Science.gov

Sample records for carboxyl functional groups

  1. Structure and function studies on enzymes with a catalytic carboxyl group(s): from ribonuclease T1 to carboxyl peptidases

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    A group of enzymes, mostly hydrolases or certain transferases, utilize one or a few side-chain carboxyl groups of Asp and/or Glu as part of the catalytic machinery at their active sites. This review follows mainly the trail of studies performed by the author and his colleagues on the structure and function of such enzymes, starting from ribonuclease T1, then extending to three major types of carboxyl peptidases including aspartic peptidases, glutamic peptidases and serine-carboxyl peptidases. PMID:23759941

  2. Retention of heavy metals by carboxyl functional groups of biochars in small arms range soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term effectiveness of biochar for heavy metal stabilization depends upon biochar’s sorptive property and recalcitrance in soil. To understand the role of carboxyl functional groups on heavy metal stabilization, cottonseed hull biochar and flax shive steam activated biochar having low O/C ratio...

  3. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dron, Julien; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri

    2007-12-12

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF3/methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L(-1). Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices.

  4. Gas-phase reactivity of carboxylic acid functional groups with carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; Gilbert, Joshua D; Stutzman, John R; Forrest, William P; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT)]. Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities.

  5. Utilization of carboxylic functional groups generated during purification of carbon nanotube fiber for its strength improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Yong-O.; Lee, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Teawon; Park, Junbeom; Lee, Jaegeun; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2017-01-01

    One of the most promising method to produce carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber is directly spinning CNT fiber from CNT aerogel. Despite the advantage of this method in terms of productivity, the CNTs thus produced include impurities such as amorphous carbon and residual catalysts. To remove these unwanted materials, the CNT fiber is usually subjected to acid treatment. At the same time, however, the acid treatment damages the CNT wall, creating functional groups on it. In this work, specific tensile strength of CNT fibers was increased by introducing cross-links between the individual CNTs using carboxylic functional groups which were inevitably generated during the acid treatment of CNT fibers. The esterification of the carboxylic acid with 1,5-pentanediol as a linker resulted in cross-links in between the CNTs, thereby increasing the specific strength of the CNT fiber from 0.43 to 1.12 N/tex and Young's modulus from 30.70 to 47.57 N/tex. Supporting weak shear interactions of untreated CNT fiber by adding covalent bonding through the cross-linking reaction led to the improvement of mechanical properties of the CNT fiber. Elimination of impurities and narrowed interspacing between CNT bundles caused by acid treatment was also confirmed, which additionally contributed to enhancing the mechanical properties of CNT fiber.

  6. Evaluation of the cyclopentane-1,2-dione as a potential bio-isostere of the carboxylic acid functional group.

    PubMed

    Ballatore, Carlo; Gay, Bryant; Huang, Longchuan; Robinson, Katie Herbst; James, Michael J; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Brunden, Kurt R; Smith, Amos B

    2014-09-01

    Cycloalkylpolyones hold promise in drug design as carboxylic acid bio-isosteres. To investigate cyclopentane-1,2-diones as potential surrogates of the carboxylic acid functional group, the acidity, tautomerism, and geometry of hydrogen bonding of representative compounds were evaluated. Prototypic derivatives of the known thromboxane A2 prostanoid (TP) receptor antagonist, 3-(3-(2-((4-chlorophenyl)sulfonamido)-ethyl)phenyl)propanoic acid, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced by the cyclopentane-1,2-dione unit, were synthesized and evaluated as TP receptor antagonists. Cyclopentane-1,2-dione derivative 9 was found to be a potent TP receptor antagonist with an IC50 value comparable to that of the parent carboxylic acid. These results indicate that the cyclopentane-1,2-dione may be a potentially useful carboxylic acid bio-isostere.

  7. Hydrogel with chains functionalized with carboxyl groups as universal 3D platform in DNA biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Agata; Fau, Michal; Karbarz, Marcin; Donten, Mikolaj; Stojek, Zbigniew; Nowicka, Anna M

    2014-04-15

    Application of hydrogel based on N-isopropylacrylamide with carboxyl groups grafted to the chains enabled the immobilization of DNA at an extent exceeding that for flat surfaces by at least one order of magnitude. The probe DNA strands in the 3D platform were fully available for the hybridization process. The examination of the gels containing different amounts of grafted carboxyl groups (1-10%) was done using quartz crystal microbalance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, chronoamperometry and ionic coupled plasma with laser ablation. The optimal carboxyl group content was determined to be 5%. A very good agreement of the data obtained with independent techniques on content of DNA in the gel was obtained. In comparison to the other methods of immobilization of DNA the new platform enabled complete removal of DNA after the measurements and analysis and, therefore, could be used many times. After a 10-fold exchange of the DNA-sensing layer the efficiency of hybridization and analytical signal did not change by more than 5%. The sensor response increased linearly with logarithm of concentration of target DNA in the range 1×10(-13)-1×10(-6) M. The obtained detection limit was circa 8×10(-13) M of target DNA in the sample which is a substantial improvement over the planar sensing layers.

  8. Electronic and optical response of Ru(II) complexes functionalized by methyl, carboxylate groups: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Tretiak, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge - a carboxyl group - is added to one or two of the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure, indeed, affect electronic and optical properties and consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru-systems. In this study, we apply both theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the Ru(II) bipyridine complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and linear response time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state structures of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase, as well as in acetonitrile solution. In addition, an inelaborate Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states. All theoretical results nicely complement experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes and contribute to their interpretation. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show a high probability of deprotonation of the carbboxyl group in the Ru-complexes resulted in a slight blue shift and decrease of intensities of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotanated complexes demonstrate strong agreement when acetonitrile solvent is used in simulations. A polar solvent is found to play an important role in calculations of optical spectra: it

  9. Surface modification of silicone tubes by functional carboxyl and amine, but not peroxide groups followed by collagen immobilization improves endothelial cell stability and functionality.

    PubMed

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Mottaghy, Khosrow; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz

    2015-03-02

    Surface modification by functional groups promotes endothelialization in biohybrid artificial lungs, but whether it affects endothelial cell stability under fluid shear stress, and the release of anti-thrombotic factors, e.g. nitric oxide (NO), is unknown. We aimed to test whether surface-modified silicone tubes containing different functional groups, but similar wettability, improve collagen immobilization, endothelialization, cell stability and cell-mediated NO-release. Peroxide, carboxyl, and amine-groups increased collagen immobilization (41-76%). Only amine-groups increased ultimate tensile strength (2-fold). Peroxide and amine enhanced (1.5-2.5 fold), but carboxyl-groups decreased (2.9-fold) endothelial cell number after 6 d. After collagen immobilization, cell numbers were enhanced by all group-modifications (2.8-3.8 fold). Cells were stable under 1 h-fluid shear stress on amine, but not carboxyl or peroxide-group-modified silicone (>50% cell detachment), while cells were also stable on carboxyl-group-modified silicone with immobilized collagen. NO-release was increased by peroxide and amine (1.1-1.7 fold), but decreased by carboxyl-group-modification (9.8-fold), while it increased by all group-modifications after collagen immobilization (1.8-2.8 fold). Only the amine-group-modification changed silicone stiffness and transparency. In conclusion, silicone-surface modification of blood-contacting parts of artificial lungs with carboxyl and amine, but not peroxide-groups followed by collagen immobilization allows the formation of a stable functional endothelial cell layer. Amine-group-modification seems undesirable since it affected silicone's physical properties.

