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Sample records for carbonic acid retreatment

  1. Carbonic Acid Retreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor university

    2003-06-01

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. (1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. (2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. (3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. (4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. (5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for

  2. Re-treatment of relapsed Paget's disease of bone with zoledronic acid: results from an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R; Brown, Jacques P; Levitt, Naomi; Román Ivorra, José A; Bachiller-Corral, Javier; Ross, Ian L; Su, Guoqin; Antunez-Flores, Oscar; Aftring, R Paul

    2013-01-01

    Six patients from the phase 3 trials of zoledronic acid in Paget's disease, who had received zoledronic acid initially and had subsequently relapsed, were entered into an open re-treatment study. Following re-treatment, each patient reached similar absolute nadirs of serum alkaline phosphatase to those recorded after their first dose. No significant adverse events were reported. It is concluded that, while re-treatment of Paget's disease with zoledronic acid is rarely needed, it is safe and effective, with no evidence of treatment resistance based on this small cohort. PMID:24422139

  3. Retreat, Hell!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Wil

    1978-01-01

    Describes an annual fall retreat for junior college newspaper staffs, which involves a program of workshops and discussions about problems, goals, and staff members' roles; offers advice on planning such a retreat. (GW)

  4. How Acidic Is Carbonic Acid?

    PubMed

    Pines, Dina; Ditkovich, Julia; Mukra, Tzach; Miller, Yifat; Kiefer, Philip M; Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Hynes, James T; Pines, Ehud

    2016-03-10

    Carbonic, lactic, and pyruvic acids have been generated in aqueous solution by the transient protonation of their corresponding conjugate bases by a tailor-made photoacid, the 6-hydroxy-1-sulfonate pyrene sodium salt molecule. A particular goal is to establish the pK(a) of carbonic acid H2CO3. The on-contact proton transfer (PT) reaction rate from the optically excited photoacid to the carboxylic bases was derived, with unprecedented precision, from time-correlated single-photon-counting measurements of the fluorescence lifetime of the photoacid in the presence of the proton acceptors. The time-dependent diffusion-assisted PT rate was analyzed using the Szabo-Collins-Kimball equation with a radiation boundary condition. The on-contact PT rates were found to follow the acidity order of the carboxylic acids: the stronger was the acid, the slower was the PT reaction to its conjugate base. The pK(a) of carbonic acid was found to be 3.49 ± 0.05 using both the Marcus and Kiefer-Hynes free energy correlations. This establishes H2CO3 as being 0.37 pK(a) units stronger and about 1 pK(a) unit weaker, respectively, than the physiologically important lactic and pyruvic acids. The considerable acid strength of intact carbonic acid indicates that it is an important protonation agent under physiological conditions. PMID:26862781

  5. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In situ observations of snow cover extent since the 1960s suggest that the snowpack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 2-2.5 °C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution ocean-atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover extent to various anthropogenic factors. At the Tibetan Plateau altitudes, the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 °C, BC 1.3 °C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 °C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. In particular, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow is coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.

  6. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2016-02-05

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In situ observations of snow cover extent since the 1960s suggest that the snowpack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 2–2.5 °C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution ocean–atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover extent to various anthropogenic factors. At the Tibetanmore » Plateau altitudes, the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 °C, BC 1.3 °C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 °C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. In particular, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow is coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.« less

  7. Spatiotemporal Trends of the Bay of Bengal Shoreline Retreat along the Sundarban Coasts and the Relevant Carbon Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, A. F.; Dragoni, D.; Elmasri, B.

    2010-12-01

    The coastal areas of the Bay of Bengal along the Ganges-Brahmaputra (GB) delta are low-lying and highly vulnerable to natural disasters, such as flooding and cyclones. The modern GB delta was formed within the large Bengal basin during the last 11,000 years, and it extends offshore in the Bay of Bengal. The coastal areas of this delta harbor the world’s largest continuous patch of mangrove forests, the Sundarbans, covering approximately one million hectares, ~60% of which is in Bangladesh and the rest is in India. Studies have shown that the GB delta is still undergoing accretion at a rate of up to 1.1 cm per year. But remote sensing studies have also indicated that the shoreline and shallow offshore areas of the western delta front are currently in a net erosional state at a rate of about 1.9 square km per year, with a coastline retreat of as much as 3-4 km since 1792. Other studies have quantified the land loss at 38 square km in since 1973. But no study to date has reported the details of spatiotemporal patterns of land loss along the Sundarbans coastline, or their drivers. Under global climate change and the related sea level rise, proper understanding of how the coastlines are changing and the drivers of those changes would be essential to mitigate the impacts on the coastal mangrove forests. In this study we used a time series of Landsat MSS and TM images from 1973 to 2010 to systematically explore the spatiotemporal distributions and trends of land loss along the Sundarbans coastline of Bangladesh and India. We also used data from a host of published studies on Bay of Bengal surface currents, cyclone tracks, sea level rise, monsoonal rainfalls, sediment flow, land subsidence and anthropogenic factors to deduct probable cause-effect relationships of the trends in coastal land loss. Finally we estimated the carbon loss of the mangrove forests due to the shoreline retreat, and using IPCC scenarios we predicted the future carbon implications of these mangrove

  8. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  9. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  10. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, W.K.; Dahlin, D.C.; Nilsen, D.N.; Walters, R.P.; Turner, P.C.

    2000-07-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite and member (mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4})], or serpentine [Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to produce magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The CO{sub 2} is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), which dissociates to H{sup +} and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The H{sup +} reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg{sup 2+} cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO{sub 2} pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185 C and a partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (P{sub CO{sub 2}}) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction conditions, have achieved roughly 83% conversion of heat treated serpentine

  11. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation with carbonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Nilsen, David N.; Walters, Richard P.; Turner, Paul C.

    2000-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) has been conducting a series of mineral carbonation tests at its Albany, Oregon, facility over the past 2 years as part of a Mineral Carbonation Study Program within the DOE. Other participants in this Program include the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Arizona State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The ARC tests have focused on ex-situ mineral carbonation in an aqueous system. The process developed at ARC utilizes a slurry of water mixed with a magnesium silicate mineral, olivine [forsterite end member (Mg2SiO4)], or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. This slurry is reacted with supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce magnesite (MgCO3). The CO2 is dissolved in water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3), which dissociates to H+ and HCO3 -. The H+ reacts with the mineral, liberating Mg2+ cations which react with the bicarbonate to form the solid carbonate. The process is designed to simulate the natural serpentinization reaction of ultramafic minerals, and for this reason, these results may also be applicable to in-situ geological sequestration regimes. Results of the baseline tests, conducted on ground products of the natural minerals, have been encouraging. Tests conducted at ambient temperature (22 C) and subcritical CO2 pressures (below 73 atm) resulted in very slow conversion to the carbonate. However, when elevated temperatures and pressures are utilized, coupled with continuous stirring of the slurry and gas dispersion within the water column, significant reaction occurs within much shorter reaction times. Extent of reaction, as measured by the stoichiometric conversion of the silicate mineral (olivine) to the carbonate, is roughly 90% within 24 hours, using distilled water, and a reaction temperature of 185?C and a partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) of 115 atm. Recent tests using a bicarbonate solution, under identical reaction

  12. Acid sorption regeneration process using carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; Husson, Scott M.

    2001-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks onto a solid adsorbent in the presence of carbon dioxide under pressure. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by a suitable regeneration method, one of which is treating them with an organic alkylamine solution thus forming an alkylamine-carboxylic acid complex which thermally decomposes to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  13. Arterial Blood Carbonic Acid Inversely Determines Lactic and Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Christopher Geoffrey Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish that arterial blood carbonic acid varies inversely with lactic acid in accordance with bicarbonate exchanging for lactate across cell membranes through the anion exchange mechanism to maintain the Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium. Study Design: Over 5 years, lactate was measured on all blood gases taken from neonatal admissions, as well as organic acid whenever electrolytes were required. Results: Arterial blood gases from 63 infants given high calcium TPN were analyzed. Twenty two needed continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) only and 31 intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) and surfactant followed by CPAP to treat respiratory distress syndrome in 51 and meconium aspiration syndrome in 2. All survived and were free of infection. Excluded gases were those with high and falling lactate soon after delivery representing perinatal asphyxia, and those on dexamethasone. Strong inverse relations between carbonic and lactic acids were found at all gestational ages and, independent of glomerular filtration, between carbonic and organic acids. Lactate (mmol/L) = 62.53 X PCO2 -0.96(mmHg) r2 0.315, n 1232, p <0.001. Sixty divided by PCO2 is a convenient measure of physiological lactate at any given PCO2. In the first week, 9.13 ± 2.57% of arterial gases from infants on IPPV had lactates above 120/PCO2, significantly more than 4.74 ± 2.73% on CPAP (p<0.05) and 2.47 ± 2.39% on no support. Conclusion: Changes in arterial blood carbonic acid cause immediate inverse changes in lactic acid, because their anions interchange across cell membranes according to the Gibbs –Donnan equilibrium. Increasing PCO2 from 40 to 120 mmHg decreased lactate from 1.5 mmol/L to 0.5 mmol/L, so that the sum of carbonic and lactic acids increased from 2.72 mmol/L to only 4.17 mmol/L. This helps explain the neuroprotective effect of hypercapnoea and highlights the importance of avoiding any degree of hypocapnoea in infants on IPPV. PMID:24392387

  14. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  15. Is rate of glacial retreat accelerated in Indian Himalaya? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Himalaya has one of the largest concentration of glaciers and rivers like Indus, Ganga and Bramhputra originate from this region. The snow and glacier melt is an important source of water for these rivers. However, this source of water may get affected in the near future due to changes in the cryosphere. Therefore, retreat of Himalayan glaciers are discussed extensively in scientific and public forums in India. Conventionally health of glaciers is assessed using changes in glacial length, as it is widely measured. However changes in glacial length and loss in areal extent near terminus needs to be interpreted carefully, as these changes can be influenced by numerous terrain and climatically sensitive parameters. The terrain parameters which can influence glacial retreat are slope, area altitude distribution, debris cover and orientation. In addition, climatically sensitive parameters like mass balance, glacial lakes and black carbon can also influence glacier retreat. These multiple influences can produce a complex pattern of glacial retreat. In this paper long-term glacier retreat in three river basins in the Indian Himalaya as Tista, Baspa and Parbati will be discussed. These basins are located in different climatically sensitive regions and each basin has unique dominant process of mass wasting. In addition to terrain parameters, influence of process like formation and expansion of moraine dammed lakes in Tista basin, deposition of black carbon on accumulation area in Baspa basin and debris cover in Parbati basin will also be discussed. This will provide understanding on varying influence of different mass wasting processes on glacial retreat during last five decades in the Indian Himalaya.

  16. Hypogene Sulfuric Acid Speleogenesis and rare sulfate minerals in Baume Galinière Cave (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France). Record of uplift, correlative cover retreat and valley dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audra, Philippe; Gázquez, Fernando; Rull, Fernando; Bigot, Jean-Yves; Camus, Hubert

    2015-10-01

    The oxidation of hydrocarbons and sulfide sources (H2S, pyrite) produces sulfuric acid that strongly reacts with bedrock, causing limestone dissolution and complex interactions with other minerals from the bedrock or from cave fillings, mainly clays. This type of cave development, known as Sulfuric Acid Speleogenesis (SAS), is a subcategory of hypogene speleogenesis, where aggressive water rises from depth. It also produces uncommon minerals, mainly sulfates, the typical byproducts of SAS. Baume Galinière is located in Southern France, in the Vaucluse spring watershed. This small maze cave displays characteristic SAS features such as corrosion notches, calcite geodes, iron crusts, and various sulfate minerals. Sulfur isotopes of SAS byproducts (jarosite and gypsum) clearly show they derive from pyrite oxidation. Using XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy, thirteen minerals were identified, including elemental sulfur, calcite, quartz, pyrite, goethite, gypsum, and fibroferrite, plus all of the six members of the jarosite subgroup (jarosite, argentojarosite, ammoniojarosite, hydroniumjarosite, natrojarosite, plumbojarosite). The Baume Galinière deposits are the first documented cave occurrence of argentojarosite and the second known occurrence of plumbojarosite, hydronium jarosite, ammoniojarosite, and fibroferrite. In the Vaucluse watershed, there were numerous upwellings of deep water along major faults, located at the contact of the karstic aquifer and the overlying impervious covers. The mixing of deep and meteoric waters at shallow depths caused pyrite depositions in numerous caves, including Baume Galinière. Sulfuric Acid Speleogenesis occurred later after base-level drop, when the cave was under shallow phreatic conditions then in the vadose zone, with oxidation of pyrites generating sulfuric acid. Attenuated oxidation is still occurring through condensation of moisture from incoming air. Baume Galinière Cave records the position of the semi-impervious paleo

  17. The Perils of Carbonic Acid and Equilibrium Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jencks, William P.; Altura, Rachel A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects caused by small amounts of carbon dioxide usually present in water and acid-base equilibria of dilute solutions. Notes that dilute solutions of most weak acids and bases undergo significant dissociation or protonation. (MVL)

  18. Carbonic acid: an important intermediate in the surface chemistry of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Al-Hosney, Hashim A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2004-07-01

    Calcium carbonate is an important and ubiquitous component of biological and geochemical systems. In this study, the surface chemistry of calcium carbonate with several trace atmospheric gases including HNO3, SO2, HCOOH, and CH3COOH is investigated with infrared spectroscopy. Adsorbed carbonic acid, H2CO3, is found to be an intermediate in these reactions. In the absence of adsorbed water, carbonic acid is stable on the surface at room temperature. However, upon water adsorption, carbonic acid dissociates as indicated by the evolution of gaseous CO2 and the disappearance of infrared absorption bands associated with adsorbed carbonic acid. Thus, it is postulated that under ambient conditions, carbonic acid may be an important albeit short-lived intermediate in the surface chemistry of calcium carbonate. PMID:15225019

  19. 40 CFR 721.10715 - Carbonic acid, dialkyl ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Carbonic acid, dialkyl ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10715 Carbonic acid, dialkyl ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and..., dialkyl ester (PMN P-13-346) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  20. New constraints on the timing of West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat in the eastern Amundsen Sea since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James A.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Kuhn, Gerhard; Klages, Johann Phillip; Graham, Alastair G. C.; Larter, Robert D.; Ehrmann, Werner; Moreton, Steven G.; Wiers, Steffen; Frederichs, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Glaciers flowing into the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) account for > 35% of the total discharge of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and have thinned and retreated dramatically over the past two decades. Here we present detailed marine geological data and an extensive new radiocarbon dataset from the eastern ASE in order to constrain the retreat of the WAIS since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and assess the significance of these recent changes. Our dating approach, relying mainly on the acid insoluble organic (AIO) fraction, utilises multi-proxy analyses of the sediments to characterise their lithofacies and determine the horizon in each core that would yield the most reliable age for deglaciation. In total, we dated 69 samples and show that deglaciation of the outer shelf was underway before 20,600 calibrated years before present (cal yr BP), reaching the mid-shelf by 13,575 cal yr BP and the inner shelf to within ca. 150 km of the present grounding line by 10,615 cal yr BP. The timing of retreat is broadly consistent with previously published radiocarbon dates on biogenic carbonate from the eastern ASE as well as AIO 14C ages from the western ASE and provides new constraints for ice sheet models. The overall retreat trajectory - slow on the outer shelf, more rapid from the middle to inner shelf - clearly highlights the importance of reverse bedslopes in controlling phases of accelerated groundling line retreat. Despite revealing these broad scale trends, the current dataset does not capture detailed changes in ice flow, such as stillstands during grounding line retreat (i.e., deposition of grounding zone wedges) and possible readvances as depicted in the geomorphological record.

  1. Columbia Glacier in 1986; 800 meters retreat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krimmel, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Columbia Glacier, in Prince William Sound, Alaska, continued its rapid retreat in 1986, with a retreat of 800 m. Average velocity of the lower portion of the glacier, 10 September 1986 to 26 January 1987, was three km/yr, or about one-half of the velocity during similar periods for the previous three years. This reduced velocity is a new development in the progression of the retreat, and if the calving rate follows the pattern of previous years, will result in continued retreat. (Author 's abstract)

  2. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-15

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100–500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO{sub 3}H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO{sub 3}H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst. - Highlights: • Carbon solid acid was successfully prepared by one-step hydrothermal carbonization. • The acrylic acid as monomer was effectively reduce the diameter size of particle. • The solid acid catalyst show good catalytic performance of starch hydrolysis. • The solid acid catalyst is not significantly deteriorated after repeated use.

  3. Nonsurgical re-treatment of endodontic failures.

    PubMed

    Weine, F S

    1995-03-01

    Endodontic treatment has a very high percentage of success. When failures did occur, many were re-treated with surgery, although nonsurgical re-treatment often was an option. Recently, improvements in instruments for use in endodontic surgery have increased the ability to perform such re-treatments. Even so, this author believes that nonsurgical re-treatment is preferable to surgical intervention whenever possible because of the greater comfort to the patient and the increased indication of failure for amalgam reverse fillings. Advice for recall appointments and evaluations and the correct procedures for re-treating common failures without surgery are presented. These include failures caused by short or incomplete canal fillings, overextended canal fillings, untreated major canals, and chronically draining teeth.

  4. Reduction of Plutonium in Acidic Solutions by Mesoporous Carbons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Jones, Stephen; Wang, Jinxiu; Wu, Zhangxiong; Uribe, Eva; Zhao, Dongyuan; Nitsche, Heino

    2015-12-19

    Batch contact experiments with several porous carbon materials showed that carbon solids spontaneously reduce the oxidation state of plutonium in 1-1.5 M acid solutions, without significant adsorption. The final oxidation state and rate of Pu reduction varies with the solution matrix, and also depends on the surface chemistry and surface area of the carbon. It was demonstrated that acidic Pu(VI) solutions can be reduced to Pu(III) by passing through a column of porous carbon particles, offering an easy alternative to electrolysis with a potentiostat.

  5. Solid Sulfonic Acid Catalysts Based on Porous Carbons and Carbon-Silica Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiao Ning; Luo, Lijuan; Jiang, Zhongqing; Zhao, X. S.

    Mesoporous carbons prepared using a templating method under different carbonization temperatures are sulfonated with concentrated H2SO4. Without the moving of silica template carbon-silica composites were prepared, which can maintain the pore structure well during sulfonation reaction process. The resultant samples are characterized using nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscope, field-emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and elemental analysis techniques. The catalytic performances of the sulfonated carbons and composites are evaluated by esterification reaction of methanol with acetic acid. The results show that a low-temperature carbonization process is favorable for improving the reaction conversion of acetic acid. In addition, the sulfonated carbon-silica composites show a higher acetic acid conversion than the sulfonated mesoporous carbons.

  6. The source of carbon dioxide for gastric acid production.

    PubMed

    Steer, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The source of carbon dioxide for the chemical reaction leading to the production of gastric acid is unknown. The decarboxylation of an amino acid releases carbon dioxide. Pepsinogens provide a rich source of the amino acid arginine. Both the source of carbon dioxide, arginine, and the consequence of arginine decarboxylation, agmatine, have been studied. The site of carbon dioxide production has been related to the survival of the parietal cell. An immunohistochemical study has been carried out on glycol methacrylate embedded gastric biopsies from the normal stomach of 38 adult patients. The sections have been stained using polyclonal antibody to pepsinogen II, polyclonal antibody to agmatine, and polyclonal antibody to Helicobacter pylori. Pepsinogen II and agmatine are found in the parietal cell canaliculi. This is consistent with the production of carbon dioxide from arginine in the parietal cell canaliculi. Evidence is presented for the decarboxylation of arginine derived from the activation segment of pepsinogen as the source of carbon dioxide for the production of gastric acid. The production of carbon dioxide by the decarboxylation of arginine in the parietal cell canaliculus enables the extracellular hydration of carbon dioxide at the known site of carbonic anhydrase activity. The extracellular production of acid in the canaliculus together with the presence of agmatine helps to explain why the parietal cells are not destroyed during the formation of gastric acid. Agmatine is found in the mucus secreting cells of the stomach and its role in acid protection of the stomach is discussed. Anat Rec, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:18951509

  7. Carbon-based strong solid acid for cornstarch hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nata, Iryanti Fatyasari; Irawan, Chairul; Mardina, Primata; Lee, Cheng-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Highly sulfonated carbonaceous spheres with diameter of 100-500 nm can be generated by hydrothermal carbonization of glucose in the presence of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid and acrylic acid at 180 °C for 4 h. The acidity of the prepared carbonaceous sphere C4-SO3H can reach 2.10 mmol/g. It was used as a solid acid catalyst for the hydrolysis of cornstarch. Total reducing sugar (TRS) concentration of 19.91 mg/mL could be obtained by hydrolyzing 20 mg/mL cornstarch at 150 °C for 6 h using C4-SO3H as solid acid catalyst. The solid acid catalyst demonstrated good stability that only 9% decrease in TRS concentration was observed after five repeat uses. The as-prepared carbon-based solid acid catalyst can be an environmentally benign replacement for homogeneous catalyst.

  8. Nitric acid vapor removal by activated, impregnated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, G.O.

    1996-12-31

    Laboratory and industrial workers can be exposed to vapors of nitric acid, especially in accidents, such as spills. Nitric acid can also be a product of incineration for energy production or waste (e.g., CW agent) disposal. Activated carbons containing impregnants for enhancing vapor and gas removal have been tested for effectiveness in removing vapors of nitric acid from air. The nitric acid vapor was generated from concentrated acid solutions and detected by trapping in a water bubbler for pH measurements. Both low and moderate relative humidity conditions were used. All carbons were effective at vapor contact times representative of air-purifying respirator use. One surprising observation was the desorption of low levels of ammonia from impregnated carbons. This was apparently due to residual ammonia from the impregnation processes.

  9. Phosphorylated Mesoporous Carbon as a Solid Acid Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Mayes, Richard T; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Ma, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous carbon catalyst supports are attractive due to their wide chemical stability while potentially increasing masstransport through and providing a path for larger molecules to access catalytic sites. Herein we report the synthesis of a 10 phosphorylated mesoporous carbon solid-acid catalyst characterized by NH3-TPD and isopropanol dehydration.

  10. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis II. Amino Acids

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Stepka, W.; Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1948-05-25

    The radioactive amino acid's synthesized from C{sup 14}O{sub 2} by green algae both in the light and in the dark after CO{sub 2}-free preillumination have been separated and identified using paper chromatography and radioautography. The radioactive amino acids identified were aspartic acid, alanine and smaller amounts of 3- and 4-carbon amino acids. This finding as well as the total absence of radioactive glutamic acid substantiates the mechanism for reduction of CO{sub 2} previously postulated by members of this laboratory.

  11. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  12. Intramolecular carbon isotope distribution of acetic acid in vinegar.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Ryota; Yamada, Keita; Kikuchi, Makiko; Hirano, Satoshi; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2011-09-14

    Compound-specific carbon isotope analysis of acetic acid is useful for origin discrimination and quality control of vinegar. Intramolecular carbon isotope distributions, which are each carbon isotope ratios of the methyl and carboxyl carbons in the acetic acid molecule, may be required to obtain more detailed information to discriminate such origin. In this study, improved gas chromatography-pyrolysis-gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-Py-GC-C-IRMS) combined with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used to measure the intramolecular carbon isotope distributions of acetic acid in 14 Japanese vinegars. The results demonstrated that the methyl carbons of acetic acid molecules in vinegars produced from plants were mostly isotopically depleted in (13)C relative to the carboxyl carbon. Moreover, isotopic differences (δ(13)C(carboxyl) - δ(13)C(methyl)) had a wide range from -0.3 to 18.2‰, and these values differed among botanical origins, C3, C4, and CAM plants.

  13. Ocean forcing drives glacier retreat sometimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassis, J. N.; Ultee, E.; Ma, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Observations show that marine-terminating glaciers respond to climate forcing nonlinearly, with periods of slow or negligible glacier advance punctuated by abrupt, rapid retreat. Once glacier retreat has initiated, glaciers can quickly stabilize with a new terminus position. Alternatively, retreat can be sustained for decades (or longer), as is the case for Columbia Glacier, Alaska where retreat initiated ~1984 and continues to this day. Surprisingly, patterns of glacier retreat show ambiguous or even contradictory correlations with atmospheric temperature and glacier surface mass balance. Despite these puzzles, observations increasingly show that intrusion of warm subsurface ocean water into fjords can lead to glacier erosion rates that can account for a substantial portion of the total mass lost from glaciers. Here we use a simplified flowline model to show that even relatively modest submarine melt rates (~100 m/a) near the terminus of grounded glaciers can trigger large increases in iceberg calving leading to rapid glacier retreat. However, the strength of the coupling between submarine melt and calving is a strong function of the geometry of the glacier (bed topography, ice thickness and glacier width). This can lead to irreversible retreat when the terminus is thick and grounded deeply beneath sea level or result in little change when the glacier is relatively thin, grounded in shallow water or pinned in a narrow fjord. Because of the strong dependence on glacier geometry, small perturbations in submarine melting can trigger glaciers in their most advanced—and geometrically precarious—state to undergo sudden retreat followed by much slower re-advance. Although many details remain speculative, our model hints that some glaciers are more sensitive than others to ocean forcing and that some of the nonlinearities of glacier response to climate change may be attributable to variations in difficult-to-detect subsurface water temperatures that need to be better

  14. Characterization of carbon black modified by maleic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asokan, Vijayshankar; Kosinski, Pawel; Skodvin, Tore; Myrseth, Velaug

    2013-09-01

    We present here a method for modifying the surface of carbon black (CB) using a simple heat treatment in the presence of a carboxylic acid as well as water or ethylene glycol as a solvent. CB was mixed with maleic acid and either water or ethylene glycol, and heated at 250°C. Unlike the traditional surface modification processes which use heat treatment of carbon with mineral acids the present modification method using a carboxylic acid proved to be simple and time efficient. CB from two different vendors was used, and the modified samples were characterized by TGA, BET surface area measurement, XRD, particle size and zeta potential measurements, and FTIR. It was found that several material properties, including thermal stability and surface area, of the modified CB are significantly altered relative to the parental carbon samples. This method provides a rapid and simple route to tailor new materials with desired properties.

  15. Fragrance material review on carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester.

    PubMed

    McGinty, D; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2012-09-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. Carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester is a member of the fragrance structural group Aryl Alkyl Alcohol Simple Acid Esters (AAASAE). The AAASAE fragrance ingredients are prepared by reacting an aryl alkyl alcohol with a simple carboxylic acid (a chain of 1-4 carbons) to generate formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate and carbonate esters. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for carbonic acid, methyl phenylmethyl ester were evaluated, then summarized, and includes: physical properties, acute toxicity, skin irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire AAASAE will be published simultaneously with this document. Please refer to Belsito et al. (2012) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all AAASAE in fragrances.

  16. USE OF FATTY ACID STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO TO INDICATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels, broad microbial community structure, and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil o...

  17. Do Higher Sea-cliff Retreat Rates Imply Faster Sea-cliff Retreat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushkin, A.; Katz, O.; Porat, N.

    2015-12-01

    Inland retreat of sea cliffs in response to post LGM (last glacial maximum) sea-level rise is an ongoing process that affects coastal environments and communities worldwide. Here, we examine a globally recurring pattern where reported sea-cliff retreat rates since the 20th century often appear to exceed longer-term millennial-scale ('background') rates that rarely exceed ~0.1 m/yr. Focusing on Israel's 30-km-long Mediterranean 'Sharon' sea-cliff as a case study we demonstrate that such apparent increase in rates may also reflect a widely acknowledged sampling bias in geologic rate estimates inferred from observation time windows ('Tobs') shorter than process episodicity. We show that this possible bias leads to an ambiguity in conventional rate estimates obtained by averaging observed retreat distances over Tobs, and that as a result despite ubiquitous and robust observations of cliff retreat since the 20th century (e.g., aerial photographs) recent/current retreat rates for many of the world's episodically retreating sea cliffs remain essentially unknown. To address this present limitation in our ability to detect and quantify recent changes in sea-cliff retreat rates we use airborne LiDAR to measure the continuous wave-driven volumetric erosion of collapsed material from the cliff base as an effective upper-bound constraint for the m/yr rate of episodic retreat of the cliff itself. We find that while conventional retreat rate estimates since the 20th century along the Sharon sea cliff artefactually increase up to several m/yr as an inverse function of Tobs, the LiDAR-constrained retreat rates are not susceptible to this sampling bias, are comparable to the cliff's background retreat rate of 0.03-0.07 m/yr since the mid Holocene and thus indicate no recent acceleration in retreat. This ability to unambiguously constrain sea-cliff retreat rates with annual to decadal-scale observations directly impacts the global-scale push to quantify, better understand and

  18. Hydrogen Storage in the Carbon Dioxide - Formic Acid Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cornel; Montandon-Clerc, Mickael; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    This year Mankind will release about 39 Gt carbon dioxide into the earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important, as the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere has reached 400 ppm. One approach to contribute to the decrease of this hazardous emission is to recycle CO(2), for example reducing it to formic acid. The hydrogenation of CO(2) can be achieved with a series of catalysts under basic and acidic conditions, in wide variety of solvents. To realize a hydrogen-based charge-discharge device ('hydrogen battery'), one also needs efficient catalysts for the reverse reaction, the dehydrogenation of formic acid. Despite of the fact that the overwhelming majority of these reactions are carried out using precious metals-based catalysts (mainly Ru), we review here developments for catalytic hydrogen evolution from formic acid with iron-based complexes. PMID:26842324

  19. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  20. Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat,F.; Gardner, C.; Montag, C.; Roser, T.

    2008-08-01

    The RHIC Retreat 2007 took place on July 16-17 2007 at the Foxwoods Resort in CT, about 3 weeks after the end of the RHIC Run-7. The goal of the Retreat is traditionally to plan the upcoming run in the light of the results from the previous one, by providing a snapshot of the present understanding of the machine and a forum for free and frank discussion. A particular attention was paid to the challenge of increasing the time at store, and the related issue of system reliability. An interesting Session covered all new developments aimed to improve the machine performance and luminosity. In Section 2 we summarize the results from Run-7 for RHIC and the injectors and discuss the present objectives of the RHIC program and performance. Sections 3-6 are summaries of the Retreat sessions focused on preparation for deuteron gold and polarized protons, respectively, machine availability and new developments.

  1. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  2. Diffusion of benzoic acid (1); carbon dioxide (2); methanol (3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) benzoic acid; (2) carbon dioxide; (3) methanol

  3. Diffusion of benzoic acid (1); carbon dioxide (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) benzoic acid; (2) carbon dioxide

  4. Acetic Acid bacteria: physiology and carbon sources oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Dhouha; Gullo, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are obligately aerobic bacteria within the family Acetobacteraceae, widespread in sugary, acidic and alcoholic niches. They are known for their ability to partially oxidise a variety of carbohydrates and to release the corresponding metabolites (aldehydes, ketones and organic acids) into the media. Since a long time they are used to perform specific oxidation reactions through processes called "oxidative fermentations", especially in vinegar production. In the last decades physiology of AAB have been widely studied because of their role in food production, where they act as beneficial or spoiling organisms, and in biotechnological industry, where their oxidation machinery is exploited to produce a number of compounds such as l-ascorbic acid, dihydroxyacetone, gluconic acid and cellulose. The present review aims to provide an overview of AAB physiology focusing carbon sources oxidation and main products of their metabolism.

  5. Suicidal chemistry: combined intoxication with carbon monoxide and formic acid.

    PubMed

    Bakovic, Marija; Nestic, Marina; Mayer, Davor

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we present a rare case of suicidal intoxication with carbon monoxide produced via reaction of formic and sulphuric acid with additional toxic effect of formic acid. The deceased was a 22-year-old men found dead in the bathroom locked from the inside. A bucket filled with liquid was found next to him, together with an almost empty canister labeled "formic acid" and another empty unlabeled canister. The postmortem examination revealed corrosive burns of the face, neck and chest, cherry-pink livor mortis, corrosive injury to the oropharyngeal area and trachea, subpleural petechiae, 100 mL of blood in stomach and superficial erosions of stomach mucosa. Toxicology analysis revealed 30% of carboxyhemoglobin in the femoral blood and the presence of the formic acid in various samples. Quantitative analysis of formic acid was performed by measuring methyl ester derivative of formic acid by using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The highest concentration of formic acid was measured in the lungs (0.55 g/kg), gastric content (0.39 g/L), and blood (0.28 g/L). In addition, it was established that content of the unlabeled canister had a pH value of 0.79 and contained sulphuric ions. Morphological and toxicology findings suggested that the main route of exposure to formic acid was inhalation of vapors with a possible ingestion of only small amount of liquid acid. The cause of death was determined to be combined intoxication with carbon monoxide and formic acid. PMID:26041513

  6. Suicidal chemistry: combined intoxication with carbon monoxide and formic acid.

    PubMed

    Bakovic, Marija; Nestic, Marina; Mayer, Davor

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we present a rare case of suicidal intoxication with carbon monoxide produced via reaction of formic and sulphuric acid with additional toxic effect of formic acid. The deceased was a 22-year-old men found dead in the bathroom locked from the inside. A bucket filled with liquid was found next to him, together with an almost empty canister labeled "formic acid" and another empty unlabeled canister. The postmortem examination revealed corrosive burns of the face, neck and chest, cherry-pink livor mortis, corrosive injury to the oropharyngeal area and trachea, subpleural petechiae, 100 mL of blood in stomach and superficial erosions of stomach mucosa. Toxicology analysis revealed 30% of carboxyhemoglobin in the femoral blood and the presence of the formic acid in various samples. Quantitative analysis of formic acid was performed by measuring methyl ester derivative of formic acid by using headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. The highest concentration of formic acid was measured in the lungs (0.55 g/kg), gastric content (0.39 g/L), and blood (0.28 g/L). In addition, it was established that content of the unlabeled canister had a pH value of 0.79 and contained sulphuric ions. Morphological and toxicology findings suggested that the main route of exposure to formic acid was inhalation of vapors with a possible ingestion of only small amount of liquid acid. The cause of death was determined to be combined intoxication with carbon monoxide and formic acid.

  7. On the retreat of forested, cohesive riverbanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, Jim; O'Neal, Michael; Stotts, Stephanie

    2010-04-01

    Data from the Brandywine Creek in Pennsylvania and the South River in Virginia document spatial and temporal patterns describing the retreat of gently curving bends with forested riparian zones containing a mix of very large and smaller trees, cohesive banks, and slow rates of migration (˜ 0.1 m/yr). Field data include 2.5 years of bank profile surveys, measurements of tree morphology, and ground-based laser scanner (LiDAR) surveys repeated biannually. These banks retreat through a cycle of erosion on decadal timescales. Initially, small volumes (mean = 0.173 m 3 per bank erosion event) of soil are removed between large trees growing on the bank. Near trees, the rate of bank retreat is initially negligible, creating a scalloped bank morphology buttressed by large trees. As the trees are increasingly exposed to the flow, they become slowly undercut, gradually leaning into the channel and sliding down to the toe of the bank, eventually toppling into the river after a few years, which restarts the cycle. A magnitude-frequency analysis of monitoring data from the Brandywine Creek indicates that the effective bank erosion event only 0.11 m 3; thus, forested bank retreat is dominated by small soil failures. Large erosion events, many associated with trees toppling into the river, greatly increase the variance of time-averaged rates of bank erosion, such that almost 4 years of monitoring are needed to measure time-averaged rates of erosion to within an accuracy of 10%. Because of the limited spatial extent of our survey data and the absence of large discharges, these results are provisional. Improved process-based models to predict the retreat of forested riverbanks should account for the spatial structure of riparian forests and the interactions between the flow, the gradual removal of bank soils, and the ongoing efforts of the trees to remain attached to the bank.

  8. Butyric acid esterification kinetics over Amberlyst solid acid catalysts: the effect of alcohol carbon chain length.

    PubMed

    Pappu, Venkata K S; Kanyi, Victor; Santhanakrishnan, Arati; Lira, Carl T; Miller, Dennis J

    2013-02-01

    The liquid phase esterification of butyric acid with a series of linear and branched alcohols is examined. Four strong cation exchange resins, Amberlyst™ 15, Amberlyst™ 36, Amberlyst™ BD 20, and Amberlyst™ 70, were used along with para-toluenesulfonic acid as a homogeneous catalyst. The effect of increasing alcohol carbon chain length and branching on esterification rate at 60°C is presented. For all catalysts, the decrease in turnover frequency (TOF) with increasing carbon chain length of the alcohol is described in terms of steric hindrance, alcohol polarity, and hydroxyl group concentration. The kinetics of butyric acid esterification with 2-ethylhexanol using Amberlyst™ 70 catalyst is described with an activity-based, pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model that includes autocatalysis by butyric acid.

  9. Direct synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide by hydrogenation in acidic media

    PubMed Central

    Moret, Séverine; Dyson, Paul J.; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important as CO2 levels in the atmosphere continue to rise as a consequence of human activities. In this article we describe the direct hydrogenation of CO2 into formic acid using a homogeneous ruthenium catalyst, in aqueous solution and in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), without any additives. In water, at 40 °C, 0.2 M formic acid can be obtained under 200 bar, however, in DMSO the same catalyst affords 1.9 M formic acid. In both solvents the catalysts can be reused multiple times without a decrease in activity. Worldwide demand for formic acid continues to grow, especially in the context of a renewable energy hydrogen carrier, and its production from CO2 without base, via the direct catalytic carbon dioxide hydrogenation, is considerably more sustainable than the existing routes. PMID:24886955

  10. Carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids: tools and targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoa, Bibiana; Zheng, Ming; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Diner, Bruce A.

    2006-05-01

    Nucleic acids, with their intrinsic structural properties as well as their high specificity, are playing an important role in the rapid development of nano-technologies. In turn, these new technologies and their efficient performance enable fast and precise methods for detection of nucleic acids, improving the diagnosis of diseases and identification of pathogens. We discuss the use of nucleic acids to disperse and sort single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and carbon nanotube-based field effect transistors (CNT-FETs) to electrically detect specific nucleic acid sequences. Both DNA and RNA are efficient agents for dispersion and separation of SWNTs by diameter and chirality. Fractions enriched in a narrow band gap distribution of DNA:SWNT hybrids do not alter the electronic performance of field effect transistors. A CNT-FET fulfills the requirements for a nanosensing device that can greatly exceed the existing technologies. Electrical detection of specific nucleic acid sequence could potentially overcome the current limitations of optical detection, by increasing sensitivity and speed, while reducing sample manipulation, size, and cost.

  11. Precipitation polymerization of acrylic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Romack, T.J.; Maury, E.E.; DeSimone, J.M.

    1995-02-13

    Increasing concern regarding the dissemination of chemical waste (both aqueous and organic) into their environment has prompted considerable interest in new technologies aimed at reducing current waste streams. Processes utilizing carbon dioxide in lieu of conventional solvents for chemical manufacturing and processing provide a viable route to achieving near-zero waste production for these important industries. The authors report the successful precipitation polymerization of acrylic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at pressure ranging from 125 to 345 bar utilizing AIBN as a free radical initiator. Analyses by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicate that for the pressure range studied there is no appreciable effect on product molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, or particle size or morphology. In addition, effective molecular weight control was demonstrated for precipitation polymerizations of acrylic acid in CO{sub 2} through the use of ethyl mercaptan as a chain transfer agent.

  12. The Board Retreat: For Listening, Learning and Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, James W.

    Retreats, which have been used by churches and corporations for some time, are currently being looked into by college presidents and boards of trustees as a means of training and problem solving. While many types of retreats may not be appropriate for boards, a well-planned working retreat can be an effective way for trustees to: (1) really get to…

  13. Modeling of carbonic acid pretreatment process using ASPEN-Plus.

    PubMed

    Jayawardhana, Kemantha; Van Walsum, G Peter

    2004-01-01

    ASPEN-Plus process modeling software is used to model carbonic acid pretreatment of biomass. ASPEN-Plus was used because of the thorough treatment of thermodynamic interactions and its status as a widely accepted process simulator. Because most of the physical property data for many of the key components used in the simulation of pretreatment processes are not available in the standard ASPEN-Plus property databases, values from an in-house database (INHSPCD) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory were used. The standard non-random-two-liquid (NRTL) or renon route was used as the main property method because of the need to distill ethanol and to handle dissolved gases. The pretreatment reactor was modeled as a "black box" stoichiometric reactor owing to the unavailability of reaction kinetics. The ASPEN-Plus model was used to calculate the process equipment costs, power requirements, and heating and cooling loads. Equipment costs were derived from published modeling studies. Wall thickness calculations were used to predict construction costs for the high-pressure pretreatment reactor. Published laboratory data were used to determine a suitable severity range for the operation of the carbonic acid reactor. The results indicate that combined capital and operating costs of the carbonic acid system are slightly higher than an H2SO4-based system and highly sensitive to reactor pressure and solids concentration.

  14. Biosynthesis of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (2-HIBA) from renewable carbon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays a growing demand for green chemicals and cleantech solutions is motivating the industry to strive for biobased building blocks. We have identified the tertiary carbon atom-containing 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (2-HIBA) as an interesting building block for polymer synthesis. Starting from this carboxylic acid, practically all compounds possessing the isobutane structure are accessible by simple chemical conversions, e. g. the commodity methacrylic acid as well as isobutylene glycol and oxide. During recent years, biotechnological routes to 2-HIBA acid have been proposed and significant progress in elucidating the underlying biochemistry has been made. Besides biohydrolysis and biooxidation, now a bioisomerization reaction can be employed, converting the common metabolite 3-hydroxybutyric acid to 2-HIBA by a novel cobalamin-dependent CoA-carbonyl mutase. The latter reaction has recently been discovered in the course of elucidating the degradation pathway of the groundwater pollutant methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in the new bacterial species Aquincola tertiaricarbonis. This discovery opens the ground for developing a completely biotechnological process for producing 2-HIBA. The mutase enzyme has to be active in a suitable biological system producing 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, which is the precursor of the well-known bacterial bioplastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). This connection to the PHB metabolism is a great advantage as its underlying biochemistry and physiology is well understood and can easily be adopted towards producing 2-HIBA. This review highlights the potential of these discoveries for a large-scale 2-HIBA biosynthesis from renewable carbon, replacing conventional chemistry as synthesis route and petrochemicals as carbon source. PMID:20184738

  15. Carbonate-containing apatite (CAP) synthesis under moderate conditions starting from calcium carbonate and orthophosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Pham Minh, Doan; Tran, Ngoc Dung; Nzihou, Ange; Sharrock, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis of carbonate-containing apatite (CAP) from calcium carbonate and orthophosphoric acid under moderate conditions was investigated. In all cases, complete precipitation of orthophosphate species was observed. The reaction temperature influenced strongly the decomposition of calcium carbonate and therefore the composition of formed products. The reaction temperature of 80 °C was found to be effective for the complete decomposition of calcium carbonate particles after 48 h of reaction. Infra-red spectroscopy (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermogravimetry/mass spectroscopy (TG-MS) coupling, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations allowed the identification of the composition of formed products. By increasing the reaction temperature from 20 °C to 80 °C, the content of A-type CAP increased and that of B-type CAP decreased, according to the favorable effect of temperature on the formation of A-type CAP. The total amount of carbonate content incorporated in CAP's structure, which was determined by TG-MS analysis, increased with the reaction temperature and reached up to 4.1% at 80 °C. At this temperature, the solid product was mainly composed of apatitic components and showed the typical flat-needle-like structure of CAP particles obtained in hydrothermal conditions. These results show an interesting one-step synthesis of CAP from calcium carbonate and orthophosphoric acid as low cost but high purity starting materials.

  16. Retreatments after multifocal intraocular lens implantation: an analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Kjell Gunnar; Makari, Sarah; Ostenstad, Steffen; Potvin, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and etiology of required retreatment after multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) implantation and to evaluate the methods and clinical outcomes of retreatment. Patients and methods A retrospective chart review of 416 eyes of 209 patients from one site that underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery with multifocal IOL implantation. Biometry, the IOL, and refractive data were recorded after the original implantation, with the same data recorded after retreatment. Comments related to vision were obtained both before and after retreatment for retreated patients. Results The multifocal retreatment rate was 10.8% (45/416 eyes). The eyes that required retreatment had significantly higher residual refractive astigmatism compared with those who did not require retreatment (1.21±0.51 D vs 0.51±0.39 D, P<0.01). The retreatment rate for the two most commonly implanted primary IOLs, blended bifocal (10.5%, 16/152) and bilateral trifocal (6.9%, 14/202) IOLs, was not statistically significantly different (P=0.12). In those requiring retreatment, refractive-related complaints were most common. Retreatment with refractive corneal surgery, in 11% of the eyes, and piggyback IOLs, in 89% of the eyes, was similarly successful, improving patient complaints 78% of the time. Conclusion Complaints related to ametropia were the main reasons for retreatment. Residual astigmatism appears to be an important determinant of retreatment rate after multifocal IOL implantation. Retreatment can improve symptoms for a high percentage of patients; a piggyback IOL is a viable retreatment option. PMID:27041983

  17. [Etiology of combined inhalational hydrocyanic acid and carbon monoxide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Sigrist, T; Dirnhofer, R

    1979-01-01

    A young man was found dead in a kitchen, that was partly burnt. Autopsy revealed, as cause of death, a combined intoxication following inhalation of carbon monoxide and hydrocyanic acid. Own investigations on the pyrolysis of pieces of furniture found in the kitchen (plastic plates containing melamine and plates containing formaldehyde) showed, that hydrocyanic acid was liberated through combustion of such substances and inhaled by the victim. The poisoning picture is discussed, and discussion includes especially considerations on the peculiar sensitivity of the brain toward the action of hydrocyanic acid and the relative insensitivity of the heart muscle. It is thought that the cause of such sensitivity difference lies in the physiological differences of the intracellular energy production. Finally the dangers of combustion gases developing from burning plastic materials are reemphasized.

  18. Carbonic anhydrase and acid-base regulation in fish.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, K M; Perry, S F

    2009-06-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is the zinc metalloenzyme that catalyses the reversible reactions of CO(2) with water. CA plays a crucial role in systemic acid-base regulation in fish by providing acid-base equivalents for exchange with the environment. Unlike air-breathing vertebrates, which frequently utilize alterations of breathing (respiratory compensation) to regulate acid-base status, acid-base balance in fish relies almost entirely upon the direct exchange of acid-base equivalents with the environment (metabolic compensation). The gill is the critical site of metabolic compensation, with the kidney playing a supporting role. At the gill, cytosolic CA catalyses the hydration of CO(2) to H(+) and HCO(3)(-) for export to the water. In the kidney, cytosolic and membrane-bound CA isoforms have been implicated in HCO(3)(-) reabsorption and urine acidification. In this review, the CA isoforms that have been identified to date in fish will be discussed together with their tissue localizations and roles in systemic acid-base regulation.

  19. Carbon dioxide generated from carbonates and acids for sampling blood-feeding arthropods.

    PubMed

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Blosser, Erik M; Young, Ryan M; Toé, Laurent D; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2015-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is utilized to attract mosquitoes and other blood-feeding arthropods to traps around the world. Commercial forms of CO2 (e.g., dry ice and compressed gas) are often unavailable or extremely expensive in developing nations, where vector surveillance is essential to make life-saving decisions. We developed and tested inexpensive and reproducible methods of CO2 production from the combination of acids and carbonates, ranging from very basic (crushed seashells and vinegar) to relatively elaborate (a device that controls the timing of the acid-carbonate reaction and extends the reaction over several hours). When utilized with mosquito traps in Florida, USA and black fly traps in Region des Cascades, Burkina Faso, these carbonate-acid CO2 sources attracted significantly greater numbers of both vector groups, than did unbaited traps. CO2 was generated for more than four hours at levels sufficient to attract vectors over the entire period. The utility of this simple methodology in developing nations should be further evaluated.

  20. Carbon dioxide generated from carbonates and acids for sampling blood-feeding arthropods.

    PubMed

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Blosser, Erik M; Young, Ryan M; Toé, Laurent D; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2015-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is utilized to attract mosquitoes and other blood-feeding arthropods to traps around the world. Commercial forms of CO2 (e.g., dry ice and compressed gas) are often unavailable or extremely expensive in developing nations, where vector surveillance is essential to make life-saving decisions. We developed and tested inexpensive and reproducible methods of CO2 production from the combination of acids and carbonates, ranging from very basic (crushed seashells and vinegar) to relatively elaborate (a device that controls the timing of the acid-carbonate reaction and extends the reaction over several hours). When utilized with mosquito traps in Florida, USA and black fly traps in Region des Cascades, Burkina Faso, these carbonate-acid CO2 sources attracted significantly greater numbers of both vector groups, than did unbaited traps. CO2 was generated for more than four hours at levels sufficient to attract vectors over the entire period. The utility of this simple methodology in developing nations should be further evaluated. PMID:26103427

  1. Nanofiltration and granular activated carbon treatment of perfluoroalkyl acids.

    PubMed

    Appleman, Timothy D; Dickenson, Eric R V; Bellona, Christopher; Higgins, Christopher P

    2013-09-15

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are of concern because of their persistence in the environment and the potential toxicological effects on humans exposed to PFAAs through a variety of possible exposure routes, including contaminated drinking water. This study evaluated the efficacy of nanofiltration (NF) and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption in removing a suite of PFAAs from water. Virgin flat-sheet NF membranes (NF270, Dow/Filmtec) were tested at permeate fluxes of 17-75 Lm(-2)h(-1) using deionized (DI) water and artificial groundwater. The effects of membrane fouling by humic acid on PFAA rejection were also tested under constant permeate flux conditions. Both virgin and fouled NF270 membranes demonstrated >93% removal for all PFAAs under all conditions tested. GAC efficacy was tested using rapid small-scale columns packed with Calgon Filtrasorb300 (F300) carbon and DI water with and without dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM effects were also evaluated with F600 and Siemens AquaCarb1240C. The F300 GAC had <20% breakthrough of all PFAAs in DI water for up to 125,000 bed volumes (BVs). When DOM was present, >20% breakthrough of all PFAAs by 10,000 BVs was observed for all carbons.

  2. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m-2 yr-1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42- accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  3. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m‑2 yr‑1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42‑ accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  4. Maintenance Carbon Cycle in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, William H.; Severson, Ray F.; Black, Clanton C.

    1985-01-01

    The reciprocal relationship between diurnal changes in organic acid and storage carbohydrate was examined in the leaves of three Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. It was found that depletion of leaf hexoses at night was sufficient to account quantitatively for increase in malate in Ananas comosus but not in Sedum telephium or Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Fructose and to a lesser extent glucose underwent the largest changes. Glucose levels in S. telephium leaves oscillated diurnally but were not reciprocally related to malate fluctuations. Analysis of isolated protoplasts and vacuoles from leaves of A. comosus and S. telephium revealed that vacuoles contain a large percentage (>50%) of the protoplast glucose, fructose and malate, citrate, isocitrate, ascorbate and succinate. Sucrose, a major constituent of intact leaves, was not detectable or was at extremely low levels in protoplasts and vacuoles from both plants. In isolated vacuoles from both A. comosus and S. telephium, hexose levels decreased at night at the same time malate increased. Only in A. comosus, however, could hexose metabolism account for a significant amount of the nocturnal increase in malate. We conclude that, in A. comosus, soluble sugars are part of the daily maintenance carbon cycle and that the vacuole plays a dynamic role in the diurnal carbon assimilation cycle of this Crassulacean acid metabolism plant. PMID:16664005

  5. Metal amides as the simplest acid/base catalysts for stereoselective carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, new possibilities for metal amides are described. Although typical metal amides are recognized as strong stoichiometric bases for deprotonation of inert or less acidic hydrogen atoms, transition-metal amides, namely silver and copper amides, show interesting abilities as one of the simplest acid/base catalysts in stereoselective carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

  6. Perchloric acid dissolution of graphite and pyrolytic carbon.

    PubMed

    Buzzelli, G; Mosen, A W

    1977-06-01

    Three procedures are described for the wet oxidation, with perchloric acid, of nuclear graphite, pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles, and other carbonaceous materials used in high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGRs). The first procedure is for dissolution of graphite and pyrolytic carbon, the second for dissolution of milligram quantities of HTGR fuel particles, and the last for dissolution of more easily oxidized carbonaceous materials such as charcoal. These procedures were developed primarily for the dissolution of irradiated materials before fission-product or burn-up analyses, but they are also used for dissolution of unirradiated materials.

  7. Cleaning and retreatment protocol for a debonded ceramic restoration

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Bruguera-Álvarez, August; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this article is to propose a resin cement cleaning protocol for use before recementing a debonded restoration. Study Design: Ceramic samples were fabricated from IPS d.sign® and IPS e.max Press® and were treated with hydrofluoric acid etching (HF), or HF+silane (S), or HF+S+adhesive or HF+S+A+resin cement. All samples were placed in a furnace at 650º for one minute in order to attempt to pyrolyze the composite. Each step was examined under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: When the cleaning protocol had been performed, it left a clean and retentive surface. Conclusions: If the restoration is placed in a furnace at 650º for one minute, the composite cement will burn or pyrolyze and disappear, allowing conventional retreatment of the ceramic before rebonding. Key words:Ceramic, debond, surface treatment. PMID:25810843

  8. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2012-05-15

    A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

  9. Tuning the Carbon Dioxide Absorption in Amino Acid Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Firaha, Dzmitry S; Kirchner, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    One of the possible solutions to prevent global climate change is the reduction of CO2 emissions, which is highly desired for the sustainable development of our society. In this work, the chemical absorption of carbon dioxide in amino acid ionic liquids was studied through first-principles methods. The use of readily accessible and biodegradable amino acids as building blocks for ionic liquids makes them highly promising replacements for the widely applied hazardous aqueous solutions of amines. A detailed insight into the reaction mechanism of the CO2 absorption was obtained through state-of-the-art theoretical methods. This allowed us to determine the reason for the specific CO2 capacities found experimentally. Moreover, we have also conducted a theoretical design of ionic liquids to provide valuable insights into the precise tuning of the energetic and kinetic parameters of the CO2 absorption.

  10. Tuning the Carbon Dioxide Absorption in Amino Acid Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Firaha, Dzmitry S; Kirchner, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    One of the possible solutions to prevent global climate change is the reduction of CO2 emissions, which is highly desired for the sustainable development of our society. In this work, the chemical absorption of carbon dioxide in amino acid ionic liquids was studied through first-principles methods. The use of readily accessible and biodegradable amino acids as building blocks for ionic liquids makes them highly promising replacements for the widely applied hazardous aqueous solutions of amines. A detailed insight into the reaction mechanism of the CO2 absorption was obtained through state-of-the-art theoretical methods. This allowed us to determine the reason for the specific CO2 capacities found experimentally. Moreover, we have also conducted a theoretical design of ionic liquids to provide valuable insights into the precise tuning of the energetic and kinetic parameters of the CO2 absorption. PMID:27214652

  11. Effects of acid treatment duration and sulfuric acid molarity on purification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Seyedeh Z.; Novinrooz, Abdul J.; Reyhani, Ali; Mirershadi, Soghra

    2010-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized using a Fe-Ni bimetallic catalyst supported by MgO using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Purification processes to remove unwanted carbon structures and other metallic impurities were carried out by boiling in sulfuric acid solution. Various analytical techniques such as TGA/DSC, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, HRTEM and EDAX were employed to investigate the morphology, graphitization and quality of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained results reveal the molarity of sulfuric acid and immersed time of the carbon nanotubes in the acid solution is very effective at purifying multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It was also found that 5 M concentration of boiling sulfuric acid for a 3 h treatment duration led to the highest removal of the impurities with the least destructive effect. Moreover, it was observed that acid treatment results in decreasing of CNTs’ diameter.

  12. Effects of acid treatment duration and sulfuric acid molarity on purification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Seyedeh; Novinrooz, Abdul; Reyhani, Ali; Mirershadi, Soghra

    2010-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized using a Fe-Ni bimetallic catalyst supported by MgO using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Purification processes to remove unwanted carbon structures and other metallic impurities were carried out by boiling in sulfuric acid solution. Various analytical techniques such as TGA/DSC, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, HRTEM and EDAX were employed to investigate the morphology, graphitization and quality of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained results reveal the molarity of sulfuric acid and immersed time of the carbon nanotubes in the acid solution is very effective at purifying multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It was also found that 5 M concentration of boiling sulfuric acid for a 3 h treatment duration led to the highest removal of the impurities with the least destructive effect. Moreover, it was observed that acid treatment results in decreasing of CNTs' diameter.

  13. Summary of the RHIC Retreat 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat,F.; Brennan, M.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.

    2008-08-01

    The main goal of the RHIC Retreat is to review last run's performance and prepare for the next. As always though we also discussed the longer term goals and plans for the facility to put the work in perspective and in the right priority. A straw-man plan for the facility was prepared for the DOE that assumes 30 cryoweek and running 2 species per year. The plan outlines RHIC operations for 2008-2012 and integrates well accelerator and detector upgrades to optimize the physics output with high luminosities. The plans includes guidance from the PAC and has been reviewed by DOE.

  14. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride using buffered alkaline ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ting; Liang, Chenju

    2015-10-01

    Alkaline ascorbic acid (AA) was recently discovered as a novel in-situ chemical reduction (ISCR) reagent for remediating chlorinated solvents in the subsurface. For this ISCR process, the maintenance of an alkaline pH is essential. This study investigated the possibility of the reduction of carbon tetrachloride (CT) using alkaline AA solution buffered by phosphate and by NaOH. The results indicated that CT was reduced by AA, and chloroform (CF) was a major byproduct at a phosphate buffered pH of 12. However, CT was completely reduced by AA in 2M NaOH without CF formation. In the presence of iron/soil minerals, iron could be reduced by AA and Fe(2+) tends to precipitate on the mineral surface to accelerate CT degradation. A simultaneous transfer of hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination would occur under phosphate buffered pH 12. This implies that a high alkaline environment is a crucial factor for maintaining the dominant pathway of two electron transfer from dianionic AA to dehydroascorbic acid, and to undergo dichloroelimination of CT. Moreover, threonic acid and oxalic acid were identified to be the major AA decomposition products in alkaline solutions.

  15. Activated carbon passes tests for acid-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-06-24

    Use of activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid-gas feed to Claus sulfur-recovery units has been successfully pilot tested in Saudi Arabia. Pilot plant results are discussed here along with issues involved in scale-up to commercial size. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}+s from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated by use of low-pressure steam. A post-regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. The paper discusses feed contaminants, vapor-phase cleanup, testing design, test parameters and results, bed drying after regeneration, regeneration conditions, basic flow, system control, and full-scale installation.

  16. Rotational Spectrum and Carbon Atom Structure of Dihydroartemisinic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Spada, Lorenzo; Pate, Brooks

    2016-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinic acid (DHAA, C15H24O2, five chiral centers) is a precursor in proposed low-cost synthetic routes to the antimalarial drug artemisinin. In one reaction process being considered in pharmaceutical production, DHAA is formed from an enantiopure sample of artemisinic acid through hydrogenation of the alkene. This reaction needs to properly set the stereochemistry of the asymmetric carbon for the synthesis to produce artemisinin. A recrystallization process can purify the diastereomer mixture of the hydrogenation reaction if the unwanted epimer is produced in less than 10% abundance. There is a need in the process analytical chemistry to rapidly (less than 1 min) measure the diastereomer excess and current solutions, such a HPLC, lack the needed measurement speed. The rotational spectrum of DHAA has been measured at 300:1 signal-to-noise ratio in a chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer operating from 2-8 GHz using simple heating of the compound. The 13C isotope analysis provides a carbon atom structure that confirms the diastereomer. This structure is in excellent agreement with quantum chemistry calculations at the B2PLYPD3/ 6-311++G** level of theory. The DHAA spectrum is expected to be fully resolved from the unwanted diastereomer raising the potential for fast diastereomer excess measurement by rotational spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical production process.

