charge and cations/anions present at the interfaces. Decreasing the nanotube diameter alters the ion hydration properties as well as hydrogen bonding structure and formation dynamics. The results indicate that fluid structure and hydrogen bond characteristics in nano-channels can be tuned through modification of tube charge and with ion selection.

  7. A Hydro-mechanical Model and Analytical Solutions for Geomechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain

    2012-05-15

    We present a hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow in greater detail. The simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcy’s law. Two parts were coupled using the standard linear poroelasticity. Analytical solutions for pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario. The model predicts the temporal and spatial variation of pressure field and effects of permeability and elastic modulus of formation on the fluid pressure distribution.

  8. Formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of silicon dioxide and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukalin, D. A.; Tuchin, A. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Bityutskaya, L. A.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of nanostructures from colloidal solutions of amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in evaporating drops at room temperature has been studied. It is established that spherical aggregates with an average diameter of ˜2 μm and rodlike nanostructures with diameters within 250-300 nm and lengths of ˜4 μm are formed under these conditions. The mechanisms of covalent and van der Waals interaction between CNTs and SiO2 are considered in the framework of a phenomenological model of the active center of a closed CNT.

  9. Gravitation-dependent, thermally-induced self-diffraction in carbon nanotube solutions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Chen, Weizhe; Lim, Sanhua; Lin, Jianyi; Guo, Zhixin

    2006-10-02

    We report the observation of thermally-induced self-diffraction in carbon nanotube (CNT) solutions under the influence of the gravity. We present a theoretical model in which CNTs are assumed to obey the Boltzmman distribution law. Under the approximations of small temperature rise and a very narrow distribution of CNT masses, the model simulation is consistent with the data measured at low laser powers. An immediate application of such a gravitation-dependent characteristic is the optical measurement for molecular weights of CNTs.

  10. Carbonized material adsorbents for the removal of mercury from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Charcoal in itself is porous making it an excellent material for activated charcoal manufacture. However, few studies have been conducted in harnessing its potential for adsorption purposes, especially in water treatment. This paper describes the possibility of utilizing charcoal materials from Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) for adsorbing heavy metals like mercury from aqueous solutions of different concentrations. The effect of soaking time, pore analyses and chemical properties on the adsorption capabilities of the carbonized materials were discussed. The pH value and chemical oxygen demand (COD) monitored during the soaking period were also described.

  11. Adsorption of alkenyl succinic anhydride from solutions in carbon tetrachloride on a fine magnetite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmasova, O. V.; Ramazanova, A. G.; Korolev, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of alkenyl succinic anhydride from a solution in carbon tetrachloride on a fine magnetite surface at a temperature of 298.15 K is studied using fine magnetite, which forms the basis of magnetic fluids, as the adsorbent. An adsorption isotherm is recorded and interpreted in terms of the theory of the volume filling of micropores (TVFM). Adsorption process parameters are calculated on the basis of the isotherm. It is shown that at low equilibrium concentrations, the experimental adsorption isotherm is linear in the TVFM equation coordinates.

  12. OPTIMIZATION OF THE WASH-OFF METHOD FOR MEASURING AEROSOL CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using the fluorescence-washing technique, oleic acid particles tagged with uranine were extracted and analyzed fluorometrically. The possible sources of errors in the technique were evaluated in this study. First, the sensitivity of uranine fluorescence in different solutions ...

  13. Carbon dioxide removal from flue gases by absorption/ desorption in aqueous diethanolamine solutions.

    PubMed

    Kierzkowska-Pawlak, Hanna; Chacuk, Andrzej

    2010-08-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2) desorption rate from CO2- loaded aqueous diethanolamine (DEA) solutions was measured using a stirred cell with a flat gas-liquid interface. The measurements were performed in the temperature range of 293.15-313.15 K and an amine concentration range of 10-20% mass DEA. Measurements were based on a semibatch isothermal absorption of the gas until the equilibrium state was reached, followed by desorption, which was initiated by the pressure release in the system. A simplified mass transfer model based on the film theory coupled with CO2, mass balance was developed to interpret the experimental data. On the basis of the proposed model, the initial mass transfer rates were calculated from the experimental results. The calculated initial desorption rates enabled estimation of the enhancement factor for CO2 mass transfer from aqueous DEA solutions. Analysis of the experimental data showed that desorption took place in the diffusive mass transfer regime.

  14. Variation in assimilable organic carbon formation during chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter solutions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingbin; Yuan, Ting; Ni, Huishan; Li, Yanpeng; Hu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter (EOM) solutions under different conditions, to determine how the metabolites produced by these organisms affect water safety and the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC). The effects of chlorine dosages, coagulant dosage, reaction time and temperature on the formation of AOC were investigated during the disinfection of M.aeruginosa metabolite solutions. The concentration of AOC followed a decreasing and then increasing pattern with increasing temperature and reaction time. The concentration of AOC decreased and then increased with increasing chlorination dosage, followed by a slight decrease at the highest level of chlorination. However, the concentration of AOC decreased continuously with increasing coagulant dosage. The formation of AOC can be suppressed under appropriate conditions. In this study, chlorination at 4mg/L, combined with a coagulant dose of 40mg/L at 20°C over a reaction time of 12hr, produced the minimum AOC.

  15. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  16. Removal of trihalomethanes from aqueous solution through armchair carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Azamat, Jafar; Khataee, Alireza; Joo, Sang Woo; Yin, Binfeng

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the removal of trihalomethanes (THMs) including CH3Cl, CH2Cl2 and CHCl3 from aqueous solutions by armchair carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under induced pressure. The studied system involved the armchair CNTs embedded between two graphene sheets with an aqueous solution of THMs in the simulation box. An external pressure was applied to the system along the z-axis of the simulation box. Six types of armchair CNTs with different diameter were used in this work, included (4,4), (5,5), (6,6), (7,7), (8,8) and (9,9) CNTs. The results of molecular dynamics simulation display that the armchair CNTs behave differently relative to THMs and water molecules. The permeation of THMs and water molecules through the armchair CNTs was dependent on the diameter of CNTs and the applied pressure.

  17. Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel by New Thiophene Azo Dye Derivatives in Acidic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N.; Fouda, A. S.; Mostafa, H. A.

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution by thiophene azo dye derivatives were studied using weight loss, electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), and atomic absorption techniques. The experimental data suggest that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitors concentration in presence of 103 μM potassium iodide (KI). This is due to synergistic effect. Thus, the experimental results suggested that the presence of these anions in the solution stabilized the adsorption of inhibitors molecules on the metal surface and improved the inhibition efficiency. The results of EFM experiments are a spectrum of current response as a function of frequency. The corrosion rate and Tafel parameters can be obtained with measurement by analyzing the harmonic frequencies. The adsorption of the inhibitors on metal surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The surface of metal examined using Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out and relations between computed parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency were discussed.

  18. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  19. Surface activated carbon nanospheres for fast adsorption of silver ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Song, Xianghua; Gunawan, Poernomo; Jiang, Rongrong; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Wang, Kean; Xu, Rong

    2011-10-30

    We report the synthesis and activation of colloidal carbon nanospheres (CNS) for adsorption of Ag(I) ions from aqueous solutions. CNS (400-500 nm in diameter) was synthesized via simple hydrothermal treatment of glucose solution. The surface of nonporous CNS after being activated by NaOH was enriched with -OH and -COO(-) functional groups. Despite the low surface area (<15m(2)/g), the activated CNS exhibited a high adsorption capacity of 152 mg silver/g. Under batch conditions, all Ag(I) ions can be completely adsorbed in less than 6 min with the initial Ag(I) concentrations lower than 2 ppm. This can be attributed to the minimum mass transfer resistance as Ag(I) ions were all deposited and reduced as Ag(0) nanoparticles on the external surface of CNS. The kinetic data can be well fitted to the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorbed silver can be easily recovered by dilute acid solutions and the CNS can be reactivated by the same treatment with NaOH solution. The excellent adsorption performance and reusability have also been demonstrated in a continuous mode. The NaOH activated CNS reported here could represent a new type of low-cost and efficient adsorbent nanomaterials for removal of trace Ag(I) ions for drinking water production.

  20. Analytical solutions to dissolved contaminant plume evolution with source depletion during carbon dioxide storage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Liu, Yongzhong; Yu, Bo; Ding, Tian

    2016-06-01

    Volatile contaminants may migrate with carbon dioxide (CO2) injection or leakage in subsurface formations, which leads to the risk of the CO2 storage and the ecological environment. This study aims to develop an analytical model that could predict the contaminant migration process induced by CO2 storage. The analytical model with two moving boundaries is obtained through the simplification of the fully coupled model for the CO2-aqueous phase -stagnant phase displacement system. The analytical solutions are confirmed and assessed through the comparison with the numerical simulations of the fully coupled model. Then, some key variables in the analytical solutions, including the critical time, the locations of the dual moving boundaries and the advance velocity, are discussed to present the characteristics of contaminant migration in the multi-phase displacement system. The results show that these key variables are determined by four dimensionless numbers, Pe, RD, Sh and RF, which represent the effects of the convection, the dispersion, the interphase mass transfer and the retention factor of contaminant, respectively. The proposed analytical solutions could be used for tracking the migration of the injected CO2 and the contaminants in subsurface formations, and also provide an analytical tool for other solute transport in multi-phase displacement system.

  1. Adsorptive removal of aniline by granular activated carbon from aqueous solutions with catechol and resorcinol.

    PubMed

    Suresh, S; Srivastava, V C; Mishrab, I M

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, the removal of aniline by adsorption process onto granular activated carbon (GAC) is reported from aqueous solutions containing catechol and resorcinol separately. The Taguchi experimental design was applied to study the effect of such parameters as the initial component concentrations (C(0,i)) of two solutes (aniline and catechol or aniline and resorcinol) in the solution, temperature (T), adsorbent dosage (m) and contact time (t). The L27 orthogonal array consisting of five parameters each with three levels was used to determine the total amount of solutes adsorbed on GAC (q(tot), mmol/g) and the signal-to-noise ratio. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the optimum conditions. Under these conditions, the ANOVA shows that m is the most important parameter in the adsorption process. The most favourable levels of process parameters were T = 303 K, m = 10 g/l and t = 660 min for both the systems, qtot values in the confirmation experiments carried out at optimum conditions were 0.73 and 0.95 mmol/g for aniline-catechol and aniline-resorcinol systems, respectively.

  2. Analytical solutions to dissolved contaminant plume evolution with source depletion during carbon dioxide storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Liu, Yongzhong; Yu, Bo; Ding, Tian

    2016-06-01

    Volatile contaminants may migrate with carbon dioxide (CO2) injection or leakage in subsurface formations, which leads to the risk of the CO2 storage and the ecological environment. This study aims to develop an analytical model that could predict the contaminant migration process induced by CO2 storage. The analytical model with two moving boundaries is obtained through the simplification of the fully coupled model for the CO2-aqueous phase -stagnant phase displacement system. The analytical solutions are confirmed and assessed through the comparison with the numerical simulations of the fully coupled model. Then, some key variables in the analytical solutions, including the critical time, the locations of the dual moving boundaries and the advance velocity, are discussed to present the characteristics of contaminant migration in the multi-phase displacement system. The results show that these key variables are determined by four dimensionless numbers, Pe, RD, Sh and RF, which represent the effects of the convection, the dispersion, the interphase mass transfer and the retention factor of contaminant, respectively. The proposed analytical solutions could be used for tracking the migration of the injected CO2 and the contaminants in subsurface formations, and also provide an analytical tool for other solute transport in multi-phase displacement system.

  3. Laboratory differential simulation design method of pressure absorbers for carbonization of phenolate solution by carbon dioxide in coal-tar processing

    SciTech Connect

    Linek, V.; Sinkule, J.; Moucha, T.; Rejl, J.F.

    2009-01-15

    A laboratory differential simulation method is used for the design of carbonization columns at coal-tar processing in which phenols are regenerated from phenolate solution by carbon dioxide absorption. The design method is based on integration of local absorption rates of carbon dioxide along the column. The local absorption rates into industrial phenolate mixture are measured in a laboratory model contactor for various compositions of the gas and liquid phases under the conditions that ensure the absorption rates in the laboratory absorber simulate the local rates in the industrial column. On the bases of the calculations, two-step carbonization columns were designed for 30000 t/year of the phenolate solution treatment by carbon dioxide. The absorption proceeds at higher pressure of 500 kPa and temperatures from 50 to 65 C, pure carbon dioxide is used and toluene is added. These conditions have the following favourable effects: (I) significant size reduction of the columns, (ii) it is possible to process more concentrated solutions without danger of silting the columns by crystallization of NaHCO{sub 3} on the packing. (iii) small amount of inert gas is released, (iv) lower alkalinity and better separability of the organic phase (phenols with toluene) from water phase (soda or bicarbonate solution) in separators.

  4. Washing machine usage in remote aboriginal communities.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, C R

    1998-10-01

    The use of washing machines was investigated in two remote Aboriginal communities in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara homelands. The aim was to look both at machine reliability and to investigate the health aspect of washing clothes. A total of 39 machines were inspected for wear and component reliability every three months over a one-year period. Of these, 10 machines were monitored in detail for water consumption, hours of use and cycles of operation. The machines monitored were Speed Queen model EA2011 (7 kg washing load) commercial units. The field survey results suggested a high rate of operation of the machines with an average of around 1,100 washing cycles per year (range 150 and 2,300 cycles per year). The results were compared with available figures for the average Australian household. A literature survey, to ascertain the health outcomes relating to washing clothes and bedding, confirmed that washing machines are efficient at removal of bacteria from clothes and bedding but suggested that recontamination of clothing after washing often negated the prior removal. High temperature washing (> 60 degrees C) appeared to be advantageous from a health perspective. With regards to larger organisms, while dust mites and body lice transmission between people would probably be decreased by washing clothes, scabies appeared to be mainly transmitted by body contact and thus transmission would be only marginally decreased by the use of washing machines.

  5. Adsorption of p-nitroaniline from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon fiber prepared from cotton stalk.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunquan; Zheng, Zheng; Feng, Jingwei; Zhang, Jibiao; Luo, Xingzhang; Zhao, Guohua; Huang, Xingfa

    2009-07-30

    Activated carbon fiber prepared from cotton stalk was used as an adsorbent for the removal of p-nitroaniline (PNA) from aqueous solutions. Liquid phase adsorption experiments were conducted and the maximum adsorptive capacity was determined. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, salinity and temperature on the adsorption was studied. The obtained experimental data were then fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson models to describe the equilibrium isotherms. The kinetics rates were modeled by using the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations. The results indicated that cotton stalk activated carbon fiber (CS-ACF) is an effective adsorbent for the removal of PNA from aqueous solutions. The maximum adsorption capacity of 406 mg g(-1) was achieved at the initial PNA concentration of 200 mg L(-1). The optimum pH for the removal of PNA was found to be 7.6. The presence of ammonium chloride proved to be favorable for the process of adsorption. The adsorption amount decreased with increasing temperature. The Redlich-Peterson model was found to best represent the equilibrium data. The kinetic data followed closely the pseudo-second-order equation. Thermodynamic study showed the adsorption was a spontaneous exothermic physical process.

  6. Measuring the Grafting Density of Nanoparticles in Solution by Analytical Ultracentrifugation and Total Organic Carbon Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Denise N.; Zhu, Huiguang; Lilierose, Michael H.; Verm, Raymond A.; Ali, Naushaba; Morrison, Adam N.; Fortner, John D.; Avendano, Carolina; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2012-01-01

    Many of the solution phase properties of nanoparticles, such as their colloidal stability and hydrodynamic diameter, are governed by the number of stabilizing groups bound to the particle surface (i.e., grafting density). Here we show how two techniques, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and total organic carbon analysis (TOC), can be applied separately to the measurement of this parameter. AUC directly measures the density of nanoparticle–polymer conjugates while TOC provides the total carbon content of its aqueous dispersions. When these techniques are applied to model gold nanoparticles capped with thiolated poly(ethylene glycol), the measured grafting densities across a range of polymer chain lengths, polymer concentrations, and nanoparticle diameters agree to within 20%. Moreover, the measured grafting densities correlate well with the polymer content determined by thermogravimetric analysis of solid conjugate samples. Using these tools, we examine the particle core diameter, polymer chain length, and polymer solution concentration dependence of nanoparticle grafting densities in a gold nanoparticle–poly(ethylene glycol) conjugate system. PMID:22967239

  7. Degradation of triclosan in aqueous solution by dielectric barrier discharge plasma combined with activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lu; Sun, Yabing; Feng, Jingwei; Wang, Jian; He, Dong

    2016-02-01

    The degradation of triclosan (TCS) in aqueous solution by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma with activated carbon fibers (ACFs) was investigated. In this study, ACFs and DBD plasma coexisted in a planar DBD plasma reactor, which could synchronously achieve degradation of TCS, modification and in situ regeneration of ACFs, enhancing the effect of recycling of ACFs. The properties of ACFs before and after modification by DBD plasma were characterized by BET and XPS. Various processing parameters affecting the synergetic degradation of TCS were also investigated. The results exhibited excellent synergetic effects in DBD plasma-ACFs system on TCS degradation. The degradation efficiency of 120 mL TCS with initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1) could reach 93% with 1 mm thick ACFs in 18 min at input power of 80 W, compared with 85% by single DBD plasma. Meanwhile, the removal rate of total organic carbon increased from 12% at pH 6.26-24% at pH 3.50. ACFs could ameliorate the degradation efficiency for planar DBD plasma when treating TCS solution at high flow rates or at low initial concentrations. A possible degradation pathway of TCS was investigated according to the detected intermediates, which were identified by liquid chromatography-hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) combined with theoretical calculation of Gaussian 09 program.

  8. Dissolved organic carbon in soil solution of peat-moorsh soils on Kuwasy Mire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszczyński, J.; Sapek, A.

    2009-04-01

    Key words: peat-moorsh soils, soil solution, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), temperature of soil, redox potential. The objective this study was the dissolved organic carbon concentration (DOC) in soil solution on the background of soil temperature, moisture and redox potential. The investigations were localized on the area of drained and agricultural used Kuwasy Mire, which are situated in the middle basin of Biebrza River, in North-East Poland. Research point was placed on a low peat soil of 110 cm depth managed as extensive grassland. The soil was recognized as peat-moorsh with the second degree of the moorshing process (with 20 cm of moorsh layer). The ceramic suction cups were installed in three replications at 30 cm depth of soil profile. The soil solution was continuously sampled by pomp of the automatic field station. The successive samples comprised of solution collected at the intervals of 21 days. Simultaneously, at the 20, 30 and 40 cm soil depths the measurements of temperature and determination of soil moisture and redox potential were made automatically. The mean twenty-four hours data were collected. The concentrations of DOC were determined by means of the flow colorimeter using the Skalar standard methods. Presented observations were made in 2001-2006. Mean DOC concentration in soil solution was 66 mg.dm-3 within all research period. A significant positive correlation between studied compound concentration and temperature of soil at 30 cm depth was observed; (correlation coefficient - r=0.55, number of samples - n=87). The highest DOC concentrations were observed during the season from July to October, when also a lower ground water level occurred. The DOC concentration in soil solution showed as well a significant correlation with the soil redox potential at 20 cm level. On this depth of describing soil profile a frontier layer between moorshing layer and peat has been existed. This layer is the potentially most active in the respect to

  9. Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of dichloroacetic acid from aqueous solution using mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Zhu, Jianzhong; Cao, Yang; Chen, Shenglu

    2014-08-01

    The presence of disinfection by-products, such as trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids in water, is believed to be harmful to human health. In this work, mesoporous carbon was synthesized with the evaporation-induced self-assembly method and employed to evaluate the effects of initial concentration, contact time, pH and temperature on the removal of dichloroacetic acid in batch experiments. Adsorption equilibrium was established in 480 min and the maximum adsorption (350mg/g) of dichloroacetic acid on the mesoporous carbon was observed to occur at 308 K and pH 3.0. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were used to analyse the equilibrium data at different temperatures; kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models and found that the adsorption capacity, mass transfer coefficient and diffusivity of dichloroacetic acid were directly affected by the physical and chemical parameters. In addition, the various thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibbs free energy (Delta G), enthalpy (Delta H = 54.35 kJmol-1) and entropy (Delta S = 258.36 Jmol-1 K-1) were calculated to analyse the adsorption process. The experimental results indicated that the mesoporous carbon was an excellent adsorbent for dichloroacetic acid removal from aqueous solutions.

  10. Removal of nickel(II) from aqueous solution using Citrus Limettioides peel and seed carbon.

    PubMed

    Sudha, R; Srinivasan, K; Premkumar, P

    2015-07-01

    The agricultural wastes like Citrus Limettioides peel and seed to be suitable precursor for the preparation of carbon [Citrus Limettioides peel carbon (CLPC) and seed carbon (CLSC)] has been explored in the present work, utilizing sulfuric acid as the activating agent. Adsorption studies were performed by varying contact time, solution pH, adsorbent dose and temperature. The equilibrium time for Ni(II) ions was determined as 4h and optimal pH was 4-7. Surface morphology and functionality of the CLPC and CLSC were characterized by SEM, EDX and FT-IR. The experimental data were analysed using the Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin, Redlich-Peterson, Sips and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherm equations using nonlinear regression analysis. Equilibrium data were found to fit well in the Langmuir isotherm, which confirmed the monolayer coverage of Ni(II) ions. The Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity of CLPC and CLSC was found to be 38.46 and 35.54 mg/g. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The kinetic data followed pseudo-second order model with film diffusion process. The adsorbents were tested with Ni(II) plating wastewater in connection with the reuse and selectivity of the adsorbents.

  11. Sorption of lanthanum and erbium from aqueous solution by activated carbon prepared from rice husk.

    PubMed

    Awwad, N S; Gad, H M H; Ahmad, M I; Aly, H F

    2010-12-01

    A biomass agricultural waste material, rice husk (RH) was used for preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation using phosphoric acid. The effect of various factors, e.g. time, pH, initial concentration and temperature of carbon on the adsorption capacity of lanthanum and erbium was quantitatively determined. It was found that the monolayer capacity is 175.4 mg g(-1) for La(III) and 250 mg g(-1) for Er(III). The calculated activation energy of La(III) adsorption on the activated carbon derived from rice husk was equal to 5.84 kJ/mol while it was 3.6 kJ/mol for Er(III), which confirm that the reaction is mainly particle-diffusion-controlled. The kinetics of sorption was described by a model of a pseudo-second-order. External diffusion and intra-particular diffusion were examined. The experimental data show that the external diffusion and intra-particular diffusion are significant in the determination of the sorption rate. Therefore, the developed sorbent is considered as a better replacement technology for removal of La(III) and Er(III) ions from aqueous solution due to its low-cost and good efficiency, fast kinetics, as well as easy to handle and thus no or small amount of secondary sludge is obtained in this application.

  12. Purification and dispersibility of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuanzhao; Li, Zhenxia; Zhao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (P-MWCNTs) were purified either by the high temperature treatment (HT-MWCNTs) or by concentrated acid treatment (CA-MWCNTs). The HT-MWCNTs were prepared by heating at 500°C, while the CA-MWCNTs were treated by the mixture of concentrated nitric and sulfuric acids taken in a volume ratio of 3: 1. Ultrasonic processing and surfactants were utilized to achieve homogenous MWCNTs suspensions. The HT-MWCNTs and CA-MWCNTs were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Among these three MWCNTs, the prepared homogeneously dispersed MWCNTs suspensions were characterized by UV-Vis absorbency and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Finally, the dispersion mechanism was discussed. The results showed that both high temperature treatment and concentrated acid treatment can be used for purification of the P-MWCNTs, removing the amorphous carbon and other impurities. In these suspensions, the purified MWCNTs showed a better dispersibility in aqueous solution. The high temperature treatment was a kind of physical purification treatment method and it just burned the amorphous carbon away and strengthened the structure of MWCNTs, while the concentrated acid treatment was a chemical purification treatment method and this chemical treatment method grafted more effective groups to improve the dispersibility of MWCNTs.

  13. Cryogenic-temperature electron microscopy direct imaging of carbon nanotubes and graphene solutions in superacids.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, O; Parra-Vasquez, A Nicholas G; Green, M J; Behabtu, N; Schmidt, J; Kesselman, E; Young, C C; Cohen, Y; Pasquali, M; Talmon, Y

    2015-07-01

    Cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful tool for imaging liquid and semiliquid systems. While cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) is a standard technique in many fields, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) is still not that widely used and is far less developed. The vast majority of systems under investigation by cryo-EM involve either water or organic components. In this paper, we introduce the use of novel cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM specimen preparation and imaging methodologies, suitable for highly acidic and very reactive systems. Both preserve the native nanostructure in the system, while not harming the expensive equipment or the user. We present examples of direct imaging of single-walled, multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphene, dissolved in chlorosulfonic acid and oleum. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability of these new cryo-TEM and cryo-SEM methodologies to follow phase transitions in carbon nanotube (CNT)/superacid systems, starting from dilute solutions up to the concentrated nematic liquid-crystalline CNT phases, used as the 'dope' for all-carbon-fibre spinning. Originally developed for direct imaging of CNTs and graphene dissolution and self-assembly in superacids, these methodologies can be implemented for a variety of highly acidic systems, paving a way for a new field of nonaqueous cryogenic electron microscopy.

  14. Corrosion behavior of titanium alloy Beta-21S coated with diamond like carbon in Hank's solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, L.; Anandan, C.; Grips, V. K. William

    2012-06-01

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings posses high hardness and low friction coefficient and also biocompatible, hence, they are of interest for enhancing the wear and corrosion resistance of bio-implant materials. Beta stabilized titanium alloys are attractive for biomedical applications because of their high specific strength and low modulus. In this work Beta-21S alloy (Ti-15Mo-3Nb-3Al-0.2Si) was implanted with carbon ions by plasma immersion ion implantation using methane and hydrogen gas mixture followed by DLC deposition by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The implanted layers enabled deposition of adherent diamond-like carbon coatings on the titanium alloy which was otherwise not possible. The corrosion behavior of the treated and untreated samples was investigated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization studies in simulated body fluid (Hank's solution). XPS, micro Raman and EDAX investigation of the samples showed the formation of a thin oxide layer on the treated samples after corrosion experiments. Corrosion resistance of the DLC coated sample is comparable with that of the untreated samples. Electrochemical impedance data of the substrate and implanted samples were fitted with two time constant equivalent circuits and that of DLC coated samples with two-layer model.

  15. Solute Export and Carbon Dioxide Trends of the Altamaha River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuong, C. K.; Patel, K.; Karim, A.

    2007-12-01

    The Altamaha River Basin (ARB), a major drainage of the Atlantic seaboard, was monitored near Jesup, Georgia, on a biweekly frequency during April 2006 through June 2007. Alkalinity, pH, temperature, and Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) were measured in the field. Geographic Information Systems and historical precipitation and stream flow were used to calculate mean annual: (1) precipitation flux into the basin; (2) runoff from the basin; (3) solute export; and (4) partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). The mean annual precipitation flux to the ARB is 46.4 km3. Runoff near the mouth of the Altamaha River is 12.1 km3 or about 26% of the precipitation input, implying that roughly three quarters of all the rain that falls on the basin is lost to evapotranspiration. The ARB has discharge-weighted average TDS concentration of 53.3 mg/L and annually exports 646,445 metric tons of dissolved solutes to the Atlantic Ocean. The pCO2 values range between close to atmospheric equilibrium in May to 106 times above atmospheric equilibrium in December. For the rising limb of the hydrograph, pCO2 trend mimics stream flow with pCO2 peak occurring about a month ahead of discharge. The low values probably indicate CO2 drawdown by aquatic photosynthesis and higher values indicate discharge of wastewater/shallow groundwater charged with bacterially respired carbon dioxide. Thus, the ARB was a net source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during the water year 2006-2007.