  10. Effect of Carboxylic Functional Group Functionalized on Carbon Nanotubes Surface on the Removal of Lead from Water

    PubMed Central

    Atieh, Muataz Ali; Bakather, Omer Yehya; Al-Tawbini, Bassam; Bukhari, Alaadin A.; Abuilaiwi, Faraj Ahmad; Fettouhi, Mohamed B.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of the removal of lead from water by using carboxylic functional group (COOH) functionalized on the surface of carbon nanotubes was investigated. Four independent variables including pH, CNTs dosage, contact time, and agitation speed were carried out to determine the influence of these parameters on the adsorption capacity of the lead from water. The morphology of the synthesized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was characterized by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to measure the diameter and the length of the CNTs. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes were varied from 20 to 40 nm with average diameter at 24 nm and 10 micrometer in length. Results of the study showed that 100% of lead was removed by using COOH-MCNTs at pH 7, 150 rpm, and 2 hours. These high removal efficiencies were likely attributed to the strong affinity of lead to the physical and chemical properties of the CNTs. The adsorption isotherms plots were well fitted with experimental data. PMID:21350599

  11. Benzylidene Acetal Protecting Group as Carboxylic Acid Surrogate: Synthesis of Functionalized Uronic Acids and Sugar Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit; Senthilkumar, Soundararasu; Baskaran, Sundarababu

    2016-01-18

    Direct oxidation of the 4,6-O-benzylidene acetal protecting group to C-6 carboxylic acid has been developed that provides an easy access to a wide range of biologically important and synthetically challenging uronic acid and sugar amino acid derivatives in good yields. The RuCl3 -NaIO4 -mediated oxidative cleavage method eliminates protection and deprotection steps and the reaction takes place under mild conditions. The dual role of the benzylidene acetal, as a protecting group and source of carboxylic acid, was exploited in the efficient synthesis of six-carbon sialic acid analogues and disaccharides bearing uronic acids, including glycosaminoglycan analogues.

  12. 17O NMR and density functional theory study of the dynamics of the carboxylate groups in DOTA complexes of lanthanides in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Florian; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Helm, Lothar; Peters, Joop A; Djanashvili, Kristina

    2012-01-02

    The rotation of the carboxylate groups in DOTA (DOTA = 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate) complexes of several lanthanide ions and Sc(3+) was investigated with density functional theory (DFT) calculations and with variable temperature (17)O NMR studies at 4.7-18.8 T. The data obtained show that the rotation is much slower than the other dynamic processes taking place in these complexes. The exchange between the bound and unbound carboxylate oxygen atoms for the largest Ln(3+) ions (La(3+)→Sm(3+)) follows a pathway via a transition state in which both oxygens of the carboxylate group are bound to the Ln(3+) ion, whereas for the smaller metal ions (Tm(3+), Lu(3+), Sc(3+)) the transition state has a fully decoordinated carboxylate group. The activation free energies show a steady increase from about 75 to 125-135 kJ·mol(-1) going from La(3+) to Lu(3+). This computed trend is consistent with the results of the (17)O NMR measurements. Fast exchange between bound and unbound carboxylate oxygen atoms was observed for the diamagnetic La-DOTA, whereas for Pr-, Sm-, Lu-, and Sc-DOTA the exchange was slow on the NMR time scale. The trends in the linewidths for the various metal ions as a function of the temperature agree with trends in the rates as predicted by the DFT calculations.

  13. Comparison of silatrane, phosphonic acid, and carboxylic acid functional groups for attachment of porphyrin sensitizers to TiO2 in photoelectrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Bradley J; Llansola Portolés, Manuel J; Liddell, Paul A; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2013-10-21

    A tetra-arylporphyrin dye was functionalized with three different anchoring groups used to attach molecules to metal oxide surfaces. The physical, photophysical and electrochemical properties of the derivatized porphyrins were studied, and the dyes were then linked to mesoporous TiO2. The anchoring groups were β-vinyl groups bearing either a carboxylate, a phosphonate or a siloxy moiety. The siloxy linkages were made by treatment of the metal oxide with a silatrane derivative of the porphyrin. The surface binding and lability of the anchored molecules were studied, and dye performance was compared in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to study charge recombination processes. At comparable surface concentration, the porphyrin showed comparable performance in the DSSC, regardless of the linker. However, the total surface coverage achievable with the carboxylate was about twice that obtainable with the other two linkers, and this led to higher current densities for the carboxylate DSSC. On the other hand, the carboxylate-linked dyes were readily leached from the metal oxide surface under alkaline conditions. The phosphonates were considerably less labile, and the siloxy-linked porphyrins were most resistant to leaching from the surface. The use of silatrane proved to be a practical and convenient way to introduce the siloxy linkages, which can confer greatly increased stability on dye-sensitized electrodes with photoelectrochemical performance comparable to that of the other linkers.

  14. An integrative technique based on synergistic coremoval and sequential recovery of copper and tetracycline with dual-functional chelating resin: roles of amine and carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Xu, Chao; Chen, Tai-Peng; Li, Ai-Min

    2013-11-27

    A novel chelating resin (R-AC) bearing dual-functional groups (amino and carboxyl groups) was self-synthesized and it showed superior properties on synergistic coremoval of Cu(II) and tetracycline (TC) to commercial resins (amine, carboxyl, and hydrophobic types), which was deeply investigated by equilibrium and kinetic tests in binary, preloading, and saline systems. The adsorption of TC on R-AC was markedly enhanced when coexisted with Cu(II), up to 13 times of that in sole system, whereas Cu(II) uptake seldom decreased in the copresence of TC. Decomplexing-bridging, which included [Cu-TC] decomplexing and [R-Cu] bridging for TC, was demonstrated as the leading mechanism for the synergistic coremoval of Cu(II) and TC. Carboxyl groups of R-AC played a dominant role in decomplexing of [Cu-TC] complex and releasing free TC. Cu(II) coordinated with amine groups of R-AC was further proved to participate in bridging interaction with free TC, and the bridging stoichiometric ratio ([NH-Cu]: TC) possibly was 2:1. About 96.9% of TC and 99.3% of Cu could be sequentially recovered with dilute NaOH followed by HCl. Considering stable application for five cycles in simulated and practical wastewater, R-AC shows great potential in green and simple coremoval of antibiotic and heavy metal ions.

  15. Structure investigations of group 13 organometallic carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Justyniak, Iwona; Prochowicz, Daniel; Tulewicz, Adam; Bury, Wojciech; Goś, Piotr; Lewiński, Janusz

    2017-01-17

    The octet-compliant group 13 organometallics with highly polarized bonds in the metal coordination sphere exhibit a significant tendency to maximize their coordination number through the formation of adducts with a wide range of neutral donor ligands or by self-association to give aggregates containing tetrahedral and higher coordinated aluminium centres, and even in some cases molecular complexes equilibrate with ionic species of different coordination numbers of the metal centre. This work provides a comprehensive overview of the structural chemistry landscape of the group 13 carboxylates. Aside from a more systematic approach to the general structural chemistry of the title compounds, the structure investigations of [R2M(μ-O2CPh)]2-type benzoate complexes (where M = B, Al and Ga) and their Lewis acid-base adducts [(R2M)(μ-O2CPh)(py-Me)] are reported. DFT calculations were also performed to obtain a more in-depth understanding of both the changes in the bonding of group 13 organometallic carboxylate adducts with a pyridine ligand.