  17. The effect of carbonic acid on well cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duguid, Andrew

    Sequestration in abandoned petroleum fields has the potential to reduce atmospheric emissions of CO2 if adopted on a large scale. When CO2 comes in contact with brine in the sequestration formation, it will form carbonic acid. The acid may damage cement that is used to construct and abandon wells in the sequestration formation, allowing the wells to leak. CO2 release from a sequestration formation through abandoned wells to the vadose zone and then from the vadose zone into a residence could cause exposure to high levels of CO2. This study presents the results of two types of experiments that were conducted in order to understand how CO2 will affect well cements. This dissertation also presents a hypothetical risk assessment that examines the risks that a sequestration site may pose. The experiments examine how well cements react when exposed to carbonated brines at 20° and 50°C. Month-long flow-through experiments were conducted on samples made from Class H neat paste and Class H cement containing 6% bentonite under conditions that simulated sandstone (pH 2.4 and 3.7) and limestone (pH 5) sequestration formations. Year-long batch experiments were conducted on composite samples made from Class H well cement and either sandstone or limestone in order to determine how carbonated brine affects the cement-stone interface. The results of the flow-through experiments showed that calcium-containing phases in cement may be completely degraded and the formation of the calcium carbonate layer acts to slow, but not stop, degradation. The results of the batch experiments showed that carbonated brines can degrade cement and damage the integrity of the cement-stone interface. The damage to the cement at the cement-stone interface caused an order-of-magnitude increase in permeability in the sandstone-cement samples. The risk assessment identifies two potential screening levels. The assessment then uses a semianalytical wellfield model coupled with analytical models of diffusion

  18. Stream temperature response to glacier retreat (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Stream temperature is a fundamental aspect of aquatic habitat, and there has been increasing concern in recent years that climatic change and glacier retreat will result in increased water temperatures, with potentially negative influences on cold and cool water species such as salmonids. A statistical model was developed to predict the maximum weekly average stream temperature based on data from 418 sites located throughout British Columbia, Canada. Catchment-scale glacier coverage was a significant predictor in the model, and example calculations indicate that plausible decreases in glacier coverage over the next few decades have the potential to result in warming that would be sufficient to cause shifts in fish species assemblages. However, this space-for-time substitution rests on assumptions that may not be valid, especially in the context of a changing climate, leading to a need to develop and apply physically based models. Reach-scale energy budget analyses indicate that parameterizations of energy fluxes used in current stream temperature models are not appropriate for steep channels with cascading flow. In particular, the sensible and latent heat fluxes are more efficient than in lower-gradient channels, and the albedo is enhanced by aeration. Over longer time scales, development of riparian forest has the potential to mitigate the effect of glacier retreat in alpine areas by shading the stream, but it may take centuries for functional riparian forest to develop at higher elevation sites.

  19. L-Lactic acid production from glycerol coupled with acetic acid metabolism by Enterococcus faecalis without carbon loss.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Nao; Oba, Mana; Iwamoto, Mariko; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Takuya; Bonkohara, Kaori; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Sakai, Kenji; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Glycerol is a by-product in the biodiesel production process and considered as one of the prospective carbon sources for microbial fermentation including lactic acid fermentation, which has received considerable interest due to its potential application. Enterococcus faecalis isolated in our laboratory produced optically pure L-lactic acid from glycerol in the presence of acetic acid. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis using [1, 2-(13)C2] acetic acid proved that the E. faecalis strain QU 11 was capable of converting acetic acid to ethanol during lactic acid fermentation of glycerol. This indicated that strain QU 11 restored the redox balance by oxidizing excess NADH though acetic acid metabolism, during ethanol production, which resulted in lactic acid production from glycerol. The effects of pH control and substrate concentration on lactic acid fermentation were also investigated. Glycerol and acetic acid concentrations of 30 g/L and 10 g/L, respectively, were expected to be appropriate for lactic acid fermentation of glycerol by strain QU 11 at a pH of 6.5. Furthermore, fed-batch fermentation with 30 g/L glycerol and 10 g/L acetic acid wholly exhibited the best performance including lactic acid production (55.3 g/L), lactic acid yield (0.991 mol-lactic acid/mol-glycerol), total yield [1.08 mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)]/mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)], and total carbon yield [1.06 C-mol-(lactic acid and ethanol)/C-mol-(glycerol and acetic acid)] of lactic acid and ethanol. In summary, the strain QU 11 successfully produced lactic acid from glycerol with acetic acid metabolism, and an efficient fermentation system was established without carbon loss.

  20. Nucleation of calcium carbonate in presence of citric acid, DTPA, EDTA and pyromellitic acid.

    PubMed

    Westin, K-J; Rasmuson, A C

    2005-02-15

    The influence of four calcium complexing additives, i.e., citric acid (CIT), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and pyromellitic acid (PMA), and their concentration on the induction time of calcium carbonate nucleation has been studied. The experiments were performed by rapidly mixing a sodium carbonate solution and a calcium chloride solution of various concentrations. The induction time was obtained by recording the white light absorption of the solution. Chemical speciation was used to estimate the initial thermodynamic driving force of each experiment. The induction time was found to increase with additive concentration. The effect varies from one additive to another. CIT causes the greatest increase in induction time and PMA the least. Using classical nucleation theory the experimental data were evaluated in terms of the interfacial energy. In pure water a value of 37.8 mJ m(-2) was obtained, showing good agreement with other works. CIT, DTPA and EDTA caused a notable increase of the interfacial energy at a concentration of 0.5 mmol l(-1). PMA does not appear to have any effect at all on the interfacial energy. Different mechanisms for the influence of the additives on the measured induction time and on the estimated interfacial energy are discussed. PMID:15589542

  1. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. I - Six carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, J. R.; Gandy, W. E.; Pizzarello, S.

    1981-01-01

    Six of the seven chain isomers of six-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids (leucine isomers) have been either identified or confirmed in hot-water extracts of the Murchison meteorite using combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion exchange chromatography. 2-Amino-2-ethylbutyric acid, 2-amino-2,3-dimethylbutyric acid, pseudoleucine, and 2-methylnorvaline were positively identified by GC-MS. These amino acids have not been previously reported to occur in natural materials and may be uniquely meteoritic in origin. The presence of leucine and isoleucine (including the diastereoisomer, alloisoleucine) was confirmed. Peaks corresponding to norleucine were seen by ion-exchange and gas chromatography but characteristic mass spectra were not obtained. The alpha-branched chain isomers in this series are quantitatively the most significant. These results are compared with literature data on amino acid synthesis by electrical discharge and Fischer-Tropsch-type catalysis. Neither model system produces an amino acid suite that is completely comparable to that found in the Murchison meteorite.

  2. Kinetics of salicylic acid adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Polakovic, Milan; Gorner, Tatiana; Villiéras, Frédéric; de Donato, Philippe; Bersillon, Jean Luc

    2005-03-29

    The adsorption and desorption of salicylic acid from water solutions was investigated in HPLC microcolumns packed with activated carbon. The adsorption isotherm was obtained by the step-up frontal analysis method in a concentration range of 0-400 mg/L and was well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The investigation of rate aspects of salicylic acid adsorption was based on adsorption/desorption column experiments where different inlet concentrations of salicylic acid were applied in the adsorption phase and desorption was conducted with pure water. The concentration profiles of individual adsorption/desorption cycles data were fitted using several single-parameter models of the fixed-bed adsorption to assess the influence of different phenomena on the column behavior. It was found that the effects of axial dispersion and extraparticle mass transfer were negligible. A rate-determining factor of fixed-bed column dynamics was the kinetics of pore surface adsorption. A bimodal kinetic model reflecting the heterogeneous character of adsorbent pores was verified by a simultaneous fit of the column outlet concentration in four adsorption/desorption cycles. The fitted parameters were the fraction of mesopores and the adsorption rate constants in micropores and mesopores, respectively. It was shown that the former rate constant was an intrinsic one whereas the latter one was an apparent value due to the effects of pore blocking and diffusional hindrances in the micropores. PMID:15779975

  3. Carbon composite micro- and nano-tubes-based electrodes for detection of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to fabricate vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). MWCNTs were successfully prepared by using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. Further, three carbon composite electrodes with different content of carbon particles with various shapes and sizes were prepared and tested on measuring of nucleic acids. The dependences of adenine peak height on the concentration of nucleic acid sample were measured. Carbon composite electrode prepared from a mixture of glassy and spherical carbon powder and MWCNTs had the highest sensitivity to nucleic acids. Other interesting result is the fact that we were able to distinguish signals for all bases using this electrode. PMID:21711910

  4. Highly efficient procedure for the synthesis of fructone fragrance using a novel carbon based acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baowei; Li, Chunqing; Zhao, Sheng-Xian; Rong, Lin-Mei; Lv, Shao-Qin; Liang, Xuezheng; Qi, Chenze

    2010-08-01

    The novel carbon based acid has been synthesized via one-step hydrothermal carbonization of furaldehyde and hydroxyethylsulfonic acid. A highly efficient procedure for the synthesis of fructone has been developed using the novel carbon based acid. The results showed that the catalyst possessed high activity for the reaction, giving a yield of over 95%. The advantages of high activity, stability, reusability and low cost for a simple synthesis procedure and wide applicability to various diols and beta-keto esters make this novel carbon based acid one of the best choices for the reaction.

  5. A Simple Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Fixation and Acid Production in CAM Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R. L.; McWha, James A.

    1976-01-01

    Described is an experiment investigating carbon dioxide fixation in the dark and the diurnal rhythm of acid production in plants exhibiting Crassulacean Acid Metabolism. Included are suggestions for four further investigations. (SL)

  6. Direct carbon-carbon coupling of furanics with acetic acid over Brønsted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Gumidyala, Abhishek; Wang, Bin; Crossley, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Effective carbon-carbon coupling of acetic acid to form larger products while minimizing CO2 emissions is critical to achieving a step change in efficiency for the production of transportation fuels from sustainable biomass. We report the direct acylation of methylfuran with acetic acid in the presence of water, all of which can be readily produced from biomass. This direct coupling limits unwanted polymerization of furanics while producing acetyl methylfuran. Reaction kinetics and density functional theory calculations illustrate that the calculated apparent barrier for the dehydration of the acid to form surface acyl species is similar to the experimentally measured barrier, implying that this step plays a significant role in determining the net reaction rate. Water inhibits the overall rate, but selectivity to acylated products is not affected. We show that furanic species effectively stabilize the charge of the transition state, therefore lowering the overall activation barrier. These results demonstrate a promising new route to C-C bond-forming reactions for the production of higher-value products from biomass.

  7. Direct carbon-carbon coupling of furanics with acetic acid over Brønsted zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Gumidyala, Abhishek; Wang, Bin; Crossley, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Effective carbon-carbon coupling of acetic acid to form larger products while minimizing CO2 emissions is critical to achieving a step change in efficiency for the production of transportation fuels from sustainable biomass. We report the direct acylation of methylfuran with acetic acid in the presence of water, all of which can be readily produced from biomass. This direct coupling limits unwanted polymerization of furanics while producing acetyl methylfuran. Reaction kinetics and density functional theory calculations illustrate that the calculated apparent barrier for the dehydration of the acid to form surface acyl species is similar to the experimentally measured barrier, implying that this step plays a significant role in determining the net reaction rate. Water inhibits the overall rate, but selectivity to acylated products is not affected. We show that furanic species effectively stabilize the charge of the transition state, therefore lowering the overall activation barrier. These results demonstrate a promising new route to C–C bond–forming reactions for the production of higher-value products from biomass. PMID:27652345

  8. Direct carbon-carbon coupling of furanics with acetic acid over Brønsted zeolites

    PubMed Central

    Gumidyala, Abhishek; Wang, Bin; Crossley, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Effective carbon-carbon coupling of acetic acid to form larger products while minimizing CO2 emissions is critical to achieving a step change in efficiency for the production of transportation fuels from sustainable biomass. We report the direct acylation of methylfuran with acetic acid in the presence of water, all of which can be readily produced from biomass. This direct coupling limits unwanted polymerization of furanics while producing acetyl methylfuran. Reaction kinetics and density functional theory calculations illustrate that the calculated apparent barrier for the dehydration of the acid to form surface acyl species is similar to the experimentally measured barrier, implying that this step plays a significant role in determining the net reaction rate. Water inhibits the overall rate, but selectivity to acylated products is not affected. We show that furanic species effectively stabilize the charge of the transition state, therefore lowering the overall activation barrier. These results demonstrate a promising new route to C–C bond–forming reactions for the production of higher-value products from biomass.

  9. Direct carbon-carbon coupling of furanics with acetic acid over Brønsted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Gumidyala, Abhishek; Wang, Bin; Crossley, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Effective carbon-carbon coupling of acetic acid to form larger products while minimizing CO2 emissions is critical to achieving a step change in efficiency for the production of transportation fuels from sustainable biomass. We report the direct acylation of methylfuran with acetic acid in the presence of water, all of which can be readily produced from biomass. This direct coupling limits unwanted polymerization of furanics while producing acetyl methylfuran. Reaction kinetics and density functional theory calculations illustrate that the calculated apparent barrier for the dehydration of the acid to form surface acyl species is similar to the experimentally measured barrier, implying that this step plays a significant role in determining the net reaction rate. Water inhibits the overall rate, but selectivity to acylated products is not affected. We show that furanic species effectively stabilize the charge of the transition state, therefore lowering the overall activation barrier. These results demonstrate a promising new route to C-C bond-forming reactions for the production of higher-value products from biomass. PMID:27652345

  10. Latest Word on Retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, R.

    2000-01-01

    The West Antarctic ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is estimated to have been three times its present volume and to have extended close to the edge of the continental shelf Holocene retreat of this ice sheet in the Ross Sea began between 11,000 and 12,000 years ago. This history implies an average contribution of this ice sheet to sea level of 0.9 mm/a. Evidence of dateable past grounding line positions in the Ross sector are broadly consistent with a linear retreat model. However, inferred rates of retreat for some of these grounding line positions are not consistent with a linear retreat model. More rapid retreat approximately 7600 years ago and possible near-stability in the Ross Sea sector at present suggest a slow rate of initial retreat followed by a more rapid-than-average retreat during the late Holocene, returning to a near-zero rate of retreat currently. This model is also consistent with the mid-Holocene high stand observations of eustatic sea level. Recent compilation of Antarctic bed elevations (BEDMAP) illustrates that the LGM and present grounding lines occur in the shallowest waters, further supporting the model of a middle phase of rapid retreat bracketed by an older and a more recent phase of modest retreat. Extension of these hypotheses into the future make subsequent behavior of the West Antarctic ice sheet more difficult to predict but suggest that if it loses its hold on the present shallow bed, the final retreat of the ice sheet could be very rapid.

  11. Electrochemical Determination of Glycoalkaloids Using a Carbon Nanotubes-Phenylboronic Acid Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huiying; Liu, Mingyue; Hu, Xinxi; Li, Mei; Xiong, Xingyao

    2013-01-01

    A versatile strategy for electrochemical determination of glycoalkaloids (GAs) was developed by using a carbon nanotubes-phenylboronic acid (CNTs-PBA) modified glassy carbon electrode. PBA reacts with α-solanine and α-chaconine to form a cyclic ester, which could be utilized to detect GAs. This method allowed GA detection from 1 μM to 28 μM and the detection limit was 0.3 μM. Affinity interaction of GAs and immobilized PBA caused an essential change of the peak current. The CNT-PBA modified electrodes were sensitive for detection of GAs, and the peak current values were in quite good agreement with those measured by the sensors. PMID:24287539

  12. Starch saccharification by carbon-based solid acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Daizo; Hara, Michikazu

    2010-06-01

    The hydrolysis of cornstarch using a highly active solid acid catalyst, a carbon material bearing SO 3H, COOH and OH groups, was investigated at 353-393 K through an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an artificial neural network (ANN). ANOVA revealed that reaction temperature and time are significant parameters for the catalytic hydrolysis of starch. The ANN model indicated that the reaction efficiency reaches a maximum at an optimal condition (water, 0.8-1.0 mL; starch, 0.3-0.4 g; catalyst, 0.3 g; reaction temperature, 373 K; reaction time, 3 h). The relationship between the reaction and these parameters is discussed on the basis of the reaction mechanism.

  13. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  14. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO3 layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO3 layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO3 coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L).

  15. Change on psychological scales following Buddhist and Roman Catholic retreats.

    PubMed

    Tori, C D

    1999-02-01

    Orthogonal contrasts of Adjective Checklist pretest-posttest change scores obtained from adolescents who attended three-day Buddhist or Roman Catholic retreats (n = 204) and no treatment control participants (n = 102) indicated those who attended had higher change scores and greater change occurred among those attending the Buddhist meditation retreat.

  16. Developer's Concerns about Staff Retreat Create Opportunity and Obligation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Joellen

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with a staff developer's concerns about Bill Stewart's staff retreat, and how these concerns create opportunity and obligation. The author presents views from a superintendent and two staff developers on the staff retreat. Aside from these, the author talks about a superintendent named Darlene Preston, and her course of action.…

  17. Academic Writing Retreat: A Time for Rejuvenated and Focused Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaggerty, Elizabeth A.; Atkinson, Terry S.; Faulconer, Johna L.; Griffith, Robin R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the impact of a three-day academic writing retreat on the writing lives of four female university faculty members. Goals of the retreat included rejuvenating their writing lives, focusing their research agendas, improving their writing, and engaging in concentrated blocks of writing and collaborative…

  18. Age Estimates of Holocene Glacial Retreat in Lapeyrère Bay, Anvers Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, K. A.; Wellner, J. S.; Rosenheim, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    Lapeyrère Bay is a fjord on the eastern side of Anvers Island, located off the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Anvers island has a maximum elevation of 2400m (comprised of ice overlaying bedrock), and experiences colder temperatures and more precipitation than the South Shetlands, which are ~230km to the north. Two glaciers enter Lapeyrère Bay, one large and vulnerable to avalanching, the Iliad Glacier, and one smaller glacier confined to a northern unnamed cove. Though several research cruises have visited Lapeyrère Bay, very little has been published on the fjord's glacial retreat history or sediment flux. The primary purpose of this study is to reconstruct the glacial retreat and sediment flux histories of Lapeyrère Bay using a SHALDRIL core and standard piston cores for chronology and sedimentary facies analysis, and multibeam swath bathymetry data for identifying seafloor morphological features. Preliminary core data from the proximal northern flank of Lapeyrère Bay show greenish grey sandy mud with scattered pebble and sand lens lithology. A core taken in the distal-most part of the fjord is largely diatomaceous sediment grading into grey silty mud with thin sandy turbidites. Multibeam data has exposed seafloor features including a grounding zone wedge at the entrance of the unnamed cove of northern Lapeyrère Bay, drumlins, glacial lineations, and a glacial outwash fan near the ocean-termination of the Iliad glacier. Additionally, this study seeks to assess the effectiveness of a novel 14C method of dating sediment lacking sufficient calcareous material for carbonate 14C dating. The method being tested is ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon analysis, which dates individual fractions of organic material. It is hypothesized that ramped pyrolysis will improve upon bulk acid insoluble organic material (AIOM) dating, as AIOM can include both autochthonous syndepositionally aged carbon and allochthonous pre-aged carbon, resulting in 14C ages inherently older than the

  19. Unexpected dehomologation of primary alcohols to one-carbon shorter carboxylic acids using o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX).

    PubMed

    Xu, Shu; Itto, Kaori; Satoh, Masahide; Arimoto, Hirokazu

    2014-03-14

    A novel and efficient transformation of primary alcohols to one-carbon shorter carboxylic acids using IBX is reported. Mechanistic studies revealed that the combination of IBX and molecular iodine produces a different active hypervalent iodine species.

  20. Method for the isolation of citric acid and malic acid in Japanese apricot liqueur for carbon stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Oe, Takaaki; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-02-15

    A method for detecting the undeclared addition of acidic ingredients is required to control the authenticity of Japanese apricot liqueur. We developed an analytical procedure that minimizes carbon isotope discrimination for measurement of the δ(13)C values of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Our results demonstrated that freeze-drying is preferable to nitrogen spray-drying, because it does not significantly affect the δ(13)C values of citric acid and results in smaller isotope discrimination for malic acid. Both 0.1% formic acid and 0.2% phosphoric acid are acceptable HPLC mobile phases for the isolation of citric and malic acid, although the δ(13)C values of malic acid exhibited relatively large variation compared with citric acid following isolation using either mobile phase. The developed procedure allows precise δ(13)C measurements of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. PMID:27664615

  1. Method for the isolation of citric acid and malic acid in Japanese apricot liqueur for carbon stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Oe, Takaaki; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-02-15

    A method for detecting the undeclared addition of acidic ingredients is required to control the authenticity of Japanese apricot liqueur. We developed an analytical procedure that minimizes carbon isotope discrimination for measurement of the δ(13)C values of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Our results demonstrated that freeze-drying is preferable to nitrogen spray-drying, because it does not significantly affect the δ(13)C values of citric acid and results in smaller isotope discrimination for malic acid. Both 0.1% formic acid and 0.2% phosphoric acid are acceptable HPLC mobile phases for the isolation of citric and malic acid, although the δ(13)C values of malic acid exhibited relatively large variation compared with citric acid following isolation using either mobile phase. The developed procedure allows precise δ(13)C measurements of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur.

  2. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (Gamma 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAS) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SO...

  3. USE OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPE RATIOS OF FATTY ACIDS TO EVALUATE MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCES IN TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (D 13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. We found that intensive sugar cane cultivation leads to ...

  4. Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution

    DOEpatents

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-07-01

    A system for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizes a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide.

  5. Larval caddis-fly nets and retreats: a unique biosedimentary paleocurrent indicator for fossil tufa deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drysdale, Russell N.; Carthew, Karen D.; Taylor, Mark P.

    2003-10-01

    Caddis-fly larvae (Order: Trichoptera; Family: Hydropsychidae; Genus: Cheumatopsyche) build distinctive nets and retreats on the surface of tufa deposits in spring-fed rivers of the Barkly karst, northern Australia. Their activities are confined specifically to swiftly flowing reaches, where the nets and retreats form linear arrays arranged almost perpendicular to stream flow. The arrays become encrusted by calcium carbonate and, when high-velocity conditions are maintained, are succeeded by the next generation of caddis flies. The arrays are well preserved in many fossil tufa deposits, where their alignment and long-section morphology indicate paleoflow direction at the time of caddis activity. This can assist in the paleoenvironmental reconstruction of fossil tufa sequences.

  6. Fate of microbial nitrogen, carbon, hydrolysable amino acids, monosaccharides, and fatty acids in sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veuger, Bart; van Oevelen, Dick; Middelburg, Jack J.

    2012-04-01

    The fate of microbial carbon, nitrogen, hydrolysable amino acids (HAAs), monosaccharides, and fatty acids in sediment was investigated experimentally. The microbial community of a tidal flat sediment was labeled with 13C-enriched glucose and 15N-enriched ammonium, and sediment was incubated for up to 371 days. Analysis of total concentrations and 13C- and 15N content of bulk sediment, hydrolysable amino acids (including D-alanine), monosaccharides, total fatty acids (TFAs), and phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFAs) allowed us to trace the fate of microbial biomass and -detritus and the major biochemical groups therein (proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids) over intermediate time scales (weeks-months). Moreover, the unidentified fraction of the labeled material (i.e. not analyzed as HAA, FA, or carbohydrate) provided information on the formation and fate of molecularly uncharacterizable organic matter. Loss of 13C and 15N from the sediment was slow (half live of 433 days) which may have been due to the permanently anoxic conditions in the experiment. Loss rates for the different biochemical groups were also low with the following order of loss rate constants: PLFA > TFA > HAA > monosaccharides. The unidentified 13C-pool was rapidly formed (within days) and then decreased relatively slowly, resulting in a gradual relative accumulation of this pool over time. Degradation and microbial reworking of the labeled material resulted in subtle, yet consistent, diagenetic changes within the different biochemical groups. In the HAA pool, glycine, lysine, and proline were lost relatively slowly (i.e. best preserved) while there was no accumulation of D-alanine relative to L-alanine, indicating no relative accumulation of bacterial macromolecules rich in D-alanine. In the fatty acid pool, there was very little difference between PLFAs and TFAs, indicating a very similar lability of these pools. Differences between individual fatty acids included a relatively slow loss of i15

  7. Simultaneous inhibition of carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a forest soil by simulated acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, T.M.; Novick, N.J.; Kreitinger, J.P.; Alexander, M.

    1984-06-01

    One method to simulate the long-term exposure of soil to acid rain involves the addition of single doses of concentrated acid. The inhibition of carbon mineralization accompanied by a stimulation of nitrogen mineralization may result from this severe, unnatural treatment. The present study was designed to determine whether the inhibition of carbon mineralization and the accompanying enhanced nitrogen mineralization would occur when soils are treated with more dilute acid for long periods of time, as takes place in nature.

  8. Sequestering CO(2) by mineral carbonation: stability against acid rain exposure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel J; Brent, Geoff F

    2010-04-01

    Mineral carbonation is a potentially attractive alternative to storage of compressed CO(2) in underground repositories, known as geosequestration. Processes for the conversion of basic ores, such as magnesium silicates, to carbonates have been proposed by various researchers, with storage of the carbonate as backfill in the original mine representing a solid carbon sink. The stability of such carbon sinks against acid rain and other sources of strong acids is examined here. It is acknowledged that in the presence of strong acid, carbonates will dissolve and release carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis covering annual average rainfall and pH that may be encountered in industrialized areas of the United States, China, Europe, and Australia was conducted to determine maximum CO(2) rerelease rates from mineral carbonation carbon sinks. This analysis is based on a worst-case premise that is equivalent to assuming infinitely rapid kinetics of dissolution of the carbonate. The analysis shows that under any likely conditions of pH and rainfall, leakage rates of stored CO(2) are negligible. This is illustrated in a hypothetical case study under Australian conditions. It is thus proposed that sequestration by mineral carbonation can be considered to be permanent on practical human time scales. Other possible sources of acid have also been considered.

  9. Sequestering CO(2) by mineral carbonation: stability against acid rain exposure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Daniel J; Brent, Geoff F

    2010-04-01

    Mineral carbonation is a potentially attractive alternative to storage of compressed CO(2) in underground repositories, known as geosequestration. Processes for the conversion of basic ores, such as magnesium silicates, to carbonates have been proposed by various researchers, with storage of the carbonate as backfill in the original mine representing a solid carbon sink. The stability of such carbon sinks against acid rain and other sources of strong acids is examined here. It is acknowledged that in the presence of strong acid, carbonates will dissolve and release carbon dioxide. A sensitivity analysis covering annual average rainfall and pH that may be encountered in industrialized areas of the United States, China, Europe, and Australia was conducted to determine maximum CO(2) rerelease rates from mineral carbonation carbon sinks. This analysis is based on a worst-case premise that is equivalent to assuming infinitely rapid kinetics of dissolution of the carbonate. The analysis shows that under any likely conditions of pH and rainfall, leakage rates of stored CO(2) are negligible. This is illustrated in a hypothetical case study under Australian conditions. It is thus proposed that sequestration by mineral carbonation can be considered to be permanent on practical human time scales. Other possible sources of acid have also been considered. PMID:20199068

  10. Calculating lunar retreat rates using tidal rhythmites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvale, E.P.; Johnson, H.W.; Sonett, C.P.; Archer, A.W.; Zawistoski, A.N.N.

    1999-01-01

    Tidal rhythmites are small-scale sedimenta??r}- structures that can preserve a hierarchy of astronomically induced tidal periods. They can also preserve a record of periodic nontidal sedimentation. If properly interpreted and understood, tidal rhjthmites can be an important component of paleoastronomy and can be used to extract information on ancient lunar orbital dynamics including changes in Earth-Moon distance through geologic time. Herein we present techniques that can be used to calculate ancient Earth-Moon distances. Each of these techniques, when used on a modern high-tide data set, results in calculated estimates of lunar orbital periods and an EarthMoon distance that fall well within 1 percent of the actual values. Comparisons to results from modern tidal data indicate that ancient tidal rhythmite data as short as 4 months can provide suitable estimates of lunar orbital periods if these tidal records are complete. An understanding of basic tidal theory allows for the evaluation of completeness of the ancient tidal record as derived from an analysis of tidal rhythmites. Utilizing the techniques presented herein, it appears from the rock record that lunar orbital retreat slowed sometime during the midPaleozoic. Copyright ??1999, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  11. Seaweed communities in retreat from ocean warming.

    PubMed

    Wernberg, Thomas; Russell, Bayden D; Thomsen, Mads S; Gurgel, C Frederico D; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Poloczanska, Elvira S; Connell, Sean D

    2011-11-01

    In recent decades, global climate change [1] has caused profound biological changes across the planet [2-6]. However, there is a great disparity in the strength of evidence among different ecosystems and between hemispheres: changes on land have been well documented through long-term studies, but similar direct evidence for impacts of warming is virtually absent from the oceans [3, 7], where only a few studies on individual species of intertidal invertebrates, plankton, and commercially important fish in the North Atlantic and North Pacific exist. This disparity of evidence is precarious for biological conservation because of the critical role of the marine realm in regulating the Earth's environmental and ecological functions, and the associated socioeconomic well-being of humans [8]. We interrogated a database of >20,000 herbarium records of macroalgae collected in Australia since the 1940s and documented changes in communities and geographical distribution limits in both the Indian and Pacific Oceans, consistent with rapid warming over the past five decades [9, 10]. We show that continued warming might drive potentially hundreds of species toward and beyond the edge of the Australian continent where sustained retreat is impossible. The potential for global extinctions is profound considering the many endemic seaweeds and seaweed-dependent marine organisms in temperate Australia.

  12. Sorption of perfluorooctanoic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluoroheptanoic acid on granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Luo, Qi; Gao, Bin; Chiang, Sheau-Yun Dora; Woodward, David; Huang, Qingguo

    2016-02-01

    The sorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) on granular activated carbon (GAC) was characterized and compared to explore the underlying mechanisms. Sorption of the three perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) on GAC appeared to be a rapid intra-particle diffusion process, which were well represented by the pseudo-second-order rate model with the sorption rate following the order PFOS > PFOA > PFHpA. Sorption isotherm data were well fitted by the Freundlich model with the sorption capacity (Kf) of PFOS, PFOA and PFHpA being 4.45, 2.42 and 1.66 respectively. This suggests that the hydrophilic head group on PFAAs, i.e. sulfonate vs carboxylic, has a strong influence on their sorption. Comparison between PFOA and PFHpA revealed that hydrophobicity could also play a role in the sorption of PFAAs on GAC when the fluorocarbon chain length is different. Analyses using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR)-Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested possible formation of a negative charge-assisted H-bond between PFAAs and the functionalities on GAC surfaces, including non-aromatic ketones, sulfides, and halogenated hydrocarbons. PMID:26606188

  13. Nanostructured membranes and electrodes with sulfonic acid functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Bijay P.; Schieda, M.; Shahi, Vinod K.; Nunes, Suzana P.

    Herein we report the covalent functionalization of multiwall carbon nanotubes by grafting sulfanilic acid and their dispersion into sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The nanocomposites were explored as an option for tuning the proton and electron conductivity, swelling, water and alcohol permeability aiming at nanostructured membranes and electrodes for application in alcohol or hydrogen fuel cells and other electrochemical devices. The nanocomposites were extensively characterized, by studying their physicochemical and electrochemical properties. They were processed as self-supporting films with high mechanical stability, proton conductivity of 4.47 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 30 °C and 16.8 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 80 °C and 100% humidity level, electron conductivity much higher than for the plain polymer. The methanol permeability could be reduced to 1/20, keeping water permeability at reasonable values. The ratio of bound water also increases with increasing content of sulfonated filler, helping in keeping water in the polymer in conditions of low external humidity level.

  14. Evaluation of Hemostatic Effects of Carbonized Hair-Loaded Poly(L-Lactic) Acid Nanofabrics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Yan; Liao, Lianming

    2015-06-01

    Carbonized human hair is used to stop bleeding in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study was aimed to prepare a novel nanofiber containing carbonized human hair and evaluate its hemostatic effect. Carbonized human hair-loaded poly(L-lactic) acid nanofiber was prepared by electrospinning. The hemostatic efficacies of dressings composed of either carbonized human hair, carbonized human hair-loaded poly(L-lactic) acid nanofiber, Yunnan White Drug power or poly(L-lactic) acid nanofiber were investigated in several swine arterial and venous bleeding models. Blood loss and bleeding time were measured. In vitro, carbonized human hair, carbonized human hair-loaded nanofiber and Yunnan White Drug Powder significantly shortened the clotting time in comparison with the nanofiber control group. The hemostatic effects of the carbonized human hair-load nanofiber on liver and spleen traumatic wounds were better than those of carbonized human hair and Yunnan White Drug Powder in terms of blood loss and bleeding time. Similar effects were observed in swine femoral artery wound model. In the swine femoral vein wound model, bleeding could not be stopped in the control animals. In the carbonized human hair group, Yunnan White Drug Powder group and carbonized human hair-load nanofiber group, bleeding was stopped in 83.3%, 83.3% and 100% of the animals, respectively. In conclusion, dressing using carbonized human hair-load nanofibers is effective in controlling severe, uncontrolled bleeding. This dressing may offer a cheap alternative to dressings composed of coagulation proteins.

  15. How fast do gully headcuts retreat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanmaercke, Matthias; Poesen, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Gullies can be a dominant sediment source at field and catchment scales. Over the past decades, several studies have been conducted that quantify gully headcut retreat (GHR) in different environments. Although this led to important site-specific and regional insights, the overall importance of this erosion process or the factors that control it at a global scale remain poorly understood. This study aims to bridge this gap by conducting a meta-analysis of measured GHR rates worldwide. Through an extensive literature review, GHR rates for ca. 900 individual actively retreating gullies (comprising a total measuring period of > 19 000 years) from more than 50 study areas worldwide have been compiled. Each GHR rate was measured by means of repeated field surveys and/or analyses of aerial photographs over a period of at least one year. The collected data shows a very large variability, both in terms of gully dimensions (cross-sectional areas ranging between 0.11 and 816 m² with a median of 4 m²) and GHR rates (ranging between 0.003 and 47 000 m³/y with a median of 2.2 m³/y). Linear GHR rates vary between 0.01 and 70 m/y (median: 0.82 m/y). By means of statistical analyses for a subset of 689 gullies with a known contributing area, we explored which factors are most relevant in explaining the observed 6 orders of magnitudes of variation in volumetric GHR rates. Results show that measured GHR rates are significantly correlated to the runoff contributing area of the gully (r² = 0.13) and the average rainfall depth on a rainy day (i.e. the long-term average annual rainfall depth divided by the average number of rainy days; r² = 0.39). Combined, these two factors explained 57% of the observed variability in average GHR rates. Other factors (e.g. land use or soil type) showed no significant correlation with the observed GHR rates. This may be attributed to the uncertainties associated with accurately quantifying these factors. In addition, a large part of the remaining

  16. Preparation and characterization of biomass carbon-based solid acid catalyst for the esterification of oleic acid with methanol.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiantian; Li, Zhilong; Li, Wei; Shi, Congjiao; Wang, Yun

    2013-04-01

    A solid acid catalyst, prepared by sulfonating carbonized corn straw, was proved to be an efficient and environmental benign catalyst for the esterification of oleic acid and methanol. Various synthetic parameters, such as carbonization temperature and time were systematically examined. It was found that the catalyst exhibited the highest acid density of 2.64 mmol/g by NaOH titration. A quantitative yield (98%) of ester was achieved, using the most active sulfonated catalyst at 333 K with a 7 wt.% catalyst/oleic acid ratio for 4h, at a 7:1 M ratio of methanol/oleic acid, while the commercial available Amberlyst-15 only gave 85% yield under the same reaction condition.

  17. The Formation and Stability of Carbonic Acid on Outer Solar System Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, Z.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Lewis, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    The radiation chemistry, thermal stability, and vapor pressure of solid-phase carbonic acid (H2CO3) have been studied with mid-infrared spectroscopy. A new procedure for measuring this molecule's radiation stability has been used to obtain intrinsic IR band strengths and half-lives for radiolytic destruction. Results are compared to literature values. We report, for the first time, measurements of carbonic acid's vapor pressure and its heat of sublimation. We also report the first observation of a chemical reaction involving solid-phase carbonic acid. Possible applications of these findings are discussed, with an emphasis on the outer Solar System.

  18. Rituximab Retreatment for Low-Tumor Burden Follicular Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a randomized clinical trial of patients with low–tumor burden follicular lymphoma that compared maintenance therapy with rituximab versus retreatment with rituximab only when there was evidence of disease progression.

  19. Effect of Acid Oxidation on the Dispersion Property of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, P. S.; Ismail, A. F.; Aziz, M.

    2009-06-01

    A means of dispersion of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) via mixed acid (HNO3 and H2SO4) oxidation with different treatment durations was investigated through the solubility study of the treated carbon nanotubes in some common solvents. Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) characterization of the reaction products revealed that the surface of MWCNTs was successfully functionalized with surface acidic groups. The acid-base titration demonstrated that the amount of surface acidic groups increased in parallel with the refluxing duration. The acid modified MWCNTs were found to be well dispersed in polar solvents, such as ethanol and water due to the presence of the hydrophilic acid functional groups on the surface of raw MWCNTs. Such chemical modification of carbon nanotube properties will pave the way towards the realistic applications in the nanotechnology world.

  20. Sulfonated mesoporous silica-carbon composites and their use as solid acid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Vigón, Patricia; Sevilla, Marta; Fuertes, Antonio B.

    2012-11-01

    The synthesis of highly functionalized porous silica-carbon composites made up of sulfonic groups attached to a carbon layer coating the pores of three types of mesostructured silica (i.e. SBA-15, KIT-6 and mesocellular silica) is presented. The synthesis procedure involves the following steps: (a) removal of the surfactant, (b) impregnation of the silica pores with a carbon precursor, (c) carbonization and (d) sulfonation. The resulting silica-carbon composites contain ˜30 wt % of carbonaceous matter with a high density of acidic groups attached to the deposited carbon (i.e.sbnd SO3H, sbnd COOH and sbnd OH). The structural characteristics of the parent silica are retained in the composite materials, which exhibit a high surface area, a large pore volume and a well-ordered porosity made up uniform mesopores. The high density of the sulfonic groups in combination with the mesoporous structure of the composites ensures that a large number of active sites are easily accessible to reactants. These sulfonated silica-carbon composites behave as eco-friendly, active, selective, water tolerant and recyclable solid acids. In this study we demonstrate the usefulness of these composites as solid acid catalysts for the esterification of maleic anhydride, succinic acid and oleic acid with ethanol. These composites exhibit a superior intrinsic catalytic activity to other commercial solid acids such as Amberlyst-15.

  1. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-01-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA. PMID:26924080

  2. Morphology-dependent Electrochemical Enhancements of Porous Carbon as Sensitive Determination Platform for Ascorbic Acid, Dopamine and Uric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qin; Ji, Liudi; Wu, Kangbing; Zhang, Weikang

    2016-02-01

    Using starch as the carbon precursor and different-sized ZnO naoparticles as the hard template, a series of porous carbon materials for electrochemical sensing were prepared. Experiments of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the particle size of ZnO has big impacts on the porous morphology and surface area of the resulting carbon materials. Through ultrasonic dispersion of porous carbon and subsequent solvent evaporation, different sensing interfaces were constructed on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behaviors of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and uric acid (UA) were studied. On the surface of porous carbon materials, the accumulation efficiency and electron transfer ability of AA, DA and UA are improved, and consequently their oxidation signals enhance greatly. Moreover, the interface enhancement effects of porous carbon are also controlled by the particle size of hard template. The constructed porous carbon interface displays strong signal amplification ability and holds great promise in constructing a sensitive platform for the simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA.

  3. Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode as a potentiometric sensor for uric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasanah, Miratul; Widati, Alfa Akustia; Fitri, Sarita Aulia

    2016-03-01

    Imprinted zeolite modified carbon paste electrode (carbon paste-IZ) has been developed and applied to determine uric acid by potentiometry. The imprinted zeolite (IZ) was synthesized by the mole ratio of uric acid/Si of 0.0306. The modified electrode was manufactured by mass ratio of carbon, IZ and solid paraffin was 40:25:35. The modified electrode had shown the measurement range of 10-5 M to 10-2 M with Nernst factor of 28.6 mV/decade, the detection limit of 5.86 × 10-6 M and the accuracy of 95.3 - 105.0%. Response time of the electrode for uric acid 10-5 M - 10-2 M was 25 - 44 s. The developed electrode showed the high selectivity toward uric acid in the urea matrix. Life time of the carbon paste-IZ electrode was 10 weeks.

  4. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

  5. Endodontic retreatment. Aspects of decision making and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Kvist, T

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological surveys have reported that 25%-35% of root filled teeth are associated with periapical radiolucencies. Descriptive studies have demonstrated that clinicians' decision making regarding such teeth are subject to substantial variation. A coherent model to explain the observed variation has not been produced. In the present thesis a "Praxis Concept theory" was proposed. The theory suggests that dentists perceive periapical lesions of varying sizes as different stages on a continuous health scale. Interindividual variations can then be regarded as the result of the choice of different cut-off points on the continuum for prescribing retreatment. In the present study experiments among novice and expert decision makers gave evidence in favour of the theory. Data also suggested that the choice of retreatment criterion is affected by values, costs of retreatment and technical quality of original treatment. From a prescriptive point of view, the presence of a persistent periapical radiolucency has often been used as a criterion of endodontic "failure" and as an indication for endodontic retreatment. As an alternative decision strategy, the use of decision analysis has been proposed. Logical display of decision alternatives, values of probabilities, utility values (U-values) of the different outcomes and calculation of optimal decision strategy are features of this theory. The implementation of this approach is impeded by the uncertainty of outcome probabilities and lack of investigations concerning U-values. U-values of two periapical health states in root filled teeth (with and without a periapical lesion respectively) were investigated in a group of 82 dental students and among 16 Swedish endodontists. Two methods were used to elicit U-values: Standard gamble and Visual Analogue Scale. Large interindividual variation for both health states were recorded. The difference in U-values between the two health states was found to be statistically significant

  6. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBONIISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (*13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SOM) cy...

  7. A complex deglacial retreat history of the Anvers Island Trough paleo-ice stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevenell, A.; Ishman, S. E.; Domack, E. W.; Leventer, A.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Vadman, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Marine-terminating ice regulates the mass balance and stability of Antarctica's ice sheets and, ultimately, global sea level. However, predictions of future ice sheet response to climate change are limited by short observational time-series and the complexity of associated forcings and feedbacks. Here, we present new chronologic and multiproxy data from 7 marine sediment records from the outer to inner shelf down the axis of the Anvers Island Trough and into Palmer Deep that better constrain the timing and rate of ice retreat and improve understanding of the mechanisms driving deglaciation of this hypothesized paleo-ice stream. The retreat chronology is based on 16 CaCO3 (foraminifer and mollusk) and 45 ramped pyrolysis (acid-insoluble organic matter) AMS 14C dates. Radiocarbon dates from the laminated diatom ooze and mud facies immediately above the glacial diamicton indicate that deglaciation of the mid-Anvers Island Trough post-dated the Palmer Deep deglaciation by ~2000 uncorrected 14C years and that collapse of the mid-shelf system was rapid, if not instantaneous. The laminated facies, present throughout the suite of cores, is consistent with the calving bay reentrant model for deglaciation. However, this facies is limited (~15 couplets) on the mid-shelf and expanded (~127 couplets) on the inner-shelf, suggesting regional differences in calving bay duration. Planktic and benthic foraminifer isotopes, together with foraminifer and diatom assemblages, and biogeochemical data provide evidence for the presence of warmer nutrient-rich modified Circumpolar Deep Water throughout the Anvers Island Trough during deglaciation. The observed retreat complexity may relate to a hypothesized mid-shelf ice-dome system and requires additional geological and geophysical data to understand ice retreat patterns south and west of Palmer Deep. Such data will provide important new constraints for ice sheet models.

  8. Enhancing the performance of lead-acid batteries with carbon - In pursuit of an understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Patrick T.; Rand, David A. J.; Peters, Ken

    2015-11-01

    The inherently poor dynamic charge-acceptance of the lead-acid battery can be greatly improved by the incorporation of additional carbon to the negative plate. An analysis is undertaken of the various ways by which the carbon may be introduced, and of the proposed mechanisms whereby its presence proves to be beneficial. It is intended that such an investigation should provide a guide to the selection of the optimum carbon inventory.

  9. Nanocubes: "Cubism" on the Nanoscale: From Squaric Acid to Porous Carbon Cubes (Small 21/2016).

    PubMed

    Mani, Christian Mbaya; Berthold, Thomas; Fechler, Nina

    2016-06-01

    The development of convenient and efficient template-free methods for the synthesis of hierarchical porous carbon materials is highly desirable. On page 2906, N. Fechler and co-workers prepare porous crystalline particles with a 3D cubic morphology by a one-step, template-free coordination of zinc ions to squaric acid molecules. Subsequently, these crystalline particles could be transferred into cubic hierarchical carbon to form carbon-based composites with excellent capacitive performance. PMID:27245940

  10. Reconciling Empirical Carbonate Clumped Isotope Calibrations: A Comparison of Calcite Precipitation and Acid Digestion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, J.; Huntington, K. W.; Schauer, A. J.; Saenger, C.; Lechler, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    An accurate empirical calibration is necessary to confidently apply the carbonate clumped isotope (Δ47) thermometer. Previous synthetic carbonate calibrations disagree in temperature sensitivity, with one group of calibrations displaying a shallow Δ47-temperature slope (e.g., Dennis & Schrag, GCA, 2010), and the other a steep slope (e.g., Zaarur et al., EPSL, 2013). These calibrations differ in both the method of mineral precipitation and the temperature of the phosphoric acid used to digest carbonates for analysis, making it difficult to isolate the cause of the discrepancy. Here, we precipitate synthetic carbonates at temperatures of 6-80ºC using 4 different precipitation methods, and analyze the samples using both 90 and 25°C acid digestion. Precipitation experiments varied the use of salts (NaHCO3 and CaCl2) vs. dissolved CaCO3 as a starting solution, the use of carbonic anhydrase to promote isotopic equilibrium among dissolved inorganic carbon species in solution, and the method by which CO2 degasses to force carbonate precipitation. Carbonates precipitated by using salts and allowing CO2 to passively degas produce a shallow calibration slope that we hypothesize to approach isotopic equilibrium. Precipitation methods that bubble CO2 into solution then degas that CO2 (either passively or actively by bubbling N2) produce carbonates with consistently lower Δ47 and higher δ18O values for a given growth temperature. We infer that these carbonates grew in disequilibrium during rapid CO2 degassing. Varying acid digestion temperature does not change the results; acid fractionation factor is not correlated with grain size, Δ47, or d47 values. No precipitation method produces a steep calibration slope. Our large sample set of >60 carbonates lend confidence to a shallow slope calibration, and inform interpretations of Δ47 and δ18O values of natural carbonates that grow under conditions of isotopic disequilibrium.

  11. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates.

    PubMed

    Izac, Marie; Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis; Lindley, Nic D

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium's growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports.

  12. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  13. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: Implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Cao, Fang; Lee, Meehye

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls, and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C values of particle phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly larger than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors. The values are consistently less negative in oxalic acid (C2, average -14.1‰), glyoxylic acid (-13.8‰), pyruvic acid (-19.4‰), glyoxal (-13.5‰), and methylglyoxal (-18.6‰) compared to other organic species (e.g., palmitic acid, -26.3‰), which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during atmospheric oxidation of pre-aged precursors (e.g., isoprene) and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after the evaporation of clouds or wet aerosols. The δ13C values of C2 is positively correlated with C2 to organic carbon ratio, indicating that photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation during long-range atmospheric transport. The isotopic results also suggest that aqueous phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a major formation process of oxalic acid via the intermediates such as glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photochemically aged in the western North Pacific rim.

  14. Preparation of a novel carbon-based solid acid from cassava stillage residue and its use for the esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingtao; Dong, Xiuqin; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Zhang, Minhua

    2014-04-01

    A novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of incompletely carbonized cassava stillage residue (CSR) with concentrated sulfuric acid, and employed to catalyze the esterification of methanol and free fatty acids (FFAs) in waste cooking oil (WCO). The effects of the carbonization and the sulfonation temperatures on the pore structure, acid density and catalytic activity of the CSR-derived catalysts were systematically investigated. Low temperature carbonization and high temperature sulfonation can cause the collapse of the carbon framework, while high temperature carbonization is not conducive to the attachment of SO3H groups on the surface. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity for esterification, and the acid value for WCO is reduced to below 2mg KOH/g after reaction. The activity of catalyst can be well maintained after five cycles. CSR can be considered a promising raw material for the production of a new eco-friendly solid acid catalyst.

  15. [Dynamics of blood gases and acid-base balance in patients with carbon monoxide acute poisoning].

    PubMed

    Polozova, E V; Shilov, V V; Bogachova, A S; Davydova, E V

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of blood gases and acid-base balance covered patients with carbon monoxide acute poisoning, in accordance with inhalation trauma presence. Evidence is that thermochemical injury of respiratory tract induced severe acid-base dysbalance remaining decompensated for a long time despite the treatment.

  16. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  17. Differing Daphnia magna assimilation efficiencies for terrestrial, bacterial, and algal carbon and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Taipale, Sami J; Brett, Michael T; Hahn, Martin W; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Yeung, Sean; Hiltunen, Minna; Strandberg, Ursula; Kankaala, Paula

    2014-02-01

    There is considerable interest in the pathways by which carbon and growth-limiting elemental and biochemical nutrients are supplied to upper trophic levels. Fatty acids and sterols are among the most important molecules transferred across the plant-animal interface of food webs. In lake ecosystems, in addition to phytoplankton, bacteria and terrestrial organic matter are potential trophic resources for zooplankton, especially in those receiving high terrestrial organic matter inputs. We therefore tested carbon, nitrogen, and fatty acid assimilation by the crustacean Daphnia magna when consuming these resources. We fed Daphnia with monospecific diets of high-quality (Cryptomonas marssonii) and intermediate-quality (Chlamydomonas sp. and Scenedesmus gracilis) phytoplankton species, two heterotrophic bacterial strains, and particles from the globally dispersed riparian grass, Phragmites australis, representing terrestrial particulate organic carbon (t-POC). We also fed Daphnia with various mixed diets, and compared Daphnia fatty acid, carbon, and nitrogen assimilation across treatments. Our results suggest that bacteria were nutritionally inadequate diets because they lacked sterols and polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 (omega-3 and omega-6) fatty acids (PUFAs). However, Daphnia were able to effectively use carbon and nitrogen from Actinobacteria, if their basal needs for essential fatty acids and sterols were met by phytoplankton. In contrast to bacteria, t-POC contained sterols and omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, but only at 22%, 1.4%, and 0.2% of phytoplankton levels, respectively, which indicated that t-POC food quality was especially restricted with regard to omega-3 PUFAs. Our results also showed higher assimilation of carbon than fatty acids from t-POC and bacteria into Daphnia, based on stable-isotope and fatty acids analysis, respectively. A relatively high (>20%) assimilation of carbon and fatty acids from t-POC was observed only when the proportion of t

  18. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA.

  19. Flexible and Conducting Carbon Nanofibers Obtained from Electrospun Polyacrylonitrile/Phosphoric Acid Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Baek Ho; Nirmala, R; Navamathavan, R; Kim, Hak Yong

    2016-01-01

    We report on the feasible synthesis of flexible and conductive carbon nanofibers by electrospinning process using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and phosphoric acid (PA) as precursors. The carbon nanofibers were subsequently obtained by stabilization and carbonization of the electrospun PAN nanofibers. From SEM data, it was found that the electrospun PAN nanofibers showed a smooth surface and had an average diameter of approximately 200 nm. Afterwards, the electrospun PAN nanofibers were stabilized at 250 °C and heated at 900 °C for the carbonization process to obtain the carbon nanofibers. The carbonized PAN nanofibers exhibited a drastic improvement of electrical conduction. From Raman spectroscopy data, it was found that the carbonization at 900 °C gave a decrease of the intensity ratio of D and G peaks, indicating higher graphitic structure. PMID:27398565

  20. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  1. Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of Retreatment Tuberculosis Patients in Benin.

    PubMed

    Ade, Serge; Adjibodé, Omer; Wachinou, Prudence; Toundoh, Narcisse; Awanou, Bérénice; Agodokpessi, Gildas; Affolabi, Dissou; Adè, Gabriel; Harries, Anthony D; Anagonou, Séverin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine among retreatment tuberculosis patients in Benin baseline characteristics, culture, and drug sensitivity testing (DST) results and treatment outcomes. Materials and Methods. A retrospective national cohort study of all retreatment tuberculosis patients in Benin in 2013 using registers and treatment cards. Results. Of 3957 patients with tuberculosis, 241 (6%) were retreatment cases. Compared to new pulmonary bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (NPBCT) patients, there were significantly higher numbers of males (P = 0.04), patients from "Atlantique-Littoral" (P = 0.006), patients aged 45-64 years (P = 0.007), and HIV-positive patients (P = 0.04) among those retreated. Overall, 171 (71%) patients submitted sputum for DST, of whom (163) 95% were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Xpert MTB/RIF and/or culture and 17 (10%) were rifampicin resistant (9 with MDR-TB and 8 monoresistant to rifampicin). For those without MDR-TB (n = 224), treatment success was 93%. Worse outcomes occurred in those with unknown HIV status (RR: 0.27; 0.05-1.45; P < 0.01) while better outcomes occurred in those who relapsed (RR: 1.06, 95 CI: 1.02-1.10, P = 0.04). Conclusion. In 2013, a high proportion of retreatment patients received DST. Treatment success was good although more needs to be done to systematically increase the final follow-up smear examination. Reasons of high losses to follow-up from "Oueme-Plateau" should be investigated. PMID:27110400

  2. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids, α-dicarbonyls, and fatty acids: implications for atmospheric processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Cao, F.; Lee, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) were measured for 23 individual organic species including 9 dicarboxylic acids, 7 oxocarboxylic acids, 1 tricarboxylic acid, 2 α-dicarbonyls and 4 fatty acids in the aerosols from Gosan background site in East Asia. δ13C of particle-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal are significantly higher than those previously reported for isoprene and other precursors, associated with isotope fractionation during atmospheric oxidation. 13C is consistently more enriched for oxalic acid (C2), glyoxylic acid, pyruvic acid, glyoxal and methylglyoxal compared to other organic compounds identified, which can be explained by the kinetic isotope effects during aqueous-phase processing and the subsequent gas-particle partitioning after clouds or wet aerosols evaporation δ13C of C2 is positively correlated with C2 and organic carbon ratio, indicating that a photochemical production of C2 is more pronounced than its degradation process during long-range transport. The 13C results also suggest that aqueous-phase oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal is major formation process of oxalic acid production via the major intermediates glyoxylic acid and pyruvic acid. This study provides evidence that organic aerosols are intensively photo-chemically aged in this region.

  3. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Svendsen, Winnie E.; Rozlosnik, Noemi; Boisen, Anja; Martínez, Fernando

    2013-03-01

    This Letter involved the preparation of a conjugate between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid that was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple 'one pot' synthesis method. Subsequently, the conjugate was investigated by a computational hybrid method: our own N-layered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6-31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid conjugate presented herein is believed to lead the way to new potential applications as carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems.

  4. Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres and their acid catalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hui; Zhang, Jianming; Zhang, Yuxiao; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang

    2013-10-01

    Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres bearing sulfonic acid groups (MPCS-SO3H) were prepared by incomplete carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by sulfonation and removal of the template. The composition and porous structure of the obtained carbon spheres were investigated by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. The catalytic properties of the MPCS-SO3H were evaluated by esterification of ethanol with acetic acid, indicating that MPCS-SO3H possess remarkable catalytic performance (high stability and acid catalytic ability) for the esterification.

  5. X-ray microtomography of hydrochloric acid propagation in carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Oliveira, T J L; Cruz, F B; Lopes, R T; Lima, I

    2015-02-01

    Acid treatments are used in the oil and gas industry, to increase the permeability of the carbonate reservoirs by creating preferential channels, called wormholes. Channels formation is strongly influenced by acid type and injection rate. The aim of this study is to evaluate some characteristics of the microporous system of carbonate rocks, before and after acidizing. For that purpose X-ray high-resolution microtomography was used. The results show that this technique can be used as a reliable method to analyze microstructural characteristics of the wormholes.

  6. Forest floor leaching: contributions from mineral, organic, and carbonic acids in new hampshire subalpine forests.

    PubMed

    Cronan, C S; Reiners, W A; Reynolds, R C; Lang, G E

    1978-04-21

    Analyses of soil water and groundwater samples from a high-elevation coniferous ecosystem in New England indicate that sulfate anions supply 76 percent of the electrical charge balance in the leaching solution. This result implies that atmospheric inputs of sulfuric acid provide the dominant source of both H(+) for cation replacement and mobile anions for cation transport in subalpine soils of the northeastern region affected by acid precipitation. In soils of relatively unpolluted regions, carbonic and organic acids dominate the leaching processes.

  7. Porous structure and surface chemistry of phosphoric acid activated carbon from corncob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, N. V.; Trofymenko, S. I.; Poddubnaya, O. I.; Tsyba, M. M.; Sapsay, V. I.; Klymchuk, D. O.; Puziy, A. M.

    2012-11-01

    Active carbons have been prepared from corncob using chemical activation with phosphoric acid at 400 °C using varied ratio of impregnation (RI). Porous structure of carbons was characterized by nitrogen adsorption and scanning electron microscopy. Surface chemistry was studied by IR and potentiometric titration method. It has been shown that porosity development was peaked at RI = 1.0 (SBET = 2081 m2/g, Vtot = 1.1 cm3/g), while maximum amount of acid surface groups was observed at RI = 1.25. Acid surface groups of phosphoric acid activated carbons from corncob includes phosphate and strongly acidic carboxylic (pK = 2.0-2.6), weakly acidic carboxylic (pK = 4.7-5.0), enol/lactone (pK = 6.7-7.4; 8.8-9.4) and phenol (pK = 10.1-10.7). Corncob derived carbons showed high adsorption capacity to copper, especially at low pH. Maximum adsorption of methylene blue and iodine was observed for carbon with most developed porosity (RI = 1.0).

  8. A comparative study of solid carbon acid catalysts for the esterification of free fatty acids for biodiesel production. Evidence for the leaching of colloidal carbon.

    PubMed

    Deshmane, Chinmay A; Wright, Marcus W; Lachgar, Abdessadek; Rohlfing, Matthew; Liu, Zhening; Le, James; Hanson, Brian E

    2013-11-01

    The preparation of a variety of sulfonated carbons and their use in the esterification of oleic acid is reported. All sulfonated materials show some loss in activity associated with the leaching of active sites. Exhaustive leaching shows that a finite amount of activity is lost from the carbons in the form of colloids. Fully leached catalysts show no loss in activity upon recycling. The best catalysts; 1, 3, and 6; show initial TOFs of 0.07 s(-1), 0.05 s(-1), and 0.14 s(-1), respectively. These compare favorably with literature values. Significantly, the leachate solutions obtained from catalysts 1, 3, and 6, also show excellent esterification activity. The results of TEM and catalyst poisoning experiments on the leachate solutions associate the catalytic activity of these solutions with carbon colloids. This mechanism for leaching active sites from sulfonated carbons is previously unrecognized.

  9. Development of poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) composites for calcium carbonate and sulphate scale inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mithil Kumar, N; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Jagadeesh, Dani; Kanny, K; Bux, F

    2015-01-01

    Polyaspartic acid (PSI) is suitable for the inhibition of inorganic scale deposition. To enhance its scale inhibition efficiency, PSI was modified by reacting aspartic acid with malic acid (MA) using thermal polycondensation polymerization. This reaction resulted in poly(aspartic acid-co-malic acid) (PSI-co-MA) dual polymer. The structural, chemical and thermal properties of the dual polymers were analysed by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography. The effectiveness of six different molar ratios of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate scale inhibition at laboratory scale batch experiments was evaluated with synthetic brine solution at selected doses of polymer at 65-70°C by the static scale test method. The performance of PSI-co-MA dual polymer for the inhibition of calcium carbonate and calcium sulphate precipitation was compared with that of a PSI single polymer. The PSI-co-MA exhibited excellent ability to control inorganic minerals, with approximately 85.36% calcium carbonate inhibition and 100% calcium sulphate inhibition at a level of 10 mg/L PSI-co-MA, respectively. Therefore, it may be reasonably concluded that PSI-co-MA is a highly effective scale inhibitor for cooling water treatment applications.