  16. [Studies on carbonization of saccharides by using aqueous solution of various acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; He, An-Qi; Kang, Ting-Guo; Xia, Jin-Ming; Weng, Shi-Fu; Xu, Yi-Zhuang; Wu, Jin-Guang

    2014-09-01

    The authors tried to establish an approach to use acids to convert biomass into a fuel with higher carbon content and lower oxygen content in a zero-energy-consumption fashion. Considering that biomass is composed of monosaccharide, we used aqueous solutions of variation acids including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and perchloric acid to treat 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose at ambient temperature and pressure. Black substances were produced after a period of time when 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose were mixed with aqueous solutions containing 8 mol · L(-1) acids. The black substance was collected and characterized by using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Elemental analysis results indicate that the contents of carbon increases significantly in the black substances in comparison with 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. Moreover, XPS results indicate that the content of oxygen in the black substance undergoes a significant decrease compared with pure 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. In the XPS spectra, the is peaks of 2-deoxy-ribose, strong sub peak at 286. 05 eV, which is assigned to carbon linked to oxygen directly, dominate in the C is peak envelop. After treatment by HClO4, the peak decreased dramatically. This result also supports the conclusion that the content of oxygen in mono-saccharide is significantly reduced after treatment by acids. In the FTIR spectra of the black substances, strong peaks can be observed around 1 600 cm(-1), indicating that C==C bond is formed in the product. The above results suggest that treatments with acids may be developed as a new zero-energy-consumption approach to convert biomass in a new fuel with improved energy output efficiency.

  17. Adsorption of Direct Blue 53 dye from aqueous solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Prola, Lizie D T; Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; de Souza, Felipe E; Gally, Caline R; Lima, Eder C; Adebayo, Matthew A; Dias, Silvio L P; Calvete, Tatiana

    2013-11-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and powder activated carbon (PAC) were used as adsorbents for adsorption of Direct Blue 53 dye (DB-53) from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised using Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of initial pH, contact time and temperature on adsorption capacity of the adsorbents were investigated. At pH 2.0, optimum adsorption of the dye was achieved by both adsorbents. Equilibrium contact times of 3 and 4 h were achieved by MWCNT and PAC adsorbents, respectively. The general order kinetic model provided the best fit of the experimental data compared to pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic adsorption models. For DB-53 dye, the equilibrium data (298-323 K) were best fitted to the Sips isotherm model. The maximum sorption capacity for adsorption of the dye occurred at 323 K, with the values of 409.4 and 135.2 mg g(-1) for MWCNT and PAC, respectively. Studies of adsorption/desorption were conducted and the results showed that DB-53 loaded MWCNT could be regenerated (97.85%) using a mixture 50% acetone + 50% of 3 mol L(-1) NaOH. Simulated dye house effluents were used to evaluate the application of the adsorbents for effluent treatment (removal of 99.87% and 97.00% for MWCNT and PAC, respectively, were recorded).

  18. Trends in soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations across European forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino-Serrano, Marta; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Vicca, Sara; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Jonard, Mathieu; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Gielen, Bert; Peñuelas, Josep; Sardans, Jordi; Waldner, Peter; Etzold, Sophia; Cecchini, Guia; Clarke, Nicholas; Galić, Zoran; Gandois, Laure; Hansen, Karin; Johnson, Jim; Klinck, Uwe; Lachmanová, Zora; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Meesenburg, Henning; Nieminen, Tiina M.; Sanders, Tanja G. M.; Sawicka, Kasia; Seidling, Walter; Thimonier, Anne; Vanguelova, Elena; Verstraeten, Arne; Vesterdal, Lars; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters is connected to DOC in soil solution through hydrological pathways. Therefore, it is expected that long-term dynamics of DOC in surface waters reflect DOC trends in soil solution. However, a multitude of site studies have failed so far to establish consistent trends in soil solution DOC, whereas increasing concentrations in European surface waters over the past decades appear to be the norm, possibly as a result of recovery from acidification. The objectives of this study were therefore to understand the long-term trends of soil solution DOC from a large number of European forests (ICP Forests Level II plots) and determine their main physico-chemical and biological controls. We applied trend analysis at two levels: (1) to the entire European dataset and (2) to the individual time series and related trends with plot characteristics, i.e., soil and vegetation properties, soil solution chemistry and atmospheric deposition loads. Analyses of the entire dataset showed an overall increasing trend in DOC concentrations in the organic layers, but, at individual plots and depths, there was no clear overall trend in soil solution DOC. The rate change in soil solution DOC ranged between -16.8 and +23 % yr-1 (median = +0.4 % yr-1) across Europe. The non-significant trends (40 %) outnumbered the increasing (35 %) and decreasing trends (25 %) across the 97 ICP Forests Level II sites. By means of multivariate statistics, we found increasing trends in DOC concentrations with increasing mean nitrate (NO3-) deposition and increasing trends in DOC concentrations with decreasing mean sulfate (SO42-) deposition, with the magnitude of these relationships depending on plot deposition history. While the attribution of increasing trends in DOC to the reduction of SO42- deposition could be confirmed in low to medium N deposition areas, in agreement with observations in surface waters, this was not the case in high N deposition areas. In

  19. Covalent cum noncovalent functionalizations of carbon nanotubes for effective reinforcement of a solution cast composite film.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2012-04-01

    Although carbon nanotubes have impressive tensile properties, exploiting these properties in composites, especially those made by the common solution casting technique, seems to be elusive thus far. The reasons could be partly due to the poor nanotube dispersion and the weak nanotube/matrix interface. To solve this dual pronged problem, we combine noncovalent and covalent functionalizations of nanotubes in a single system by the design and application of a novel dispersant, hydroxyl polyimide-graft-bisphenol A diglyceryl acrylate (PI(OH)-BDA), and use them with epoxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNTs). Our novel PI(OH)-BDA dispersant functionalizes the nanotubes noncovalently to achieve good dispersion of the nanotubes because of the strong π-π interaction due to main chain and steric hindrance of the BDA side chain. PI(OH)-BDA also functionalizes O-SWNTs covalently because it reacts with epoxide groups on the nanotubes, as well as the cyanate ester (CE) matrix used. The resulting solution-cast CE composites show 57%, 71%, and 124% increases in Young's modulus, tensile strength, and toughness over neat CE. These values are higher than those of composites reinforced with pristine SWNTs, epoxidized SWNTs, and pristine SWNTs dispersed with PI(OH)-BDA. The modulus and strength increase per unit nanotube weight fraction, i.e., dE/dW(NT) and dσ/dW(NT), are 175 GPa and 7220 MPa, respectively, which are significantly higher than those of other nanotube/thermosetting composites (22-70 GPa and 140-3540 MPa, respectively). Our study indicates that covalent cum noncovalent functionalization of nanotubes is an effective tool for improving both the nanotube dispersion and nanotube/matrix interfacial interaction, resulting in significantly improved mechanical reinforcement of the solution-cast composites.

  20. Crustal solute fluxes and transient carbon dioxide drawdown in the Scottbreen Basin, Svalbard in 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Wiesława Ewa; Bartoszewski, Stefan A.

    2008-12-01

    SummarySolute fluxes and transient carbon dioxide drawdown in a small glacierized basin investigated on Svalbard in 2002 are presented. It was a sample year within a period of significant climate warming in the Arctic. Discharge was recorded in the Scottbreen Basin (10.1 km 2), Bellsund Fjord, between July 8 and September 10, 2002. Specific runoff for this period was 0.784 m, 22% more than the mean for 1986-2001. The runoff for all of 2002 (i.e. the hydrologic year) was estimated by comparison with Bayelva, the only glacial river with longer records on Svalbard. The specific runoff for 2002 was ˜1.228 m, yielding crustal solute fluxes of 69.4 t km -2 yr -1 (25.8 m 3 km -2 yr -1). This rate is the highest chemical denudation rate reported from glacierized basins on Svalbard, and it may be underestimated because higher solute fluxes at the beginning of the melt season were not taken into account. Crustal fluxes in the fall may also have been higher because it is probable that crustal ion concentrations were increasing after recording stopped in September. The cation denudation rate was 1213 ∑ meq + m -2 yr -1 and the mean annual crustal ion concentration derived from it amounted to 981 μeq L -1. Transient CO 2 drawdown in 2002 was 5242 kg C km -2 yr -1. Most of the carbon dioxide was removed in the summer ablation waters, estimated CO 2 drawdown in the fall being only 13% of the total. Comparison with crustal solute fluxes (CSF) computed from specific conductivity in the 1980s and 1990s suggests that earlier fluxes may have been overestimated by around 19%. Comparing earlier data with the 2002 rates may confirm the influence of climate warming on increasing chemical denudation rates. It was also found that a globally derived equation relating specific conductivity to concentrations of dissolved limestone in water gave estimates of the crustal solute fluxes that were only 1.1% less than those obtained via comprehensive chemical analyses of waters and ion

  1. Linking mineralisation process and sedimentary product in terrestrial carbonates using a solution thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogerson, M.; Pedley, H. M.; Kelham, A.; Wadhawan, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    Determining the processes which generate terrestrial carbonate deposits (tufas, travertines and to a lesser extent associated chemical sediments such as calcretes and speleothems) is a long-standing problem. Precipitation of mineral products from solution reflects a complex combination of biological, equilibrium and kinetic processes, and the different morphologies of carbonate sediment produced by different processes have yet to be clearly demarked. Building on the groundbreaking work of previous authors, we propose that the underlying control on the processes leading to the deposition of these products can be most parsimoniously understood from the thermodynamic properties of their source solutions. Here, we report initial observations of the differences in product generated from spring and lake systems spanning a range of temperature-supersaturation space. We find that at high supersaturation, biological influences are masked by high rates of physico-chemical precipitation, and sedimentary products from these settings infrequently exhibit classic "biomediated" fabrics such as clotted micrite. Likewise, at high temperature (>40 °C) exclusion of vascular plants and complex/diverse biofilms can significantly inhibit the magnitude of biomediated precipitation, again impeding the likelihood of encountering the "bio-type" fabrics. Conversely, despite the clear division in product between extensive tufa facies associations and less spatially extensive deposits such as oncoid beds, no clear division can be identified between these systems in temperature-supersaturation space. We reiterate the conclusion of previous authors, which demonstrate that this division cannot be made on the basis of physico-chemical characteristics of the solution alone. We further provide a new case study of this division from two adjacent systems in the UK, where tufa-like deposition continuous on a metre scale is happening at a site with lower supersaturation than other sites exhibiting only

  2. Separation of water-ethanol solutions with carbon nanotubes and electric fields.

    PubMed

    Winarto; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2016-12-07

    Bioethanol has been used as an alternative energy source for transportation vehicles to reduce the use of fossil fuels. The separation of water-ethanol solutions from fermentation processes is still an important issue in the production of anhydrous ethanol. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the separation of water-ethanol solutions with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In the absence of an electric field, CNT-ethanol van der Waals interactions allow ethanol to fill the CNTs in preference to water, i.e., a separation effect for ethanol. However, as the CNT diameter increases, this ethanol separation effect significantly decreases owing to a decrease in the strength of the van der Waals interactions. In contrast, under an electric field, the energy of the electrostatic interactions within the water molecule structure induces water molecules to fill the CNTs in preference to ethanol, i.e., a separation effect for water. More importantly, the electrostatic interactions are dependent on the water molecule structure in the CNT instead of the CNT diameter. As a result, the separation effect observed under an electric field does not diminish over a wide CNT diameter range. Moreover, CNTs and electric fields can be used to separate methanol-ethanol solutions too. Under an electric field, methanol preferentially fills CNTs over ethanol in a wide CNT diameter range.

  3. Dispergation and modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chunlai; Cheng, Fang; Su, Hui; Zhao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are widely applied in development of composite materials. However, their properties are directly influenced by the degree of uniformity of dispersion of MWCNTs in the material's matrix. In this paper, the dispersing of raw MWCNTs (R-MWCNTs) and decorated MWCNTs (D-MWCNTs) was studied in aqueous solution. The D-MWCNTs were obtained by chemical modification method by treatment of initial MWCNTs with the mixture of concentrated nitric and sulfuric acids (3: 1 vol/vol). To achieve a good dispersion of the MWCNTs, a method utilizing ultrasonic processing and surfactant (polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP) was employed. MWCNTs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The prepared MWCNTs suspensions were investigated by UV spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements, surface tension and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The D-MWCNTs have better dispersibility in aqueous solution; this attributed to the functional groups formed on their surface during chemical modification. The PVP surfactant in a certain concentration of 0.6 g/L has the maximum dispersing effect on MWCNTs in aqueous solution, the optimum concentration ratio of PVP and MWCNTs was 3: 1.

  4. Mercury adsorption on granular activated carbon in aqueous solutions containing nitrates and chlorides.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, F; Erto, A; Lancia, A; Musmarra, D

    2011-09-15

    Adsorption is an effective process to remove mercury from polluted waters. In spite of the great number of experiments on this subject, the assessment of the optimal working conditions for industrial processes is suffering the lack of reliable models to describe the main adsorption mechanisms. This paper presents a critical analysis of mercury adsorption on an activated carbon, based on the use of chemical speciation analysis to find out correlations between mercury adsorption and concentration of dissolved species. To support this analysis, a comprehensive experimental study on mercury adsorption at different mercury concentrations, temperatures and pH was carried out in model aqueous solutions. This study pointed out that mercury capture occurs mainly through adsorption of cationic species, the adsorption of anions being significant only for basic pH. Furthermore, it was shown that HgOH(+) and Hg(2+) are captured to a higher extent than HgCl(+), but their adsorption is more sensitive to solution pH. Tests on the effect of temperature in a range from 10 to 55 °C showed a peculiar non-monotonic trend for mercury solution containing chlorides. The chemical speciation and the assumption of adsorption exothermicity allow describing this experimental finding without considering the occurrence of different adsorption mechanisms at different temperature.

  5. Adsorption of tetracycline from aqueous solutions onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes with different oxygen contents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Ma, Jie; Han, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different oxygen contents were investigated for the adsorption of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solutions. As the surface oxygen content of the MWCNTs increased, the maximum adsorption capacity and adsorption coefficient of TC increased to the largest values and then decreased. The relation can be attributed to the interplay between the nanotubes' dispersibility and the water cluster formation upon TC adsorption. The overall adsorption kinetics of TC onto CNTs-3.2%O might be dependent on both intra-particle diffusion and boundary layer diffusion. The maximum adsorption capacity of TC on CNTs-3.2%O was achieved in the pH range of 3.3–8.0 due to formation of water clusters or H-bonds. Furthermore, the presence of Cu2+ could significantly enhanced TC adsorption at pH of 5.0. However, the solution ionic strength did not exhibit remarkable effect on TC adsorption. In addition, when pH is beyond the range (3.3–8.0), the electrostatic interactions caused the decrease of TC adsorption capacity. Our results indicate that surface properties and aqueous solution chemistry play important roles in TC adsorption on MWCNTs. PMID:24937315

  6. Significantly reinforced composite fibers electrospun from silk fibroin/carbon nanotube aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui; Zhang, Yaopeng; Hang, Yichun; Shao, Huili; Hu, Xuechao; Xu, Yuemin; Feng, Chao

    2012-09-10

    Microcomposite fibers of regenerated silk fibroin (RSF) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were successfully prepared by an electrospinning process from aqueous solutions. A quiescent blended solution and a three-dimensional Raman image of the composite fibers showed that functionalized MWNTs (F-MWNTs) were well dispersed in the solutions and the RSF fibers, respectively. Raman spectra and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) patterns of RSF/F-MWNT electrospun fibers indicated that the composite fibers had higher β-sheet content and crystallinity than the pure RSF electrospun fibers, respectively. The mechanical properties of the RSF electrospun fibers were improved drastically by incorporating F-MWNTs. Compared with the pure RSF electrospun fibers, the composite fibers with 1.0 wt % F-MWNTs exhibited a 2.8-fold increase in breaking strength, a 4.4-fold increase in Young's modulus, and a 2.1-fold increase in breaking energy. Cytotoxicity test preliminarily demonstrated that the electrospun fiber mats have good biocompatibility for tissue engineering scaffolds.

  7. Microwave-induced carbon nanotubes catalytic degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Song, Youtao; Shen, Manli; Zhang, Zhaohong; Yuan, Tianxin; Tian, Fangyuan; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-06-05

    In this study, a new catalytic degradation technology using microwave induced carbon nanotubes (MW/CNTs) was proposed and applied in the treatment of organic pollutants in aqueous solution. The catalytic activity of three CNTs of 10-20nm, 20-40nm, and 40-60nm diameters were compared. The results showed that organic pollutants such as methyl orange (MO), methyl parathion (MP), sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), bisphenol A (BPA), and methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution could be degraded effectively and rapidly in MW/CNTs system. CNTs with diameter of 10-20nm exhibited the highest catalytic activity of the three CNTs under MW irradiation. Further, complete degradation was obtained using 10-20nm CNTs within 7.0min irradiation when 25mL MO solution (25mg/L), 1.2g/L catalyst dose, 450W, 2450MHz, and pH=6.0 were applied. The rate constants (k) for the degradation of SDBS, MB, MP, MO and BPA using 10-20nm CNTs/MW system were 0.726, 0.679, 0.463, 0.334 and 0.168min(-1), respectively. Therefore, this technology may have potential application for the treatment of targeted organic pollutants in wastewaters.

  8. Catalytic ozonation of pentachlorophenol in aqueous solutions using granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Ghorban; Samiee, Fateme; Ahmadian, Mohammad; Poormohammadi, Ali; solimanzadeh, Bahman

    2014-11-01

    The efficiency of granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated in this study as a catalyst for the elimination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated streams in a laboratory-scale semi-batch reactor. The influence of important parameters including solution pH (2-10), radical scavenger (tert-butanol, 0.04 mol/L), catalyst dosage (0.416-8.33 g/L), initial PCP concentration (100-1000 mg/L) and ozone flow rate (2.3-12 mg/min) was examined on the efficiency of the catalytic ozonation process (COP) in degradation and mineralization of PCP in aqueous solution. The experimental results showed that catalytic ozonation with GAC was most effective at pH of 8 with ozone flow rate of 12 mg/min and a GAC dosage of 2 g. Compared to the sole ozonation process (SOP), the removal levels of PCP and COP were, 98, and 79 %, respectively. The degradation rate of kinetics was also investigated. The results showed that using a GAC catalyst in the ozonation of PCP produced an 8.33-fold increase in rate kinetic compared to the SOP under optimum conditions. Tert-butanol alcohol (TBA) was used as a radical scavenger. The results demonstrated that COP was affected less by TBA than by SOP. These findings suggested that GAC acts as a suitable catalyst in COP to remove refractory pollutants from aqueous solution.

  9. [Machine for washing hospital laboratory vessels].

    PubMed

    Smotriaev, V M; Solov'ev, A A; Shvedov, Iu A; Zakharov, A G

    1977-01-01

    To improve washing laboratory vessels a selection of effective detergents was made and the technology of washing has been worked out. These data formed a groundwork for the construction of the washing machine, model BII-200, whose pilot unit has passed technical and medical tests and is recommended for batch production. The capacity of the machine with the use of the synthetic detergent "Trias" (per cycle): 252 test tubes, 96 microscope slides, 30 Petri dishes. The duration of the washing cycle is 27 min.

  10. Wash water waste pretreatment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were completed on wash waters based on each candidate personal cleansing agent. Evaluations of coagulants, antifoam agents, and the effect of promising antifoams on the chemical precipitation were included. Based on these evaluations two candidate soaps as well as their companion antifoam agents were selected for further work. Operating parameters included the effect of soap concentration, ferric chloride concentration, duration of mixing, and pore size of depth filters on the degree of soap removal. The effect of pressure on water flow through filter cartridges and on the rate of decline of water flow was also investigated. The culmination of the program was the recommendation of a pretreatment concept based on chemical precipitation followed by pressure filtration.

  11. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM AQUEOUS PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Igelsrud, I.; Stephen, E.F.

    1959-08-11

    ABS>A method is presented for recovering hexavalent uranium from an acidic phosphaie solution. A high molecular weight amine, such as a mixture of cccoanut oil amines, is added to the solution in such amount as to give a ratio of about 2000 parts by weight of amine to 1 part by weight of uranium. The uranium is precipitated with the amines and the whole filtered from the solution. The uranium is leached from the amine mass by washing with aqueous sodium carbonate solution; and the amine mixture is available for reuse.

  12. Magnesium bicarbonate and carbonate interactions in aqueous solutions: An infrared spectroscopic and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Lemke, Kono H.; Bénézeth, Pascale; Schott, Jacques

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of magnesium with bicarbonate and carbonate ions in aqueous solutions was studied using infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. Using the infrared vibrational bands for HCO3- and CO32- at 1200-1450 cm-1 (δC-OH, vS and v3) together with their molar absorptivity (ε), the concentrations of the HCO3- and CO32- ions and the corresponding Mg ion pairs have been determined. In the absence of Mg2+, measured spectra were accurately reproduced assuming that only HCO3- and CO32- were present in solution. Upon addition of Mg2+ at fixed pH, infrared spectra were observed to shift indicating presence of the MgHCO3+ and MgCO3 (aq) ion pairs. From measurements, the second ionization constant of carbonic acid and the MgHCO3+ and MgCO3 (aq) ion pair formation constants have been obtained, these being logK2 = -10.34 ± 0.04, logKMgHCO3+ = 1.12 ± 0.11 and logKMgCO3 = 2.98 ± 0.06, respectively. To support our experimental infrared measurements and to gain further insight into the molecular nature of the ion pair formation, density functional theory (DFT) calculations with VPT2 anharmonic correction were conducted. The most stable geometries predicted for the MgHCO3+ and MgCO3 (aq) ion pairs were a bi-dentate [MgHCO3]+(H2O)n and a monodentate [MgHCO3]+(OH)(H2O)n complexes, respectively. The predicted frequencies for HCO3-, CO32- and MgHCO3+ were found to shift toward those experimentally measured with an increasing H2O solvation number where possible band shifts were predicted for MgCO3 (aq) relative to CO32-, this being dependent on the exact structure and hydration of the bulk MgCO3 (aq) ion pair. Experimentally, the ion pair formations were found to have insignificant effects on the δC-OH, vS and v3 vibrational frequencies. The speciation of dissolved inorganic carbon may be significantly influenced by ion pair formation, particularly in alkaline solutions where they may be the predominant species.

  13. Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Short communication: Automatic washing of hooves can help control digital dermatitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Peter T; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Sørensen, Jan Tind

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop and test a system for automatic washing of the hooves of dairy cows and to evaluate the effect of frequent automatic washing on the prevalence of digital dermatitis (DD). An automatic hoof washer was developed in an experimental dairy herd and tested in 6 commercial dairy herds in 2 experiments (1 and 2). In the experimental herd, automatic hoof washing resulted in cleaner hooves. In experiments 1 and 2, cows were washed after each milking on the left side only, leaving the right side unwashed as a within-cow control. In experiment 1, hooves were washed with a water and 0.4% soap solution. In experiment 2, hooves were washed with water only. In each experiment, DD was scored in a hoof-trimming chute approximately 60 d after the start of hoof washing. Data were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. The outcome was the DD status of each leg (DD positive or DD negative). Herd and cow within herd were included as random effects, and treatment (washing or control) was included as a fixed effect. The statistical analyses showed that the odds ratio of having DD was 1.48 in the control leg compared with the washed leg in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the odds ratio of having DD was 1.27 in the control leg compared with the washed leg. We concluded that automatic washing of hooves with water and soap can help decrease the prevalence of DD in commercial dairy herds.

  15. Impact of solution chemistry on viral removal by a single-walled carbon nanotube filter.

    PubMed

    Brady-Estévez, Anna S; Nguyen, Thanh H; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Elimelech, Menachem

    2010-07-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) filter for removal of viruses from water. MS2 bacteriophage viral removal was examined over a range of environmentally relevant solution chemistries, spanning various ionic strengths, monovalent and divalent salts, pH, and natural organic matter (NOM) concentrations. Viral removal by the SWNT filter was governed by physicochemical (depth) filtration. The removal of viruses increased at higher ionic strengths (NaCl) due to suppression of repulsive electrostatic interactions between viruses and SWNTs. Addition of divalent salts, however, had varying impacts. While CaCl(2) increased virus removal, likely due to complexation of calcium ions to viral surfaces, addition of MgCl(2) reduced viral removal by the SWNT filter. Solution pH also had significant impact on viral removal as the interactions between viral particles and SWNTs changed from attractive below the virus isoelectric point (about pH 3.9) to repulsive at higher pH. Suwannee River NOM was shown to be detrimental to filter viral removal. Reduction of viral removal by NOM was attributed to adsorption of NOM macromolecules to viruses and SWNTs, thereby resulting in steric repulsive forces. Modifications of the filter to incorporate thicker SWNT layers mitigate the negative impacts of NOM on filter performance. This study has shown that while it is possible to attain high levels of viral removal over a broad range of solution chemistries, the extent of viral removal will be highly dependent on the specific solution chemistry of the treated water.

  16. Adsorptive Removal of Nitrate from Aqueous Solution Using Nitrogen Doped Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Machida, Motoi; Goto, Tatsuru; Amano, Yoshimasa; Iida, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been widely applied for adsorptive removal of organic contaminants from aqueous phase, but not for ionic pollutants. In this study, nitrogen doped AC was prepared to increase the adsorption capacity of nitrate from water. AC was oxidized with (NH4)2S2O8 solution to maximize oxygen content for the first step, and then NH3 gas treatment was carried out at 950°C to aim at forming quaternary nitrogen (N-Q) species on AC surface (Ox-9.5AG). Influence of solution pH was examined so as to elucidate the relationship between surface charge and adsorption amounts of nitrate. The results showed that Ox-9.5AG exhibited about twice higher adsorption capacity than non-treatment AC at any initial nitrate concentration and any equilibrium solution pH (pHe) investigated. The more decrease in pHe value, the more adsorption amount of negatively charged nitrate ion, because the surface charge of AC and Ox-9.5AG could become more positive in acidic solution. The oxidation and consecutive ammonia treatments lead to increase in nitrogen content from 0.35 to 6.4% and decrease in the pH of the point of zero charge (pHpzc) from 7.1 to 4.0 implying that positively charged N-Q of a Lewis acid was created on the surface of Ox-9.5AG. Based on a Langmuir data analysis, maximum adsorption capacity attained 0.5-0.6 mmol/g of nitrate and adsorption affinity was 3.5-4.0 L/mmol at pHe 2.5 for Ox-9.5AG.