  16. Nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite anchored with multi-carboxyl functional groups as an adsorbent for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) from nuclear industry wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Deepa, J R; Christa, J

    2016-04-01

    A novel adsorbent, poly(itaconic acid/methacrylic acid)-grafted-nanocellulose/nanobentonite composite [P(IA/MAA)-g-NC/NB] with multi carboxyl functional groups for the effective removal of Cobalt(II) [Co(II)] from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM-EDS, AFM and potentiometric titrations before and after adsorption of Co(II) ions. FTIR spectra revealed that Co(II) adsorption on to the polymer may be due to the involvement of COOH groups. The surface morphological changes were observed by the SEM images. The pH was optimized as 6.0. An adsorbent dose of 2.0g/L found to be sufficient for the complete removal of Co(II) from 100mg/L at room temperature. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models were tested to describe kinetic data and adsorption of Co(II) follows pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium attained at 120min. Isotherm studies were conducted and data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips isotherm models and best fit was Sips model. Thermodynamic study confirmed endothermic and physical nature of adsorption of the Co(II) onto the adsorbent. Desorption experiments were done with 0.1MHCl proved that without significant loss in performance adsorbent could be reused for six cycles. The practical efficacy and effectiveness of the adsorbent were tested using nuclear industrial wastewater. A double stage batch adsorption system was designed from the adsorption isotherm data of Co(II) by constructing operating lines.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, Ted V.

    Silicon nanoparticles are of great interest in a great number of fields. Silicon nanoparticles show great promise particularly in the field of bioimaging. Carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles have the ability to covalently bond to biomolecules through the conjugation of the carboxylic acid to an amine functionalized biomolecule. This thesis explores the synthesis of silicon nanoparticles functionalized by both carboxylic acids and alkenes and their carboxylic acid functionality. Also discussed is the characterization of the silicon nanoparticles by the use of x-ray spectroscopy. Finally, the nature of the Si-H bond that is observed on the surface of the silicon nanoparticles will be investigated using photoassisted exciton mediated hydrosilation reactions. The silicon nanoparticles are synthesized from both carboxylic acids and alkenes. However, the lack of solubility of diacids is a significant barrier to carboxylic acid functionalization by a mixture of monoacids and diacids. A synthesis route to overcome this obstacle is to synthesize silicon nanoparticles with terminal vinyl group. This terminal vinyl group is distal to the surface of the silicon nanoparticle. The conversion of the vinyl group to a carboxylic acid is accomplished by oxidative cleavage using ozonolysis. The carboxylic acid functionalized silicon nanoparticles were then successfully conjugated to amine functionalized DNA strand through an n-hydroxy succinimide ester activation step, which promotes the formation of the amide bond. Conjugation was characterized by TEM and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The PAGE results show that the silicon nanoparticle conjugates move slower through the polyacrylamide gel, resulting in a significant separation from the nonconjugated DNA. The silicon nanoparticles were then characterized by the use of x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (Xanes) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the bonding and chemical

  18. Enrichment of Nanodiamond Surfaces with Carboxyl Groups for Doxorubicin Loading and Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Y.; Saputra, F. D.; Wuning, S.; Arnelli; Bhaduri, G.

    2017-02-01

    In their pristine state, nanodiamond crystals produced via detonation techniques containing several functional groups present on the surface including amine, amide, alcohol, carbonyl, and carboxyl. These functional groups facilitate nanodiamond to interact drugs so as to nanodiamond is potential for medical application such as drug delivery. Even though research on t he use of nanodiamond for this application has been conducted widely, research on the effect of enrichment of nanodiamond surface with carboxyl functional groups for drug loading and release has not been explored extensively. Therefore, in this paper, the effect of carboxyl-terminated nanodiamond (ND-COOH) on drug loading and release will be presented. The enrichment of nanodiamond with carboxyl groups was undertaken by treating nanodiamond with sulphuric acid and nitric acid. The results show that the doxorubicin (DOX) loading and release efficiencies of ND pristine are higher than that of ND-COOH.

  19. Characterization and diagenesis of strong-acid carboxyl groups in humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Brown, G.K.; Reddy, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    A small fraction of carboxylic acid functional groups in humic substances are exceptionally acidic with pKa values as low as 0.5. A review of acid-group theory eliminated most models and explanations for these exceptionally acidic carboxyl groups. These acidic carboxyl groups in Suwannee River fulvic acid were enriched by a 2-stage fractionation process and the fractions were characterized by elemental, molecular-weight, and titrimetric analyses, and by infrared and 13C- and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. An average structural model of the most acidic fraction derived from the characterization data indicated a high density of carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings. Intramolecular H-bonding between adjacent carboxyl groups in these ring structures enhanced stabilization of the carboxylate anion which results in low pKa1 values. The standard, tetrahydrofuran tetracarboxylic acid, was shown to have similar acidity characteristics to the highly acidic fulvic acid fraction. The end products of 3 known diagenetic pathways for the formation of humic substances were shown to result in carboxyl groups clustered on oxygen-heterocycle alicyclic rings.

  20. IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF AEROSOL POLAR OXYGENATED COMPOUNDS BEARING CARBOXYLIC AND/OR HYDROXYL GROUPS. 1. METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a new analytical technique was developed for the identification and quantification of multi-functional compounds containing simultaneously at least one hydroxyl or one carboxylic group, or both. This technique is based on derivatizing first the carboxylic group(s) ...

  1. Ovalbumin with Glycated Carboxyl Groups Shows Membrane-Damaging Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ching-Chia; Shi, Yi-Jun; Chen, Ying-Jung; Chang, Long-Sen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether glycated ovalbumin (OVA) showed novel activity at the lipid-water interface. Mannosylated OVA (Man-OVA) was prepared by modification of the carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-dextro (d)-mannopyranoside. An increase in the number of modified carboxyl groups increased the membrane-damaging activity of Man-OVA on cell membrane-mimicking vesicles, whereas OVA did not induce membrane permeability in the tested phospholipid vesicles. The glycation of carboxyl groups caused a notable change in the gross conformation of OVA. Moreover, owing to their spatial positions, the Trp residues in Man-OVA were more exposed, unlike those in OVA. Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that the Trp residues in Man-OVA were located on the interface binds with the lipid vesicles, and their microenvironment was abundant in positively charged residues. Although OVA and Man-OVA showed a similar binding affinity for lipid vesicles, the lipid-interacting feature of Man-OVA was distinct from that of OVA. Chemical modification studies revealed that Lys and Arg residues, but not Trp residues, played a crucial role in the membrane-damaging activity of Man-OVA. Taken together, our data suggest that glycation of carboxyl groups causes changes in the structural properties and membrane-interacting features of OVA, generating OVA with membrane-perturbing activities at the lipid-water interface. PMID:28264493

  2. Improved antifouling properties of polyamide nanofiltration membranes by reducing the density of surface carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yinghui; Tiraferri, Alberto; Yip, Ngai Yin; Adout, Atar; Huang, Xia; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-12-18

    Carboxyls are inherent functional groups of thin-film composite polyamide nanofiltration (NF) membranes, which may play a role in membrane performance and fouling. Their surface presence is attributed to incomplete reaction of acyl chloride monomers during the membrane active layer synthesis by interfacial polymerization. In order to unravel the effect of carboxyl group density on organic fouling, NF membranes were fabricated by reacting piperazine (PIP) with either isophthaloyl chloride (IPC) or the more commonly used trimesoyl chloride (TMC). Fouling experiments were conducted with alginate as a model hydrophilic organic foulant in a solution, simulating the composition of municipal secondary effluent. Improved antifouling properties were observed for the IPC membrane, which exhibited lower flux decline (40%) and significantly greater fouling reversibility or cleaning efficiency (74%) than the TMC membrane (51% flux decline and 40% cleaning efficiency). Surface characterization revealed that there was a substantial difference in the density of surface carboxyl groups between the IPC and TMC membranes, while other surface properties were comparable. The role of carboxyl groups was elucidated by measurements of foulant-surface intermolecular forces by atomic force microscopy, which showed lower adhesion forces and rupture distances for the IPC membrane compared to TMC membranes in the presence of calcium ions in solution. Our results demonstrated that a decrease in surface carboxyl group density of polyamide membranes fabricated with IPC monomers can prevent calcium bridging with alginate and, thus, improve membrane antifouling properties.