  10. Adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids by carbonaceous adsorbents: Effect of carbon surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption by carbonaceous sorbents is among the most feasible processes to remove perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) from drinking and ground waters. However, carbon surface chemistry, which has long been recognized essential for dictating performance of such sorbents, has never been considered for PFOS and PFOA adsorption. Thus, the role of surface chemistry was systematically investigated using sorbents with a wide range in precursor material, pore structure, and surface chemistry. Sorbent surface chemistry overwhelmed physical properties in controlling the extent of uptake. The adsorption affinity was positively correlated carbon surface basicity, suggesting that high acid neutralizing or anion exchange capacity was critical for substantial uptake of PFOS and PFOA. Carbon polarity or hydrophobicity had insignificant impact on the extent of adsorption. Synthetic polymer-based Ambersorb and activated carbon fibers were more effective than activated carbon made of natural materials in removing PFOS and PFOA from aqueous solutions.

  11. Surface enhanced Raman spectra of carbonate, hydrocarbonate, and substituted acetic acids on silver hydrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Sun; Chaozhi, Wan; Guangzhi, Xu

    1989-01-01

    The SERS spectra of carbonate, hydrocarbonate and several substituted acetic acids absorbed on silver hydrosols are recorded. The greatest enhancement of E' modes is shown in the spectrum of carbonate, from which the carbonate is deduced to be absorbed in an "end on" configuration, rather than flat on the surface. The spectrum of the hydrocarbonate solution shows the most enhanced bands at about 925 and 620 cm -1, which cannot be explained clearly. All the substituted acids have a most enhanced bands at about 1630 cm -1, revealing that the acids are initially adsorbed in a single bonding state through the carboxyl group. The change in the SERS spectra of the acids with time indicates that a bidentate bridging adsorbed state may be formed after some time.

  12. Metabolic carbon fluxes and biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates in Ralstonia eutropha on short chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Si, Yingtao

    2004-01-01

    Short chain fatty acids such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids can be synthesized into polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by Ralstonia eutropha. Metabolic carbon fluxes of the acids in living cells have significant effect on the yield, composition, and thermomechanical properties of PHA bioplastics. Based on the general knowledge of central metabolism pathways and the unusual metabolic pathways in R. eutropha, a metabolic network of 41 bioreactions is constructed to analyze the carbon fluxes on utilization of the short chain fatty acids. In fed-batch cultures with constant feeding of acid media, carbon metabolism and distribution in R. eutropha were measured involving CO2, PHA biopolymers, and residual cell mass. As the cells underwent unsteady state metabolism and PHA biosynthesis under nitrogen-limited conditions, accumulative carbon balance was applied for pseudo-steady-state analysis of the metabolic carbon fluxes. Cofactor NADP/NADPH balanced between PHA synthesis and the C3/C4 pathway provided an independent constraint for solution of the underdetermined metabolic network. A major portion of propionyl-CoA was directed to pyruvate via the 2-methylcitrate cycle and further decarboxylated to acetyl-CoA. Only a small amount of propionate carbon (<15% carbon) was directly condensed with acetyl-CoA for 3-hydroxyvalerate. The ratio of glyoxylate shunt to TCA cycle varies from 0 to 0.25, depending on the intracellular acetyl-CoA level and acetic acid in the medium. Malate is the node of the C3/C4 pathway and TCA cycle and its decarboxylation to dehydrogenation ranges from 0.33 to 1.28 in response to the demands on NADPH and oxaloacetate for short chain fatty acids utilization. PMID:15296425

  13. Endodontic retreatment in case of failure. Case report.

    PubMed

    Mărgărit, Ruxandra; Andrei, Oana Celia

    2011-01-01

    In medical practice, clinicians come across an increased number of endodontic treatments, which, like other dental treatments, can fail. The increase in the number of endodontic treatment resulted in an increased number of failures, their management raising complex and serious endodontic problems. The endodontic retreatment of a failure is required by the increased desire to preserve the tooth on the dental arch, thus preventing the need for dental extraction that may have adverse consequences in terms of functional and psychological effect on patients. This article presents two clinical cases that required endodontic retreatment in order to avoid the complications that could ultimately require tooth extraction. The teeth in question (a mandibular first molar and an upper central incisor) having a special importance, and a physiognomic role, the endodontic retreatment consisted in covering them in porcelain fused to the metal crowns. PMID:22046813

  14. Ocean forcing of glacier retreat in the western Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. J.; Holland, P. R.; Meredith, M. P.; Murray, T.; Luckman, A.; Vaughan, D. G.

    2016-07-01

    In recent decades, hundreds of glaciers draining the Antarctic Peninsula (63° to 70°S) have undergone systematic and progressive change. These changes are widely attributed to rapid increases in regional surface air temperature, but it is now clear that this cannot be the sole driver. Here, we identify a strong correspondence between mid-depth ocean temperatures and glacier-front changes along the ~1000-kilometer western coastline. In the south, glaciers that terminate in warm Circumpolar Deep Water have undergone considerable retreat, whereas those in the far northwest, which terminate in cooler waters, have not. Furthermore, a mid-ocean warming since the 1990s in the south is coincident with widespread acceleration of glacier retreat. We conclude that changes in ocean-induced melting are the primary cause of retreat for glaciers in this region.

  15. Ocean forcing of glacier retreat in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Cook, A J; Holland, P R; Meredith, M P; Murray, T; Luckman, A; Vaughan, D G

    2016-07-15

    In recent decades, hundreds of glaciers draining the Antarctic Peninsula (63° to 70°S) have undergone systematic and progressive change. These changes are widely attributed to rapid increases in regional surface air temperature, but it is now clear that this cannot be the sole driver. Here, we identify a strong correspondence between mid-depth ocean temperatures and glacier-front changes along the ~1000-kilometer western coastline. In the south, glaciers that terminate in warm Circumpolar Deep Water have undergone considerable retreat, whereas those in the far northwest, which terminate in cooler waters, have not. Furthermore, a mid-ocean warming since the 1990s in the south is coincident with widespread acceleration of glacier retreat. We conclude that changes in ocean-induced melting are the primary cause of retreat for glaciers in this region. PMID:27418507

  16. [Study on solid dispersion of precipitated calcium carbonate-based oleanolic acid].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-mei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Jia, Xiao-bin; Jiang, Yan-rong; Sun, E

    2015-05-01

    Oleanolic acid-precipitated calcium carbonate solid dispersion was prepared by using solvent evaporation method. The microscopic structure and physicochemical properties of solid dispersion were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). And its in vitro release also was investigated. The properties of the precipitated calcium carbonate was studied which was as a carrier of oleanolic acid solid dispersion. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis suggested that oleanolic acid may be present in solid dispersion as amorphous substance. The in vitro release determination results of oleanolic acid-precipitated calcium carbonate (1: 5) solid dispersion showed accumulated dissolution rate of.oleanolic acid was up to 90% at 45 min. Accelerating experiment showed that content and in vitro dissolution of oleanolic acid solid dispersion did not change after storing over 6 months. The results indicated that in vitro dissolution of oleanolic acid was improved greatly by the solid dispersion with precipitated calcium carbonate as a carrier. The solid dispersion is a stabilizing system which has actual applied value.

  17. Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D.; Gibson, S.I.

    2000-10-01

    Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.

  18. Effects of simulated acid precipitation on decomposition and leaching of organic carbon in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Alexander, M.

    1984-09-01

    Soil samples from three watersheds of New York State were treated with simulated rain at pH 3.5, 4.1, and 5.6 daily for 14 d, at 12 3-d intervals in three separate tests, or at 22 7-d intervals. Except for one system of treating the three forest soils, simulated acid rain reduced the amount of organic matter leached from samples of soil from which more than 0.05% of the organic carbon was leached during the exposure period. In the soil samples representing the exceptions, acid rain enhanced the leaching of organic matter. Samples from the organic layer of the treated samples of acid soil were taken at two equal depths, and the rates of organic matter decomposition in the two layers were studied. As compared with simulated rain at pH 5.6, simulated acid rain reduced the decomposition of organic matter in the three soils at both depths in three of the five tests and at both depths of two of the soils in the fourth test. In some instances, organic matter decomposition was enhanced by the simulated acid rain. Except for the sample of soil at the highest initial pH, carbon mineralization was inhibited in soils and treatments in which simulated acid rain reduced the amount of organic carbon leached, and it was stimulated in soils and treatments in which the quantity of organic carbon leached was increased by the simulated acid rain. 12 references, 3 figures, 8 tables.

  19. Comparison of the amount of apical debris extrusion associated with different retreatment systems and supplementary file application during retreatment process

    PubMed Central

    Çiçek, Ersan; Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Koçak, Sibel; Sağlam, Baran Can

    2016-01-01

    Background: The type of instrument affects the amount of debris extruded. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of retreatment systems and supplementary file application on the amount of apical debris extrusion. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight extracted mandibular premolars with a single canal and similar length were selected. The root canals were prepared with the ProTaper Universal system with a torque-controlled engine. The root canals were dried and were obturated using Gutta-percha and sealer. The specimens were randomly divided into four equal groups according to the retreatment procedures (Group 1, Mtwo retreatment files; Group 2, Mtwo retreatment files + Mtwo rotary file #30 supplementary file; Group 3, ProTaper Universal retreatment (PTUR) files; and Group 4, PTUR files + ProTaper F3 supplementary file). The extruded debris during instrumentation were collected into preweighed Eppendorf tubes. The amount of apically extruded debris was calculated by subtracting the initial weight of the tube from the final weight. Three consecutive weights were obtained for each tube. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in the amount of apically extruded debris between Groups 1 and 3 (P = 0.590). A significant difference was observed between Groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.05), and between Groups 3 and 4 (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The use of supplementary file significantly increased the amount of apically extruded debris. PMID:27563185

  20. In vitro toxicity of carbon nanotubes, nano-graphite and carbon black, similar impacts of acid functionalization.

    PubMed

    Figarol, Agathe; Pourchez, Jérémie; Boudard, Delphine; Forest, Valérie; Akono, Céline; Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Jean-Pierre; Cottier, Michèle; Bernache-Assollant, Didier; Grosseau, Philippe

    2015-12-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nano-graphite (NG) are graphene-based nanomaterials which share exceptional physicochemical properties, but whose health impacts are unfortunately still not well understood. On the other hand, carbon black (CB) is a conventional and widely studied material. The comparison of these three carbon-based nanomaterials is thus of great interest to improve our understanding of their toxicity. An acid functionalization was carried out on CNT, NG and CB so that, after a thorough characterization, their impacts on RAW 264.7 macrophages could be compared for a similar surface chemistry (15 to 120 μg·mL(-1) nanomaterials, 90-min to 24-h contact). Functionalized nanomaterials triggered a weak cytotoxicity similar to the pristine nanomaterials. Acid functionalization increased the pro-inflammatory response except for CB which did not trigger any TNF-α production before or after functionalization, and seemed to strongly decrease the oxidative stress. The toxicological impact of acid functionalization appeared thus to follow a similar trend whatever the carbon-based nanomaterial. At equivalent dose expressed in surface and equivalent surface chemistry, the toxicological responses from murine macrophages to NG were higher than for CNT and CB. It seemed to correspond to the hypothesis of a platelet and fiber paradigm.

  1. Quantifying global warming from the retreat of glaciers

    SciTech Connect

    Oerlemans, J. )

    1994-04-08

    Records of glacier fluctuations compiled by the World Glacier Monitoring Service can be used to derive an independent estimate of global warming during the last 100 years. Records of different glaciers are made comparable by a two-step scaling procedure; one allowing for differences in glacier geometry, the other for differences in climate sensitivity. The retreat of glaciers during the last 100 years appears to be coherent over the globe. On the basis of modeling of the climate sensitivity of glaciers, the observed glacier retreat can be explained by a linear warming trend of 0.66 kelvin per century.

  2. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF-carbon

  3. Influence of Sodium Carbonate on Decomposition of Formic Acid by Discharge inside Bubble in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2015-09-01

    An influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubble in water was investigated. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of addition of sodium carbonate, the pH value increased with decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the increase of pH value contributed to improve an efficiency of the formic acid decomposition because the reaction rate of ozone and formic acid increased with increasing pH value. In the case of argon injection, the decomposition rate was not affected by the pH value owing to the high rate constants for loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  4. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  5. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A.; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-06-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%.

  6. Catalytic Decarboxylation of Fatty Acids to Aviation Fuels over Nickel Supported on Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianghua; Shi, Juanjuan; Fu, Jie; Leidl, Jamie A; Hou, Zhaoyin; Lu, Xiuyang

    2016-01-01

    Decarboxylation of fatty acids over non-noble metal catalysts without added hydrogen was studied. Ni/C catalysts were prepared and exhibited excellent activity and maintenance for decarboxylation. Thereafter, the effects of nickel loading, catalyst loading, temperature, and carbon number on the decarboxylation of fatty acids were investigated. The results indicate that the products of cracking increased with high nickel loading or catalyst loading. Temperature significantly impacted the conversion of stearic acid but did not influence the selectivity. The fatty acids with large carbon numbers tend to be cracked in this reaction system. Stearic acid can be completely converted at 370 °C for 5 h, and the selectivity to heptadecane was around 80%. PMID:27292280

  7. Chemical and biological consequences of using carbon dioxide versus acid additions in ocean acidification experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; DuFore, Christopher M.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Use of different approaches for manipulating seawater chemistry during ocean acidification experiments has confounded comparison of results from various experimental studies. Some of these discrepancies have been attributed to whether addition of acid (such as hydrochloric acid, HCl) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used to adjust carbonate system parameters. Experimental simulations of carbonate system parameter scenarios for the years 1766, 2007, and 2100 were performed using the carbonate speciation program CO2SYS to demonstrate the variation in seawater chemistry that can result from use of these approaches. Results showed that carbonate system parameters were 3 percent and 8 percent lower than target values in closed-system acid additions, and 1 percent and 5 percent higher in closed-system CO2 additions for the 2007 and 2100 simulations, respectively. Open-system simulations showed that carbonate system parameters can deviate by up to 52 percent to 70 percent from target values in both acid addition and CO2 addition experiments. Results from simulations for the year 2100 were applied to empirically derived equations that relate biogenic calcification to carbonate system parameters for calcifying marine organisms including coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera. Calculated calcification rates for coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera differed from rates at target conditions by 0.5 percent to 2.5 percent in closed-system CO2 gas additions, from 0.8 percent to 15 percent in the closed-system acid additions, from 4.8 percent to 94 percent in open-system acid additions, and from 7 percent to 142 percent in open-system CO2 additions.

  8. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Binbin Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  9. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of mesoporous activated carbon with acidic groups].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Zhang, Yu-Xuan

    2013-06-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons containing acidic groups were prepared with cotton stalk based fiber as raw materials and H3PO4 as activating agent by one step carbonization method. Effects of impregnation ratio, carbonization temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition, oxygen-containing acid functional groups and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The adsorption capacity of the prepared activated carbon AC-01 for p-nitroaniline and Pb(II) was studied, and the adsorption mechanism was also suggested according to the equilibrium experimental results. The maximum yield of activated carbons prepared from cotton stalk fiber reached 35.5% when the maximum mesoporous volume and BET surface area were 1.39 cm3 x g(-1) and 1 731 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The activated carbon AC-01 prepared under a H3 PO4/precursor ratio of 3:2 and activated at 900 degrees C for 90 min had a total pore volume of 1.02 cm3 x g(-1), a micoporous ratio of 31%, and a mesoporous ratio of 65%. The pore diameter of the mesoporous activated carbon was mainly distributed in the range of 2-5 nm. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of Pb(II) and p-nitroaniline on cotton stalk fiber activated carbon were 123 mg x g(-1) and 427 mg x g(-1), respectively, which were both higher than those for commercial activated carbon fiber ACF-CK. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data showed that mesopore and oxygen-containing acid functional groups played an important role in the adsorption. PMID:23947073

  10. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VIII. The Role of Malic Acid

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bassham, James A.; Benson, Andrew A.; Calvin, Melvin

    1950-01-25

    Malonate has been found to inhibit the formation of malic acid during short periods of photosynthesis with radioactive carbon dioxide. This result, together with studies which show the photosynthetic cycle to be operating normally at the same time, indicates that malic acid is not an intermediate in photosynthesis but is probably closely related to some intermediate of the cycle. Absence of labeled succinic and fumaric acids in these experiments, in addition to the failure of malonate to inhibit photosynthesis, precludes the participation of these acids as intermediates in photosynthesis.

  11. Carbonic acid as a reserve of carbon dioxide on icy moons: The formation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in a polar environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-06-20

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) has been detected on the surface of several icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn via observation of the ν{sub 3} band with the Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Galileo spacecraft and the Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on board the Cassini spacecraft. Interestingly, the CO{sub 2} band for several of these moons exhibits a blueshift along with a broader profile than that seen in laboratory studies and other astrophysical environments. As such, numerous attempts have been made in order to clarify this abnormal behavior; however, it currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. We present a rather surprising result pertaining to the synthesis of carbon dioxide in a polar environment. Here, carbonic acid was synthesized in a water (H{sub 2}O)-carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) (1:5) ice mixture exposed to ionizing radiation in the form of 5 keV electrons. The irradiated ice mixture was then annealed, producing pure carbonic acid which was then subsequently irradiated, recycling water and carbon dioxide. However, the observed carbon dioxide ν{sub 3} band matches almost exactly with that observed on Callisto; subsequent temperature program desorption studies reveal that carbon dioxide synthesized under these conditions remains in solid form until 160 K, i.e., the sublimation temperature of water. Consequently, our results suggest that carbon dioxide on Callisto as well as other icy moons is indeed complexed with water rationalizing the shift in peak frequency, broad profile, and the solid state existence on these relatively warm moons.

  12. Sulfuric acid as an agent of carbonate weathering constrained by δ13C DIC: Examples from Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Liang; Calmels, Damien; Han, Guilin; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2008-06-01

    Rock weathering by carbonic acid is thought to play an important role in the global carbon cycle because it can geologically sequestrate atmospheric CO 2. Current model of carbon cycle evolution usually assumes that carbonic acid is the major weathering agent and that other acids are not important. Here, we use carbon isotopic evidence and water chemistry of springs and rivers from the Beipanjiang River basin (Guizhou Province, Southwest China) to demonstrate that sulfuric acid is also an important agent of rock weathering. The δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the water samples ranges from - 13.1‰ to - 2.4‰, and correlates negatively to [HCO 3-]/([Ca 2+] + [Mg 2+]) ratios and positively to [SO 42-]/([Ca 2+] + [Mg 2+]) ratios. These relationships are interpreted as mixing diagrams between two reactions of carbonate weathering, using carbonic acid and sulfuric acid as a proton donor, respectively. Mixing proportions show that around 42% of the divalent cations in the spring water from Guizhou are originated from the interaction between carbonate minerals and sulfuric acid. It is shown that 40% of this sulfuric acid is derived from the atmosphere and has an anthropogenic origin. The remaining 60% are derived from the oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals in sedimentary rocks. Our results show the positive action of sulfuric acid on the chemical weathering of carbonate. Particularly, we show that sulfuric acid generated by coal combustion has increased by almost 20% the weathering rates of carbonate in Southwest China. This is a clear evidence that human activities are changing the weathering rates of rocks and demonstrates a negative feedback on the acidification of the ocean by greenhouse gases. Because of the involvement of sulfuric acid in weathering reactions, 63% of the alkalinity exported by rivers is derived from carbonate, instead of 50% when atmospheric CO 2 is the only acid involved in chemical weathering of carbonate. In the Guizhou

  13. Formation of Carbonic Acid in Impact of CO2 on Ice and Water.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, Barak; Gerber, R Benny

    2016-08-01

    A new mode of formation is proposed for carbonic acid in the atmosphere. It involves impact of vibrationally excited gas-phase CO2 molecules on water or ice particles. This is a first mechanism that supports formation on ice as well as on liquid water surfaces. Results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are presented on collisions of CO2 with (H2O)n clusters (n = 1, 4, 8, 12). Efficient formation of carbonic acid is seen with product lifetimes exceeding 100 ps. The reaction is feasible even for collision of CO2 with a single water molecule but in a different mechanism than for larger clusters. For clusters, the transition state shows charge separation into H3O(+)···HCO3(-), which transforms into neutral carbonic acid as the product, hydrated by the remaining waters. Possible atmospheric implications of the results are discussed. PMID:27420400

  14. Carbon isotope composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids from Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, G.; Blair, N.; Des Marais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon isotopic compositions have been measured for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids from the Murchison meteorite, a C2 carbonaceous chondrite which fell in Australia in 1969. With few exceptions, notably benzene, the volatile products are substantially isotopically heavier than their terrestrial counterparts, signifying their extraterrestrial origin. For both classes of compounds, the ratio of C-13 to C-12 decreases with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic ratio than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with the kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues from lower ones. The results suggest the possibility that the production mechanisms for hydrocarbons and carboxylic acids may be similar, and impose constraints on the identity of the reactant species.

  15. Formation of Carbonic Acid in Impact of CO2 on Ice and Water.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, Barak; Gerber, R Benny

    2016-08-01

    A new mode of formation is proposed for carbonic acid in the atmosphere. It involves impact of vibrationally excited gas-phase CO2 molecules on water or ice particles. This is a first mechanism that supports formation on ice as well as on liquid water surfaces. Results of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are presented on collisions of CO2 with (H2O)n clusters (n = 1, 4, 8, 12). Efficient formation of carbonic acid is seen with product lifetimes exceeding 100 ps. The reaction is feasible even for collision of CO2 with a single water molecule but in a different mechanism than for larger clusters. For clusters, the transition state shows charge separation into H3O(+)···HCO3(-), which transforms into neutral carbonic acid as the product, hydrated by the remaining waters. Possible atmospheric implications of the results are discussed.

  16. Dendrogeomorphic approach to estimating slope retreat, Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupp, Cliff R.; Carey, William P.

    1990-07-01

    A dendrogeomorphic study of slope retreat was conducted at the Maxey Flats nuclear-waste disposal site in northeastern Kentucky. Tree roots exposed by surface lowering were used as an indicator of ground surface at the time of germination. The amount of lowering was measured and divided by tree-ring-determined tree age. Surface lowering and slope degradation rates were estimated for three slopes below waste-burial trenches and compared with data obtained from sediment troughs and erosion frames at the site. Mean rates of slope retreat ranged from 1.92 to 3.16 mm/yr. Sediment-trough results are two to three orders of magnitude less than dendrogeomorphic and erosion-frame estimates of slope degradation, which suggests that piping and solution-weathering processes may be important in slope degradation. Slope aspect and declivity may be important factors affecting retreat of slopes with a uniform lithology. Dendrogeomorphic techniques provide results comparable to those in the literature and offer a rapid method for estimating slope retreat that integrates slope processes over many years.

  17. Partner Choice and the Differential Retreat from Marriage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Robert; Cheng, Yen-Hsin Alice

    2006-01-01

    The contemporary retreat from marriage in the United States has had a differential impact across socioeconomic and racial groups. Here, 1990 marriage rates and propensities for Virginia, North Carolina, and Wisconsin are analyzed regarding (a) the likelihood that persons in different groups ever marry and (b) patterns of partner choice with…

  18. Scientists Discover New Possibilities at Scientific Investigators Retreat | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; photos by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer Scientists who attended the 2015 NCI Intramural Scientific Investigators Retreat on Jan. 13 had a chance to discuss research results with other investigators from across the National Cancer Institute. And this year, they could also explore new possibilities for the future of their research.

  19. Promoting Writing for Research: The "Writing Retreat" Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Research papers take a long time to write and in an academic environment where the "publish or perish" clause applies, writing retreats are a way of creating time and space to write academic articles in a concentrated period of time. This article examines ways in which academics can write more articles for publication. In particular it focuses on…

  20. Jumpstarting Junior Faculty Motivation and Performance with Focused Writing Retreats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girardeau, Laura; Rud, A. G.; Trevisan, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty members are critical assets to universities, and large losses to institutions occur if they are not successful. Although institutions value publications and grants in the tenure process, newer professors receive little guidance in writing for these endeavors. Faculty writing retreats help apprentice professors in the craft of writing;…

  1. Exploring the Effectiveness of a Retreat Method for Extension Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worker, Steven M.; Hill, Russell D.; Miller, JoLynn C.; Go, Charles G.; Boyes, Rita J.

    2015-01-01

    The California 4-H Association hosted two retreats to support its members with goals of balancing professional development with intentional relationship building. Evaluations demonstrated that staff found the intentional balance of time spent in unstructured, semi-structured, and structured time offered opportunities to grow professionally while…

  2. Monodispersed Hollow SO3H-Functionalized Carbon/Silica as Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Esterification of Oleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Ding; Tan, Minghui; Jiang, Bo; Zheng, Jingtang; Tsubaki, Noritatsu; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-12-01

    SO3H-functionalized monodispersed hollow carbon/silica spheres (HS/C-SO3H) with primary mesopores were prepared with polystyrene as a template and p-toluenesulfonic acid (TsOH) as a carbon precursor and -SO3H source simultaneously. The physical and chemical properties of HS/C-SO3H were characterized by N2 adsorption, TEM, SEM, XPS, XRD, Raman spectrum, NH3-TPD, element analysis and acid-base titration techniques. As a solid acid catalyst, HS/C-SO3H shows excellent performance in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol, which is a crucial reaction in biodiesel production. The well-defined hollow architecture and enhanced active sites accessibility of HS/C-SO3H guarantee the highest catalytic performance compared with the catalysts prepared by activation of TsOH deposited on the ordered mesoporous silicas SBA-15 and MCM-41. At the optimized conditions, high conversion (96.9%) was achieved and no distinct activity drop was observed after 5 recycles. This synthesis strategy will provide a highly effective solid acid catalyst for green chemical processes.

  3. Monodispersed Hollow SO3H-Functionalized Carbon/Silica as Efficient Solid Acid Catalyst for Esterification of Oleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Ding; Tan, Minghui; Jiang, Bo; Zheng, Jingtang; Tsubaki, Noritatsu; Wu, Mingbo

    2015-12-01

    SO3H-functionalized monodispersed hollow carbon/silica spheres (HS/C-SO3H) with primary mesopores were prepared with polystyrene as a template and p-toluenesulfonic acid (TsOH) as a carbon precursor and -SO3H source simultaneously. The physical and chemical properties of HS/C-SO3H were characterized by N2 adsorption, TEM, SEM, XPS, XRD, Raman spectrum, NH3-TPD, element analysis and acid-base titration techniques. As a solid acid catalyst, HS/C-SO3H shows excellent performance in the esterification of oleic acid with methanol, which is a crucial reaction in biodiesel production. The well-defined hollow architecture and enhanced active sites accessibility of HS/C-SO3H guarantee the highest catalytic performance compared with the catalysts prepared by activation of TsOH deposited on the ordered mesoporous silicas SBA-15 and MCM-41. At the optimized conditions, high conversion (96.9%) was achieved and no distinct activity drop was observed after 5 recycles. This synthesis strategy will provide a highly effective solid acid catalyst for green chemical processes. PMID:26588826

  4. One-Pot synthesis of phosphorylated mesoporous carbon heterogeneous catalysts with tailored surface acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Mayes, Richard T; Bauer, Christopher; Wang, Xiqing; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Soft-templated phosphorylated mesoporous carbons with homogeneous distributions of phosphate groups were prepared by a 'one-pot' synthesis method using mixtures of phosphoric acid with hydrochloric, or nitric acids in the presence of Pluronic F127 triblock copolymer. Adjusting the various ratios of phosphoric acid used in these mixtures resulted in carbons with distinct adsorption, structural and surface acidity properties. The pore size distributions (PSDs) from nitrogen adsorption at -196 C showed that mesoporous carbons exhibit specific surface areas as high as 551 m{sup 2}/g and mesopores as large as 13 nm. Both structural ordering of the mesopores and the final phosphate contents were strongly dependent on the ratios of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in the synthesis gels, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The number of surface acid sites determined from temperature programmed desorption of ammonia (NH{sub 3}-TPD) were in the range of 0.3-1.5 mmol/g while the active surface areas are estimated to comprise 5-54% of the total surface areas. Finally, the conversion temperatures for the isopropanol dehydration were lowered by as much as 100 C by transitioning from the least acidic to the most acidic catalysts surface.

  5. An Examination of the Carbon Isotope Effects Associated with Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, James H.; O'Brien, Diane M.; Emerson, David; Sun, Henry; McDonald, Gene D.; Salgado, Antonio; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2006-12-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) were determined for alanine, proline, phenylalanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartate (aspartic acid and asparagine), glutamate (glutamic acid and glutamine), lysine, serine, glycine, and threonine from metabolically diverse microorganisms. The microorganisms examined included fermenting bacteria, organotrophic, chemolithotrophic, phototrophic, methylotrophic, methanogenic, acetogenic, acetotrophic, and naturally occurring cryptoendolithic communities from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. Here we demonstrated that reactions involved in amino acid biosynthesis can be used to distinguish amino acids formed by life from those formed by nonbiological processes. The unique patterns of δ13C imprinted by life on amino acids produced a biological bias. We also showed that, by applying discriminant function analysis to the δ13C value of a pool of amino acids formed by biological activity, it was possible to identify key aspects of intermediary carbon metabolism in the microbial world. In fact, microorganisms examined in this study could be placed within one of three metabolic groups: (1) heterotrophs that grow by oxidizing compounds containing three or more carbon-to-carbon bonds (fermenters and organotrophs), (2) autotrophs that grow by taking up carbon dioxide (chemolitotrophs and phototrophs), and (3) acetoclastic microbes that grow by assimilation of formaldehyde or acetate (methylotrophs, methanogens, acetogens, and acetotrophs). Furthermore, we demonstrated that cryptoendolithic communities from Antarctica grouped most closely with the autotrophs, which indicates that the dominant metabolic pathways in these communities are likely those utilized for CO2 fixation. We propose that this technique can be used to determine the dominant metabolic types in a community and reveal the overall flow of carbon in a complex ecosystem.

  6. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert I.; Thomson, Bruce C.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of rhizosphere soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h) and DNA (30 h) turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 days), while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) had the slowest turnover (42 days). PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings. PMID:25914679

  7. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous phytic acid for enhancing biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoyu; Miao, Yun; Ye, Pingping; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2014-04-01

    The poor dispersion of carbon based nanomaterials without strong acid pretreatment in aqueous solution is a fundamental problem, limiting its applications in biology-related fields. A good dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water was realized by 50 wt.% phytic acid (PA) solution. As an application case, the PA-MWCNTs dispersion in aqueous solution was used for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and its direct electrochemistry was realized. The constructed biosensor has a sound limit of detection, wide linear range, and high affinity for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as being free from interference of co-existing electro-active species.

  8. A microalgae residue based carbon solid acid catalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaobo; Li, Dianhong; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Yuanming; Huang, Weiya; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Chengwu

    2013-10-01

    Biodiesel production from microalgae is recognized as one of the best solutions to deal with the energy crisis issues. However, after the oil extraction from the microalgae, the microalgae residue was generally discarded or burned. Here a novel carbon-based solid acid catalyst derived from microalgae residue by in situ hydrothermal partially carbonization were synthesized. The obtained catalyst was characterized and subjected to both the esterification of oleic acid and transesterification of triglyceride to produce biodiesel. The catalyst showed high catalytic activity and can be regenerated while its activity can be well maintained after five cycles.

  9. Acetaldehyde stimulation of net gluconeogenic carbon movement from applied malic acid in tomato fruit pericarp tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Halinska, A.; Frenkel, C. )

    1991-03-01

    Applied acetaldehyde is known to lead to sugar accumulation in fruit including tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum) presumably due to stimulation of gluconeogenesis. This conjecture was examined using tomato fruit pericarp discs as a test system and applied l-(U-{sup 14}C)malic acid as the source for gluconeogenic carbon mobilization. Results indicate that malic and perhaps other organic acids are carbon sources for gluconeogenesis occurring normally in ripening tomatoes. The process is stimulated by acetaldehyde apparently by attenuating the fructose-2,6-biphosphate levels. The mode of the acetaldehyde regulation of fructose-2,6-biphosphate metabolism awaits clarification.

  10. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  11. Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of Retreatment Tuberculosis Patients in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Ade, Serge; Adjibodé, Omer; Wachinou, Prudence; Toundoh, Narcisse; Awanou, Bérénice; Agodokpessi, Gildas; Affolabi, Dissou; Adè, Gabriel; Harries, Anthony D.; Anagonou, Séverin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine among retreatment tuberculosis patients in Benin baseline characteristics, culture, and drug sensitivity testing (DST) results and treatment outcomes. Materials and Methods. A retrospective national cohort study of all retreatment tuberculosis patients in Benin in 2013 using registers and treatment cards. Results. Of 3957 patients with tuberculosis, 241 (6%) were retreatment cases. Compared to new pulmonary bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (NPBCT) patients, there were significantly higher numbers of males (P = 0.04), patients from “Atlantique-Littoral” (P = 0.006), patients aged 45–64 years (P = 0.007), and HIV-positive patients (P = 0.04) among those retreated. Overall, 171 (71%) patients submitted sputum for DST, of whom (163) 95% were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Xpert MTB/RIF and/or culture and 17 (10%) were rifampicin resistant (9 with MDR-TB and 8 monoresistant to rifampicin). For those without MDR-TB (n = 224), treatment success was 93%. Worse outcomes occurred in those with unknown HIV status (RR: 0.27; 0.05–1.45; P < 0.01) while better outcomes occurred in those who relapsed (RR: 1.06, 95 CI: 1.02–1.10, P = 0.04). Conclusion. In 2013, a high proportion of retreatment patients received DST. Treatment success was good although more needs to be done to systematically increase the final follow-up smear examination. Reasons of high losses to follow-up from “Oueme-Plateau” should be investigated. PMID:27110400

  12. Removal of free fatty acid in Palm Fatty Acid Distillate using sulfonated carbon catalyst derived from biomass wastefor biodiesel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi; Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the esterification of PFAD using the sulfonatedcoconut shell biochar catalyst was studied. Carbon solid catalysts were prepared by a sulfonation of carbonized coconut shells. The performances of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of the reaction temperatures, the molar ratios of methanol to PFAD, the catalyst loading and the reaction times. The reusability of the solid acid carbon catalysts was also studied in this work. The results indicated that the FFA conversion was significantly increased with increasing catalyst loading and reaction times. It can be concluded that the optimal conditions were an PFAD to methanol molar ratio of 1:12, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60oC.At this optimum condition, the conversion to biodieselreached 88%.

  13. Quantification and mass isotopomer profiling of α-keto acids in central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2014-03-18

    Mass spectrometry has been established as a powerful and versatile technique for studying cellular metabolism. Applications range from profiling of metabolites to accurate quantification and tracing of stable isotopes through the biochemical reaction network. Despite broad coverage of central carbon metabolism, most methods fail to provide accurate assessments of the α-keto acids oxaloacetic acid, pyruvate, and glyoxylate because these compounds are highly reactive and degraded during sample processing and mass spectrometric measurement. We present a derivatization procedure to chemically stabilize these compounds readily during quenching of cellular metabolism. Stable derivatives were analyzed by ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry to accurately quantify the abundance of α-keto acids in biological matrices. Eventually, we demonstrated that the developed protocol is suited to measure mass isotopomers of these α-keto acids in tracer studies with stable isotopes. In conclusion, the here described method fills one of the last technical gaps for metabolomics investigations of central carbon metabolism.

  14. Quantification and mass isotopomer profiling of α-keto acids in central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2014-03-18

    Mass spectrometry has been established as a powerful and versatile technique for studying cellular metabolism. Applications range from profiling of metabolites to accurate quantification and tracing of stable isotopes through the biochemical reaction network. Despite broad coverage of central carbon metabolism, most methods fail to provide accurate assessments of the α-keto acids oxaloacetic acid, pyruvate, and glyoxylate because these compounds are highly reactive and degraded during sample processing and mass spectrometric measurement. We present a derivatization procedure to chemically stabilize these compounds readily during quenching of cellular metabolism. Stable derivatives were analyzed by ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry to accurately quantify the abundance of α-keto acids in biological matrices. Eventually, we demonstrated that the developed protocol is suited to measure mass isotopomers of these α-keto acids in tracer studies with stable isotopes. In conclusion, the here described method fills one of the last technical gaps for metabolomics investigations of central carbon metabolism. PMID:24533614

  15. Highly efficient extraction of cellular nucleic acid associated proteins in vitro with magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Wei, Xiaoluan; Cheng, Kai; Liu, Fangjie; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-12-01

    Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) play the essential roles in gene regulation and protein expression. The global analysis of cellular NAaP would give a broad insight to understand the interaction between nucleic acids and the associated proteins, such as the important proteinous regulation factors on nucleic acids. Proteomic analysis presents a novel strategy to investigate a group of proteins. However, the large scale analysis of NAaP is yet impossible due to the lack of approaches to harvest target protein groups with a high efficiency. Herein, a simple and efficient method was developed to collect cellular NAaP using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes based on the strong interaction between carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids along with corresponding associated proteins. We found that the magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes demonstrated a nearly 100% extraction efficiency for intracellular nucleic acids from cells in vitro. Importantly, the proteins associated on nucleic acids could be highly efficiently harvested using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes due to the binding of NAaP on nucleic acids. 1594 groups of nuclear NAaP and 2595 groups of cellular NAaP were extracted and identified from about 1,000,000 cells, and 803 groups of NAaP were analyzed with only about 10,000 cells, showing a promising performance for the proteomic analysis of NAaP from minute cellular samples. This highly efficient extraction strategy for NAaP is a simple approach to identify cellular nucleic acid associated proteome, and we believed this strategy could be further applied in systems biology to understand the gene expression and regulation.

  16. The effect of lactic acid on anaerobic carbon or nitrogen limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Thomsson, Elisabeth; Larsson, Christer

    2006-07-01

    Weak organic acids are well-known metabolic effectors in yeast and other micro-organisms. High concentrations of lactic acid due to infection of lactic acid bacteria often occurs in combination with growth under nutrient-limiting conditions in industrial yeast fermentations. The effects of lactic acid on growth and product formation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied, with cells growing under carbon- or nitrogen-limiting conditions in anaerobic chemostat cultures (D=0.1 h(-1)) at pH values 3.25 and 5. It was shown that lactic acid in industrially relevant concentrations had a rather limited effect on the metabolism of S. cerevisiae. However, there was an effect on the energetic status of the cells, i.e. lactic acid addition provoked a reduction in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content of the cells. The decrease in ATP was not accompanied by a significant increase in the adenosine monophosphate levels.

  17. Effect of acid rain on calcium carbonate saturation in the Albemarle sound of North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, K.A.; Burgess, S.K.; Willey, J.D.; Kieber, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of acidic rainwater additions on calcium carbonate solubility and alkalinity in the poorly buffered, biologically active and commercially important waters of the Albemarle Sound, NC are reported. Samples collected monthly at four sites were analyzed for salinity, pK total alkalinity, and calcium concentrations. Five percent and 10% dilutions of sulfuric acid at pH 4, mimicking acid rain additions, were added and total alkalinity and calcium concentrations again determined. The addition of acid decreased the alkalinity in the Albemarle samples by as much as 15%, although the magnitude of the impact depended both on site and season. The effects of acid additions on dissolved calcium concentrations were more variable,. and also displayed a site and season dependency. Calcium concentrations, alkalinity, and pH values were also determined during controlled laboratory experiments, where 25 mg/L Callinectes sapidus shells were added to Albemarle Sound water. All three analytes increased significantly upon acid additions relative to controls.

  18. Simple quantification of surface carboxylic acids on chemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hyejin; Kim, Seong-Taek; Lee, Jong Doo; Yim, Sanggyu

    2013-02-01

    The surface of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was chemically oxidized using nitric acid and sulfuric-nitric acid mixtures. Thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy revealed that the use of acid mixtures led to higher degree of oxidation. More quantitative identification of surface carboxylic acids was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and acid-base titration. However, these techniques are costly and require very long analysis times to promptly respond to the extent of the reaction. We propose a much simpler method using pH measurements and pre-determined pKa value in order to estimate the concentration of carboxylic acids on the oxidized MWCNT surfaces. The results from this technique were consistent with those obtained from XPS and titration, and it is expected that this simple quantification method can provide a cheap and fast way to monitor and control the oxidation reaction of MWCNT.

  19. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of organic acids in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-10-01

    Stable carbon isotopic compositions of individual organic acids were determined in total suspended particles and dusts from Guangzhou. The δ 13C values of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 20-C 28) varied from -34.1‰ to -32.4‰ and tended to be heavier in summer and lighter in winter. These δ 13C values indicate that high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids were derived mainly from emission by C 3 plants. Reduced biological synthesis of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids in winter may be the reason for the light carbon isotopic composition. The δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids (C 10-C 18) changed from -31.7‰ to -30.3‰ and exhibited a reverse seasonal trend, i.e., heavier in winter and lighter in summer. Slightly heavier δ 13C values of low molecular weight n-alkanoic acids than those of high molecular weight n-alkanoic acids suggested that they may be emitted from blended sources, e.g., anthropogenic sources and vegetation waxes. Lighter δ 13C values in summer may be attributed to relatively low anthropogenic sources and high botanic sources in summer. Dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids have been proposed as secondary products from photochemical degradation. The average δ 13C values of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids were heavier, and ranged from -25.2‰ to -22.9‰ and from -30.0‰ to -27.6‰, respectively. Both dicarboxylic acids and aromatic acids displayed the same temporal variations in the δ 13C values, i.e., negative δ 13C in the summer samples and positive in the winter samples, which may be controlled by photochemical reactions; they are generally severe in winter in Guangzhou under the monsoon weather system. The heaviest δ 13C values were observed in dicarboxylic acids, indicating that dicarboxylic acids were formed by fast and more complete oxidation reactions. These results indicate that the stable carbon isotopic composition of organic acids may provide important information about sources and

  20. On the neutralization of acid rock drainage by carbonate and silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, E. J.; Lawrence, R. W.; Poulin, R.

    1995-02-01

    The net result of acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions within mining wastes is termed acid rock drainage (ARD). The oxidation of sulfide minerals is the major contributor to acid generation. Dissolution and alteration of various minerals can contribute to the neutralization of acid. Definitions of alkalinity, acidity, and buffer capacity are reviewed, and a detailed discussion of the dissolution and neutralizing capacity of carbonate and silicate minerals related to equilibium conditions, dissolution mechanism, and kinetics is provided. Factors that determine neutralization rate by carbonate and silicate minerals include: pH, PCO 2, equilibrium conditions, temperature, mineral composition and structure, redox conditions, and the presence of “foreign” ions. Similar factors affect sulfide oxidation. Comparison of rates shows sulfides react fastest, followed by carbonates and silicates. The differences in the reaction mechanisms and kinetics of neutralization have important implications in the prediction, control, and regulation of ARD. Current static and kinetic prediction methods upon which mine permitting, ARD control, and mine closure plans are based do not consider sample mineralogy or the kinetics of the acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions. Erroneous test interpretations and predictions can result. The importance of considering mineralogy for site-specific interpretation is highlighted. Uncertainty in prediction leads to difficulties for the mine operator in developing satisfactory and cost-effective control and remediation measures. Thus, the application of regulations and guidelines for waste management planning need to beflexible.

  1. Efficient optical resolution of amino acid by alanine racemaze chiral analogue supported on mesoporous carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, D.; Kim, K.; Park, D.; Kim, G.

    2012-09-01

    Optically pure D-amino acids are industrially important chiral building blocks for the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, and drug intermediates. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic-resolution processes have recently been developed for deracemization of amino acids. S-ARCA would be a good candidate for the selective adsorption of D amino acid through the imine formation reaction. The organic phase containing S-ARCA adsorbent, TPPC or Ionic Liquid (as a phase transfer catalyst) in MC were coated on the surfaces of mesoporous carbon C-SBA-15(CMK). The aqueous solution of racemic D/L-amino acid and NaOH were added to the carbon support coated with ARCA. The D/L ratios on ARCA and in solution were determined with increasing reaction time. S-ARCA has a unique property for the selective adsorption of D- amino acid (up to 90% selcetivity) in the racemic mixture. The fixed bed reactor containing ARCA/carbon support was also adopted successfully for the selective separation of amino acid.

  2. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Measurements of Ordinary Chondrite (OC) Meteorites from Antarctica Indicate Distinct Terrestrial Carbonate Species using a Stepped Acid Extraction Procedure Impacting Mars Carbonate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. E.; Niles, P. B.; Locke, D.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from five OC meteorites collected in Antarctica. These samples were selected for analysis based upon their size and collection proximity to known Martian meteorites. They were also selected based on petrologic type (3+) such that they were likely to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth. This study has two main tasks: 1) characterize the isotopic composition of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals formed on meteorites in Antarctica, and 2) study the mechanisms of carbonate formation in cold and arid environments with Antarctica as an analog for Mars. Two samples from each meteorite, each ~0.5g, was crushed and dissolved in pure phosphoric acid for 3 sequential reactions: a) Rx0 for 1 hour at 30°C, b) Rx1 for 18 hours at 30°C, and c) Rx2 for 3 hours at 150°C. CO2 was distilled by freezing with liquid nitrogen from each sample tube, then separated from organics and sulfides with a TRACE GC using a Restek HayeSep Q 80/100 6' 2mm stainless column, and then analyzed on a Thermo MAT 253 IRMS in Dual Inlet mode. This system was built at NASA/JSC over the past 3 years and proof tested with known carbonate standards to develop procedures, assess yield, and quantify expected uncertainties. Two distinct species of carbonates are found based on the stepped extraction technique: 1) Ca-rich carbonate released at low temperatures, and 2) Mg, or Fe-rich carbonate released at high temperatures. Preliminary results indicate that most of the carbonates present in the ordinary chondrites analyzed have δ13C=+5‰, which is consistent with formation from atmospheric CO2 δ13C=-7‰ at -20°C. The oxygen isotopic compositions of the carbonates vary between +4‰ and +34‰ with the Mg-rich and/or Fe-rich carbonates possessing the lowest δ18O values. This suggests that the carbonates formed under a wide range of temperatures. However, the carbonate oxygen

  3. Predicting sorption of organic acids to a wide range of carbonized sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Many contaminants and infochemicals are organic acids that undergo dissociation under environmental conditions. The sorption of dissociated anions to biochar and other carbonized sorbents is typically lower than that of neutral species. It is driven by complex processes that are not yet fully understood. It is known that predictive approaches developed for neutral compounds are unlikely to be suitable for organic acids, due to the effects of dissociation on sorption. Previous studies on the sorption of organic acids to soils have demonstrated that log Dow, which describes the decrease in hydrophobicity of acids upon dissociation, is a useful alternative to log Kow. The aim of the present study was to adapt a log Dow based approach to describe the sorption of organic acids to carbonized sorbents. Batch experiments were performed with a series of 9 sorbents (i.e., carbonized wood shavings, pig manure, and sewage sludge, carbon nanotubes and activated carbon), and four acids commonly used for pesticidal and biocidal purposes (i.e., 2,4-D, MCPA, 2,4-DB, and triclosan). Sorbents were comprehensively characterized, including by N2 and CO2 physisorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The wide range of sorbents considered allows (i) discussing the mechanisms driving the sorption of neutral and anionic species to biochar, and (ii) their dependency on sorbate and sorbent properties. Results showed that the sorption of the four acids was influenced by factors that are usually not considered for neutral compounds (i.e., pH, ionic strength). Dissociation affected the sorption of the four compounds, and sorption of the anions ranged over five orders of magnitude, thus substantially contributing to sorption in some cases. For prediction purposes, most of the variation in sorption to carbonized sorbents (89%) could be well described with a two-parameter regression equation including log Dow and sorbent specific surface area. The proposed model

  4. Particulate, carbon monoxide, and acid emission factors for residential wood burn stoves

    SciTech Connect

    Burnet, P.G.; Edmisten, N.G.; Tiegs, P.E.; Houck, J.E.; Yoder, R.A.

    1986-09-01

    Emissions from residential wood burning stoves are of increasing concern in many areas. This concern is due to the magnitude of the emissions and the toxic and chemical characteristics of the pollutants. Recent testing of standard and new technology woodstoves has provided data for developing a family of particulate and carbon monoxide emission factor curves. This testing has also provided data illustrating the acidity of woodstove emissions. The particulate and carbon monoxide curves relate the actual stove emissions to the stove size and operating parameters of burn rate, fuel loading, and fuel moisture. Curves relating stove types to the acidity of emissions have also been constructed. Test data show actual emissions vary from 3 to 50 grams per kilogram for particles and from 50 to 300 grams per kilogram for carbon monoxide. Since woodstove emissions are the largest single category of particulate emissions in many area, it is essential that these emissions be quantified specifically for geographic regions, allowing meaningful impact analysis modeling to be accomplished. Emission factors for particles and carbon monoxide are presented from several stove sizes and burn rates. The acidic nature of woodstove emissions has been clearly demonstrated. Tests indicate woodstove flue gas condensate solutions to be predominantly in the 2.8 to 4.2 pH range. Condensate solutions from conventional woodstoves exhibited the characteristic buffering capacity of carboxylic acids when titrations were performed with a strong base. The environmental impact of buffered acidic woodstove emissions is not currently well understood; however, it is possible with the data presented here to make semi-quantitative estimates of acid emission from particulate and carbon monoxide emission factors and wood use inventories.

  5. Synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotubes and carbon fiber for improved electro-activated polymeric shape-memory nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Min Huang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The present work studies the synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon fiber on the electrical property and electro-activated recovery behavior of shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposites. The combination of CNT and carbon fiber results in improved electrical conductivity in the SMP nanocomposites. Carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs are grafted onto the carbon fibers and then self-assembled by deposition to significantly enhance the reliability of the bonding between carbon fiber and SMP via van der Waals and covalent crosslink. Furthermore, the self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs and carbon fibers enable the SMP nanocomposites for Joule heating triggered shape recovery.

  6. Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Schrag

    2005-12-01

    Our research is aimed at investigating several technical issues associated with carbon dioxide sequestration in calcium carbonate sediments below the sea floor through laboratory experiments and chemical transport modeling. Our goal is to evaluate the basic feasibility of this approach, including an assessment of optimal depths, sediment types, and other issues related to site selection. Through laboratory and modeling efforts, we are studying the flow of liquid carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide-water mixtures through calcium carbonate sediments to better understand the geomechanical and structural stability of the sediments during and after injection. Our modeling efforts in the first year show that the idea is feasible, but requires more sophisticated analysis of fluid flow at high pressure in deep sea sediments. In addition, we are investigating the kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution in the presence of CO{sub 2}-water fluids, which is a critical feature of the system as it allows for increased permeability during injection. Our experimental results from the first year of work have shown that the kinetics are likely to be fast enough to create dissolution which will affect permeability. However, additional experiments are needed at high pressures, which will be a focus for years 2 and 3. We are also investigating the possibility of carbon dioxide hydrate formation in the pore fluid, which might complicate the injection procedure by reducing sediment permeability but might also provide an upper seal in the sediment-pore fluid system, preventing release of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, particularly if depth and temperature at the injection point rule out immediate hydrate formation. Finally, we are in the beginning stages of an economic analysis to estimate costs of drilling and gas injection, site monitoring as well as the availability of potential disposal sites with particular emphasis on those sites that are within the 200-mile economic zone of the

  7. Whole-body pharmacokinetics of HDAC inhibitor drugs, butyric acid, valproic acid and 4-phenylbutyric acid measured with carbon-11 labeled analogs by PET

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Otto, Nicola; Win, Khaing; Muench, Lisa; Shea, Colleen; Carter, Pauline; King, Payton; Reid, Alicia E.; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acids, n-butyric acid (BA), 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) and valproic acid (VPA, 2-propylpentanoic acid) have been used for many years in the treatment of a variety of CNS and peripheral organ diseases including cancer. New information that these drugs alter epigenetic processes through their inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) has renewed interest in their biodistribution and pharmacokinetics and the relationship of these properties to their therapeutic and side effect profile. In order to determine the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these drugs in primates, we synthesized their carbon-11 labeled analogues and performed dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) in six female baboons over 90 min. The carbon-11 labeled carboxylic acids were prepared by using 11CO2 and the appropriate Grignard reagents. [11C]BA was metabolized rapidly (only 20% of the total carbon-11 in plasma was parent compound at 5 min post injection) whereas for VPA and PBA 98% and 85% of the radioactivity was the unmetabolized compound at 30 min after their administration respectively. The brain uptake of all three carboxylic acids was very low (<0.006%ID/cc, BA>VPA>PBA), which is consistent with the need for very high doses for therapeutic efficacy. Most of the radioactivity was excreted through the kidneys and accumulated in the bladder. However, the organ biodistribution between the drugs differed. [11C]BA showed relatively high uptake in spleen and pancreas whereas [11C]PBA showed high uptake in liver and heart. Notably, [11C]VPA showed exceptionally high heart uptake possibly due to its involvement in lipid metabolism. The unique biodistribution of each of these drugs may be of relevance in understanding their therapeutic and side effect profile including their teratogenic effects. PMID:23906667

  8. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrode arrays for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, Prabhu U.; Yu, Edmond; Riviere, Roger; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-10-01

    We present electrochemical detection of DNA targets that corresponds to Escherichia coli O157:H7 16S rRNA gene using a nanoelectrode array consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) electrodes. Parylene C is used as gap filling 'matrix' material to avoid high temperature processing in electrode construction. This easy to deposit film of several micron heights provides a conformal coating between the high aspect ratio VACNFs with negligible pin-holes. The low background currents show the potential of this approach for ultra-sensitive detection. Consistent and reproducible electrochemical-signals are achieved using a simple electrode preparation. This simple, reliable and low-cost approach is a forward step in developing practical sensors for applications like pathogen detection, early cancer diagnosis and environmental monitoring.

  9. Coastal ocean CO2-carbonic acid-carbonate sediment system of the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas J.; MacKenzie, Fred T.; Lerman, Abraham

    2006-03-01

    There is little doubt that human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land use practices have changed and will continue to change the cycling of carbon in the global coastal ocean. In the present study, two biogeochemical box models were used to investigate the consequences of increasing atmospheric CO2 and subsequent ocean acidification and increasing riverine transport of organic matter and nutrients arising from human activities on land on the global coastal ocean between the years 1700 and 2300. Numerical simulations show that the net flux of CO2 between coastal ocean surface water and the atmosphere is likely to change during this time from net evasion to net invasion owing to increasing atmospheric CO2, increasing net ecosystem production arising from increasing nutrient loading to this region, and decreasing net ecosystem calcification due to lower carbonate ion concentration and subsequent lower surface water saturation state with respect to carbonate minerals. Model calculations show that surface water saturation state with respect to calcite will decrease 73% by the year 2300 under a business-as-usual scenario, which in concert with increasing temperature will cause overall biogenic calcification rate to decrease by 90%. Dissolution of carbonate minerals increased by 267% throughout the model simulation. This increase was in part due to increased invasion of atmospheric CO2, but mainly due to greater deposition and remineralization of land-derived and in situ produced organic matter in the sediments, producing CO2 that caused pore water pH and carbonate saturation state to decrease. This decrease, in turn, drove selective dissolution of metastable carbonate minerals. As a consequence, the relative carbonate composition of the sediments changed in favor of carbonate phases with lower solubility than that of an average 15 mol% magnesian calcite phase. Model projected changes in surface water carbonate saturation state agree well with observations

  10. Enhanced sidewall functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes using nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Gerard; Shao, Lidong; Ballesteros, Belin; Green, Malcolm L H

    2009-10-01

    When a sample of as-made single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is treated with nitric acid, oxidation debris are formed due to the functionalization (mainly carboxylation) of the amorphous carbon present in the sample and a continuous coating along the carbon nanotube walls is created preventing the sidewall functionalization of the SWNTs. This oxidation debris can be easily removed by an aqueous base wash leaving behind a sample with a low degree of functionality. After removal of the amorphous carbon (by steam purification) from a sample of as-made SWNTs, the resulting purified SWNTs are readily carboxylated on the walls by nitric acid treatment. The use of steam for the purification of SWNTs samples allows the removal of the amorphous carbon and graphitic layers coating the metal particles present in the sample without altering the tubular structure of the SWNTs. The exposed metal particles can then be easily removed by an acid wash. Comparison between the steam treatment and molten sodium hydroxide treatment is made.

  11. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; Martin-Uriz, Patxi San; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A.; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets. PMID:24755961

  12. Carbon Isotopic Measurements of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here, we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and e-aminocaproic acid (EACA), the two most abundant amino acids, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CAMS/IRMS).

  13. Carbon Isotopic Ratios of Amino Acids in Stardust-Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft returned to Earth samples from comet 81P/Wild 2 in January 2006. Preliminary examinations revealed the presence of a suite of organic compounds including several amines and amino acids, but the origin of these compounds could not be identified. Here. we present the carbon isotopic ratios of glycine and E-aminocaproic acid (EACH), the two most abundant amino acids observed, in Stardust-returned foil samples measured by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio crass spectrometry coupled with quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QMS/IRMS).

  14. FATTY ACID STABLE ISOTOPE INDICATORS OF MICROBIAL CARBON SOURCE IN TROPICAL SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The soil microbial community plays an important role in tropical ecosystem functioning because of its importance in the soil organic matter (SOM) cycle. We have measured the stable carbon isotopic ratio (delta13C) of individual phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in a variety of tr...

  15. Polymerization of euphorbia oil with Lewis acid in carbon dioxide media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3-OEt2) Lewis acid catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of euphorbia oil (EO), a natural epoxy oil, in liquid carbon dioxide was conducted in an effort to develop useful vegetable oil based polymers. The resulting polymers (RPEO) were characterized by FTIR, 1H-...

  16. Diffusion of cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (1); carbon dioxide (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid; (2) carbon dioxide

  17. Titration of Monoprotic Acids with Sodium Hydroxide Contaminated by Sodium Carbonate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effects of using carbon dioxide contaminated sodium hydroxide solution as a titrant for a solution of a weak monoprotic acid and the resulting distortion of the titration curve in comparison to one obtained when an uncontaminated titrant is used. (CW)

  18. Modeling and optimizing the design of matrix treatments in carbonate reservoirs with self-diverting acid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgakova, G. T.; Kharisov, R. Ya; Sharifullin, A. R.; Pestrikov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Application of a self-diverting-acid based on viscoelastic surfactant (SDVA) is a promising technology for improving the efficacy of acid treatment in oil and gas-bearing carbonate reservoirs. In this study, we present a mathematical model for assessing SDVA flow and reaction with carbonate rock using the SDVA rheological characteristics. The model calculates the technological parameters for acidizing operations and the prediction of well productivity after acid treatment, in addition to technical and economic optimization of the acidizing process by modeling different acid treatment options with varying volumes, injection rates, process fluids stages and initial economic scenarios.

  19. Acid rain damage to carbonate stone: a quantitative assessment based on the aqueous geochemistry of rainfall runoff from stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    An onsite experimental procedure was used to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone, based on the change in rain runoff chemical composition. Onsite data obtained during the summer and fall of 1984 at three locations in the northeastern United States indicate that carbonate stone surface recession is related to acid deposition. -from Author

  20. Enhancing adsorption efficiency of dichloroacetic acid onto mesoporous carbons: Procedure optimization, mechanism and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Zhu, Jianzhong; Ji, Dongliang; Cao, Yang; Ling, Xiaojia; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-15

    Highly ordered mesoporous carbon may be directly synthesized via supramolecular self-assembly with in situ evaporation-induced crystallization process by controlling thermal reaction temperatures and carbon mass loading. In the present study, the effects of thermal reaction temperatures on the structural characterization and adsorption capacity of mesoporous carbon have been investigated and analyzed with orthogonal test experiments. The results show the carbonization temperature (R=32.1) plays a more important role than the self-assembly temperature (R=8.5) and thermal polymerization temperature (R=10.1) in manipulating the pore texture structures. The optimization grouping temperature was 40-110-500 °C. The optimum mesoporous carbon sample had the highest BET specific surface area (474 m(2)/g), the largest pore volume (0.46 cm(3)/g), and with reasonable uniform pore size distribution. The adsorption evaluation also shows the adsorption capacity is strongly correlated with the pore structure of mesoporous carbon, the optimized mesoporous carbon sample displayed the largest adsorption capacity (350 mg/g) at an initial concentration of 20.0 mg/L of dichloroacetic acid. The study results indicate optimization of thermal reaction parameters is an effective approach for synthesis of ordered mesoporous carbons.