  17. Closed circuit rebreathing to achieve inert gas wash-in for multiple breath wash-out

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Katherine; Downey, Damian G.; Elborn, J. Stuart; Bell, Nicholas J.; Smith, Jaclyn; Owers-Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Multiple breath wash-out (MBW) testing requires prior wash-in of inert tracer gas. Wash-in efficiency can be enhanced by a rebreathing tracer in a closed circuit. Previous attempts to deploy this did not account for the impact of CO2 accumulation on patients and were unsuccessful. We hypothesised that an effective rebreathe wash-in could be delivered and it would not alter wash-out parameters. Computer modelling was used to assess the impact of the rebreathe method on wash-in efficiency. Clinical testing of open and closed circuit wash-in–wash-out was performed in healthy controls and adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) using a circuit with an effective CO2 scrubber and a refined wash-in protocol. Wash-in efficiency was enhanced by rebreathing. There was no difference in mean lung clearance index between the two wash-in methods for controls (6.5 versus 6.4; p=0.2, n=12) or patients with CF (10.9 versus 10.8; p=0.2, n=19). Test time was reduced by rebreathe wash-in (156 versus 230 s for CF patients, p<0.001) and both methods were well tolerated. End wash-in CO2 was maintained below 2% in most cases. Rebreathe–wash-in is a promising development that, when correctly deployed, reduces wash-in time and facilitates portable MBW testing. For mild CF, wash-out outcomes are equivalent to an open circuit. PMID:27730167

  18. Closed circuit rebreathing to achieve inert gas wash-in for multiple breath wash-out.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Alex R; O'Neill, Katherine; Downey, Damian G; Elborn, J Stuart; Bell, Nicholas J; Smith, Jaclyn; Owers-Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Multiple breath wash-out (MBW) testing requires prior wash-in of inert tracer gas. Wash-in efficiency can be enhanced by a rebreathing tracer in a closed circuit. Previous attempts to deploy this did not account for the impact of CO2 accumulation on patients and were unsuccessful. We hypothesised that an effective rebreathe wash-in could be delivered and it would not alter wash-out parameters. Computer modelling was used to assess the impact of the rebreathe method on wash-in efficiency. Clinical testing of open and closed circuit wash-in-wash-out was performed in healthy controls and adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) using a circuit with an effective CO2 scrubber and a refined wash-in protocol. Wash-in efficiency was enhanced by rebreathing. There was no difference in mean lung clearance index between the two wash-in methods for controls (6.5 versus 6.4; p=0.2, n=12) or patients with CF (10.9 versus 10.8; p=0.2, n=19). Test time was reduced by rebreathe wash-in (156 versus 230 s for CF patients, p<0.001) and both methods were well tolerated. End wash-in CO2 was maintained below 2% in most cases. Rebreathe-wash-in is a promising development that, when correctly deployed, reduces wash-in time and facilitates portable MBW testing. For mild CF, wash-out outcomes are equivalent to an open circuit.

  19. Removal of dyes from aqueous solutions using activated carbon prepared from rice husk residue.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaxin; Zhang, Xian; Yang, Ruiguang; Li, Guiying; Hu, Changwei

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of dye wastewater by activated carbon (AC) prepared from rice husk residue wastes was studied. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to investigate the effects of contact time, initial concentration (50-450 mg/L), pH (3-11) and temperature (30-70 °C) on the removal of methylene blue (MB), neutral red, and methyl orange. Kinetic investigation revealed that the adsorption of dyes followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The results suggested that AC was effective to remove dyes, especially MB, from aqueous solutions. Desorption studies found that chemisorption by the adsorbent might be the major mode of dye removal. Fourier transform infrared results suggested that dye molecules were likely to combine with the O-H and P=OOH groups of AC.

  20. Electrosorption of ions from aqueous solutions with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers composite film electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. Z.; Li, M. G.; Chen, Y. W.; Cheng, R. M.; Huang, S. M.; Pan, L. K.; Sun, Z.

    2006-07-31

    Electrosorption of ions from aqueous solutions with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers (CNTs-CNFs) composite film electrodes has been demonstrated. The large area CNTs-CNFs film was directly grown on Ni plate by low pressure and low temperature thermal chemical vapor deposition. The CNTs-CNFs electrodes have great advantages such as low cost, easy operation, long-term reproducibility, and integrity of monolithic CNTs-CNFs film and current collector. Batch-mode experiments at low voltage (0.4-2 V) were conducted in a continuously recycling system to investigate the electrosorption process. Purification of water with good reproducibility was achieved because of optimal pore size distribution of CNTs-CNFs composite films.

  1. Heterogeneous adsorption of activated carbon nanofibers synthesized by electrospinning polyacrylonitrile solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Kang, Hyun-Chul; Shim, Wang-Geun; Kim, Chan; Yang, Kap-Seung; Moon, Hee

    2006-11-01

    This study focuses on the adsorption properties of activated carbon nanofibers (CNFs) fabricated by electrospinning polyacrylonitrile solutions dissolved in dimethylformamide, followed by heat treatment at high activation temperatures (700, 750, 800 degrees C). The samples were characterized by BET, SEM, and XRD. In addition, the adsorption energy distribution functions of CNFs were analyzed by using the generalized nonlinear regularization method. Comparative analysis of energy distribution functions provided significant information on the energetic and structural heterogeneities of CNFs. Furthermore, an investigation of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of methylene blue (MB) and congo red (CR) revealed that the adsorption capacity and kinetics of MB are much higher and faster than that of CR on a given sample. Our experimental and theoretical results suggest that the CNFs used in this work may be widely used as an adsorbent.

  2. Kinetic adsorption of application of carbon nanotubes for Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kabbashi, Nassereldeen A; Atieh, Muataz A; Al-Mamun, Abdullah; Mirghami, Mohamed E S; Alam, M D Z; Yahya, Noorahayu

    2009-01-01

    The capability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to adsorb lead (Pb) in aqueous solution was investigated. Batch mode adsorption experiment was conducted to determine the effects of pH, agitation speed, CNTs dosage and contact time. The removal of Pb(II) reached maximum value 85% or 83% at pH 5 or 40 mg/L of CNTs, respectively. Higher correlation coefficients from Langmuir isotherm model indicates the strong adsorptions of Pb(II) on the surface of CNTs (adsorption capacity Xm = 102.04 mg/g). The results indicates that the highest percentage removal of Pb (96.03%) can be achieved at pH 5, 40 mg/L of CNTs, contact time 80 min, and agitation speed 50 r/min.

  3. Oxidative treatment, dispersion effect, and simulation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kai; Guo, Li-Quan; Chen, Hui

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified by the treatment with concentrated nitric and sulfuric acid mixture (3: 1 vol/vol). The obtained material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of two surfactants, methylcellulose (MC) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on dispersing of MWCNTs in aqueous solution was monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Also, the dispersing effect of the surfactants was simulated by three-dimensional Monte Carlo method. The results showed that the oxidative treatment leads to purification of the neat MWCNTs, and directly improved their dispersing. The mixture containing both MC and CTAB surfactants has better dispersing effect than individual surfactants. The optimum concentration ratio of MC, CTAB, and MWCNTs was 2: 3: 1. In the simulation model, MWCNTs were dispersed randomly. The simulation results may be helpful for the further research on mechanical and electrical properties of composites reinforced with MWCNTs.

  4. Hybrid transparent electrodes of silver nanowires and carbon nanotubes: a low-temperature solution process.

    PubMed

    Tokuno, Takehiro; Nogi, Masaya; Jiu, Jinting; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2012-05-31

    Hybrid transparent electrodes with silver nanowires (AgNWs) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated on plastic films by a low-temperature solution process. The hybrid transparent electrodes exhibited a sheet resistance of 29.2 Ω/sq with a transparency of 80% when 6 wt.% of SWCNTs was mixed with AgNWs. This sheet resistance was less than one-fourth that of the AgNW transparent electrodes that were prepared using the same method. This reduction in sheet resistance is because the SWCNTs formed bridges between the AgNWs, thus, resulting in high conductivity of the hybrid transparent electrodes. The hybrid electrodes formed on plastic films exhibited high conductivity as well as excellent stability in sheet resistance when tested using a repeated bending test.PACS: 62.23.Hj; 61.48.De; 81.15.-z.

  5. Electrosorption of ions from aqueous solutions with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers composite film electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Z.; Li, M. G.; Chen, Y. W.; Cheng, R. M.; Huang, S. M.; Pan, L. K.; Sun, Z.

    2006-07-01

    Electrosorption of ions from aqueous solutions with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers (CNTs-CNFs) composite film electrodes has been demonstrated. The large area CNTs-CNFs film was directly grown on Ni plate by low pressure and low temperature thermal chemical vapor deposition. The CNTs-CNFs electrodes have great advantages such as low cost, easy operation, long-term reproducibility, and integrity of monolithic CNTs-CNFs film and current collector. Batch-mode experiments at low voltage (0.4-2V) were conducted in a continuously recycling system to investigate the electrosorption process. Purification of water with good reproducibility was achieved because of optimal pore size distribution of CNTs-CNFs composite films.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of carbamate formation from CO2(aq), carbonate species, and monoethanolamine in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    McCann, Nichola; Phan, Duong; Wang, Xiaoguang; Conway, William; Burns, Robert; Attalla, Moetaz; Puxty, Graeme; Maeder, Marcel

    2009-04-30

    Removal of carbon dioxide from fossil-based power generation is a potentially useful technique for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Reversible interaction with aqueous amine solutions is most promising. In this process, the formation of carbamates is an important reaction of carbon dioxide. In this contribution, a detailed molecular reaction mechanism for the carbamate formation between MEA (monoethanolamine) and dissolved CO(2) as well as carbonate species in aqueous solution is presented. There are three parallel, reversible reactions of the free amine with CO(2), carbonic acid, and the bicarbonate ion; the relative importance of the three paths is strongly pH dependent. Kinetic and equilibrium measurements are based on (1)H NMR and stopped-flow measurements with rate constants, equilibrium constants, and protonation constants being reported.

  7. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Solids Washing

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, David L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Toth, James J.; Huckaby, James L.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2009-08-14

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. Two operating scenarios were evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-VSL-T01A/B ultrafiltration feed vessels, identified as Integrated Test A. The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-VSL-T02A ultrafiltration feed preparation vessel, identified as Integrated Test B. Washing operations in PEP Integrated Tests A and B were conducted successfully as per the approved run sheets. However, various minor instrumental problems occurred, and some of the process conditions specified in the run sheet were not met during the wash operations, such as filter-loop flow-rate targets not being met. Five analytes were selected based on full solubility and monitored in the post-caustic-leach wash as successful indicators of washing efficiency. These were aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, and free hydroxide. Other analytes, including sodium, oxalate, phosphate, and total dissolved solids, showed indications of changing solubility; therefore, they were unsuitable for monitoring washing efficiency. In the post-oxidative-leach wash, two analytes with full solubility were selected as suitable indicators of washing

  8. Kinetics of adsorption of dyes from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot.

    PubMed

    Onal, Yunus

    2006-10-11

    Adsorbent (WA11Zn5) has been prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation with ZnCl(2). Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by N(2) adsorption and DFT plus software. Adsorption of three dyes, namely, Methylene Blue (MB), Malachite Green (MG), Crystal Violet (CV), onto activated carbon in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system with respect to contact time, temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of MB, MG and CV have been discussed using six kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the Elovich equation, the intraparticle diffusion model, the Bangham equation, the modified Freundlich equation. Kinetic parameters and correlation coefficients were determined. It was shown that the second-order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption kinetics for three dyes. The dyes uptake process was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at earlier stages (before 5 min) and by intraparticle diffusion at later stages (after 5 min). Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG, DeltaH and DeltaS, have been calculated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficient obtained at different temperatures and concentrations. The thermodynamics of dyes-WA11Zn5 system indicates endothermic process.

  9. Hybrid multiwalled carbon nanotube--Laponite sorbent for removal of methylene blue from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Loginov, Maksym; Lebovka, Nikolai; Vorobiev, Eugene

    2014-10-01

    The article discusses adsorption of methylene blue dye by novel hybrid sorbent consisting of Laponite and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The sorbent was obtained by sonication of the aqueous suspensions of nanotubes at different concentrations of Laponite. The methods of the methylene blue adsorption, dead-end membrane filtration and environmental scanning electron microscopy were used for the sorbent characterization. It may be concluded from the results of filtration and adsorption experiments that sonication of mixed aqueous suspensions of Laponite and multiwalled carbon nanotubes leads to the formation of hybrid particles (ML-particles) with a core-shell structure. The size and the shape of hybrid particles were determined by nanotubes, while their adsorption properties were determined by Laponite particles attached to the surface of nanotubes. The Laponite content in hybrid particles was corresponding to the Laponite to nanotubes ratio in the initial suspension X(L)=0-1. Due to the presence of Laponite in the sorbent, its adsorbing capacity was much higher as compared to the adsorbing capacity of pure nanotubes, and it was directly proportional to the Laponite content. This sorbent may be used either as a purifying additive or as a filtering layer if it is deposited on the surface of a supporting membrane. Due to relatively large size of hybrid particles, they can be easily separated from the purified solution by filtration or centrifugation.

  10. Mechanisms of enhanced total organic carbon elimination from oxalic acid solutions by electro-peroxone process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijiao; Yuan, Shi; Zhan, Juhong; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that combines ozonation and electrolysis process to enhance pollutant degradation during water and wastewater treatment. This enhancement has been mainly attributed to several mechanisms that increase O3 transformation to ·OH in the E-peroxone system, e.g., electro-generation of H2O2 from O2 at a carbon-based cathode and its subsequent peroxone reaction with O3 to ·OH, electro-reduction of O3 to ·OH at the cathode, and O3 decomposition to ·OH at high local pH near the cathode. To get more insight how these mechanisms contribute respectively to the enhancement, this study investigated total organic carbon (TOC) elimination from oxalic acid (OA) solutions by the E-peroxone process. Results show that the E-peroxone process significantly increased TOC elimination rate by 10.2-12.5 times compared with the linear addition of the individual rates of corresponding ozonation and electrolysis process. Kinetic analyses reveal that the electrochemically-driven peroxone reaction is the most important mechanism for the enhanced TOC elimination rate, while the other mechanisms contribute minor to the enhancement by a factor of 1.6-2.5. The results indicate that proper selection of electrodes that can effectively produce H2O2 at the cathode is critical to maximize TOC elimination in the E-peroxone process.

  11. Salt Solutions in Carbon Nanotubes: The Role of Cation- π Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Mortuza, Golam; Wood, Brandon; Lau, Edmond; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Buchsbaum, Steven; Siwy, Zuzanna; Fornasiero, Francesco; Schwegler, Eric

    Understanding the structure of aqueous electrolytes at interfaces is essential for predicting and optimizing device performances for a wide variety of emerging energy and environmental technologies. In this work, we investigate the structure of two common salt solutions, NaCl and KCl, at a hydrophobic interface within narrow carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Using a combination of first-principles and classical molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the solvation structure of the cations in the CNTs can deviate substantially from the conventional weakly interacting hydrophobic picture. Instead, interactions between solvated ions and the π-orbitals of the CNTs are found to play a critically important role, with the ion solvation structure ultimately determined by a subtle interplay between cation- π interactions and the intrinsic flexibility of the solvation shell. In the case of K+, these effects result in an unusually strong propensity to partially desolvate and reside closer to the carbon wall than either Na+ and Cl-, in sharp contrast to the known ion ordering at the water-vapor interface. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. An experimental design approach for modeling As(V) adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bakkal Gula, C; Bilgin Simsek, E; Duranoglu, D; Beker, U

    2015-01-01

    The present paper discusses response surface methodology as an efficient approach for predictive model building and optimization of As(V) adsorption on activated carbon derived from a food industry waste: peach stones. The objectives of the study are application of a three-factor 2³ full factorial and central composite design technique for maximizing As(V) removal by produced activated carbon, and examination of the interactive effects of three independent variables (i.e., solution pH, temperature, and initial concentration) on As(V) adsorption capacity. Adsorption equilibrium was investigated by using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. First-order and second-order kinetic equations were used for modeling of adsorption kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG °, ΔH °, and ΔS °) were calculated and used to explain the As(V) adsorption mechanism. The negative value of ΔH (-7.778 kJ mol⁻¹) supported the exothermic nature of the sorption process and the Gibbs free energy values (ΔG°) were found to be negative, which indicates that the As(V) adsorption is feasible and spontaneous.

  13. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  14. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard C

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  15. Recovery of glycols, sugars, and Related Multiple -OH Compounds from Dilute-Aqueous Solution by Regenerable Adsorption onto Activated Carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, Daniel

    1999-06-01

    The present research explores the use of adsorption onto activated carbons as a means of recover glycerol, glycols, and sugars from dilute-aqueous solution. Our work is focused on understanding the mechanisms of adsorption onto carbons, assessing the degree of adsorption reversibility with precision, and implementing a bench-scale recovery process that results in a higher product concentration and reduction of the energy load for final purification.

  16. Direct Assembly of Modified Proteins on Carbon Nanotubes in an Aqueous Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Park, Cheol; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have superior mechanical and electrical properties that have opened up many potential applications. However, poor dispersibility and solubility, due to the substantial van der Waals attraction between tubes, have prevented the use of CNTs in practical applications, especially biotechnology applications. Effective dispersion of CNTs into small bundles or individual tubes in solvents is crucial to ensure homogeneous properties and enable practical applications. In addition to dispersion of CNTs into a solvent, the selection of appropriate solvent, which is compatible with a desired matrix, is an important factor to improve the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical properties of CNT-based fibers and composites. In particular, dispersion of CNTs into an aqueous system has been a challenge due to the hydrophobic nature of CNTs. Here we show an effective method for dispersion of both single wall CNTs (SWCNTs) and few wall CNTs (FWCNTs) in an aqueous buffer solution. We also show an assembly of cationized Pt-cored ferritins on the well dispersed CNTs in an aqueous buffer solution.

  17. Fluorophore and dye-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Koh, Byumseok; Kim, Gwangseong; Yoon, Hyung Ki; Park, Jong Bae; Kopelman, Raoul; Cheng, Wei

    2012-08-14

    DNA short oligo, surfactant, peptides, and polymer-assisted dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) in aqueous solution have been intensively studied. It has been suggested that van der Waals interaction, π-π stacking, and hydrophobic interaction are major factors that account for the SWCNTs dispersion. Fluorophore and dye molecules such as Rhodamine B and fluorescein have both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. These molecules also contain π-conjugated systems that can potentially interact with SWCNTs to induce its dispersion. Through a systematic study, here we show that SWCNTs can be dispersed in aqueous solution in the presence of various fluorophore or dye molecules. However, the ability of a fluorophore or dye molecule to disperse SWCNTs is not correlated with the stability of the fluorophore/dye-SWCNT complex, suggesting that the on-rate of fluorophore/dye binding to SWCNTs may dominate the efficiency of this process. We also examined the uptake of fluorophore molecules by mammalian cells when these molecules formed complexes with SWCNTs. The results can have potential applications in the delivery of poor cell-penetrating fluorophore molecules.

  18. Removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Di; Tan, Xiaoli; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke

    2008-06-15

    Oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were employed as sorbent to study the sorption characteristic of Pb(II) from aqueous solution as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, and oxidized MWCNTs' contents under ambient conditions using batch technique. The results indicate that sorption of Pb(II) on oxidized MWCNTs is strongly dependent on pH values, and independent of ionic strength and the type of foreign ions. The removal of Pb(II) to oxidized MWCNTs is rather quickly and the kinetic sorption can be described by a pseudo-second-order model very well. Sorption of Pb(II) is mainly dominated by surface complexation rather than ion exchange. The efficient removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution is limited at pH 7-10. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is performed to study the sorption mechanism at a molecular level and thereby to identify the species of the sorption processes. The 3-D relationship of pH, Ceq and q indicates that all the data of Ceq-q lie in a straight line with slope -V/m and intercept C0V/m for the same initial concentration of Pb(II) and same content of oxidized MWCNTs of each experimental data.

  19. Removal of lead(II) from aqueous solutions using carbonate hydroxyapatite extracted from eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dexiang; Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Yue, Xiu; Guo, Liang; Zeng, Guangming

    2010-05-15

    Carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHAP) synthesized from eggshell waste was used for removing lead ion from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH, contact time and initial concentration were studied in batch experiments. The maximum uptake of lead ion was obtained at pH 6.0. Adsorption equilibrium was established by 60 min. The pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied to study the kinetics of the sorption processes. The pseudo-second order kinetic model provided the best correlation (R(2)>0.9991) of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models. The adsorption of lead ion by CHAP increased as the initial concentration of lead ion increased in the medium. The maximum lead ion adsorbed was found to be 101 mg g(-1). It was found that the adsorption of Pb(II) on CHAP was correlated well (R(2)=0.9995) with the Langmuir equation as compared to Freundlich isotherm equation under the concentration range studied. This study indicated that CHAP could be used as an efficient adsorbent for removal of lead ion from aqueous solution.

  20. Thermodynamic modeling of solute adsorption equilibrium from near-critical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoning

    2004-05-15

    Modeling of adsorption equilibrium for supercritical fluid mixtures, with as few parameters as possible, is important in applications of the technology of supercritical fluid adsorption. In this paper, a correlative model has been developed to represent the adsorption equilibria of solutes from the near-critical CO(2) fluid. A two-dimensional van der Waals equation of state and the three-dimensional P - R equation of state were used to describe the adsorbed and bulk phases, respectively. This model contains five parameters for adsorption equilibrium isotherms at finite concentrations and two parameters for adsorption equilibrium constants at infinite dilution. All the parameters are independent of temperature and pressure. By applying the model to the experimental data from the literature, it was shown that this model is capable of describing the adsorption behavior of solutes from supercritical carbon dioxide over relatively wide temperature and pressure ranges. In addition, the adsorption behavior of supercritical fluid mixtures was investigated at finite and infinite dilution conditions.

  1. Arsenic removal from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto iron oxide/activated carbon magnetic composite

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work the adsorption features of activated carbon and the magnetic properties of iron oxides were combined in a composite to produce magnetic adsorbent. Batch experiments were conducted to study the adsorption behavior of arsenate onto the synthetic magnetic adsorbent. The effects of initial solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and co-existing anionic component on the adsorption of arsenate were investigated. The results showed that the removal percentage of arsenate could be over 95% in the conditions of adsorbent dosage 5.0 g/L, initial solution pH 3.0-8.0, and contact time 1 h. Under the experimental conditions, phosphate and silicate caused greater decrease in arsenate removal percentage among the anions, and sulfate had almost no effect on the adsorption of arsenate. Kinetics study showed that the overall adsorption rate of arsenate was illustrated by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich models for the arsenate adsorption data was tested. Both the models adequately describe the experimental data. Moreover, the magnetic composite adsorbent could be easily recovered from the medium by an external magnetic field. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by arsenate. PMID:24602339

  2. Solution-processed zinc oxide nanoparticles/single-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangmei; Sun, Jia; Qian, Chuan; Hu, Xiaotao; Wu, Han; Huang, Yulan; Yang, Junliang

    2016-09-01

    Solution-processed thin-film transistors (TFTs) are the essential building blocks for manufacturing the low-cost and large-area consumptive electronics. Herein, solution-processed TFTs based on the composites of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were fabricated by the methods of spin-coating and doctor-blading. Through controlling the weight of SWCNTs, the ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs fabricated by spin-coating demonstrated a field-effect mobility of 4.7 cm2/Vs and a low threshold voltage of 0.8 V, while the TFTs devices fabricated by doctor-blading technique showed reasonable electrical performance with a mobility of 0.22 cm2/Vs. Furthermore, the ion-gel was used as an efficient electrochemical gate dielectric because of its large electric double-layer capacitance. The operating voltage of all the TFTs devices is as low as 4.0 V. The research suggests that ZnO/SWCNTs TFTs have the potential applications in low-cost, large-area and flexible consumptive electronics, such as chemical-biological sensors and smart label.

  3. Corrosion of used nuclear fuel in aqueous perchlorate and carbonate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoesmith, D. W.; Sunder, S.; Bailey, M. G.; Miller, N. H.

    1996-01-01

    The corrosion of used fuel was investigated using electrodes constructed from fuel pins discharged from the Pickering, Bruce and Darlington CANDU reactors, and compared to the corrosion behaviour observed on unirradiated UO 2 and SIMFUEL. Experiments were carried out in solutions of NaClO 4 (pH˜ 9.5) in the presence and absence of (a) substantial concentrations of sodium carbonate, and (b) additional external gamma fields. Used fuel electrodes reached oxidizing corrosion potentials ( ECORR) rapidly compared with unirradiated UO 2 electrodes. However, optical and SEM examinations showed no evidence for rapid oxidative dissolution. This reaction, expected to be fast since high values of ECORR are observed, appears to be blocked by the accumulation of secondary phases in grain boundaries. The oxidation and dissolution behaviour of used fuel is determined predominantly by (i) the dose rate in solution near the fuel surface, (ii) the extent of burnup (which determines the degree of fission product doping), and (iii) the degree of non-stoichiometry.

  4. Adsorption kinetics of a basic dye from aqueous solutions onto apricot stone activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Demirbas, E; Kobya, M; Sulak, M T

    2008-09-01

    The preparation of activated carbon from apricot stone with H(2)SO(4) activation and its ability to remove a basic dye, astrazon yellow 7 GL, from aqueous solutions were reported in this study. The adsorbent was characterized by FTIR, BET and SEM, respectively. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as initial dye concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage and temperature were investigated in a batch-adsorption technique. The optimum conditions for removal of the basic dye were found to be pH 10, 6g/l of adsorbent dosage and equilibrium time of 35 min, respectively. A comparison of three kinetic models, the pseudo first-order, second-order and diffusion controlled kinetic models, on the basic dye-adsorbent system showed that the removal rate was heavily dependent on diffusion controlled kinetic models. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption capacity was calculated as 221.23 mg/g at 50 degrees C. Thermodynamics parameters were also evaluated. The values of enthalpy and entropy were 49.87 kJ/mol and 31.93 J/mol K, respectively, indicating that this process was spontaneous and endothermic. The experimental studies were indicated that ASC had the potential to act as an alternative adsorbent to remove the basic dye from aqueous solutions.

  5. Adsorption and desorption of dissolved organic matter by carbon nanotubes: Effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to their introduction into the environment where they can interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). This study focuses on solution chemistry effects on DOM adsorption/desorption processes by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Our data show that DOM adsorption is controlled by the attachment of DOM molecules to the SWCNTs, and that the initial adsorption rate is dependent on solution parameters. Adsorbed amount of DOM at high ionic strength was limited, possibly due to alterations in SWCNT bundling. Desorption of DOM performed at low pH resulted in additional DOM adsorption, whereas at high pH, adsorbed DOM amount decreased. The extent of desorption conducted at increased ionic strength was dependent on pre-adsorbed DOM concentration: low DOM loading stimulated additional adsorption of DOM, whereas high DOM loading facilitated release of adsorbed DOM. Elevated ionic strength and increased adsorbed amount of DOM reduced the oxidation temperature of the SWCNTs, suggesting that changes in the assembly of the SWCNTs had occurred. Moreover, DOM-coated SWCNTs at increased ionic strength provided fewer sites for atrazine adsorption. This study enhances our understanding of DOM-SWCNT interactions in aqueous systems influenced by rapid changes in salinity, and facilitates potential use of SWCNTs in water-purification technologies.

  6. [Removal of nitrate from aqueous solution using cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)-modified activated carbon as the adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-Jing; Lin, Jian-Wei; Zhan, Yan-Hui; Fang, Qiao; Yang, Meng-Juan; Wang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Surfactant-modified activated carbon (SMAC) was prepared by loading cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) onto activated carbon and used as adsorbents to remove nitrate from aqueous solution. The SMAC was effective for removing nitrate from aqueous solution. The SMAC exhibited much higher nitrate adsorption capacity than that of the unmodified activated carbon. The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC increased with increasing the CPC loading. The adsorption kinetics of nitrate on SMAC followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium adsorption data of nitrate on SMAC could be described by the Langmuir isotherm model. Based on the Langmuir isotherm model, the maximum nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC with CPC loading amount of444 mmol per 1 kg activated carbon was determined to be 16.1 mg x g(-1). The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC decreased with the increasing solution pH. The presence of competing anions such as chloride, sulfate and bicarbonate reduced the nitrate adsorption capacity. The nitrate adsorption capacity for SMAC slightly decreased with the increasing reaction temperature. Almost 95% of nitrate molecules adsorbed on SMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaCl solution. The main mechanisms for the adsorption of nitrate on SMAC are anionic exchange and electrostatic attraction. The results of this work indicate that SMAC is a promising adsorbent for removing nitrate from aqueous solution.