  3. Fluorescently tuned nitrogen-doped carbon dots from carbon source with different content of carboxyl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Zou, Guifu E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Ke-Qin E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn; Du, Dezhuang; Guo, Jun

    2015-08-01

    In this study, fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (NCDs) were tuned via varying the sources with different number of carboxyl groups. Owing to the interaction between amino and carboxyl, more amino groups conjugate the surface of the NCDs by the source with more carboxyl groups. Fluorescent NCDs were tuned via varying the sources with different content of carboxyl groups. Correspondingly, the nitrogen content, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetime of NCDs increases with the content of carboxyl groups from the source. Furthermore, cytotoxicity assay and cell imaging test indicate that the resultant NCDs possess low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility.

  4. Synthesis and bioactivities of Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid derivatives based on the modification of PCA carboxyl group.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhipeng; Niu, Junfan; Liu, Hao; Xu, Zhihong; Li, Junkai; Wu, Qinglai

    2017-03-08

    Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) as a natural product widely exists in microbial metabolites of Pseudomonads and Streptomycetes and has been registered for the fungicide against rice sheath blight in China. To find higher fungicidal activities compounds and study the effects on fungicidal activities after changing the carboxyl group of PCA, we synthesized a series of PCA derivatives by modifying the carboxyl group of PCA and their structures were confirmed by (1)H NMR and HRMS. Most compounds exhibited significant fungicidal activities in vitro. In particular, compound 6 exhibited inhibition effect against Rhizoctonia solani with EC50 values of 4.35mg/L and compound 3b exhibited effect against Fusarium graminearum with EC50 values of 8.30mg/L, compared to the positive control PCA with its EC50 values of 7.88mg/L (Rhizoctonia solani) and 127.28mg/L (Fusarium graminearum), respectively. The results indicated that the carboxyl group of PCA could be modified to be amide group, acylhydrazine group, ester group, methyl, hydroxymethyl, chloromethyl and ether group etc. And appropriate modifications on carboxyl group of PCA were useful to extend the fungicidal scope.

  5. Roles of carboxyl groups in the transmembrane insertion of peptides

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Francisco N.; Weerakkody, Dhammika; Anderson, Michael; Andreev, Oleg A.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used the pHLIP® peptide to study the roles of carboxyl groups in transmembrane peptide insertion. The pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) binds to the surface of a lipid bilayer as a disordered peptide at neutral pH, and when the pH is lowered it inserts across the membrane to form a transmembrane helix. Peptide insertion is reversed when the pH is raised above the characteristic pKa (6.0). A key event facilitating the membrane insertion is the protonation of aspartic (Asp) and/or glutamic (Glu) acid residues, since at neutral pH their negatively charged side chains hinder membrane insertion. In order to gain mechanistic understanding, we studied the membrane insertion and exit of a series of pHLIP variants where the four Asp residues were sequentially mutated to nonacidic residues, including histidine (His). Our results show that the presence of His residues does not prevent the pH-dependent peptide membrane insertion at ~pH 4 driven by the protonation of carboxyl groups at the inserting end of the peptide. A further pH drop leads to the protonation of His residues in the TM part of peptide, which induces peptide exit from the bilayer. We also find that the number of ionizable residues that undergo a change in protonation during membrane insertion correlates with the pH-dependent insertion into and exit from the lipid bilayer, and that cooperativity increases with their number. We expect that our understanding will be used to improve the targeting of acidic diseased tissue by pHLIP peptides. PMID:21888917

  6. Highly visible-light luminescence properties of the carboxyl-functionalized short and ultrashort MWNTs

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Yongsong Xia Xiaohong; Liang Ying; Zhang Yonggang; Ren Qinfeng; Li Jialin Jia Zhijie; Tang Yiwen

    2007-06-15

    Luminescence of the short multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) conjugated with carboxylic acid groups has been studied. The results show that the carboxyl-functionalized short MWNTs could emit luminescence and the emission peak appears at 500 nm with a corresponding optimal excitation wavelength centering at 310 nm. When the short MWNTs are filtered through 0.15 {mu}m polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane, the ultrashort MWNTs are obtained from the filtrate. An interesting feature for the ultrashort MWNTs is that the emission intensity is strengthened and the peak is slightly blue shifted to 460 nm. This result indicates that the luminescence properties of MWNTs are strongly affected by the tube length. After chemical oxidization cutting, defects and carboxylic acid groups at the tube end and/or sidewall can be produced; the more shorten of MWNTs, the better dispersion and carboxylic passivation of the nanotubes, and the more intense luminescence emissions. The broad emissions are logically attributed to the trapping of excitation energy by defect sites in the carboxyl-functionalized nanotube structure. - Graphical abstract: Luminescence of the short and ultrashort multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) conjugated with carboxylic acid groups, which is logically attributed to the trapping of excitation energy by defect sites, has been studied.

  7. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-05

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I' band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D₂O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  8. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I‧ region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin A.; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I‧ band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D2O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  9. Bovine serum albumin with glycated carboxyl groups shows membrane-perturbing activities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shin-Yi; Chen, Ying-Jung; Kao, Pei-Hsiu; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-12-15

    The aim of the present study aimed to investigate whether glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) showed novel activities on the lipid-water interface. Mannosylated BSA (Man-BSA) was prepared by modification of the carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-d-mannopyranoside. In contrast to BSA, Man-BSA notably induced membrane permeability of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC)/egg yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM)/cholesterol (Chol) and EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Noticeably, Man-BSA induced the fusion of EYPC/EYSM/Chol vesicles, but not of EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Although BSA and Man-BSA showed similar binding affinity for lipid vesicles, the lipid-bound conformation of Man-BSA was distinct from that of BSA. Moreover, Man-BSA adopted distinct structure upon binding with the EYPC/EYSM/Chol and EYPC/EYSM vesicles. Man-BSA could induce the fusion of EYPC/EYSM/Chol vesicles with K562 and MCF-7 cells, while Man-BSA greatly induced the leakage of Chol-depleted K562 and MCF-7 cells. The modified BSA prepared by conjugating carboxyl groups with p-aminophenyl α-d-glucopyranoside also showed membrane-perturbing activities. Collectively, our data indicate that conjugation of carboxyl groups with monosaccharide generates functional BSA with membrane-perturbing activities on the lipid-water interface.

  10. Synthesis of Functionalized Dialkyl Ketones From Carboxylic Acid Derivatives and Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Wotal, Alexander C.; Weix, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Unsymmetrical dialkyl ketones can be directly prepared by the nickel-catalyzed reductive coupling of carboxylic acid chlorides or (2-pyridyl)thioesters with alkyl iodides or benzylic chlorides. A wide variety of functional groups are tolerated by this process, including common nitrogen protecting groups and C-B bonds. Even hindered ketones flanked by tertiary and secondary centers can be formed. The mechanism is proposed to involve the reaction of a (L)Ni(alkyl)2 intermediate with the carboxylic acid derivative. PMID:22360350

  11. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 1. Minor structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of the strong-acid characteristics (pKa 3.0 or less) of fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia, was conducted. Quantitative determinations were made for amino acid and sulfur-containing acid structures, oxalate half-ester structures, malonic acid structures, keto acid structures, and aromatic carboxyl-group structures. These determinations were made by using a variety of spectrometric (13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and ultraviolet spectrometry) and titrimetric characterizations on fulvic acid or fulvic acid samples that were chemically derivatized to indicate certain functional groups. Only keto acid and aromatic carboxyl-group structures contributed significantly to the strong-acid characteristics of the fulvic acid; these structures accounted for 43% of the strong-acid acidity. The remaining 57% of the strong acids are aliphatic carboxyl groups in unusual and/or complex configurations for which limited model compound data are available.