  1. Reaction Mechanism for Direct Proton Transfer from Carbonic Acid to a Strong Base in Aqueous Solution I: Acid and Base Coordinate and Charge Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Kiefer, Philip M; Miller, Yifat; Motro, Yair; Pines, Dina; Pines, Ehud; Hynes, James T

    2016-03-10

    Protonation by carbonic acid H2CO3 of the strong base methylamine CH3NH2 in a neutral contact pair in aqueous solution is followed via Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Proton transfer (PT) occurs to form an aqueous solvent-stabilized contact ion pair within 100 fs, a fast time scale associated with the compression of the acid-base hydrogen-bond (H-bond), a key reaction coordinate. This rapid barrierless PT is consistent with the carbonic acid-protonated base pKa difference that considerably favors the PT, and supports the view of intact carbonic acid as potentially important proton donor in assorted biological and environmental contexts. The charge redistribution within the H-bonded complex during PT supports a Mulliken picture of charge transfer from the nitrogen base to carbonic acid without altering the transferring hydrogen's charge from approximately midway between that of a hydrogen atom and that of a proton. PMID:26879554

  2. Reaction Mechanism for Direct Proton Transfer from Carbonic Acid to a Strong Base in Aqueous Solution I: Acid and Base Coordinate and Charge Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Daschakraborty, Snehasis; Kiefer, Philip M; Miller, Yifat; Motro, Yair; Pines, Dina; Pines, Ehud; Hynes, James T

    2016-03-10

    Protonation by carbonic acid H2CO3 of the strong base methylamine CH3NH2 in a neutral contact pair in aqueous solution is followed via Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Proton transfer (PT) occurs to form an aqueous solvent-stabilized contact ion pair within 100 fs, a fast time scale associated with the compression of the acid-base hydrogen-bond (H-bond), a key reaction coordinate. This rapid barrierless PT is consistent with the carbonic acid-protonated base pKa difference that considerably favors the PT, and supports the view of intact carbonic acid as potentially important proton donor in assorted biological and environmental contexts. The charge redistribution within the H-bonded complex during PT supports a Mulliken picture of charge transfer from the nitrogen base to carbonic acid without altering the transferring hydrogen's charge from approximately midway between that of a hydrogen atom and that of a proton.

  3. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, H J M Henk-Marijn; Gans, R O B Rijk; Huls, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate absorption. No convincing scientific evidence supporting the advice to prescribe calcium citrate instead of calcium carbonate to patients who also take antacids is available, and therefore deserves further investigation. On the contrary, the fact that calcium carbonate does not need acid in order to be absorbed, has also not been proven. In clinical practise, it appears important that calcium is taken with meals in order to improve its absorption. PMID:22914054

  4. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, H J M Henk-Marijn; Gans, R O B Rijk; Huls, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate absorption. No convincing scientific evidence supporting the advice to prescribe calcium citrate instead of calcium carbonate to patients who also take antacids is available, and therefore deserves further investigation. On the contrary, the fact that calcium carbonate does not need acid in order to be absorbed, has also not been proven. In clinical practise, it appears important that calcium is taken with meals in order to improve its absorption.

  5. Solubility of small-chain carboxylic acids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sparks, Darrell L.; Estevez, L. Antonio; Hernandez, Rafael; McEwen, Jason; French, Todd

    2010-07-08

    The solubility of heptanoic acid and octanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide has been determined at temperatures of (313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K over a pressure range of (8.5 to 30.0) MPa, depending upon the solute. The solubility of heptanoic acid ranged from a solute concentration of (0.08 ± 0.03) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 8.5 MPa) to (147 ± 0.2) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 20.0 MPa). The lowest octanoic acid solubility obtained was a solute concentration of (0.40 ± 0.1) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 10.0more » MPa), while the highest solute concentration was (151 ± 2) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 26.7 MPa). In addition, solubility experiments were performed for nonanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at 323.15 K and pressures of (10.0 to 30.0) MPa to add to the solubility data previously published by the authors. In general, carboxylic acid solubility increased with increasing solvent density. The results also showed that the solubility of the solutes decreased with increasing molar mass at constant supercritical-fluid density. Additionally, the efficacy of Chrastil's equation and other density-based models was evaluated for each fatty acid.« less

  6. Solubility of small-chain carboxylic acids in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Darrell L.; Estevez, L. Antonio; Hernandez, Rafael; McEwen, Jason; French, Todd

    2010-07-08

    The solubility of heptanoic acid and octanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide has been determined at temperatures of (313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K over a pressure range of (8.5 to 30.0) MPa, depending upon the solute. The solubility of heptanoic acid ranged from a solute concentration of (0.08 ± 0.03) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 8.5 MPa) to (147 ± 0.2) kg • m-3 (T = 323.15 K, p = 20.0 MPa). The lowest octanoic acid solubility obtained was a solute concentration of (0.40 ± 0.1) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 10.0 MPa), while the highest solute concentration was (151 ± 2) kg • m-3 (T = 333.15 K, p = 26.7 MPa). In addition, solubility experiments were performed for nonanoic acid in supercritical carbon dioxide at 323.15 K and pressures of (10.0 to 30.0) MPa to add to the solubility data previously published by the authors. In general, carboxylic acid solubility increased with increasing solvent density. The results also showed that the solubility of the solutes decreased with increasing molar mass at constant supercritical-fluid density. Additionally, the efficacy of Chrastil's equation and other density-based models was evaluated for each fatty acid.

  7. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  8. Comparison of inhibition effects of some benzoic acid derivatives on sheep heart carbonic anhydrase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliç, Deryanur; Yildiz, Melike; Şentürk, Murat; Erdoǧan, Orhan; Küfrevioǧlu, Ömer Irfan

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is a family of metalloenzymes that requires Zn as a cofactor and catalyze the quick conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and H+. Inhibitors of the carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have medical usage of significant diseases such as glaucoma, epilepsy, gastroduodenal ulcers, acid-base disequilibria and neurological disorders. In the present study, inhibition of CA with some benzoic derivatives (1-6) were investigated. Sheep heart CA (shCA) enzyme was isolated by means of designed affinity chromatography gel (cellulose-benzyl-sulfanylamide) 42.45-fold in a yield of 44 % with 564.65 EU/mg. Purified shCA enzyme was used in vitro studies. In the studies, IC50 values were calculated for 3-aminobenzoic acid (1), 4-aminobenzoic acid (2), 2-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), 2-benzoylbenzoic acid (4), 2,3-dimethoxybenzoic acid (5), and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid (6), showing the inhibition effects on the purified enzyme. Such molecules can be used as pioneer for discovery of novel effective CA inhibitors for medicinal chemistry applications.

  9. Stable carbon isotopic compositions of total carbon, dicarboxylic acids and glyoxylic acid in the tropical Indian aerosols: Implications for sources and photochemical processing of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Swaminathan, T.; Tachibana, Eri

    2011-09-01

    The tropical Indian aerosols (PM10) collected on day- and nighttime bases in winter and summer, 2007 from Chennai (13.04°N; 80.17°E) were studied for stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of total carbon (TC), individual dicarboxylic acids (C2-C9) and glyoxylic acid (ωC2). δ13C values of TC ranged from -23.9‰ to -25.9‰ (-25.0 ± 0.6‰; n = 49). Oxalic (C2) (-17.1 ± 2.5‰), malonic (C3) (-20.8 ± 1.8‰), succinic (C4) (-22.5 ± 1.5‰) and adipic (C6) (-20.6 ± 4.1‰) acids and ωC2 acid (-22.4 ± 5.5‰) were found to be more enriched with 13C compared to TC. In contrast, suberic (C8) (-29.4 ± 1.8‰), phthalic (Ph) (-30.1 ± 3.5‰) and azelaic (C9) (-28.4 ± 5.8‰) acids showed smaller δ13C values than TC. Based on comparisons of δ13C values of TC in Chennai aerosols to those (-24.7 ± 2.2‰) found in unburned cow-dung samples collected from Chennai and isotopic signatures of the particles emitted from point sources, we found that biofuel/biomass burning are the major sources of carbonaceous aerosols in South and Southeast Asia. The decrease in δ13C values of C9 diacid by about 5‰ from winter to summer suggests that tropical plant emissions also significantly contribute to organic aerosol in this region. Significant increase in δ13C values from C4 to C2 diacids in Chennai aerosols could be attributed for their photochemical processing in the tropical atmosphere during long-range transport from source regions.

  10. Carbonate precipitation under bulk acidic conditions as a potential biosignature for searching life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Preston, Louisa J.; Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Huang, L.; Southam, Gordon; Banerjee, Neil R.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Flemming, Roberta; Gómez-Ortíz, David; Prieto Ballesteros, Olga; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo; Darby Dyar, M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent observations of carbonate minerals in ancient Martian rocks have been interpreted as evidence for the former presence of circumneutral solutions optimal for carbonate precipitation. Sampling from surface and subsurface regions of the low-pH system of Río Tinto has shown, unexpectedly, that carbonates can form under diverse macroscopic physicochemical conditions ranging from very low to neutral pH (1.5-7.0). A multi-technique approach demonstrates that carbonate minerals are closely associated with microbial activity. Carbonates occur in the form of micron-size carbonate precipitates under bacterial biofilms, mineralization of subsurface colonies, and possible biogenic microstructures including globules, platelets and dumbbell morphologies. We propose that carbonate precipitation in the low-pH environment of Río Tinto is a process enabled by microbially-mediated neutralization driven by the reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of biomolecules in microbially-maintained circumneutral oases, where the local pH (at the scale of cells or cell colonies) can be much different than in the macroscopic environment. Acidic conditions were likely predominant in vast regions of Mars over the last four billion years of planetary evolution. Ancient Martian microbial life inhabiting low-pH environments could have precipitated carbonates similar to those observed at Río Tinto. Preservation of carbonates at Río Tinto over geologically significant timescales suggests that similarly-formed carbonate minerals could also be preserved on Mars. Such carbonates could soon be observed by the Mars Science Laboratory, and by future missions to the red planet.

  11. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China. PMID:26657252

  12. Culture strategies for lipid production using acetic acid as sole carbon source by Rhodosporidium toruloides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia-Nan; Lu, Li-Jun; Peng, Kai-Ming; Yang, Gao-Xiang; Liu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Rhodosporidium toruloides AS 2.1389 was tested using different concentrations of acetic acid as a low-cost carbon source for the production of microbial lipids, which are good raw materials for biodiesel production. It grew and had higher lipid contents in media containing 4-20 g/L acetic acid as the sole carbon source, compared with that in glucose-containing media under the same culture conditions. At acetic acid concentrations as high as 20 g/L and the optimal carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C/N) of 200 in a batch culture, the highest biomass production was 4.35 g/L, with a lipid content of 48.2%. At acetic acid concentrations as low as 4 g/L, a sequencing batch culture (SBC) with a C/N of 100 increased biomass production to 4.21 g/L, with a lipid content of 38.6%. These results provide usable culture strategies for lipid production by R. toruloides AS 2.1389 when using diverse waste-derived volatile fatty acids.

  13. Prolonged acid rain facilitates soil organic carbon accumulation in a mature forest in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianping; Liang, Guohua; Hui, Dafeng; Deng, Qi; Xiong, Xin; Qiu, Qingyan; Liu, Juxiu; Chu, Guowei; Zhou, Guoyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-02-15

    With the continuing increase in anthropogenic activities, acid rain remains a serious environmental threat, especially in the fast developing areas such as southern China. To detect how prolonged deposition of acid rain would influence soil organic carbon accumulation in mature subtropical forests, we conducted a field experiment with simulated acid rain (SAR) treatments in a monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at Dinghushan National Nature Reserve in southern China. Four levels of SAR treatments were set by irrigating plants with water of different pH values: CK (the control, local lake water, pH ≈ 4.5), T1 (water pH=4.0), T2 (water pH=3.5), and T3 (water pH=3.0). Results showed reduced pH measurements in the topsoil exposed to simulated acid rains due to soil acidification. Soil respiration, soil microbial biomass and litter decomposition rates were significantly decreased by the SAR treatments. As a result, T3 treatment significantly increased the total organic carbon by 24.5% in the topsoil compared to the control. Furthermore, surface soil became more stable as more recalcitrant organic matter was generated under the SAR treatments. Our results suggest that prolonged acid rain exposure may have the potential to facilitate soil organic carbon accumulation in the subtropical forest in southern China.

  14. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Binbin; Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-01

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl2 using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl2 at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of -SO3H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N2 adsorption-desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of -SO3H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of -SO3H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and -SO3H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles.

  15. Controlled exposures of volunteers to respirable carbon and sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.R.; Avol, E.L.; Edwards, S.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Ruchuan Peng; Linn, W.S.; Hackney, J.D. )

    1992-06-01

    Respirable carbon or fly ash particles are suspected to increase the respiratory toxicity of coexisting acidic air pollutants, by concentrating acid on their surfaces and so delivering it efficiently to the lower respiratory tract. To investigate this issue, the authors exposed 15 healthy and 15 asthmatic volunteers in a controlled-environment chamber to four test atmospheres: (1) clean air; (2) 0.5-{mu}m H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol at {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from water solution; (3) 0.5-{mu}m carbon aerosol at {approx}250 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, generated from highly pure carbon black with specific surface area comparable to ambient pollution particles; and (4) carbon as in (3) plus {approx}100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of ultrafine H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol generated from fuming sulfuric acid. Electron microscopy showed that nearly all acid in (4) became attached to carbon particle surfaces, and that most particles remained in the sub-{mu}m size range. Exposures were performed double-blind, 1 week apart. They lasted 1 hr each, with alternate 10-min periods of heavy exercise (ventilation {approx}50 L/min) and rest. Subjects gargled citrus juice before exposure to suppress airway ammonia. Lung function and symptoms were measured pre-exposure, after initial exercise, and at end-exposure. Bronchial reactivity to methacholine was measured after exposure. Statistical analyses tested for effects of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or carbon, separate or interactive, on health measures.

  16. [Studies on carbonization of saccharides by using aqueous solution of various acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; He, An-Qi; Kang, Ting-Guo; Xia, Jin-Ming; Weng, Shi-Fu; Xu, Yi-Zhuang; Wu, Jin-Guang

    2014-09-01

    The authors tried to establish an approach to use acids to convert biomass into a fuel with higher carbon content and lower oxygen content in a zero-energy-consumption fashion. Considering that biomass is composed of monosaccharide, we used aqueous solutions of variation acids including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and perchloric acid to treat 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose at ambient temperature and pressure. Black substances were produced after a period of time when 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose were mixed with aqueous solutions containing 8 mol · L(-1) acids. The black substance was collected and characterized by using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Elemental analysis results indicate that the contents of carbon increases significantly in the black substances in comparison with 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. Moreover, XPS results indicate that the content of oxygen in the black substance undergoes a significant decrease compared with pure 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. In the XPS spectra, the is peaks of 2-deoxy-ribose, strong sub peak at 286. 05 eV, which is assigned to carbon linked to oxygen directly, dominate in the C is peak envelop. After treatment by HClO4, the peak decreased dramatically. This result also supports the conclusion that the content of oxygen in mono-saccharide is significantly reduced after treatment by acids. In the FTIR spectra of the black substances, strong peaks can be observed around 1 600 cm(-1), indicating that C==C bond is formed in the product. The above results suggest that treatments with acids may be developed as a new zero-energy-consumption approach to convert biomass in a new fuel with improved energy output efficiency. PMID:25532323

  17. [Studies on carbonization of saccharides by using aqueous solution of various acids].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; He, An-Qi; Kang, Ting-Guo; Xia, Jin-Ming; Weng, Shi-Fu; Xu, Yi-Zhuang; Wu, Jin-Guang

    2014-09-01

    The authors tried to establish an approach to use acids to convert biomass into a fuel with higher carbon content and lower oxygen content in a zero-energy-consumption fashion. Considering that biomass is composed of monosaccharide, we used aqueous solutions of variation acids including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid and perchloric acid to treat 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose at ambient temperature and pressure. Black substances were produced after a period of time when 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose were mixed with aqueous solutions containing 8 mol · L(-1) acids. The black substance was collected and characterized by using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Elemental analysis results indicate that the contents of carbon increases significantly in the black substances in comparison with 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. Moreover, XPS results indicate that the content of oxygen in the black substance undergoes a significant decrease compared with pure 2-deoxy-ribose and fructose. In the XPS spectra, the is peaks of 2-deoxy-ribose, strong sub peak at 286. 05 eV, which is assigned to carbon linked to oxygen directly, dominate in the C is peak envelop. After treatment by HClO4, the peak decreased dramatically. This result also supports the conclusion that the content of oxygen in mono-saccharide is significantly reduced after treatment by acids. In the FTIR spectra of the black substances, strong peaks can be observed around 1 600 cm(-1), indicating that C==C bond is formed in the product. The above results suggest that treatments with acids may be developed as a new zero-energy-consumption approach to convert biomass in a new fuel with improved energy output efficiency.

  18. Pathological organizations and psychic retreats in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Kadish, Yael Adira

    2012-04-01

    A set of characteristic symptoms allow for the relatively straightforward diagnosis of eating disorders. Simultaneously and paradoxically, underlying the eating disorders are a wide variety of personality organizations/disorders, stretching from the neurotic to the borderline and narcissistic, and even to conditions approaching psychosis. This paper will argue that the inherent commonalities can be ascribed to pathological organizations of a similar nature and quality, operational across the spectrum of eating disorders and functioning in a particular, sadomasochistic way. The typical forms that eating disorders take are based on the specific ways that food and the body are used, that is, symptom manifestation. These distinctive symptom manifestations appear to be related to Steiner's (1982, 1993) notion of a psychic retreat. Pathological organizations and psychic retreats are latent until called upon either sporadically or continuously. When activated, these defensive structures operate like a complex psychic skeleton around which the unique psychodynamics of each patient become rearranged and thereby transformed.

  19. Recycling of carbon dioxide and acetate as lactic acid by the hydrogen-producing bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana.

    PubMed

    d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Dipasquale, Laura; Fontana, Angelo

    2014-09-01

    The heterotrophic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana produces hydrogen by fermentation of sugars. Under capnophilic (carbon dioxide requiring) conditions, the process is preferentially associated with the production of lactic acid, which, as shown herein, is synthesized by reductive carboxylation of acetyl coenzyme A. The enzymatic coupling is dependent on the carbon dioxide stimulated activity of heterotetrameric pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. Under the same culture conditions, T. neapolitana also operates the unfavorable synthesis of lactic acid from an exogenous acetate supply. This process, which requires carbon dioxide (or carbonate) and an unknown electron donor, allows for the conversion of carbon dioxide into added-value chemicals without biomass deconstruction.

  20. Amperometric uric acid biosensor based on poly(vinylferrocene)-gelatin-carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Erden, Pınar Esra; Kaçar, Ceren; Öztürk, Funda; Kılıç, Esma

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a new uric acid biosensor was constructed based on ferrocene containing polymer poly(vinylferrocene) (PVF), carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNT) and gelatin (GEL) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Uricase enzyme (UOx) was immobilized covalently through N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethyaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxyl succinimide (NHS) chemistry onto c-MWCNT/GEL/PVF/GCE. The c-MWCNT/GEL/PVF composite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Various experimental parameters such as pH, applied potential, enzyme loading, PVF and c-MWCNT concentration were investigated in detail. Under the optimal conditions the dynamic linear range of uric acid was 2.0×10(-7) M-7.1×10(-4) M (R=0.9993) with the detection limit low to 2.3×10(-8) M. With good selectivity and sensitivity, the biosensor was successfully applied to determine the uric acid in human serum. The results of the biosensor were in good agreement with those obtained from standard method. Therefore, the presented biosensor could be a good promise for practical applications in real samples.

  1. Imaging Cancer Cells Expressing the Folate Receptor with Carbon Dots Produced from Folic Acid.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Nandi, Sukhendu; Stepensky, David; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-04-01

    Development of new imaging tools for cancer cells in vitro and in vitro is important for advancing cancer research, elucidating drug effects upon cancer cells, and studying cellular processes. We showed that fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) synthesized from folic acid can serve as an effective vehicle for imaging cancer cells expressing the folate receptor on their surface. The C-dots, synthesized through a simple one-step process from folic acid as the carbon source, exhibited selectivity towards cancer cells displaying the folate receptor, making such cells easily distinguishable in fluorescence microscopy imaging. Biophysical measurements and competition experiments both confirmed the specific targeting and enhanced uptake of C-dots by the folate receptor-expressing cells. The folic acid-derived C-dots were not cytotoxic, and their use in bioimaging applications could aid biological studies of cancer cells, identification of agonists/antagonists, and cancer diagnostics.

  2. Hydrogen-bond acidic functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with covalently-bound hexafluoroisopropanol groups

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Grate, Jay W.

    2010-06-01

    Fluorinated hydrogen-bond acidic groups are directly attached to the backbone of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) without the introduction of intermediate electron donating surface groups. Hexafluoroalcohol functional groups are exceptionally strong hydrogen bond acids, and are added to the nanotube surface using the aryl diazonium approach to create hydrogen-bond acidic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces. These groups can promote strong hydrogen-bonding interactions with matrix materials in composites or with molecular species to be concentrated and sensed. In the latter case, this newly developed material is expected to find useful application in chemical sensors and in CNT-based preconcentrator devices for the detection of pesticides, chemical warfare agents and explosives.

  3. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    This reporting period, progress is reported on the following: metabolic pathway of solvent production in B. methylotrophicum; the biochemical mechanism for metabolic regulation of the succinate fermentation; models to understand the physiobiochemical function of formate metabolism in anaerobes and; models for understanding the influence of low pH on one carbon metabolism. (CBS)

  4. Scientific Investigators Retreat Brings Like Minds Together | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists throughout NCI gathered at the 2016 Intramural Scientific Investigators Retreat on Jan. 12, at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, to discuss the results of their research with fellow investigators. Several researchers who have made significant advances toward the goal of eliminating the threat of cancer spoke to a packed auditorium of like-minded experts. Speaker topics included the role genetics play in the risk of breast cancer, using fiberglass to...

  5. Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Schrag

    2006-07-14

    Our research is aimed at investigating several technical issues associated with carbon dioxide sequestration in calcium carbonate sediments below the sea floor through laboratory experiments and chemical transport modeling. Our goal is to evaluate the basic feasibility of this approach, including an assessment of optimal depths, sediment types, and other issues related to site selection. The results of our modeling efforts were published this past summer in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. We are expanding on that work through a variety of laboratory and modeling efforts. In the laboratories at Columbia and at Harvard, we are studying the flow of liquid carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide-water mixtures through calcium carbonate sediments to better understand the geomechanical and structural stability of the sediments during and after injection. We are currently preparing the results of these findings for publication. In addition, we are investigating the kinetics of calcium carbonate dissolution in the presence of CO{sub 2}-water fluids, which is a critical feature of the system as it allows for increased permeability during injection. We are also investigating the possibility of carbon dioxide hydrate formation in the pore fluid, which might complicate the injection procedure by reducing sediment permeability but might also provide an upper seal in the sediment-pore fluid system, preventing release of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean, particularly if depth and temperature at the injection point rule out immediate hydrate formation. This is done by injecting liquid CO{sub 2} into various types of porous media, and then monitoring the changes in permeability. Finally, we are performing an economic analysis to estimate costs of drilling and gas injection, site monitoring as well as the availability of potential disposal sites with particular emphasis on those sites that are within the 200-mile economic zone of the United States. We present some

  6. A transfer of carbon atoms from fatty acids to sugars and amino acids in yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Borek, Sławomir; Ratajczak, Wiktoria; Ratajczak, Lech

    2003-05-01

    The metabolism of 14C-acetate was investigated during the in vitro germination of yellow lupine seeds. Carbon atoms (14C) from the C-2 position of acetate were incorporated mainly into amino acids: aspartate, glutamate, and glutamine and into sugars: glucose, sucrose, and fructose. In contrast to this, 14C from the C-1 position of acetate was released mainly as 14CO2. Incorporation of 1-14C and 2-14C from acetate into amino acids and sugars in seedling axes was more intense when sucrose was added to the medium. However, in cotyledons where lipids are converted to carbohydrates, this process was inhibited by exogenous sucrose. Since acetate is the product of fatty acid beta-oxidation, our results indicate that, at least in lupine, seed storage lipids can be converted not only to sucrose, but mainly to amino acids. Inhibitory effects of sucrose on the incorporation of 14C from acetate into amino acids and sugars in cotyledons of lupine seedlings may be explained as the effect of regulation of the glyoxylate cycle by sugars. PMID:12806783

  7. Aqueous solutions of acidic ionic liquids for enhanced stability of polyoxometalate-carbon supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chenchen; Zhao, Enbo; Nitta, Naoki; Magasinski, Alexandre; Berdichevsky, Gene; Yushin, Gleb

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposites based on polyoxometalates (POMs) nanoconfined in microporous carbons have been synthesized and used as electrodes for supercapacitors. The addition of the pseudocapacitance from highly reversible redox reaction of POMs to the electric double-layer capacitance of carbon lead to an increase in specific capacitance of ∼90% at 1 mV s-1. However, high solubility of POM in traditional aqueous electrolytes leads to rapid capacity fading. Here we demonstrate that the use of aqueous solutions of protic ionic liquids (P-IL) as electrolyte instead of aqueous sulfuric acid solutions offers an opportunity to significantly improve POM cycling stability. Virtually no degradation in capacitance was observed in POM-based positive electrode after 10,000 cycles in an asymmetric capacitor with P-IL aqueous electrolyte. As such, POM-based carbon composites may now present a viable solution for enhancing energy density of electrical double layer capacitors (EDLC) based on pure carbon electrodes.

  8. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  9. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-10-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2-0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology.

  10. Facile Carbon Fixation to Performic Acids by Water-Sealed Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Mitsuo; Morita, Tatsuo; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation refers to the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic materials, as commonly performed in nature through photosynthesis by plants and other autotrophic organisms. The creation of artificial carbon fixation processes is one of the greatest challenges for chemistry to solve the critical environmental issue concerning the reduction of CO2 emissions. We have developed an electricity-driven facile CO2 fixation process that yields performic acid, HCO2OH, from CO2 and water at neutral pH by dielectric barrier discharge with an input electric power conversion efficiency of currently 0.2−0.4%. This method offers a promising future technology for artificial carbon fixation on its own, and may also be scaled up in combination with e.g., the post-combustion CO2 capture and storage technology. PMID:26439402

  11. Retreatment Predictions in Odontology by means of CBR Systems

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Livia; Aliaga, Ignacio J.; García, Alvaro Enrique; Villarubia, Gabriel; Corchado, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    The field of odontology requires an appropriate adjustment of treatments according to the circumstances of each patient. A follow-up treatment for a patient experiencing problems from a previous procedure such as endodontic therapy, for example, may not necessarily preclude the possibility of extraction. It is therefore necessary to investigate new solutions aimed at analyzing data and, with regard to the given values, determine whether dental retreatment is required. In this work, we present a decision support system which applies the case-based reasoning (CBR) paradigm, specifically designed to predict the practicality of performing or not performing a retreatment. Thus, the system uses previous experiences to provide new predictions, which is completely innovative in the field of odontology. The proposed prediction technique includes an innovative combination of methods that minimizes false negatives to the greatest possible extent. False negatives refer to a prediction favoring a retreatment when in fact it would be ineffective. The combination of methods is performed by applying an optimization problem to reduce incorrect classifications and takes into account different parameters, such as precision, recall, and statistical probabilities. The proposed system was tested in a real environment and the results obtained are promising. PMID:26884749

  12. Retreatment Predictions in Odontology by means of CBR Systems.

    PubMed

    Campo, Livia; Aliaga, Ignacio J; De Paz, Juan F; García, Alvaro Enrique; Bajo, Javier; Villarubia, Gabriel; Corchado, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The field of odontology requires an appropriate adjustment of treatments according to the circumstances of each patient. A follow-up treatment for a patient experiencing problems from a previous procedure such as endodontic therapy, for example, may not necessarily preclude the possibility of extraction. It is therefore necessary to investigate new solutions aimed at analyzing data and, with regard to the given values, determine whether dental retreatment is required. In this work, we present a decision support system which applies the case-based reasoning (CBR) paradigm, specifically designed to predict the practicality of performing or not performing a retreatment. Thus, the system uses previous experiences to provide new predictions, which is completely innovative in the field of odontology. The proposed prediction technique includes an innovative combination of methods that minimizes false negatives to the greatest possible extent. False negatives refer to a prediction favoring a retreatment when in fact it would be ineffective. The combination of methods is performed by applying an optimization problem to reduce incorrect classifications and takes into account different parameters, such as precision, recall, and statistical probabilities. The proposed system was tested in a real environment and the results obtained are promising.

  13. Retreatment Predictions in Odontology by means of CBR Systems.

    PubMed

    Campo, Livia; Aliaga, Ignacio J; De Paz, Juan F; García, Alvaro Enrique; Bajo, Javier; Villarubia, Gabriel; Corchado, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The field of odontology requires an appropriate adjustment of treatments according to the circumstances of each patient. A follow-up treatment for a patient experiencing problems from a previous procedure such as endodontic therapy, for example, may not necessarily preclude the possibility of extraction. It is therefore necessary to investigate new solutions aimed at analyzing data and, with regard to the given values, determine whether dental retreatment is required. In this work, we present a decision support system which applies the case-based reasoning (CBR) paradigm, specifically designed to predict the practicality of performing or not performing a retreatment. Thus, the system uses previous experiences to provide new predictions, which is completely innovative in the field of odontology. The proposed prediction technique includes an innovative combination of methods that minimizes false negatives to the greatest possible extent. False negatives refer to a prediction favoring a retreatment when in fact it would be ineffective. The combination of methods is performed by applying an optimization problem to reduce incorrect classifications and takes into account different parameters, such as precision, recall, and statistical probabilities. The proposed system was tested in a real environment and the results obtained are promising. PMID:26884749

  14. Controls on erosional retreat of the uplifted rift flanks at the Gulf of Suez and northern Red Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckler, Michael S.; Omar, Gomaa I.

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf of Suez and the Red Sea rigts are currently bordered by large asymmetric uplifts that are undergoing erosion. We find that the amount and timing of erosion vary systematically along the strike of the margin and have been controlled by variations in the perift stratigraphy. The perfit strata are compsoed of cliff-forming Eocene-Cretaceous carbonates overlaying the easily eroded Cretaceous-Cambrian 'Nubian' sandstone. This lithologic succession promotes scarp retreat of the sedimentary section, follwed by dissection of the underlying basement. The perift section thins from over 2000 m at the northern end of the rift to less htan 400 m at its junction with the Red Sea. Thus, at the northern part of the Gulf of Suez, the Nubian sandstone is minimally exposed, and the carbonates form a scarp at the rift border fault. Farther south, undercuttin of hte carbonates by erosion of the sandstion has resulted in scarp retreat. The escarpment cuts diagonally away from the border fault andis over 100 km inland from the border fault at the southernmost Gulf of Suez. The amount of retreat varies inversely with the sediment thickness. Exposure and erosion of basement are initiated by the retreate of the escarpment, and the depth of erosion, as indicated by fission track ages, increases with distance from the escarpment. These observations are explained by a model in which erosion along the Gulf of Suez is initiated as rift flank uplift becomes sufficiently large ot expose the friable sandstones. Undercutting the escarpment and exhumation of basement has been propagating northward and westward for at least 20 m.y. The average rate of scarp retreat has been 6 km/m.y. and the along-strike propagation of the erosion has been 12 km/m.y. The diachronous erosion of the rift flanks at the Gulf of Suez highlights the importance of distinguishing between the timing of uplift and of erosion. Both thermochronometric and stratigraphic data primarily indicate the timing of erosion, which

  15. Solubilities of stearic acid, stearyl alcohol, and arachidyl alcohol in supercritical carbon dioxide at 35[degree]C

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Yoshio; Koga, Yoshio; Maruyama, Hironori; Arai, Yasuhiko . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    The solubilities of stearic acid (octadecanoic acid), stearyl alcohol (1-octadecanol), and arachidyl alcohol (1-eicosanol) in supercritical carbon dioxide were measured by using a flow-type apparatus at 35 C up to 23.7 MPa. The solubilities of those substances and other fatty acids and higher alcohols in supercritical carbon dioxide at 35 C were correlated by a solution model based on the regular solution model coupled with the Flory-Huggins theory.

  16. Ancient low-molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw.

    PubMed

    Drake, Travis W; Wickland, Kimberly P; Spencer, Robert G M; McKnight, Diane M; Striegl, Robert G

    2015-11-10

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high-temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  17. Ancient low-molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw.

    PubMed

    Drake, Travis W; Wickland, Kimberly P; Spencer, Robert G M; McKnight, Diane M; Striegl, Robert G

    2015-11-10

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high-temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters.

  18. Ancient low–molecular-weight organic acids in permafrost fuel rapid carbon dioxide production upon thaw

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Travis W.; Wickland, Kimberly P.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Northern permafrost soils store a vast reservoir of carbon, nearly twice that of the present atmosphere. Current and projected climate warming threatens widespread thaw of these frozen, organic carbon (OC)-rich soils. Upon thaw, mobilized permafrost OC in dissolved and particulate forms can enter streams and rivers, which are important processors of OC and conduits for carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. Here, we demonstrate that ancient dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from 35,800 y B.P. permafrost soils is rapidly mineralized to CO2. During 200-h experiments in a novel high–temporal-resolution bioreactor, DOC concentration decreased by an average of 53%, fueling a more than sevenfold increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration. Eighty-seven percent of the DOC loss to microbial uptake was derived from the low–molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids acetate and butyrate. To our knowledge, our study is the first to directly quantify high CO2 production rates from permafrost-derived LMW DOC mineralization. The observed DOC loss rates are among the highest reported for permafrost carbon and demonstrate the potential importance of LMW DOC in driving the rapid metabolism of Pleistocene-age permafrost carbon upon thaw and the outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere by soils and nearby inland waters. PMID:26504243

  19. Utility of bortezomib retreatment in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma patients: a multicenter case series.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jeffrey; Richardson, Paul G; Schuster, Michael; LeBlanc, Annette; Walters, Ian B; Battleman, David S

    2008-10-01

    Bortezomib therapy has become an important part of the standard of care for patients with relapsed multiple myeloma, and preliminary clinical evidence suggests that bortezomib retreatment in patients previously treated with the drug may prolong disease control. This retrospective study was designed to clarify the utility of bortezomib as a repeat therapy. We reviewed records from 3 major cancer centers that had participated in the phase II (SUMMIT or CREST) or phase III (APEX) registration studies to identify patients who were subsequently retreated off protocol with bortezomib-based therapy. We found 22 patients who received bortezomib retreatment following a 60 or more day gap between bortezomib treatments. Twelve patients had intervening therapy between initial bortezomib treatment and bortezomib retreatment. During retreatment, 14 of 22 patients received bortezomib in combination with another antineoplastic agent. The overall response rate for bortezomib retreatment was 50% (9% complete responses). The median length of retreatment was 5.1 months in responding patients and 2.4 months in nonresponding patients. Therapy was terminated due to unmanageable toxicity in 2 patients during retreatment, compared with 6 patients during initial treatment. During retreatment, no patients required dose reduction due to peripheral neuropathy, compared to 4 patients during their initial treatment. Thus, bortezomib retreatment appears to be safe and effective. Favorable observed response rates with bortezomib retreatment suggest that it may be a viable option for relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma, even in patients previously exposed to bortezomib.

  20. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces.more » The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.« less

  1. The adsorption of gold, palladium and platinum from acidic chloride solutions on mesoporous carbons.

    SciTech Connect

    Zalupski, Peter R.; McDowell, Rocklan; Dutech, Guy

    2014-08-05

    Studies on the adsorption characteristics of gold, palladium and platinum on mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) and sulfur-impregnated mesoporous carbon (CMK-3/S) evaluated the benefits/drawbacks of the presence of a layer of elemental sulfur inside mesoporous carbon structures. Adsorption isotherms collected for Au(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) on those materials suggest that sulfur does enhance the adsorption of those metal ions in mildly acidic environment (pH 3). The isotherms collected in 1 M HCl show that the benefit of sulfur disappears due to the competing influence of large concentration of hydrogen ions on the ion-exchanging mechanism of metal ions sorption on mesoporous carbon surfaces. The collected acid dependencies illustrate similar adsorption characteristics for CMK-3 and CMK-3/S in 1-5 M HCl concentration range. Sorption of metal ions from diluted aqueous acidic mixtures of actual leached electronic waste demonstrated the feasibility of recovery of gold from such liquors.

  2. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively.

  3. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively. PMID:19459394

  4. Merging photoredox catalysis with Lewis acid catalysis: activation of carbon-carbon triple bonds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruiwen; Chen, Yiyong; Liu, Wangsheng; Xu, Dawen; Li, Yawei; Ding, Aishun; Guo, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Here, we demonstrate that merging photoredox catalysis with Lewis acid catalysis provides a fundamentally new activation mode of C-C triple bonds, to achieve the bond-forming reaction of alkynes with weak nucleophiles. Using a synergistic merger of Eosin Y and Cu(OTf)2, a highly efficient cyclization reaction of arene-ynes was developed. PMID:27432542

  5. Discrete carbon nanotubes increase lead acid battery charge acceptance and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swogger, Steven W.; Everill, Paul; Dubey, D. P.; Sugumaran, Nanjan

    2014-09-01

    Performance demands placed upon lead acid batteries have outgrown the technology's ability to deliver. These demands, typically leading to Negative Active Material (NAM) failure, include: short, high-current surges; prolonged, minimal, overvoltage charging; repeated, Ah deficit charging; and frequent deep discharges. Research shows these failure mechanisms are attenuated by inclusion of carbon allotropes into the NAM. Addition of significant quantities of carbon, however, produces detrimental changes in paste rheology, leading to lowered industrial throughput. Additionally, capacity, cold-cranking performance, and other battery metrics are negatively affected at high carbon loads. Presented here is Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative, a new battery additive comprising discrete carbon nanotubes (dCNT) which uniformly disperse within battery pastes during mixing. NS40ZL batteries containing dCNT show enhanced charge acceptance, reserve capacity, and cold-cranking performance, decreased risk of polarization, and no detrimental changes to paste properties, when compared to dCNT-free controls. This work focuses on the dCNT as NAM additives only, but early-stage research is underway to test their functionality as a PAM additive. Batteries infused with Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative address the needs of modern lead acid battery applications, produce none of the detrimental side effects associated with carbon additives, and require no change to existing production lines.

  6. Trihalomethane formation potential of aquatic and terrestrial fulvic and humic acids: Sorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Abouleish, Mohamed Y Z; Wells, Martha J M

    2015-07-15

    Humic substances (HSs) are precursors for the formation of hazardous disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination of water. Various surrogate parameters have been used to investigate the generation of DBPs by HS precursors and the removal of these precursors by activated carbon treatment. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC)- and ultraviolet absorbance (UVA254)-based isotherms are commonly reported and presumed to be good predictors of the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). However, THMFP-based isotherms are rarely published such that the three types of parameters have not been compared directly. Batch equilibrium experiments on activated carbon were used to generate constant-initial-concentration sorption isotherms for well-characterized samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). HSs representing type (fulvic acid [FA], humic acid [HA]), origin (aquatic, terrestrial), and geographical source (Nordic, Suwannee, Peat, Soil) were examined at pH6 and pH9. THMFP-based isotherms were generated and compared to determine if DOC- and UVA254-based isotherms were good predictors of the THMFP. The sorption process depended on the composition of the HSs and the chemical nature of the activated carbon, both of which were influenced by pH. Activated carbon removal of THM-precursors was pH- and HS-dependent. In some instances, the THMFP existed after UVA254 was depleted.

  7. Sulfated Carbon Quantum Dots as Efficient Visible-Light Switchable Acid Catalysts for Room-Temperature Ring-Opening Reactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Sun, Chenghua; Ali, Muataz; Zhou, Fengling; Zhang, Xinyi; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2015-07-13

    Acid catalytic processes play a classic and important role in modern organic synthesis. How well the acid can be controlled often plays the key role in the controllable synthesis of the products with high conversion yield and selectivity. The preparation of a novel, photo-switchable solid-acid catalyst based on carbon quantum dots is described. The carbon quantum dots are decorated with small amounts of hydrogensulfate groups and thus exhibit a photogenerated acidity that produces a highly efficient acid catalysis of the ring opening of epoxides with methanol and other primary alcohols. This reversible, light-switchable acidity is shown to be due to photoexcitation and charge separation in the carbon quantum dots, which create an electron withdrawing effect from the acidic groups. The catalyst is easily separated by filtration, and we demonstrate multiple cycles of its recovery and reuse.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of polylactic acid and polylactic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofibers through centrifugal spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patlan, Richard

    Biocompatible polymer nanofibers hold great potential in the biomedical engineering field. Their biodegradable nature and enhanced properties could help solve a wide array of health related problems, particularly in the areas of tissue regeneration, drug delivery, and biosensor design. The novel Forcespinning™ method allows the production of submicron fibers without many of the drawbacks found in electrospinning, while also providing a substantial increase in fiber production. The aim of the study was to utilize this method to fabricate non-woven nanofibrous mats composed of polylactic acid (PLA) and polylactic acid/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite fibers. The morphology, thermal properties, and crystalline structure of the resulting nanofibers were then characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD).

  9. Colloidal methods for the fabrication of carbon nanotube-manganese dioxide and carbon nanotube-polypyrrole composites using bile acids.

    PubMed

    Ata, M S; Zhitomirsky, I

    2015-09-15

    Nature inspired strategies have been developed for the colloidal processing of advanced composites for supercapacitor applications. New approach was based on the use of commercially available bile acid salts, such as sodium cholate (ChNa) and taurocholic acid sodium salt (TChNa). It was demonstrated that cholic acid (ChH) films can be obtained by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) from ChNa solutions. The analysis of deposition yield, quartz crystal microbalance and cyclic voltammetry data provided an insight into the anodic deposition mechanism. The outstanding suspension stability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), achieved using bile acids as anionic dispersants, allowed the fabrication of MWCNT films by EPD. The use of ChNa for EPD offered advantages of binding and film forming properties of this material. Composite MnO2-MWCNT films, prepared using ChNa as a dispersant and film forming agent for EPD, showed promising capacitive behavior. In another colloidal strategy, TChNa was used as a dispersant for MWCNT for the fabrication of polypyrrole (PPy) coated MWCNT. The use of PPy coated MWCNT allowed the fabrication of electrodes with high active mass loading, high capacitance and excellent capacitance retention at high charge-discharge rates. PMID:26001135

  10. Slab roll-back and trench retreat as controlling factor for basin subsidence in southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Christian; Winsemann, Jutta

    2015-04-01

    Slab roll-back and trench retreat are important factors for basin subsidence, magma generation and volcanism in arc-trench systems. Based on the sedimentary and tectonic record of the southern Central American island-arc we conclude that repeated phases of slab roll-back and trench retreats occurred the arc-trench system since the Late Cretaceous. These trench retreats were most probably related to the subduction of oceanic plateaus and seamounts and effected both the fore-arc and back-arc evolution. We used numerical basin modelling techniques to analyse the burial history of fore-arc and back-arc basins in Central America and combined the results with field data of the sedimentological evolution of the basin-fills. From the basin models, geohistory curves were extracted for the fore-arc and back-arc basins to derive the subsidence evolution. The Sandino Fore-arc Basin is characterized by low subsidence during the first 40 Myr. Since the Late Cretaceous the basin has a linear moderate subsidence with a phase of accelerated subsidence in the Oligocene. In the North and South Limón Back-arc Basin, subsidence started at approximately the same time as in the Sandino Fore-arc Basin. The North and South Limón Basins show a linear subsidence trend in the Paleocene and Eocene. Evidence for trench retreats is given by pulses of uplift in the outer-arc area, followed by subsidence in both the fore-arc and back-arc basins. The first slab roll-back probably occurred during the Early Paleocene. This is indicated by the collapse of carbonate platforms, and the re-deposition of large carbonate blocks into deep-water turbidites. A new pulse of uplift or decreased subsidence, respectively during the Late Eocene is attributed to subduction of rough crust. A subsequent slab detachment and the establishment of a new subduction zone further westward was described by Walther et al. (2000). Strong uplift affected the entire fore-arc area, which led to the deposition of very coarse

  11. Microwave-assisted polyol synthesis of carbon nitride dots from folic acid for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weiwei; Gu, Wei; Ye, Ling; Guo, Chenyang; Su, Su; Xu, Pinxiang; Xue, Ming

    2014-01-01

    A green, one-step microwave-assisted polyol synthesis was employed to prepare blue luminescent carbon nitride dots (CNDs) using folic acid molecules as both carbon and nitrogen sources. The as-prepared CNDs had an average size of around 4.51 nm and could be well dispersed in water. Under excitation at 360 nm, the CNDs exhibited a strong blue luminescence and the quantum yield was estimated to be 18.9%, which is greater than that of other reported CNDs. Moreover, the CNDs showed low cytotoxicity and could efficiently label C6 glioma cells, demonstrating their potential in cell imaging. PMID:25382977

  12. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  13. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Observations of Benzoic Acid Molecules Coadsorbed with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Au(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabot, Caroline; Clair, Sylvain; Kim, Yousoo; Kawai, Maki

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with benzoic acid molecules coadsorbed on a Au(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We studied the self-assembly of the benzoic acid overlayer on Au(111) terraces and along Au(111) step edges and compared the structure of this layer with the benzoic acid molecular structure along SWCNTs.

  14. Process characterization and influence of alternative carbon sources and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio on organic acid production by Aspergillus oryzae DSM1863.

    PubMed

    Ochsenreither, Katrin; Fischer, Christian; Neumann, Anke; Syldatk, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    L-Malic acid and fumaric acid are C4 dicarboxylic organic acids and considered as promising chemical building blocks. They can be applied as food preservatives and acidulants in rust removal and as polymerization starter units. Molds of the genus Aspergillus are able to produce malic acid in large quantities from glucose and other carbon sources. In order to enhance the production potential of Aspergillus oryzae DSM 1863, production and consumption rates in an established bioreactor batch-process based on glucose were determined. At 35 °C, up to 42 g/L malic acid was produced in a 168-h batch process with fumaric acid as a by-product. In prolonged shaking flask experiments (353 h), the suitability of the alternative carbon sources xylose and glycerol at a carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 200:1 and the influence of different C/N ratios in glucose cultivations were tested. When using glucose, 58.2 g/L malic acid and 4.2 g/L fumaric acid were produced. When applying xylose or glycerol, both organic acids are produced but the formation of malic acid decreased to 45.4 and 39.4 g/L, respectively. Whereas the fumaric acid concentration was not significantly altered when cultivating with xylose (4.5 g/L), it is clearly enhanced by using glycerol (9.3 g/L). When using glucose as a carbon source, an increase or decrease of the C/N ratio did not influence malic acid production but had an enormous influence on fumaric acid production. The highest fumaric acid concentrations were determined at the highest C/N ratio (300:1, 8.44 g/L) and lowest at the lowest C/N ratio (100:1, 0.7 g/L).

  15. Effect of magnesium carbonate on the solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability of fenofibric acid powder as an alkalising solubilizer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Soo; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Jin, Sung Giu; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Cho, Kwan Hyung; Li, Dong Xun; Woo, Jong Soo; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the possibility of developing a novel oral pharmaceutical product using fenofibric acid instead of choline fenofibrate, the powder properties, solubility, dissolution and pharmacokinetics in rats of fenofibrate, choline fenofibrate and fenofibric acid were compared. Furthermore, the effect of magnesium carbonate, an alkalising agent on the solubility, dissolution and oral bioavailability of fenofibric acid was assessed, a mixture of fenofibric acid and magnesium carbonate being prepared by simple blending at a weight ratio of 2/1. The three fenofibrate derivatives showed different particle sizes and melting points with similar crystalline shape. Fenofibric acid had a significantly higher aqueous solubility and dissolution than fenofibrate, but significantly lower solubility and dissolution than choline fenofibrate. However, the fenofibric acid/magnesium carbonate mixture greatly improved the solubility and dissolution of fenofibric acid with an enhancement to levels similar with those for choline fenofibrate. Fenofibric acid gave lower plasma concentrations, AUC and Cmax values compared to choline fenofibrate in rats. However, the mixture resulted in plasma concentrations, AUC and Cmax values levels not significantly different from those for choline fenofibrate. Specifically, magnesium carbonate increased the aqueous solubility, dissolution and bioavailability of fenofibric acid by about 7.5-, 4- and 1.6-fold, respectively. Thus, the mixture of fenofibric acid and magnesium carbonate at the weight ratio of 2/1 might be a candidate for an oral pharmaceutical product with improved oral bioavailability. PMID:26992922

  16. Selective Acidic Leaching of Spent Zinc-Carbon Batteries Followed by Zinc Electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalchian, Hossein; Rafsanjani-Abbasi, Ali; Vahdati-Khaki, Jalil; Babakhani, Abolfazl

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a selective acidic leaching procedure was employed for recycling zinc from spent zinc-carbon batteries. Leaching experiments were carried out in order to maximize zinc recovery and minimize manganese recovery in diluted sulfuric acid media. Response surface methodology and analysis of variance were employed for experimental design, data analysis, and leaching optimization. The experimental design has 28 experiments that include 24 main runs and four replicate in center point. The optimal conditions obtained from the selective acidic leaching experiments, were sulfuric acid concentration of 1 pct v/v, leaching temperature of 343 K (70 °C), pulp density of 8 pct w/v, and stirring speed of 300 rpm. The results show that the zinc and manganese recoveries after staged selective leaching are about 92 and 15 pct, respectively. Finally, metallic zinc with purity of 99.9 pct and electrolytic manganese dioxide were obtained by electrowinning.

  17. Optimization of modified carbon paste electrode with multiwalled carbon nanotube/ionic liquid/cauliflower-like gold nanostructures for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid.

    PubMed

    Afraz, Ahmadreza; Rafati, Amir Abbas; Najafi, Mojgan

    2014-11-01

    We describe the modification of a carbon paste electrode (CPE) with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an ionic liquid (IL). Electrochemical studies by using a D-optimal mixture design in Design-Expert software revealed an optimized composition of 60% graphite, 14.2% paraffin, 10.8% MWCNT and 15% IL. The optimal modified CPE shows good electrochemical properties that are well matched with model prediction parameters. In the next step, the optimized CPE was modified with gold nanostructures by applying a double-pulse electrochemical technique. The resulting electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It gives three sharp and well-separated oxidation peaks for ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA), and uric acid (UA). The sensor enables simultaneous determination of AA, DA and UA with linear responses from 0.3 to 285, 0.08 to 200, and 0.1 to 450 μM, respectively, and with 120, 30 and 30 nM detection limits (at an S/N of 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of AA, DA, and UA in spiked samples of human serum and urine.

  18. Dispersion Characteristics of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Gallic Acid.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaosong; Shao, Zhenyi; Li, Jingrui; Liu, Wanxia; Zhu, Degui; Liu, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Dispersions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MW-CNTs) assisted by non-covalent surface modification and covalent surface modification were prepared using different concentration of gallic acid aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the dispersion states and effect of MWNTs. FTIR results demonstrate that concentration of gallic acid has great effect on the surface modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes. With the content of gallic acid increasing, modification effect were firstly increased and then decreased in that the optimal concentration is about 10 μg/ml as it is its solubility in water. SEM and TEM results also show that gallic acid not only can ensure the integrity of the MW-CNTs, but also can purify it. These results confirmed achievement of a good dispersion state and effect of MW-CNTs with gallic acid. The dispersion mechanism of non-covalent surface modification and covalent surface modification was analyzed.

  19. Characterization of nano-lead-doped active carbon and its application in lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bo; Jiang, Liangxing; Xue, Haitao; Liu, Fangyang; Jia, Ming; Li, Jie; Liu, Yexiang

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, nano-lead-doped active carbon (nano-Pb/AC) composite with low hydrogen evolution current for lead-acid battery was prepared by ultrasonic-absorption and chemical-precipitate method. The nano-Pb/AC composite was characterized by SEM, EDS and TEM. The electrochemical characterizations are performed by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) in a three-electrode system. Since intermediate adsorption is the rate-determining step, the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is markedly inhibited as the intermediate adsorption impedance of nano-Pb/AC increased. Meanwhile, the working potential of nano-Pb/AC is widened to the whole potential region of Pb negative plate (from -1.36 V to -0.86 V vs. Hg/HgSO4) in lead-acid battery. In addition, nano-Pb can improve the interfacial compatibility between AC and Pb paste, accordingly relieve the symptoms of carbon floatation. Finally, 2.0 V single-cell flooded lead-acid batteries with 1.0 wt.% nano-Pb/AC or 1.0 wt.% AC addition in negative active materials are assembled. The cell performances test results show that the 3 h rate capacity, quick charging performance, high current discharging performance and cycling performance of nano-Pb/AC modified battery are all improved compared with regular lead-acid battery and AC modified lead-acid battery.

  20. Photocatalytic degradation of L-acid by TiO2 supported on the activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Wang, Lian-Jun; Peng, Pan-Ying

    2006-01-01

    TiO2 sol was prepared by sol-gel technique with tetrabutyl titanate as precursor. Supported TiO2 catalysts on activated carbon were prepared by soak and sintering method. The aggregation of nano-TiO2 particles can be effectively suppressed by added polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a surface modifier. The average particle diameter of TiO2, specific surface area and absorbability of catalyst can be modified. Based on characteristics of the TiO2 photocatalyst with XRD, specific surface area, adsorption valves of methylene blue and the amount of TiO2 supported on the activated carbon, the photocatalytic degradation of L-acid was studied. The effect of the factors, such as pH of the solution, the initial concentration of L-acid on the photocatalytic degradation of L-acid, were studied also. It was found that when the pH of the solution is 1.95, the amount of photocatalyst is 0.5 g, the concentration of the L-acid solution is 1.34 x 10(-3) mol/L and the illumination time is 7 h, the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of L-acid can reach 89.88%. The catalyst was reused 6 times and its degradation efficiency hardly changed.

  1. Carbon quantum dots with photo-generated proton property as efficient visible light controlled acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haitao; Liu, Ruihua; Kong, Weiqian; Liu, Juan; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Xing; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-12-01

    Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34.7-46.2%, respectively) in water solution under visible light, while the 1-4 nm CQDs and 10-2000 nm graphite do not have such excellent catalytic activity. The use of 5-10 nm CQDs as a light responsive and controllable photocatalyst is truly a novel application of carbon-based nanomaterials, which may significantly push research in the current catalytic industry, environmental pollution and energy issues.Developing light-driven acid catalyst will be very meaningful for the controlled-acid catalytic processes towards a green chemical industry. Here, based on scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and ΔpH testing, we demonstrate that the 5-10 nm carbon quantum dots (CQDs) synthesized by electrochemical ablation of graphite have strong light-induced proton properties under visible light in solution, which can be used as an acid catalyst. The 5-10 nm CQDs' catalytic activity is strongly dependent on the illumination intensity and the temperature of the reaction system. As an effective visible light driven and controlled acid-catalyst, 5-10 nm CQDs can catalyze a series of organic reactions (esterification, Beckmann rearrangement and aldol condensation) with high conversion (34

  2. Surface and catalytic properties of acid metal carbons prepared by the sol gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado-Serrano, J.; Rojas-Cervantes, M. L.; Martín-Aranda, R. M.; López-Peinado, A. J.; Gómez-Serrano, V.

    2006-06-01

    The sol-gel method has been applied for the synthesis of a series of acid metal-carbon xerogels (with M = V, Cr, Mo and Ni) by polymerisation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in the presence of metallic precursors. A blank sample was also prepared without any metal addition. The xerogels were heated in nitrogen at 1000 °C to obtain the pyrolysed products. The samples were characterised by different techniques such as thermal-mass spectrometry analysis, gas physisorption, and mercury porosimetry. In addition, the acid character of the pyrolysed products was tested by the Claisen-Schmidt condensation between benzaldehyde and acetophenone for the formation of chalcones.

  3. Carbon nanotubes as SPE sorbents for the extraction of salicylic acid from river water.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Díaz, Encarnación; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2014-02-01

    This paper deals with the ability of different types of carbon nanotubes to adsorb salicylic acid in river water samples. The use of these nanoparticles as a sorbent in a SPE procedure prior to CE analysis is essential for improving the enrichment factor and the recovery values. Several experimental variables were optimized in order to maximize the extraction efficiency. The proposed analytical method is simple, fast, and entails low solvent consumption. Furthermore, salicylic acid could be extracted from river water providing good recovery values in the range from 76.2 to 102.0% (RSD<8.2%). The combination of the specific chemical properties of analyte and the unique physicochemical features of carbon nanotubes sheds new light on the use of these nanoparticles as excellent sorbent materials of pharmaceutical compounds in environmental matrices.

  4. Miniaturized ascorbic acid fuel cells with flexible electrodes made of graphene-coated carbon fiber cloth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Kazuki; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Sumi, Hisato; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2016-04-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is a biologically friendly compound and exists in many products such as sports drinks, fruit, and even in human blood. Thus, a miniaturized and flexible ascorbic acid fuel cell (AAFC) is expected be a power source for portable or implantable electric devices. In this study, we fabricated an AAFC with anode and cathode dimensions of 3 × 10 mm2 made of a graphene-coated carbon fiber cloth (GCFC) and found that GCFC electrodes significantly improve the power generated by the AAFC. This is because the GCFC has more than two times the effective surface area of a conventional carbon fiber cloth and it can contain more enzymes. The power density of the AAFC in a phosphate buffer solution containing 100 mM AA at room temperature was 34.1 µW/cm2 at 0.46 V. Technical issues in applying the AAFC to portable devices are also discussed.

  5. Isotopic composition of Murchison organic compounds: Intramolecular carbon isotope fractionation of acetic acid. Simulation studies of cosmochemical organic syntheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, G. U.; Cronin, J. R.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, in our laboratories, samples of Murchison acetic acid were decarboxylated successfully and the carbon isotopic composition was measured for the methane released by this procedure. These analyses showed significant differences in C-13/C-12 ratios for the methyl and carboxyl carbons of the acetic acid molecule, strongly suggesting that more than one carbon source may be involved in the synthesis of the Murchison organic compounds. On the basis of this finding, laboratory model systems simulating cosmochemical synthesis are being studied, especially those processes capable of involving two or more starting carbon sources.

  6. Protective effect of boric acid against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Keles, Hikmet; Erdogan, Metin; Hazman, Omer; Kucukkurt, Ismail

    2012-07-01

    The protective effect of boric acid against liver damage was evaluated by its attenuation of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced hepatotoxicity in mice. Male albino mice were treated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with boric acid (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) or silymarin daily for 7 days and received 0.2% CCl(4) in olive oil (10 mL/kg, i.p.) on day 7. Results showed that administration of boric acid significantly reduced the elevation in serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and the level of malondialdehyde in the liver that were induced by CCl(4) in mice. Boric acid treatment significantly increased glutathione content, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the liver. Boric acid treatment improved the catalytic activity of cytochrome P450 2E1 and maintained activation of nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cell gene expression, with no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in the livers of mice. Histopathologically, clear decreases in the severity of CCl(4)-induced lesions were observed, particularly at high boric acid concentrations. Results suggest that boric acid exhibits potent hepatoprotective effects on CCl(4)-induced liver damage in mice, likely the result of both the increase in antioxidant-defense system activity and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  7. The erosion of carbonate stone by acid rain: Laboratory and field investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    One of the goals of research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone surfaces is to define the incremental impact of acidic deposition relative to natural weathering processes on the rate of carbonate stone erosion. If rain that impacts carbonate stone surfaces is resident on the surface long enough to approach chemical equilibrium, the incremental effect of hydrogen ion is expected to be small (i.e., 6% for a rain of pH 4.0). Under nonequilibrium (i.e., high flow rate) conditions, kinetic considerations suggest that the incremental effect of hydrogen ion deposition could be quite significant. Field run-off experiments involving the chemical analysis of rain collected from inclined stone slabs have been used to evaluate stone dissolution processes under ambient conditions of wet and dry deposition of acidic species. The stoichiometry of the reaction of stone with hydrogen ion is difficult to define from the field data due to scatter in the data attributed to hydrodynamic effects. Laboratory run-off experiments show that the stoichiometry is best defined by a reaction with H+ in which CO2 is released from the system. The baseline effect caused by water in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 is identical in the field and in laboratory simulation. The experiments show that the solutions are close enough to equilibrium for the incremental effect of hydrogen ion to be minor (i.e., 24% for marble for a rain of pH 4.0) relative to dissolution due to water and carbonic acid reactions. Stone erosion rates based on physical measurement are approximately double the recession rates that are due to dissolution (estimated from the observed calcium content of the run-off solutions). The difference may reflect the loss of granular material not included in recession estimates based on the run-off data. Neither the field nor the laboratory run-off experiments indicate a pH dependence for the grain-removal process.