  7. Sodium carbonate poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium carbonate (known as washing soda or soda ash) is a chemical found in many household and ... products. This article focuses on poisoning due to sodium carbonate. This article is for information only. Do ...

  8. Surfactant-enhanced in-situ soils washing. Final report, March 1985-April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, J.; Traver, R.P.; Downey, D.C.

    1987-09-01

    The objective of this joint Air Force - Environmental Protection Agency project was to demonstrate the feasibility of using surfactants to enhance the washing of petroleum and solvent-contaminated soils. A pilot-scale test of in-situ soils washing was performed at an abandoned fire training area using several surfactant solutions. The results of this study did not show in-situ soils washing as a proven and reliable remediation technology. Several shortfalls were observed and are documented in this report. The report also contains information on the operation of a groundwater treatment system which were successfully used to decontaminate highly polluted groundwater at the site.

  9. Modelling Of Displacement Washing Of Pulp Bed Using Orthogonal Collocation On Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Shelly; Potůček, František; Dhaliwal, S. S.; Kukreja, V. K.

    2009-07-01

    Mechanism of displacement washing of packed bed of porous, compressible and cylindrical particles, e.g., fibers is presented with the help of an axial dispersion model involving Peclet number (Pe) and Biot number (Bi). Bulk fluid concentration and intra-pore solute concentration are related by Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Model equations have been solved using orthogonal collocation on finite elements using Lagrangian interpolating polynomials as base functions. Displacement washing has been simulated using a laboratory washing cell and experiments have been performed on pulp beds formed from unbeaten, unbleached kraft fibers. Model predicted values have been compared with experimental values to check the applicability of the method.

  10. Formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite during adsorption of lead from aqueous solution on oxidized carbons by cold oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S.; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia; Concheso, A.; Montes-Morán, Miguel A.

    2016-11-01

    A new procedure of elimination of Pb2+ from aqueous solution using carbon adsorbents, in which high amounts of cerussite and hydrocerussite are deposited on the carbon surfaces, is reported. The procedure includes the preparation of carbons from selected lignocellulosic wastes (pecan nut shells and peach stones) by single carbonization and further oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. The materials prior and after the oxidation treatment were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM/EDX analysis, adsorption of N2 at -196 °C and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of Pb2+ was carried out in batch systems under constant agitation. The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite on the spent carbon surfaces was confirmed by XRD, SEM/EDX and FT-IR. A Pb2+ removal mechanism is proposed in which a co-precipitation of lead nitrate and calcium carbonate would render the formation of the lead carbonates. In such mechanism, the occurrence of CaCO3 on the surface of the adsorbents plays a crucial role. The presence of calcium carbonate on the precursors is understood on the basis of the thermal evolution of calcium oxalate originally present in the biomass. The oxygen plasma treatment helps to expose the calcium carbonate nanocrystals thus improving dramatically the removal capacity of Pb2+. Accordingly, retention capacities as high as 63 mg of Pb2+ per gram of adsorbent have been attained.

  11. Linking process and product in terrestrial carbonates using a solution thermodynamic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogerson, M.; Pedley, H. M.; Kelham, A.

    2013-09-01

    Determining the processes which generate terrestrial carbonate deposits (tufas, travertines and associated chemical sediments) is a long-standing problem. Deposition of mineral products from solution reflects a complex combination of biological, equilibrium and kinetic processes, and the differences in products these processes produce are yet to be clearly demarked. Building on the groundbreaking work of previous authors, we propose that the underlying control on the processes leading to the deposition of these products can be most parsimoniously understood from the thermodynamic properties of their source solutions. Here, we report initial observations of the differences in product generated from spring and lake systems spanning a range of temperature : supersaturation space. We find that at high supersaturation, biological influences are masked by high rates of spontaneous nucleation and sedimentary products from these settings infrequently exhibit classic "biomediated" fabrics such as clotted micrite. Likewise, at high temperature exclusion of vascular plants and complex/diverse biofilms significantly inhibits the magnitude of biomediated precipitation, again impeding the likelihood of encountering the "bio-type" fabrics. Conversely, despite the clear division in product between extensive tufa facies associations and discontinuous deposits such as oncoid beds, no clear division can be identified between these systems in temperature : supersaturation space. We reiterate the conclusion of previous authors, which demonstrate that this division cannot be made on the basis of physico-chemical characteristics of the solution alone. We further provide a new case study of this division from two adjacent systems in the UK, where continuous tufa-like deposition is happening at a site with lower supersaturation than other sites exhibiting only discontinuous (oncoidal) deposition. However, a strong microbiological division is demonstrated between these sites on the basis of

  12. Analytical solution of geological carbon sequestration under constant pressure injection into a horizontal radial reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, R.; Liou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is believed to be an economically feasible technology to mitigate global warming by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2), the major component of greenhouse gases, from the atmosphere and injecting it into deep geological formations.Several mechanisms can help trap CO2 in the pore space of a geological reservoir, stratigraphic and structural trapping, hydrodynamic trapping, and geochemical trapping.Besides these trapping mechanisms, another important issue that deserves careful attention is the risk of CO2 leakage. The common ';constant injection rate' scenario may induce high pressure buildup that will endanger the mechanical integrity as well as the sealing capability of the cap rock. Instead of injecting CO2 at a constant mass rate, CO2 can be injected into the reservoir by fixing the pressure (usually the bottom-hole pressure) in the injection borehole. By doing so, the inevitable pressure buildup associated with the constant injection scheme can be completely eliminated in the constant pressure injection scheme. In this paper, a semi-analytical solution for CO2 injection with constant pressure was developed. For simplicity, structural and geochemical trapping mechanisms were not considered. Therefore, a horizontal reservoir with infinite radial extent was considered. Prior to injection, the reservoir is fully saturated with the formation brine. It is assumed that CO2 does not mix with brine such that a sharp interface is formed once CO2 invades the brine-saturated pores. Because of the density difference between CO2 and brine, CO2 resides above the interface. Additional assumptions were also made when building up the brine and CO2 mass balance equations: (1) both of the fluids and the geological formations are incompressible, (2) capillary pressure is neglected, (3)there is no fluid flow in the vertical direction, and the horizontal flow satisfies the Darcy's law.In order to solve for the height of brine-CO2 interface, the two

  13. High-pressure saline washing of allografts reduces bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M Y; Salmela, P M; Vuento, R E

    2001-02-01

    60 fresh-frozen bone allografts were contaminated on the operating room floor. No bacterial growth was detected in 5 of them after contamination. The remaining 55 grafts had positive bacterial cultures and were processed with three methods: soaking in saline, soaking in antibiotic solution or washing by high-pressure saline. After high-pressure lavage, the cultures were negative in three fourths of the contaminated allografts. The corresponding figures after soaking grafts in saline and antibiotic solution were one tenth and two tenths, respectively. High-pressure saline cleansing of allografts can be recommended because it improves safety by reducing the superficial bacterial bioburden.

  14. Contaminant resorption during soil washing

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.

    1993-10-01

    To evaluate the applicability of soil washing to a specific site requires some basic research in how contaminants are bound. Much can be learned from sequential extraction methodology based on micronutrient bioavailability studies wherein the soil matrix is chemically dissected to selectively remove particular fixation mechanisms independently. This procedure uses a series of progressively more aggressive solvents to dissolve the principle phases that make up a soil, however, the published studies do not appear to consider the potential for a contaminant released from one type of site to resorb on another site during an extraction. This physical model assumes no ion exchange or adsorption at sites either previously occupied by other ions, or exposed by the dissolution. Therefore, to make engineering use of the sequential extraction data, the release of contamination must be evaluated relative to the effects of resorption. Time release studies were conducted to determine the optimum duration for extraction to maximize complete destruction of the target matrix fraction while minimizing contaminant resorption. Tests with and without a potassium brine present to inhibit cesium resorption indicated extraction efficiency could be enhanced by as much as a factor of ten using the brine.

  15. 49 CFR 230.60 - Time of washing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Washing Boilers § 230.60 Time of washing. (a) Frequency of washing. All boilers shall thoroughly be washed... inspection. The date of the boiler wash shall be noted on the FRA Form No. 1 or FRA Form No. 3. (See...

  16. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies of selected lanthanides and actinides in concentrated aqueous carbonate and carbonate-hydroxide solutions and in molten dimethyl sulfone

    SciTech Connect

    Varlashkin, P.G.

    1985-03-01

    Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of neptunium, plutonium, americium, californium, and terbium in concentrated aqueous carbonate and carbonate-hydroxide solutions have been carried out. Changes in the absorption spectra of Np(VII), Np(V), Pu(VI), Pu(V), Am(VI), and Am(V) in concentrated Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solution and in the formal potentials of the Np(VI)/Np(V) and Pu(VI)/Pu(V) couples as a function of pH were observed. Heptavalent neptunium in concentrated Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solution could only be producted at pH values close to or greater than 14. Plutonium(VII) in 2 M Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solution could only be produced at hydroxide ion concentrations in excess of about 2.5 M. The complexation of Np(VII) and Pu(VII) in Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-NaOH solution seems to be mainly by hydroxide ions. Neptunium(IV) and plutonium(IV) are insoluble in Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solution above ca. pH 11-12. Neptunium(III) in carbonate solution is rapidly oxidized by water to Np(IV). Plutonium(III) is insoluble in Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solution. In K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solution Pu(III) is stable to oxidation by water but is very sensitive to air oxidation. The redox properties of Cf(III) in Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ and K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solutions at pH values from 8 to 14 were investigated. The oxidation of terbium(III) in K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-KOH solution was studied. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies of cerium, samarium, europium, ytterbium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium in molten dimethyl sulfone (DMSO/sub 2/) at 400 K were performed. Differences in the DMSO/sub 2/ solution absorption spectra of trivalent Sm, Eu, and Yb and divalent Eu compared with those in aqueous solution were observed. Complexation effects on the spectra of Ce(III), Ce(IV), U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(VI), and Am(VI) are more noticeable in poorly coordinating DMSO/sub 2/ than they are in water. 123 references, 54 figures, 11 tables.

  17. Ca-Rich Carbonate Melts: A Regular-Solution Model, with Applications to Carbonatite Magma + Vapor Equilibria and Carbonate Lavas on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1995-01-01

    A thermochemical model of the activities of species in carbonate-rich melts would be useful in quantifying chemical equilibria between carbonatite magmas and vapors and in extrapolating liquidus equilibria to unexplored PTX. A regular-solution model of Ca-rich carbonate melts is developed here, using the fact that they are ionic liquids, and can be treated (to a first approximation) as interpenetrating regular solutions of cations and of anions. Thermochemical data on systems of alkali metal cations with carbonate and other anions are drawn from the literature; data on systems with alkaline earth (and other) cations and carbonate (and other) anions are derived here from liquidus phase equilibria. The model is validated in that all available data (at 1 kbar) are consistent with single values for the melting temperature and heat of fusion for calcite, and all liquidi are consistent with the liquids acting as regular solutions. At 1 kbar, the metastable congruent melting temperature of calcite (CaCO3) is inferred to be 1596 K, with (Delta)bar-H(sub fus)(calcite) = 31.5 +/- 1 kJ/mol. Regular solution interaction parameters (W) for Ca(2+) and alkali metal cations are in the range -3 to -12 kJ/sq mol; W for Ca(2+)-Ba(2+) is approximately -11 kJ/sq mol; W for Ca(2+)-Mg(2+) is approximately -40 kJ/sq mol, and W for Ca(2+)-La(3+) is approximately +85 kJ/sq mol. Solutions of carbonate and most anions (including OH(-), F(-), and SO4(2-)) are nearly ideal, with W between 0(ideal) and -2.5 kJ/sq mol. The interaction of carbonate and phosphate ions is strongly nonideal, which is consistent with the suggestion of carbonate-phosphate liquid immiscibility. Interaction of carbonate and sulfide ions is also nonideal and suggestive of carbonate-sulfide liquid immiscibility. Solution of H2O, for all but the most H2O-rich compositions, can be modeled as a disproportionation to hydronium (H3O(+)) and hydroxyl (OH(-)) ions with W for Ca(2+)-H3O(+) (approximately) equals 33 kJ/sq mol. The

  18. Self-assembly of fluorescent carbon dots in a N,N-dimethylmethanamide solution via Schiff base reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengliang; Ding, Yanli; Chang, Qing; Trinchi, Adrian; Lin, Kui; Yang, Jinlong; Liu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    The transition from nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions into solid fluorescent structures is developed for application in solid functional devices. The presented approach enables the organization of carbon dots into rod-like shapes that can still be re-dispersed into aqueous solution. Schiff bases forming at the surface of carbon dots not only protect their surface states, but also provide sites for tethering to other carbon dots. As a consequence, the large assemblies of CDs can come together to form regular, well ordered structures whilst still maintaining their photoluminescence properties. This opens up enormous possibilities for device manufacture, as these self-assemblies could be grown or grafted onto templates forming regular structures, and find innumerable applications ranging from optoelectronic devices, light harvesting to artificial photosynthesis.The transition from nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions into solid fluorescent structures is developed for application in solid functional devices. The presented approach enables the organization of carbon dots into rod-like shapes that can still be re-dispersed into aqueous solution. Schiff bases forming at the surface of carbon dots not only protect their surface states, but also provide sites for tethering to other carbon dots. As a consequence, the large assemblies of CDs can come together to form regular, well ordered structures whilst still maintaining their photoluminescence properties. This opens up enormous possibilities for device manufacture, as these self-assemblies could be grown or grafted onto templates forming regular structures, and find innumerable applications ranging from optoelectronic devices, light harvesting to artificial photosynthesis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and more characterization of carbon dot assemblies. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07119k

  19. Effect of multiple washing in salicylic acid on the bacterial flora of the skin of processed broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were conducted to determine changes in the bacterial flora of the skin of processed broilers after each of five consecutive washings in solutions of the keratolytic agent, salicylic acid. Skin samples from commercially processed broiler carcasses were divided into 3 groups and washed in ...

  20. Genesis Eco Systems, Inc. soil washing process

    SciTech Connect

    Cena, R.J.

    1994-10-11

    The Genesis soil washing system is an integrated system of modular design allowing for maximum material handling capabilities, with optimized use of space for site mobility. The Surfactant Activated Bio-enhanced Remediation Equipment-Generation 1 (SABRE-1, Patent Applied For) modification was developed specifically for removing petroleum byproducts from contaminated soils. Scientifically formulated surfactants, introduced by high pressure spray nozzles, displace the contaminant from the surface of the soil particles into the process solution. Once the contaminant is dispersed into the liquid fraction of the process, it is either mechanically removed, chemically oxidized, or biologically oxidized. The contaminated process water is pumped through the Genesis Biosep (Patent Applied For) filtration system where the fines portion is flocculated, and the contaminant-rich liquid portion is combined with an activated mixture of nutrients and carefully selected bacteria to decompose the hydrocarbon fraction. The treated soil and dewatered fines are transferred to a bermed stockpile where bioremediation continues during drying. The process water is reclaimed, filtered, and recycled within the system.

  1. Adsorptive removal of Zn(II) ion from aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Mohd F.; Ibrahim, Muhammad H. C.; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Chong, F. K.

    2012-09-01

    The study of rice husk-based activated carbon as a potential low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Zn(II) ion from aqueous solution was investigated. Rice husk, an agricultural waste, is a good alternative source for cheap precursor of activated carbon due to its abundance and constant availability. In this work, rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via chemical treatment using NaOH as an activation agent prior the carbonization process. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon carbonized at 650°C, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). Other analyses were also conducted on these samples using fourier transmitter infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), CHN elemental analyzer and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for characterization study. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were found to be 255 m2/g and 0.17 cm2/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Zn(II) ion from aqueous solution were carried out as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of Zn(II) ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Zn(II) ion from aqueous solution.

  2. Will Astronauts Wash Clothes on the Way to Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K.; Jeng, Frank F.

    2015-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions will lengthen to years, and keeping crews clothed without a huge resupply burden is an important consideration for habitation systems. A space laundry system could be the solution; however, the resources it uses must be accounted for and must win out over the reliable practice of simply bringing along enough spare underwear. NASA has conducted trade-off studies through its Logistics Reduction Project to compare current space clothing systems, life extension of that clothing, traditional water-based clothes washing, and other sanitizing techniques. The best clothing system depends on the mission and assumptions but, in general, analysis results indicate that washing clothes on space missions will start to pay off as mission durations approach a year.

  3. Activated carbons from potato peels: The role of activation agent and carbonization temperature of biomass on their use as sorbents for bisphenol A uptake from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arampatzidou, An; Deliyanni, Eleni A.

    2015-04-01

    Activated carbons prepared from potato peels, a solid waste by product, and activated with different activating chemicals, have been studied for the adsorption of an endocrine disruptor (Bisphenol-A) from aqueous solutions. The potato peels biomass was activated with phosphoric acid, KOH and ZnCl2. The different activating chemicals were tested in order the better activation agent to be found. The carbons were carbonized by pyrolysis, in one step procedure, at three different temperatures in order the role of the temperature of carbonization to be pointed out. The porous texture and the surface chemistry of the prepared activated carbons were characterized by Nitrogen adsorption (BET), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), thermal analysis (DTA) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effect of pH, the adsorbent dose, the initial bisphenol A concentration and temperature. Equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The thermodynamic parameters such as the change of enthalpy (ΔH0), entropy (ΔS0) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG0) of adsorption systems were also evaluated. The adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was found to be 450 mg g-1 at an initial pH 3 at 25 °C for the phosphoric acid activated carbon, that make the activated carbon a promising adsorbent material.

  4. Bauxite washing for the removal of clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ishaq; Hartge, Ernst-Ulrich; Werther, Joachim; Wischnewski, Reiner

    2014-11-01

    Clay impurities associated with bauxite negatively affect the Bayer process for alumina production. These impurities should be removed as far as possible by a beneficiation technique before the ore is used as feed for the Bayer process. In this current investigation, bauxite washing was conducted in the laboratory. Bauxite washing is a physical process that causes the disintegration and deagglomeration of the clay matrix, and bauxite is liberated from the clay (mainly rich in silica). Subsequently, separation occurs with the assistance of wet screening at a predetermined cut size. Three techniques were investigated in the laboratory: drum washing, water-jet washing, and ultrasonic washing. Various operating parameters were investigated for drum washing and water-jet washing, including materials retention time, drum rotation speed, solid concentration, water-jet spray duration, pressure, and height. We concluded that the retention time of bauxite inside the drum at a solid concentration of 55wt% and a drum rotation speed of 31 r/min is the dominant parameter for the removal of clay from the bauxite surface.

  5. Gas chromatographic evaluation of pesticide residue contents in nectarines after non-toxic washing treatments.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, P; Moltó, J C; Damiani, P; Marín, R; Cossignani, L; Mañes, J

    2004-10-01

    Washing with aqueous solutions of citric acid, ethanol, glycerol, hydrogen peroxide, potassium permanganate, sodium metabisulfite, sodium laurylsulfate (SLS), sodium hypochlorite, and urea is evaluated for pesticide residue reduction in nectarines and compared with simple tap water washing. Residues of pesticides commonly utilized in nectarines (chlorpyrifos, fenarimol, iprodione, malathion, methidathion, myclobutanil, parathion and pirimicarb) are extracted with ethyl acetate and anhydrous sodium sulfate, extract is concentred and analyzed by GC with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. The formation of possible toxic by-products (chlorpyrifos oxon, malaoxon, methidaoxon and paraoxon methyl) is studied by GC-MS. No toxic by-products are identified in the extracts of the washed samples for the washing-time and concentrations studied, but high levels of sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate form oxons from the organophosphorus pesticides. Ethanol, glycerol and SLS solutions removed near the 50% of the pesticide residues. The other solutions were not more effective than tap water washing. The amount of pesticide removed by washings is related to its water solubility and octanol-water partition coefficient.

  6. Wash water solids removal system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    During wash water purification, surfactants tend to precipitate and foul the RO membranes, causing water flux decline and loss of salt rejection. The use of 165 to 190 ppm ferric chloride and optionally 0.25 to 1.0 ppm polymeric flocculate precipitates 92 to 96 percent of the surfactant from an Olive Leaf Soap based wash water. Crossflow filtration and pressure filtration yield good soap rejection at high water flux rates. Post-treatment of the chemically pretreated and filtered wash water with activated charcoal removes the residual soap down to an undetectable level.

  7. Energetic changes in the surface of activated carbons and relationship with Ni(II) adsorption from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Estupiñan, Paola; Giraldo, Liliana; Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated Ni(II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution on activated carbons obtained by chemically modifying the surface with the oxidizing agents nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide (CAGoxP and CAGoxN, respectively). The activated carbons were characterized by total acidity and basicity, pH at the point of charge zero determination and IR spectroscopy. Textural parameters such as the BET area and pore volumes were evaluated by gas adsorption. The BET area of the materials was between 816 and 876 m2 g-1. Additionally, the immersion enthalpies of the activated carbons in water and benzene were determined. The experimental results on adsorption in solution were adjusted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models, obtaining values for the monolayer capacity between 29.68 and 50.97 mg g-1, which indicates that the adsorption capacity depends largely on solid surface chemistry.

  8. Polymorph selection and nanocrystallite rearrangement of calcium carbonate in carboxymethyl chitosan aqueous solution: Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Donghui; Zhu, Yingchun; Li, Fang; Ruan, Qichao; Zhang, Shengmao; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Fangfang

    2010-01-15

    In this article, the polymorph selection of calcium carbonate has been successfully achieved in water-soluble carboxymethyl chitosan aqueous solution at different temperatures (25-95 {sup o}C). Vaterite is formed in carboxymethyl chitosan solution 25 {sup o}C accompanied with trace of calcite, whereas pure aragonite is obtained at 95 {sup o}C. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses show that the products are formed from the recrystallization of nanometer crystallites. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses reveal that the polymorph of calcium carbonate is controlled and selected by kinetics in various temperatures. As a heterogeneous nucleator and stabilizing agent, carboxymethyl chitosan changes the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate from thermodynamic into kinetic control. Under kinetic limitation, the reaction rate of aragonite increases along with the elevating of temperature and surpasses the rate of vaterite above 327 K.

  9. Calcium-magnesium carbonate solid solutions from Holocene conglomerate cements and travertines in the Coast Range of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, I.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1971-01-01

    Two calcium-magnesium carbonate solid solutions form Holocene travertines and conglomerate cements in fresh water stream channels of the Coast Range of California. Calcite does not yield the {015} diffraction maximum. The {006} diffraction maximum is lacking over most of the range of composition of calcite. Calcite has compositions from CaCO3 to Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3. Dolomite yields both the {006} and {015} diffraction maxima over its entire composition range, Ca0.6Mg0.4CO3 to Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3. The Ca-Mg carbonates form in isotopic equilibrium and thermodynamic disequilibrium from dispersion of Ca2+-rich water into CO32--rich water within the alluvium. The stable isotope data suggest that all the Mg-rich carbonates are primary precipitates and not a result of Mg-substitution in precursor CaCO3. There is a correlation between ??C13 and Mg content of the carbonates which predicts a 5%. fractionation of C13 between dolomite and calcite at sedimentary temperatures. C14 is incorporated in Ca-Mg carbonates forming from C13-poor meteoric waters and C13-rich waters from Cretaceous sediments. C14 ages of the Ca-Mg carbonates are apparent, and cannot be corrected to absolute values. Solution rates of calcite decrease with increasing MgCO3 content; dolomite dissolves slower than any calcite. ?? 1971.

  10. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Solehudin, Agus; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2014-03-24

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H{sub 2}S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  11. Ciprofloxacin adsorption on graphene and granular activated carbon: kinetics, isotherms, and effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuan; Tsang, Daniel C W; Chen, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Yang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly used antibiotic and widely detected in wastewaters and farmlands nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of next-generation adsorbent (graphene) and conventional adsorbent (granular activated carbon, GAC) for CIP removal. Batch experiments and characterization tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, thermodynamic properties, and the influences of solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter (NOM), and water sources). Compared to GAC, graphene showed significantly faster adsorption and reached equilibrium within 3 min, confirming the rapid access of CIP into the macroporous network of high surface area of graphene as revealed by the Brunner-Emmet-Teller measurements analysis. The kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second-order model, suggesting the importance of the initial CIP concentration related to surface site availability of graphene. The adsorption isotherm on graphene followed Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 323 mg/g, which was higher than other reported carbonaceous adsorbents. The CIP adsorption was thermodynamically favourable on graphene and primarily occurred through π - π interaction, according to the FTIR spectroscopy. While the adsorption capacity of graphene decreased with increasing solution pH due to the speciation change of CIP, the adverse effects of ionic strength (0.01-0.5 mol L(-1)), presence of NOM (5 mg L⁻¹), and different water sources (river water or drinking water) were less significant on graphene than GAC. These results indicated that graphene can serve as an alternative adsorbent for CIP removal in commonly encountered field conditions, if proper separation and recovery is available in place.

  12. Activated carbon enhanced ozonation of oxalate attributed to HO oxidation in bulk solution and surface oxidation: effect of activated carbon dosage and pH.

    PubMed

    Xing, Linlin; Xie, Yongbing; Minakata, Daisuke; Cao, Hongbin; Xiao, Jiadong; Zhang, Yi; Crittenden, John C

    2014-10-01

    Ozonation of oxalate in aqueous phase was performed with a commercial activated carbon (AC) in this work. The effect of AC dosage and solution pH on the contribution of hydroxyl radicals (HO) in bulk solution and oxidation on the AC surface to the removal of oxalate was studied. We found that the removal of oxalate was reduced by tert-butyl alcohol (tBA) with low dosages of AC, while it was hardly affected by tBA when the AC dosage was greater than 0.3g/L. tBA also inhibited ozone decomposition when the AC dosage was no more than 0.05g/L, but it did not work when the AC dosage was no less than 0.1g/L. These observations indicate that HO in bulk solution and oxidation on the AC surface both contribute to the removal of oxalate. HO oxidation in bulk solution is significant when the dosage of AC is low, whereas surface oxidation is dominant when the dosage of AC is high. The oxalate removal decreased with increasing pH of the solution with an AC dosage of 0.5g/L. The degradation of oxalate occurs mainly through surface oxidation in acid and neutral solution, but through HO oxidation in basic bulk solution. A mechanism involving both HO oxidation in bulk solution and surface oxidation was proposed for AC enhanced ozonation of oxalate.

  13. Water wash apparatus for cleaning radioactively contaminated garments

    SciTech Connect

    Sewter, B.R.; Jarvis, T.A.; Kirchner, M.A.; Prisco, A.J. Jr.; Bonneau, A.M.; Trendler, K.E.; Briggs, W.E.; Godfrey, L.E.

    1990-03-20

    This patent describes an apparatus for water washing fabrics and removing radioactive contaminants therefrom without the generation of liquid effluents. It comprises: a washing machine means for washing the fabrics having a wash water inlet, a rinse water inlet, and an outlet, and a hydraulically closed wash water system which includes a reservoir means of polished water connected to the wash water inlet of the machine means, a particulate filtration means connected to the outlet for removing particulate impurities from the wash water discharged from the outlet, and a water polishing means connected between the particulate filtration means and the wash water inlet for supplying the reservoir means with filtered and polished water.

  14. Wash water waste pretreatment system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The use of real wash water had no adverse effect on soap removal when an Olive Leaf soap based system was used; 96 percent of the soap was removed using ferric chloride. Numerous chemical agents were evaluated as antifoams for synthetic wash water. Wash water surfactants used included Olive Leaf Soap, Ivory Soap, Neutrogena and Neutrogena Rain Bath Gel, Alipal CO-436, Aerosol 18, Miranol JEM, Palmeto, and Aerosol MA-80. For each type of soapy wash water evaluated, at least one antifoam capable of causing nonpersistent foam was identified. In general, the silicones and the heavy metal ions (i.e., ferric, aluminum, etc.) were the most effective antifoams. Required dosage was in the range of 50 to 200 ppm.