  12. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-09-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species.

  13. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species. PMID:27650635

  14. Density Functional Theory Study on the Interactions of Metal Ions with Long Chain Deprotonated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Y; Riccardi, Enrico; van Erp, Titus S; Koch, Henrik; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Trinh, Thuat T; Grimes, Brian A

    2015-10-08

    In this work, interactions between carboxylate ions and calcium or sodium ions are investigated via density functional theory (DFT). Despite the ubiquitous presence of these interactions in natural and industrial chemical processes, few DFT studies on these systems exist in the literature. Special focus has been placed on determining the influence of the multibody interactions (with up to 4 carboxylates and one metal ion) on an effective pair-interaction potential, such as those used in molecular mechanics (MM). Specifically, DFT calculations are employed to quantify an effective pair-potential that implicitly includes multibody interactions to construct potential energy curves for carboxylate-metal ion pairs. The DFT calculated potential curves are compared to a widely used molecular mechanics force field (OPLS-AA). The calculations indicate that multibody effects do influence the energetic behavior of these ionic pairs and the extent of this influence is determined by a balance between (a) charge transfer from the carboxylate to the metal ions which stabilizes the complex and (b) repulsion between carboxylates, which destabilizes the complex. Additionally, the potential curves of the complexes with 1 and 2 carboxylates and one counterion have been examined to higher separation distance (20 Å) by the use of relaxed scan optimization and constrained density functional theory (CDFT). The results from the relaxed scan optimization indicate that near the equilibrium distance, the charge transfer between the metal ion and the deprotonated carboxylic acid group is significant and leads to non-negligible differences between the DFT and MM potential curves, especially for calcium. However, at longer separation distances the MM calculated interaction potential functions converge to those calculated with CDFT, effectively indicating the approximate domain of the separation distance coordinate where charge transfer between the ions is occurring.

  15. Rh(III)-catalyzed decarboxylative ortho-heteroarylation of aromatic carboxylic acids by using the carboxylic acid as a traceless directing group.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xurong; Sun, Denan; You, Qiulin; Cheng, Yangyang; Lan, Jingbo; You, Jingsong

    2015-04-03

    Highly selective decarboxylative ortho-heteroarylation of aromatic carboxylic acids with various heteroarenes has been developed through Rh(III)-catalyzed two-fold C-H activation, which exhibits a wide substrate scope of both aromatic carboxylic acids and heteroarenes. The use of naturally occurring carboxylic acid as the directing group avoids troublesome extra steps for installation and removal of an external directing group.

  16. Theoretical insights on the interaction of uranium with amidoxime and carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wu, Qun-Yan; Luo, Qiong; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wang, Xiang-Ke; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-09-15

    Recovery of uranium from seawater is extremely challenging but important for the persistent development of nuclear energy, and thus exploring the coordination structures and bonding nature of uranyl complexes becomes essential for designing highly efficient uranium adsorbents. In this work, the interactions of uranium and a series of adsorbents with various well-known functional groups including amidoximate (AO(-)), carboxyl (Ac(-)), glutarimidedioximate (HA(-)), and bifunctional AO(-)/Ac(-), HA(-)/Ac(-) on different alkyl chains (R'═CH3, R″═C13H26) were systematically studied by quantum chemical calculations. For all the uranyl complexes, the monodentate and η(2) coordination are the main binding modes for the AO(-) groups, while Ac(-) groups act as monodentate and bidentate ligands. Amidoximes can also form cyclic imide dioximes (H2A), which coordinate to UO2(2+) as tridentate ligands. Kinetic analysis of the model displacement reaction confirms the rate-determining step in the extraction process, that is, the complexing of uranyl by amidoxime group coupled with the dissociation of the carbonate group from the uranyl tricarbonate complex [UO2(CO3)3](4-). Complexing species with AO(-) groups show higher binding energies than the analogues with Ac(-) groups. However, the obtained uranyl complexes with Ac(-) seem to be more favorable according to reactions with [UO2(CO3)3](4-) as reactant, which may be due to the higher stability of HAO compared to HAc. This is also the reason that species with mixed functional group AO(-)/Ac(-) are more stable than those with monoligand. Thus, as reported in the literature, the adsorbability of uranium can be improved by the synergistic effects of amidoxime and carboxyl groups.

  17. Density functional theory study of the oligomerization of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Devis; Watson, Ken L

    2014-11-20

    We present a density functional theory [M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p)] study of the structures and free energies of formation of oligomers of four carboxylic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, tetrolic acid, and benzoic acid) in water, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride. Solvation effects were treated using the SMD continuum solvation model. The low-lying energy structures of molecular complexes were located by adopting an efficient search procedure to probe the potential energy surfaces of the oligomers of carboxylic acids (CA)n (n = 2-6). The free energies of the isomers of (CA)n in solution were determined as the sum of the electronic energy, vibrational-rotational-translational gas-phase contribution, and solvation free energy. The assessment of the computational protocol adopted in this study with respect to the dimerization of acetic acid, (AA)2, and formic acid, (FA)2, located new isomers of (AA)2 and (FA)2 and gave dimerization constants in good agreement with the experimental values. The calculation of the self-association of acetic acid, tetrolic acid, and benzoic acid shows the following: (i) Classic carboxylic dimers are the most stable isomer of (CA)2 in both the gas phase and solution. (ii) Trimers of carboxylic acid are stable in apolar aprotic solvents. (iii) Molecular clusters consisting of two interacting classic carboxylic dimers (CA)4,(D+D) are the most stable type of tetramers, but their formation from the self-association of classic carboxylic dimers is highly unfavorable. (iv) For acetic acid and tetrolic acid the reactions (CA)2 + 2CA → (CA)4,(D+D) and (CA)3 + CA → (CA)4,(D+D) are exoergonic, but these aggregation pathways go through unstable clusters that could hinder the formation of tetrameric species. (v) For tetrolic acid the prenucleation species that are more likely to form in solution are dimeric and trimeric structures that have encoded structural motifs resembling the α and β solid forms of tetrolic acid. (vi) Stable tetramers of

  18. Identification and quantification of aerosol polar oxygenated compounds bearing carboxylic or hydroxyl groups. 1. Method development.

    PubMed

    Jaoui, M; Kleindienst, T E; Lewandowski, M; Edney, E O

    2004-08-15

    In this study, a new analytical technique was developed for the identification and quantification of multifunctional compounds containing simultaneously at least one hydroxyl or one carboxylic group, or both. This technique is based on derivatizing first the carboxylic group(s) of the multifunctional compound using an alcohol (e.g., methanol, 1-butanol) in the presence of a relatively strong Lewis acid (BF3) as a catalyst. This esterification reaction quickly and quantitatively converts carboxylic acids to their ester forms. The second step is based on silylation of the ester compounds using bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as the derivatizing agent. For compounds bearing ketone groups in addition to carboxylic and hydroxyl groups, a third step was used based on PFBHA derivatization of the carbonyls. Different parameters including temperature, reaction time, and effect due to artifacts were optimized. A GC/MS in EI and in methane-CI mode was used for the analysis of these compounds. The new approach was tested on a number of multifunctional compounds. The interpretation of their EI (70 eV) and CI mass spectra shows that critical information is gained leading to unambiguous identification of unknown compounds. For example, when derivatized only with BF(3)-methanol, their mass spectra comprise primary ions at m/z M.+ + 1, M.+ + 29, and M.+ - 31 for compounds bearing only carboxylic groups and M.+ + 1, M.+ + 29, M.+ - 31, and M+. - 17 for those bearing hydroxyl and carboxylic groups. However, when a second derivatization (BSTFA) was used, compounds bearing hydroxyl and carboxylic groups simultaneously show, in addition to the ions observed before, ions at m/z M.+ + 73, M.+ - 15, M.+ - 59, M.+ - 75, M.+ - 89, and 73. To the best of our knowledge, this technique describes systematically for the first time a method for identifying multifunctional oxygenated compounds containing simultaneously one or more hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups.