  8. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM) with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10-0.12 h(-1)), biomass (0.7-0.8 g cells/g Substrate) and product (0.14-0.15 g DHA/g cells) yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct. PMID:26690180

  9. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  10. Biotechnological Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid Using Aurantiochytrium limacinum: Carbon Sources Comparison And Growth Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Sergi; Turon, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Aurantiochytrium limacinum, a marine heterotrophic protist/microalga has shown interesting yields of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) when cultured with different carbon sources: glucose, pure and crude glycerol. A complete study in a lab-scale fermenter allowed for the characterization and comparison of the growth kinetic parameters corresponding to each carbon source. Artificial Marine Medium (AMM) with glucose, pure and crude glycerol offered similar biomass yields. The net growth rates (0.10–0.12 h−1), biomass (0.7–0.8 g cells/g Substrate) and product (0.14–0.15 g DHA/g cells) yields, as well as DHA productivity were similar using the three carbon sources. Viable potential applications to valorize crude glycerol are envisioned to avoid an environmental problem due to the excess of byproduct. PMID:26690180

  11. Free nitrous acid pretreatment of wasted activated sludge to exploit internal carbon source for enhanced denitrification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Peng, Yongzhen; Wei, Yan; Li, Baikun; Bao, Peng; Wang, Yayi

    2015-03-01

    Using internal carbon source contained in waste activated sludge (WAS) is beneficial for nitrogen removal from wastewater with low carbon/nitrogen ratio, but it is usually limited by sludge disintegration. This study presented a novel strategy based on free nitrous acid (FNA) pretreatment to intensify the release of organic matters from WAS for enhanced denitrification. During FNA pretreatment, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) production kept increasing when FNA increased from 0 to 2.04 mg HNO2-N/L. Compared with untreated WAS, the internal carbon source production increased by 50% in a simultaneous fermentation and denitrification reactor fed with WAS pretreated by FNA for 24 h at 2.04 mg HNO2-N/L. This also increased denitrification efficiency by 76% and sludge reduction by 87.5%. More importantly, greenhouse gas nitrous oxide production in denitrification was alleviated since more electrons could be provided by FNA pretreated WAS.

  12. Influence of dissolved organic carbon content on modelling natural organic matter acid-base properties.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Cédric; Mounier, Stéphane; Benaïm, Jean Yves

    2004-10-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) behaviour towards proton is an important parameter to understand NOM fate in the environment. Moreover, it is necessary to determine NOM acid-base properties before investigating trace metals complexation by natural organic matter. This work focuses on the possibility to determine these acid-base properties by accurate and simple titrations, even at low organic matter concentrations. So, the experiments were conducted on concentrated and diluted solutions of extracted humic and fulvic acid from Laurentian River, on concentrated and diluted model solutions of well-known simple molecules (acetic and phenolic acids), and on natural samples from the Seine river (France) which are not pre-concentrated. Titration experiments were modelled by a 6 acidic-sites discrete model, except for the model solutions. The modelling software used, called PROSECE (Programme d'Optimisation et de SpEciation Chimique dans l'Environnement), has been developed in our laboratory, is based on the mass balance equilibrium resolution. The results obtained on extracted organic matter and model solutions point out a threshold value for a confident determination of the studied organic matter acid-base properties. They also show an aberrant decreasing carboxylic/phenolic ratio with increasing sample dilution. This shift is neither due to any conformational effect, since it is also observed on model solutions, nor to ionic strength variations which is controlled during all experiments. On the other hand, it could be the result of an electrode troubleshooting occurring at basic pH values, which effect is amplified at low total concentration of acidic sites. So, in our conditions, the limit for a correct modelling of NOM acid-base properties is defined as 0.04 meq of total analysed acidic sites concentration. As for the analysed natural samples, due to their high acidic sites content, it is possible to model their behaviour despite the low organic carbon concentration.

  13. In vitro inhibition of salicylic acid derivatives on human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isozymes I and II.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Esra; Senturk, Murat; Kufrevioglu, O Irfan; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2008-10-15

    The inhibition of two human cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (hCA, EC 4.2.1.1) isozymes, hCA I and II, with a series of salicylic acid derivatives was investigated by using the esterase method with 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate. IC(50) values for sulfasalazine, diflunisal, 5-chlorosalicylic acid, dinitrosalicylic acid, 4-aminosalicylic acid, 4-sulfosalicylic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid, salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and 3-metylsalicylic acid were of 3.04 microM, 3.38 microM, 4.07 microM, 7.64 microM, 0.13 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.42 mM, 0.56 mM, 2.71 mM and 3.07 mM for hCA I and of 4.49 microM, 2.70 microM, 0.72 microM, 2.80 microM, 0.75 mM, 0.72 mM, 0.29 mM, 0.68 mM, 1.16 mM and 4.70 mM for hCA II, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots were also used for the determination of the inhibition mechanism of these substituted phenols, most of which were noncompetitive inhibitors with this substrate. Some salicylic acid derivatives investigated here showed effective hCA I and II inhibitory activity, and might be used as leads for generating enzyme inhibitors eventually targeting other isoforms which have not been assayed yet for their interactions with such agents.

  14. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Joseph R; Kline, La'Kesha C; Kenyon, William J

    2015-10-26

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H₂O₂). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth.

  15. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth.

  16. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth. PMID:27682115

  17. Neutralizing Carbonic Acid in Deep Carbonate Strata below the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Klaus Lackner; Charles Harvey; Bruce Watson

    2008-01-14

    Carbon dioxide injection into deep sea sediments below 2700 m water depth and a few hundred meters to fifteen hundred meters deep in the sediment column may provide permanent geologic storage by gravitational trapping. At high pressures and low temperatures common in deep sea sediments a few hundred meters below sea floor, CO{sub 2} will be in its liquid phase and will be denser than the overlying pore fluid. The lower density of the pore fluid provides a cap to the denser CO{sub 2} and ensures gravitational trapping in the short term. The overall storage capacity for CO{sub 2} in such deep sea formations below the ocean floor is primarily determined by the permeability, and will vary with seafloor depth, geothermal gradient, porosity, and pore water salinity. Furthermore, the dissemination of the injected CO{sub 2} in the sediments and potential chemical reactions between CO{sub 2}, pore fluid and sediments will define its fate in the storage reservoir. The main objectives of our research was to evaluate the potential for sub-seabed CO{sub 2} storage in deep sea sediments using a range of approaches including experiments, permeability analysis, and modeling. Over the course of the three-year award, our results support an important role for sub-seabed storage in a diverse portfolio of carbons sequestration options. Our analysis has shown the feasibility of this type of storage, and also emphasizes that escape or leakage from such sites would be negligible. The most difficult challenge is to overcome the low permeability of typical deep-sea sediments, and a variety of approaches are suggested for future research.

  18. Activated carbon cleanup of the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur plants

    SciTech Connect

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the details of a recently developed novel process using activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur recovery units. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This effect is especially evident in split flow Claus plants which bypass some of the acid gas feed stream around the initial combustion step because of a low hydrogen sulfide concentration. This new clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}{sup +} hydrocarbons from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated using low pressure steam. A post regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. This technology was extensively pilot tested in Saudi Aramco`s facilities in Saudi Arabia. Full scale commercial units are planned for two plants in the near future with the first coming on-line in 1997. The process described here represents the first application of activated carbon in this service, and a patent has been applied for. The paper will discuss the pilot plant results and the issues involved in scale-up to commercial size.

  19. Tracing Carbon Sources through Aquatic and Terrestrial Food Webs Using Amino Acid Stable Isotope Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Thomas; Ventura, Marc; Andersen, Nils; O’Brien, Diane M.; Piatkowski, Uwe; McCarthy, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Tracing the origin of nutrients is a fundamental goal of food web research but methodological issues associated with current research techniques such as using stable isotope ratios of bulk tissue can lead to confounding results. We investigated whether naturally occurring δ13C patterns among amino acids (δ13CAA) could distinguish between multiple aquatic and terrestrial primary production sources. We found that δ13CAA patterns in contrast to bulk δ13C values distinguished between carbon derived from algae, seagrass, terrestrial plants, bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, we showed for two aquatic producers that their δ13CAA patterns were largely unaffected by different environmental conditions despite substantial shifts in bulk δ13C values. The potential of assessing the major carbon sources at the base of the food web was demonstrated for freshwater, pelagic, and estuarine consumers; consumer δ13C patterns of essential amino acids largely matched those of the dominant primary producers in each system. Since amino acids make up about half of organismal carbon, source diagnostic isotope fingerprints can be used as a new complementary approach to overcome some of the limitations of variable source bulk isotope values commonly encountered in estuarine areas and other complex environments with mixed aquatic and terrestrial inputs. PMID:24069196

  20. Tracing carbon sources through aquatic and terrestrial food webs using amino acid stable isotope fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Thomas; Ventura, Marc; Andersen, Nils; O'Brien, Diane M; Piatkowski, Uwe; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Tracing the origin of nutrients is a fundamental goal of food web research but methodological issues associated with current research techniques such as using stable isotope ratios of bulk tissue can lead to confounding results. We investigated whether naturally occurring δ(13)C patterns among amino acids (δ(13)CAA) could distinguish between multiple aquatic and terrestrial primary production sources. We found that δ(13)CAA patterns in contrast to bulk δ(13)C values distinguished between carbon derived from algae, seagrass, terrestrial plants, bacteria and fungi. Furthermore, we showed for two aquatic producers that their δ(13)CAA patterns were largely unaffected by different environmental conditions despite substantial shifts in bulk δ(13)C values. The potential of assessing the major carbon sources at the base of the food web was demonstrated for freshwater, pelagic, and estuarine consumers; consumer δ(13)C patterns of essential amino acids largely matched those of the dominant primary producers in each system. Since amino acids make up about half of organismal carbon, source diagnostic isotope fingerprints can be used as a new complementary approach to overcome some of the limitations of variable source bulk isotope values commonly encountered in estuarine areas and other complex environments with mixed aquatic and terrestrial inputs.

  1. N-doped carbon nanomaterials are durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shui, Jianglan; Wang, Min; Du, Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-02-01

    The availability of low-cost, efficient, and durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a prerequisite for commercialization of the fuel cell technology. Along with intensive research efforts of more than half a century in developing nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) to replace the expensive and scarce platinum-based catalysts, a new class of carbon-based, low-cost, metal-free ORR catalysts was demonstrated to show superior ORR performance to commercial platinum catalysts, particularly in alkaline electrolytes. However, their large-scale practical application in more popular acidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells remained elusive because they are often found to be less effective in acidic electrolytes, and no attempt has been made for a single PEM cell test. We demonstrated that rationally designed, metal-free, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and their graphene composites exhibited significantly better long-term operational stabilities and comparable gravimetric power densities with respect to the best NPMC in acidic PEM cells. This work represents a major breakthrough in removing the bottlenecks to translate low-cost, metal-free, carbon-based ORR catalysts to commercial reality, and opens avenues for clean energy generation from affordable and durable fuel cells.

  2. N-doped carbon nanomaterials are durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in acidic fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Jianglan; Wang, Min; Du, Feng; Dai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, efficient, and durable catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a prerequisite for commercialization of the fuel cell technology. Along with intensive research efforts of more than half a century in developing nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) to replace the expensive and scarce platinum-based catalysts, a new class of carbon-based, low-cost, metal-free ORR catalysts was demonstrated to show superior ORR performance to commercial platinum catalysts, particularly in alkaline electrolytes. However, their large-scale practical application in more popular acidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells remained elusive because they are often found to be less effective in acidic electrolytes, and no attempt has been made for a single PEM cell test. We demonstrated that rationally designed, metal-free, nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and their graphene composites exhibited significantly better long-term operational stabilities and comparable gravimetric power densities with respect to the best NPMC in acidic PEM cells. This work represents a major breakthrough in removing the bottlenecks to translate low-cost, metal-free, carbon-based ORR catalysts to commercial reality, and opens avenues for clean energy generation from affordable and durable fuel cells. PMID:26601132

  3. Amino acid diagenesis, organic carbon and nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments from the inner Oslofjord, Norway

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, J.E. ); Lichtentaler, R. )

    1991-06-01

    Total hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA), total organic carbon (TOC), and total nitrogen (TN) have been measured in an oxic and anoxic surface sediment from the inner Oslofjord. Downcore variations of these parameters are ascribed to both diagenesis and changes in organic matter supply, the latter being most important. These changes are most prominent in the anoxic sediment, which reflects the eutrophication history of the innermost part of the fjord. Downcore, THAA content decreased from 3.8 to 2.0 mg/g (salt-free dry weight) in the oxic sediment and from 22.3 to 3.8 mg/g in the anoxic sediment. Total amino acid nitrogen varied between 17 and 34% of total nitrogen in the oxic, and 25 and 54% in the anoxic, sediment. Organic carbon and organic nitrogen accumulation rates and depth integrated mineralization rates are about three times higher in the anoxic sediment than in the oxic sediment. Recycling of amino acids accounted for 4 to 12% of the total organic carbon and 13 to 40% of the total organic nitrogen regenerated in these sediments.

  4. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    SciTech Connect

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal; Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  5. Potentially bioavailable natural organic carbon and hydrolyzable amino acids in aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Lashun K.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Novak, John T.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Benner, Ronald; Kaiser, Karl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between concentrations of operationally defined potentially bioavailable organic -carbon (PBOC) and hydrolyzable amino acids (HAAs) in sediments collected from a diverse range of chloroethene--contaminated sites. Concentrations of PBOC and HAA were measured using aquifer sediment samples collected at six selected study sites. Average concentrations of total HAA and PBOC ranged from 1.96 ± 1.53 to 20.1 ± 25.6 mg/kg and 4.72 ± 0.72 to 443 ± 65.4 mg/kg, respectively. Results demonstrated a statistically significant positive relationship between concentrations of PBOC and total HAA present in the aquifer sediment (p < 0.05). Higher levels of HAA were consistently observed at sites with greater levels of PBOC and first-order decay rates. Because amino acids are known to be readily biodegradable carbon compounds, this relationship suggests that the sequential chemical extraction procedure used to measure PBOC is a useful indicator of bioavailable carbon in aquifer sediments. This, in turn, is consistent with the interpretation that PBOC measurements can be used for estimating the amount of natural organic carbon available for driving the reductive dechlorination of chloroethenes in groundwater systems.

  6. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) inhibition of the dissolved inorganic carbon concentrating process in unicellular green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, A.; Tolbert, N.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution, for measuring K{sub 0.5}(CO{sub 2} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K{sub i}(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO{sub 2} uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar NaHCO{sub 3}), and the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} fixation with 100 micromolar ({sup 14}C)HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O{sub 2} evolution and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO{sub 3}. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO{sub 2} accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  7. Salicylhydroxamic Acid (SHAM) Inhibition of the Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Concentrating Process in Unicellular Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Goyal, A; Tolbert, N E

    1990-03-01

    Rates of photosynthetic O(2) evolution, for measuring K(0.5)(CO(2) + HCO(3) (-)) at pH 7, upon addition of 50 micromolar HCO(3) (-) to air-adapted Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, or Scenedesmus cells, were inhibited up to 90% by the addition of 1.5 to 4.0 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) to the aqueous medium. The apparent K(1)(SHAM) for Chlamydomonas cells was about 2.5 millimolar, but due to low solubility in water effective concentrations would be lower. Salicylhydroxamic acid did not inhibit oxygen evolution or accumulation of bicarbonate by Scenedesmus cells between pH 8 to 11 or by isolated intact chloroplasts from Dunaliella. Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid appears to inhibit CO(2) uptake, whereas previous results indicate that vanadate inhibits bicarbonate uptake. These conclusions were confirmed by three test procedures with three air-adapted algae at pH 7. Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibited the cellular accumulation of dissolved inorganic carbon, the rate of photosynthetic O(2) evolution dependent on low levels of dissolved inorganic carbon (50 micromolar Na-HCO(3)), and the rate of (14)CO(2) fixation with 100 micromolar [(14)C] HCO(3) (-). Salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition of O(2) evolution and (14)CO(2)-fixation was reversed by higher levels of NaHCO(3). Thus, salicylhydroxamic acid inhibition was apparently not affecting steps of photosynthesis other than CO(2) accumulation. Although salicylhydroxamic acid is an inhibitor of alternative respiration in algae, it is not known whether the two processes are related.

  8. Adsorption of aromatic organic acids onto high area activated carbon cloth in relation to wastewater purification.

    PubMed

    Ayranci, Erol; Duman, Osman

    2006-08-25

    Adsorption of aromatic organic acids: benzoic acid (BA), salicylic acid (SA), p-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) and nicotinic acid (NA), onto high area activated carbon cloth from solutions in 0.4 M H(2)SO(4), in water at natural pH, in 0.1 M NaOH and also from solutions having pH 7.0 were studied by in situ UV-spectroscopic technique. The first-order rate law was found to be applicable for the kinetic data of adsorption. The rates and extents of adsorption of the organic acids were the highest from water or 0.4 M H(2)SO(4) solutions and the lowest from 0.1 M NaOH solution. The order of rates and extents of adsorption of the four organic acids in each of the four solutions (0.4 M H(2)SO(4), water, solution of pH 7.0 and 0.1 M NaOH) was determined as SA>BA>NA approximately pABA. These observed orders were explained in terms of electrostatic, dispersion and hydrogen bonding interactions between the surface and the adsorbate species, taking the charge of the carbon surface and the adsorbate in each solution into account. Adsorption of BA in molecular form or in benzoate form was analyzed by treating the solution as a mixture of two components and applying Lambert-Beer law to two-component system. The adsorption isotherm data of the systems studied were derived at 30 degrees C and fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich equations. PMID:16442224

  9. 13C Incorporation into Signature Fatty Acids as an Assay for Carbon Allocation in Arbuscular Mycorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Pål Axel; van Aarle, Ingrid M.; Gavito, Mayra E.; Bengtson, Per; Bengtsson, Göran

    2005-01-01

    The ubiquitous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi consume significant amounts of plant assimilated C, but this C flow has been difficult to quantify. The neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 is a quantitative signature for most arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots and soil. We measured carbon transfer from four plant species to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices by estimating 13C enrichment of 16:1ω5 and compared it with 13C enrichment of total root and mycelial C. Carbon allocation to mycelia was detected within 1 day in monoxenic arbuscular mycorrhizal root cultures labeled with [13C]glucose. The 13C enrichment of neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 extracted from roots increased from 0.14% 1 day after labeling to 2.2% 7 days after labeling. The colonized roots usually were more enriched for 13C in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 than for the root specific neutral lipid fatty acid 18:2ω6,9. We labeled plant assimilates by using 13CO2 in whole-plant experiments. The extraradical mycelium often was more enriched for 13C than was the intraradical mycelium, suggesting rapid translocation of carbon to and more active growth by the extraradical mycelium. Since there was a good correlation between 13C enrichment in neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1ω5 and total 13C in extraradical mycelia in different systems (r2 = 0.94), we propose that the total amount of labeled C in intraradical and extraradical mycelium can be calculated from the 13C enrichment of 16:1ω5. The method described enables evaluation of C flow from plants to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to be made without extraction, purification and identification of fungal mycelia. PMID:15870350

  10. Contributions of modern and dead organic carbon to individual fatty acid homologues in spring aerosols collected from northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Matsumoto, Kohei; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) and stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) have been used as proxies to evaluate the contributions of modern/fossil carbon and marine/terrestrial organic matter, respectively, in geochemical samples. However, there are few such studies in atmospheric aerosols. Here, we measured 14C contents and δ13C of individual n-fatty acids in an aerosol sample collected from northern Japan in spring 2001 during Asian dust season. Our results show that the distribution of fatty acids in the spring aerosols was characterized by a strong even/odd carbon number predominance with two maxima at C16 and C26. Their δ13C (range: -30.6 to -20.5‰) showed higher values (average: -24.5‰) for lower molecular weight (LMW) fatty acids (C16 - C19) and lower values (average: -29.7‰) for higher MW (HMW) fatty acids (C20 - C32). This difference suggests that LMW acids are mainly derived from lacustrine and/or marine algal sources whereas HMW acids are predominantly from terrestrial C3 higher plants. Δ14C values of fatty acids were found to range from -96.9 to +122.9‰ with lower values for HMW acids and higher values for LMW acids. LMW acids in the aerosols contain only modern carbon. In contrast, HMW acids ≥C24 were found to contain up to 9.7 wt% dead carbon, although their major portion (up to 92.3%) is composed of modern carbon. Backward trajectory analyses indicated that the source regions of the spring aerosols were dominated by central and north China (62%). This study suggests that the old fatty acids in the spring aerosols are most likely originated from the loess deposits in China via long-range atmospheric transport over the western North Pacific, although their contribution to the aerosols was relatively small.

  11. An amperometric uric acid biosensor based on chitosan-carbon nanotubes electrospun nanofiber on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Numnuam, Apon; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2014-06-01

    A novel amperometric uric acid biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing uricase on an electrospun nanocomposite of chitosan-carbon nanotubes nanofiber (Chi-CNTsNF) covering an electrodeposited layer of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on a gold electrode (uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au). The uric acid response was determined at an optimum applied potential of -0.35 V vs Ag/AgCl in a flow-injection system based on the change of the reduction current for dissolved oxygen during oxidation of uric acid by the immobilized uricase. The response was directly proportional to the uric acid concentration. Under the optimum conditions, the fabricated uric acid biosensor had a very wide linear range, 1.0-400 μmol L(-1), with a very low limit of detection of 1.0 μmol L(-1) (s/n = 3). The operational stability of the uricase/Chi-CNTsNF/AgNPs/Au biosensor (up to 205 injections) was excellent and the storage life was more than six weeks. A low Michaelis-Menten constant of 0.21 mmol L(-1) indicated that the immobilized uricase had high affinity for uric acid. The presence of potential common interfering substances, for example ascorbic acid, glucose, and lactic acid, had negligible effects on the performance of the biosensor. When used for analysis of uric acid in serum samples, the results agreed well with those obtained by use of the standard enzymatic colorimetric method (P > 0.05). PMID:24718436

  12. Adsorption and properties of aromatic amino acids on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cuihong; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Ruiqin; Lin, Zijing

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the adsorption of three aromatic amino acids--phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan--on the sidewalls of a number of representative single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using density-functional tight-binding calculations, complemented by an empirical dispersion correction. The armchair (n, n) SWNTs (n = 3-12) and zigzag (n, 0) SWNTs (n = 4-12) were thoroughly examined. We found that the most stable amino acid/SWNT complexes for different SWNTs have similar local structures, and that the distance between the amino acid and SWNT is about 3 Å. Owing to the π-π and H-π stacking interactions, the benzene and indole rings are not exactly parallel to the SWNTs but instead lie at a small angle. We also investigated the diameter and chirality dependences of binding energies and found that SWNT (5, 0) has an especially large binding energy that can be used for SWNT identification or selection.

  13. Characterization and surface properties of amino-acid-modified carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite particles.

    PubMed

    Jack, Kevin S; Vizcarra, Timothy G; Trau, Matt

    2007-11-20

    The surface properties (nature, strength, and stability of interaction of functional groups) and bulk morphologies of a series of amino-acid-functionalized carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite (CHA) particles were investigated. It was found that the amino acids were both occluded in and presented on the surface of the CHA particles. Furthermore, their presence enhanced particle colloidal stability by retardation of Ostwald ripening and in some cases increasing the magnitude of the zeta-potential. Measurements of adsorption isotherms and zeta-potential titrations have shown that the amino-acid-surface interactions are weak and reversible at pH 9 and consistent with a model in which the carboxyl terminus interacts with calcium ions in the CHA lattice. Complexities in adsorption behavior are discussed in terms of different adsorption mechanisms that may be prevalent at different pHs.

  14. Supported zirconium sulfate on carbon nanotubes as water-tolerant solid acid catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, Joon Ching; Jiang Yajie; Meng Xiujuan; Cao Weiliang; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar; Zhang Jingchang . E-mail: zhangjc1@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2007-07-03

    A new solid acid of zirconium sulfate (CZ) was successfully supported on carbon nanotube (CNT) for esterification reaction. Preparation conditions of the supported CZ have been investigated, to obtain highest catalytic activity for esterification reaction. XRD, TEM, BET, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and in situ FTIR analysis has also been carried out to understand the characteristics of the catalyst. In the esterification of acrylic acid with n-octanol, the supported CZ exhibited high catalytic activity and stability. The catalytic activity was nearly unchanged during four times of reuse. XRD and TEM analysis indicated that CZ was finely dispersed on CNT. XPS analysis shows that the CZ species was preserved and the chemical environment of the CZ has changed after loaded on CNT. This finding show that CNT as CZ support is an efficient water-tolerant solid acid.

  15. Formation of isomers of anionic hemiesters of sugars and carbonic acid in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Vagner B; Vidal, Denis T R; Francisco, Kelliton J M; Ducati, Lucas C; do Lago, Claudimir L

    2016-06-16

    Hemiesters of carbonic acid can be freely formed in aqueous media containing HCO3(-)/CO2 and mono- or poly-hydroxy compounds. Herein, (13)C NMR spectroscopy was used to identify isomers formed in aqueous solutions of glycerol (a prototype compound) and seven carbohydrates, as well as to estimate the equilibrium constant of formation (Keq). Although both isomers are formed, glycerol 1-carbonate corresponds to 90% of the product. While fructose and ribose form an indistinct mixture of isomers, the anomers of d-glucopyranose 6-carbonate correspond to 74% of the eight isomers of glucose carbonate that were detected. The values of Keq for the disaccharides sucrose (4.3) and maltose (4.2) are about twice the values for the monosaccharides glucose (2.0) and fructose (2.3). Ribose (Keq = 0.89)-the only sugar without a significant concentration of a species containing a -CH2OH group in an aqueous solution-resulted in the smallest Keq. On the basis of the Keq value and the concentrations of HCO3(-) and glucose in blood, one can anticipate a concentration of 2-4 µmol L(-1) for glucose 6-carbonate, which corresponds to ca. of 10% of its phosphate counterpart (glucose 6-phosphate).

  16. Modeling the rate and style of Arctic coastal retreat along the Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, K. R.; Anderson, R. S.; Overeem, I.; Wobus, C. W.; Clow, G. D.; Urban, F. E.; Stanton, T. P.

    2010-12-01

    In Arctic landscapes, modern surface warming has significantly altered geomorphic process rates. Along the Beaufort Sea coastline bounding Alaska’s North Slope, the mean annual coastal erosion rate has doubled from ~7 m/yr for 1955-1979 to ~14 m/yr for 2002-2007 (Mars and Houseknecht, 2007). Locally the erosion rate can reach 30 m/yr, with short-term rates that are far greater than this. A robust understanding of the processes that govern the rate of coastal erosion is required in order to predict the response of the coast and its adjacent landscape to a rapidly changing climate, with implications for sediment and carbon fluxes, oilfield infrastructure, and animal habitat. Constrained by time-lapse imagery, and by measurements of both the oceanic and atmospheric conditions, we have developed a numerical model to capture the evolution of the permafrost bluffs on the North Slope. During the sea ice-free season, relatively warm waters melt a notch into the ice-rich silt that comprises the 4-m tall bluffs. The bluffs ultimately fail by toppling of polygonal blocks bounded by mechanically weak ice-wedges that are spaced roughly 10-20 m apart. The toppled blocks then temporarily armor the coast against further attack. The annual retreat rate is controlled by the length of the sea ice-free season, water and air temperatures, and the wave history. Honoring the high ice content of the bluff materials, we employ a positive degree day algorithm to govern subaerial melt, and an iceberg melting algorithm to determine rate of notch incision. In the iceberg melting algorithm, the local instantaneous melt rate goes as the product of the temperature difference between seawater and bluff material, the sea state, captured by the ratio of wave height to wave period, and the ratio of ice surface roughness to wave height to the 0.2 power (Kubat et al., 2007). The calculated instantaneous melt rate is adjusted to account for the ambient temperature of the permafrost and the presence of

  17. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Objectives Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. Materials and Methods In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. Results It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Conclusions Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery

  18. Mobility of acid-treated carbon nanotubes in water-saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Peng, X J; Du, C J; Liang, Z; Wang, J; Luan, Z K; Li, W J

    2011-01-01

    The production, use, and disposal of nanomaterials may inevitably lead to their appearance in water. With the development of new industries around nanomaterials, it seems necessary to be concerned about the transport of nanomaterials in the environment. In this paper, the transport of acid-treated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in porous media was investigated. Before the mobility investigation, the stability of acid-treated CNT dispersions was studied using ultraviolet-visible spectra and it was indicated that, under the chemical conditions employed in this work, there was no apparent aggregation. The mobility investigation showed that transport of acid-treated CNTs increased with treatment time due to increase in particle zeta potential. Carbon nanotubes treated with nitric acid for 2, 6, and 12 h possessed measured zeta potentials of -30.0, -43.0, and -48.5 mV, respectively. Utilizing clean-bed filtration theory, we showed that acid-treated CNTs have the potential to migrate 3.28, 5.67, and 7.69 m in saturated glass beads, respectively. We showed that solution ionic strength and pH have important effects on the mobility of acid-treated CNTs. Increasing the pH from 6.0 to 7.9 resulted in an increase in migration potential from 2.96 to 10.86 m. Increasing the ionic strength from 0.005 to 0.020 M resulted in a decrease in CNT migration potential from 5.67 to 1.42 m.

  19. Chemisorption of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Powdered Activated Carbon Initiated by Persulfate in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Ma, Jun; Sedlak, David L

    2016-07-19

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a perfluorocarboxylic acid that is difficult to treat by most conventional methods. As a result, it is often removed from solution by adsorption on powdered activated carbon (PAC), followed by incineration of the spent carbon. To provide a new approach for treatment, PFOA was exposed to sulfate radicals (SO4(-•)) produced by thermolysis of persulfate (S2O8(2-)) in the presence of PAC. Under acidic conditions, thermal activation of persulfate resulted in transformation of PFOA to shorter-chain-length perfluorinated compounds, as previously reported. However, when thermolysis of persulfate occurred under circumneutral pH conditions in the presence of PAC, a new removal pathway for PFOA was observed. Under these conditions, the removal of PFOA was attributable to chemisorption, a process in which PAC catalyzed persulfate decomposition and reacted with the transformation products to produce covalently bound PFOA. At PAC concentrations between 200 and 1000 mg/L and an initial PFOA concentration of 0.5 μM, covalent bonding resulted in removal of 10-40% of the PFOA. Under these conditions, the process resulted in removal of more than half of a more hydrophilic perfluoroalkyl acid (i.e., perfluorobutanoic acid, PFBA), which was greater than the amount of PFBA removed by physical adsorption on PAC. Although the high reaction temperatures (i.e., 80 °C) and relatively high doses of PAC used in this study may be impractical for drinking water treatment, this process may be applied to the treatment of these recalcitrant compounds in industrial wastewater, reverse osmosis concentrate, and other waters that contain high concentrations of PFOA and other perfluorocarboxylic acids. PMID:27336204

  20. Insights into lateral marsh retreat mechanism through localized field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendoni, M.; Mel, R.; Solari, L.; Lanzoni, S.; Francalanci, S.; Oumeraci, H.

    2016-02-01

    Deterioration of salt marshes may be due to several factors related to increased anthropic pressure, sea level rise, and erosive processes. While salt marshes can reach equilibrium in the vertical direction, adapting to sea level rise, they are inherently unstable in the horizontal direction. Marsh boundaries are characterized by scarps with bare sediment below the vegetated surface layer that can be easily removed by wave-induced erosion. In this work, we explore the different mechanisms involved in the erosion of marsh borders through the interpretation of field data. The analysis is based on a systematic field monitoring of a salt marsh in the Venice Lagoon subject to lateral erosion. Measurements included horizontal retreat of the scarp at various locations and wave height in front of the marsh during three storm surges. Continuous erosion and mass failures alternated during the observed period, leading to an average retreat up to 80 cm/yr. The data, collected roughly every month for 1.5 year, indicate that the linear relation that links the observed erosion rate to the impinging wave power exhibits a larger slope than that already estimated in literature on the basis of long-term surveys. Moreover, an increase in the gradient of erodibility is detected along the marsh scarp, due to the combined action of soil strengthening by vegetation on the marsh surface and the impact of wave breaking at the bank toe, which promote cantilever failures and increase the lateral erosion rate.

  1. A Palaeohydrological Shift during Neogene East Antarctic Ice Sheet Retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees-Owen, R. L.; Newton, R.; Ivanovic, R. F.; Francis, J.; Tindall, J. C.; Riding, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The East Antarctic Ice Sheet is an important driver of global climate, playing a particular role in governing albedo and atmospheric circulation (eg. Singh et al., 2013). Recent evidence from marine sediment and terrestrial glaciovolcanic sequences suggests that the EAIS underwent periodic retreat and collapse in response to warmer climates during the late Neogene (14 to 3 million years ago). Mummified prostrate trees recovered from palaeosols at Oliver Bluffs in the Beardmore Glacier region, Transantarctic Mountains (85° S), represent a rare insight into the terrestrial palaeoclimate during one of these periods of retreat. Prostrate trees are an understudied but useful tool for interrogating endmember (e.g. periglacial) environments at high altitudes and latitudes. We present exciting new palaeoclimate data from the sequence at Oliver Bluffs. δ18O analysis of tree ring cellulose suggests that Antarctic summer palaeoprecipitation was enriched relative to today (-25 to -5‰ for ancient, -35 to -20‰ for modern); consistent with our isotope-enabled general circulation model simulations. The MBT/CBT palaeothermometer gives a summer temperature of 3-6ºC, consistent with other palaeobotanical climate indices. These geological and model data have wide-ranging implications for our understanding of the hydrological cycle during this time period. We present data suggesting that changes in moisture recycling and source region indicate a markedly different hydrological cycle.

  2. Dissociation of carbonic acid: gas phase energetics and mechanism from ab initio metadynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Padma; Kalinichev, Andrey G; Kirkpatrick, R James

    2007-05-28

    A comprehensive metadynamics study of the energetics, stability, conformational changes, and mechanism of dissociation of gas phase carbonic acid, H2CO3, yields significant new insight into these reactions. The equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, and conformer energies calculated using the density functional theory are in good agreement with the previous theoretical predictions. At 315 K, the cis-cis conformer has a very short life time and transforms easily to the cis-trans conformer through a change in the O=C-O-H dihedral angle. The energy difference between the trans-trans and cis-trans conformers is very small (approximately 1 kcal/mol), but the trans-trans conformer is resistant to dissociation to carbon dioxide and water. The cis-trans conformer has a relatively short path for one of its hydroxyl groups to accept the proton from the other end of the molecule, resulting in a lower activation barrier for dissociation. Comparison of the free and potential energies of dissociation shows that the entropic contribution to the dissociation energy is less than 10%. The potential energy barrier for dissociation of H2CO3 to CO2 and H2O from the metadynamics calculations is 5-6 kcal/mol lower than in previous 0 K studies, possibly due to a combination of a finite temperature and more efficient sampling of the energy landscape in the metadynamics calculations. Gas phase carbonic acid dissociation is triggered by the dehydroxylation of one of the hydroxyl groups, which reorients as it approaches the proton on the other end of the molecule, thus facilitating a favorable H-O-H angle for the formation of a product H2O molecule. The major atomic reorganization of the other part of the molecule is a gradual straightening of the O=C=O bond. The metadynamics results provide a basis for future simulation of the more challenging carbonic acid-water system.

  3. [Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on 5-keto-gluconic acid production].

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhilei; Wang, Hongcui; Wei, Yuqiao; Li, Yanyan; Zhong, Cheng; Jia, Shiru

    2014-01-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans is known to oxidize glucose to gluconic acid (GA), and subsequently, to 2-keto-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-gluconic acid (5KGA), while 5KGA can be converted to L-(+)-tartaric acid. In order to increase the production of 5KGA, Gluconobacter oxydans HGI-1 that converts GA to 5KGA exclusively was chosen in this study, and effects of carbon sources (lactose, maltose, sucrose, amylum and glucose) and nitrogen sources (yeast extract, fish meal, corn steep liquor, soybean meal and cotton-seed meal) on 5KGA production were investigated. Results of experiment in 500 mL shake-flask show that the highest yield of 5KGA (98.20 g/L) was obtained using 100 g/L glucose as carbon source. 5KGA reached 100.20 g/L, 109.10 g/L, 99.83 g/L with yeast extract, fish meal and corn steep liquor as nitrogen source respectively, among which the optimal nitrogen source was fish meal. The yield of 5KGA by corn steep liquor is slightly lower than that by yeast extract. For the economic reason, corn steep liquor was selected as nitrogen source and scaled up to 5 L stirred-tank fermentor, and the final concentration of 5KGA reached 93.80 g/L, with its maximum volumetric productivity of 3.48 g/(L x h) and average volumetric productivity of 1.56 g/(L x h). The result obtained in this study showed that carbon and nitrogen sourses for large-scale production of 5KGA by Gluconobacter oxydans HGI-1 were glucose and corn steep liquor, respectively, and the available glucose almost completely (85.93%) into 5KGA.

  4. Regulation of Senescence in Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus): Effect of Abscisic Acid and Carbon Dioxide on Ethylene Production.

    PubMed

    Mayak, S; Dilley, D R

    1976-11-01

    Abscisic acid hastened senescence of carnation flowers and this was preceded by stimulation of accelerated ethylene production. Carbon dioxide delayed the onset of autocatalytic ethylene production in flowers regardless of treatment with abscisic acid. Flowers exhibited a low and transient climacteric of ethylene production without wilting while in 4% carbon dioxide and underwent accelerated ethylene production culminating in wilting when removed from carbon dioxide. Hypobaric ventilation, which lowers ethylene to hyponormal levels within tissues, extended flower longevity and largely negated enhancement of senescence by abscisic acid. Supplementing hypobarically ventilated flowers with ethylene hastened senescence irrespective of abscisic acid treatment. Collectively, the data indicate that abscisic acid hastens senescence of carnations largely as a result of advancing the onset of autocatalytic ethylene production.

  5. Simultaneous Determination of Dopamine, Serotonin and Ascorbic Acid at a Glassy Carbon Electrode Modified with Carbon-Spheres

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianqing; Sheng, Meili; Jiang, Xueyue; Wu, Guozhi; Gao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    A novel glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with carbon-spheres has been fabricated through a simple casting procedure. The modified GCE displays high selectivity and excellent electrochemical catalytic activities towards dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and ascorbic acid (AA). In the co-existence system, the peak separations between AA and DA, DA and 5-HT, and AA and 5-HT are large up to 230, 180, and 410 mV, respectively. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) has been employed to simultaneously detect DA, 5-HT, and AA, and the linear calibration curves for DA, 5-HT, and AA are obtained in the range of 20.0–150.0 μM, 40.0–750.0 μM and 300.0–2,000.0 μM with detection limits (S/N = 3) of 2.0 μM, 0.7 μM and 0.6 μM, respectively. The proposed electrode has been applied to detect DA, 5-HT, and AA in real samples using standard addition method with satisfactory results. PMID:24135993

  6. Theoretical study of inhibition efficiencies of some amino acids on corrosion of carbon steel in acidic media: green corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dehdab, Maryam; Shahraki, Mehdi; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition efficiencies of three amino acids [tryptophan (B), tyrosine (c), and serine (A)] have been studied as green corrosion inhibitors on corrosion of carbon steel using density functional theory (DFT) method in gas and aqueous phases. Quantum chemical parameters such as EH OMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), E LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), hardness (η), polarizability ([Formula: see text]), total negative charges on atoms (TNC), molecular volume (MV) and total energy (TE) have been calculated at the B3LYP level of theory with 6-311++G** basis set. Consistent with experimental data, theoretical results showed that the order of inhibition efficiency is tryptophan (B) > tyrosine (C) > serine (A). In order to determine the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks, local reactivity has been evaluated through Fukui indices.

  7. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes among retreatment patients registered by private practitioners in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Win, A N; Edginton, M E; Hinderaker, S G; Minn, N N; Linn, A K

    2012-09-21

    The objectives of this retrospective cohort study were to report treatment outcomes and identify factors associated with treatment failure among all retreatment tuberculosis (TB) patients registered in the public-private mix DOTS programme of Populations Services International-Myanmar over 6 years. Among 3643 retreatment patients, 2657 (73%) were successfully treated and 309 (8.5%) failed. This study shows that retreatment patients who have failed treatment for their first TB episode are almost twice as likely to fail a second time (13.5%). We have identified some key programmatic challenges associated with retreatment TB in the private sector, and steps are being taken to address this issue.

  8. Acidity and origin of dissolved organic carbon in different vegetation zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruška, Jakub; Oulehle, Filip; Myška, Oldřích; Chuman, Tomáš

    2016-04-01

    The acid/base character of aquatic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been studied intensively during recent decades with regard to the role of DOC in stream water acidity and the balance between natural acidity and anthropogenic acidification. Recently, DOC has been shown to play an important role in preindustrial surface waters. Studies focused on the acid/base properties of DOC have been carried out in mainly in Europe and North America and paint a conflicting picture. Some studies reported large differences in acid base properties, sometimes between quite similar and nearby localities, or between seasons at the same site. Other studies, however, found similar acid/base properties in waters from a variety of sites, sometimes far from each other as well as stable acid/base properties at the same site through different seasons or runoff events. Site density of DOC (amount of carboxylic groups per milligram of DOC) and SUVA was measured for streams (or small tundra ponds respectively) from the tundra in northern Alaska, boreal zone of Sweden, western Czech Republic (temperate region), and tropical Congo rain forest in central Africa. At least 10 samples from each region were taken from surface waters during the growing season. Titration of carboxylic groups after proton saturation on cation-exchange resin was used for site density determination. Despite very different climatic and vegetation properties and internal variation within a region, there was no statistically significant difference among regions for site density (it varied between 10.2-10.5 ueq/mg DOC) as well as for SUVA (tested by ANOVA). Results suggest that different vegetation and climate produced generally the same DOC in respect of acid/base character and SUVA. It also suggests that use of the one analytical technique was more important than differences between climatic zones itself.

  9. Dissolved organic carbon for upland acidic and acid sensitive catchments in mid-Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Colin; Robson, Alice J.; Neal, Margaret; Reynolds, Brian

    2005-03-01

    The distribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rainfall, cloud water, spruce throughfall and stemflow, stream runoff and groundwater is described for the Plynlimon catchments in mid-Wales for up to 20 years of record. Rainfall concentrations average at 0.69 mg-C l -1 while equivalent values in cloud water are over three times higher. Spruce throughfall and stemflow averages are over an order of magnitude higher than rainfall. DOC averages are around 1.5 mg-C l -1 for most streams draining moorland and forested areas but much higher values occur for streams draining from organic-rich gley soils in the forest. Groundwater concentrations typically average about 0.5 mg-C l -1. For forested sites where felling has taken place, this has typically resulted in little change for either the streams or the groundwater, but larger changes can occur for a small stream drainage area with gley soils. For rainfall, DOC concentrations increased from 1983 to 1993 and then declined thereafter to 2003. For the streams draining forest there has been a fairly uniform rise in DOC concentrations over time throughout the period of typically about 0.055 mg-C l -1 year -1. However, when the influence of season, air temperature and flow was filtered out of the 'raw' time series, there appeared a residual trend for 1983-1993 and a moderate levelling off from 1983 onwards the streams draining forest. One moorland stream showed a lower gradient barely significant from zero, but this may be partially because data was only available from 1990. The variation in gradient across the sites for the full monitoring period of each of the streams was 0.019-0.146 mg-C l -1 year -1 for the raw and 0-0.113 mg-C l -1 year -1 for the residual time series.

  10. Controls on the microbial utilization of carbon monoxide and formic acid in Acidic Hydrothermal Springs in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urschel, M.; Kubo, M. W.; Hoehler, T. M.; Boyd, E. S.; Peters, J.

    2012-12-01

    In hydrothermal systems, dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) in the presence of reduced iron-bearing minerals, such as those found in basalt, can be reduced to form formic acid (HCOOH). HCOOH can then be dehydrated in a side reaction, resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), which forms an equilibrium with HCOOH. HCOOH can also be further reduced to methane, and longer chain hydrocarbons. Geochemical measurements have demonstrated the presence of elevated concentrations of HCOOH, dissolved CO, and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, H2CO3), in high temperature, low pH springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Likewise, a number of compounds that could potentially serve as electron acceptors (e.g. S0, SO42-, NO3-, Fe3+) in the oxidation of CO or formic acid have been detected in many of these systems. We hypothesized that the utilization of CO and HCOOH as carbon and/or energy sources is a broadly-distributed metabolic strategy in high temperature, low pH springs in YNP. To test this hypothesis, radiolabeled CO (14CO) and HCOOH (H14COOH) were used to determine rates of CO and formate oxidation activity in three hot springs in YNP ranging in temperature from 53 °C to 89 °C and pH from 2.5 to 5.3. In parallel, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and enrichment isolation techniques were employed to identify the microorganisms responsible for these activities. Our results indicate that CO and HCOOH are important sources of carbon and/or energy in high temperature, low pH hydrothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park. Rates of CO oxidation appear to be orders of magnitude lower than those of HCOOH oxidation. One possible explanation for this result is that HCOOH is preferentially utilized, consistent with thermodynamic calculations indicating that HCOOH liberates approximately 215 kJ/mol more Gibbs energy (under standard conditions) than CO when oxidized with oxygen (O2) as the electron acceptor. Redox couples of HCOOH oxidation with other electron acceptors (e.g. SO4

  11. Poly(lactic acid)/Carbon Nanotube Fibers as Novel Platforms for Glucose Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; Mattoso, Luiz Henrique Capparelli; Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the development and investigation of properties of new nanostructured architecture for biosensors applications. Highly porous nanocomposite fibers were developed for use as active materials in biosensors. The nanocomposites comprised poly(lactic acid)(PLA)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) fibers obtained via solution-blow spinning onto indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of nanocomposite-modified ITO electrodes were investigated toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection. We investigated the effect of carbon nanotube concentration and the time deposition of fibers on the sensors properties, viz., sensitivity and limit of detection. Cyclic voltammetry experiments revealed that the nanocomposite-modified electrodes displayed enhanced activity in the electrochemical reduction of H2O2, which offers a number of attractive features to be explored in development of an amperometric biosensor. Glucose oxidase (GOD) was further immobilized by drop coating on an optimized ITO electrode covered by poly(lactic acid)/carbon nanotube nanofibrous mats. The optimum biosensor response was linear up to 800 mM of glucose with a sensitivity of 358 nA·mM-1 and a Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) of 4.3 mM. These results demonstrate that the solution blow spun nanocomposite fibers have great potential for application as amperometric biosensors due to their high surface to volume ratio, high porosity and permeability of the substrate. The latter features may significantly enhance the field of glucose biosensors. PMID:25585633

  12. Electroplated reticulated vitreous carbon current collectors for lead-acid batteries: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, Elod; Jung, Joey; Mahato, Basanta

    Reticulated, open-cell structures based on vitreous carbon substrates electroplated with a Pb-Sn (1 wt.%) alloy were investigated as current collectors for lead-acid batteries. Scanning and backscattered electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, anodic polarization and flooded 2 V single-cell battery testing was employed to characterize the performance of the proposed collectors. A battery equipped with pasted electroplated reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) electrodes of 137 cm 2 geometric area, at the time of manuscript submission, completed 500 cycles and over 1500 h of continuous operation. The cycling involved discharges at 63 A kg PAM-1 corresponding to a nominal 0.75 h rate and a positive active mass (PAM) utilization efficiency of 21%. The charging protocol was composed of two voltage limited (i.e. 2.6 V/cell), constant current steps of 35 and 9.5 A kg PAM-1, respectively, with a total duration of about 2 h. The charge factor was 1.05-1.15. The observed cycling behavior in conjunction with the versatility of electrodeposition to produce application-dependent optimized lead alloy coating thickness and composition shows promise for the development of lead-acid batteries using electroplated reticulated vitreous carbon collectors.

  13. High Acetic Acid Production Rate Obtained by Microbial Electrosynthesis from Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Jourdin, Ludovic; Grieger, Timothy; Monetti, Juliette; Flexer, Victoria; Freguia, Stefano; Lu, Yang; Chen, Jun; Romano, Mark; Wallace, Gordon G; Keller, Jurg

    2015-11-17

    High product specificity and production rate are regarded as key success parameters for large-scale applicability of a (bio)chemical reaction technology. Here, we report a significant performance enhancement in acetate formation from CO2, reaching comparable productivity levels as in industrial fermentation processes (volumetric production rate and product yield). A biocathode current density of -102 ± 1 A m(-2) and an acetic acid production rate of 685 ± 30 (g m(-2) day(-1)) have been achieved in this study. High recoveries of 94 ± 2% of the CO2 supplied as the sole carbon source and 100 ± 4% of electrons into the final product (acetic acid) were achieved after development of a mature biofilm, reaching an elevated product titer of up to 11 g L(-1). This high product specificity is remarkable for mixed microbial cultures, which would make the product downstream processing easier and the technology more attractive. This performance enhancement was enabled through the combination of a well-acclimatized and enriched microbial culture (very fast start-up after culture transfer), coupled with the use of a newly synthesized electrode material, EPD-3D. The throwing power of the electrophoretic deposition technique, a method suitable for large-scale production, was harnessed to form multiwalled carbon nanotube coatings onto reticulated vitreous carbon to generate a hierarchical porous structure. PMID:26484732

  14. [Seasonality and contribution to acid rain of the carbon abundance in rainwater].

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Song, Zhi-guang; Liu, Jun-feng; Wang, Cui-ping

    2008-02-01

    This paper reports the results from a study of the carbon abundance in rainwater of Guangzhou city, China. The determination of TOC, DOC, POC and PEC helps to study the seasonality of carbon abundance and its contribution to the acid rain. The results display the fact that the average contents of TOC, DOC, POC and PEC are 7.10 mg/L, 3.58 mg/L, 3.60 mg/L and 0.72 mg/L, respectively. These results confirm the deep effect of the organic pollutant to the rain. The seasonality exists in the carbon abundance of rainwater. The contents of TOC and DOC are up to the maximum in spring and the minimum in summer; the contribution of POC to TOC in summer is obviously higher than that in other seasons; and the relative content of POC is clearly higher in dry season than that in wet season. The seasonality reflects the more emission of the total pollutant in spring and the solid particle pollutant in summer than those in other seasons. Moreover, the emission of the organic pollutant from the mobile vehicles is more obvious in dry season than that in wet season. The contents of TOC and DOC have the negative correlation to the pH values, which confirms the contribution effect of the organic pollutant, such as vehicle emission, to the acid rain.

  15. Poly(lactic acid)/Carbon Nanotube Fibers as Novel Platforms for Glucose Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; Mattoso, Luiz Henrique Capparelli; Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the development and investigation of properties of new nanostructured architecture for biosensors applications. Highly porous nanocomposite fibers were developed for use as active materials in biosensors. The nanocomposites comprised poly(lactic acid)(PLA)/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) fibers obtained via solution-blow spinning onto indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of nanocomposite-modified ITO electrodes were investigated toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection. We investigated the effect of carbon nanotube concentration and the time deposition of fibers on the sensors properties, viz., sensitivity and limit of detection. Cyclic voltammetry experiments revealed that the nanocomposite-modified electrodes displayed enhanced activity in the electrochemical reduction of H2O2, which offers a number of attractive features to be explored in development of an amperometric biosensor. Glucose oxidase (GOD) was further immobilized by drop coating on an optimized ITO electrode covered by poly(lactic acid)/carbon nanotube nanofibrous mats. The optimum biosensor response was linear up to 800 mM of glucose with a sensitivity of 358 nA·mM−1 and a Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) of 4.3 mM. These results demonstrate that the solution blow spun nanocomposite fibers have great potential for application as amperometric biosensors due to their high surface to volume ratio, high porosity and permeability of the substrate. The latter features may significantly enhance the field of glucose biosensors. PMID:25585633

  16. High Acetic Acid Production Rate Obtained by Microbial Electrosynthesis from Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Jourdin, Ludovic; Grieger, Timothy; Monetti, Juliette; Flexer, Victoria; Freguia, Stefano; Lu, Yang; Chen, Jun; Romano, Mark; Wallace, Gordon G; Keller, Jurg

    2015-11-17

    High product specificity and production rate are regarded as key success parameters for large-scale applicability of a (bio)chemical reaction technology. Here, we report a significant performance enhancement in acetate formation from CO2, reaching comparable productivity levels as in industrial fermentation processes (volumetric production rate and product yield). A biocathode current density of -102 ± 1 A m(-2) and an acetic acid production rate of 685 ± 30 (g m(-2) day(-1)) have been achieved in this study. High recoveries of 94 ± 2% of the CO2 supplied as the sole carbon source and 100 ± 4% of electrons into the final product (acetic acid) were achieved after development of a mature biofilm, reaching an elevated product titer of up to 11 g L(-1). This high product specificity is remarkable for mixed microbial cultures, which would make the product downstream processing easier and the technology more attractive. This performance enhancement was enabled through the combination of a well-acclimatized and enriched microbial culture (very fast start-up after culture transfer), coupled with the use of a newly synthesized electrode material, EPD-3D. The throwing power of the electrophoretic deposition technique, a method suitable for large-scale production, was harnessed to form multiwalled carbon nanotube coatings onto reticulated vitreous carbon to generate a hierarchical porous structure.

  17. Carbonic anhydrase activators: Activation of the β-carbonic anhydrase from Malassezia globosa with amines and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    The β-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the dandruff producing fungus Malassezia globosa, MgCA, was investigated for its activation with amines and amino acids. MgCA was weakly activated by amino acids such as L-/D-His, L-Phe, D-DOPA, D-Trp, L-/D-Tyr and by the amine serotonin (KAs of 12.5-29.3μM) but more effectively activated by d-Phe, l-DOPA, l-Trp, histamine, dopamine, pyridyl-alkylamines, and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-morpholine, with KAs of 5.82-10.9μM. The best activators were l-adrenaline and 1-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, with activation constants of 0.72-0.81μM. This study may help a better understanding of the activation mechanisms of β-CAs from pathogenic fungi as well as the design of tighter binding ligands for this enzyme which is a drug target for novel types of anti-dandruff agents.

  18. Carbonic anhydrase activators: Activation of the β-carbonic anhydrase from Malassezia globosa with amines and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    The β-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the dandruff producing fungus Malassezia globosa, MgCA, was investigated for its activation with amines and amino acids. MgCA was weakly activated by amino acids such as L-/D-His, L-Phe, D-DOPA, D-Trp, L-/D-Tyr and by the amine serotonin (KAs of 12.5-29.3μM) but more effectively activated by d-Phe, l-DOPA, l-Trp, histamine, dopamine, pyridyl-alkylamines, and 4-(2-aminoethyl)-morpholine, with KAs of 5.82-10.9μM. The best activators were l-adrenaline and 1-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, with activation constants of 0.72-0.81μM. This study may help a better understanding of the activation mechanisms of β-CAs from pathogenic fungi as well as the design of tighter binding ligands for this enzyme which is a drug target for novel types of anti-dandruff agents. PMID:26856923

  19. Biometrics from the carbon isotope ratio analysis of amino acids in human hair.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Glen P; An, Yan; Konstantynova, Kateryna I; Rashaid, Ayat H B

    2015-01-01

    This study compares and contrasts the ability to classify individuals into different grouping factors through either bulk isotope ratio analysis or amino-acid-specific isotope ratio analysis of human hair. Using LC-IRMS, we measured the isotope ratios of 14 amino acids in hair proteins independently, and leucine/isoleucine as a co-eluting pair, to provide 15 variables for classification. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the essential amino acids and non-essential amino acids were mostly independent variables in the classification rules, thereby enabling the separation of dietary factors of isotope intake from intrinsic or phenotypic factors of isotope fractionation. Multivariate analysis revealed at least two potential sources of non-dietary factors influencing the carbon isotope ratio values of the amino acids in human hair: body mass index (BMI) and age. These results provide evidence that compound-specific isotope ratio analysis has the potential to go beyond region-of-origin or geospatial movements of individuals-obtainable through bulk isotope measurements-to the provision of physical and characteristic traits about the individuals, such as age and BMI. Further development and refinement, for example to genetic, metabolic, disease and hormonal factors could ultimately be of great assistance in forensic and clinical casework.

  20. Pd clusters supported on amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres for hydrogen production from formic acid.

    PubMed

    Bulushev, Dmitri A; Bulusheva, Lyubov G; Beloshapkin, Sergey; O'Connor, Thomas; Okotrub, Alexander V; Ryan, Kevin M

    2015-04-29

    Amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres on the order of a few micrometers in size were prepared by carbonization of squalane (C30H62) in supercritical CO2 at 823 K. The spheres were characterized and used as catalysts' supports for Pd. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the spheres revealed sp(2) and sp(3) hybridized carbon. To activate carbons for interaction with a metal precursor, often oxidative treatment of a support is needed. We showed that boiling of the obtained spheres in 28 wt % HNO3 did not affect the shape and bulk structure of the spheres, but led to creation of a considerable amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups and increase of the content of sp(2) hybridized carbon on the surface. This carbon was seen by scanning transmission electron microscopy in the form of waving graphene flakes. The H/C atomic ratio in the spheres was relatively high (0.4) and did not change with the HNO3 treatment. Palladium was deposited by impregnation with Pd acetate followed by reduction in H2. This gave uniform Pd clusters with a size of 2-4 nm. The Pd supported on the original C spheres showed 2-3 times higher catalytic activity in vapor phase formic acid decomposition and higher selectivity for H2 formation (98-99%) than those for the catalyst based on the HNO3 treated spheres. Using of such low-porosity spheres as a catalyst support should prevent mass transfer limitations for fast catalytic reactions.

  1. Physicochemical pretreatments and hydrolysis of furfural residues via carbon-based sulfonated solid acid.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bao Jun; Sun, Yuan; Lin, Ke Ying; Li, Bing; Liu, Wan Yi

    2014-03-01

    Potential commercial physicochemical pretreatment methods, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasound were developed, and the carbon-based sulfonated solid acid catalysts were prepared for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. After the two optimum pretreatments, both the content of cellulose increased (74.03%, 72.28%, respectively) and the content of hemicellulose (94.11%, 94.17% of removal rate, respectively) and lignin (91.75%, 92.09% of removal rate, respectively) decreased in furfural residues. The reducing sugar yields of furfural residues with the two physicochemical pretreatments on coal tar-based solid acid reached 33.94% and 33.13%, respectively, higher than that pretreated via NaOH alone (27%) and comparable to that pretreated via NaOH/H2O2 (35.67%). The XRD patterns, IR spectra and SEM images show microwave and ultrasound improve the pretreatment effect. The results demonstrate the carbon-based sulfonated solid acids and the physicochemical pretreatments are green, effective, low-cost for furfural residues conversion.

  2. Inactivation of foot-and-mouth disease virus by citric acid and sodium carbonate with deicers.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-11-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at -20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at -20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose.

  3. CORROSION TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CHEMICAL CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Mickalonis, J.; Subramanian, K.; Ketusky, E.