  15. Adsorption of Acid Red 57 from aqueous solutions onto polyacrylonitrile/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A; Diab, Mostafa A; Hussien, Mostafa A; El-Sonbati, Adel Z; Eessa, Ahmed M

    2014-04-24

    The adsorption of Acid Red 57 (AR57) onto Polyacrylonitrile/activated carbon (PAN/AC) composite was investigated in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to contact time, pH and temperature. Physical characteristics of (PAN/AC) composite such as fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were obtained. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto (PAN/AC) composite. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data. The dynamic data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model well. The activation energy, change of free energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption were also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto (PAN/AC) composite. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that (PAN/AC) composite could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from textile effluents.

  16. Removal of Chemazol Reactive Red 195 from aqueous solution by dehydrated beet pulp carbon.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Arzu Y; Tepe, Ozlem

    2011-10-30

    An agricultural low-cost by-product, dehydrated beet pulp carbon (DBPC) was used as an adsorbent for removal of Chemazol Reactive Red 195 (CRR 195) from aqueous solution. The surface area of DBPC was measured as 9.5m(2)g(-1) by using BET method. The results indicated that adsorption was strongly pH-dependent and optimum pH was determined as 1.0. The maximum dye adsorption capacity was obtained as 58.0 mg g(-1)at the temperature of 50°C at this pH value. The Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium and it was reported that, experimental data fitted very well to Freundlich model. Mass transfer and kinetic models were applied to the experimental data to examine the mechanisms of adsorption and potential rate-controlling steps. It was found that both external mass transfer and intra-particle diffusion played an important role in the adsorption mechanisms of dye and adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-first-order type kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) had been determined. The results show that adsorption of CRR 195 on DBPC is endothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  17. Adsorption of quinolone, tetracycline, and penicillin antibiotics from aqueous solution using activated carbons: Review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muthanna J

    2017-03-01

    Antibiotics, an important type of pharmaceutical pollutant, have attracted many researchers to the study of their removal from aqueous solutions. Activated carbon (AC) has been widely used as highly effective adsorbent for antibiotics because of its large specific surface area, high porosity, and favorable pore size distribution. In this article, the adsorption performance of AC towards three major types of antibiotics such as tetracyclines, quinolones, and penicillins were reviewed. According to collected data, maximum adsorption capacities of 1340.8, 638.6, and 570.4mg/g were reported for tetracyclines, quinolones, and penicillins, respectively. The values of 1/n for Freundlich isotherm were less than unity, suggesting that the adsorption was nonlinear and favorable. Adsorption kinetics followed closely the pseudo-second-order model and analysis using the Weber-Morris model revealed that the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate controlling step. AC adsorption demonstrated superior performance for all selected drugs, thus being efficient technology for treatment of these pollutants.

  18. Partial carbonized nanoporous resin for uptake of lead from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ghiloufi, I; Al-Hobaib, A S; El Mir, L

    2015-01-01

    Four partial carbonized nanoporous resins (PCNRs), based on organic xerogel compounds, were synthesised by the sol-gel method from pyrogallol and formaldehyde mixtures in water using picric acid as catalyst. The PCNRs were prepared at different pyrolysis temperatures: T(1) = 200 °C (PF-200), T(2) = 300 °C (PF-300), T(3) = 400 °C (PF-400), or T(4) = 500 °C (PF-500). The PCNRs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, and nitrogen porosimetry. The obtained results show that PF-200 is more efficient for the removal of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution than the other adsorbent prepared in this study. The characteristics of lead uptake by PF-200 were explored using well-established and effective parameters including pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. Optimum adsorption of Pb(2+), using PF-200, was observed at pH 4.5. The Langmuir model gave a better fit than the other models, and kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption was well fitted by the pseudo second-order kinetic model and thermodynamic properties, i.e., Gibbs free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change, showed that adsorption of Pb(2+) onto PF-200 was endothermic, spontaneous and feasible in the temperature range of 298-328 K.

  19. Structural and electrical characteristics of solution processed P3HT-carbon nanotube composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahakul, Prakash Chandra; Mahanandia, Pitamber

    2017-02-01

    Organic semiconductors have been identified as a fascinating class of low cost and flexible novel semiconductor materials that have the electrical and optical properties which can be easily processed. Due to their interesting physical properties, organic semiconductors have attracted tremendous research attention for next generation electronics and optoelectronics. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) incorporated Poly[3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl] (P3HT) hybrid nano-composite film have been fabricated by solution processing technique followed by spin coating method using 1,2-dichlorobenzene as an intermediate solvent. Structural and morphological characteristics of the composite film have been studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The MWCNTs were observed to be well dispersed in the polymer matrix. Crystallites were found to be more ordered barely affecting the lamellar structure of P3HT in the nano-composite film. Structural and functional characteristics of P3HT and its hybrid nano-composite have been studied by UV-Visible (UV-Vis), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopic characterization. Excellent electrical properties have been observed from I-V and cyclic-voltammetric characterization of the well dispersed MWCNT in the P3HT composite. Improvement in electrical properties can be attributed to the higher carrier mobility of MWCNTs in the composites.

  20. Comparative performance of cement kiln dust and activated carbon in removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    El-Refaey, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the performance of cement kiln dust (CKD) as industrial byproduct and commercially activated carbon (AC) as adsorbent derived from agricultural waste for the removal of cadmium (Cd(2+)) from aqueous solutions. CKD and AC were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface areas demonstrate the differences of physicochemical properties. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted for various intervals extended to 96 h at 20, 25 and 30°C to investigate the efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd(2+). CKD expressed high affinity for removal of Cd(2+) and was not affected by temperature, while AC was significantly affected, which reflects dissimilarity in the retention mechanisms defendant in CKD and those pursued by AC. The results were explained by changes of FTIR and SEM images before and after sorption experiments. The suggestion is that electrostatic ion exchange and complex reactions are the main mechanisms for Cd(2+) removal. The kinetic data were evaluated by fractional power, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model was found to correlate with the experimental data well. These results revealed that CKD can be used as a cost-effective and efficient sorbent for Cd(2+) removal in comparison with AC.

  1. Characteristics of cesium ion sorption from aqueous solution on bentonite- and carbon nanotube-based composites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shubin; Han, Cho; Wang, Xiangke; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2014-06-15

    The technology development of Cs(+) capture from aqueous solution is crucial for the disposal of nuclear waste and still remains a significant challenge. Previous researches have been proven that ion exchanges with the cations and hydroxyl exchange are the main sorption mechanisms for Cs(+). Therefore, how important are the cation exchange and the hydroxyl exchange mechanisms to Cs(+) sorption? And whether can we improve the sorption capacity of the material by increasing the amount of hydroxyl groups? With these in mind, we herein designed the chitosan-grafted carbon nanotubes (CS-g-CNTs) and the chitosan-grafted bentonite (CS-g-bentonite) by plasma-induced grafting method. The interactions of Cs(+) with CNTs, bentonite, CS-g-CNTs and CS-g-bentonite composites were investigated. The sorption of Cs(+) is mainly dominated by strong cation exchange in monovalent Group I and divalent Group II. And the cation-exchange mechanism is much more effective than the hydroxyl group exchange. The effect of hydroxyl groups is dependent on the property of the matrix. We cannot improve the Cs adsorption capacity of material for Cs(+) only by increasing the amount of hydroxyl groups in any case. The spatial structure and the cation-exchange capacity of the material are important factors for choosing the sorbent for Cs(+) removal from radioactive waste water.

  2. Organic compounds in olive mill wastewater and in solutions resulting from hydrothermal carbonization of the wastewater.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Baskyr, I

    2013-09-01

    Organic components in olive mill wastewater (OMW) were analyzed by exhaustive solvent extraction of the lyophilisate followed by pre-chromatographic derivatization techniques and GC/MS-analysis of the extracts. Simple biophenols including tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (OH-Tyr) and homovanillic alcohol as well as complex biophenols including decarbomethoxy ligostride aglycon and decarbomethoxy oleuropein aglycon proved most abundant analytes. Hydroxylated benzoic and cinnamic acids are less abundant, which may indicate a humification process to have occurred. The pattern of organic components obtained from native OMW was compared with that obtained from hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of the waste product. Former results provided strong evidence that HTC of OMW at 220°C for 14h results in an almost complete hydrolysis of complex aglycons. However, simple biophenols were not decomposed on hydrothermal treatment any further. Phenol and benzenediols as well as low molecular weight organic acids proved most abundant analytes which were generated due to HTC. Similarly to aglycons, lipids including most abundant acylglycerines and less abundant wax esters were subjected almost quantitatively to hydrolysis under hydrothermal conditions. Fatty acids (FAs) released from lipids were further decomposed. The pathways of volatile analytes in both native OMW and aqueous HTC solutions were studied by solventless headspace-Solid Phase Micro Extraction. Basically, a wide array low molecular alcohols and ketones occurring in native OMW survived the HTC process.

  3. Carbon-13 chemical shift anisotropy in DNA bases from field dependence of solution NMR relaxation rates.

    PubMed

    Ying, Jinfa; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2006-03-01

    Knowledge of (13)C chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) in nucleotide bases is important for the interpretation of solution-state NMR relaxation data in terms of local dynamic properties of DNA and RNA. Accurate knowledge of the CSA becomes particularly important at high magnetic fields, prerequisite for adequate spectral resolution in larger oligonucleotides. Measurement of (13)C relaxation rates of protonated carbons in the bases of the so-called Dickerson dodecamer, d(CGCGAATTCGCG)(2), at 500 and 800 MHz (1)H frequency, together with the previously characterized structure and diffusion tensor yields CSA values for C5 in C, C6 in C and T, C8 in A and G, and C2 in A that are closest to values previously reported on the basis of solid-state FIREMAT NMR measurements, and mostly larger than values obtained by in vacuo DFT calculations. Owing to the noncollinearity of dipolar and CSA interactions, interpretation of the NMR relaxation rates is particularly sensitive to anisotropy of rotational diffusion, and use of isotropic diffusion models can result in considerable errors.

  4. Sorption of chlorophenols from aqueous solution by granular activated carbon, filter coal, pine and hardwood.

    PubMed

    Hossain, G S M; McLaughlan, R G

    2012-09-01

    Wood and coal, as low-cost sorbents, have been evaluated as an alternative to commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) for chlorophenol removal. Kinetic experiments indicated that filter coal had a significantly lower rate of uptake (approximately 10% of final uptake was achieved after three hours) than the other sorbents, owing to intra-particle diffusion limitations. The data fitted a pseudo-second-order model. Sorption capacity data showed that GAC had a high sorption capacity (294-467 mg g(-1)) compared with other sorbents (3.2-7.5 mg(g-1)). However, wood and coal had a greater sorption capacity per unit surface area than GAC. Sorption equilibrium data was best predicted using a Freundlich adsorption model. The sorption capacity for all sorbents was 2-chlorophenol < 4-chlorophenol < 2, 4-dichlorophenol, which correlates well with solute hydrophobicity, although the relative differences were much less for coal than the other sorbents. The results showed that pine, hardwood and filter coal can be used as sorbent materials for the removal of chlorophenol from water; however, kinetic considerations may limit the application of filter coal.

  5. Removal of boron from aqueous solution using magnetic carbon nanotube improved with tartaric acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Boron removal capacity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with tartaric acid was investigated in this study. Modification of MWCNTs with tartaric acid was confirmed by Boehm surface chemistry method and fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Experiments were performed to determine the adsorption isotherm and adsorption thermodynamic parameters of boron adsorption on tartaric acid modified MWCNTs (TA-MWCNTs). The effect of variables including initial pH, dosage of adsorbent, contact time and temperature was investigated. Analysis of data showed that adsorption equilibrium could be better described by Freundlich isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacities obtained at the pH of 6.0 was 1.97 mg/g. The estimated thermodynamic values of free energy (ΔG°), entropy (ΔS°) and enthalpy (ΔH°) indicated a spontaneous and an endothermic process. Furthermore, the TA-MWCNTs was magnetized for separation of boron-contaminated adsorbent from aqueous solution by applying magnetic field. The results showed that magnetic TA-MWCNTs particles were separated effectively after adsorption from contaminated water. PMID:24393401

  6. Low-cost, solution processable carbon nanotube supercapacitors and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtimäki, Suvi; Tuukkanen, Sampo; Pörhönen, Juho; Moilanen, Pasi; Virtanen, Jorma; Honkanen, Mari; Lupo, Donald

    2014-06-01

    We report ecological and low-cost carbon nanotube (CNT) supercapacitors fabricated using a simple, scalable solution processing method, where the use of a highly porous and electrically conductive active material eliminates the need for a current collector. Electrodes were fabricated on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrate from a printable multi-wall CNT ink, where the CNTs are solubilized in water using xylan as a dispersion agent. The dispersion method facilitates a very high concentration of CNTs in the ink. Supercapacitors were assembled using a paper separator and an aqueous NaCl electrolyte and the devices were characterized with a galvanostatic discharge method defined by an industrial standard. The capacitance of the 2 cm^2 devices was 6 mF/cm^2 (2.3 F/g) and equivalent series resistance 80 Ω . Low-cost supercapacitors fabricated from safe and environmentally friendly materials have potential applications as energy storage devices in ubiquitous and autonomous intelligence as well as in disposable low-end products.

  7. Effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of carbon nanotube–gold nanoparticle conjugates in solution

    PubMed Central

    Konczak, Lukasz; Narkiewicz-Michalek, Jolanta; Pastorin, Giorgia; Panczyk, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the role of intermolecular interactions in the stability of a carbon nanotube (CNT) capped by functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The importance of such a system is due to its potential application as a pH-controlled drug carrier. Our preliminary experimental studies showed that fabrication of such a nanobottle/nanocontainer is feasible and it is possible to encapsulate the anticancer drug cisplatin inside the inner space of a CNT and seal its ends by functionalized AuNPs. The expected behavior, that is, detachment of AuNPs at acidic pH and the release of cisplatin, was, however, not observed. On the other hand, our theoretical studies of chemically identical system led to the conclusion that the release of cisplatin at acidic pH should be observed. Therefore, in this work, a deeper theoretical analysis of various factors that could be responsible for the disagreement between experimental and theoretical results were performed. The study found that the major factor is a large dispersion interaction component acting between CNT and AuNP in solution in the case of the experimental system. This factor can be controlled to some extent by tuning the system size or the ratio between AuNP diameter and CNT diameter. Thus, such kind of a pH-sensitive drug carrier is still of great interest, but its structural parameters need to be properly adjusted. PMID:27853368

  8. Degradation of carbon tetrachloride in aqueous solution in the thermally activated persulfate system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minhui; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian; Miao, Zhouwei; Zang, Xueke; Wu, Xiaoliang

    2015-04-09

    Thermal activation of persulfate (PS) has been identified to be effective in the destruction of organic pollutants. The feasibility of carbon tetrachloride (CT) degradation in the thermally activated PS system was evaluated. The experimental results showed that CT could be readily degraded at 50 °C with a PS concentration of 0.5M, and CT degradation and PS consumption followed the pseudo-first order kinetic model. Superoxide radical anion (O2(*-)) was the predominant radical species responsible for CT degradation and the split of CCl was proposed as the possible reaction pathways for CT degradation. The process of CT degradation was accelerated by higher PS dose and lower initial CT concentration. No obvious effect of the initial pH on the degradation of CT was observed in the thermally activated PS system. Cl(*-), HCO3(*-), and humic acid (HA) had negative effects on CT degradation. In addition, the degradation of CT in the thermally activated PS system could be significantly promoted by the solvents addition to the solution. In conclusion, the thermally activated PS process is a promising option in in-situ chemical oxidation/reduction remediation for degrading highly oxidized organic contaminants such as CT that is widely detected in contaminated sites.

  9. The solubility of ethane, propane, and carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions of sodium cumene sulfonate.

    PubMed

    King, A D

    2004-05-01

    Measurements have been made to determine the solubilities of ethane, C2H6, propane, C3H8, and carbon dioxide, CO2, in aqueous solutions of sodium cumene sulfonate (NaCS) at 25 degrees C. The solubilities measured for each gas satisfy Henry's law at all concentrations of NaCS. The solubilities of C2H6 and C3H8 exhibit quite similar behavior with respect to added NaCS. The solubilities of these two gases are very low in pure water and are found to be nearly independent of NaCS concentration over a concentration range of 0-0.4 mol NaCS/kg H2O. At intermediate concentrations of NaCS, the solubilities of C2H6 and C3H8 exhibit a gradual increase with added NaCS concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 2.0 mol NaCS/kg H2O. At NaCS concentrations greater than 2.0 mol NaCS/kg H2O, the solubilities of these two gases increase with added NaCS in an approximately linear manner, with the solubility of C3H8 increasing more rapidly than that for C2H6 (by a factor of approximately 2.5). CO2 is much more soluble in pure water than the hydrocarbon gases and exhibits markedly different behavior with respect to added NaCS. The solubility of CO2 decreases with added NaCS over a concentration range of 0-0.9 mol NaCS/kg H2O, passes through a minimum at a concentration of approximately 1.0 mol NaCS/kg H2O, and then increases with added NaCS at higher NaCS concentrations in a manner similar to that observed with C2H6 and C3H8. The trends in solubility observed for these three gases dissolved in aqueous solutions of NaCS resemble those found previously with aqueous solutions of ordinary surfactants. The solubility data measured for these three gases can be interpreted surprisingly well in terms of the mass-action model for micellization, in which salting-out effects due to monomer salt ions suppress gas solubility at low NaCS concentrations and gas solubilization by small micelles of NaCS acts to enhance gas solubility at the higher NaCS concentrations.

  10. Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, D.I.

    1992-04-09

    Peatlands are one of the most important terrestrial reservoirs in the global cycle for carbon, and are a major source for atmospheric methane. However, little is known about the dynamics of these carbon reservoirs or their feedback mechanisms with the pool of atmospheric CO{sub 2} during the Holocene. Specifically, it is unknown whether large peat basins are sources, sinks, or steady-state reservoirs for the global carbon cycle. In particular, the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved organic carbon form the deeper portions of these peatlands is unknown. Our DOE research program is to conduct an integrated ecologic and hydrogeochemical study of the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands (northern Minnesota) to better understand the carbon dynamics in globally significant peat basins. Specifically, our study will provide local and regional data on (1), rates of carbon accumulation and loss and fluxes of methane in the peat profiles; (2) the physical and botanical factors controlling the production of methane and carbon dioxide in the wetland; and (3) the role of hydrogeologic processes in controlling the fluxes of gases and solutes through the peat. We intend to use computer simulation models, calibrated to field data, to scale-up from local to regional estimates of methane and carbon dioxide within the basin. How gases and dissolved organic carbon escapes form peatlands in unknown. It has been suggested that the concentrations of methane produced in the upper peat are sufficient to produce diffusion gradients towards the surface. Alternatively, gas may move through the peat profile by groundwater advection.

  11. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  12. [Ritual washing, another aspect of care].

    PubMed

    Brisse, Joëlle; Ghoul, Abderrahman; Samoun, Ary

    2011-12-01

    After death, mortuary staff attend to the deceased and his or her family until the deceased leaves the institution. Washing, dressing, presentation of the body and dealing with requests for information form part of this aspect of care. Religious practices, such as the ritual washing of the body may be requested by the family. As with all forms of care given to the deceased, staff facilitate the carrying out of such practices.

  13. Basic solutions to carbon/carbon oxidation: Science and technology. Final report, 15 April 1993--14 April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, I.R.; Chung, T.; Pantano, C.; Radovic, L.; Thrower, P.

    1998-04-14

    The goal of this study was to gain a fundamental understanding of the role of boron in carbon oxidation. Boron-doped carbons were synthesized via CVD, ion implantation and high temperature doping are subsequently characterized. It was found that high temperature doped HOPG carbons were ideal for oxidation studies because their surface could be reproduced, their surface structures were determined and they were able to be characterized by XPS, AFM and SEM. The direct analysis of the chemical structures and atomic arrangements in boron- doped carbon or carbon surfaces by these techniques was critical in determining the effect of boron on carbon oxidation. XPS was utilized in this work to determine the local bonding environment of boron in carbon before an after oxidation. It was necessary to obtain an accurate calibration of the B1s binding energy scale which was accomplished by obtaining photoemission spectra of boron-doped carbons with known structures (local boron bonding environments), such as boron oxide, boron carbide, triphenylboroxine, tourmaline, boric acid, danburite and high temperature boron-doped graphite. All of the aforementioned standards contain boron in a unique bonding environment and thus their spectra formulated a complete conversion of B1s binding energies to boron chemical environments which has not been reported in the past. It was clearly established that a chemical shift for substitutional boron in graphite exists at 186.5 eV with a FWHM of 1.2. The chemical structures of the boron in the standards were related to the binding energy using a Pauling charge distribution model and a modification of the Sanderson electronegativity method. This approach was used to determine whether the B1s binding energy would change depending upon the specific location of boron in the graphite or graphite surface.

  14. PROCESSES OF RECLAIMING URANIUM FROM SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Zumwalt, L.R.

    1959-02-10

    A process is described for reclaiming residual enriched uranium from calutron wash solutions containing Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Mn as impurities. The solution is adjusted to a pH of between 2 and 4 and is contacted with a metallic reducing agent, such as iron or zinc, in order to reduce the copper to metal and thereby remove it from the solution. At the same time the uranium present is reduced to the uranous state The solution is then contacted with a precipitate of zinc hydroxide or barium carbonate in order to precipitate and carry uranium, iron, and chromium away from the nickel and manganese ions in the solution. The uranium is then recovered fronm this precipitate.

  15. Multi-instrumental characterization of carbon nanotubes dispersed in aqueous solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies showed that the dispersion extent and physicochemical properties of carbon nanotubes are highly dependent upon the preparation methods (e.g., dispersion methods and dispersants). In the present work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are dispersed in aqueous s...

  16. Carbon Solution in Core-Forming Magma Ocean Conditions: Implications for the Origin and Distribution of Terrestrial Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, R.; Chi, H.; Walker, D.; Shimizu, N.; Buono, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    The origin of bulk silicate Earth carbon inventory is poorly known and the fate of the element during the early Earth differentiation and core formation is a missing link in the evolution of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here we present high pressure-temperature experiments that simulate metal-silicate equilibria in a shallow magma ocean. Experiments were performed at 1-5 GPa, 1600-2100 °C on mixtures of synthetic or natural silicates (tholeiitic basalt/ alkali basalt/ komatiite/ fertile peridotite) and Fe-Ni-C±Co±S contained in graphite or MgO capsules. All the experiments produced immiscible Fe-rich metallic and silicate melts at oxygen fugacity (fO2) between ~IW-1.5 and IW-1.9. Carbon and hydrogen concentrations of basaltic glasses and non-glassy quenched silicate melts were determined using secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) and speciation of dissolved C-O-H volatiles in silicate glasses was constrained using Raman spectroscopy. Carbon contents of metallic melts were determined using both electron microprobe and SIMS. Our experiments indicate that at core-forming, reduced conditions, carbon in mafic-ultramafic magmas dissolves primarily as various hydrogenated species and the total carbon storage capacity, although is significantly higher than solubility of CO2 under similar conditions, remains low (<500 ppm). The total carbon content in our reduced melts at graphite saturation increases with increasing melt depolymerization (NBO/T), consistent with recent spectroscopic studies [1], and modestly with increasing hydration. Carbon behaves as a metal loving element during core-mantle separation and metal/silicate carbon partition coefficient, DC varies between ~3500 and ≥150 and increases with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature and melt NBO/T. Extrapolation of our data to the plausible conditions of core-mantle equilibration suggest that if only a trace amount of carbon (~730 ppm C; [2]) was available during early Earth

  17. Activity and stability of immobilized carbonic anhydrase for promoting CO2 absorption into a carbonate solution for post-combustion CO2 capture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Jones, A.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) currently under development could significantly reduce the energy consumed when capturing CO2 from the flue gases of coal-fired power plants. The biocatalyst carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been found to effectively promote the absorption of CO2 into the potassium carbonate solution that would be used in the IVCAP. Two CA enzymes were immobilized onto three selected support materials having different pore structures. The thermal stability of the immobilized CA enzymes was significantly greater than their free counterparts. For example, the immobilized enzymes retained at least 60% of their initial activities after 90days at 50??C compared to about 30% for their free counterparts under the same conditions. The immobilized CA also had significantly improved resistance to concentrations of sulfate (0.4M), nitrate (0.05M) and chloride (0.3M) typically found in flue gas scrubbing liquids than their free counterparts. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Morphology of carbonates particles precipitated from saline waste solution: Influence of magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, L. O.; Grandjean, M.; Filippova, I. V.; Pelletier, M.

    2013-03-01

    The role of a very low concentration of Mg on the nature, morphology and surface of carbonate particles during soda-ash residual brine carbonation has been studied. The Mg concentration of 200 mg/kg in brine slows down the kinetic of carbonation, modifies the shape of precipitated particles and new carbonated phases are precipitated. The existence of aragonite and (Ca, Mg) hydrated phases is supposed for Ca:Mg ratio equivalent to 24:1 in solid fraction.

  19. Molecular-scale Hydrophilicity Induced by Solute: Molecular-thick Charged Pancakes of Aqueous Salt Solution on Hydrophobic Carbon-based Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guosheng; Shen, Yue; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Ying; Song, Bo; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    We directly observed molecular-thick aqueous salt-solution pancakes on a hydrophobic graphite surface under ambient conditions employing atomic force microscopy. This observation indicates the unexpected molecular-scale hydrophilicity of the salt solution on graphite surfaces, which is different from the macroscopic wetting property of a droplet standing on the graphite surface. Interestingly, the pancakes spontaneously displayed strong positively charged behavior. Theoretical studies showed that the formation of such positively charged pancakes is attributed to cation–π interactions between Na+ ions in the aqueous solution and aromatic rings on the graphite surface, promoting the adsorption of water molecules together with cations onto the graphite surface; i.e., Na+ ions as a medium adsorbed to the graphite surface through cation–π interactions on one side while at the same time bonding to water molecules through hydration interaction on the other side at a molecular scale. These findings suggest that actual interactions regarding carbon-based graphitic surfaces including those of graphene, carbon nanotubes, and biochar may be significantly different from existing theory and they provide new insight into the control of surface wettability, interactions and related physical, chemical and biological processes. PMID:25348642

  20. Generation of chlorine by-products in simulated wash water.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cangliang; Norris, Pauline; Williams, Olivia; Hagan, Stephanie; Li, KaWang

    2016-01-01

    Free chlorine (FC) reacting with organic matter in wash water promotes the formation of chlorine by-products. This study aims to evaluate the dynamic impact of FC and organic load on the generation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs) in simulated wash water. Lettuce juice was sequentially added into FC solution with FC periodically replenished. Water samples were collected after each lettuce juice addition to measure water qualities and determine HAAs and THMs using US-Environmental-Protection-Agency (EPA) methods. Concentrations of 88-2103 μg/l of total HAAs and 20.79-859.47 μg/l of total THMs were detected during the study. Monobromoacetic, tribromoacetic, chlorodibromoacetic and trichloroacetic acid were the major HAAs components. Chloroform (trichloromethane) was the primary THMs present. A significant correlation of HAAs with chemical oxygen demand and THMs with FC was observed. Results indicated that optimizing wash water sanitizing systems to limit organic matters and maintain minimal effective FC concentration is critical.