  19. The Reactivity of Carboxylic Acid and Ester Groups in the Functionalized Interfacial Region of ’Polyethylene Carboxylic Acid’ (PE-CO2H) and Derivatives: Differentiation of the Functional Groups into Shallow and Deep Subsets Based on a Comparison of Contact Angle and ATR-IR Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    the relationship is less obvious, because the sensitivity of this technique depends on the depth of the group being observed in the interface and on...the nature of this group and the surrounding material. We have postulated that relationships of the type required by eq I hold for contact angle...8217 points are drawn sinaller than their estimated error far clarity. Bottom: The relationship between fe (pH 1 and pH 13) and fIR based on the data in

  20. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyls play an important role in the chemistry of natural organic molecules (NOM) in the environment, and their behavior is dependent on local structural environment within the macromolecule. We studied the structural environments of carboxyl groups in dissolved NOM from the Pine Barrens (New Jersey, USA), and IHSS NOM isolates from soils and river waters using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. It is well established that the energies of the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the carboxylate anion (COO -) are sensitive to the structural environment of the carboxyl group. These energies were compiled from previous infrared studies on small organic acids for a wide variety of carboxyl structural environments and compared with the carboxyl spectral features of the NOM samples. We found that the asymmetric stretching peaks for all NOM samples occur within a narrow range centered at 1578 cm -1, suggesting that all NOM samples examined primarily contain very similar carboxyl structures, independent of sample source and isolation techniques employed. The small aliphatic acids containing hydroxyl (e.g., D-lactate, gluconate), ether/ester (methoxyacetate, acetoxyacetate), and carboxylate (malonate) substitutions on the α-carbon, and the aromatic acids salicylate ( ortho-OH) and furancarboxylate ( O-heterocycle), exhibit strong overlap with the NOM range, indicating that similar structures may be common in NOM. The width of the asymmetric peak suggests that the structural heterogeneity among the predominant carboxyl configurations in NOM is small. Changes in peak area with pH at energies distant from the peak at 1578 cm -1, however, may be indicative of a small fraction of other aromatic carboxyls and aliphatic structures lacking α-substitution. This information is important in understanding NOM-metal and mineral-surface complexation, and in building appropriate structural and mechanistic models of humic materials.

  1. Carboxylic acids as traceless directing groups for the rhodium(III)-catalyzed decarboxylative C-H arylation of thiophenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanfei; Zhao, Huaiqing; Zhang, Min; Su, Weiping

    2015-03-16

    A rhodium(III)-catalyzed carboxylic acid directed decarboxylative C-H/C-H cross-coupling of carboxylic acids with thiophenes has been developed. With a slight adjustment of the reaction conditions based on the nature of the substrates, aryl carboxylic acids with a variety of substituents could serve as suitable coupling partners, and a broad variety of functional groups were tolerated. This method provides straightforward access to biaryl scaffolds with diverse substitution patterns, many of which have conventionally been synthesized through lengthy synthetic sequences. An illustrative example is the one-step gram-scale synthesis of a biologically active 3,5-substituted 2-arylthiophene by way of the current method.

  2. Polycarboxylation of carbon nanofibers under Friedel-Crafts condition: A simple route to direct binding of carboxylic functionalities to graphitic π-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiancheng; Cai, Hualun; Xu, Kai; Fu, Zien; Liu, Xin; Chen, Mingcai; Zhang, Xiuju

    2012-11-01

    The functionalization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with oxalyl chloride, via Friedel-Crafts reaction in the presence of aluminum chloride, was first demonstrated as an efficient way to introduce carboxyl groups onto the nanofiber sidewalls. Octa-aminophenylsilsesquioxane (OASQ) was then covalently attached to the carboxylated nanocarbon CNF-(COOH)n through amide linkage. Taking into account the nature of the electrophilic aromatic substitution, this chemical functionalization may involve formation of conjugated carboxylic acid moiety. Structural analysis combined with electron microscopy observation of the robust octasilsesquioxane species show that carboxyl groups are uniformly distributed on the nanofibers surface.

  3. Isotope-Encoded Carboxyl Group Footprinting for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Conformational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    We report an isotope-encoding method coupled with carboxyl-group footprinting to monitor protein conformational changes. The carboxyl groups of aspartic/glutamic acids and of the C-terminus of proteins can serve as reporters for protein conformational changes when labeled with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) mediated by carbodiimide. In the new development, isotope-encoded "heavy" and "light" GEE are used to label separately the two states of the orange carotenoid protein (OCP) from cyanobacteria. Two samples are mixed (1:1 ratio) and analyzed by a single LC-MS/MS experiment. The differences in labeling extent between the two states are represented by the ratio of the "heavy" and "light" peptides, providing information about protein conformational changes. Combining isotope-encoded MS quantitative analysis and carboxyl-group footprinting reduces the time of MS analysis and improves the sensitivity of GEE and other footprinting.

  4. Strong-acid, carboxyl-group structures in fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia. 2. Major structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Reddy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Polycarboxylic acid structures that account for the strong-acid characteristics (pKa1 near 2.0) were examined for fulvic acid from the Suwannee River. Studies of model compounds demonstrated that pKa values near 2.0 occur only if the ??-ether or ??-ester groups were in cyclic structures with two to three additional electronegative functional groups (carboxyl, ester, ketone, aromatic groups) at adjacent positions on the ring. Ester linkage removal by alkaline hydrolysis and destruction of ether linkages through cleavage and reduction with hydriodic acid confirmed that the strong carboxyl acidity in fulvic acid was associated with polycarboxylic ??-ether and ??-ester structures. Studies of hypothetical structural models of fulvic acid indicated possible relation of these polycarboxylic structures with the amphiphilic and metal-binding properties of fulvic acid.

  5. Novel Carbazole (Cbz)-Based Carboxylated Functional Monomers: Design, Synthesis, and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Ejabul; Lellouche, Jean-Paul; Naddaka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel functional carbazole (Cbz)-based carboxylated monomers were synthesized and characterized. A Clauson-Kaas procedure, a deprotection step, amide coupling, and hydrolysis were utilized as key chemical reactions towards the multistep synthesis of monomers in good to excellent isolated yields. The design strategy was further extended to complex carbazole-COOH monomers incorporated arylazo groups as photoreactive moieties. In addition, photoreactive hybrid carbazole (Cbz)-pyrrole (Pyr)-based carboxylated monomers, comprising a pyrrole core linking a carbazole and a photoreactive phenylazide or benzophenone moiety through an amide spacer in the molecular structure, were also synthesized. The latter can be utilized for surface modification of polymeric films in their monomeric form or as polymeric microparticles (MPs). PMID:26478845

  6. Mapping of Fab-1:VEGF Interface Using Carboxyl Group Footprinting Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecksler, Aaron T.; Kalo, Matt S.; Deperalta, Galahad

    2015-12-01

    A proof-of-concept study was performed to demonstrate that carboxyl group footprinting, a relatively simple, bench-top method, has utility for first-pass analysis to determine epitope regions of therapeutic mAb:antigen complexes. The binding interface of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the Fab portion of a neutralizing antibody (Fab-1) was analyzed using carboxyl group footprinting with glycine ethyl ester (GEE) labeling. Tryptic peptides involved in the binding interface between VEGF and Fab-1 were identified by determining the specific GEE-labeled residues that exhibited a reduction in the rate of labeling after complex formation. A significant reduction in the rate of GEE labeling was observed for E93 in the VEGF tryptic peptide V5, and D28 and E57 in the Fab-1 tryptic peptides HC2 and HC4, respectively. Results from the carboxyl group footprinting were compared with the binding interface identified from a previously characterized crystal structure (PDB: 1BJ1). All of these residues are located at the Fab-1:VEGF interface according to the crystal structure, demonstrating the potential utility of carboxyl group footprinting with GEE labeling for mapping epitopes.