    2011-10-14

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid has been selected for this purpose because it is an effective chelating agent for the solids and is not as corrosive as other acids. Electrochemical and immersion studies were conducted to investigate the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in simulated chemical cleaning environments. The effects of temperature, agitation, and the presence of sludge solids in the oxalic acid on the corrosion rate and the likelihood of hydrogen evolution were determined. The testing showed that the corrosion rates decreased significantly in the presence of the sludge solids. Corrosion rates increased with agitation, however, the changes were less noticeable.

  4. Inactivation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Citric Acid and Sodium Carbonate with Deicers

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at −20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at −20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. PMID:26319879

  5. Probabilistic estimation of dun retreate on the Gold Coast, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmsten, Margaret L.; Splinter, Kristen D.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2014-01-01

    Sand dunes are an important natural buffer between storm impacts and development backing the beach on the Gold Coast of Queensland, Australia. The ability to forecast dune erosion at a prediction horizon of days to a week would allow efficient and timely response to dune erosion in this highly populated area. Towards this goal, we modified an existing probabilistic dune erosion model for use on the Gold Coast. The original model was trained using observations of dune response from Hurricane Ivan on Santa Rosa Island, Florida, USA (Plant and Stockdon 2012. Probabilistic prediction of barrier-island response to hurricanes, Journal of Geophysical Research, 117(F3), F03015). The model relates dune position change to pre-storm dune elevations, dune widths, and beach widths, along with storm surge and run-up using a Bayesian network. The Bayesian approach captures the uncertainty of inputs and predictions through the conditional probabilities between variables. Three versions of the barrier island response Bayesian network were tested for use on the Gold Coast. One network has the same structure as the original and was trained with the Santa Rosa Island data. The second network has a modified design and was trained using only pre- and post-storm data from 1988-2009 for the Gold Coast. The third version of the network has the same design as the second version of the network and was trained with the combined data from the Gold Coast and Santa Rosa Island. The two networks modified for use on the Gold Coast hindcast dune retreat with equal accuracy. Both networks explained 60% of the observed dune retreat variance, which is comparable to the skill observed by Plant and Stockdon (2012) in the initial Bayesian network application at Santa Rosa Island. The new networks improved predictions relative to application of the original network on the Gold Coast. Dune width was the most important morphologic variable in hindcasting dune retreat, while hydrodynamic variables, surge and

  6. Probabilistic estimation of dune retreat on the Gold Coast, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmsten, Margaret L.; Splinter, Kristen D.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2014-01-01

    Sand dunes are an important natural buffer between storm impacts and development backing the beach on the Gold Coast of Queensland, Australia. The ability to forecast dune erosion at a prediction horizon of days to a week would allow efficient and timely response to dune erosion in this highly populated area. Towards this goal, we modified an existing probabilistic dune erosion model for use on the Gold Coast. The original model was trained using observations of dune response from Hurricane Ivan on Santa Rosa Island, Florida, USA (Plant and Stockdon 2012. Probabilistic prediction of barrier-island response to hurricanes, Journal of Geophysical Research, 117(F3), F03015). The model relates dune position change to pre-storm dune elevations, dune widths, and beach widths, along with storm surge and run-up using a Bayesian network. The Bayesian approach captures the uncertainty of inputs and predictions through the conditional probabilities between variables. Three versions of the barrier island response Bayesian network were tested for use on the Gold Coast. One network has the same structure as the original and was trained with the Santa Rosa Island data. The second network has a modified design and was trained using only pre- and post-storm data from 1988-2009 for the Gold Coast. The third version of the network has the same design as the second version of the network and was trained with the combined data from the Gold Coast and Santa Rosa Island. The two networks modified for use on the Gold Coast hindcast dune retreat with equal accuracy. Both networks explained 60% of the observed dune retreat variance, which is comparable to the skill observed by Plant and Stockdon (2012) in the initial Bayesian network application at Santa Rosa Island. The new networks improved predictions relative to application of the original network on the Gold Coast. Dune width was the most important morphologic variable in hindcasting dune retreat, while hydrodynamic variables, surge and

  7. Writing Retreat Increases Productivity And Community For Women Geoscientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, S.; Holmes, M.

    2011-12-01

    Five, weeklong geoscientist writing retreats have been completed with an NSF ADANCE PAID grant. During the five nights and four and a half days, eight to twenty-four academics have gathered in a rural setting outside of Boston to get to focus on writing papers and proposals while getting to know each other. Participants range in age and experience from graduate students to emeritus professors. Over twenty papers and proposals acknowledge their production, in part to this writing retreat. Impact extends beyond papers as informal mentoring and discussions at meals and in the evenings centers on succeeding in academia. Research and teaching are foremost in the conversation. Post-docs learn strategies for applying for jobs and grants, and senior professors discuss strategies for working with academic administrations, running departments and mentoring students. They also learn new technologies and perspectives from younger participants. Particularly helpful are discussions on work-life balance. Networking opportunities extend beyond the retreat as participants join each other at their home institutions to give seminars, develop research projects and mentor each other's students. All weeks follow the same format. Participants arrive Sunday and meet during an evening welcome reception. Monday is devoted to writing. Tuesday a writing coach is available. In the morning, using examples from the scientific literature, she discusses strategies and techniques for writing clearly at a group session. During the afternoon, participants work with the coach individually or in small groups to improve their own writing projects. Wednesday evening a skill session is offered on a topic of interest. These have included undergraduate research, NSF funding, productive techniques for dealing with conflict, and generational characteristics and attitudes, which can hamper communication. A Thursday evening wrap-up session prepares participants for Friday's departure. We believe that this model

  8. Duboscic acid: a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor with an unprecedented triterpenoidal carbon skeleton from Duboscia macrocarpa.

    PubMed

    Wafo, Pascal; Kamdem, Ramsay S T; Ali, Zulfiqar; Anjum, Shazia; Khan, Shamsun Nahar; Begum, Afshan; Krohn, Karsten; Abegaz, Berhanu M; Ngadjui, Bonaventure T; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2010-12-17

    Duboscic acid (1), a triterpenoid with a unique carbon backbone, was isolated from Duboscia macrocarpa Bocq. It is the first member of a new class of triterpenoids, for which the name "dubosane" is proposed. Duboscic acid has a potent α-glucosidase inhibition, and its structure was unambiguously deduced by a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study.

  9. RAPID ANALYSIS OF CYNANURIC ACID IN SWIMMING POOL WATERS BY HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY USING POROUS GRAPHITIC CARBON COLUMN

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative approach is presented for reducing analysis times of cyanuric acid in swimming pool waters by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The HPLC method exploits the unique selectivity of porous graphitic carbon (PGC) to fully resolve cyanuric acid from other p...

  10. Solubility of carbon dioxide in acetone and propionic acid at temperatures between 298 K and 333 K

    SciTech Connect

    Adrian, T.; Maurer, G.

    1997-07-01

    The solubility of carbon dioxide in organic solvents acetone and propionic acid has been measured with an analytical method. The composition and the density of the liquid phase in the binary vapor-liquid equilibrium have been investigated at (313 and 333) K (for the system carbon dioxide + acetone) and at (298, 313, and 333) K (for the system carbon dioxide + propionic acid) at pressures up the binary critical pressure. The experimental results for the phase equilibrium have been correlated with the Peng-Robinson EOS applying several mixing rules.

  11. Fungi Contribute Critical but Spatially Varying Roles in Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Annika C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Ohm, Robin A.; Li, Zhou; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lipzen, Anna; Chen, Cindy; Johnson, Jenifer; Lindquist, Erika A.; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Singer, Steven W.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-01-01

    The ecosystem roles of fungi have been extensively studied by targeting one organism and/or biological process at a time, but the full metabolic potential of fungi has rarely been captured in an environmental context. We hypothesized that fungal genome sequences could be assembled directly from the environment using metagenomics and that transcriptomics and proteomics could simultaneously reveal metabolic differentiation across habitats. We reconstructed the near-complete 27 Mbp genome of a filamentous fungus, Acidomyces richmondensis, and evaluated transcript and protein expression in floating and streamer biofilms from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. A. richmondensis transcripts involved in denitrification and in the degradation of complex carbon sources (including cellulose) were up-regulated in floating biofilms, whereas central carbon metabolism and stress-related transcripts were significantly up-regulated in streamer biofilms. These findings suggest that the biofilm niches are distinguished by distinct carbon and nitrogen resource utilization, oxygen availability, and environmental challenges. An isolated A. richmondensis strain from this environment was used to validate the metagenomics-derived genome and confirm nitrous oxide production at pH 1. Overall, our analyses defined mechanisms of fungal adaptation and identified a functional shift related to different roles in carbon and nitrogen turnover for the same species of fungi growing in closely located but distinct biofilm niches. PMID:26973616

  12. Fungi contribute critical but spatially varying roles in nitrogen and carbon cycling in acid mine drainage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mosier, Annika C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Ohm, Robin A.; Li, Zhou; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lipzen, Anna; Chen, Cindy; Johnson, Jenifer; et al

    2016-03-03

    The ecosystem roles of fungi have been extensively studied by targeting one organism and/or biological process at a time, but the full metabolic potential of fungi has rarely been captured in an environmental context. We hypothesized that fungal genome sequences could be assembled directly from the environment using metagenomics and that transcriptomics and proteomics could simultaneously reveal metabolic differentiation across habitats. We reconstructed the near-complete 27 Mbp genome of a filamentous fungus, Acidomyces richmondensis, and evaluated transcript and protein expression in floating and streamer biofilms from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. A. richmondensis transcripts involved in denitrification and inmore » the degradation of complex carbon sources (including cellulose) were up-regulated in floating biofilms, whereas central carbon metabolism and stress-related transcripts were significantly up-regulated in streamer biofilms. Finally, these findings suggest that the biofilm niches are distinguished by distinct carbon and nitrogen resource utilization, oxygen availability, and environmental challenges. An isolated A. richmondensis strain from this environment was used to validate the metagenomics-derived genome and confirm nitrous oxide production at pH 1. Overall, our analyses defined mechanisms of fungal adaptation and identified a functional shift related to different roles in carbon and nitrogen turnover for the same species of fungi growing in closely located but distinct biofilm niches.« less

  13. Mechanistic investigation of industrial wastewater naphthenic acids removal using granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm based processes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinoor; Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-01-15

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) found in oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) have known environmental toxicity and are resistant to conventional wastewater treatments. The granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm treatment process has been shown to effectively treat OSPW NAs via combined adsorption/biodegradation processes despite the lack of research investigating their individual contributions. Presently, the NAs removals due to the individual processes of adsorption and biodegradation in OSPW bioreactors were determined using sodium azide to inhibit biodegradation. For raw OSPW, after 28 days biodegradation and adsorption contributed 14% and 63% of NA removal, respectively. For ozonated OSPW, biodegradation removed 18% of NAs while adsorption reduced NAs by 73%. Microbial community 454-pyrosequencing of bioreactor matrices indicated the importance of biodegradation given the diverse carbon degrading families including Acidobacteriaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae, and Comamonadaceae. Overall, results highlight the ability to determine specific processes of NAs removals in the combined treatment process in the presence of diverse bacteria metabolic groups found in GAC bioreactors.

  14. The Writing Retreat: A High-Yield Clinical Faculty Development Opportunity in Academic Writing

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Christian T.; Boyer, Debra; Colbert, Colleen Y.; Boyer, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    Background The need for consistent academic productivity challenges junior clinician-scholars, who often lack the aptitude to ensure efficient production of manuscripts. Intervention To solve this problem, an academic division of a major medical center developed an off-site writing retreat. The purpose of the retreat was not to teach writing skills, but to offer senior mentor assistance with a focus on the elements of manuscript writing. Methods The retreat paired senior faculty members with junior staff. Senior faculty identified manuscript topics and provided real-time writing and editing supervision. Team-building exercises, midcourse corrections, and debriefing interviews were built into the retreat. The number of manuscripts and grant proposals generated during the 2008–2011 retreats was recorded, and the program was evaluated by using unstructured debriefing interviews. Results An average of 6 to 7 faculty members and fellows participated in each retreat. During the past 4 years, participants produced an average of 3 grant proposals and 7 manuscripts per retreat. After the writing retreat, each fellow and junior faculty member produced an average of 4 scholarly products per year, compared to fewer than 2 for prior years' retreats. Participant feedback indicated the success of the retreat resulted from protected time, direct mentorship by the scholars involved, and pairing of authors, which allows for rapid production of manuscripts and accelerated the editing process. More than 80% of mentors returned each year to participate. Conclusions The writing retreat is a feasible, effective strategy to increase scholarship among faculty, acceptable to mentees and mentors, and sustainable over time. PMID:24404277

  15. Evaluation of surface alterations in different retreatment nickel-titanium files: AFM and SEM study.

    PubMed

    Can Sağlam, Baran; Görgül, Güliz

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface changes of nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) rotary retreatment files after three and five uses. Furthermore, the effects of 2% sodium hypochlorite and chloroform solutions and sterilization procedures on the NiTi rotary retreatment surfaces were investigated. ProTaper Retreatment files, R-endo files, and Mtwo retreatment files were used for this study. The palatinal roots of maxillary molar teeth were obturated with gutta percha and Ah26. Retreatment procedures were performed with these retreatment file systems. The surface changes of untreated NiTi rotary files that were used three and five times, immersed in NaOCl and chloroform and subjected to sterilization procedures were investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The RMS values, three dimensional images and SEM images at various magnifications were obtained. RMS values showed that all three NiTi rotary retreatment file systems showed significant deteriorations after three and five uses. Cracks, damages and spiral construction deteriorations were detected in the SEM images after three and five uses. Furthermore, the Mtwo 15 file was broken off after five uses. AFM data indicated that 2% NaOCl caused significant surface deteriorations on NiTi rotary files and both AFM and SEM evaluation showed that chloroform solution and sterilization procedures did not cause significant surface deteriorations. In conclusion, ProTaper retreatment, R-endo, and Mtwo retreatment files showed surface damages depending on retreatment procedures. Clinicians have to consider that retreatment files always have a tendency to break off after the third time they have been used.

  16. Utilization of date stones for production of activated carbon using phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Haimour, N.M. . E-mail: nomanhaimour@hotmail.com; Emeish, S. . E-mail: s_emiesh@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    Date stone wastes have been utilized for production of activated carbon by chemical activation with phosphoric acid using a fluidized-bed reactor. The effects of the activation time, activation temperature, impregnation ratio, and particle size on the yield and the adsorptive capacity towards iodine were studied. The yield and the quality of the activated carbon prepared by using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were compared with that prepared from date stones using the same equipment, and under similar conditions by using ZnCl{sub 2} as an oxidizing agent. The maximum value of the iodine number of the activated carbon produced using H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} in this work was about 495 under the following conditions: impregnation ratio 0.4, activation time 60 min, activation temperature 800 deg. C, particle size 0.60 mm. The iodine number for the produced activated carbon was higher when phosphoric acid was used, compared to that when zinc chloride was used as impregnation reagent; however, the yield obtained when H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was used was lower than the yield when ZnCl{sub 2} was used. The iodine number increases significantly with increasing the activation temperature. By increasing the impregnation ratio at the same temperature, the iodine number decreased sharply and an oscillation is noticed for all the cases but it was clearer at 800 deg. C. The average variation of the iodine number for the whole range of particle size used in this work is {+-}10%.

  17. Artificial photosynthesis of. beta. -ketocarboxylic acids from carbon dioxide and ketones via enolate complexes of aluminum porphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Yasuhiro; Aida, Takuzo; Inoue, Shohei )

    1989-04-12

    Photochemical fixation of carbon dioxide is of much interest in connection with biological photosynthesis by green plants as well as from the viewpoint of carbon resource utilization. One of the important steps in the assimilation of carbon dioxide is the carboxylation of a carbonyl compound into ketocarboxylic acid, where the reaction proceeds via an enolate species as reactive intermediate. For example, in four carbon (C{sub 4}) pathway and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) processes, pyruvate is converted with the aid of ATP into phosphoenolpyruvate, which is subsequently carboxylated to give oxaloacetate by the action of pyruvate carboxylase. In relation to this interesting biological process, some artificial systems have been exploited for the synthesis of {beta}-ketocarboxylic acid derivatives from carbon dioxide and ketones using nucleophiles such as metal carbonates, thiazolates, phenolates, alkoxides, and strong organic as well as inorganic basis, which promote the enolization of ketones in the intermediate step. We wish to report here a novel, visible light-induced fixation of carbon dioxide with the enolate complex of aluminum porphyrin, giving {beta}-ketocarboxylic acid under mild conditions.

  18. Modeling the rate and style of Arctic coastal retreat along the Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, K. R.; Anderson, R. S.; Overeem, I.; Wobus, C. W.; Clow, G. D.; Urban, F. E.; Lewinter, A. L.; Stanton, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    In Arctic landscapes, modern surface warming has significantly altered geomorphic process rates. Along the Beaufort Sea coastline bounding Alaska's North Slope, the mean annual coastal erosion rate has doubled from ~7 m/yr for 1955-1979 to ~14 m/yr for 2002-2007. Locally the erosion rate reaches 30 m/yr. A robust understanding of the processes that govern the rate of erosion is required in order to predict the response of the coast and its adjacent landscape to a rapidly changing climate, with implications for sediment and carbon fluxes, oilfield infrastructure, and animal habitat. On the Beaufort Sea coast, bluffs in regions of ice-rich silt-dominated permafrost are abundant. This type of coast is vulnerable to rapid erosion due to its high ice content and the small grain size of bluff sediment. The bluff material at our study site near Drew Point is 64% ice, making the bluff susceptible to thermal erosion. Liberated sediment is removed from the system in suspension and does not form sheltering beaches or barrier islands which would provide a negative feedback to erosion. During the sea ice-free season, relatively warm waters abut the bluff and ocean water melts a notch into the 4-m tall bluffs. The bluffs ultimately fail by the toppling of polygonal blocks bounded by mechanically weak ice-wedges that are spaced roughly 10-20 m apart. The blocks then temporarily armor the coast against further attack. We document the style and the drivers of coastal erosion in this region through simultaneous measurements of the oceanic and atmospheric conditions, and time-lapse imagery. We extract proxies for erosion rate from time-lapse imagery of both a degrading block and a retreating bluff from the summer of 2010, and compare the proxy record with environmental conditions and melt rate models. These observations verify that the dominant process by which erosion occurs is thermal insertion of a notch, toppling of blocks, and subsequent melting of the ice in the block. The

  19. Windblown Pliocene diatoms and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Reed P; DeConto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Alley, Richard B

    2016-09-20

    Marine diatoms in tillites along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) have been used to suggest a diminished East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Pliocene warm periods. Updated ice-sheet modelling shows significant Pliocene EAIS retreat, creating marine embayments into the Wilkes and Aurora basins that were conducive to high diatom productivity and rapid accumulation of diatomaceous sediments. Here we show that subsequent isostatic uplift exposed accumulated unconsolidated marine deposits to wind erosion. We report new atmospheric modelling utilizing Pliocene climate and derived Antarctic landscapes indicating that prevailing mid-altitude winds transported diatoms towards the TAMs, dominantly from extensive emerged coastal deposits of the Aurora Basin. This result unifies leading ideas from competing sides of a contentious debate about the origin of the diatoms in the TAMs and their link to EAIS history, supporting the view that parts of the EAIS are vulnerable to relatively modest warming, with possible implications for future sea-level rise.

  20. Windblown Pliocene diatoms and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Reed P.; Deconto, Robert M.; Pollard, David; Alley, Richard B.

    2016-09-01

    Marine diatoms in tillites along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) have been used to suggest a diminished East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Pliocene warm periods. Updated ice-sheet modelling shows significant Pliocene EAIS retreat, creating marine embayments into the Wilkes and Aurora basins that were conducive to high diatom productivity and rapid accumulation of diatomaceous sediments. Here we show that subsequent isostatic uplift exposed accumulated unconsolidated marine deposits to wind erosion. We report new atmospheric modelling utilizing Pliocene climate and derived Antarctic landscapes indicating that prevailing mid-altitude winds transported diatoms towards the TAMs, dominantly from extensive emerged coastal deposits of the Aurora Basin. This result unifies leading ideas from competing sides of a contentious debate about the origin of the diatoms in the TAMs and their link to EAIS history, supporting the view that parts of the EAIS are vulnerable to relatively modest warming, with possible implications for future sea-level rise.

  1. GPCR Retreat 2014: a good view leads to many discoveries!

    PubMed

    Chidiac, Peter; Hébert, Terence E

    2015-06-01

    The GPCR gods smiled on us last year as the 15th Annual GPCR Retreat was held last October 2nd-4th in Bromont, Québec. The fall colors were at their peak and the meeting attendees were also in fine form. The program was one of the best we have seen at any GPCR-related meeting in years and there was a great deal of excitement about new methodological approaches to understanding receptor biology, new concepts in GPCR signaling and a continued emphasis on translation of these discoveries. This year was also the first year we opened the meeting with a short course on biased agonism and how to measure and analyze it.

  2. Windblown Pliocene diatoms and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Reed P; DeConto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Alley, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Marine diatoms in tillites along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) have been used to suggest a diminished East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Pliocene warm periods. Updated ice-sheet modelling shows significant Pliocene EAIS retreat, creating marine embayments into the Wilkes and Aurora basins that were conducive to high diatom productivity and rapid accumulation of diatomaceous sediments. Here we show that subsequent isostatic uplift exposed accumulated unconsolidated marine deposits to wind erosion. We report new atmospheric modelling utilizing Pliocene climate and derived Antarctic landscapes indicating that prevailing mid-altitude winds transported diatoms towards the TAMs, dominantly from extensive emerged coastal deposits of the Aurora Basin. This result unifies leading ideas from competing sides of a contentious debate about the origin of the diatoms in the TAMs and their link to EAIS history, supporting the view that parts of the EAIS are vulnerable to relatively modest warming, with possible implications for future sea-level rise. PMID:27649516

  3. Windblown Pliocene diatoms and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Reed P.; DeConto, Robert M.; Pollard, David; Alley, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Marine diatoms in tillites along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) have been used to suggest a diminished East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Pliocene warm periods. Updated ice-sheet modelling shows significant Pliocene EAIS retreat, creating marine embayments into the Wilkes and Aurora basins that were conducive to high diatom productivity and rapid accumulation of diatomaceous sediments. Here we show that subsequent isostatic uplift exposed accumulated unconsolidated marine deposits to wind erosion. We report new atmospheric modelling utilizing Pliocene climate and derived Antarctic landscapes indicating that prevailing mid-altitude winds transported diatoms towards the TAMs, dominantly from extensive emerged coastal deposits of the Aurora Basin. This result unifies leading ideas from competing sides of a contentious debate about the origin of the diatoms in the TAMs and their link to EAIS history, supporting the view that parts of the EAIS are vulnerable to relatively modest warming, with possible implications for future sea-level rise. PMID:27649516

  4. A Numerical Model of Retreating Alluvial Fan Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, M.; Dickson, M.; Coco, G.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical model has been developed that simulates the wave-driven retreat of partially-consolidated alluvial- fan shores over millennium time-scales. It has been developed to reproduce the shore profiles and coastal erosion rates observed along the Pleistocene glacial-outwash fan built by the Waitaki River on the east coast of New Zealand's South Island. This cliffed shore is currently fronted by a narrow sand-and-gravel beach. The nearshore seabed is formed in Pleistocene substrate and has only a thin and patchy cover of sand. The motivation is to examine the sensitivity of the erosion rates to wave-climate change, sea-level rise, and river sediment supplies. The model is forced by two wave conditions that, when randomly sampled, represent the storm-wave and normal-swell climates of the prototype coast. These each operate for a fixed proportion of the model's yearly time-step. Morphological change is driven by a series of coupled process models. These include scour of the nearshore seabed by shoaling waves, cross-shore exchanges of sand and gravel between the nearshore and beach, berm construction during normal wave conditions, berm overtopping by storm waves with consequent beach stripping and scour of the exposed sub-aerial substrate and cliff-toe notch-cutting, gravity-failure of the cliffs and talus construction between storm events, and beach sediment abrasion. The scour, notching, and transport models are generally based on energetics principles and are calibrated with linear scaling coefficients to match field observations from the prototype coast. Negative feedback regulates the rate of cliff erosion through the protection that is afforded by cliff and substrate material added to the beach. The starting model condition is a sloping alluvial fan inundated by the sea-level rise that followed the last glacial epoch, and the model is run for 6000 years to the present assuming a stable sea level. Initially, the gentle slope of the alluvial fan results in

  5. Holocene Glacial Retreat at Walgreen Coast, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindow, J.; Johnson, J.; Castex, M.; Wittmann, H.; Smith, J.; Lisker, F.; Gohl, K.; Spiegel, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Walgreen Coast of West Antarctica represents one of the most rapidly changing sectors of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). With the fastest ice streams in the whole Antarctic, the WAIS is characterised by rapid thinning and grounding line retreat. Airborne and satellite-based short-term observations show a doubling of the negative net mass balance between 1996-2006 (Rignot et al., 2008). Furthermore, because the WAIS is largely grounded below sea level, continued inland thinning and grounding line retreat could result in rapid ice sheet collapse, which would raise global sea level by between 3-5 m. However, due to remoteness and challenging accessibility, onshore data is limited to a few isolated nunataks making it difficult to assess the long-term evolution of the glacial dynamics along Walgreen Coast. To address this we present new data from two key areas of the Walgreen Coast; the Kohler Range and the Pine Island Bay. Our 10Be surface exposure ages from erratic boulders in the Kohler Range are the first and reveal that this area became ice-free between 8.3 and 12.3 ka. This implies a long-term thinning rate of 3.3 cm/yr and agrees with similar data published from glaciers eastward. Our ages are also consistent with recent deglaciation models which suggest strong thinning after 15 ka and off-shore sediments shows a concurrent lateral ice-shelf front retreat. Our results suggest an ice-cover at least 300 m thicker in the Kohler Range during the early Holocene and that subsequent average thinning occurred on rates one order of magnitude slower than recent satellite measurements show. This implies that the recent trend in ice-sheet thinning results from a recent dynamic changes rather than a response to long-term thinning. To further constrain the lateral deglaciation history along the eastern Walgreen Coast, namely the Pine Island Glacier, we collected additional samples from a chain of islands, located flow-parallel and downstream of the ice-shelf front. We

  6. WHO in retreat: is it losing its influence?

    PubMed Central

    Godlee, F.

    1994-01-01

    WHO says it has three main functions: to set normative standards; to provide technical advice and assistance on medical matters; and to advocate changes in health policy. During its 46 year history the first two functions have been a constant and uncontroversial backbone through which WHO has earned its reputation for scientific excellence. The third function, advocacy, came to the fore with the launch of Health for All in 1977, after which WHO took a key role in influencing international health policy. WHO's friends and critics alike now say that the organisation is losing its influence and retreating into its technical and biomedical shell. This article maps the changes in WHO's approach over the past 46 years and considers whether fears about its loss of influence are justified. Images p1492-a p1492-b p1493-a p1494-a FIG 1 PMID:7804058

  7. North Atlantic warming and the retreat of Greenland's outlet glaciers.

    PubMed

    Straneo, Fiammetta; Heimbach, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet quadrupled over the past two decades, contributing a quarter of the observed global sea-level rise. Increased submarine melting is thought to have triggered the retreat of Greenland's outlet glaciers, which is partly responsible for the ice loss. However, the chain of events and physical processes remain elusive. Recent evidence suggests that an anomalous inflow of subtropical waters driven by atmospheric changes, multidecadal natural ocean variability and a long-term increase in the North Atlantic's upper ocean heat content since the 1950s all contributed to a warming of the subpolar North Atlantic. This led, in conjunction with increased runoff, to enhanced submarine glacier melting. Future climate projections raise the potential for continued increases in warming and ice-mass loss, with implications for sea level and climate.

  8. The 21st Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation Scientific Retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2015-08-01

    The 21st Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was held from October 23-25, 2014, in Carlsbad, CA. This event is the world's foremost scientific meeting focusing on prostate cancer and brings together leading basic, translational and clinical researchers in prostate cancer and other diverse disciplines to discuss the newest findings most likely to advance the understanding of prostate cancer and the clinical care of prostate cancer patients. This year's meeting highlighted themes including: (i) research integrity and standards for scientific reproducibility; (ii) prostate cancer disparities; (iii) mechanisms and models of prostate cancer progression and dormancy; (iv) mechanisms of therapeutic resistance; and (v) advancements in precision medicine treatments, treatment models, and predictive and prognostic biomarkers.

  9. Distribution of Hydrogen Peroxide, Carbon Dioxide, and Sulfuric Acid in Europa's Icy Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) detected hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide and a hydrated material on Europa's surface, the latter interpreted as hydrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4*nH2O) or hydrated salts. Related compounds are molecular oxygen, sulfur dioxide, and two chromophores, one that is dark in the ultraviolet(UV) and concentrated on the trailing side, the other brighter in the UV and preferentially distributed in the leading hemisphere. The UV-dark material has been suggested to be sulfur.

  10. Effects of Teriparatide Retreatment in Osteoporotic Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joel S.; Wyland, Jason J.; Leder, Benjamin Z.; Burnett-Bowie, Sherri-Ann M.; Lee, Hang; Jüppner, Harald; Neer, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Context: The stimulatory effect of teriparatide on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover is initially exuberant, but then diminishes. Objective: Our objective was to determine whether retreating with teriparatide after a drug-free period can restore the initial exuberant response to teriparatide. Design and Setting: This was a planned extension of a randomized controlled trial conducted in a single university hospital. Patients and Intervention: Subjects previously participated in a 30-month randomized trial comparing the effects of alendronate (group 1), teriparatide (group 2), or both (group 3) on BMD and bone turnover in men and women with low BMD (phase 1). Subjects who completed phase 1 on their assigned therapy entered phase 2 (months 30–42), during which teriparatide was stopped in groups 2 and 3. Teriparatide was administered to all subjects during months 42 to 54 (phase 3). Main Outcome Measures: We compared changes in BMD and markers of bone turnover (serum osteocalcin, N-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen, and N-telopeptide) between phase 1 and 3 in subjects receiving teriparatide alone. Results: Posterior-anterior and lateral spine BMD increased 12.5 ± 1.5 and 16.9 ± 1.7%, respectively, during the first 12 months of teriparatide administration and 5.2 ± 0.8 and 6.2 ± 1.8%, respectively, during teriparatide retreatment (P < 0.001 and P = 0.001). Increases in osteocalcin (P < 0.001), N-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen (P < 0.001), and N-telopeptide (P < 0.001) were greater during the first period of teriparatide administration. Conclusion: The response to teriparatide is attenuated when readministered after a 12-month hiatus. PMID:19401368

  11. Amperometric Low-Potential Detection of Malic Acid Using Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Arvinte, Adina; Rotariu, Lucian; Bala, Camelia

    2008-01-01

    The electrocatalytical property of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) modified electrode toward NADH detection was explored by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry techniques. The experimental results show that SWNT decrease the overvoltage required for oxidation of NADH (to +300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) and this property make them suitable for dehydrogenases based biosensors. The behavior of the SWNT modified biosensor for L-malic acid was studied as an example for dehydrogenases biosensor. The amperometric measurements indicate that malate dehydrogenase (MDH) can be strongly adsorbed on the surface of the SWNT-modified electrode to form an approximate monolayer film. Enzyme immobilization in Nafion membrane can increase the biosensor stability. A linear calibration curve was obtained for L-malic acid concentrations between 0.2 and 1mM.

  12. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES ON THE CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-10-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will disperse or dissolve precipitated metal oxides as part of radioactive waste tank closure operations. Previously SRS has utilized oxalic acid to accomplish this task. Since the waste tanks are constructed of carbon steel, a significant amount of corrosion may occur. Although the total amount of corrosion may be insignificant for a short contact time, a significant amount of hydrogen may be generated due to the corrosion reaction. Linear polarization resistance and anodic/cathodic polarization tests were performed to investigate the corrosion behavior during the process. The effect of process variables such as temperature, agitation, aeration, sample orientation, light as well as surface finish on the corrosion behavior were evaluated. The results of the tests provided insight into the corrosion mechanism for the iron-oxalic acid system.

  13. Oleic acid-grafted chitosan/graphene oxide composite coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Fayyad, Eman M; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Al-Maadeed, Mariam Al Ali

    2016-10-20

    An anticorrosion coating film based on the formation of nanocomposite coating is reported in this study. The composite consisted of chitosan (green matrix), oleic acid, and graphene oxide (nano filler). The nanocomposite coating was arranged on the surface of carbon steel, and the corrosion resistance was monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP). Compared to the pure chitosan (CS) coating, the corrosion resistance of oleic acid-modified chitosan/graphene oxide film (CS/GO-OA) is increased by 100 folds. Since the well-dispersed smart grafted nanolayers delayed the penetration rate of corrosive species and thus maintained long term anticorrosive stability which is correlated with hydrophobicity and permeability.

  14. Oleic acid-grafted chitosan/graphene oxide composite coating for corrosion protection of carbon steel.

    PubMed

    Fayyad, Eman M; Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Al-Maadeed, Mariam Al Ali

    2016-10-20

    An anticorrosion coating film based on the formation of nanocomposite coating is reported in this study. The composite consisted of chitosan (green matrix), oleic acid, and graphene oxide (nano filler). The nanocomposite coating was arranged on the surface of carbon steel, and the corrosion resistance was monitored using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP). Compared to the pure chitosan (CS) coating, the corrosion resistance of oleic acid-modified chitosan/graphene oxide film (CS/GO-OA) is increased by 100 folds. Since the well-dispersed smart grafted nanolayers delayed the penetration rate of corrosive species and thus maintained long term anticorrosive stability which is correlated with hydrophobicity and permeability. PMID:27474635

  15. A general rule for the assignment of the carbon-13 NMR peaks in fatty acid chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengsch, E.; Perly, B.; Deleuze, C.; Valero, A.

    Complete assignments of the carbon-13 NMR signals in long fatty acid chains up to C 19 and C 22 were obtained from relaxation behavior studies, from specific isotope labeling, and from studies of analogies between homologous compounds. Results lead to a pyramidal representation which offers a very surprising systematic ordering. From high to low field, signals are ordered in triads with increasing number like C 3C 4C 5, C 6C 7C 8. The triads are interrupted by a signal from the chain end position in decreasing order like C n-3 , C n-4 , and so on. This rule allows complete line assignments for unknown aliphatic fatty acid chains. The rule should be important for studies of lipid compounds and for motional models in biological membrane material.

  16. Hydrolysis of Cellulose by a Mesoporous Carbon-Fe₂(SO₄)₃/γ-Fe₂O₃ Nanoparticle-Based Solid Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Daizo; Watanabe, Koki; Fukumi, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based solid acid catalysts have shown significant potential in a wide range of applications, and they have been successfully synthesized using simple processes. Magnetically separable mesoporous carbon composites also have enormous potential, especially in separation and adsorption technology. However, existing techniques have been unable to produce a magnetically separable mesoporous solid acid catalyst because no suitable precursors have been identified. Herein we describe a magnetically separable, mesoporous solid acid catalyst synthesized from a newly developed mesoporous carbon-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle composite. This material exhibits an equivalent acid density and catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose, to that of the cellulose-derived conventional catalyst. Since it is magnetically separable, this material can be readily recovered and reused, potentially reducing the environmental impact of industrial processes to which it is applied. PMID:26856604

  17. Organic Carbon Stabilization of Soils Formed on Acidic and Calcareous Bedrocks in Neotropical Alpine Grassland, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Songyu; Cammeraat, Erik; Jansen, Boris; Cerli, Chiara; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence shows that Neotropical alpine ecosystems are vulnerable to global change. Since soils in the alpine grasslands of the Peruvian Andean region have large soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, profound understanding of soil organic matter (OM) stabilization mechanisms will improve the prediction of the feedback between SOC stocks and global change. It is well documented that poor-crystalline minerals and organo-metallic complexes significantly contribute to the OM stabilization in volcanic ash soils, including those in the Andean region. However, limited research has focused on non-ash soils that also express significant SOC accumulation. A pilot study of Peruvian Andean grassland soils suggests that lithology is a prominent factor for such carbon accumulation. As a consequence of contrasting mineral composition and pedogenic processes in soils formed on different non-volcanic parent materials, differences in OM stabilization mechanisms may be profound and consequently may respond differently to global change. Therefore, our study aims at a further understanding of carbon stocks and OM stabilization mechanisms in soils formed on contrasting bedrocks in the Peruvian Andes. The main objective is to identify and compare the roles that organo-mineral associations and aggregations play in OM stabilization, by a combination of selective extraction methods and fractionations based on density, particle size and aggregates size. Soil samples were collected from igneous acidic and calcareous sedimentary bedrocks in alpine grassland near Cajamarca, Peru (7.17°S, 78.63°W), at around 3700m altitude. Samples were taken from 3 plots per bedrock type by sampling distinguishable horizons until the C horizons were reached. Outcomes confirmed that both types of soil accumulate large amounts of carbon: 405.3±41.7 t/ha of calcareous bedrock soil and 226.0±5.6 t/ha of acidic bedrock soil respectively. In addition, extremely high carbon contents exceeding 90g carbon per

  18. Supported phosphate and carbonate salts for heterogeneous catalysis of triglycerides to fatty acid methyl esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Stephanie Lynne

    Fatty acid methyl esters made from vegetable oil, or biodiesel, have been identified as a substitute for diesel derived from crude oil. Biodiesel is currently made using a homogeneous base catalyst to perform the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol to generate fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). The use of a homogeneous catalyst necessitates additional purification of the product and byproducts before sale, and the catalyst is consumed and discarded. The development of a heterogeneous basic catalyst for the production of FAME is desirable. Tribasic phosphate salts and dibasic carbonate salts are active for the production of FAME but generally operate as homogeneous catalysts. Supporting these phosphate and carbonate salts on mesoporous MCM-41, microporous silica gel, and nonporous a-alumina proved successful to greater or lesser degrees depending on the identity of the support and pretreatment of the support. Although these salts were supported and were active for the production of FAME from canola oil, they proved to be operating as homogeneous catalysts due to leaching of the active species off the surface of the support. Further investigation of the active species present in the tribasic phosphate catalysts identified the active support as orthophosphate, and NMR studies revealed the phosphorus to be present as orthophosphate and diphosphate in varying proportions in each catalyst. Evaluation of the acid-washing support pretreatment process revealed that the exposure of the support to acid plays a large role in the development of activity on the surface of the catalyst, but manipulation of these parameters did not prevent leaching of the active site off the surface of the catalyst. Alternate methods of support pretreatment were no more effective in preventing leaching. Tribasic phosphate supported on silica gel is not effective as a heterogeneous catalyst for FAME production from triglycerides because of the lack of stability of the phosphate on the

  19. Snails from heavy-metal polluted environments have reduced sensitivity to carbon dioxide-induced acidity.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Cleary, David A; Marble, Aaron M; Phillips, Morgan V; Stoddard, Timothy J; Tuthill, Lara M; Winslow, James R

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 reacts with water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) which increases water acidity. While marine acidification has received recent consideration, less attention has been paid to the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on freshwater systems-systems that often have low buffering potential. Since many aquatic systems are already impacted by pollutants such as heavy metals, we wondered about the added effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on freshwater organisms. We studied aquatic pulmonate snails (Physella columbiana) from both a heavy-metal polluted watershed and snails from a reference watershed that has not experienced mining pollution. We used gaseous CO2 to increase water acidity and we then measured changes in antipredatory behavior and also survival. We predicted a simple negative additive effect of low pH. We hypothesized that snails from metal-polluted environments would be physiologically stressed and impaired due to defense responses against heavy metals. Instead, snails from populations that acclimated or evolved in the presence of heavy metal mining pollution were more robust to acidic conditions than were snails from reference habitats. Snails from mining polluted sites seemed to be preadapted to a low pH environment. Their short-term survival in acidic conditions was better than snails from reference sites that lacked metal pollution. In fact, the 48 h survival of snails from polluted sites was so high that it did not significantly differ from the 24 h survival of snails from control sites. This suggests that the response of organisms to a world with rising anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels may be complex and difficult to predict. Snails had a weaker behavioral response to stressful stimuli if kept for 1 month at a pH that differed from their lake of origin. We found that snails raised at a pH of 5.5 had a weaker response (less of a decrease in activity) to concentrated heavy metals than did snails raised at their natal pH of

  20. Snails from heavy-metal polluted environments have reduced sensitivity to carbon dioxide-induced acidity.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Cleary, David A; Marble, Aaron M; Phillips, Morgan V; Stoddard, Timothy J; Tuthill, Lara M; Winslow, James R

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 reacts with water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) which increases water acidity. While marine acidification has received recent consideration, less attention has been paid to the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on freshwater systems-systems that often have low buffering potential. Since many aquatic systems are already impacted by pollutants such as heavy metals, we wondered about the added effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on freshwater organisms. We studied aquatic pulmonate snails (Physella columbiana) from both a heavy-metal polluted watershed and snails from a reference watershed that has not experienced mining pollution. We used gaseous CO2 to increase water acidity and we then measured changes in antipredatory behavior and also survival. We predicted a simple negative additive effect of low pH. We hypothesized that snails from metal-polluted environments would be physiologically stressed and impaired due to defense responses against heavy metals. Instead, snails from populations that acclimated or evolved in the presence of heavy metal mining pollution were more robust to acidic conditions than were snails from reference habitats. Snails from mining polluted sites seemed to be preadapted to a low pH environment. Their short-term survival in acidic conditions was better than snails from reference sites that lacked metal pollution. In fact, the 48 h survival of snails from polluted sites was so high that it did not significantly differ from the 24 h survival of snails from control sites. This suggests that the response of organisms to a world with rising anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels may be complex and difficult to predict. Snails had a weaker behavioral response to stressful stimuli if kept for 1 month at a pH that differed from their lake of origin. We found that snails raised at a pH of 5.5 had a weaker response (less of a decrease in activity) to concentrated heavy metals than did snails raised at their natal pH of

  1. Facile synthesis of boronic acid-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongna; Hu, Junjie; Cai, Zongwei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) via an amide reaction. The introduction of PASE could bridge the MCNT and APBA, suppress the nonspecific adsorption and reduce the steric hindrance among the bound molecules. Due to the excellent structure of the MCNTs, the functionalization of PASE and then APBA on MCNTs was quite simple, specific and effective. The glycopeptides enrichment and separation with a magnetic field could be achieved by their reversible covalent binding with the boronic group of APBA-MCNTs. The exceptionally large specific surface area and the high density of boronic acid groups of APBA-MCNTs resulted in rapid and highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides, even in the presence of large amounts of interfering nonglycopeptides. The functional MCNTs possessed high selectivity for enrichment of 21 glycopeptides from the digest of horseradish peroxidase demonstrated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis showing more glycopeptides detected than the usual 9 glycopeptides with commercially available APBA-agarose. The proposed system showed better specificity for glycopeptides even in the presence of non-glycopeptides with 50 times higher concentration. The boronic acid functionalized MCNTs provide a promising selective enrichment platform for precise glycoproteomic analysis.A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid

  2. Carbon isotopes in otolith amino acids identify residency of juvenile snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) in coastal nurseries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, K. W.; Berumen, M. L.; Mateo, I.; Elsdon, T. S.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    This study explored the potential for otolith geochemistry in snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) to identify residency in juvenile nursery habitats with distinctive carbon isotope values. Conventional bulk otolith and muscle stable isotope analyses (SIA) and essential amino acid (AA) SIA were conducted on snapper collected from seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs in the Red Sea, Caribbean Sea, and Pacific coast of Panama. While bulk stable isotope values in otoliths showed regional differences, they failed to distinguish nursery residence on local scales. Essential AA δ13C values in otoliths, on the other hand, varied as a function of habitat type and provided a better tracer of residence in different juvenile nursery habitats than conventional bulk otolith SIA alone. A strong linear relationship was found between paired otolith and muscle essential AA δ13C values regardless of species, geographic region, or habitat type, indicating that otolith AAs recorded the same dietary information as muscle AAs. Juvenile snapper in the Red Sea sheltered in mangroves but fed in seagrass beds, while snapper from the Caribbean Sea and Pacific coast of Panama showed greater reliance on mangrove-derived carbon. Furthermore, compound-specific SIA revealed that microbially recycled detrital carbon, not water-column-based new phytoplankton carbon, was the primary carbon source supporting snapper production on coastal reefs of the Red Sea. This study presented robust tracers of juvenile nursery residence that will be crucial for reconstructing ontogenetic migration patterns of fishes among coastal wetlands and coral reefs. This information is key to determining the importance of nursery habitats to coral reef fish populations and will provide valuable scientific support for the design of networked marine-protected areas.

  3. Evaluation of a gully headcut retreat model using multitemporal aerial photographs and digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo-Bescós, M. A.; Flores-Cervantes, J. H.; Bras, R. L.; Casalí, J.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2013-12-01

    large fraction of soil erosion in temperate climate systems proceeds from gully headcut growth processes. Nevertheless, headcut retreat is not well understood. Few erosion models include gully headcut growth processes, and none of the existing headcut retreat models have been tested against long-term retreat rate estimates. In this work the headcut retreat resulting from plunge pool erosion in the Channel Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development (CHILD) model is calibrated and compared to long-term evolution measurements of six gullies at the Bardenas Reales, northeast Spain. The headcut retreat module of CHILD was calibrated by adjusting the shape factor parameter to fit the observed retreat and volumetric soil loss of one gully during a 36 year period, using reported and collected field data to parameterize the rest of the model. To test the calibrated model, estimates by CHILD were compared to observations of headcut retreat from five other neighboring gullies. The differences in volumetric soil loss rates between the simulations and observations were less than 0.05 m3 yr-1, on average, with standard deviations smaller than 0.35 m3 yr-1. These results are the first evaluation of the headcut retreat module implemented in CHILD with a field data set. These results also show the usefulness of the model as a tool for simulating long-term volumetric gully evolution due to plunge pool erosion.

  4. Teacher Retreating: The Little Known Behavior That Impacts Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Nancy J.; Carroll, Kimberly L.; Hunt, Gilbert H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses findings from four years of observational research examining classroom climate. Specifically, findings that focused on one powerful teacher behavior (teacher retreating) were examined. These data indicated that teacher retreating was negatively correlated to the amount of instructional interaction occurring between students…

  5. Ipilimumab retreatment in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma: the expanded access programme in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiarion-Sileni, V; Pigozzo, J; Ascierto, P A; Simeone, E; Maio, M; Calabrò, L; Marchetti, P; De Galitiis, F; Testori, A; Ferrucci, P F; Queirolo, P; Spagnolo, F; Quaglino, P; Carnevale Schianca, F; Mandalà, M; Di Guardo, L; Del Vecchio, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Retreatment with ipilimumab has been shown to re-establish disease control in some patients with disease progression. Here, we report the efficacy and safety of retreatment with ipilimumab 3 mg kg−1 among patients participating in an expanded access programme in Italy. Methods: Patients who achieved disease control during induction therapy were retreated with ipilimumab upon progression (3 mg kg−1 every 3 weeks for up to four doses), providing they had not experienced toxicity that precluded further dosing. Tumour assessments were conducted after retreatment, and patients were monitored throughout for adverse events. Results: Of 855 patients treated with ipilimumab, 51 were retreated upon disease progression. Of these, 28 (55%) regained disease control upon retreatment and 42% were alive 2 years after the first induction dose of ipilimumab; median overall survival was 21 months. Eleven patients (22%) had a treatment-related adverse event of any grade during retreatment. These were generally mild-to-moderate and resolved within a median of 4 days. No new types of toxicity were reported. Conclusions: For patients who meet predefined criteria, retreatment with ipilimumab is generally well tolerated and can translate into clinical benefit. This strategy should be compared with other therapeutic options in randomised controlled trials. PMID:24619072

  6. Impact of different file systems on the amount of apically extruded debris during endodontic retreatment

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoglu, Emel; Turker, Sevinc Aktemur

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of present study was to determine the effect of different nickel–titanium file systems on the amount of apically extruded debris during endodontic retreatment: D-RaCe retreatment systems, EdgeFile XR retreatment rotary files, and Reciproc R40. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six single-rooted prepared mandibular premolar teeth were filled with Gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer. The teeth were then randomly assigned into three groups (n = 12) for retreatment. The endodontic retreatment was performed as follows: D-RaCe, EdgeFile XR, Reciproc 40. Debris extruded apically during the retreatment was collected into preweighed Eppendorf tubes. An incubator was used to store tubes at 70° C for 5 days. The initial weight was subtracted from final weight of the Eppendorf tubes to calculate the weight of the dry extruded debris for each group. The data obtained were evaluated using Welch analysis of variance and Games-Howell post-hoc tests (P < 0.05). Results: All files resulted in apical extrusion of debris. Reciproc caused significantly less debris extrusion compared to D-RaCe and EdgeFile XR (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The findings revealed that during endodontic retreatment, number, and taper of files might have an influence on the amount of apically extruded debris during endodontic retreatment. PMID:27095898

  7. The Rhetoric of Strategic Retreat: Carter and the Panama Canal Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudol, Ronald A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses President Carter's televised address on the Panama Canal Treaties in terms of five "topoi" for a rhetoric of retreat: timeliness, urgency, value, advantage, and shrewdness. Compares his failure to employ the commonsense arguments that a policy of retreat requires in the televised speech with his more successful impromptu speeches. (JMF)

  8. Timing of ice retreat alters seabird abundances and distributions in the southeast Bering Sea.

    PubMed

    Renner, Martin; Salo, Sigrid; Eisner, Lisa B; Ressler, Patrick H; Ladd, Carol; Kuletz, Kathy J; Santora, Jarrod A; Piatt, John F; Drew, Gary S; Hunt, George L

    2016-09-01

    Timing of spring sea-ice retreat shapes the southeast Bering Sea food web. We compared summer seabird densities and average bathymetry depth distributions between years with early (typically warm) and late (typically cold) ice retreat. Averaged over all seabird species, densities in early-ice-retreat-years were 10.1% (95% CI: 1.1-47.9%) of that in late-ice-retreat-years. In early-ice-retreat-years, surface-foraging species had increased numbers over the middle shelf (50-150 m) and reduced numbers over the shelf slope (200-500 m). Pursuit-diving seabirds showed a less clear trend. Euphausiids and the copepod Calanus marshallae/glacialis were 2.4 and 18.1 times less abundant in early-ice-retreat-years, respectively, whereas age-0 walleye pollock Gadus chalcogrammus near-surface densities were 51× higher in early-ice-retreat-years. Our results suggest a mechanistic understanding of how present and future changes in sea-ice-retreat timing may affect top predators like seabirds in the southeastern Bering Sea.

  9. Timing of ice retreat alters seabird abundances and distributions in the southeast Bering Sea.

    PubMed

    Renner, Martin; Salo, Sigrid; Eisner, Lisa B; Ressler, Patrick H; Ladd, Carol; Kuletz, Kathy J; Santora, Jarrod A; Piatt, John F; Drew, Gary S; Hunt, George L

    2016-09-01

    Timing of spring sea-ice retreat shapes the southeast Bering Sea food web. We compared summer seabird densities and average bathymetry depth distributions between years with early (typically warm) and late (typically cold) ice retreat. Averaged over all seabird species, densities in early-ice-retreat-years were 10.1% (95% CI: 1.1-47.9%) of that in late-ice-retreat-years. In early-ice-retreat-years, surface-foraging species had increased numbers over the middle shelf (50-150 m) and reduced numbers over the shelf slope (200-500 m). Pursuit-diving seabirds showed a less clear trend. Euphausiids and the copepod Calanus marshallae/glacialis were 2.4 and 18.1 times less abundant in early-ice-retreat-years, respectively, whereas age-0 walleye pollock Gadus chalcogrammus near-surface densities were 51× higher in early-ice-retreat-years. Our results suggest a mechanistic understanding of how present and future changes in sea-ice-retreat timing may affect top predators like seabirds in the southeastern Bering Sea. PMID:27651532

  10. Electro-oxidation of perfluorooctanoic acid by carbon nanotube sponge anode and the mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xue, An; Yuan, Zi-Wen; Sun, Yan; Cao, An-Yuan; Zhao, Hua-Zhang

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging persistent organic pollutant (POPs), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) exists widely in natural environment. It is of particular significance to develop efficient techniques to remove low-concentration PFOA from the contaminated waters. In this work, we adopted a new material, carbon nanotube (CNT) sponge, as electrode to enhance electro-oxidation and achieve high removal efficiency of low-concentration (100μgL(-1)) PFOA from water. CNT sponge was pretreated by mixed acids to improve the surface morphology, hydrophilicity and the content of carbonyl groups on the surface. The highest removal efficiencies for low-concentration PFOA electrolyzed by acid-treated CNT sponge anode proved higher than 90%. The electro-oxidation mechanism of PFOA on CNT sponge anode was also discussed. PFOA is adsorbed on the CNT sponge rapidly increasing the concentration of PFOA on anode surface. When the potential on the anode is adjusted to more than 3.5V, the adsorbed PFOA undergoes electrochemically oxidation and hydrolysis to produce shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids with less CF2 unit. The efficient electro-oxidation of PFOA by CNT sponge anode is due to the combined effect of adsorption and electrochemical oxidation. These findings provide an efficient method to remove actual concentration PFOA from water. PMID:26172515

  11. Habit modification of calcium carbonate in the presence of malic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Zhaofeng; Huang Jianhua

    2007-02-15

    The ability of malic acid to control calcium carbonate morphology has been investigated by aging calcium chloride solution in the presence of urea in a 90 deg. C bath. Malic acid favors the formation of calcite. A transition from single block to aggregate with special morphology occurs upon increasing malic acid concentration. The morphological development of CaCO{sub 3} crystal obviously depends on the starting pH. CaCO{sub 3} crystal grows from spindle seed to dumbbell in the pH regime from 7 to 11; while it evolves from spindle seed, through peanut, to sphere at pH=11.5. Both dumbbell and sphere consist of rods that are elongated along c-axis and capped with three smooth, well-defined rhombic {l_brace}1 0 4{r_brace} faces. A tentative growth mechanism is proposed based on the fractal model suggested by R. Kniep and S. Busch [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 35 (1996) 2624]. - Graphical abstract: Dumbbell-like CaCO{sub 3} particles obtained in the presence of malic acid.

  12. Assembly of acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes at oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Hoagland, David A; Russell, Thomas P

    2014-02-01

    The efficient segregation of water-soluble, acid-functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at the oil/water interface was induced by dissolving low-molecular-weight amine-terminated polystyrene (PS-NH2) in the oil phase. Salt-bridge interactions between carboxylic acid groups of SWCNTs and amine groups of PS drove the assembly of SWCNTs at the interface, monitored by pendant drop tensiometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The impact of PS end-group functionality, PS and SWCNT concentrations, and the degree of SWCNT acid modification on the interfacial activity was assessed, and a sharp drop in interfacial tension was observed above a critical SWCNT concentration. Interfacial tensions were low enough to support stable oil/water emulsions. Further experiments, including potentiometric titrations and the replacement of SWCNTs by other carboxyl-containing species, demonstrated that the interfacial tension drop reflects the loss of SWCNT charge as the pH falls near/below the intrinsic carboxyl dissociation constant; species lacking multivalent carboxylic acid groups are inactive. The trapped SWCNTs appear to be neither ordered nor oriented.

  13. Assembly of Acid-Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes at Oil/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tao; Hoagland, David; Russell, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The segregation of water-soluble acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at the oil/water interface was induced by dissolving low-molecular-weight amine-terminated polystyrene (PS-NH2) in the oil phase. Salt-bridge interactions between carboxylic acid groups of SWCNTs and amine groups of PS drove assembly of a mixed interfacial film, monitored by pendant drop tensiometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The influence of PS end-group functionality, PS and SWCNT concentrations, and degree of SWCNT acid modification on interfacial activity were assessed, and a sharp drop in interfacial tension was observed above a critical SWCNT concentration. Interfacial tensions were low enough to support stable oil/water emulsions. Further experiments, including potentiometric titrations and replacement of SWCNTs by other carboxyl-containing species, demonstrated that the interfacial tension drop reflects the loss of SWCNT charge as pH falls near/below the intrinsic carboxyl dissociation constant; species lacking multivalent carboxylic acid groups are inactive. The interfacial assemblies of SWCNTs appear neither ordered nor oriented. Research Advisor.

  14. Heteropoly Acid/Nitrogen Functionalized Onion-like Carbon Hybrid Catalyst for Ester Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Qi, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-02-18

    A novel heteropoly acid (HPA)/nitrogen functionalized onion-like carbon (NOLC) hybrid catalyst was synthesized through supramolecular (electrostatic and hydrogen bond) interactions between the two components. The chemical structure and acid strength of the HPA/NOLC hybrid have been fully characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption and acid-base titration measurements. The proposed method for the fabrication of the HPA/NOLC hybrid catalyst is a universal strategy for different types of HPAs to meet various requirements of acidic or redox catalysis. The hydrophobic environment of NOLC effectively prevents the deactivation of HPA in an aqueous system, and the combination of uniformly dispersed HPA clusters and the synergistic effect between NOLC and HPA significantly promotes its activity in ester hydrolysis reactions, which is higher than that of bare PWA as homogeneous catalyst. The kinetics of the hydrolysis reactions indicate that the aggregation status of the catalyst particles has great influence on the apparent activity. PMID:26606266

  15. Acid-functionalized mesoporous carbon: an efficient support for ruthenium-catalyzed γ-valerolactone production.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alberto; Schiavoni, Marco; Chan-Thaw, Carine E; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng; More, Karren L; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2015-08-10

    The hydrogenation of levulinic acid has been studied using Ru supported on ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) prepared by soft-templating. P- and S-containing acid groups were introduced by postsynthetic functionalization before the addition of 1 % Ru by incipient wetness impregnation. These functionalities and the reaction conditions mediate the activity and selectivity of the levulinic acid hydrogenation. The presence of S-containing groups (Ru/OMC-S and Ru/OMC-P/S) deactivates the Ru catalysts strongly, whereas the presence of P-containing groups (Ru/OMC-P) enhances the activity compared to that of pristine Ru/OMC. Under mild conditions (70 °C and 7 bar H2 ) the catalyst shows high selectivity to γ-valerolactone (GVL; >95 %) and high stability on recycling. However, under more severe conditions (200 °C and p H 2=40 bar) Ru/OMC-P is particularly able to promote GVL ring-opening and the consecutive hydrogenation to pentanoic acid. PMID:26089180

  16. Electro-oxidation of perfluorooctanoic acid by carbon nanotube sponge anode and the mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xue, An; Yuan, Zi-Wen; Sun, Yan; Cao, An-Yuan; Zhao, Hua-Zhang

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging persistent organic pollutant (POPs), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) exists widely in natural environment. It is of particular significance to develop efficient techniques to remove low-concentration PFOA from the contaminated waters. In this work, we adopted a new material, carbon nanotube (CNT) sponge, as electrode to enhance electro-oxidation and achieve high removal efficiency of low-concentration (100μgL(-1)) PFOA from water. CNT sponge was pretreated by mixed acids to improve the surface morphology, hydrophilicity and the content of carbonyl groups on the surface. The highest removal efficiencies for low-concentration PFOA electrolyzed by acid-treated CNT sponge anode proved higher than 90%. The electro-oxidation mechanism of PFOA on CNT sponge anode was also discussed. PFOA is adsorbed on the CNT sponge rapidly increasing the concentration of PFOA on anode surface. When the potential on the anode is adjusted to more than 3.5V, the adsorbed PFOA undergoes electrochemically oxidation and hydrolysis to produce shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids with less CF2 unit. The efficient electro-oxidation of PFOA by CNT sponge anode is due to the combined effect of adsorption and electrochemical oxidation. These findings provide an efficient method to remove actual concentration PFOA from water.

  17. Heteropoly Acid/Nitrogen Functionalized Onion-like Carbon Hybrid Catalyst for Ester Hydrolysis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Qi, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-02-18

    A novel heteropoly acid (HPA)/nitrogen functionalized onion-like carbon (NOLC) hybrid catalyst was synthesized through supramolecular (electrostatic and hydrogen bond) interactions between the two components. The chemical structure and acid strength of the HPA/NOLC hybrid have been fully characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption and acid-base titration measurements. The proposed method for the fabrication of the HPA/NOLC hybrid catalyst is a universal strategy for different types of HPAs to meet various requirements of acidic or redox catalysis. The hydrophobic environment of NOLC effectively prevents the deactivation of HPA in an aqueous system, and the combination of uniformly dispersed HPA clusters and the synergistic effect between NOLC and HPA significantly promotes its activity in ester hydrolysis reactions, which is higher than that of bare PWA as homogeneous catalyst. The kinetics of the hydrolysis reactions indicate that the aggregation status of the catalyst particles has great influence on the apparent activity.