  1. The radiation induced chemistry of uranyl cation in aqueous carbonate –bicarbonate solutions as followed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Snow, Lanee A.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Cho, Herman M.; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-05-01

    Alpha radiation induced formation of hydrogen peroxide in carbonate ?bicarbonate media was followed by 13C NMR using dissolved [233UO2(13CO3)3]4- as the alpha source (Dalpha= 12.1 Gy/hr). Between the pH region between 5.9 and 11.6 hydrogen peroxide causes a varied speciation of the uranyl carbonates that is a function of the uranium, carbonate and the hydrogen peroxide concentrations. It is shown that the speciation of the peroxy carbonates (or other species) formed in solution by titration with hydrogen peroxide are common to those formed by hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis. The radiolysis experiment was carried out above pH = 9.96 to minimize the loss of 13CO2 over a 2800 hr period. Radiolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide was followed by formation of a uranyl peroxy carbonate complex and complex formation accelerated for about 1200 hours. Complex formation was observed to terminate at a concentration between 1x10-4 and 5x10-4 M. It is assumed that either a steady state H2O2 production rate was established in solution or that some limiting feature of the experiment was responsible for slowing the yield of product.

  2. Compositional analysis of passivating surface film formed on carbon electrode in organic electrolytic solution using in-situ spectroelectrochemical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyun, Su-Il

    1999-02-01

    In-situ spectroelectrochemical technique has been applied to investigate passivating surface film on porous carbon electrode and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) carbon film electrode in organic electrolytic solution consisting of ethylene carbonate (EC) and diethyl carbonate (DEC) solvent, and 1 M LiPF6 and LiAsF6. Water impurity with the concentration of 0 M, 0.02 M, 0.05 M, and 0.1 M H20 was added to 1 M LiPF6-EC/DEC solution. In-situ Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectra of the surface film on both electrodes with the constituents of ROCO2Li, Li2CO3, and LixPFy suggested that the reduction of EC to ROCO2Li runs via a one-electron transfer pathway as a result of diffusion of water through the surface film, and then Li2CO3 formation proceeds simultaneously by the chemical reaction of ROCO2Li with water. From the measured potential dependence of the amount of the salt reduction products, it is suggested that the surface film formed in 1 M LiPF6EC/DEC solution gives a poorer passivity as compared with that formed in 1 M LiAsF6-EC/DEC solution, which is due to the considerable interference of LiPE6 salt reduction with the compact sedimentation of ROCO2Li on the electrode. In-situ FFIR spectra of the surface film showed that all the peak intensities of the three constituents significantly increase with increasing water content under application of the negative potentials with respect to open circuit potential (OCP). From these experimental results, the dependence of the passivity of the surface film on the carbon electrode on the water concentration of the electrolyte, as well as on the lithium salt type, was discussed in view of the salt and solvent reactivities.

  3. Carbonized properties of iodine-incorporated poly(vinyl alcohol) composite films prepared by gelation/crystallization from solution.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yumiko; Matsuo, Masaru

    2010-02-16

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) composite films were prepared by gelation/crystallization from a dispersed solution containing different TiO(2) contents against PVA. Iodine was incorporated into the composites, and the iodine-incorporated composites were carbonized under argon gas in the temperature range of 700-1600 degrees C. Under the carbonization process, the incorporation of iodine into composites ensured tough films without cracks. This indicated that iodine incorporation played an important role as a catalyst to promote the formation of cross links between amorphous carbon chains through the resultant Ti-C structure that occurs by hydration. Surprisingly, X-ray diffraction intensity measurements revealed that the coagulated TiO(2) powders in the composite film carbonized at 1200 degrees C remained predominantly anatase type, which has generally been known as photocatalytic activity. The perfect transition to the rutile-type structure dramatically occurred at 1600 degrees C. Judging from the carbon coating on the TiO(2) particle surface as detected by ESCA, no disruption of the composite was found to be due to the appearances of Ti(2)O(3) groups and the Ti-C structure performing cross linking between neighboring amorphous carbon chains. The characteristics of anatase-type TiO(2) crystallites and amorphous carbon structures were analyzed using the para-crystalline theory concerning the distance fluctuation between graphene sheets. The electrical conductivity of the carbonized composite was ca. 0.01 S/cm and was independent of the TiO(2) admixed in the carbon matrix.

  4. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA.

  5. Comparisons of adsorbent cost for the removal of zinc (II) from aqueous solution by carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chungsying; Chiu, Huantsung; Bai, Hsunling

    2007-01-01

    The reversibility of Zn2+ sorption onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated to evaluate their repeated availability performance in water treatment. Under the same conditions, the Zn2+ sorption capacity of SWCNTs and MWCNTs was more than that of PAC and could be maintained after several cycles of water treatment and regeneration. A statistical analysis on the replacement cost of these adsorbents based on the best-fit regression of the measured equilibrium capacity of each water treatment cycle was also conducted. The results revealed that the SWCNTs and MWCNTs could be reused through a large number of water treatment cycles and thus appear cost-effective in spite of their high unit cost at the present time.

  6. A conductance study of guanidinium chloride, thiocyanate, sulfate, and carbonate in dilute aqueous solutions: ion-association and carbonate hydrolysis effects.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Johannes; Neueder, Roland; Buchner, Richard; Apelblat, Alexander

    2013-01-17

    We study the conductance of dilute aqueous solutions for a series of guandinium salts at 298.15 K. The experimental molar conductivities were analyzed within the framework of the Quint-Viallard theory in combination with Debye-Hückel activity coefficients. From this analysis, we find no evidence for significant ion association in aqueous solutions of guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) and guanidinium thiocyanate (GdmSCN), and the molar conductivity of these electrolytes can be modeled assuming a complete dissociation. The limiting ionic conductivity of the guanidinium ion (Gdm(+)) is accurately determined to λ(Gdm(+)) = 51.45 ± 0.10 S cm(2) mol(-1). For the bivalent salts guanidinium sulfate (Gdm(2)SO(4)) and guanidinium carbonate (Gdm(2)CO(3)), the molar conductivities show small deviations from ideal (fully dissociated electrolyte) behavior, which are related to weak ion association in solution. Furthermore, for solutions of Gdm(2)CO(3), the hydrolysis of the carbonate anion leads to distinctively increased molar conductivities at high dilutions. The observed ion association is rather weak for all studied electrolytes and cannot explain the different protein denaturing activities of the studied guanidinium salts, as has been proposed previously.

  7. Adsorption of chlorophenols from aqueous solutions by pristine and surface functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Han; Li, Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaojian; Chen, Chao

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of six kinds of chlorophenols on pristine, hydroxylated and carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been investigated. Pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models were used to describe the kinetic data. All adsorption isotherms were well fitted with Langmuir, Freundlich and Polanyi-Manes models, due to surface adsorption dominating the adsorption process. The close linear relationship between logKow and logKd suggested that hydrophobicity played an important role in the adsorption. The SWCNTs' adsorption capacity for chlorophenols was weakened by addition of oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface, due to the loss of specific surface area, the increase of hydrophilicity and the reduction of π-π interaction. The best adsorption capacity of pristine SWCNTs, SWCNT-OH and SWCNT-COOH for six chlorophenols varied from 19 to 84mg/g, from 19 to 65mg/g and from 17 to 65mg/g, respectively. The effect of pH on the adsorption of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), was also studied. When pH is over the pKa of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), its removal dropped sharply. When ionic strength increased (NaCl or KCl concentration from 0 to 0.02mmol/L), the adsorption capacity of 2,6-DCP on pristine SWCNTs decreased slightly. The comparison of chlorophenols adsorption by SWCNTs, MWCNTs and PAC was made, indicating that the adsorption rate of CNTs was much faster than that of PAC. The results provide useful information about the feasibility of SWCNTs as an adsorbent to remove chlorophenols from aqueous solutions.

  8. Effect of Na+ impregnated activated carbon on the adsorption of NH4(+)-N from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mo; Wang, Zhengfang; Zheng, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    Two kinds of activated carbons modified by Na+ impregnation after pre-treatments involving oxidation by nitric acid or acidification by hydrochloric acid (denoted as AC/N-Na and AC/HCl-Na, respectively), were used as adsorbents to remove NH4(+)-N. The surface features of samples were investigated by BET, SEM, XRD and FT-IR. The adsorption experiments were conducted in equilibrium and kinetic conditions. Influencing factors such as initial solution pH and initial concentration were investigated. A possible mechanism was proposed. Results showed that optimal NH4(+)-N removal efficiency was achieved at a neutral pH condition for the modified ACs. The Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation provided a better fit than other models for the equilibrium study. The adsorption kinetics followed both the pseudo second-order kinetics model and intra-particle kinetic model. Chemical surface analysis indicated that Na+ ions form ionic bonds with available surface functional groups created by pre-treatment, especially oxidation by nitric acid, thus increasing the removal efficiency of the modified ACs for NH4(+)-N. Na(+)-impregnated ACs had a higher removal capability in removing NH4(+)-N than unmodified AC, possibly resulting from higher numbers of surface functional groups and better intra-particle diffusion. The good fit of Langmuir isotherm adsorption to the data indicated the presence of monolayer NH4(+)-N adsorption on the active homogenous sites within the adsorbents. The applicability of pseudo second-order and intra-particle kinetic models revealed the complex nature of the adsorption mechanism. The intra-particle diffusion model revealed that the adsorption process consisted not only of surface adsorption but also intra-particle diffusion.

  9. Synthesis and utilization of a novel carbon nanotubes supported nanocables for the adsorption of dyes from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xinyu; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2015-09-01

    Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) as mechanical support and glucose as carbon resource, a hydrothermal carbonization route was designed for the synthesis of MWCNTs@carbon nanocables with tunable diameter and length. MWCNTs are firstly used as templates for the formation of carbon-rich composite nanocables, and the diameter of the nanocables could be tailored through adjusting the hydrothermal time or the ratio of MWCNTs and glucose. Owing to abundant superficial oxygen-containing functional groups, porous surface and remarkable reactivity, the as-synthesized nanocables are capable of efficiently adsorbing cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). Furthermore, the optimum adsorption conditions, kinetics, adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamics of dyes were studied systematically. Additionally, the maximum adsorption capacities calculated from data analysis (298.5 mg/g for MB and 228.3 mg/g for CV) are significant higher than those of raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents reported previously, which provides strong evidence for using MWCNTs@carbon nanocables as adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solutions.

  10. Domestic wash water reclamation for reuse as commode water supply using filtration: Reverse-osmosis separation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. B., Jr.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A combined filtration-reverse-osmosis water recovery system has been evaluated to determine its capability to reclaim domestic wash water for reuse as a commode water supply. The system produced water that met all chemical and physical requirements established by the U.S. Public Health Service for drinking water with the exception of carbon chloroform extractables, methylene blue active substances, and phenols. It is thought that this water is of sufficient quality to be reused as commode supply water. The feasibility of using a combined filtration and reverse-osmosis technique for reclaiming domestic wash water has been established. The use of such a technique for wash-water recovery will require a maintenance filter to remove solid materials including those less than 1 micron in size from the wash water. The reverse-osmosis module, if sufficiently protected from plugging, is an attractive low-energy technique for removing contaminants from domestic wash water.

  11. Desorption of 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene from Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact of Solution Chemistry and Surface Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xingmao; Uddin, Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    The strong affinity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to environmental contaminants has raised serious concern that CNTs may function as a carrier of environmental pollutants and lead to contamination in places where the environmental pollutants are not expected. However, this concern will not be realized until the contaminants are desorbed from CNTs. It is well recognized that the desorption of environmental pollutants from pre-laden CNTs varies with the environmental conditions, such as the solution pH and ionic strength. However, comprehensive investigation on the influence of solution chemistry on the desorption process has not been carried out, even though numerous investigations have been conducted to investigate the impact of solution chemistry on the adsorption of environmental pollutants on CNTs. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength) and surface functionalization on the desorption of preloaded 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB) from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The results suggested that higher pH, ionic strength and natural organic matter in solution generally led to higher desorption of 1,3,5-TCB from MWNTs. However, the extent of change varied at different values of the tested parameters (e.g., pH < 7 vs. pH > 7). In addition, the impact of these parameters varied with MWNTs possessing different surface functional groups, suggesting that surface functionalization could considerably alter the environmental behaviors and impact of MWNTs.

  12. Hand washing promotion for preventing diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ejemot-Nwadiaro, Regina I; Ehiri, John E; Arikpo, Dachi; Meremikwu, Martin M; Critchley, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea accounts for 1.8 million deaths in children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). One of the identified strategies to prevent diarrhoea is hand washing. Objectives To assess the effects of hand washing promotion interventions on diarrhoeal episodes in children and adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (27 May 2015); CENTRAL (published in the Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5); MEDLINE (1966 to 27 May 2015); EMBASE (1974 to 27 May 2015); LILACS (1982 to 27 May 2015); PsycINFO (1967 to 27 May 2015); Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index (1981 to 27 May 2015); ERIC (1966 to 27 May 2015); SPECTR (2000 to 27 May 2015); Bibliomap (1990 to 27 May 2015); RoRe, The Grey Literature (2002 to 27 May 2015); World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform (ICTRP), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT), and reference lists of articles up to 27 May 2015. We also contacted researchers and organizations in the field. Selection criteria Individually randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster-RCTs that compared the effects of hand washing interventions on diarrhoea episodes in children and adults with no intervention. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We stratified the analyses for child day-care centres or schools, community, and hospital-based settings. Where appropriate, incidence rate ratios (IRR) were pooled using the generic inverse variance method and random-effects model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence. Main results We included 22 RCTs: 12 trials from child day-care centres or schools in mainly high-income countries (54,006 participants), nine community-based trials in LMICs (15,303 participants), and one hospital-based trial among people with acquired immune deficiency

  13. Biological activation of carbon filters.

    PubMed

    Seredyńska-Sobecka, Bozena; Tomaszewska, Maria; Janus, Magdalena; Morawski, Antoni W

    2006-01-01

    To prepare biological activated carbon (BAC), raw surface water was circulated through granular activated carbon (GAC) beds. Biological activity of carbon filters was initiated after about 6 months of filter operation and was confirmed by two methods: measurement of the amount of biomass attached to the carbon and by the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) test. The effect of carbon pre-washing on WG-12 carbon properties was also studied. For this purpose, the nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 77K and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectra analyses were performed. Moreover, iodine number, decolorizing power and adsorption properties of carbon in relation to phenol were studied. Analysis of the results revealed that after WG-12 carbon pre-washing its BET surface increased a little, the pH value of the carbon water extract decreased from 11.0 to 9.4, decolorizing power remained at the same level, and the iodine number and phenol adsorption rate increased. In preliminary studies of the ozonation-biofiltration process, a model phenol solution with concentration of approximately 10mg/l was applied. During the ozonation process a dose of 1.64 mg O(3)/mg TOC (total organic carbon) was employed and the contact time was 5 min. Four empty bed contact times (EBCTs) in the range of 2.4-24.0 min were used in the biofiltration experiment. The effectiveness of purification was measured by the following parameters: chemical oxygen demand (COD(Mn)), TOC, phenol concentration and UV(254)-absorbance. The parameters were found to decrease with EBCT.

  14. Removal of cationic dyes from aqueous solution using magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube nanocomposite as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ji-Lai; Wang, Bin; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yang, Chun-Ping; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Zhou, Wen-Jin; Liang, Yi

    2009-05-30

    A magnetic multi-wall carbon nanotube (MMWCNT) nanocomposite was synthesized and was used as an adsorbent for removal of cationic dyes from aqueous solutions. The MMWCNT nanocomposite was composed of commercial multi-wall carbon nanotubes and iron oxide nanoparticles. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and BET surface area measurements. Adsorption characteristics of the MMWCNT nanocomposite adsorbent were examined using methylene blue, neutral red and brilliant cresyl blue as adsorbates. Experiments were carried out to investigate adsorption kinetics, adsorption capacity of the adsorbent and the effect of adsorption dosage and solution pH values on the removal of cationic dyes. Kinetic data were well fitted by a pseudo second-order model. Freundlich model was used to study the adsorption isotherms. The prepared MMWCNT adsorbent displayed the main advantage of separation convenience compared to the present adsorption treatment.

  15. Advances in preparation of modified activated carbon and its applications in the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. L.; Liang, M. N.; Li, H. H.; Zhu, Z. J.

    2016-08-01

    The wastewater in which Cr(VI) is not fully treated has drawn environment researchers’ attention increasingly, due to its environmental pollution and harms to human health. Thus a high efficiency of modified activated carbon (MAC) to remove Cr(VI) has become one of the hot topics among environmental material research. This paper introduces the modification methods from the physical structure features and chemical properties of the activated carbon (AC) surface. At the same time, it briefly analyses the chemical characteristics of Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions, and on the basis of the aforementioned introduces the modification methods of the surface chemical characteristics of AC, such as: oxidation modification, reduction modification, loaded metal modification, and microwave modification. Combining studies on removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions by MAC in recent years, this paper anticipates the new trends of preparing MAC and the points in absorption research, offering some suggestions for future studies.

  16. Study of caffeine as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solehudin, Agus; Berman, Ega Taqwali; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion behaviour of steel surface in the absence and presence of caffeine in 3.5% NaCl solution containing dissolved H2S gas is studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different caffeine concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 0 to 0,1 mmol/l. Whereas, the corrosion rate increase with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 1 to 10 mmol/l. It is clear that no inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitor concentration. The optimum value of inhibition efficiency was 90% at a caffeine concentration of 0.1 mmol/l. This suggests that caffeine's performance as a corrosion inhibitor is more effective at a concentration of 0.1 mmol/l.

  17. Anodic stripping voltammetry at in situ bismuth-plated carbon and gold microdisc electrodes in variable electrolyte content unstirred solutions.

    PubMed

    Baldrianova, L; Svancara, I; Economou, A; Sotiropoulos, S

    2006-10-27

    Carbon and gold microdisc electrodes (30 and 10 microm, respectively) have been tested as substrates for in situ bismuth film plating from unstirred solutions of variable acetate buffer content and were subsequently used in the anodic stripping voltammetry determination of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions. The effects of Bi(III) concentration, analyte accumulation time, stirring as well as supporting electrolyte content have been studied. Under optimal conditions good voltammetric responses were obtained by means of square wave anodic stripping voltammetry in unstirred analyte solutions of 5 x 10(-8) to 10(-6)M, even in the absence of added buffer. In an indicative application, Pb(II) ion levels were determined in tap water using bismuth-plated carbon microdisc electrodes.

  18. Ion-Selective Deposition of Manganese Sulphate Solution from Trenggalek Manganese Ore by Active Carbon and Sodium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyah, L.; Sulistiyono, E.

    2017-02-01

    One of the step in manganese dioxide manufacturing process for battery industry is a purification process of lithium manganese sulphate solution. The elimination of impurities such as iron removal is important in hydrometallurgical processes. Therefore, this paper present the purification results of manganese sulphate solution by removing impurities using a selective deposition method, namely activated carbon adsorption and NaOH. The experimental results showed that the optimum condition of adsorption process occurs on the addition of 5 g adsorbent and the addition of 10 ml NaOH 1 N, processing time of 30 minutes and the best is the activated carbon adsorption of Japan. Because the absolute requirement of the cathode material of lithium ion manganese are free of titanium then of local wood charcoal is good enough in terms of eliminating ions Ti is equal to 70.88%.

  19. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  20. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  1. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  2. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  3. 21 CFR 133.137 - Washed curd cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. 133.137... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.137 Washed curd cheese for manufacturing. Washed curd cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for washed curd cheese by §...

  4. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  5. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it...

  6. 30 CFR 206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.459 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the...

  7. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  8. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  9. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  10. 30 CFR 1206.459 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.459 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Indian Coal § 1206.459 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  11. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it...

  12. 30 CFR 1206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 1206.260 Section... RESOURCES REVENUE PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 1206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b)...

  13. 30 CFR 206.260 - Allocation of washed coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allocation of washed coal. 206.260 Section 206... MANAGEMENT PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Coal § 206.260 Allocation of washed coal. (a) When coal is subjected to washing, the washed coal must be allocated to the leases from which it was extracted. (b) When the...

  14. Wash water reclamation technology for advanced manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an analytical study and assessment of state-of-the-art wash water reclamation technology for advanced manned spacecraft is presented. All non-phase-change unit operations, unit processes, and subsystems currently under development by NASA are considered. Included among these are: filtration, ultrafiltration, carbon adsorption, ion exchange, chemical pretreatment, reverse osmosis, hyperfiltration, and certain urea removal techniques. Performance data are given together with the projected weights and sizes of key components and subsystems. In the final assessment, a simple multifiltration approach consisting of surface-type cartridge filters, carbon adsorption and ion exchange resins receives the highest rating for six-man orbital missions of up to 10 years in duration.

  15. Microbial decolorization and bioremediation of melanoidin containing molasses spent wash.

    PubMed

    Singh, K D; Sharma, S; Dwivedi, A; Pandey, P; Thakur, R L; Kumar, V

    2007-07-01

    Molasses spent wash from cane-molasses based distilleries contains a brown coloured recalcitrantpolymer melanoidin, which if disposed untreated poses a great threat to environment. Microbial decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction was found to be dependent on specific carbon and nitrogen source. Under optimal condition of pH, carbon and nitrogen concentration for each treatment, it was found that Bacillus sp isolated from soil was capable of removing COD (85. 35%) and colour (81.10%) from distillery waste to the maximum extent after 9 days atpH 7 in the medium containing 0.5% peptone, 2% glucose and 10% (v/v), followed by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and lowest reduction was obtained by using native microbial consortium.

  16. Adsorption of Nickel (II) from Aqueous Solution by Bicarbonate Modified Coconut Oilcake Residue Carbon.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumari, N; Srinivasan, K

    2014-07-01

    The adsorption of Ni (II) on modified coconut oilcake residue carbon (bicarbonate treated coconut oilcake residue carbon-BCORC) was employed for the removal of Ni (II) from water and wastewater. The influence of various factors such as agitation time, pH and carbon dosage on the adsorption capacity has been studied. Adsorption isothermal data could be interpreted by Langmuir and Freundlich equations. In order to understand the reaction mechanism, kinetic data has been studied using reversible first order rate equation. Similar studies were carried out using commercially available activated carbon--CAC, for comparison purposes. Column studies were conducted to obtain breakthrough capacities of BCORC and CAC. Common anions and cations affecting the removal of Ni (II) on both the carbons were also studied. Experiments were also done with wastewater containing Ni (II), to assess the potential of these carbons.

  17. Morphological degradation of human hair cuticle due to simulated sunlight irradiation and washing.

    PubMed

    Richena, M; Rezende, C A

    2016-08-01

    Morphological changes in hair surface are undesirable, since they cause shine loss, roughness increase and split ends. These effects occur more frequently in the cuticle, which is the outermost layer of the hair strand, and thus the most exposed to the environmental damages. Sunlight irradiation contributes significantly to these morphological alterations, which motivates the investigation of this effect on hair degradation. In this work, the influence of irradiation and hand-washing steps on the morphology of pigmented and non-pigmented hair cuticle was investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To simulate daily conditions, where hair is hand-washed and light exposed, samples of dark brown and gray hair underwent three different conditions: 1) irradiation with a mercury lamp for up to 600h; 2) irradiation with the mercury lamp combined with washes with a sodium lauryl sulphate solution; and 3) only washing. A new preparation procedure was applied for TEM samples to minimize natural variations among different hair strands: a single hair strand was cut into two neighbouring halves and only one of them underwent irradiation and washing. The non-exposed half was used as a control, so that the real effects caused by the controlled irradiation and washing procedures could be highlighted in samples that had very similar morphologies initially. More than 25images/sample were analysed using FESEM (total of 300 images) and ca. 150images/sample were obtained with TEM (total of 900 images). The results presented herein show that the endocuticle and the cell membrane complex (CMC) are the cuticle structures more degraded by irradiation. Photodegradation alone results in fracturing, cavities (Ø≈20-200nm) and cuticle cell lifting, while the washing steps were able to remove cuticle cells (≈1-2 cells removed after 60 washes). Finally, the combined action of irradiation and washing caused the most severe

  18. Synthesis and utilization of a novel carbon nanotubes supported nanocables for the adsorption of dyes from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Xinyu; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2015-09-15

    Using multiwalled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs) as mechanical support and glucose as carbon resource, a hydrothermal carbonization route was designed for the synthesis of MWCNTs@carbon nanocables with tunable diameter and length. MWCNTs are firstly used as templates for the formation of carbon-rich composite nanocables, and the diameter of the nanocables could be tailored through adjusting the hydrothermal time or the ratio of MWCNTs and glucose. Owing to abundant superficial oxygen-containing functional groups, porous surface and remarkable reactivity, the as-synthesized nanocables are capable of efficiently adsorbing cationic dye methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). Furthermore, the optimum adsorption conditions, kinetics, adsorption isotherms and adsorption thermodynamics of dyes were studied systematically. Additionally, the maximum adsorption capacities calculated from data analysis (298.5 mg/g for MB and 228.3 mg/g for CV) are significant higher than those of raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents reported previously, which provides strong evidence for using MWCNTs@carbon nanocables as adsorbent to remove dyes from aqueous solutions. - Graphical abstract: MWCNTs@carbon nanocables has been successfully fabricated by a hydrothermal carbonization method. The as-synthesized novel samples were used as adsorbents and exhibited high adsorption capacity on MB and CV. - Highlights: • A simple, cost-effective and “green” method for the synthesis of the material. • The diameter and length of the material are relatively easy to control. • The surface has large oxygen-containing groups and preferable chemical reactivity. • Compared with raw MWCNTs and some other adsorbents, the adsorption capacity is much high.

  19. Preparation of activated carbons from Iris tectorum employing ferric nitrate as dopant for removal of tetracycline from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Dongsheng; Wang, Man; Huang, Ji; Huang, Lihui

    2013-12-01

    Ferric nitrate was employed to modify activated carbon prepared from Iris tectorum during H₃PO₄ activation and ability of prepared activated carbon for removal of tetracycline (TC) was investigated. The properties of the activated carbon samples with or without ferric nitrate, ITAC-Fe and ITAC, were measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N₂ adsorption/desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Boehm's titration. The results showed that mixing with iron increased the BET surface area, total pore volume and the adsorption capacity as compared to the original carbon. FTIR and Boehm's titration suggested that ITAC-Fe was characteristic of more acidic functional groups than ITAC. Adsorption of TC on both samples exhibited a strong pH-dependent behavior and adsorption capacity reduced rapidly with the increasing solution pH. The adsorption kinetics agreed well with the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption isotherms data were well described by Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption capacity of 625.022 mg/g for ITAC and 769.231 mg/g for ITAC-Fe. The present work suggested that ITAC-Fe could be used to remove tetracycline effectively from aqueous solutions.

  20. Utilization of activated carbon produced from fruit juice industry solid waste for the adsorption of Yellow 18 from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Angin, Dilek

    2014-09-01

    The use of activated carbon obtained from sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) stones for the removal of a basic textile dye, which is Yellow 18, from aqueous solutions at different contact times, pH values and solution temperatures was investigated. The surface area and micropore volume of chemically modified activated carbon were 1704 m(2) g(-1) and 0.984 cm(3) g(-1), respectively. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation and the calculated adsorption capacity was 75.76 mg g(-1) at 318 K. The adsorption kinetic of Yellow 18 obeys the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated to estimate the nature of adsorption. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 0.71-2.36 kJ/mol. According to these results, prepared activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent to compare with the commercial activated carbon for the removal of Yellow 18 from wastewater.