  7. Quantum chemical investigation of the primary thermal pyrolysis reactions of the sodium carboxylate group in a brown coal model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Baisheng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Kefeng; Kang, Lixun

    2014-12-01

    The primary pyrolysis mechanisms of the sodium carboxylate group in sodium benzoate-used as a model compound of brown coal-were studied by performing quantum chemical computations using B3LYP and the CBS method. Various possible reaction pathways involving reactions such as unimolecular and bimolecular decarboxylation and decarbonylation, crosslinking, and radical attack in the brown coal matrix were explored. Without the participation of reactive radicals, unimolecular decarboxylation to release CO2 was calculated to be the most energetically favorable primary reaction pathway at the B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) level of theory, and was also found to be more energetically favorable than decarboxylation of an carboxylic acid group. When CBS-QBS results were included, crosslinking between the sodium carboxylate group and the carboxylic acid and the decarboxylation of the sodium carboxylate group (catalyzed by the phenolic hydroxyl group) were found to be possible; this pathway competes with unimolecular decarboxylation of the sodium carboxylate group. Provided that H and CH3 radicals are present in the brown coal matrix and can access the sodium carboxylate group, accelerated pyrolysis of the sodium carboxylate group becomes feasible, leading to the release of an Na atom or an NaCO2 radical at the B3LYP/6-311+G (d, p) or CBS-QB3 level of theory, respectively.

  8. (±)Alkyl 3-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylates: conformational preferences of the alkoxycarbonyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias-Pérez, M. S.; Cosme, A.; Gálvez, E.; Morreale, A.

    2003-07-01

    Molecular mechanics, ab initio (RHF) and density functional (DFT/B3LYP) methods are applied to investigate the conformational preferences of the methoxycarbonyl group of the (±)methyl 3-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylate. 1H and 13C chemical shifts are also calculated by the GIAO/DFT approach and compared with experimental values. Both theoretical and experimental data account for almost eclipsed conformations with different degrees of distortion from the ideal geometry. It is found that calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level are relatively more reliable to explain the behaviour of the alkoxycarbonyl moiety of 2-hydroxyesters derived from the (±)3-hydroxy-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-carboxylic acid.

  9. Silylesterification of oxidized multi-wall carbon nanotubes by catalyzed dehydrogenative cross-coupling between carboxylic and hydrosilane functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffer, J.-F.; Detriche, S.; Nagy, J. B.; Delhalle, J.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Surface modification of oxidized carbon nanotubes (O-CNTs) with silicon based anchoring groups (R-SiR3) is a relatively uncommon approach of the CNTs functionalization. Hydrosilane derivatives constitute an attractive subclass of compounds for silanization reactions on the CNTs surface. In this work, we report on the ZnCl2 catalytically controlled reaction (hydrosilane dehydrogenative cross-coupling, DHCC) of fluorinated hydrosilane probes with the carboxylic functions present on the surface of oxidized multi-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes functionalized with essentially alcohol groups are also used to compare the selectivity of zinc chloride toward carboxylic groups. To assess the efficiency of functionalization, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy is used to determine the qualitative and quantitative composition of the different samples. Solubility tests on the oxidized and silanized MWNTs are also carried out in the framework of the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSP) theory to apprehend at another scale the effect of DHCC.

  10. Carboxyl functionalization of carbon fibers via aryl diazonium reaction in molten urea to enhance interfacial shear strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Meng, Linghui; Fan, Liquan; Wu, Guangshun; Ma, Lichun; Zhao, Min; Huang, Yudong

    2016-01-01

    Using molten urea as the solvent, carbon fibers were functionalized with carboxylic acid groups via aryl diazonium reaction in 15 min to improve their interfacial bonding with epoxy resin. The surface functionalization was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which showed that the relative surface coverage of carboxylic acid groups increased from an initial percentage of 3.17-10.41%. Mechanical property test results indicated that the aryl diazonium reaction in this paper could improve the interfacial shear strength by 66%. Meanwhile, the technique did not adopt any pre-oxidation step to produce functional groups prior to grafting and was shown to maintain the tensile strength of the fibers. This methodology provided a rapid, facile and economically viable route to produce covalently functionalized carbon fibers in large quantities with an eco-friendly method.

  11. Removal of transition metals from dilute aqueous solution by carboxylic acid group containing absorbent polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new carboxylic acid group containing resin with cation exchange capacity, 12.67 meq/g has been used to remove Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ ions from dilute aqueous solution. The resin has Cu2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ removal capacity, 216 mg/g, 154 mg/g and 180 mg/g, respectively. The selectivity of the resin to ...

  12. Adsorption of Co(II) by a carboxylate-functionalized polyacrylamide grafted lignocellulosics.

    PubMed

    Shibi, I G; Anirudhan, T S

    2005-02-01

    A new adsorbent (PGBS-COOH) having carboxylate functional group at the chain end was synthesized by graft copolymerization of acrylamide onto banana stalk, BS (Musa Paradisiaca) using ferrous ammonium sulphate/H2O2 redox initiator system. The efficiency of the adsorbent in the removal of cobalt [Co(II)] from water was investigated using batch adsorption technique. The adsorbent exhibits very high adsorption potential for Co(II) and under optimum conditions more than 99% removal was achieved. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed at the pH range 6.5-9.0. The equilibrium isotherm data were analysed using three isotherm models, Langmuir, Freundlich and Scatchard, to determine the best fit equation for the sorption of Co(II) on the PGBS-COOH. A comparative study with a commercial cation exchanger, Ceralite IRC-50, having carboxylate functional group showed that PGBS-COOH is 2.8 times more effective compared to Ceralite IRC-50 at 30 degrees C. Synthetic nuclear power plant coolant water samples were also treated by the adsorbent to demonstrate its efficiency in removing Co(II) from water in the presence of other metal ions. Acid regeneration was tried for several cycles to recover the adsorbed metal ions and also to restore the sorbent to its original state.

  13. Preparation and characterization of carboxyl functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles for oligonucleotide immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Jung; Jang, Dae-Hwan; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2010-05-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles prepared by the co-precipitation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ with NH4OH were simply modified by the carboxylic acid group of 3-thiopheneacetic acid (3TA) and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). These functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles when coated with 3TA and DMSA have increased hydrophilic properties, thus causing them to be well dispersed in aqueous solutions. Then oligonucleotides (5'-AGC T-Amine-3') were immobilized on the carboxylic acid group-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles. They were characterized by using FT-IR, XRD and TEM. The concentration of the oligonucleotide-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles was investigated using a UV-vis spectrometer and compared to that of Fe3O4 nanoparticles without any surface modification. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles were spherical and the particle sizes were approximately 10 nm. The immobilizing efficiencies of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles modified with 3TA and DMSA were higher than those of the non-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

  14. Preferential Interaction of Na+ over K+ to Carboxylate-functionalized Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elucidating mechanistic interactions between specific ions (Na+/ K+) and nanoparticle surfaces to alter particle stability in polar media has received little attention. We investigated relative preferential binding of Na+ and K+ to carboxylate-functionalized silver nanoparticles ...