  18. Discovery of arjunolic acid as a novel non-zinc binding carbonic anhydrase II inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kalyanavenkataraman, Subhalakshmi; Nanjan, Pandurangan; Banerji, Asoke; Nair, Bipin G; Kumar, Geetha B

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) have been shown to be associated with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Although arjunolic acid (AA) has a diverse range of therapeutic applications including cardio-protection, there have been no reports on the effect of AA on CA II. The present study describes for the first time, the novel zinc independent inhibition of CA II by AA. The molecular docking studies of AA indicated that the hydroxyl group at C2 of the A-ring, which hydrogen bonds with the catalytic site residues (His64, Asn62 and Asn67), along with the gem-dimethyl group at C20 of the E-ring, greatly influences the inhibitory activity, independent of the catalytic zinc, unlike the inhibition observed with most CA II inhibitors. Among the triterpenoids tested viz. arjunolic acid, arjunic acid, asiatic acid, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid, AA was the most potent in inhibiting CA II in vitro with an IC50 of 9μM. It was interesting to note, that in spite of exhibiting very little differences in their structures, these triterpenoids exhibited vast differences in their inhibitory activities, with IC50 values ranging from 9μM to as high as 333μM. Furthermore, AA also inhibited the cytosolic activity of CA in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, as reflected by the decrease in acidification of the intracellular pH (pHi). The decreased acidification reduced the intracellular calcium levels, which further prevented the mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Thus, these studies provide a better understanding for establishing the novel molecular mechanism involved in CA II inhibition by the non-zinc binding inhibitor AA. PMID:27038848

  19. Regional and global forcing of glacier retreat during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Shakun, Jeremy D; Clark, Peter U; He, Feng; Lifton, Nathaniel A; Liu, Zhengyu; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L

    2015-08-21

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers globally is one of the clearest manifestations of recent global warming associated with rising greenhouse gas concentrations. By comparison, the importance of greenhouse gases in driving glacier retreat during the most recent deglaciation, the last major interval of global warming, is unclear due to uncertainties in the timing of retreat around the world. Here we use recently improved cosmogenic-nuclide production-rate calibrations to recalculate the ages of 1,116 glacial boulders from 195 moraines that provide broad coverage of retreat in mid-to-low-latitude regions. This revised history, in conjunction with transient climate model simulations, suggests that while several regional-scale forcings, including insolation, ice sheets and ocean circulation, modulated glacier responses regionally, they are unable to account for global-scale retreat, which is most likely related to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  20. Regional and global forcing of glacier retreat during the last deglaciation

    PubMed Central

    Shakun, Jeremy D.; Clark, Peter U.; He, Feng; Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Liu, Zhengyu; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers globally is one of the clearest manifestations of recent global warming associated with rising greenhouse gas concentrations. By comparison, the importance of greenhouse gases in driving glacier retreat during the most recent deglaciation, the last major interval of global warming, is unclear due to uncertainties in the timing of retreat around the world. Here we use recently improved cosmogenic-nuclide production-rate calibrations to recalculate the ages of 1,116 glacial boulders from 195 moraines that provide broad coverage of retreat in mid-to-low-latitude regions. This revised history, in conjunction with transient climate model simulations, suggests that while several regional-scale forcings, including insolation, ice sheets and ocean circulation, modulated glacier responses regionally, they are unable to account for global-scale retreat, which is most likely related to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. PMID:26293133

  1. Regional and global forcing of glacier retreat during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Shakun, Jeremy D; Clark, Peter U; He, Feng; Lifton, Nathaniel A; Liu, Zhengyu; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing retreat of glaciers globally is one of the clearest manifestations of recent global warming associated with rising greenhouse gas concentrations. By comparison, the importance of greenhouse gases in driving glacier retreat during the most recent deglaciation, the last major interval of global warming, is unclear due to uncertainties in the timing of retreat around the world. Here we use recently improved cosmogenic-nuclide production-rate calibrations to recalculate the ages of 1,116 glacial boulders from 195 moraines that provide broad coverage of retreat in mid-to-low-latitude regions. This revised history, in conjunction with transient climate model simulations, suggests that while several regional-scale forcings, including insolation, ice sheets and ocean circulation, modulated glacier responses regionally, they are unable to account for global-scale retreat, which is most likely related to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. PMID:26293133

  2. Multi-temporal retreat rates along the eastern Mediterranean coastal cliff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, O.; Mushkin, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Israeli coastal cliff extends about 50 km along the eastern Mediterranean shores. The cliff is comprised of late Quaternary eolianites and paleosols and reaches heights of up to 50 meters. In places, time-averaged inland cliff-top retreat rates of up to a few tens of centimeters per year have been measured usually by comparing aerial photos from the last decades. Commonly, these locally constrained retreat rates have been: 1) extrapolated as representative of the entire cliff length, and 2) adopted by hazard-mitigation and planning authorities. Here, we re-evaluate the current understanding of coastal-retreat patterns and rates along Israel's Mediterranean cliff line using a suite of field observations, aerial photography and recently obtained airborne and ground based high resolution LiDAR measurement of cliff morphologies. First, we constrain the decadal-scale retreat rates along the coastal-cliff by comparing the cliff-top location in 1945 and 2004 using aerial photos. We find a statistically significant spatial correlation between: 1) calculated low retreat rates (less than 0.1 m/yr) and field-based criteria indicating overall stability: slope angle of 45 deg. and talus cover along the lower part of the cliff and developed vegetation cover, and 2) high retreat rates and field criteria indicating recent instability: fresh landslide scars and 'hanging' valleys, which provides independent support for the calculated retreat rates. Calculated 60 years average cliff-top retreat rates of less than 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 m/yr along 58%, 77% and 85% of the cliff length, respectively, reveal that extended stretches of the cliff line did not experience detectable retreat in the past 60 years, thus implying relative stability of 50% of Israel's costal cliffs during this time period. Second, we constrain the annual retreat rates using repeat high-resolution ground based LiDAR surveys before and after an extreme winter storm that occurred in Dec. 2010. Locally, storm induced

  3. Biomediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate in a Slightly Acidic Hot Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L.

    2015-12-01

    A slightly acidic hot spring named "Female Tower" (T=73.5 °C, pH=6.64) is located in the Jifei Geothermal Field, Yunnan Province, Southwest China. The precipitates in the hot spring are composed of large amounts of calcite, aragonite, and sulfur. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses revealed that the microbial mats were formed of various coccoid, rod-shaped, and filamentous microbes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the intracellular sulfur granules were commonly associated with these microbes. A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the majority of the bacteria in the spring were sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In the spring water, H2S concentration was up to 60 ppm, while SO42- concentration was only about 10 ppm. We speculated that H2S might be utilized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in this hot spring water, leading to the intracellular formation of sulfur granules. In the meantime, this reaction increased the pH in the micron-scale microdomains, which fostered the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the microbial mats. The results of this study indicated that the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria could play an important role in calcium carbonate precipitation in slightly acidic hot spring environments.

  4. Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid that Contains Dissolved Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, Bruce J.; Mickalonis, John I.; Subramanian, Karthik H.

    2012-10-11

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid (OA) will be used to chemically clean the tanks after waste retrieval is completed. The waste tanks at SRS were constructed from carbon steel materials and thus are vulnerable to corrosion in acidic media. In addition to structural impacts, the impact of corrosion on the hydrogen generated during the process must be assessed. Electrochemical and coupon immersion tests were used to investigate the corrosion mechanism at anticipated process conditions. The testing showed that the corrosion rates were dependent upon the reduction of the iron species that had dissolved in solution. Initial corrosion rates were elevated due to the reduction of the ferric species to ferrous species. At later times, as the ferric species depleted, the corrosion rate decreased. On the other hand, the hydrogen evolution reaction became more dominant.

  5. [Degradation of Acid Orange 7 with Persulfate Activated by Silver Loaded Granular Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-ming; Huang, Tian-yin; Chen, Jia-bin; Li, Wen-wei; Zhang, Li-ming

    2015-11-01

    Granular activated carbon with silver loaded as activator (Ag/GAC) was prepared using impregnation method. N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were adopted to characterize the Ag/GAC, showing that silver was successfully loaded on granular activated carbon. The oxidation degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) by the Ag/GAC activated by persulfate (PS) was investigated at ambient temperature. The influences of factors such as Ag loading, PS or Ag/GAC dosages and initial pH on the degradation of AO7 were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the degradation rate of AO7 could reach more than 95.0% after 180 min when the Ag loading content, PS/AO7 molar ratio, the Ag/GAC dosage were 12.7 mg x g(-1), 120: 1, 1.0 g x L(-1), respectively. The initial pH had significant effect on the AO7 degradation, with pH 5.0 as the optimal pH for the degradation of AO7. The possible degradation pathway was proposed for the AO7 degradation by using UV-visible spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GG/MS). The azo bond and naphthalene ring in the AO7 were destroyed during the degradation, with phthalic acid and acetophenone as the main degradation products. PMID:26910999

  6. Promoted degradation of perfluorooctanic acid by persulfate when adding activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Lo, Shang-Lien; Kuo, Jeff; Huang, Chin-Pao

    2013-10-15

    Treatment of persistent perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in water using persulfate (PS) oxidation typically requires an elevated temperature or UV irradiation, which is energy-consuming. Under relatively low temperatures of 25-45°C, activated carbon (AC) activated PS oxidation of PFOA was evaluated for its potential of practical applications. With presence of AC in PS oxidation, PFOA removal efficiency at 25°C reached 682% with a high defluorination efficiency of 549% after 12h and few intermediates of short-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) were found. The removal and defluorination rates with the combined AC/PS system were approximately 12 and 19 times higher than those of the PS-only system, respectively. Activated carbon not only removes PFOA through adsorption, but also activates PS to form sulfate radicals that accelerate the decomposition and mineralization of PFOA. The activation energy for PS oxidation of PFOA was reduced from 668 to 261kJ/mol by the catalytic effect of AC, which implies a lower reaction temperature and a shorter reaction time would suffice. A 2-cycle schematic reaction mechanism was used to describe PS oxidation of PFOA with the generation of various intermediates and end-products.

  7. Biomediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate and Sulfur in a Faintly Acidic Hot Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L.; Peng, X.; Qiao, H.

    2014-12-01

    A faintly acidic hot spring named "female Tower" (T=73.5 ℃, pH=6.64 ) is located in the Jifei Geothermal Field,Yunnan province, Southwest China. The precipitates in the hot spring are composed of large amounts of calcite and sulfur, as reveals by XRD analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis show the microbial mats are formed of various coccoid, rod and filamentous microbes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis show that intracellular sulfur granules are commonly associated with these microbes. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) analysis shows that the surface of microbes are mainly composed of Ca, C, O and S. A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic analysis demonstrates the majority of bacteria in the spring are sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. In the spring water, H2S concentration was up to 60 ppm, while SO42- concentration was only about 10 ppm. We suggest that H2S might be utilized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in this hot spring water, leading to the formation of sulfur granules intracellularly and extracellularly. In the meantime, this reaction increases the pH in ambient environments, which fosters the precipitation of calcium carbonate precipitation in the microbial mats. This study suggests that the sulfur-oxidizing bacteria could play an important role in calcium carbonate precipitation in faintly acidic hot spring environments.

  8. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced during dark fermentation of food waste by adsorption on Amberlite IRA-67 and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Ahasa; Bonk, Fabian; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2016-10-01

    Amberlite IRA-67 and activated carbon were tested as promising candidates for carboxylic acid recovery by adsorption. Dark fermentation was performed without pH control and without addition of external inoculum at 37°C in batch mode. Lactic, acetic and butyric acids, were obtained, after 7days of fermentation. The maximum acid removal, 74%, from the Amberlite IRA-67 and 63% from activated carbon was obtained from clarified fermentation broth using 200gadsorbent/Lbroth at pH 3.3. The pH has significant effect and pH below the carboxylic acids pKa showed to be beneficial for both the adsorbents. The un-controlled pH fermentation creates acidic environment, aiding in adsorption by eliminating use of chemicals for efficient removal. This study proposes simple and easy valorization of waste to valuable chemicals.

  9. Influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by pulsed discharge plasma inside bubble in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    The influence of sodium carbonate on the decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubbles in water was investigated experimentally. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of sodium carbonate additive, the pH increased owing to the decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the percentage of conversion of formic acid increased with increasing pH because the reaction rate of ozone with formic acid increased with increasing pH. In the case of argon injection, the percentage of conversion was not affected by the pH owing to the high rate loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of sulfonated single-walled carbon nanotubes and their performance as solid acid catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Jin, Yuguang; Li, Zhili; Peng, Feng; Wang, Hongjuan

    2008-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were treated with sulfuric acid at 300 °C to synthesize sulfonated SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs), which were characterized by electron microscopy, infrared, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermo analysis. Compared with activated carbon, more sulfonic acid groups can be introduced onto the surfaces of SWCNTs. The high degree (˜20 wt%) of surface sulfonation led to hydrophilic sidewalls that allows the SWCNTs to be uniformly dispersed in water and organic solvents. The high surface acidity of s-SWCNTs was demonstrated by NH 3 temperature-programmed desorption technique and tested by an acetic acid esterification reaction catalyzed by s-SWCNTs. The results show that the water-dispersive s-SWCNTs are an excellent solid acid catalyst and demonstrate the potential of SWCNTs in catalysis applications.

  11. Removal of chromium(VI) from wastewater using phosphoric acid treated activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganthi, N.

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon prepared by phosphoric acid treatment of tamarind nuts (seeds) was investigated for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The characteristics of phosphorylated tamarind nut carbon (PTNC) were evaluated for porosity and surface area. The effect of contact time, pH, adsorbent dose and particle size variation were studied to evaluate the potential applicability of carbon for treating Cr(VI) containing wastewater. The adsorbent data were modeled by Langmiur and Freundlich classical adsorption isotherms. The kinetic studies showed that Cr(VI) adsorption on PTNC was in compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption studies indicated that ion-exchange mechanism was operating. The continuous adsorption was studied in glass columns of 2.5 cm diameter using electroplating wastewater to ascertain the practical applicability of PTNC in large scale. The mechanism of adsorption was found to be ion-exchange process and was supported by FTIR spectroscopy. The surface modification after adsorption was confirmed by SEM studies.

  12. "Cubism" on the Nanoscale: From Squaric Acid to Porous Carbon Cubes.

    PubMed

    Mani, Christian Mbaya; Berthold, Thomas; Fechler, Nina

    2016-06-01

    3D cube-shaped composites and carbon microparticles with hierarchically porous structure are prepared by a facile template-free synthesis route. Via the coordination of zinc acetate dihydrate and squaric acid, porous 3D cubic crystalline particles of zinc squarate can be obtained. These are easily transformed into the respective zinc oxide carbon composites under preservation of the macromorphology by heat treatment. Washing of the composite materials results in hierarchically porous carbons with high surface areas (1295 m(2) g(-1) ) and large pore volumes (1.5 cm(3) g(-1) ) under full retention of the cube-like architecture of the initial crystals. The materials are shown to be promising electrode materials for supercapacitor applications with a specific capacitance of 133 F g(-1) in H2 SO4 at a scan rate of 5 mV s(-1) , while 67% of this specific capacitance is retained, when increasing the scan rate to 200 mV s(-1) .

  13. Enzymatic synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters by utilizing camellia oil soapstocks and diethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Cao, Xuejun

    2011-11-01

    This study was reported on a novel process for fatty acid ethyl esters preparation by transesterification and esterification from renewable low-cost feedstock camellia oil soapstocks and friendly acyl acceptor diethyl carbonate. The main components of product were 83.9% ethyl oleate, 8.9% ethyl palmitate, 4.7% ethyl linoleate and 2.1% ethyl stearate, which could be used as eco-friendly renewable resources or additives of industrial solvent and fossil fuel. The effects of molar ratio of diethyl carbonate to soapstocks oil, lipases, organic solvent, reaction temperature and time were investigated, and process conditions were optimized. The yield was up to 98.4% in solvent-free system with molar ratio of diethyl carbonate to soapstocks oil 3:1 and 5% Novozym 435 (based on the weight of soapstocks oil) at 50 °C and 180 rpm for 24 h. Moreover, there was no obvious loss in the yield after lipases were reused for 10 batches without treatment under optimized conditions.

  14. Carbon isotope ratios in crassulacean Acid metabolism plants: seasonal patterns from plants in natural stands.

    PubMed

    Szarek, S R

    1976-09-01

    A year round study of photosynthesis and carbon isotope fractionation was conducted with plants of Opuntia phaeacantha Engelm. and Yucca baccata Torr. occurring in natural stands at elevations of 525, 970, 1450 and 1900 m. Plant water potentials and the daytime pattern of (14)CO(2) photosynthesis were similar for all cacti along the elevational gradient, despite significant differences in temperature regime and soil water status. Carbon isotope ratios of total tissue and soluble extract fractions were relatively constant throughtout the entire year. Additionally, the sigma(13)C values were similar in all plants of the same species along the elevational gradient, i.e. -12.5 +/- 0.86 per thousand for O. phaeacantha and -15.7 +/- 0.95 per thousand for Y. baccata. The results of this study indicate Crassulacean acid metabolism predominates as the major carbon pathway of these plants, which do not facultatively utilize the reductive pentose phosphate cycle of photosynthesis as the primary carboxylation reaction. PMID:16659680

  15. "Cubism" on the Nanoscale: From Squaric Acid to Porous Carbon Cubes.

    PubMed

    Mani, Christian Mbaya; Berthold, Thomas; Fechler, Nina

    2016-06-01

    3D cube-shaped composites and carbon microparticles with hierarchically porous structure are prepared by a facile template-free synthesis route. Via the coordination of zinc acetate dihydrate and squaric acid, porous 3D cubic crystalline particles of zinc squarate can be obtained. These are easily transformed into the respective zinc oxide carbon composites under preservation of the macromorphology by heat treatment. Washing of the composite materials results in hierarchically porous carbons with high surface areas (1295 m(2) g(-1) ) and large pore volumes (1.5 cm(3) g(-1) ) under full retention of the cube-like architecture of the initial crystals. The materials are shown to be promising electrode materials for supercapacitor applications with a specific capacitance of 133 F g(-1) in H2 SO4 at a scan rate of 5 mV s(-1) , while 67% of this specific capacitance is retained, when increasing the scan rate to 200 mV s(-1) . PMID:27062376

  16. Recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum and utilization for remediation of acid mine drainage from coal mines.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, J; Radebe, V

    2012-01-01

    The recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum (a waste product of the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process) was tested using sodium carbonate. Batch recovery of calcium carbonate from waste gypsum slurries by reacting with sodium carbonate under ambient conditions was used to assess the technical feasibility of CaCO(3) recovery and its use for pre-treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines. The effect of key process parameters, such as the slurry concentration (%) and the molar ratio of sodium carbonate to gypsum were considered. It was observed that batch waste gypsum conversion significantly increased with decrease in the slurry concentration or increase in the molar ratio of sodium carbonate to gypsum. The CaCO(3) recovered from the bench-scale batch reactor demonstrated effective neutralization ability during AMD pre-treatment compared with commercial laboratory grade CaCO(3).

  17. Formation of calcium carbonate films on chitosan substrates in the presence of polyacrylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    He, Linghao; Xue, Rui; Song, Rui

    2009-05-15

    In this investigation, chitosan membranes with different surface average degrees of deacetylation (DA) are prepared and then are employed as the support matrix to culture calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). In the presence of high concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA), the CaCO{sub 3} films obtained on the surface of all chitosan films mainly consisted of vaterite, which suggests the presence of bulk PAA plays an overwhelming part in stabilizing the vaterite. As a comparison, the influences of active groups indicate that only in case of low concentration PAA the thin CaCO{sub 3} films grown on chitosan with 8% DA mainly consisted of vaterite owing to the strong nucleation ability of -NH{sub 2} group, whereas, for those grown on chitosan with 80% DA the CaCO{sub 3} films mainly consisted of aragonite. A more complex scenario revealed that in the case of intermediate concentration of PAA the formed polymorphs behave as mixtures of vaterite and aragonite. - Graphical abstract: Chitosan membranes with different degrees of deacetylation (DA) are employed as support to culture calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}). In high concentration of polyacrylic acid (PAA), the CaCO{sub 3} films obtained consisted of vaterite. However, the CaCO{sub 3} film grown on chitosan with 8% DA mainly consisted of vaterite as opposed to aragonite for chitosan with 8% DA. The schematic presentation of the formation of calcium carbonate on chitosan films with different degrees of acetylation in the presence of PAA with low-, mid- and high concentrations.

  18. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion.

    PubMed

    Lyles, Christopher N; Le, Huynh M; Beasley, William Howard; McInerney, Michael J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11) or a methanogen (M. hungatei). The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons.

  19. Anaerobic hydrocarbon and fatty acid metabolism by syntrophic bacteria and their impact on carbon steel corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Lyles, Christopher N.; Le, Huynh M.; Beasley, William Howard; McInerney, Michael J.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    The microbial metabolism of hydrocarbons is increasingly associated with the corrosion of carbon steel in sulfate-rich marine waters. However, how such transformations influence metal biocorrosion in the absence of an electron acceptor is not fully recognized. We grew a marine alkane-utilizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfoglaeba alkanexedens, with either sulfate or Methanospirillum hungatei as electron acceptors, and tested the ability of the cultures to catalyze metal corrosion. Axenically, D. alkanexedens had a higher instantaneous corrosion rate and produced more pits in carbon steel coupons than when the same organism was grown in syntrophic co-culture with the methanogen. Since anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation pathways converge on fatty acid intermediates, the corrosive ability of a known fatty acid-oxidizing syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus aciditrophicus was compared when grown in pure culture or in co-culture with a H2-utilizing sulfate-reducing bacterium (Desulfovibrio sp., strain G11) or a methanogen (M. hungatei). The instantaneous corrosion rates in the cultures were not substantially different, but the syntrophic, sulfate-reducing co-culture produced more pits in coupons than other combinations of microorganisms. Lactate-grown cultures of strain G11 had higher instantaneous corrosion rates and coupon pitting compared to the same organism cultured with hydrogen as an electron donor. Thus, if sulfate is available as an electron acceptor, the same microbial assemblages produce sulfide and low molecular weight organic acids that exacerbated biocorrosion. Despite these trends, a surprisingly high degree of variation was encountered with the corrosion assessments. Differences in biomass, initial substrate concentration, rates of microbial activity or the degree of end product formation did not account for the variations. We are forced to ascribe such differences to the metallurgical properties of the coupons. PMID:24744752

  20. Changes in the physiological properties and kinetics of citric acid accumulation via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger *

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Liu, Jing; Song, Yuan; Wu, Qing-feng; Li, Wen-jian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to produce citric acid from corn starch using a newly isolated mutant of Aspergillus niger, and to analyze the relationship between changes in the physiological properties of A. niger induced by carbon ion irradiation and citric acid accumulation. Our results showed that the physiological characteristics of conidia in A. niger were closely related to citric acid accumulation and that lower growth rate and viability of conidia may be beneficial to citric acid accumulation. Using corn starch as a raw material, a high-yielding citric acid mutant, named HW2, was obtained. In a 10-L bioreactor, HW2 can accumulate 118.9 g/L citric acid with a residual total sugar concentration of only 14.4 g/L. This represented an 18% increase in citric acid accumulation and a 12.5% decrease in sugar utilization compared with the original strain.

  1. Elaidate, an 18-Carbon Trans-monoenoic Fatty Acid, but not Physiological Fatty Acids Increases Intracellular Zn2+ in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zacherl, Janelle R.; Tourkova, Irina; St Croix, Claudette M.; Robinson, Lisa J.; Peck Palmer, Octavia M.; Mihalik, Stephanie J.; Blair, Harry C.

    2015-01-01

    Artificial trans fatty acids promote atherosclerosis by blocking macrophage clearance of cell debris. Classical fatty-acid response mechanisms include TLR4-NF-κB activation, and Erk1/2 phosphorylation, but these may not indicate long-term mechanisms. Indeed, nuclear NF-κB was increased by 60 minute treatment by 30 μM of the 18 carbon trans unsaturated fatty acid elaidic acid (elaidate), the physiological cis-unsaturated fatty acid oleic acid (oleate), and the 18 or 16 carbon saturated fatty acids stearic and palmitic acid (stearate or palmitate). However, except for stearate, effects on related pathways were minimal at 44 hours. To determine longer term effects of trans fatty acids, we compared whole exome mRNA expression of (trans) elaidate to (cis) oleate, 30 μM, at 44 hours in human macrophages. We found that elaidate changed Zn2+-homeostasis gene mRNAs markedly. This might be important because Zn2+ is a major regulator of macrophage activity. Messenger RNAs of seven Zn2+-binding metallothioneins decreased 2–4 fold; the zinc importer SLC39A10 increased 2-fold, in elaidate relative to oleate-treated cells. Results were followed by quantitative PCR comparing cis, trans, and saturated fatty acid effects on Zn2+-homeostasis gene mRNAs. This confirmed that elaidate uniquely decreased metallothionein expression and increased SLC39A10 at 44 hours. Further, intracellular Zn2+ was measured using N-(carboxymethyl)-N-[2-[2-[2(carboxymethyl)amino]-5-(2,7,-difluoro-6-hydroxy-3-oxo-3H-xanthen-9-yl)-phenoxy]-ethoxy]-4-methoxyphenyl]glycine, acetoxymethyl ester (FluoZin-3-AM). This showed that, at 44 hours, only cells treated with elaidate had increased Zn2+. The durable effect of elaidate on Zn2+ activation is a novel and specific effect of trans fatty acids on peripheral macrophage metabolism. PMID:25358453

  2. Acid Fluid-Rock Interactions with Shales Comprising Unconventional Hydrocarbon Reservoirs and with Shale Capping Carbon Storage Reservoirs: Experimental Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Bratcher, J.; Marcon, V.; Herz-Thyhsen, R.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of HCl is often a first stage in the hydraulic fracturing process. These acidic fluids react with marls or shales in unconventional reservoirs, reactions generally comparable to reaction between shale caprocks and acidic, carbonated formation waters in a carbon storage reservoir. Hydrothermal experiments examine acid fluid-rock interaction with 1) an unconventional shale reservoir and 2) a model shale capping a carbon storage reservoir. In the former, unconventional reservoir rock and hydraulic fracturing fluid possessing a range of ionic strengths (I = 0.01, 0.15) and initial pH values (2.5 and 7.3) reacted at 115°C and 35 MPa for 28 days. In the latter, a model carbon storage reservoir (Fe-rich dolomite), shale caprock (illite), and shale-reservoir mixture each reacted with formation water (I = 0.1 and pH 6.3) at 160°C and 25 MPa for ~15 days. These three experiments were subsequently injected with sufficient CO2 to maintain CO2 saturation in the water and allowed to react for ~40 additional days. Acidic frac fluid was rapidly buffered (from pH 2.5 to 6.2 after 38 hrs) by reaction with reservoir rock whereas the pH of near-neutral frac fluid decreased (from 7.3 to 6.9) after 47 hrs. Carbonate dissolution released Ca and Sr into solution and feldspar dissolution released SiO2 and Li; the extent of reaction was greater in the experiment containing acidic frac fluid. All three carbon storage experiments displayed a similar pH decrease of 1.5 units after the addition of CO2. The pH remained low for the duration of the experiments because the immiscible supercritical CO2 phase provided an infinite reservoir of carbonic acid that could not be consumed by reaction with the rock. In all three experiments, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn and SO4 increase with injection, but slowly decline through termination of the experiments. This trend suggests initial dissolution followed by re-precipitation of carbonates, which can be seen in modeling and SEM results. New clay minerals

  3. Rapid last-deglacial thinning and retreat of the marine-terminating southwestern Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, Kelsey; Carlson, Anders E.; Caffee, Marc W.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2015-09-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers are a major source of modern ice loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), but their role in GrIS retreat during the last deglaciation is not well constrained. Here, we develop deglacial outlet glacier retreat chronologies for four regions in southwest and south Greenland to improve understanding of spatial variations in centennial- to millennial-scale ice loss under a warming climate. We calculate 10Be surface exposure ages of boulders located in fjords near the towns of Qaqortoq, Paamiut, Nuuk, and Sisimiut. Our northernmost study site, Sisimiut, deglaciated earliest at ∼18 ka to ∼15 ka with an average thinning rate of 0.1-0.3 m yr-1. Inland retreat from Sisimiut to the modern ice margin took ∼7 ka at an average retreat rate of 15-20 m yr-1. A 10Be-dated moraine ∼25 km from the modern GrIS margin deposited at ∼8 ka suggests a possible ice-margin still-stand, but this does not change overall retreat rates. After retreat from the small coastal Sisimiut fjords, the GrIS margin was mainly land-terminating in this region. In contrast, earliest exposure occurred at ∼12 ka near Qaqortoq, and 11-10 ka near Nuuk and Paamiut, with ice thinning at rates of 0.2-0.3 m yr-1 to instantaneous within measurement uncertainty. Ice retreat inland through the extensive Nuuk, Paamiut, and Qaqortoq fjord systems to near modern ice margins occurred in <1 ka, resulting in minimum retreat rates of 25-65 m yr-1 and maximum retreat rates of ∼95 m yr-1 to instantaneous within the uncertainty of our measurements. This rapid thinning and retreat of marine-terminating southwest GrIS margins is contemporaneous with an incursion of relatively warm ocean waters into the Labrador Sea and toward the southwest Greenland coast, suggesting that a warming ocean may have contributed to the more rapid retreat of marine GrIS termini in the Nuuk, Paamiut, and Qaqortoq fjord systems relative to the slower ice retreat inland from Sisimiut. Our results highlight

  4. An experimental study on the effect of carbonic anhydrase on the oxygen isotope exchange kinetics and equilibrium in the carbonic acid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchikawa, J.; Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotopes of marine biogenic carbonates are often depleted in 18O relative to the values expected for thermodynamic equilibrium with ambient seawater. One possibility is that 18O-depletion in carbonates is kinetically controlled. The kinetic isotope effect associated with the hydration of CO2 results in 18O-depleted HCO3-. If the HCO3- is utilized before re-establishing equilibrium with ambient water under rapid calcification, the 18O-depletion will be recorded in carbonates. But one caveat in this kinetic model is the fact that many marine calcifiers posses carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bearing enzyme that catalyzes the CO2 hydration reaction. It is expected that this enzyme accelerates 18O-equilibration in the carbonic acid system by facilitating direct oxygen isotope exchange between HCO3- and H2O via CO2 hydration. Clearly this argues against the conceptual framework of the kinetic model. Yet the critical variable here is the effectiveness of the carbonic anhydrase, which is likely to depend on its concentration and the carbonate chemistry of the aqueous medium. It is also hitherto unknown whether the presence of carbonic anhydrase alters the equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations between dissolved carbonate species and water. We performed a series of quantitative inorganic carbonate precipitation experiments to examine the changes in the oxygen isotope equilibration time as a function of carbonic anhydrase concentrations. We conducted experiments at pH 8.3 and 8.9. These pH values are similar to the average surface ocean pH and the elevated pH levels observed within calcification microenvironments of certain corals and planktonic foraminifera. A summary of our new experimental results will be presented.

  5. Characterization, Quantification and Compound-specific Isotopic Analysis of Pyrogenic Carbon Using Benzene Polycarboxylic Acids (BPCA)

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemeier, Daniel B.; Lang, Susan Q.; Gierga, Merle; Abiven, Samuel; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Früh-Green, Gretchen L.; Hajdas, Irka; Hanke, Ulrich M.; Hilf, Michael D.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Scheider, Maximilian P. W.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Wacker, Lukas; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.

    2016-01-01

    Fire-derived, pyrogenic carbon (PyC), sometimes called black carbon (BC), is the carbonaceous solid residue of biomass and fossil fuel combustion, such as char and soot. PyC is ubiquitous in the environment due to its long persistence, and its abundance might even increase with the projected increase in global wildfire activity and the continued burning of fossil fuel. PyC is also increasingly produced from the industrial pyrolysis of organic wastes, which yields charred soil amendments (biochar). Moreover, the emergence of nanotechnology may also result in the release of PyC-like compounds to the environment. It is thus a high priority to reliably detect, characterize and quantify these charred materials in order to investigate their environmental properties and to understand their role in the carbon cycle. Here, we present the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method, which allows the simultaneous assessment of PyC's characteristics, quantity and isotopic composition (13C and 14C) on a molecular level. The method is applicable to a very wide range of environmental sample materials and detects PyC over a broad range of the combustion continuum, i.e., it is sensitive to slightly charred biomass as well as high temperature chars and soot. The BPCA protocol presented here is simple to employ, highly reproducible, as well as easily extendable and modifiable to specific requirements. It thus provides a versatile tool for the investigation of PyC in various disciplines, ranging from archeology and environmental forensics to biochar and carbon cycling research. PMID:27214064

  6. Characterization, Quantification and Compound-specific Isotopic Analysis of Pyrogenic Carbon Using Benzene Polycarboxylic Acids (BPCA).

    PubMed

    Wiedemeier, Daniel B; Lang, Susan Q; Gierga, Merle; Abiven, Samuel; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Früh-Green, Gretchen L; Hajdas, Irka; Hanke, Ulrich M; Hilf, Michael D; McIntyre, Cameron P; Scheider, Maximilian P W; Smittenberg, Rienk H; Wacker, Lukas; Wiesenberg, Guido L B; Schmidt, Michael W I

    2016-01-01

    Fire-derived, pyrogenic carbon (PyC), sometimes called black carbon (BC), is the carbonaceous solid residue of biomass and fossil fuel combustion, such as char and soot. PyC is ubiquitous in the environment due to its long persistence, and its abundance might even increase with the projected increase in global wildfire activity and the continued burning of fossil fuel. PyC is also increasingly produced from the industrial pyrolysis of organic wastes, which yields charred soil amendments (biochar). Moreover, the emergence of nanotechnology may also result in the release of PyC-like compounds to the environment. It is thus a high priority to reliably detect, characterize and quantify these charred materials in order to investigate their environmental properties and to understand their role in the carbon cycle. Here, we present the benzene polycarboxylic acid (BPCA) method, which allows the simultaneous assessment of PyC's characteristics, quantity and isotopic composition ((13)C and (14)C) on a molecular level. The method is applicable to a very wide range of environmental sample materials and detects PyC over a broad range of the combustion continuum, i.e., it is sensitive to slightly charred biomass as well as high temperature chars and soot. The BPCA protocol presented here is simple to employ, highly reproducible, as well as easily extendable and modifiable to specific requirements. It thus provides a versatile tool for the investigation of PyC in various disciplines, ranging from archeology and environmental forensics to biochar and carbon cycling research. PMID:27214064

  7. Asynchronous Reductive Release of Iron and Organic Carbon from Hematite-Humic Acid Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, D.; Poulson, S.; Sumaila, S.; Dynes, J.; McBeth, J. M.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Association with solid-phase iron plays an important role in the accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). Ferric minerals are subject to redox reactions, which can compromise the stability of iron-bound SOM. To date, there is limited information available concerning the fate of iron-bound SOM during redox reactions. In this study, we investigated the release kinetics of hematite-bound organic carbon (OC) during the abiotic reduction of hematite-humic acid (HA) complexes by dithionite, as an analog for the fate of iron-bound SOM in natural redox reactions. Carbon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy was used to examine the ratio of the aromatic, phenolic and carboxylic/imide functional groups of the adsorbed OC before and after reduction. Our results indicate that the reductive release of iron obeyed first-order kinetics with release rate constants of 6.67×10-3 to 13.0×10-3 min-1. The iron-bound OC was released rapidly during the initial stage with release rate constants of 0.011 to 1.49 min-1, and then became stable with residual fractions of 4.6% to 58.2% between 120 and 240 min. The release rate of aromatic OC was much faster than for the non-aromatic fraction of HA, and 90% of aromatic OC was released within the first hour for most samples. The more rapid release of aromatic OC was attributed to its potential distribution on the outer layer because of steric effects and the possible reduction of quinoids. Our findings show that in the reductive reaction the mobilization of iron-bound organic carbon was asynchronous with the reduction of iron, and aromatic carbon was released more readily than other organic components. This study illustrates the importance of evaluating the stability of iron-bound SOM, especially under aerobic-anaerobic transition conditions.

  8. Do rapidly retreating valley glaciers increase catchment sediment export rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Stuart; Bakker, Maarten; Gabbud, Chrystelle; Micheletti, Natan; Saugy, Jean-Noël

    2016-04-01

    In the face of rapid climate warming, rapid glacier recession should lead to a marked increase in the spatial extent of paraglacial processes operating in glaciated drainage basins. The paraglacial phase has been well established to be transient but there are very few studies of this transient response and what it means for sediment export. There is good reason to expect that glacier recession could increase basin-scale sediment connectivity as: sediment becomes less dependent on glacier surface transport; proglacial streams are more able to migrate laterally than subglacial streams and so access sediment for transport; and glacier debuttressing may aid the development of gullies that can dissect moraines and so aid hillslope to proglacial zone connectivity. By using records of the flushing of hydroelectric power installations we were able to develop a record of coarse sediment (sand and gravel) export from a basin with a rapidly retreating valley glacier, the Haut Glacier d'Arolla, from 1977 to 2014. Modelling suggested that these data could only be partially controlled by transport capacity implying an important role for sediment supply and potentially for the influence of changing sediment connectivity. Indeed, there was evidence of the effects of glacial debuttressing upon gullying processes and hence a possible increase in the ease of connection of upstream basins to the proglacial area. More recently, it was possible to show possible temperature control on sediment export, which may only have become apparent because of the progressive development of better sediment connectivity. However, whilst rapid glacier recession should result in theory in a progressive increase in connectivity of sediment sources to the basin outlet, the supply to capacity ratio does not increase continually with glacier recession until maximum capacity is reached. We identify two examples of why. First, gullying was also accompanied by the sediment accumulation at the base of moraines

  9. Field assessment of yeast- and oxalic Acid-generated carbon dioxide for mosquito surveillance.

    PubMed

    Harwood, James F; Richardson, Alec G; Wright, Jennifer A; Obenauer, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sources improve the efficacy of mosquito traps. However, traditional CO2 sources (dry ice or compressed gas) may be difficult to acquire for vector surveillance during military contingency operations. For this reason, a new and convenient source of CO2 is required. Two novel CO2 generators were evaluated in order to address this capability gap: 1) an electrolyzer that converts solid oxalic acid into CO2 gas, and 2) CO2 produced by yeast as it metabolizes sugar. The flow rate and CO2 concentration produced by each generator were measured, and each generator's ability to attract mosquitoes to BG-Sentinel™ traps during day surveillance and to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light traps with incandescent bulbs during night surveillance was compared to dry ice and compressed gas in Jacksonville, FL. The electrolyzed oxalic acid only slightly increased the number of mosquitoes captured compared to unbaited traps. Based on the modest increase in mosquito collection for traps paired with the oxalic acid, it is not a suitable stand-in for either of the 2 traditional CO2 sources. Conversely, the yeast-generated CO2 resulted in collections with mosquito abundance and species richness more closely resembling those of the traditional CO2 sources, despite achieving a lower CO2 flow rate. Therefore, if dry ice or compressed gas cannot be acquired for vector surveillance, yeast-generated CO2 can significantly improve trap capability. PMID:25843133

  10. Au nanoparticles/poly(caffeic acid) composite modified glassy carbon electrode for voltammetric determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianbao; Xu, Juan; Zhao, Lei; Shen, Shaofei; Yuan, Maosen; Liu, Wenming; Tu, Qin; Yu, Ruijin; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    An Au nanoparticles/poly(caffeic acid) (AuNPs/PCA) composite modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was prepared by successively potentiostatic technique in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution containing 0.02mM caffeic acid and 1.0mM HAuCl4. Electrochemical characterization of the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen (AP) at the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was also studied by cyclic voltammetry. Compared with bare GC and poly(caffeic acid) modified GC electrode, the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of AP. The plot of catalytic current versus AP concentration showed two linear segments in the concentration ranges 0.2-20µM and 50-1000µM. The detection limit of 14 nM was obtained by using the first range of the calibration plot. The AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode has been successfully applied and validated by analyzing AP in blood, urine and pharmaceutical samples. PMID:27474318

  11. Au nanoparticles/poly(caffeic acid) composite modified glassy carbon electrode for voltammetric determination of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianbao; Xu, Juan; Zhao, Lei; Shen, Shaofei; Yuan, Maosen; Liu, Wenming; Tu, Qin; Yu, Ruijin; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    An Au nanoparticles/poly(caffeic acid) (AuNPs/PCA) composite modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was prepared by successively potentiostatic technique in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solution containing 0.02mM caffeic acid and 1.0mM HAuCl4. Electrochemical characterization of the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen (AP) at the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was also studied by cyclic voltammetry. Compared with bare GC and poly(caffeic acid) modified GC electrode, the AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode was exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of AP. The plot of catalytic current versus AP concentration showed two linear segments in the concentration ranges 0.2-20µM and 50-1000µM. The detection limit of 14 nM was obtained by using the first range of the calibration plot. The AuNPs/PCA-GC electrode has been successfully applied and validated by analyzing AP in blood, urine and pharmaceutical samples.

  12. Removal of boron from aqueous solution using magnetic carbon nanotube improved with tartaric acid.

    PubMed

    Zohdi, Nima; Mahdavi, Fariba; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Choong, Thomas Sy

    2014-01-06

    Boron removal capacity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with tartaric acid was investigated in this study. Modification of MWCNTs with tartaric acid was confirmed by Boehm surface chemistry method and fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Experiments were performed to determine the adsorption isotherm and adsorption thermodynamic parameters of boron adsorption on tartaric acid modified MWCNTs (TA-MWCNTs). The effect of variables including initial pH, dosage of adsorbent, contact time and temperature was investigated. Analysis of data showed that adsorption equilibrium could be better described by Freundlich isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacities obtained at the pH of 6.0 was 1.97 mg/g. The estimated thermodynamic values of free energy (ΔG°), entropy (ΔS°) and enthalpy (ΔH°) indicated a spontaneous and an endothermic process. Furthermore, the TA-MWCNTs was magnetized for separation of boron-contaminated adsorbent from aqueous solution by applying magnetic field. The results showed that magnetic TA-MWCNTs particles were separated effectively after adsorption from contaminated water.

  13. Biologically active carbon filtration for haloacetic acid removal from swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao L; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-01-15

    A biologically activate carbon (BAC) filter was continuously operated on site for the treatment of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in an outdoor swimming pool at an average empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 5.8 min. Results showed that BAC filtration was a viable technology for direct removal of HAAs from the pool water with a nominal efficiency of 57.7% by the filter while the chlorine residuals were 1.71 ± 0.90 mg/L during the study. THMs and TOC were not removed and thus were not considered as indicators of the effectiveness of BAC filtration. Increased EBCT in the range of 4.5 and 6.4 min led to improved HAA removal performance, which could be best fit by a logarithmic regression model. BAC filtration also affected the HAA speciation by removing more dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) than trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), resulting in a lower ratio of DCAA/TCAA in the filtered effluent. However, the observation of an overall constant ratio could be attributable to a complex formation and degradation mechanism occurring in swimming pools. PMID:26398451

  14. Removal of boron from aqueous solution using magnetic carbon nanotube improved with tartaric acid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Boron removal capacity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with tartaric acid was investigated in this study. Modification of MWCNTs with tartaric acid was confirmed by Boehm surface chemistry method and fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Experiments were performed to determine the adsorption isotherm and adsorption thermodynamic parameters of boron adsorption on tartaric acid modified MWCNTs (TA-MWCNTs). The effect of variables including initial pH, dosage of adsorbent, contact time and temperature was investigated. Analysis of data showed that adsorption equilibrium could be better described by Freundlich isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacities obtained at the pH of 6.0 was 1.97 mg/g. The estimated thermodynamic values of free energy (ΔG°), entropy (ΔS°) and enthalpy (ΔH°) indicated a spontaneous and an endothermic process. Furthermore, the TA-MWCNTs was magnetized for separation of boron-contaminated adsorbent from aqueous solution by applying magnetic field. The results showed that magnetic TA-MWCNTs particles were separated effectively after adsorption from contaminated water. PMID:24393401

  15. Biologically active carbon filtration for haloacetic acid removal from swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao L; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-01-15

    A biologically activate carbon (BAC) filter was continuously operated on site for the treatment of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in an outdoor swimming pool at an average empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 5.8 min. Results showed that BAC filtration was a viable technology for direct removal of HAAs from the pool water with a nominal efficiency of 57.7% by the filter while the chlorine residuals were 1.71 ± 0.90 mg/L during the study. THMs and TOC were not removed and thus were not considered as indicators of the effectiveness of BAC filtration. Increased EBCT in the range of 4.5 and 6.4 min led to improved HAA removal performance, which could be best fit by a logarithmic regression model. BAC filtration also affected the HAA speciation by removing more dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) than trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), resulting in a lower ratio of DCAA/TCAA in the filtered effluent. However, the observation of an overall constant ratio could be attributable to a complex formation and degradation mechanism occurring in swimming pools.

  16. 18-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids ameliorate palmitate-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in mouse C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yin; Wang, John; Lin, Yi-Chin; Li, Chien-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Liu, Te-Chung; Chen, Haw-Wen; Huang, Chin-Shiu; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Liu, Kai-Li

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle is a major site of insulin action. Intramuscular lipid accumulation results in inflammation, which has a strong correlation with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR). The aim of this study was to explore the effects of linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), 18-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), on palmitic acid (PA)-induced inflammatory responses and IR in C2C12 myotubes. Our data demonstrated that these three test 18-carbon PUFAs can inhibit PA-induced interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and IR as evidenced by increases in phosphorylated AKT and the 160-kD AKT substrate, mRNA and plasma membrane protein expression of glucose transporter 4, and glucose uptake. Moreover, the 18-carbon PUFAs blocked the effects of PA on activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), protein kinase C-θ (PKC-θ), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Of note, supplementation with GLA-rich borage oil decreased proinflammatory cytokine production and hindered the activation of MAPKs, PKC-θ and NF-κB in the skeletal muscles of diabetic mice. The 18-carbon PUFAs did not reverse PA-induced inflammation or IR in C2C12 myotubes transfected with a constitutively active mutant IκB kinase-β plasmid, which suggests the importance of the inhibition of NF-κB activation by the 18-carbon PUFAs. Moreover, blockade of AMPK activation by short hairpin RNA annulled the inhibitory effects of the 18-carbon PUFAs on PA-induced IR but not inflammation. Our findings suggest that the 18-carbon PUFAs may be useful in the management of PA-induced inflammation and IR in myotubes. PMID:25687616

  17. Porous media investigation before and after hydrochloric acid injection on a pre-salt carbonate coquinas sample.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Teles, A P; Pepin, A; Bize-Forest, N; Lima, I; Lopes, R T

    2016-04-01

    Porous space characterization of carbonate rocks is an important aid in petroleum exploration from carbonate reservoir. In this study, X-ray microtomography technique was applied to evaluate total porosity of a coquina sample extracted from pre-salt reservoir, in Brazil, before and after acid injection. Two image processing program were used in order to assess performance. The results showed that microtomography has potential to compute porosity of coquina samples and provides information about rock porous network. PMID:26794261

  18. Dual Catalysis Using Boronic Acid and Chiral Amine: Acyclic Quaternary Carbons via Enantioselective Alkylation of Branched Aldehydes with Allylic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiaobin; Hall, Dennis G

    2016-08-31

    A ferrocenium boronic acid salt activates allylic alcohols to generate transient carbocations that react with in situ-generated chiral enamines from branched aldehydes. The optimized conditions afford the desired acyclic products embedding a methyl-aryl quaternary carbon center with up to 90% yield and 97:3 enantiomeric ratio, with only water as the byproduct. This noble-metal-free method complements alternative methods that are incompatible with carbon-halogen bonds and other sensitive functional groups. PMID:27518200

  19. Extraneous carbon assessment in ultra-microscale radiocarbon analysis using benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Ulrich M.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the natural abundance of radiocarbon (14C) concentrations in inorganic and organic carbon-containing materials can be used to investigate their date of origin. Particularly, the biogeochemical cycling of specific compounds in the environment may be investigated applying molecular marker analyses. However, the isolation of specific molecules from environmental matrices requires a complex processing procedure resulting in small sample sizes that often contain less than 30 μg C. Such small samples are sensitive to extraneous carbon (Cex) that is introduced during the purification of the compounds (Shah and Pearson, 2007). We present a thorough radiocarbon blank assessment for benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA), a proxy for combustion products that are formed during the oxidative degradation of condensed polyaromatic structures (Wiedemeier et al, in press). The extraneous carbon assessment includes reference material for (1) chemical extraction, (2) preparative liquid chromatography (3) wet chemical oxidation which are subsequently measured with gas ion source AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometer, 5-100 μg C). We always use pairs of reference materials, radiocarbon depleted (14Cfossil) and modern (14Cmodern) to determine the fraction modern (F14C) of Cex.Our results include detailed information about the quantification of Cex in radiocarbon molecular marker analysis using BPCA. Error propagation calculations indicate that ultra-microscale samples (20-30 μg) are feasible with uncertainties of less than 10 %. Calculations of the constant contamination reveal important information about the source (F14C) and mass (μg) of Cex (Wacker and Christl, 2011) for each sub procedure. An external correction of compound specific radiocarbon data is essential for robust results that allow for a high degree of confidence in the 14C results. References Shah and Pearson, 2007. Ultra-microscale (5-25μg C) analysis of individual lipids by 14C AMS: Assessment and

  20. The effects of nitric acid and silane surface treatments on carbon fibers and carbon/vinyl ester composites before and after seawater exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, Tye A.

    This research focuses on carbon fiber treatment by nitric acid and 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate silane, and how this affects carbon/vinyl ester composites. These composites offer great benefits, but it is difficult to bond the fiber and matrix together, and without a strong interfacial bond, composites fall short of their potential. Silanes work well with glass fiber, but do not bond directly to carbon fiber because its surface is not reactive to liquid silanes. Oxidizing surface treatments are often prescribed for improved wetting and bonding to carbon, but good results are not always achieved. Furthermore, there is the unanswered question of environmental durability. This research aimed to form a better understanding of oxidizing carbon fiber treatments, determine if silanes can be bonded to oxidized surfaces, and how these treatments affect composite strength and durability before and after seawater exposure. Nitric acid treatments on carbon fibers were found to improve their tensile strength to a constant level by smoothing surface defects and chemically modifying their surfaces by increasing carbonyl and carboxylic acid concentrations. Increasing these surface group concentrations raises fiber polar energy and causes them to cohere. This impedes wetting, resulting in poor quality, high void content composites, even though there appeared to be improved adhesion between the fibers and matrix. Silane was found to bond to the oxidized carbon fiber surfaces, as evidenced by changes in both fiber and composite properties. The fibers exhibited low polarity and cohesion, while the composites displayed excellent resin wetting, low void content, and low seawater weight gain and swelling. On the contrary, the oxidized fibers that were not treated with silane exhibited high polarity and fiber cohesion. Their composites displayed poor wetting, high void content, high seawater weight gain, and low swelling. Both fiber treatment types resulted in great improvements

  1. Extinction and ecological retreat in a community of primates.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Brooke E; Godfrey, Laurie R; Guilderson, Thomas P; Zermeño, Paula; Koch, Paul L; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2012-09-01

    The lemurs of Madagascar represent a prodigious adaptive radiation. At least 17 species ranging from 11 to 160 kg have become extinct during the past 2000 years. The effect of this loss on contemporary lemurs is unknown. The concept of competitive release favours the expansion of living species into vacant niches. Alternatively, factors that triggered the extinction of some species could have also reduced community-wide niche breadth. Here, we use radiocarbon and stable isotope data to examine temporal shifts in the niches of extant lemur species following the extinction of eight large-bodied species. We focus on southwestern Madagascar and report profound isotopic shifts, both from the time when now-extinct lemurs abounded and from the time immediately following their decline to the present. Unexpectedly, the past environments exploited by lemurs were drier than the protected (albeit often degraded) riparian habitats assumed to be ideal for lemurs today. Neither competitive release nor niche contraction can explain these observed trends. We develop an alternative hypothesis: ecological retreat, which suggests that factors surrounding extinction may force surviving species into marginal or previously unfilled niches.

  2. The 20th Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation Scientific Retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2014-06-01

    The 20th Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was held from October 24 to 26, 2013, in National Harbor, Maryland. This event is held annually for the purpose of convening a diverse group of leading experimental and clinical researchers from academia, industry, and government to present and discuss critical and emerging topics relevant to prostate cancer (PCa) biology, and the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PCa patients, with a focus on results that will lend to treatments for the most life-threatening stages of this disease. The themes that were highlighted at this year's event included: (i) mechanisms of PCa initiation and progression: cellular origins, neurons and neuroendocrine PCa, long non-coding RNAs, epigenetics, tumor cell metabolism, tumor-immune interactions, and novel molecular mechanisms; (ii) advancements in precision medicine strategies and predictive biomarkers of progression, survival, and drug sensitivities, including the analysis of circulating tumor cells and cell-free tumor DNA-new methods for liquid biopsies; (iii) new treatments including epigenomic therapy and immunotherapy, discovery of new treatment targets, and defining and targeting mechanisms of resistance to androgen-axis therapeutics; and (iv) new experimental and clinical epidemiology methods and techniques, including PCa population studies using patho-epidemiology.

  3. Extinction and ecological retreat in a community of primates.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Brooke E; Godfrey, Laurie R; Guilderson, Thomas P; Zermeño, Paula; Koch, Paul L; Dominy, Nathaniel J

    2012-09-01

    The lemurs of Madagascar represent a prodigious adaptive radiation. At least 17 species ranging from 11 to 160 kg have become extinct during the past 2000 years. The effect of this loss on contemporary lemurs is unknown. The concept of competitive release favours the expansion of living species into vacant niches. Alternatively, factors that triggered the extinction of some species could have also reduced community-wide niche breadth. Here, we use radiocarbon and stable isotope data to examine temporal shifts in the niches of extant lemur species following the extinction of eight large-bodied species. We focus on southwestern Madagascar and report profound isotopic shifts, both from the time when now-extinct lemurs abounded and from the time immediately following their decline to the present. Unexpectedly, the past environments exploited by lemurs were drier than the protected (albeit often degraded) riparian habitats assumed to be ideal for lemurs today. Neither competitive release nor niche contraction can explain these observed trends. We develop an alternative hypothesis: ecological retreat, which suggests that factors surrounding extinction may force surviving species into marginal or previously unfilled niches. PMID:22628463

  4. Semantics versus statistics in the retreat from locative overgeneralization errors.

    PubMed

    Ambridge, Ben; Pine, Julian M; Rowland, Caroline F

    2012-05-01

    The present study investigated how children learn that some verbs may appear in the figure-locative but not the ground-locative construction (e.g., Lisa poured water into the cup; *Lisa poured the cup with water), with some showing the opposite pattern (e.g., *Bart filled water into the cup; Bart filled the cup with water), and others appearing in both (Lisa sprayed water onto the flowers; Lisa sprayed the flowers with water). Grammatical acceptability judgments were obtained for the use of each of 142 locative verbs (60 for children) in each sentence type. Overall, and for each age group individually, the judgment data were best explained by a model that included ratings of the extent to which each verb exhibits both the broad- and narrow-range semantic properties of the figure- and ground-locative constructions (relating mainly to manner and end-state respectively; Pinker, 1989) and the statistical-learning measure of overall verb frequency (entrenchment; Braine & Brooks, 1995). A second statistical-learning measure, frequency in each of the two locative constructions (pre-emption; Goldberg, 1995), was found to have no additional dissociable effect. We conclude by drawing together various theoretical proposals to arrive at a possible account of how semantics and statistics interact in the retreat from overgeneralization.

  5. In Review (Geology): Alpine Landscape Evolution Dominated by Cirque Retreat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oskin, Michael; Burbank, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Despite the abundance in alpine terrain of glacially dissected landscapes, the magnitude and geometry of glacial erosion can rarely be defined. In the eastern Kyrgyz Range, a widespread unconformity exhumed as a geomorphic surface provides a regional datum with which to calibrate erosion. As tectonically driven surface uplift has progressively pushed this surface into the zone of ice accumulation, glacial erosion has overprinted the landscape. With as little as 500 m of incision into rocks underlying the unconformity, distinctive glacial valleys display their deepest incision adjacent to cirque headwalls. The expansion of north-facing glacial cirques at the expense of south-facing valleys has driven the drainage divide southwards at rates up to 2 to 3 times the rate of valley incision. Existing ice-flux-based glacial erosion rules incompletely model expansion of glacial valleys via cirque retreat into the low-gradient unconformity remnants. Local processes that either directly sap cirque headwalls or inhibit erosion down-glacier appear to control, at least initially, alpine landscape evolution.

  6. Paludification and forest retreat in northern oceanic environments.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R M M; Jeffree, C E; Rees, W G

    2003-01-01

    Examination of temperature variations over the past century for Europe and the Arctic from northern Norway to Siberia suggests that variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation are associated with an increase in oceanicity in certain maritime regions. A southward depression of the tree line in favour of wet heaths, bogs and wetland tundra communities is also observed in northern oceanic environments. The physiological basis for this change in ecological succession from forest to bog is discussed in relation to the long-term effects of flooding on tree survival. The heightened values currently detected in the North Atlantic Oscillation Index, together with rising winter temperatures, and increased rainfall in many areas in northern Europe, presents an increasing risk of paludification with adverse consequences for forest regeneration, particularly in areas with oceanic climates. Climatic warming in oceanic areas may increase the area covered by bogs and, contrary to general expectations, lead to a retreat rather than an advance in the northern limit of the boreal forest. High water-table levels are not automatically detrimental to forest survival as can be seen in swamp, bottom land and mangrove forests. Consequently, the inhibitory effects of flooding on tree survival and regeneration in northern regions should not be uncritically accepted as merely due to high water levels. Evidence is discussed which suggests that physiological and ecological factors may interact to inhibit forest regeneration in habitats where there is a risk of prolonged winter-flooding combined with warmer winters and cool moist summers.

  7. Production of D-lactic acid in a continuous membrane integrated fermentation reactor by genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae: enhancement in D-lactic acid carbon yield.

    PubMed

    Mimitsuka, Takashi; Sawai, Kenji; Kobayashi, Koji; Tsukada, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Norihiro; Yamada, Katsushige; Ogino, Hiroyasu; Yonehara, Tetsu

    2015-01-01

    Poly d-lactic acid is an important polymer because it improves the thermostability of poly l-lactic acid by stereo complex formation. To demonstrate potency of continuous fermentation using a membrane-integrated fermentation reactor (MFR) system, continuous fermentation using genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae which produces d-lactic acid was performed at the low pH and microaerobic conditions. d-Lactic acid continuous fermentation using the MFR system by genetically modified yeast increased production rate by 11-fold compared with batch fermentation. In addition, the carbon yield of d-lactic acid in continuous fermentation was improved to 74.6 ± 2.3% compared to 39.0 ± 1.7% with batch fermentation. This dramatic improvement in carbon yield could not be explained by a reduction in carbon consumption to form cells compared to batch fermentation. Further detailed analysis at batch fermentation revealed that the carbon yield increased to 76.8% at late stationary phase. S. cerevisiae, which exhibits the Crabtree-positive effect, demonstrated significant changes in metabolic activities at low sugar concentrations (Rossignol et al., Yeast, 20, 1369-1385, 2003). Moreover, lactate-producing S. cerevisiae requires ATP supplied not only from the glycolytic pathway but also from the TCA cycle (van Maris et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 70, 2898-2905, 2004). Our finding was revealed that continuous fermentation, which can maintain the conditions of both a low sugar concentration and air supply, results in Crabtree-positive and lactate-producing S. cerevisiae for suitable conditions of d-lactic acid production with respect to redox balance and ATP generation because of releasing the yeast from the Crabtree effect.