  1. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solution by algal bloom residue derived activated carbon: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Tang, Yi; Cai, Dongqing; Liu, Xianan; Wang, Xiangqin; Huang, Qing; Yu, Zengliang

    2010-09-15

    A novel approach to prepare activated carbon from blue-green algal bloom residue has been tried for first time and its adsorption capability to remove hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from aqueous solution has been examined. For this algal bloom residue derived activated carbon, the physical characters regarding adsorption capability were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Batch studies showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for Cr(VI) absorption. It was found that initial pH of 1.0 was most favorable for Cr(VI) removal. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order equation and Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was 155.52 mg g(-1) in an acidic medium, which is comparable to best result from activated carbons derived from biomass. Therefore, this work put forward a nearly perfect solution which on one hand gets rid of environment-unfriendly algae residue while on the other hand produces high-quality activated carbon that is in return advantageous to environment protection.

  2. Removal of PFOA and PFOS from aqueous solutions using activated carbon produced from Vitis vinifera leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Fagbayigbo, Bamidele Oladapo; Opeolu, Beatrice Olutoyin; Fatoki, Olalekan Siyanbola; Akenga, Terresa Ayuko; Olatunji, Olatunde Stephen

    2017-04-05

    The removal of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solutions using agro-waste biomass of Vitis vinifera (grape) leaf litter was studied. Activated carbons were produced from the biomass and chemical activation achieved by using phosphoric acid (H3PO4) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) for the modification of the carbons' surface morphology. Activated carbons were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) in order to understand removal mechanisms of the contaminants by activated carbons. The effect of solution concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature was evaluated to optimize the removal efficiency of activated carbons. Adsorption isotherm models were used to analyse the equilibrium data obtained, and kinetic models were applied to study sorption mechanisms. The results fitted well into Freundlich isotherm with both AC-KOH and AC-H3PO4 having high K f values. Maximum adsorption capacities for AC-H3PO4 were 78.90 and 75.13 mg/g for PFOA and PFOS, respectively. Equilibrium was reached before 60 min on both adsorbents, and thermodynamic studies indicated that the process was exothermic and spontaneous. Surface morphology showed the abundance of microspores (>60%) with BET total surface area of 295.488 and 158.67 m(2)/g for AC-H3PO4 and AC-KOH activated carbons, respectively. Removal efficiencies were 95 and 90% for PFOA using AC-H3PO4 and AC-KOH, respectively; corresponding values for PFOS were 94 and 88%. Adsorbents' removal capacities depended on the physicochemical characteristics of adsorbents.

  3. The adsorption and inhibition effect of calcium lignosulfonate on Q235 carbon steel in simulated concrete pore solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu; Zhao, Xuhui; Zha, Shanshan

    2016-08-01

    The corrosion inhibition of calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) for Q235 carbon steel in saturated Ca(OH)2 + 0.1 mol/L NaCl solution was studied by means of weight loss, polarization, fluorescence microscopy (FM), scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS), microscopic infrared spectral imaging (M-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the steel in simulated concrete pore solution (pH 12.6), an increase of Eb value and a decrease of icorr value occurred with different concentrations of CLS. The optimal content of CLS was 0.001 mol/L at which the inhibition rate was 98.86% and the Eb value increased to 719 mV after 10 h of immersion. In mortar solution and in reinforced concrete environment, CLS also showed good inhibition for steel. The preferential adsorption of CLS around pits was detected by M-IR. The result illustrates that at the early stage the adsorption of CLS was heterogeneous and CLS may have a competitive adsorption with chloride ions at the active sites, which would be beneficial for decreasing the susceptibility of pitting corrosion. After the pre-filming time, an intact adsorption CLS film formed on carbon steel surface. The adsorption between CLS and calcium presented as Casbnd Osbnd S bonds. The adsorption of CLS on carbon steel surface occurred probably by both physisorption and chemisorption.

  4. Adsorption of the complex ion Au(CN)2- onto sulfur-impregnated activated carbon in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Muñiz, Kardia; Song, Shaoxian; Berber-Mendoza, Selene; Tong, Shitang

    2010-09-15

    The adsorption of the gold-cyanide complex ion (Au(CN)(2)(-)) on sulfur-impregnated activated carbon in aqueous solution has been studied in order to find a better adsorbent for the gold cyanidation process for extracting gold from ores. This study was performed using sulfur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC 8.0) made from high-sulfur petroleum coke and an artificial aqueous solution of Au(CN)(2)(-). The experimental results have shown that Au(CN)(2)(-) strongly adsorbed onto the SIAC 8.0, leading the gold adsorption capacity of the SIAC 8.0 to be 2.25x that on conventional activated carbon. It has been also found that the adsorption fit the Langmuir isotherm well, and the adsorption density of Au(CN)(2)(-) on the SIAC 8.0 in aqueous solution increased with increasing temperature, suggesting chemical adsorption. The chemical adsorption might be attributed to the formation of S-Au-CN on SIAC 8.0 surfaces through the covalent bond between the gold atom of the ion and the sulfur in the molecular structure of the SIAC 8.0. In addition, the desorption test has demonstrated that the majority of the adsorption was irreversible, which depended on the density of the adsorption sites on the SIAC.

  5. Degradation of alkanolamines in gas-treating solutions: Kinetics of Di-2-propanolamine degradation in aqueous solutions containing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    The rates and products of degradation of di-2-propanolamine (DIPA) were measured at 100-120/sup 0/C in the presence of a controlled amount of CO/sub 2/. DIPA underwent facile degradation, giving 3-(2-hydroxypropyl)-5-methyl-2-oxazolidone (HPMO) as the main product. Hydrolysis of HPMO occurs readily, but its equilibrium concentration increases with increasing amounts of CO/sub 2/ in solution. A kinetic model was derived and compared with the previously established model for diethanolamines (DEA) degradation. The virtual absence of di- or triamino degradation products is the most striking feature of DIPA degradation, which may be contrasted with the facile formation of di- and triamino products from DEA. This difference is discussed in terms of steric inhibition of the reaction, HPMO + DIPA ..-->.. diamino compounds.

  6. Are carbon nanotubes a natural solution? Applications in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Heister, Elena; Brunner, Eric W; Dieckmann, Gregg R; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan B

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes and materials based on carbon nanotubes have many perceived applications in the field of biomedicine. Several highly promising examples have been highlighted in the literature, ranging from their use as growth substrates or tissue scaffolds to acting as intracellular transporters for various therapeutic and diagnostic agents. In addition, carbon nanotubes have a strong optical absorption in the near-infrared region (in which tissue is transparent), which enables their use for biological imaging applications and photothermal ablation of tumors. Although these advances are potentially game-changing, excitement must be tempered somewhat as several bottlenecks exist. Carbon nanotube-based technologies ultimately have to compete with and out-perform existing technologies in terms of performance and price. Moreover, issues have been highlighted relating to toxicity, which presents an obstacle for the transition from preclinical to clinical use. Although many studies have suggested that well-functionalized carbon nanotubes appear to be safe to the treated animals, mainly rodents, long-term toxicity issues remains to be elucidated. In this report, we systematically highlight some of the most promising biomedical application areas of carbon nanotubes and review the interaction of carbon nanotubes with cultured cells and living organisms with a particular focus on in vivo biodistribution and potential adverse health effects. To conclude, future challenges and prospects of carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications will be addressed.

  7. The effect of washing water on bonding to etched enamel.

    PubMed

    Schneider, D J; Combe, E C; Martens, L V

    2004-01-01

    There is current concern about bacterial contamination of dental unit waterlines. This research hypothesized that the presence of increasing concentrations of bacteria in water used to wash etched enamel would result in a corresponding decrease in both shear bond strength (SBS) and critical surface tension (gammaC) of enamel. A further hypothesis was made that there is a correlation between SBS and gammaC. The effect of 3.5 ppm iodine in the water as a bacteriostatic agent was also assessed. Five groups of 10 samples of bovine enamel were etched, washed, and a resin composite bonded to them. The control group was washed with distilled water. Another group was washed with the dilute iodine solution. The remaining three groups used a different concentration of Escherichia coli DH5alpha as follows (in cfu mL(-1)): group 1: 10(2); group 2: 10(4); group 3: 10(6). Shear bond strength data were measured on an Instron testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm min(-1). Adhesion data were (MPa): control: 24.6 +/- 6.0; with iodine: 20.8 +/- 2.7; group 1: 19.8 +/- 2.7; group 2: 13.5 +/- 3.0; group 3: 13.9 +/- 3.6. The F-test yielded a highly significant difference between control group, iodine group and group 1, compared with groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.0001). Tukey's Studentized Range Test was used for pairwise comparison testing between groups. Using a Cahn dynamic contact angle analyzer and linear regression analysis, the plots of surface tension versus costheta were extrapolated to costheta = 1 to give gammaC data for the control group and groups 1-3. In all cases reasonable linearity was observed (r2 > or = 0.87). Data (mN m(-1)) were: control group: 50.8; group 1: 45.1; group 2: 43.2; group 3: 39.5. The SBS and gammaC were then plotted against each other and linear regression analysis performed. It was concluded that increasing concentrations of bacteria in wash water decreased both SBS and gammaC and that a linear correlation (R2 = 0.84) was found between the values of

  8. The microwave assisted synthesis of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as potential corrosion inhibitor toward carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasasa, Norman Vincent A.; Bundjali, Bunbun; Wahyuningrum, Deana

    2015-09-01

    Injection of corrosion inhibitor into the fluid current of oil and gas pipelines is an effective way to mitigate corrosion rate on the inner-surface parts of pipelines, especially carbon steel pipelines. In this research, two alkylimidazolium ionic liquids, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL1) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL2) have been synthesized and studied as a potential corrosion inhibitor towards carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide. IL1 and IL2 were synthesized using microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) method. Mass Spectrometry analysis of IL1 and IL2 showed molecular mass [M-H+] peak at 223.2166 and 251.2484, respectively. The FTIR,1H-NMR and 13C-NMR spectra confirmed that IL1 and IL2 were successfully synthesized. Corrosion inhibition activity of IL1 and IL2 were determined using weight loss method. The results showed that IL1 and IL2 have the potential as good corrosion inhibitors with corrosion inhibition efficiency of IL1 and IL2 are 96.00% at 100 ppm (343 K) and 95.60% at 50 ppm (343 K), respectively. The increase in the concentration of IL1 and IL2 tends to improve their corrosion inhibition activities. Analysis of the data obtained from the weight loss method shows that the adsorption of IL1 and IL2 on carbon steel is classified into chemisorption which obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm.

  9. 2, 4 dichlorophenol (2, 4-DCP) sorption from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and polymeric adsorbents and studies on effect of temperature on activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ghatbandhe, A S; Yenkie, M K N

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), one of the most commonly used chlorophenol, onto bituminous coal based Filtrasorb-400 grade granular activated carbon, were studied in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to temperature. Uptake capacity of activated carbon found to increase with temperature. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental equilibrium data of 2, 4-DCP adsorption and competitive studies with respect to XAD resin were carried out. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium model. Adsorbent monolayer capacity 'Q0, Langmuir constant 'b' and adsorption rate constant 'k(a)' were evaluated at different temperatures for activated carbon adsorption. This data was then used to calculate the energy of activation of adsorption and also the thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0, enthalpy of adsorption, deltaH0 and the entropy of adsorption deltaS0. The obtained results showed that the monolayer capacity increases with the increase in temperatures. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters showed that adsorption of 2,4 DCP is an endothermic process. Synthetic resin was not found efficient to adsorb 2,4 DCP compared to activated carbon. The order of adsorption efficiencies of three resins used in the study found as XAD7HP > XAD4 > XAD1180.

  10. Chemical and structural evaluation of activated carbon prepared from jute sticks for Brilliant Green dye removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Asaduzzaman, Mohammad; Kabir, Mohammad Shajahan; Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Miyazawa, Tomohisa

    2010-02-15

    Activated carbons have been prepared from jute sticks by chemical activation using ZnCl(2) and physical activation using steam for the removal of Brilliant Green dye from aqueous solution. The activated carbons and charcoal prepared from jute sticks were characterized by evaluating the surface chemistry, structural features and surface morphology. The maximum BET surface area was obtained to be 2304 m(2)/g for chemical activated carbon (ACC) while it is 730 and 80 m(2)/g for steam activated carbon (ACS) and charcoal, respectively. The FT-IR spectra exhibited that the pyrolysis and steam activation of jute sticks resulted in the release of aliphatic and O-containing functional groups by thermal effect. However, the release of functional groups is the effect of chemical reaction in the ZnCl(2) activation process. A honeycomb-type carbon structure in ACC was formed as observed on SEM images. Although charcoal and ACC were prepared at 500 degrees C the ACC exhibited much lower Raman sensitivity due to the formation of condensed aromatic ring systems. Due to high surface area and high porous structure with abundance of functional groups, the ACC adsorbed dye molecules with much higher efficiency than those of ACS and charcoal.

  11. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A.; Salazar, R. R.; Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A.; Danis, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  12. One-electron oxidation in irradiated carbon tetrachloride solutions of ZnTPP, TMPD, and phenols. [Pulsed irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grodkowski, J.; Neta, P.

    1984-03-15

    One-electron oxidation of phenol, p-methoxphenol, N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, chlorpromazine, and zinc tetraphenolporphyrin (ZnTPP) was studied by pulse radiolysis in carbon tetrachloride solutions. Phenols form phenoxyl radicals and the other compounds form cation radicals with yields strongly dependent on solute concentration. The highest yield in deoxygenated solutions approached G = 4. In the presence of oxygen an additional oxidation step is observed owing to CCl/sub 3/O/sub 2/ radicals and the overall oxidation yield approached G = 8. ZnTPP was found to be oxidized to the cation radical without any side effects, unlike oxidation in 1,2-dichloroethane which was accompanied by demetallation owing to HCl production.

  13. Effective removal of tetracycline from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) industrial processing waste.

    PubMed

    Sayğılı, Hasan; Güzel, Fuat

    2016-09-01

    Activated carbon (TAC) prepared under optimized conditions with ZnCl2 activation from a new precursor; tomato industrial processing waste (TW), was applied as an adsorbent to remove tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The factors (TAC dosage, initial TC concentration, contact time, ionic strength and solution temperature) affecting the adsorption process were examined at natural pH (5.7) of TAC-TC system in aqueous solution. Kinetic data was found to be best complied by the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm analysis indicated that the equilibrium data could be represented by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity was identified as 500.0mgg(-1) at 308K.

  14. Equilibrium adsorption studies of some aromatic pollutants from dilute aqueous solutions on activated carbon at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.R.; Ataullah, R.; Al-Haddad, A.

    1997-10-01

    Aqueous solutions of phenol, p-chlorophenol, and p-nitrophenol have been used to determine the adsorption isotherm for single solute systems on activated carbon at different temperatures. The experimental program has been conducted to investigate the influence of concentration and temperature. All the reported equilibrium isotherm equations have been tried on present and published experimental data. A generalized isotherm equation which was proposed by Khan et al. and tested for bi-solute adsorption data has been modified for single-solute system. The temperature dependency has also been incorporated into a generalized equation. It has been noticed that the Radke and Prausnitz and generalized isotherm equations could represent the entire data with a minimum average percentage error. The influence of different adsorbents, sorbate concentrations, and pH of aqueous solutions has also been discussed in detail. The temperature dependency has been investigated using both the Dubinin-Astakov and the modified generalized equation. The generalized equation describes the experimental and published data adequately and provides a single value of differential molar heat of adsorption, {Delta}H{sub ads}, for a single solute adsorption system. The Dubinin-Astakov isotherm equation has shown an increasing trend of {Delta}H{sub ads} as the loading of adsorbent has increased.

  15. Ring-Oven Washing Technique Integrated Paper-based Immunodevice for Sensitive Detection of Cancer Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Guo, Yumei; Zhao, Mei; Li, Huifang; Zhang, Zhujun

    2015-08-04

    A paper-based microfluidic immunodevice has recently attracted considerable interest for point-of-care testing (POCT) and a washing procedure was used as a standard procedure in immunoassay to eliminate the nonspecific binding protein from a paper surface. However, the traditional washing method cannot get rid of the nonspecific binding protein more completely to get a lower background. In this work, a novel washing strategy with a ring-oven technique integrated on a paper-based immunodevice was presented, which can effectively wash a nonspecific binding protein and enable a low background for sensitive detection of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). By immobilizing the antibody on the detection area and incorporating the temperature-controlled ring-oven under the paper-based device, the continuous washing solution can carry the nonspecific binding protein to the waste area freely by capillary force and then the waste area dried quickly by heating. The paper device, which is matched to the size of the ring-oven, is composed of eight microfluidic channels by the simple and rapid paper-cutting fabrication method. With the HRP-catalyzed 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB)-H2O2 colorimetric detection method, a lower detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL CEA can be obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The washing efficiency for the nonspecific binding protein was improved a lot compared to the traditional washing methods, and the established paper-based device can be used in the determination of CEA in human serum with high sensitivity. The paper-based device provides a new washing strategy for sensitive immunoassay and point-of-care diagnostics.

  16. Hand washing compliance among retail food establishment workers in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Allwood, Paul B; Jenkins, Timothy; Paulus, Colleen; Johnson, Lars; Hedberg, Craig W

    2004-12-01

    Inadequate hand washing by food workers is an important contributing factor to foodborne disease outbreaks in retail food establishments (RFEs). We conducted a survey of RFEs to investigate the effect of hand washing training, availability of hand washing facilities, and the ability of the person in charge (PIC) to describe hand washing according to the Minnesota Food Code (food code) on workers' ability to demonstrate food code-compliant hand washing. Only 52% of the PICs could describe the hand washing procedure outlined in the food code, and only 48% of workers could demonstrate code-compliant hand washing. The most common problems observed were failure to wash for 20 s and failure to use a fingernail brush. There was a strong positive association between the PIC being a certified food manager and being able to describe the food code hand washing procedure (odds ratio [OR], 5.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2 to 13.7), and there was an even stronger association between the PIC being able to describe hand washing and workers being able to demonstrate code-compliant hand washing (OR, 15; 95% CI, 6 to 37). Significant associations were detected among correct hand washing demonstration, physical infrastructure for hand washing, and the hand washing training methods used by the establishment. However, the principal determinant of successful hand washing demonstration was the PIC's ability to describe proper hand washing procedure. These results suggest that improving hand washing practices among food workers will require interventions that address PIC knowledge of hand washing requirement and procedure and the development and implementation of effective hand washing training methods.

  17. Effect of acetate and carbonate buffers on the photolysis of riboflavin in aqueous solution: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Anwar, Zubair; Iqbal, Kefi; Ali, Syed Abid; Mirza, Tania; Khurshid, Adeela; Khurshid, Aqeela; Arsalan, Adeel

    2014-06-01

    The photolysis of riboflavin (RF) in the presence of acetate buffer (pH 3.8-5.6) and carbonate buffer (pH 9.2-10.8) has been studied using a multicomponent spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous assay of RF and its photoproducts. Acetate and carbonate buffers have been found to catalyze the photolysis reaction of RF. The apparent first-order rate constants for the acetate-catalyzed reaction range from 0.20 to 2.86 × 10(-4) s(-1) and for the carbonate-catalyzed reaction from 3.33 to 15.89 × 10(-4) s(-1). The second-order rate constants for the interaction of RF with the acetate and the carbonate ions range from 2.04 to 4.33 × 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1) and from 3.71 to 11.80 × 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The k-pH profile for the acetate-catalyzed reaction is bell shaped and for the carbonate-catalyzed reaction a steep curve. Both HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) ions are involved in the catalysis of the photolysis reaction in alkaline solution. The rate constants for the HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) ions catalyzed reactions are 0.72 and 1.38 × 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, indicating a major role of CO3(2-) ions in the catalysis reaction. The loss of RF fluorescence in acetate buffer suggests an interaction between RF and acetate ions to promote the photolysis reaction. The optimum stability of RF solutions is observed in the pH range 5-6, which is suitable for pharmaceutical preparations.

  18. Prototype wash water renovation system integration with government-furnished wash fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The requirements of a significant quantity of proposed life sciences experiments in Shuttle payloads for available wash water to support cleansing operations has provided the incentive to develop a technique for wash water renovation. A prototype wash water waste renovation system which has the capability to process the waste water and return it to a state adequate for reuse in a typical cleansing fixture designed to support life science experiments was investigated. The resulting technology is to support other developments efforts pertaining to water reclamation by serving as a pretreatment step for subsequent reclamation procedures.

  19. SOIL-WASHING TECHNOLOGY AND PRACTICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing in the United States has been studied and evaluated with increasing thoroughness during the last 15 to 20 years. It is now entering a phase of actual use and acceptance as its applicability and economics become clearer. This paper reviews the principles behind soil...

  20. Washing of the AW-101 entrained solids

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta

    2000-03-31

    BNFL Inc. (BNFL) is under contract with the US Department of Energy, River Protection Project (DOE-RPP) to design, construct, and operate facilities for treating wastes stored in the single-shell and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The DOE-BNFL RPP contract identifies two feeds to the waste treatment plant: (1) primarily liquid low-activity waste (LAW) consisting of less than 2 wt% entrained solids and (2) high-level waste (HLW) consisting of 10 to 200 g/L solids slurry. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of inhibited water washing on the composition of the entrained solids in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. The objective of this work was to gather data on the solubility of the AW-101 entrained solids in 0.01 M NaOH, so that BNFL can evaluate whether these solids require caustic leaching. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-9, Rev. 0, LAW Entrained Solids Water Wash and Caustic Leach Testing. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan. Based on the results of the 0.01 M NaOH washing, a decision was made by BNFL to not proceed with the caustic leaching test. The composition of the washed solids was such that caustic leaching would not result in significant reduction in the immobilized HLW volume.

  1. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOIL WASHING SYSTEM - BIOTROL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three component technologies of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS). Tested in the SITE demonstration were a Soil Washer (SW), and Aqueous Treatment System (ATS), and a Slurry Bio-Reactor (SBR). The Soil Washer operates on the principle that a significant fraction of the...

  2. An Alternative Antimicrobial Commercial Egg Washing Procedure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presently, commercial eggs are washed with water containing an alkali detergent at approximately pH 11 followed by a chlorine rinse. At this pH, it is likely that there is little, if any, free chlorine in the final rinse to act as an antimicrobial against pathogens like Salmonella. Using a chlorine ...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The BioGenesis Enterprises, Inc. (BioGenesis) soil washing technology was demonstrated as part of the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program in November 1992. The demonstration was conducted over three days at a petrol...

  4. What Happens at a Car Wash?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barbara; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    A class of 3- to 5-year-old children in a child care center in the midwestern United States chose to study a car wash as a group project. This article discusses how the project evolved, describes the three phases of the project, and provides the teachers' reflections on the project. Photos taken during the project and children's sketches are…

  5. Preparation of Activated Carbon From Polygonum orientale Linn. to Remove the Phenol in Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jia; Shi, Shengli; Pei, Liangyu; Lv, Junping; Liu, Qi; Xie, Shulian

    2016-01-01

    Phenol components are major industry contaminants of aquatic environment. Among all practical methods for removing phenol substances from polluted water, activated carbon absorption is the most effective way. Here, we have produced low-cost activated carbon using Polygonum orientale Linn, a wide spreading species with large biomass. The phenol adsorption ability of this activated carbon was evaluated at different physico-chemical conditions. Average equilibrium time for adsorption was 120 min. The phenol adsorption ability of the P. orientale activated carbon was increased as the pH increases and reached to the max at pH 9.00. By contrast, the ionic strength had little effect on the phenol absorption. The optimum dose for phenol adsorption by the P. orientale activated carbon was 20.00 g/L. The dominant adsorption mechanism of the P. orientale activated carbon was chemisorption as its phenol adsorption kinetics matched with the pseudo-second-order kinetics. In addition, the equilibrium data were fit to the Langmuir model, with the negative standard free energy and the positive enthalpy, suggesting that adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. PMID:27741305

  6. High adsorption capacity NaOH-activated carbon for dye removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Chin; Tseng, Ru-Ling

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the surface coverage ratio (Sc/Sp) and monolayer cover adsorption amount per unit surface area (qmon/Sp) were employed to investigate the adsorption isotherm equilibrium of the adsorption of dyes (AB74, BB1 and MB) on NaOH-activated carbons (FWNa2, FWNa3 and FWNa4); the adsorption rate of the Elovich equation (1/b) and the ratio of 1min adsorption amount of adsorbate to the monolayer cover amount of adsorbate (q1/qmon) were employed to investigate adsorption kinetics. The qmon/Sp of NaOH-activated carbons was better than that of KOH-activated carbons prepared from the same raw material (fir wood). The Sc/Sp values of the adsorption of all adsorbates on adsorbent FWNa3 in this study were found to be higher than those in related literature. Parameters 1/b and q1 of the adsorption of dyes on activated carbons in this study were higher than those on KOH-activated carbons; the q1/qmon value of FWNa3 was the highest. The pore structure and the TPD measurement of the surface oxide groups were employed to explain the superior adsorption performance of FWNa3. A high surface activated carbon (FWNa3) with excellent adsorption performance on dyes with relation to adsorption isotherm equilibrium and kinetics was obtained in this study. Several adsorption data processing methods were employed to describe the adsorption performance.

  7. The behavior of silver nanotextiles during washing.

    PubMed

    Geranio, L; Heuberger, M; Nowack, B

    2009-11-01

    The widespread use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in commercial products, especially textiles, will likely result in an unknown spread of Ag into the environment. The quantification and characterization of the Ag released from nano-Ag-products is an important parameter needed to predict the effect of Ag-NPs on the environment. The aim of this study was to determine the amount and the form of Ag released during washing from nine fabrics with different ways of silver incorporation into or onto the fibers. The effect of pH, surfactants, and oxidizing agents was evaluated. The results show that little dissolution of Ag-NPs occurs under conditions relevant to washing (pH 10) with dissolved concentrations 10 times lower than at pH 7. However, bleaching agents such as hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid (formed by the perborate/TAED system) can greatly accelerate the dissolution of Ag. The amount and form of Ag released from the fabrics as ionic and particulate Ag depended on the type of Ag-incorporation into the textile. The percentage of the total silver emitted during one washing of the textiles varied considerably among products (from less than 1 to 45%). In the washing machine the majority of the Ag (at least 50% but mostly >75%) was released in the size fraction >450 nm, indicating the dominant role of mechanical stress. A conventional silver textile did not show any significant difference in the size distribution of the released silver compared to many of the textiles containing nano-Ag. These results have important implications for the risk assessment of Ag-textiles and also for environmental fate studies of nano-Ag, because they show that under conditions relevant to washing, primarily coarse Ag-containing particles are released.

  8. A Novel Glycinate-based Body Wash

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jamie; Ananthapadmanabhan, K.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the properties of a novel body wash containing the mild surfactant glycinate. Design: Biochemical and clinical assays. Setting: Research laboratories and clinical sites in the United States and Canada. Participants: Women 18 to 65 years of age (cleansing efficacy); male and female subjects 26 to 63 years of age with mild or moderate dryness and erythema (leg-controlled application test); subjects 5 to 65 years of age with mild-to-moderate eczema (eczema compatibility); and women 18 to 64 years of age (home use). Measurements: Assessments across studies included colorimetric dye exclusion to assess skin damage potential (corneosurfametry), efficacy of cosmetic product removal from skin, change from baseline in visual dryness, change from baseline in Eczema Area and Severity Index, and self-perceived eczema attributes and self-reported product preference. Results: The glycinate-based cleanser demonstrated mildness to skin components when evaluated in a corneosurfametry assay. Short-term use under exaggerated wash conditions in subjects with dryness scores <3 and erythema scores <2 (both on a 0-6 scale) indicated an initial reduction in visual dryness. In subjects with eczema, normal use resulted in significant improvements (p<0.05) at Week 4 compared with baseline in skin dryness (change from baseline = −0.73), rash (−0.56), itch (−0.927), tightness (−0.585), and all eczema (−0.756). The glycinate-based body wash removed 56 percent of a long-lasting cosmetic foundation from skin compared with less than 30 percent removed by two competitive products tested. The glycinate-based body wash was preferred over a competitive mild cleansing product overall. Conclusion: The patented glycinate-containing body wash demonstrated better product mildness and patient-preferred attributes and clinical benefits. PMID:23882306

  9. Generalized linear solvation energy model applied to solute partition coefficients in ionic liquid-supercritical carbon dioxide systems.