  8. Clay fractions from a soil chronosequence after glacier retreat reveal the initial evolution of organo-mineral associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dümig, Alexander; Häusler, Werner; Steffens, Markus; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2012-05-01

    Interactions between organic and mineral constituents prolong the residence time of organic matter in soils. However, the structural organization and mechanisms of organic coverage on mineral surfaces as well as their development with time are still unclear. We used clay fractions from a soil chronosequence (15, 75 and 120 years) in the foreland of the retreating Damma glacier (Switzerland) and from mature soils outside the proglacial area (>700 and <3000 years) to elucidate the evolution of organo-mineral associations during initial soil formation. The chemical composition of the clay-bound organic matter (OM) was assessed by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy while the quantities of amino acids and neutral sugar monomers were determined after acid hydrolysis. The mineral phase was characterized by X-ray diffraction, oxalate extraction, specific surface area by N2 adsorption (BET approach), and cation exchange capacity at pH 7 (CECpH7). The last two methods were applied before and after H2O2 treatment. We found pronounced shifts in quantity and quality of OM during aging of the clay fractions, especially within the first one hundred years of soil formation. The strongly increasing organic carbon (OC) loading of clay-sized particles resulted in decreasing specific surface areas (SSA) of the mineral phases and increasing CECpH7. Thus, OC accumulation was faster than the supply of mineral surfaces and cation exchange capacity was mainly determined by the OC content. Clay-bound OC of the 15-year-old soils showed high proportions of carboxyl C and aromatic C. This may point to remnants of ancient OC which were inherited from the recently exposed glacial till. With increasing age (75 and 120 years), the relative proportions of carboxyl and aromatic C decreased. This was associated with increasing O-alkyl C proportions, whereas accumulation of alkyl C was mainly detected in clay fractions from the mature soils. These findings from solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy are in

  9. Elusive Carbonic Acid: A Determination of its Vapor Pressures and Enthalpy of Sublimation for Mars and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ariel S.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Cooper, P. D.

    2007-10-01

    Solid H2O and CO2 are present on Mars, some Galilean satellites, comets, and interstellar ices. Laboratory work on frozen H2O-CO2 mixtures shows that they produce H2CO3, carbonic acid, when exposed to either high-energy radiation (keV, MeV) or vacuum-UV photons (eV). While this molecule readily dissociates at 298 K, its stability below about 250 K suggests that it should exist in extraterrestrial environments. Unfortunately, little is known of solid-phase carbonic acid at temperatures relevant to planetary science. Recently we have studied some of the thermodynamic properties of carbonic acid. To synthesize this compound, we first injected a KHCO3 solution onto a substrate, pre-cooled to 15 K, to make a thin icy film. On top of this, an HBr solution was injected to make a second icy film. The substrate then was heated to about 200 K to initiate an acid-base reaction between KHCO3 and HBr, and to sublime the water present into a vacuum chamber. The resulting formation of carbonic acid was confirmed by recording infrared (IR) spectra of the samples before and after warming. The ices then were further heated to 240 - 255 K, and spectra recorded over time. Decreases in carbonic acid's IR bands near 1300 and 1500 cm-1 allowed the vapor pressure of the compound to be measured at several temperatures, from which an enthalpy of sublimation was determined. Comparisons were made to the heats of sublimation for formic and acetic acids, both those measured by us and those already in the literature. This work was supported by the Mars Fundamental Research Program and Goddard Center for Astrobiology. The first author was supported by an award from the Summer Undergraduate Internship in Astrobiology program.

  10. The unsteady nature of sea cliff retreat due to mechanical abrasion, failure and comminution feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Shaun W.; Adams, Peter N.; Limber, Patrick W.

    2014-08-01

    Sea cliff retreat is often linked to large waves, heavy precipitation and seismic events, but the specific operative mechanics have not been well constrained. In particular, what is the role of mechanical abrasion by beach sediments in cliff/platform evolution and how does it relate to the episodic nature of cliff retreat observed at certain locations? Here we present a simple, numerical model of sea cliff retreat that incorporates mechanical abrasion of a basal notch, threshold-controlled failure of the cantilevered block, and a feedback mechanism wherein retreat is dependent on the rate of sediment comminution within the surf zone. Using shore platform and cliff characteristics found in two coastal settings (the central California coast and the English North Sea coast), the model produces retreat rates comparable to those observed via field measurements. The highest retreat rates coincide with the steepest shore platforms and increasing wave height. Steeper platforms promote wave access to the cliff toe and, correspondingly, the receding cliff face produces additional accommodation space for the platform beach, preserving the erosive efficacy of the beach sediments. When exposed to energetic wave forcing, the slope of the inner platform segment controls retreat rates for concave platforms, whereas the slope of the outer platform segment exerts greater control for convex platforms. Platform beaches approached a long-term dynamic equilibrium on the concave profiles, leading to more consistent and steady retreat. Platform beaches were ephemeral on convex profiles, mirroring observed sand wave (Ord) migration on the Holderness coast, UK. These findings agree with previous field observations and support mechanical abrasion as a viable cause of temporal heterogeneity in cliff retreat rate for both coastlines.

  11. Inhibition of mammalian carbonic anhydrase isoforms I-XIV with a series of phenolic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Alfonso; Akyuz, Gulay; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-15

    A series of phenolic acid esters incorporating caffeic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acid, and benzyl, m/p-hydroxyphenethyl- as well as p-hydroxy-phenethoxy-phenethyl moieties were investigated for their inhibitory effects against the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1). Many of the mammalian isozymes of human (h) or murine (m) origin, hCA I-hCA XII, mCA XIII and hCA XIV, were inhibited in the submicromolar range by these derivatives (with KIs of 0.31-1.03 μM against hCA VA, VB, VI, VII, IX and XIV). The off-target, highly abundant isoforms hCA I and II, as well as hCA III, IV and XII were poorly inhibited by many of these esters, although the original phenolic acids were micromolar inhibitors. These phenols, like others investigated earlier, possess a CA inhibition mechanism distinct of the sulfonamides/sulfamates, clinically used drugs for the treatment of a multitude of pathologies, but with severe side effects due to hCA I/II inhibition. Unlike the sulfonamides, which bind to the catalytic zinc ion, phenols are anchored at the Zn(II)-coordinated water molecule, binding more externally within the active site cavity, and making contacts with amino acid residues at the entrance of the active site. As this is the region with the highest variability between the many CA isozymes found in mammals, this class of compounds shows isoform-selective inhibitory profiles, which may be exploited for obtaining pharmacological agents with less side effects compared to other classes of inhibitors. PMID:26498394

  12. Arachidonic acid-dependent carbon-eight volatile synthesis from wounded liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha).

    PubMed

    Kihara, Hirotomo; Tanaka, Maya; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Horibata, Akira; Yamada, Atsushi; Kita, Sayaka; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kajikawa, Masataka; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Kohchi, Takayuki; Akakabe, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Eight-carbon (C8) volatiles, such as 1-octen-3-ol, octan-3-one, and octan-3-ol, are ubiquitously found among fungi and bryophytes. In this study, it was found that the thalli of the common liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, a model plant species, emitted high amounts of C8 volatiles mainly consisting of (R)-1-octen-3-ol and octan-3-one upon mechanical wounding. The induction of emission took place within 40min. In intact thalli, 1-octen-3-yl acetate was the predominant C8 volatile while tissue disruption resulted in conversion of the acetate to 1-octen-3-ol. This conversion was carried out by an esterase showing stereospecificity to (R)-1-octen-3-yl acetate. From the transgenic line of M. polymorpha (des6(KO)) lacking arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, formation of C8 volatiles was only minimally observed, which indicated that arachidonic and/or eicosapentaenoic acids were essential to form C8 volatiles in M. polymorpha. When des6(KO) thalli were exposed to the vapor of 1-octen-3-ol, they absorbed the alcohol and converted it into 1-octen-3-yl acetate and octan-3-one. Therefore, this implied that 1-octen-3-ol was the primary C8 product formed from arachidonic acid, and further metabolism involving acetylation and oxidoreduction occurred to diversify the C8 products. Octan-3-one was only minimally formed from completely disrupted thalli, while it was formed as the most abundant product in partially disrupted thalli. Therefore, it is assumed that the remaining intact tissues were involved in the conversion of 1-octen-3-ol to octan-3-one in the partially disrupted thalli. The conversion was partly promoted by addition of NAD(P)H into the completely disrupted tissues, suggesting an NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase was involved in the conversion. PMID:25174554

  13. Gluconeogenic carbon flow of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is critical for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish and maintain infection

    PubMed Central

    Marrero, Joeli; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Pethe, Kevin; Ehrt, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation to the host niche is a defining feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In vitro, Mtb is able to grow on a variety of carbon sources, but mounting evidence has implicated fatty acids as the major source of carbon and energy for Mtb during infection. When bacterial metabolism is primarily fueled by fatty acids, biosynthesis of sugars from intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle is essential for growth. The role of gluconeogenesis in the pathogenesis of Mtb however remains unaddressed. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes the first committed step of gluconeogenesis. We applied genetic analyses and 13C carbon tracing to confirm that PEPCK is essential for growth of Mtb on fatty acids and catalyzes carbon flow from tricarboxylic acid cycle–derived metabolites to gluconeogenic intermediates. We further show that PEPCK is required for growth of Mtb in isolated bone marrow–derived murine macrophages and in mice. Importantly, Mtb lacking PEPCK not only failed to replicate in mouse lungs but also failed to survive, and PEPCK depletion during the chronic phase of infection resulted in mycobacterial clearance. Mtb thus relies on gluconeogenesis throughout the infection. PEPCK depletion also attenuated Mtb in IFNγ-deficient mice, suggesting that this enzyme represents an attractive target for chemotherapy. PMID:20439709

  14. Gluconeogenic carbon flow of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is critical for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish and maintain infection.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Joeli; Rhee, Kyu Y; Schnappinger, Dirk; Pethe, Kevin; Ehrt, Sabine

    2010-05-25

    Metabolic adaptation to the host niche is a defining feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In vitro, Mtb is able to grow on a variety of carbon sources, but mounting evidence has implicated fatty acids as the major source of carbon and energy for Mtb during infection. When bacterial metabolism is primarily fueled by fatty acids, biosynthesis of sugars from intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle is essential for growth. The role of gluconeogenesis in the pathogenesis of Mtb however remains unaddressed. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes the first committed step of gluconeogenesis. We applied genetic analyses and (13)C carbon tracing to confirm that PEPCK is essential for growth of Mtb on fatty acids and catalyzes carbon flow from tricarboxylic acid cycle-derived metabolites to gluconeogenic intermediates. We further show that PEPCK is required for growth of Mtb in isolated bone marrow-derived murine macrophages and in mice. Importantly, Mtb lacking PEPCK not only failed to replicate in mouse lungs but also failed to survive, and PEPCK depletion during the chronic phase of infection resulted in mycobacterial clearance. Mtb thus relies on gluconeogenesis throughout the infection. PEPCK depletion also attenuated Mtb in IFNgamma-deficient mice, suggesting that this enzyme represents an attractive target for chemotherapy.

  15. Biological treatment of acidic coal refuse using sulphate-reducing bacteria with chicken manure as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The performance of using chicken manure as carbon source to promote sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity within acidic coal refuse to prevent the generation of acidic leachate was investigated in batch and column bioreactors. The bioreactors showed satisfactory performance in biological sulphate reduction, evidenced by the increase in effluent pH, high removal efficiencies of sulphate and metals, and the presence of large numbers of SRB. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis of the formed precipitate indicated the formation of metal sulphides. Chicken manure was observed to play an important role in this treatment, which could not only provide carbon source but also reduce the adverse effect of strong acidity and metal toxicity on SRB activity. Metal removal could be mainly attributed to sulphides precipitation and sorption to chicken manure. This study indicated that SRB with chicken manure could be a novel alternative used for the prevention of acidic leachate from coal refuse.

  16. Effects of propionate and methylmalonate on conversions of acetate, butyrate, and D(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate to fatty acids and carbon dioxide by mammary tissue slices of goats

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel, B.; Kennelly, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Incorporations of (1-carbon-14) acetate, (1-carbon-14) propionate, n-(1-carbon-14) butyrate, and D(-)-3-hydroxy(3-carbon-14) butyrate into individual milk fatty acids and their conversion to carbon dioxide were studied in vitro with caprine mammary tissue slices in the presence and absence of propionate and methylmalonate. Neither propionate nor methylmalonate affected incorporation of these substances into fatty acids. In a decreasing order butyrate, acetate, propionate, and D(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate were converted to carbon dioxide. Acetate had the highest incorporation rate into fatty acids followed by D(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate, butyrate, and propionate. Labeled propionate was incorporated mainly into odd-numbered fatty acids. Results do not support the theory that either propionate or its metabolite, methylmalonate, inhibit de novo synthesis of fatty acids in the mammary gland in relation to the etiology of low milk fat syndrome.

  17. High mortality associated with retreatment of tuberculosis in a clinic in Kampala, Uganda: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Villaorduña, Carlos; Ayakaka, Irene; Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Nakubulwa, Susan; Worodria, William; Reilly, Nancy; Hosford, Jennifer; Fennelly, Kevin P; Okwera, Alphonse; Jones-López, Edward C

    2015-07-01

    The World Health Organization recommends for tuberculosis retreatment a regimen of isoniazid (H), rifampicin (R), ethambutol (E), pyrazinamide (Z), and streptomycin (S) for 2 months, followed by H, R, E, and Z for 1 month and H, R, and E for 5 months. Using data from the National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Program registry, this study determined the long-term outcome under programmatic conditions of patients who were prescribed the retreatment regimen in Kampala, Uganda, between 1997 and 2003. Patients were traced to determine their vital status; 62% (234/377) patients were found dead. Having ≤ 2 treatment courses and not completing retreatment were associated with mortality in adjusted analyses.

  18. Enantioselective small molecule synthesis by carbon dioxide fixation using a dual Brønsted acid/base organocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Vara, Brandon A; Struble, Thomas J; Wang, Weiwei; Dobish, Mark C; Johnston, Jeffrey N

    2015-06-17

    Carbon dioxide exhibits many of the qualities of an ideal reagent: it is nontoxic, plentiful, and inexpensive. Unlike other gaseous reagents, however, it has found limited use in enantioselective synthesis. Moreover, unprecedented is a tool that merges one of the simplest biological approaches to catalysis-Brønsted acid/base activation-with this abundant reagent. We describe a metal-free small molecule catalyst that achieves the three component reaction between a homoallylic alcohol, carbon dioxide, and an electrophilic source of iodine. Cyclic carbonates are formed enantioselectively.

  19. Carbonate minerals in porous media decrease mobility of polyacrylic acid modified zero-valent iron nanoparticles used for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Laumann, Susanne; Micić, Vesna; Lowry, Gregory V; Hofmann, Thilo

    2013-08-01

    The limited transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in porous media is a major obstacle to its widespread application for in situ groundwater remediation. Previous studies on nZVI transport have mainly been carried out in quartz porous media. The effect of carbonate minerals, which often predominate in aquifers, has not been evaluated to date. This study assessed the influence of the carbonate minerals in porous media on the transport of polyacrylic acid modified nZVI (PAA-nZVI). Increasing the proportion of carbonate sand in the porous media resulted in less transport of PAA-nZVI. Predicted travel distances were reduced to a few centimeters in pure carbonate sand compared to approximately 1.6 m in quartz sand. Transport modeling showed that the attachment efficiency and deposition rate coefficient increased linearly with increasing proportion of carbonate sand.

  20. Controlled graft copolymerization of lactic acid onto starch in a supercritical carbon dioxide medium.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Kouroush; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Rzayev, Zakir M O; Piskin, Erhan

    2014-12-19

    This work presents a new approach for the synthesis of a starch-g-poly L-lactic acid (St-g-PLA) copolymer via the graft copolymerization of LA onto starch using stannous 2-ethyl hexanoate (Sn(Oct)2) as a catalyst in a supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) medium. The effects of several process parameters, including the pressure, temperature, scCO2 flow rate and reaction time, on the polymerization yield and grafting degree were studied. Amorphous graft St-g-PLA copolymers with increased thermal stability and processability were produced with a high efficiency. The maximum grafting degree (i.e., 52% PLA) was achieved with the following reaction conditions: 6h, 100°C, 200 bar and a 1:3 (w/w) ratio of St/LA. It was concluded that these low cost biobased graft biopolymers are potential candidates for several environment-friendly applications.

  1. Controlled graft copolymerization of lactic acid onto starch in a supercritical carbon dioxide medium.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Kouroush; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Rzayev, Zakir M O; Piskin, Erhan

    2014-12-19

    This work presents a new approach for the synthesis of a starch-g-poly L-lactic acid (St-g-PLA) copolymer via the graft copolymerization of LA onto starch using stannous 2-ethyl hexanoate (Sn(Oct)2) as a catalyst in a supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) medium. The effects of several process parameters, including the pressure, temperature, scCO2 flow rate and reaction time, on the polymerization yield and grafting degree were studied. Amorphous graft St-g-PLA copolymers with increased thermal stability and processability were produced with a high efficiency. The maximum grafting degree (i.e., 52% PLA) was achieved with the following reaction conditions: 6h, 100°C, 200 bar and a 1:3 (w/w) ratio of St/LA. It was concluded that these low cost biobased graft biopolymers are potential candidates for several environment-friendly applications. PMID:25263875

  2. Mechanical characterization and morphology of polylactic acid /liquid natural rubber filled with multi walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Adilah Mat; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the polymer nanocomposite of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanoparticles was incorporated with polylactic acid (PLA) and liquid natural rubber (LNR) as compatibilizer were prepared via melt blending method. The effect of MWCNTs loading on the tensile and impact properties of nanocomposites was investigated. The result has shown that the sample with 3.5 wt % of MWCNTs exhibited higher tensile strength, Young's modulus and impact strength. The elongation at break decreased with increasing percentage of MWCNTs. The SEM micrographs confirmed the effect of good dispersion of MWCNTs and their interfacial bonding in PLA/LNR composites. The improved dispersion of MWCNTs can be obtained due to altered interparticle interactions, MWCNTs-MWCNTs and MWCNTs-matrix networks are well combined to generate the synergistic effect of the system as shown by SEM micrographs which is improved the properties significantly.

  3. Enhanced removal of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid in an activated carbon cloth by electroadsorption in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    López-Bernabeu, S; Ruiz-Rosas, R; Quijada, C; Montilla, F; Morallón, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the electrochemical treatment (potentiostatic treatment in a filter-press electrochemical cell) on the adsorption capacity of an activated carbon cloth (ACC) was analyzed in relation with the removal of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid pollutant from water. The adsorption capacity of an ACC is quantitatively improved in the presence of an electric field (electroadsorption process) reaching values of 96% in comparison to 55% in absence of applied potential. In addition, the cathodic treatment results in higher removal efficiencies than the anodic treatment. The enhanced adsorption capacity has been proved to be irreversible, since the removed compound remains adsorbed after switching the applied potential. The kinetics of the adsorption processes is also improved by the presence of an applied potential. PMID:26433936

  4. Interaction of D-Amino Acid Oxidase with Carbon Nanotubes: Implications in the Design of Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Maria F.; Giacomelli, Carla E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the interaction of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) with single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Dynamic adsorption experiments were performed at different experimental conditions. In addition, the activity of the enzyme adsorbed at different conditions was studied. Our results indicate that DAAO can be adsorbed to CNT at different pH values and concentrations by a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Considering that the highest enzymatic activity was obtained by adsorbing the protein at pH 5.7 and 0.1 mg.mL−1, our results indicate that DAAO can adopt multiple orientations on the surface; which are ultimately responsible for significant differences in catalytic activity. PMID:19132842

  5. Quantitative autoradiography of parathyroid glands in rats with carbon-14-labeled amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wortman, J.A.; Alavi, A.; Attie, M.; Yudd, A.P.; Johnston, S.A.; Greenberg, J.

    1987-09-01

    We have utilized a quantitative autoradiographic method as a means of evaluating amino acid uptake of the rat parathyroid gland for the ultimate purpose of finding agents potentially suitable for position emission tomographic scanning of parathyroid glands. L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine and L-(guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine were evaluated because of their relatively high content in the synthetic products of the parathyroid glands compared with other neck tissues, thyroid gland, and muscle. Carbon-14 leucine disappeared rapidly from plasma following intravenous injection and there was relatively selective uptake of the (/sup 14/C)leucine and (/sup 14/C)arginine by the parathyroid glands when compared with uptake by the thyroid gland and neck muscle. These data suggest that both agents warrant further investigation for their potential utility in positron emission tomographic scanning of the parathyroid gland.

  6. Corrosion Inhibition of Carbon Steel by New Thiophene Azo Dye Derivatives in Acidic Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Haddad, Mahmoud N.; Fouda, A. S.; Mostafa, H. A.

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of carbon steel corrosion in 2 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution by thiophene azo dye derivatives were studied using weight loss, electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), and atomic absorption techniques. The experimental data suggest that the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitors concentration in presence of 103 μM potassium iodide (KI). This is due to synergistic effect. Thus, the experimental results suggested that the presence of these anions in the solution stabilized the adsorption of inhibitors molecules on the metal surface and improved the inhibition efficiency. The results of EFM experiments are a spectrum of current response as a function of frequency. The corrosion rate and Tafel parameters can be obtained with measurement by analyzing the harmonic frequencies. The adsorption of the inhibitors on metal surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The surface of metal examined using Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations were carried out and relations between computed parameters and experimental inhibition efficiency were discussed.

  7. Porous texture of activated carbons prepared by phosphoric acid activation of woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Díez, M. A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.; Fernández González, C.; Cuerda-Correa, E. M.; Macías-García, A.

    2004-11-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared using chestnut, cedar and walnut wood shavings from furniture industries located in the Comunidad Autónoma de Extremadura (SW Spain). Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) at different concentrations (i.e. 36 and 85 wt.%) has been used as activating agent. ACs have been characterized from the results obtained by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Moreover, the fractal dimension (D) has been calculated in order to determine the AC surface roughness degree. Optimal textural properties of ACs have been obtained by chemical activation with H3PO4 36 wt.%. This is corroborated by the slightly lower values of D for samples treated with H3PO4 85 wt.%.

  8. Enhanced removal of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid in an activated carbon cloth by electroadsorption in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    López-Bernabeu, S; Ruiz-Rosas, R; Quijada, C; Montilla, F; Morallón, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the electrochemical treatment (potentiostatic treatment in a filter-press electrochemical cell) on the adsorption capacity of an activated carbon cloth (ACC) was analyzed in relation with the removal of 8-quinolinecarboxylic acid pollutant from water. The adsorption capacity of an ACC is quantitatively improved in the presence of an electric field (electroadsorption process) reaching values of 96% in comparison to 55% in absence of applied potential. In addition, the cathodic treatment results in higher removal efficiencies than the anodic treatment. The enhanced adsorption capacity has been proved to be irreversible, since the removed compound remains adsorbed after switching the applied potential. The kinetics of the adsorption processes is also improved by the presence of an applied potential.

  9. Antimicrobial biomaterials based on carbon nanotubes dispersed in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Seyma; Loebick, Codruta Zoican; Kang, Seoktae; Elimelech, Menachem; Pfefferle, Lisa D.; van Tassel, Paul R.

    2010-09-01

    Biomaterials that inactivate microbes are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate here the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) incorporated within the biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration (<2% by weight). Up to 98% of bacteria die within one hour on SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNTs are more toxic, possibly due to increased density of open tube ends. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of SWNT-PLGA as an antimicrobial biomaterial.Biomaterials that inactivate microbes are needed to eliminate medical device infections. We investigate here the antimicrobial nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) incorporated within the biomedical polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). We find Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis viability and metabolic activity to be significantly diminished in the presence of SWNT-PLGA, and to correlate with SWNT length and concentration (<2% by weight). Up to 98% of bacteria die within one hour on SWNT-PLGA versus 15-20% on pure PLGA. Shorter SWNTs are more toxic, possibly due to increased density of open tube ends. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of SWNT-PLGA as an antimicrobial biomaterial. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Raman spectra before and after SWNT cutting via cyclodextrins, and sample images from viability and metabolic activity assays are included. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00329h

  10. Towards the experimental decomposition rate of carbonic acid (H2CO3) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Tautermann, Christofer S; Voegele, Andreas F; Loerting, Thomas; Kohl, Ingrid; Hallbrucker, Andreas; Mayer, Erwin; Liedl, Klaus R

    2002-01-01

    Dry carbonic acid has recently been shown to be kinetically stable even at room temperature. Addition of water molecules reduces this stability significantly, and the decomposition (H2CO3 + nH2O --> (n+1)H2O + CO2) is extremely accelerated for n = 1, 2, 3. By including two water molecules, a reaction rate that is a factor of 3000 below the experimental one (10 s(-1)) at room temperature was found. In order to further remove the gap between experiment and theory, we increased the number of water molecules involved to 3 and took into consideration different mechanisms for thorough elucidation of the reaction. A mechanism whereby the reaction proceedes via a six-membered transition state turns out to be the most efficient one over the whole examined temperature range. The determined reaction rates approach experimental values in aqueous solution reasonably well; most especially, a significant increase in the rates in comparison to the decomposition reaction with fewer water molecules is found. Further agreement with experiment is found in the kinetic isotope effects (KIE) for the deuterated species. For water-free carbonic acid, the KIE (i.e., kH2CO3/kD2CO3) for the decomposition reaction is predicted to be 220 at 300 K, whereas it amounts to 2.2-3.0 for the investigated mechanisms including three water molecules. This result is therefore reasonably close to the experimental value of 2 (at 300 K). These KIEs are in much better accordance with the experiment than the KIE for decomposition with fewer water entities. PMID:11822465

  11. Highly selective determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and serotonin at glassy carbon electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes dispersed in polyethylenimine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Marcela C; Rubianes, María D; Rivas, Gustavo A

    2008-11-01

    We report the highly selective and sensitive voltammetric dopamine quantification in the presence of ascorbic acid and serotonin by using glassy carbon electrodes modified with a dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in polyethylenimine, PEI (GCE/MWCNT-PEI). The electrocatalytic activity of the MWCNT deposited on the glassy carbon electrode has allowed an important decrease in the overvoltages for the oxidation of ascorbic acid and dopamine, making possible a clear definition of dopamine, serotonin and ascorbic acid oxidation processes. The sensitivities for dopamine in the presence and absence of 1.0 mM ascorbic acid and serotonin were (2.18 +/- 0.03) x 10(5) microAM(-1) (r = 0.9998); and (2.10 +/- 0.07) x 10(5) miroAM(-1) (r=0.9985), respectively, demonstrating the excellent performance of the GCE/MWCNT-PEI. The detection limit for dopamine in the mixture was 9.2 x 10(-7) M. The R. S. D. for the determination of 50 microM dopamine using four different electrodes was 3.9% when modified with the same MWCNT/PEI dispersion, and 4.6% when using four different dispersions. The modified electrode has been successfully applied for recovery assays of dopamine in human blood serum. Therefore, the new sensor represents an interesting and promising alternative for the electrochemical quantification of neurotransmitters and other analytes of clinical interest.

  12. Initial characterization of carbon flows through microbial communities in Beowulf spring, an acidic hot spring in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, H.; Moran, J.; Ehrhardt, C.; Melville, A.; Kranz, A.; Inskeep, W. P.

    2011-12-01

    Beowulf Springs are acidic, sulfidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. Visual inspection of the springs reveals distinct geochemical regions starting with a sulfur deposition zone followed by a transition to iron oxide deposition downstream. The relatively rapid sulfur and iron oxide deposition rates in this spring suggests the processes are microbially mediated (since, for instance, abiotic iron oxidation is kinetically slow at this temperature and pH) and previous diversity studies identify microbial communities consistent with the observed metabolic products (namely sulfur and iron oxide). While the energetics of sulfide and iron oxidation are sufficient for supporting microbial activity, a suitable carbon source remains undocumented. The temperatures in Beowulf approach 80 °C, which is above the photosynthetic upper temperature limit thus precluding photosynthetic-based autotrophy within the spring itself. Observed potential carbon sources in Beowulf include dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and methane. We are employing geochemical and stable isotope techniques to assess carbon inventories in the system. With thorough analysis we hope to identify both the major carbon stores in the system and track how they are transferred between microbial components in Beowulf. Initial stable isotope measurements focused on bulk isotope analysis of major carbon pools; both directly in the spring and in surrounding areas that may affect the spring water through runoff or ground water migration. We are analyzing bulk carbon isotopes of different microbial groups in the spring, the dissolved organic and inorganic carbon in the spring, and surrounding soils and potential plant inputs. Isotopic similarity between dissolved organic carbon and soil organic carbon is consistent with a common carbon source (local vegetation) but has not yet been confirmed as such. Correlation between δ13C of microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon are suggestive

  13. Tannic acid adsorption and its role for stabilizing carbon nanotube suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2008-08-15

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been reported to stabilize carbon nanotube (CNT) suspensions, which increases concern over the subsequent transport and behavior of CNTs. However, it is unknown exactly which compounds or functional groups cause the stabilization of CNTs in natural environments. Naturally occurring tannic acid (TA), which has a large number of aromatic functional groups, was used as a surrogate of DOM to investigate its interaction with CNTs. CNT suspendability in TA solution increased with increasing CNT diameter without the aid of sonication. Sorption affinity of CNTs for TA increased with decreasing CNT diameter, positively related to their surface area. A two-stage sorption model was proposed to illustrate the interaction between CNTs and TA. TA molecules may be adsorbed first onto CNTs with aromatic rings binding to the surface carbon rings via pi-pi interactions, until forming a monolayer; the TA monolayer then further sorbed the dissolved TA by hydrogen bonds and other polar interactions. The sorbed TA increased the steric repulsion between individual CNTs, which might disperse the relatively loose CNT aggregates and result in the stabilization of large-diameter CNTs in TA solution. The sorption and suspending processwere also examined bytransmission electron microscopy, providing further evidence for the above proposed CNT-TA interactions. This study implies that widely distributed TA may promote the mobility and transport of CNTs in natural aqueous environments.

  14. Carbon nanodots sensitized chemiluminescence on peroxomonosulfate-sulfite-hydrochloric acid system and its analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Xing, Gaowa; Chen, Hui; Ogawa, Nobuaki; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2012-09-15

    In the present work, new water-soluble fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) were prepared in a facile microwave pyrolysis approach in minutes by combining glycine and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG 200). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements showed that the resulting C-dots had diameters of about 3 nm. (13)C NMR spectra further confirmed the presence of carbons (sp(2) and sp(3)) indicating a nanocrystalline core of the resulting C-dots with hydroxyl of PEG 200 covered outside. It was discovered that the prepared C-dots could dramatically enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) intensity of potassium peroxomonosulfate-sodium sulfite-hydrochloric acid (PSHA) reactions. UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated that the C-dots sensitized enhancements originated from their energy transfer and electron-transfer annihilation effects on the CL system. When the concentration of C-dots was 4×10(-5) M, and those of KHSO(5), Na(2)SO(3) and HCl were 1×10(-2) M, an excellent performance was obtained. The C-dots sensitized CL system was successfully applied to the determination of aliphatic primary amines in real water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:22967581

  15. Identification and yield of carbonic acid and formaldehyde in irradiated ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellorusso, Neil; Khanna, R. K.; Moore, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Carbonic acid, (OH)2CO, was tentatively identified in the IR spectrum of a proton irradiated CO2 + H2O ice mixture. In this report, we present additional evidence for a more definitive identification of (OH)2CO with (1) the infrared spectrum of a residue obtained by proton irradiation of CO2 + D2O ice mixture, and (2) the IR spectra of solid phases of formaldehyde (H2CO), acetone (CH3)2CO, and dimethyl carbonate (OCH3)2CO, which are structurally similar to (OH)2CO. IR characteristics (peak frequencies and complex refractive indices of the compounds in point 2) are also reported. In particular, the integrated absorption coefficients for the C-O band for the compounds in point 2 do not vary by more than 20 percent. Based on these values, we estimate the yields of H2CO and (OH)2CO by proton irradiation or ice mixtures. Both H2CO and (OH)2CO are possible irradiation products of cometary and planetary ices.

  16. Identification and yield of carbonic acid and formaldehyde in irradiated ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellorusso, N.; Khanna, R. K.; Moore, M. H.

    1993-03-01

    Carbonic acid, (OH)2CO, was tentatively identified in the IR spectrum of a proton irradiated CO2 + H2O ice mixture. In this report, we present additional evidence for a more definitive identification of (OH)2CO with (1) the infrared spectrum of a residue obtained by proton irradiation of CO2 + D2O ice mixture, and (2) the IR spectra of solid phases of formaldehyde (H2CO), acetone (CH3)2CO, and dimethyl carbonate (OCH3)2CO, which are structurally similar to (OH)2CO. IR characteristics (peak frequencies and complex refractive indices of the compounds in point 2) are also reported. In particular, the integrated absorption coefficients for the C-O band for the compounds in point 2 do not vary by more than 20 percent. Based on these values, we estimate the yields of H2CO and (OH)2CO by proton irradiation or ice mixtures. Both H2CO and (OH)2CO are possible irradiation products of cometary and planetary ices.

  17. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part II: Operation of the negative plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Dumenil, S.; Alias, M.; Christin, R.; de Mascarel, A.; Perrin, M.

    2015-04-01

    The article presents the recent progress in the carbon honeycomb grid technology for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries with absorptive glass-mat separators (AGM-VRLAB). The work is focused on the development of negative current collectors using industrial grade composite honeycomb precursors. The developed model AGM-VRLA cells comprised of one prototype honeycomb negative electrode and two conventional traction positive counter-electrodes show high utilisation of the negative active material and long cycle life both in high-rate partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling mode and in deep cycling mode. The analysis of the results from the cycle-life tests and the tear-down analysis indicate that the benefits delivered by the novel grids can be related to the low mesh size of the grid, low γ-coefficient, as well as the use of milled carbon fibre additive. The combination of the three, results in the reversibility of the negative active material sulfation process when the electrolyte concentration in the cells is lower than the one traditionally used in the AGM-VRLAB technology. The negative plates show no signs of irreversible degradation after more than 900 cycles in deep cycling mode and more than 2000 capacity turnovers (equivalent cycles) in HRPSoC cycling mode.

  18. Insights into properties of activated carbons prepared from different raw precursors by pyrophosphoric acid activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2016-03-01

    Low-cost activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from four kinds of solid wastes: petroleum coke, Enteromorpha prolifera, lignin from papermaking black liquid and hair, by pyrophosphoric acid (H4P2O7) activation. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of the pyrolysis of H4P2O7-precursor mixtures implied that H4P2O7 had different influences on the pyrolysis behavior of the four raw materials. N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and adsorption capacities for dyes were used to characterize the prepared activated carbons. AC derived from E. prolifera exhibited the highest surface area (1094m(2)/g) and maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for malachite green (1250mg/g). Kinetic studies showed that the experimental data were in agreement with the pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir isotherm model, indicating the adsorption of dye onto the ACs proceeded by monolayers. PMID:26969070

  19. Mechanisms of enhanced total organic carbon elimination from oxalic acid solutions by electro-peroxone process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijiao; Yuan, Shi; Zhan, Juhong; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that combines ozonation and electrolysis process to enhance pollutant degradation during water and wastewater treatment. This enhancement has been mainly attributed to several mechanisms that increase O3 transformation to ·OH in the E-peroxone system, e.g., electro-generation of H2O2 from O2 at a carbon-based cathode and its subsequent peroxone reaction with O3 to ·OH, electro-reduction of O3 to ·OH at the cathode, and O3 decomposition to ·OH at high local pH near the cathode. To get more insight how these mechanisms contribute respectively to the enhancement, this study investigated total organic carbon (TOC) elimination from oxalic acid (OA) solutions by the E-peroxone process. Results show that the E-peroxone process significantly increased TOC elimination rate by 10.2-12.5 times compared with the linear addition of the individual rates of corresponding ozonation and electrolysis process. Kinetic analyses reveal that the electrochemically-driven peroxone reaction is the most important mechanism for the enhanced TOC elimination rate, while the other mechanisms contribute minor to the enhancement by a factor of 1.6-2.5. The results indicate that proper selection of electrodes that can effectively produce H2O2 at the cathode is critical to maximize TOC elimination in the E-peroxone process.

  20. Catechol and humic acid sorption onto a range of laboratory-produced black carbons (biochars).

    PubMed

    Kasozi, Gabriel N; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Nkedi-Kizza, Peter; Gao, Bin

    2010-08-15

    Although the major influence of black carbon (BC) on soil and sediment organic contaminant sorption is widely accepted, an understanding of the mechanisms and natural variation in pyrogenic carbon interaction with natural organic matter (NOM) is lacking. The sorption of a phenolic NOM monomer (catechol) and humic acids (HA) onto BC was examined using biochars made from oak, pine, and grass at 250, 400, and 650 degrees C. Catechol sorption equilibrium occurred after 14 d and was described by a diffusion kinetic model, while HA required only 1 d and followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. Catechol sorption capacity increased with increasing biochar combustion temperature, from pine < oak < grass and from coarse < fine particle size. At lower catechol concentrations, sorption affinity (Freundlich constant, K(f)) was directly related to micropore surface area (measured via CO(2) sorptometry) indicating the predominance of specific adsorption. In contrast, HA exhibited an order of magnitude less sorption (0.1% versus 1%, by weight) due to its exclusion from micropores. Greater sorption of both catechol and HA occurred on biochars with nanopores, i.e. biochars made at higher temperatures. These findings suggest that addition of BC to soil, via natural fires or biochar amendments, will sequester abundant native OM through sorption. PMID:20669904

  1. Mechanisms of enhanced total organic carbon elimination from oxalic acid solutions by electro-peroxone process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijiao; Yuan, Shi; Zhan, Juhong; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    Electro-peroxone (E-peroxone) is a novel electrocatalytic ozonation process that combines ozonation and electrolysis process to enhance pollutant degradation during water and wastewater treatment. This enhancement has been mainly attributed to several mechanisms that increase O3 transformation to ·OH in the E-peroxone system, e.g., electro-generation of H2O2 from O2 at a carbon-based cathode and its subsequent peroxone reaction with O3 to ·OH, electro-reduction of O3 to ·OH at the cathode, and O3 decomposition to ·OH at high local pH near the cathode. To get more insight how these mechanisms contribute respectively to the enhancement, this study investigated total organic carbon (TOC) elimination from oxalic acid (OA) solutions by the E-peroxone process. Results show that the E-peroxone process significantly increased TOC elimination rate by 10.2-12.5 times compared with the linear addition of the individual rates of corresponding ozonation and electrolysis process. Kinetic analyses reveal that the electrochemically-driven peroxone reaction is the most important mechanism for the enhanced TOC elimination rate, while the other mechanisms contribute minor to the enhancement by a factor of 1.6-2.5. The results indicate that proper selection of electrodes that can effectively produce H2O2 at the cathode is critical to maximize TOC elimination in the E-peroxone process. PMID:25989593

  2. Activated carbon fibers/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid composite scaffolds: preparation and characterizations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanni; Han, Hao; Quan, Haiyu; Zang, Yongju; Wang, Ning; Ren, Guizhi; Xing, Melcolm; Wu, Qilin

    2014-10-01

    The present work is a first trial to introduce activated carbon fibers (ACF) with high adsorption capacity into poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), resulting in a novel kind of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. ACF, prepared via high-temperature processing of carbon fibers, are considered to possess bioactivity and biocompatibility. The ACF/PLGA composite scaffolds are prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching method. Increments in both pore quantity and quality over the surface of ACF as well as a robust combination between ACF and PLGA matrix are observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The high adsorption capacity of ACF is confirmed by methylene blue solution absorbency test. The surfaces of ACF are affiliated with many hydrophilic groups and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the SEM images show that cells possess a favorable spreading morphology on the ACF/PLGA scaffolds. Besides, vivo experiments are also carried out to evaluate the histocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. The results show that ACF have the potential to become one of the most promising materials in biological fields.

  3. Activated carbon fibers/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid composite scaffolds: preparation and characterizations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanni; Han, Hao; Quan, Haiyu; Zang, Yongju; Wang, Ning; Ren, Guizhi; Xing, Melcolm; Wu, Qilin

    2014-10-01

    The present work is a first trial to introduce activated carbon fibers (ACF) with high adsorption capacity into poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), resulting in a novel kind of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. ACF, prepared via high-temperature processing of carbon fibers, are considered to possess bioactivity and biocompatibility. The ACF/PLGA composite scaffolds are prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching method. Increments in both pore quantity and quality over the surface of ACF as well as a robust combination between ACF and PLGA matrix are observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The high adsorption capacity of ACF is confirmed by methylene blue solution absorbency test. The surfaces of ACF are affiliated with many hydrophilic groups and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the SEM images show that cells possess a favorable spreading morphology on the ACF/PLGA scaffolds. Besides, vivo experiments are also carried out to evaluate the histocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. The results show that ACF have the potential to become one of the most promising materials in biological fields. PMID:25175194

  4. Selective extraction of gallic acid in pomegranate rind using surface imprinting polymers over magnetic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yi; Gao, Ruixia; Liu, Dechun; Tang, Yuhai; Guo, Zengjun

    2015-10-01

    A novel surface imprinting polymer based on magnetic carbon nanotubes was prepared using dendritic polyethyleneimine as functional monomer to amplify the number of imprinted cavities. The characteristics of resulting polymers were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Results suggest that magnetic nanoparticles are deposited onto the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and the imprinted shell is coated on the surface of magnetic carbon nanotubes with a thickness of approximately 8 nm. Magnetic imprinted polymers are sensitive to magnetic fields and can be easily separated within 3 s using an external magnet. The adsorption results indicate that the obtained imprinted polymers have fast kinetics, an ultrahigh adsorption capacity of 479.9 mg g(-1), and satisfactory selectivity towards the template molecule. The prepared materials have excellent stability with no obvious deterioration after six adsorption-regeneration cycles. In addition, a method for determination of gallic acid (GA) in pomegranate rind was developed, using a combination of the prepared polymers used as solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for rapid isolation and determination of GA. The limit of detection of the proposed method is 0.001 μg mL(-1), and the intra and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) are lower than 3.8% and 5.3%, respectively. The recoveries of GA from pomegranate rind extract are in the range 98.2-103.6% with RSDs lower than 4.3%.

  5. Effect of Phosphoric Acid Concentration on the Characteristics of Sugarcane Bagasse Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, M. R. M.; Suraya, W. M. S. W.; Rafidah, H.; Amirza, A. R. M.; Attahirah, M. H. M. N.; Hani, M. S. N. Q.; Adnan, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation method is one of the crucial steps involved in producing activated carbon using chemical activation process. Chemicals employed in this step is effective at decomposing the structure of material and forming micropores that helps in adsorption of contaminants. This paper explains thorough procedures that have been involved in producing sugarcane bagasse activated carbon (SBAC) by using 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) during the impregnation step. Concentration of H3PO4 used in the process of producing SBAC was optimized through several tests including bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter and the charactesristic of optimum SBAC produced has been compared with commercial activated carbon (CAC). Batch study has been carried out by using the SBAC produced from optimum condition to investigate the performance of SBAC in removal of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand (COD) from textile wastewater. From characteristic study, SBAC with 30% H3PO4 has shown the optimum value of bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter of 0.3023 g cm-3, 4.35%, 974.96 mg/g and 0.21-0.41 µm, respectively. These values are comparable to the characteristics of CAC. Experimental result from the batch study has been concluded that the SBAC has a promising potential in removing turbidity and COD of 75.5% and 66.3%, respectively which was a slightly lower than CAC which were able to remove 82.8% of turbidity and 70% of COD. As a conclusion, the SBAC is comparable with CAC in terms of their characteristics and the capability of removing contaminants from textile wastewater. Therefore, it has a commercial value to be used as an alternative of low-cost material in producing CAC.

  6. Functionalizing multi-walled carbon nanotubes using ECR plasma and a mild nitric acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wen-Shou; Tseng, Chyuan-Yow; Kuo, Cheng-Tzu

    2009-12-01

    In the present work, a two-step process combining electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma and 0.25 M nitric acid treatments is utilized to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In the process, high density and high incident energy hydrogen and oxygen cations generated by using ECR plasma system are used to bombard the MWCNTs for 5 min to break C-C bonds, creating free radical defects on the nanotube surface; the treated nanotubes are subsequently sonicated in the mild acid for 2 h, forming functional groups at the defects. Several characterization techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, are utilized to systematically evaluate the effect of the method. The results show that the MWCNTs treated by the presented method can contain a high concentration of oxygen-containing functional groups on the nanotube surface with the added advantage of high thermal stability and minimal destructive effects to the material structure. PMID:19908694

  7. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine.

    PubMed

    Deborah, M; Jawahar, A; Mathavan, T; Dhas, M Kumara; Benial, A Milton Franklin

    2015-03-15

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (002) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  8. Hepatoprotective effect of trimethylgallic acid esters against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Mamta; Chadha, Renu; Kumar, Anil; Karan, Maninder; Singh, Tejvir; Dhingra, Sameer

    2015-12-01

    Gallic acid and its derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating various oxidative stress mediated disorders. In the present study, we investigated the hepatoprotective effects of newly synthesized conjugated trimethylgallic acid (TMGA) esters against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Animals were pre-treated with TMGA esters at their respective doses for 7 days against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity. The histopathological changes were evaluated to find out degenerative fatty changes including vacuole formation, inflammation and tissue necrosis. Various biomarkers of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, glutathione levels, and endogenous antioxidant enzyme activities), liver enzymes (AST and ALT), triacylglycerol and cholesterol were evaluated. Pre-treatment with TMGA esters (MRG, MGG, MSG, and MUG at the dose of 28.71, 30.03, 31.35, 33.62 mg/kg/day), respectively reversed the CCl4-induced liver injury scores (reduced vacuole formation, inflammation and necrosis), biochemical parameters of plasma (increased AST, ALT, TG, and cholesterol), antioxidant enzymes (increased lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels; decreased glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities) in liver tissues and inflammatory surge (serum TNF-α) significantly. The study revealed that TMGA esters exerted hepatoprotective effects in CCl4-induced rats, specifically by modulating oxidative-nitrosative stress and inflammation.

  9. Hyaluronic acid-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xueyan; Tao, Lei; Wen, Shihui; Hou, Wenxiu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-03-20

    Development of novel drug carriers for targeted cancer therapy with high efficiency and specificity is of paramount importance and has been one of the major topics in current nanomedicine. Here we report a general approach to using multifunctional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a platform to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeted cancer therapy. In this approach, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified MWCNTs were covalently conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and hyaluronic acid (HA). The formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA conjugates were characterized via different techniques and were used as a new carrier system to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin for targeted delivery to cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. We show that the formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes with a drug loading percentage of 72% are water soluble and stable. In vitro release studies show that the drug release rate under an acidic condition (pH 5.8, tumor cell microenvironment) is higher than that under physiological condition (pH 7.4). Cell viability assay demonstrates that the carrier material has good biocompatibility in the tested concentration range, and the MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors and exert growth inhibition effect to the cancer cells. The developed HA-modified MWCNTs hold a great promise to be used as an efficient anticancer drug carrier for tumor-targeted chemotherapy.

  10. Application of Lactobacillus immobilized by Activated Carbon Fiber in Fermentation of Lactic Acid in Starch Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Peng; Chi, Guoda; Huang, Chenyong

    2010-11-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACF) as the carrier of Lactobacillus was introduced into fermenting system, and a method of modifying the surface of ACF by HNO3-Fe (III) was established. Factors that affect ACF carrier's effect on immobilization of Lactobacillus were studied. HCl, H2SO4, HNO3 and FeCl3 solutions were respectively used to modify the surface properties of ACF. The amount of Fe (III) carried on ACF surface was 0.1563 mol/kg after ACF surface was modified by HNO3 for 5 h and then by 0.1 mol/L FeCl3 for 4 h, when the thickness of Lactobacillus on a single silk of carrier reached 40 μm. When ACF modified by HNO3-Fe (III) was applied in the fermentation of lactic acid in starch industry wastewater, the fermentation period reduced by 8 h and the output of L-lactic acid was 65.5 g/L, which was 3.3% more than that fermented without the carrier.

  11. Regeneration of Acid Orange 7 Exhausted Granular Activated Carbon Using Pulsed Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijuan; Guo, He; Liu, Yongjie; Yi, Chengwu

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) system with a multi-needle-to-plate electrodes geometry was set up to investigate the regeneration of acid orange 7 (AO7) exhausted granular activated carbon (GAC). Regeneration of GAC was studied under different conditions of peak pulse discharge voltage and water pH, as well as the modification effect of GAC by the pulse discharge process, to figure out the regeneration efficiency and the change of the GAC structure by the PDP treatment. The obtained results showed that there was an appropriate peak pulse voltage and an optimal initial pH value of the solution for GAC regeneration. Analyses of scanning electron microscope (SEM), Boehm titration, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Horvath-Kawazoe (HK), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) showed that there were more mesopore and macropore in the regenerated GAC and the structure turned smoother with the increase of discharge voltage; the amount of acidic functional groups on the GAC surface increased while the amount of basic functional groups decreased after the regeneration process. From the result of the XRD analysis, there were no new substances produced on the GAC after PDP treatment. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21207052), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 20110491353) and Jiangsu Planned Projects for Postdoctoral Research Funds, China (No. 1102116C)

  12. Adsorption of Acid Red 57 from aqueous solutions onto polyacrylonitrile/activated carbon composite.

    PubMed

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A; Diab, Mostafa A; Hussien, Mostafa A; El-Sonbati, Adel Z; Eessa, Ahmed M

    2014-04-24

    The adsorption of Acid Red 57 (AR57) onto Polyacrylonitrile/activated carbon (PAN/AC) composite was investigated in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to contact time, pH and temperature. Physical characteristics of (PAN/AC) composite such as fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were obtained. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms and the isotherm constants were determined. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto (PAN/AC) composite. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were used to describe the kinetic data. The dynamic data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model well. The activation energy, change of free energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption were also evaluated for the adsorption of AR57 onto (PAN/AC) composite. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that (PAN/AC) composite could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from textile effluents. PMID:24463242

  13. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  14. Influences of perfluorooctanoic acid on the aggregation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengliang; Schäffer, Andreas; Vereecken, Harry; Heggen, Marc; Ji, Rong; Klumpp, Erwin

    2013-03-01

    The aggregation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the aqueous phase not only inhibits their extensive utilization in various aspects but also dominates their environmental fate and transport. The role of surfactants at low concentration in the aggregation of MWCNTs has been studied, however the effect of perfluorinated surfactants at low concentration is uncertain. To understand this interfacial phenomenon, the influences of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a control, on MWCNT aggregation in the aqueous phase were examined by the UV absorbency method. Influences of pH and cationic species on the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) value were evaluated. The CCC values were dependent on the concentration of PFOA, however a pronounced effect of SDS concentration on the CCC values was not observed. The CCC values of the MWCNTs were 51.6 mmol/L in NaCl and 0.28 mmol/L in CaCl2 solutions, which suggested pronounced differences in the effects of Na+ and Ca2+ ions on the aggregation of the MWCNTs. The presence of both PFOA and SDS significantly decreased the CCC values of the MWCNTs in NaCl solution. The aggregation of the MWCNTs took place under acidic conditions and was not notably altered under neutral and alkaline conditions due to the electrostatic repulsion of deprotonated functional groups on the surface of the MWCNTs. PMID:23923418

  15. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deborah, M.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-03-01

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (0 0 2) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  16. Irradiation and Bevacizumab in High-Grade Glioma Retreatment Settings

    SciTech Connect

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Ganswindt, Ute; Schwarz, Silke Birgit; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Tonn, Joerg-Christian; Geisler, Julia; Fougere, Christian la; Ertl, Lorenz; Linn, Jennifer; Siefert, Axel; Belka, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation is a treatment option for recurrent high-grade glioma with proven but limited effectiveness. Therapies directed against vascular endothelial growth factor have been shown to exert certain efficacy in combination with chemotherapy and have been safely tested in combination with radiotherapy in a small cohort of patients. To study the feasibility of reirradiation combined with bevacizumab treatment, the toxicity and treatment outcomes of this approach were analyzed retrospectively. Patients and Methods: After previous treatment with standard radiotherapy (with or without temozolomide) patients with recurrent malignant glioma received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenous) on Day 1 and Day 15 during radiotherapy. Maintenance therapy was selected based on individual considerations, and mainly bevacizumab-containing regimens were chosen. Patients received 36 Gy in 18 fractions. Results: The data of the medical charts of the 30 patients were analyzed retrospectively. All were irradiated in a single institution and received either bevacizumab (n = 20), no additional substance (n = 7), or temozolomide (n = 3). Reirradiation was tolerated well, regardless of the added drug. In 1 patient treated with bevacizumab, a wound dehiscence occurred. Overall survival was significantly better in patients receiving bevacizumab (p = 0.03, log-rank test). In a multivariate proportional hazards Cox model, bevacizumab, Karnovsky performance status, and World Health Organization grade at relapse turned out to be the most important predictors for overall survival. Conclusion: Reirradiation with bevacizumab is a feasible and effective treatment for patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas. A randomized trial is warranted to finally answer the question whether bevacizumab adds substantial benefit to a radiotherapeutic retreatment setting.

  17. Reconsidering the Significance of Subaerial Processes in Streambank Retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, T. M.; Henderson, M. B.; Staley, N. A.

    2006-12-01

    Subaerial processes, such as freeze-thaw cycling and desiccation cracking, increase streambank retreat by reducing soil strength and directly inducing soil erosion. To date, the effects of subaerial processes have been largely dismissed in stream channel erosion models, both at the reach-scale and watershed-scale. Results from recent field and modeling research in southwestern Virginia indicate subaerial processes are a dominant erosion process in small headwater streams in the mid-Atlantic US. In situ tests of streambank soil erodibility (k) showed the median k in the winter was 1.4 times greater than in spring or fall and 75 percent greater than in summer (p=0.024). The median summer k was 37 percent higher than in spring/fall. Regression analysis using measurements of streambank surface moisture content and temperature indicated over 70 percent of the variance in k measurements was explained by the number of freeze-thaw cycles occurring in the 30 days prior to field testing. In comparing both watershed-scale (SWAT and GWLF) and reach-scale (CONCEPTS) model estimates of streambank soil loss to field measurements using erosion pins, the models failed to simulate significant erosion rates that occurred during January 2006. This inconsistency was attributed to the lack of subaerial process routines in the models. A history of poor agricultural and silvicultural practices and the widespread presence of small mill dams in the Piedmont and Appalachian mountains in the 1800s created floodplain soils composed largely of silts. Considering the susceptibility of silty soils to degradation by freeze-thaw cycling and the temperate climate of the mid-Atlantic with cold winters and hot summers, subaerial processes may be a significant mechanism for stream channel degradation in the region.

  18. Glacier retreat in New Zealand during the Younger Dryas stadial.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Michael R; Schaefer, Joerg M; Denton, George H; Barrell, David J A; Chinn, Trevor J H; Putnam, Aaron E; Andersen, Bjørn G; Finkel, Robert C; Schwartz, Roseanne; Doughty, Alice M

    2010-09-01

    Millennial-scale cold reversals in the high latitudes of both hemispheres interrupted the last transition from full glacial to interglacial climate conditions. The presence of the Younger Dryas stadial (approximately 12.9 to approximately 11.7 kyr ago) is established throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, but the global timing, nature and extent of the event are not well established. Evidence in mid to low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, in particular, has remained perplexing. The debate has in part focused on the behaviour of mountain glaciers in New Zealand, where previous research has found equivocal evidence for the precise timing of increased or reduced ice extent. The interhemispheric behaviour of the climate system during the Younger Dryas thus remains an open question, fundamentally limiting our ability to formulate realistic models of global climate dynamics for this time period. Here we show that New Zealand's glaciers retreated after approximately 13 kyr bp, at the onset of the Younger Dryas, and in general over the subsequent approximately 1.5-kyr period. Our evidence is based on detailed landform mapping, a high-precision (10)Be chronology and reconstruction of former ice extents and snow lines from well-preserved cirque moraines. Our late-glacial glacier chronology matches climatic trends in Antarctica, Southern Ocean behaviour and variations in atmospheric CO(2). The evidence points to a distinct warming of the southern mid-latitude atmosphere during the Younger Dryas and a close coupling between New Zealand's cryosphere and southern high-latitude climate. These findings support the hypothesis that extensive winter sea ice and curtailed meridional ocean overturning in the North Atlantic led to a strong interhemispheric thermal gradient during late-glacial times, in turn leading to increased upwelling and CO(2) release from the Southern Ocean, thereby triggering Southern Hemisphere warming during the northern Younger Dryas.

  19. Glacier retreat in New Zealand during the Younger Dryas stadial.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Michael R; Schaefer, Joerg M; Denton, George H; Barrell, David J A; Chinn, Trevor J H; Putnam, Aaron E; Andersen, Bjørn G; Finkel, Robert C; Schwartz, Roseanne; Doughty, Alice M

    2010-09-01

    Millennial-scale cold reversals in the high latitudes of both hemispheres interrupted the last transition from full glacial to interglacial climate conditions. The presence of the Younger Dryas stadial (approximately 12.9 to approximately 11.7 kyr ago) is established throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, but the global timing, nature and extent of the event are not well established. Evidence in mid to low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, in particular, has remained perplexing. The debate has in part focused on the behaviour of mountain glaciers in New Zealand, where previous research has found equivocal evidence for the precise timing of increased or reduced ice extent. The interhemispheric behaviour of the climate system during the Younger Dryas thus remains an open question, fundamentally limiting our ability to formulate realistic models of global climate dynamics for this time period. Here we show that New Zealand's glaciers retreated after approximately 13 kyr bp, at the onset of the Younger Dryas, and in general over the subsequent approximately 1.5-kyr period. Our evidence is based on detailed landform mapping, a high-precision (10)Be chronology and reconstruction of former ice extents and snow lines from well-preserved cirque moraines. Our late-glacial glacier chronology matches climatic trends in Antarctica, Southern Ocean behaviour and variations in atmospheric CO(2). The evidence points to a distinct warming of the southern mid-latitude atmosphere during the Younger Dryas and a close coupling between New Zealand's cryosphere and southern high-latitude climate. These findings support the hypothesis that extensive winter sea ice and curtailed meridional ocean overturning in the North Atlantic led to a strong interhemispheric thermal gradient during late-glacial times, in turn leading to increased upwelling and CO(2) release from the Southern Ocean, thereby triggering Southern Hemisphere warming during the northern Younger Dryas. PMID

  20. Why is there no Universal Law for Rock Wall Retreat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, Michael; Moore, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Comparing studies of rock slope erosion and soil slope erosion, we find no governing equation similar to the universal soil loss equation for rock slopes. Rock masses in contact with the atmosphere are affected by a suite of physical, chemical and biological processes which degrade intact rock, creating new fractures and extending existing flaws. Complex feedbacks must be explored between changing slope boundary conditions, stress redistribution and fracturing, and weathering by external mechanisms. Rock slope systems are distinguished from soil slope systems by the fundamental nonlinear properties of rock masses. Rock masses represent discontinuous, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, and nonlinearly elastic materials, and contain a record of millions of years of thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes. The origin and evolution of rock mass strength over time can significantly affect bedrock erodibility and engineering performance, the study of which represents a major chance and challenge for the geoscience community. The imprint of THMC processes on rock properties begins with the geological genesis of rocks; however, a significant degree of material behaviour evolves coincidently with the exhumation and evolution of topography. Thus, fracture generation has been investigated as the result of the environmental stress history in geology and geomorphology, partly modulated by incision and topographic stress evolution. Resultant fracture patterns control the degree of discontinuity heterogeneity, anisotropy, and nonlinear mechanical behaviour over millions of years. Here we discuss important novel conceptual approaches to temporally and spatially decipher nonlinear effects on rock slope erosion including incision-related topographic stresses, rock fatigue, paraglacial and paracratering effects etc. and how they could contribute to a more uniform understanding of rockwall retreat.