    PubMed

    Planeta, Josef; Karásek, Pavel; Hohnová, Barbora; Sťavíková, Lenka; Roth, Michal

    2012-08-10

    Biphasic solvent systems composed of an ionic liquid (IL) and supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) have become frequented in synthesis, extractions and electrochemistry. In the design of related applications, information on interphase partitioning of the target organics is essential, and the infinite-dilution partition coefficients of the organic solutes in IL-scCO(2) systems can conveniently be obtained by supercritical fluid chromatography. The data base of experimental partition coefficients obtained previously in this laboratory has been employed to test a generalized predictive model for the solute partition coefficients. The model is an amended version of that described before by Hiraga et al. (J. Supercrit. Fluids, in press). Because of difficulty of the problem to be modeled, the model involves several different concepts - linear solvation energy relationships, density-dependent solvent power of scCO(2), regular solution theory, and the Flory-Huggins theory of athermal solutions. The model shows a moderate success in correlating the infinite-dilution solute partition coefficients (K-factors) in individual IL-scCO(2) systems at varying temperature and pressure. However, larger K-factor data sets involving multiple IL-scCO(2) systems appear to be beyond reach of the model, especially when the ILs involved pertain to different cation classes.

  10. Junction-Controlled Elasticity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Dispersions in Acrylic Copolymer Gels and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Schoch, Andrew B.; Shull, Kenneth R.; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2008-08-26

    Oscillatory shear rheometry is used to study the mechanical response of single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in solutions of acrylic diblock or triblock copolymers in 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Thermal transitions in the copolymer solutions provide a route for the easy processing of these composite materials, with excellent dispersion of the nanotubes as verified by near-infrared photoluminescence spectroscopy. The nanotube dispersions form elastic networks with properties that are controlled by the junction points between nanotubes, featuring a temperature-dependent elastic response that is controlled by the dynamic properties of the matrix copolymer solution. The data are consistent with the formation of micelle-like aggregates around the nanotubes. At low temperatures the core-forming poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks are glassy, and the overall mechanical response of the composite does not evolve with time. At higher temperatures the enhanced mobility of the core-forming blocks enables the junctions to achieve more intimate nanotube-nanotube contact, and the composite modulus increases with time. These aging effects are observed in both diblock and triblock copolymer solutions but are partially reversed in the triblock solutions by cooling through the gel transition of the triblock copolymer. This result is attributed to the generation of internal stresses during gelation and the ability of these stresses to break or weaken the nanotube junctions.

  11. The solvation study of carbon, silicon and their mixed nanotubes in water solution.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Haeri, Haleh; Ketabi, Sepideh; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2012-07-01

    Nanotubes are believed to open the road toward different modern fields, either technological or biological. However, the applications of nanotubes have been badly impeded for the poor solubility in water which is especially essential for studies in the presence of living cells. Therefore, water soluble samples are in demand. Herein, the outcomes of Monte Carlo simulations of different sets of multiwall nanotubes immersed in water are reported. A number of multi wall nanotube samples, comprised of pure carbon, pure silicon and several mixtures of carbon and silicon are the subjects of study. The simulations are carried out in an (N,V,T) ensemble. The purpose of this report is to look at the effects of nanotube size (diameter) and nanotube type (pure carbon, pure silicon or a mixture of carbon and silicon) variation on solubility of multiwall nanotubes in terms of number of water molecules in shell volume. It is found that the solubility of the multi wall carbon nanotube samples is size independent, whereas multi wall silicon nanotube samples solubility varies with diameter of the inner tube. The higher solubility of samples containing silicon can be attributed to the larger atomic size of silicon atom which provides more direct contact with the water molecules. The other affecting factor is the bigger inter space (the space between inner and outer tube) in the case of silicon samples. Carbon type multi wall nanotubes appeared as better candidates for transporting water molecules through a multi wall nanotube structure, while in the case of water adsorption problems it is better to use multi wall silicon nanotubes or a mixture of multi wall carbon/ silicon nanotubes.

  12. The self-similar solutions of the problem of carbon dioxide injection into the reservoir saturated with methane and its hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musakaev, N. G.; Khasanov, M. K.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper the research of carbon dioxide injection into a porous medium initially saturated with methane and its hydrate was performed. The mathematical model of heat and mass transfer in a porous media, accompanied by the formation of carbon dioxide hydrate, is presented. The self-similar solutions, for the axisymmetric problem definition, were built. These solutions describe the distribution of the fluid parameters in a reservoir.

  13. Pilot-scale washing of metal contaminated garden soil using EDTA.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2012-05-15

    Ten batches (75kg each) of garden soil with >50% of silt and clay and average 1935mgkg(-1) Pb, 800mgkg(-1) Zn, 10mgkg(-1) Cd and 120mgkg(-1) As were remediated in a pilot-scale chemical extraction plant. Washing with 60mmol ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) per kg of soil on average removed 79, 38, 70, and 80% of Pb, Zn, Cd and As, respectively, and significantly reduced the leachability, phyto-accessibility and oral-availability of residual toxic metals, as assessed using deionised water, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid extraction (DTPA) and physiologically based extraction test (PBET) tests. The used soil washing solution was treated before discharge using an electrochemical advanced oxidation process with graphite anode: EDTA was removed by degradation and toxic metals were electro-precipitated onto a stainless steel cathode. The novelty of the remediation technique is separation of the soil from the washing solution and soil rinsing (removal of mobilized contaminants) carried out in the same process step. Another novelty is the reuse of the soil rinsing solution from the previous batch for cleansing the soil sand, soil rinsing and for preparation of the washing solution in subsequent batches. The cost of energy and material expenses and disposal of waste products amounted to approximately 75€ton(-1) of soil.

  14. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: LABORATORY FEASIBILITY TESTING OF PROTOTYPE SOIL WASHING CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft document reports on laboratory testing of several washing solutions to decontaminate soils contaminated vith dioxins. The following extractants were evaluated; surfactant mixtures of 0.5% to 3% Adsee 799 and 0.5* to 3% Hyonic NP90 in distilled water, Freon TF with ...

  15. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution (w/v). Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing li...

  16. Role of lauric acid-potassium hydroxide concentration on bacterial contamination of spray washed broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed in a spray cabinet with various concentrations of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions. Fifty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing line of...

  17. Influence of washing time on residual contamination of carcasses sprayed with lauric acid-potassium hydroxide.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed for various times in a spray cabinet with a 2% lauric acid (LA)-1% potassium hydroxide (KOH) (w/v) solution. Forty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing l...

  18. Two competitive nucleation mechanisms of calcium carbonate biomineralization in response to surface functionality in low calcium ion concentration solution

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hua; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Xiumei; Du, Chang; Shen, Xingcan; Wang, Yingjun; Cui, Fuzhai

    2015-01-01

    Four self-assembled monolayer surfaces terminated with –COOH, –OH, –NH2 and –CH3 functional groups are used to direct the biomineralization processes of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in low Ca2+ concentration, and the mechanism of nucleation and initial crystallization within 12 h was further explored. On −COOH surface, nucleation occurs mainly via ion aggregation mechanism while prenucleation ions clusters may be also involved. On −OH and −NH2 surfaces, however, nucleation forms via calcium carbonate clusters, which aggregate in solution and then are adsorbed onto surfaces following with nucleation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Furthermore, strongly negative-charged −COOH surface facilitates the direct formation of calcites, and the −OH and −NH2 surfaces determine the formation of vaterites with preferred crystalline orientations. Neither ACC nor crystalline CaCO3 is observed on −CH3 surface. Our findings present a valuable model to understand the CaCO3 biomineralization pathway in natural system where functional groups composition plays a determining role during calcium carbonate crystallization. PMID:26814639

  19. [Adsorption Characteristics of Nitrate and Phosphate from Aqueous Solution on Zirconium-Hexadecyltrimethylammonium Chloride Modified Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen-jing; Lin, Jian-wei; Zhan, Yan-hui; Wang, Hong

    2015-06-01

    A novel adsorbent material, i.e., zirconium-cationic surfactant modified activated carbon (ZrSMAC) was prepared by loading zirconium hydroxide and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) on activated carbon, and was used as an adsorbent for nitrate and phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The adsorption characteristics of nitrate and phosphate on ZrSMAC from aqueous solution were investigated in batch mode. Results showed that the ZrSMAC was effective for nitrate and phosphate removal from aqueous solution. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted both the nitrate and phosphate kinetic experimental data well. The equilibrium isotherm data of nitrate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC were well fitted to the Langmuir, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Freundlich isotherm models. The equilibrium isotherm data of phosphate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC could be described by the Langmuir and,D- R isotherm models. According to the Langmuir isotherm model, the maximum nitrate and phosphate adsorption capacities for the ZrSMAC were 7.58 mg x g(-1) and 10.9 mg x g(-1), respectively. High pH value was unfavorable for nitrate and phosphate adsorption onto the ZrSMAC. The presence of Cl-, HCO3- and SO4(2-) in solution reduced the nitrate and phosphate adsorption capacities for the ZrSMAC. The nitrate adsorption capacity for the ZrSMAC was reduced by the presence of coexisting phosphate in solution, and the phosphate adsorption capacity for the ZrSMAC was also reduced by the presence of coexisting nitrate in solution. About 90% of nitrate adsorbed on the ZrSMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaCl solution, and about 78% of phosphate adsorbed on the ZrSMAC could be desorbed in 1 mol x L(-1) NaOH solution. The adsorption mechanism of nitrate on the ZrSMAC included the anion exchange interactions and electrostatic attraction, and the adsorption mechanism of phosphate on the ZrSMAC included the ligand exchange interaction, electrostatic attraction and anion exchange interaction.

  20. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; He, Xu; Gitsis, Emmanouil; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Kim, Nayoung; Wang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH3CO2NH4) and sodium acetate (CH3CO2Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example.

  1. Sorption of mercury (II) and atrazine by biochar, modified biochars and biochar based activated carbon in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangcai; Sun, Weiling; Xu, Yaru; Wang, Hongyuan; Xu, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Corn straw biochar (BC) was used as a precursor to produce Na2S modified biochar (BS), KOH modified biochar (BK) and activated carbon (AC). Experiments were conducted to compare the sorption capacity of these sorbents for aqueous Hg (II) and atrazine existed alone or as a mixture. In comparison to BC, the sorption capacity of BS, BK and AC for single Hg (II) increased by 76.95%, 32.12% and 41.72%, while that for atrazine increased by 38.66%, 46.39% and 47 times, respectively. When Hg (II) and atrazine coexisted in an aqueous solution, competitive sorption was observed on all these sorbents. Sulfur impregnation was an efficient way to enhance the Hg (II) removal due to the formation of HgS precipitate, and oxygen-containing functional groups on the sorbents also contributed to Hg (II) sorption. Activated carbon was the best sorbent for atrazine removal because of its extremely high specific surface area.

  2. Analysis of the corrosion of carbon steels in simulated salt repository brines and acid chloride solutions at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.; Kassner, T.F.

    1988-04-01

    An analysis of literature data on the corrosion of carbon steels in anoxic brines and acid chloride solutions was performed, and the results were used to assess the expected life of high-level nuclear waste package containers in a salt repository environment. The corrosion rate of carbon steels in moderately acidic aqueous chloride environments obeys an Arrhenius dependence on temperature and a (pH{sub 2}){sup {minus}1/2} dependence on hydrogen partial pressure. The cathodic reduction of water to produce hydrogen is the rate-controlling step in the corrosion process. An expression for the corrosion rate incorporating these two dependencies was used to estimate the corrosion life of several proposed waste package configurations. 42 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Functionalization of super-aligned carbon nanotube film using hydrogen peroxide solution and its application in copper electrodeposition.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lunqiao; Shuai, Jing; Hou, Zecheng; Zhu, Lin; Li, Wenzhen

    2017-07-15

    In order to make super-aligned carbon nanotubes (SACNT) homogeneously spread in electrolytes, a swift and effective method was devised for surface functionalization of SACNT film by ohmic heating using hydrogen peroxide solution. Controllable generation of defects and notable graft of oxygen functional groups on the sidewall of SACNTs were induced as proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Differently from the harsh wet chemical oxidation, the super-aligned morphology and structural integrity of carbon nanotubes in the SACNT film were found to be well preserved by electron microscopy analysis. The functionalized treatment can remove extraneous material contaminating SACNT film and improve its conductivity. The grafting of polar ionizable groups has been proved to effectively eliminate the agglomeration of SACNTs. When the oxidized SACNT film was used as host material for electrodeposition of copper, the composite film of well-bonded SACNTs and Cu was successfully prepared.

  4. Origin of gasoline-range hydrocarbons and their migration by solution in carbon dioxide in Norton basin, Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon dioxide from a submarine seep in Norton Sound carries a minor component of gas- and gasoline-range hydrocarbons. The molecular and isotopic compositions of the hydrocarbon gases and the presence of gasoline-range hydrocarbons indicate that these molecules are derived from thermal alteration of marine and/or nonmarine organic matter buried within Norton basin. The gasoline-range hydrocarbon distribution suggests that the hydrocarbon mixture is an immature petroleum-like condensate of lower temperature origin than normal crude oil. The submarine seep provides a natural example in support of a carbon dioxide solution transport mechanism thought to be operative in the migration of hydrocarbons in certain reservoirs.-Authors

  5. Preparation of polyacrylnitrile (PAN)/ Manganese oxide based activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) for adsorption of Cadmium (II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, N.; Yusof, N.; Jaafar, J.; Ismail, AF; Che Othman, F. E.; Hasbullah, H.; Salleh, W. N. W.; Misdan, N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs) from precursor polyacrylnitrile (PAN) and manganese oxide (MnO2) were prepared via electrospinning process. The electrospun PAN/MnO2-based ACNFs were characterised in term of its morphological structure and specific surface area using SEM and BET analysis respectively. The comparative adsorption study of cadmium (II) ions from aqueous solution between the neat ACNFs, composite ACNFs and commercial granular activated carbon was also conducted. SEM analysis illustrated that composite ACNFs have more compact fibers with presence of MnO2 beads with smaller fiber diameter of 437.2 nm as compared to the neat ACNFs which is 575.5 nm. BET analysis elucidated specific surface area of ACNFs/MnO2 to be 67 m2/g. Under adsorption study, it was found out that Cd (II) removal by ACNFs/MnO2 was the highest (97%) followed by neat ACNFs (96%) and GAC (74%).

  6. Adsorption characteristics of N-nitrosodimethylamine from aqueous solution on surface-modified activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaodong; Zou, Linda; Yan, Zifeng; Millikan, Mary

    2009-08-30

    This study investigated the removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) by an adsorption mechanism using commercially available activated carbons and surface-modified activated carbons. The effects of the modification on the properties of the activated carbon were studied by N(2) adsorption/desorption, Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transmission (DRIFT) analysis and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Adsorption experiments revealed that the activated carbons demonstrated a greater capacity for NDMA adsorption capacity than can be achieved using zeolite. The equilibrium data was fitted to the Freundlich equation and it was found that the adsorption capacity was significantly influenced by the micropore size, relative pore volume and surface characteristics. Adsorption experiments were conducted using unmodified and modified activated carbons. The results indicated that the adsorption capacity of NDMA can be significantly improved by heat treatment and doping of TiO(2) particles. This was because the surface treatments yielded more hydrophobic sites and fewer oxygen-containing surface functional groups, and consequently an increased capacity for NDMA adsorption.

  7. Bacterial flora of processed broiler chicken skin after successive washings in mixtures of potassium hydroxide and lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Arthur; Cason, John A

    2008-08-01

    Changes in the size of populations of different groups of bacteria composing the normal flora of processed broiler skin were examined after each of five consecutive washings in mixtures of potassium hydroxide (KOH) and lauric acid (LA). Portions of skin from commercially processed broiler carcasses were washed in distilled water (control) or in mixtures of 0.25% KOH-0.5% LA or 0.5% KOH-1% LA by using a stomacher laboratory blender to agitate the skin in the solutions. After each wash, skin was transferred to fresh solutions, and washing was repeated to provide samples washed one to five times in each solution. Bacteria in rinsates of the washed skin were enumerated on plate count (PC) agar, Staphylococcus (STA) agar, Levine eosin methylene blue (EMB) agar, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) agar, and Perfringens (PER) agar with TSC supplement. Selected isolates recovered on each medium were identified. Overall, no significant differences were observed in numbers of bacteria recovered on PC, STA, or EMB agars from skin after repeated washing in water, but there were significant reductions in the number of bacteria recovered on LAB and PER agars. Repeated washing of skin in 0.25% KOH-0.5% LA or 0.5% KOH-1% LA generally produced significant reductions in the number of bacteria recovered on all media. Furthermore, no bacteria were recovered on PER agar from skin washed five times in 0.25% KOH-0.5% LA. Likewise, no bacteria were recovered on EMB or LAB agars from skin washed three or more times in 0.5% KOH-1% LA or on PER agar from skin washed four or five times in this solution. Staphylococcus spp. were identified as the skin isolates with the highest degree of resistance to the bactericidal activity of KOH-LA. Findings indicate that although bacteria may be continually shed from poultry skin after repeated washings, bactericidal surfactants can be used to remove and kill several types of bacteria found on the surface of the skin of processed broilers.

  8. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments.

  9. Food worker hand washing practices: an observation study.

    PubMed

    Green, Laura R; Selman, Carol A; Radke, Vincent; Ripley, Danny; Mack, James C; Reimann, David W; Stigger, Tammi; Motsinger, Michelle; Bushnell, Lisa

    2006-10-01

    Improvement of food worker hand washing practices is critical to the reduction of foodborne illness and is dependent upon a clear understanding of current hand washing practices. To that end, this study collected detailed observational data on food worker hand washing practices. Food workers (n = 321) were observed preparing food, and data were recorded on specific work activities for which hand washing is recommended (e.g., food preparation, handling dirty equipment). Data were also recorded on hand washing behaviors that occurred in conjunction with these work activities. Results indicated that workers engaged in approximately 8.6 work activities per hour for which hand washing is recommended. However, workers made hand washing attempts (i.e., removed gloves, if worn, and placed hands in running water) in only 32% of these activities and washed their hands appropriately (i.e., removed gloves, if worn, placed hands in running water, used soap, and dried hands) in only 27% of these work activities. Attempted and appropriate hand washing rates varied by work activity--they were significantly higher in conjunction with food preparation than other work activities (46 versus < or = 37% for attempted hand washing; 41 versus < or = 30% for appropriate hand washing) and were significantly lower in conjunction with touching the body than other work activities (13 versus > or = 27% for attempted hand washing; 10 versus > or = 23% for appropriate hand washing). Attempted and appropriate hand washing rates were significantly lower when gloves were worn (18 and 16%) than when gloves were not worn (37 and 30%). These findings suggest that the hand washing practices of food workers need to be improved, glove use may reduce hand washing, and restaurants should consider reorganizing their food preparation activities to reduce the frequency with which hand washing is needed.

  10. Fabrication of the supersaturated solid solution of carbon in copper by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xueran; Liu Yongbing; Ran Xu; An Jian; Cao Zhanyi . E-mail: caozy@jlu.edu.cn

    2007-06-15

    Mechanical alloying of powder mixtures of copper and graphite was performed in a high energy ball mill. The as-milled powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. These investigations indicated that high energy ball milling could largely extend the solid solubility of carbon in copper and the 4 wt.% C was dissolved in Cu. It was ascribed to the decrease of the grain size and the increase of the lattice strain. Nanostructures, amorphous carbon and lamellar graphite were observed in the as-milled powder after milling for 24 h.

  11. Improved mechanical properties of solution-cast silicone film reinforced with electrospun polyurethane nanofiber containing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijing, Leonard D.; Park, Chan-Hee; Kang, Seung-Ji; Amarjargal, Altangerel; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Pant, Hem Raj; Kim, Han Joo; Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we describe the enhancing ability of electrospun polyurethane (PU) nanofibers containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as nanofillers for silicone film in improving the physico-mechanical properties of the composite material. We prepared the samples combining two simple techniques: solution casting and electrospinning. Neat PU nanofibers alone are good reinforcing materials but the presence of CNTs inside the PU nanofibers has drastically improved the mechanical properties of the silicone composite film. The silicone film increased its tensile strength by 226% and its tensile modulus by more than 14-fold when CNT/PU nanofibers were incorporated.

  12. Optical limiting response of multi-walled carbon nanotube-phthalocyanine nanocomposite in solution and when in poly (acrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhosana, Kutloano Edward; Nyokong, Tebello

    2016-08-01

    Bis{23-(3,4-di-yloxybenzoic acid)-(2(3), 9(10), 16(17), 23(24)-(hexakis-pyridin-3-yloxy phthalocyaninato)} dineodymium (III) acetate (3) is linked to amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) to form 3-MWCNT. Z-scan technique was employed to experimentally determine the nonlinear absorption coefficient from the open-aperture data. The limiting threshold values as low as 0.045 J cm-2 were found in solution. The conjugate (3-MWCNT) gave better optical limiting behavior than complex 3 alone.

  13. Fundamental Effects of Aging on Creep Properties of Solution-Treated Low-Carbon N-155 Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, D N; Freeman, J W; White, A E

    1950-01-01

    A method is developed whereby the fundamental mechanisms are investigated by which processing, heat treatment, and chemical composition control the properties of alloys at high temperatures. The method used metallographic examination -- both optical and electronic --studies of x-ray diffraction-line widths, intensities, and lattice parameters, and hardness surveys to evaluate fundamental structural conditions. Mechanical properties at high temperatures are then measured and correlated with these measured structural conditions. In accordance with this method, a study was made of the fundamental mechanism by which aging controlled the short-time creep and rupture properties of solution-treated low-carbon n-155 alloy at 1200 degrees F.

  14. Performance of high-recovery recycling reverse osmosis with wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.

    1993-01-01

    Inclusion of a recycling loop for partially-desalted water from second-stage reverse-osmosis permeate has been shown useful for achieving high-recovery at moderate applied pressures. This approach has now been applied to simulated wash waters, to obtain data on retention by the membranes of solutes in a mixture comparable to anticipated spacecraft hygiene wastewaters, and to generate an estimate of the maximum concentration that can be expected without causing membrane fouling. A first experiment set provides selectivity information from a single membrane and an Igepon detergent, as a function of final concentration. A reject concentration of 3.1% Total Organic Carbon has been reached, at a pressure of 1.4 Mega Pascals, without membrane fouling. Further experiments have generated selectivity values for the recycle configuration from two washwater simulations, as a function of applied pump pressure. Reverse osmosis removal has also been tested for washwater containing detergent formulated for plant growth compatibility (containing nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium functional groups.)

  15. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution with magnetite loaded multi-wall carbon nanotube: kinetic, isotherm and mechanism analysis.

    PubMed

    Ai, Lunhong; Zhang, Chunying; Liao, Fang; Wang, Yao; Li, Ming; Meng, Lanying; Jiang, Jing

    2011-12-30

    In this study, we have demonstrated the efficient removal of cationic dye, methylene blue (MB), from aqueous solution with the one-pot solvothermal synthesized magnetite-loaded multi-walled carbon nanotubes (M-MWCNTs). The as-prepared M-MWCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH on the adsorption of MB onto M-MWCNTs were systematically studied. It was shown that the MB adsorption was pH-dependent. Adsorption kinetics was best described by the pseudo-second-order model. Equilibrium data were well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model, yielding maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 48.06 mg g(-1). FTIR analysis suggested that the adsorption mechanism was possibly attributed to the electrostatic attraction and π-π stacking interactions between MWCNTs and MB.

  16. Vapor diffusion method: Dependence of polymorphs and morphologies of calcium carbonate crystals on the depth of an aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Hai-Shui; Zeng, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    The polymorph control of calcium carbonate by the vapor diffusion method is still a challenging issue because the resultant crystal polymorphs and morphologies highly depend on the experimental setup. In this communication, we demonstrated that the concentration gradients accompanied by the vapor diffusion method (ammonia concentration, pH and the ratio of CO32- to Ca2+ are changed with the solution depth and with time) are probably the main reasons to significantly affect the formation of crystal polymorphs. Raman, SEM and XRD data showed that calcite and vaterite crystals were preferred to nucleate and grow in the upper or the lower areas of aqueous solution respectively. The above results can be explained by the gradient effect.

  17. Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate from a homogeneous precursor solution in the presence of partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Takashi; Naka, Kensuke

    2015-04-01

    Photoinduced crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was demonstrated by the photodecarboxylation of ketoprofen (KP, 2-(3-benzoylphenyl)propionic acid) under alkaline conditions (pH 10). In this method, a homogeneous solution comprising KP, calcium chloride, ammonia, and partially hydrolyzed poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAPS, degree of saponification: 86.5-89.0 mol %) was used as the precursor solution and was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation for different time periods. Thermogravimetric analysis of the obtained xerogels showed that increasing the UV irradiation time increased the amount of CaCO3 formed and the complete conversion of calcium ions to calcite was achieved after 50 min of UV irradiation. Furthermore, solid phase analyses suggested that nanometer-to-micron-sized calcite crystals were formed and dispersed in the obtained PVAPS matrix.

  18. The microwave assisted synthesis of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as potential corrosion inhibitor toward carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pasasa, Norman Vincent A. Bundjali, Bunbun; Wahyuningrum, Deana

    2015-09-30

    Injection of corrosion inhibitor into the fluid current of oil and gas pipelines is an effective way to mitigate corrosion rate on the inner-surface parts of pipelines, especially carbon steel pipelines. In this research, two alkylimidazolium ionic liquids, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL1) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (IL2) have been synthesized and studied as a potential corrosion inhibitor towards carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution saturated with carbon dioxide. IL1 and IL2 were synthesized using microwave assisted organic synthesis (MAOS) method. Mass Spectrometry analysis of IL1 and IL2 showed molecular mass [M-H+] peak at 223.2166 and 251.2484, respectively. The FTIR,{sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR spectra confirmed that IL1 and IL2 were successfully synthesized. Corrosion inhibition activity of IL1 and IL2 were determined using weight loss method. The results showed that IL1 and IL2 have the potential as good corrosion inhibitors with corrosion inhibition efficiency of IL1 and IL2 are 96.00% at 100 ppm (343 K) and 95.60% at 50 ppm (343 K), respectively. The increase in the concentration of IL1 and IL2 tends to improve their corrosion inhibition activities. Analysis of the data obtained from the weight loss method shows that the adsorption of IL1 and IL2 on carbon steel is classified into chemisorption which obeys Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm.

  19. Breadboard wash water renovation system. [using ferric chloride and ion exchange resins to remove soap and dissolved salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A total wash water renovation system concept was developed for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water in order to make the water reusable. The breadboard model system described provides for pretreatment with ferric chloride to remove soap by chemical precipitation, carbon adsorption to remove trace dissolved organics, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved salts. The entire system was put into continuous operation and carefully monitored to assess overall efficiency and equipment maintenance problems that could be expected in actual use. In addition, the capacity of the carbon adsorbers and the ion-exchange resin was calculated and taken into consideration in the final evaluation of the system adequacy. The product water produced was well within the Tentative Wash Water Standards with regard to total organic carbon, conductivity, urea content, sodium chloride content, color, odor, and clarity.

  20. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    DOE PAGES

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces.more » The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.« less