  15. β-Functionalization of carboxylic anhydrides with β-alkyl substituents through carbene organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhichao; Chen, Shaojin; Wang, Yuhuang; Zheng, Pengcheng; Yang, Song; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2014-12-01

    The first NHC-catalyzed functionalization of carboxylic anhydrides is described. In this reaction, the β carbon behaves as a nucleophilic carbon and undergoes asymmetric reactions with electrophiles. Anhydrides with challenging β-alkyl substituents work effectively.

  16. Shielding membrane surface carboxyl groups by covalent-binding graphene oxide to improve anti-fouling property and the simultaneous promotion of flux.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing-Long; Xia, Xue; Tao, Yu; Yun, Hui; Hou, Ya-Nan; Zhao, Chang-Wei; Luo, Qin; Cheng, Hao-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jie

    2016-10-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an excellent material for membrane surface modification. However, little is known about how and to what extent surface functional groups change after GO modification influence membrane anti-fouling properties. Carboxyl is an inherent functional group on polyamide or other similar membranes. Multivalent cations in wastewater secondary effluent can bridge with carboxyls on membrane surfaces and organic foulants, resulting in serious membrane fouling. In this study, carboxyls of a polydopamine (pDA)/1,3,5-benzenetricarbonyl trichloride (TMC) active layer are shielded by covalently-bound GO. The process is mediated by N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). For GO containing low quantities of carboxyls, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and zeta potential analyzer test results reveal that the carboxyl density decreased by 52.3% compare to the pDA/TMC membrane after GO modification. Fouling experiments shows that the flux only slightly declines in the GO functionalized membrane (19.0%), compared with the pDA/TMC membrane (36.0%) after fouling. In addition, during GO modification process the pDA/TMC active layer also become harder and thinner with the aid of EDC/NHS. So the pure water permeability increases from 56.3 ± 18.2 to 103.7 ± 12.0 LMH/MPa. Our results provide new insights for membrane modification work in water treatment and other related fields.

  17. "Fifty Shades" of Black and Red or How Carboxyl Groups Fine Tune Eumelanin and Pheomelanin Properties.

    PubMed

    Micillo, Raffaella; Panzella, Lucia; Koike, Kenzo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco

    2016-05-17

    Recent advances in the chemistry of melanins have begun to disclose a number of important structure-property-function relationships of crucial relevance to the biological role of human pigments, including skin (photo) protection and UV-susceptibility. Even slight variations in the monomer composition of black eumelanins and red pheomelanins have been shown to determine significant differences in light absorption, antioxidant, paramagnetic and redox behavior, particle morphology, surface properties, metal chelation and resistance to photo-oxidative wear-and-tear. These variations are primarily governed by the extent of decarboxylation at critical branching points of the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways, namely the rearrangement of dopachrome to 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA), and the rearrangement of 5-S-cysteinyldopa o-quinoneimine to 1,4-benzothiazine (BTZ) and its 3-carboxylic acid (BTZCA). In eumelanins, the DHICA-to-DHI ratio markedly affects the overall antioxidant and paramagnetic properties of the resulting pigments. In particular, a higher content in DHICA decreases visible light absorption and paramagnetic response relative to DHI-based melanins, but markedly enhances antioxidant properties. In pheomelanins, likewise, BTZCA-related units, prevalently formed in the presence of zinc ions, appear to confer pronounced visible and ultraviolet A (UVA) absorption features, accounting for light-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas non-carboxylated benzothiazine intermediates seem to be more effective in inducing ROS production by redox cycling mechanisms in the dark. The possible biological and functional significance of carboxyl retention in the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways is discussed.

  18. High performance flexible pH sensor based on carboxyl-functionalized and DEP aligned SWNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Shao, Jinyou; Li, Xiangming; Zhao, Qiang; Nie, Bangbang; Xu, Chuan; Ding, Haitao

    2016-11-01

    The detection and control of the pH is very important in many biomedical and chemical reaction processes. A miniaturized flexible pH sensor that is light weight, robust, and conformable is very important in many applications, such as multifunctional lab-on-a-chip systems or wearable biomedical devices. In this work, we demonstrate a flexible chemiresistive pH sensor based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) aligned carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Decorated carboxyl groups can react with hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-) ions, enabling the sensor to be capable of sensing the pH. DEP is used to deposit well-organized and highly aligned SWNTs in desired locations, which improves the metal-nanotube interface and highly rapid detection of the pH, resulting in better overall device performance. When pH buffer solutions are dropped onto such SWNTs, the H+ and OH- ions caninteract with the carboxyl groups and affect the generation of holes and electrons in the SWNTs, leading to resistance variations in the SWNTs. The results shows that the relative resistance variations of the sensor increases linearly with increasing the pH values in the range from 5 to 9 and the response time ranges from 0.2 s to 22.6 s. The pH sensor also shows high performance in mechanical bendability, which benefited from the combination of flexible PET substrates and SWNTs. The SWNT-based flexible pH sensor demonstrates great potential in a wide range of areas due to its simple structure, excellent performance, low power consumption, and compatibility with integrated circuits.

  19. Snythesis and characterization of the first main group oxo-centered trinuclear carboxylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duraj, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis and structural characterization of the first main group oxo-centered, trinuclear carboxylato-bridged species is reported, namely (Ga3(mu(sub 3)-O) (mu-O2CC6H5)6 (4-Mepy)3) GaCl4 center dot 4-Mepy (compound 1), where 4-Mepy is 4-methylpyridine. Compound 1 is a main group example of a well-established class of complexes, referred to as 'basic carboxylates' of the general formula (M3(mu(sub 3)-O)(mu-O2CR)6L3)(+), previously observed only for transition metals.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Poly(methyl methacrylate)-functionalized Carboxyl Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-jie; Zhang, Xing-xiang; Bai, Shi-he; Wang, Xue-chen

    2007-12-01

    An in situ polymerization process was used to prepare poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-functionalized carboxyl multi-walled carbon nanotubes using carboxylate carbon nanotubes and methyl methacrylate as reactants and benzoyl peroxide as an initiator agent. The functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes were characterized using transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and Raman. The results indicate that the PMMA chains are covalently linked with the surface of carboxylate carbon nanotubes. The surface morphology is controlled by the content of carboxylate carbon nanotubes in the reactants. The PMMA functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes are soluble in deuterated chloroform. The storage modulus and tanδ magnitude increase as the content of CCNTs increases up to 0.3%.

  1. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  2. Binding properties of solubilized gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: role of carboxylic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hazum, E.

    1987-11-03

    The interaction of /sup 125/I-buserelin, a superactive agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with solubilized GnRH receptor was studied. The highest specific binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor is evident at 4/sup 0/C, and equilibrium is reached after 2 h of incubation. The soluble receptor retained 100% of the original binding activity when kept at 4 or 22/sup 0/C for 60 min. Mono- and divalent cations inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor. Monovalent cations require higher concentrations than divalent cations to inhibit the binding. Since the order of potency with the divalent cations was identical with that of their association constants to dicarboxylic compounds, it is suggested that there are at least two carboxylic groups of the receptor that participate in the binding of the hormone. The carboxyl groups of sialic acid residues are not absolutely required for GnRH binding since the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor was only slightly affected by pretreatment with neuraminidase and wheat germ agglutinin. The finding that polylysines stimulate luteinizing hormone (LH) release from pituitary cell cultures with the same efficacy as GnRH suggest that simple charge interactions can induce LH release. According to these results, the authors propose that the driving force for the formation of the hormone-receptor complex is an ionic interaction between the positively charged amino acid arginine in position 8 and the carboxyl groups in the binding site.

  3. Enhanced dispersion stability and mobility of carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions through strong hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahk, Yeon Kyoung; He, Xu; Gitsis, Emmanouil; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Kim, Nayoung; Wang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied due to its importance for their technical applications, toxic effects, and environmental impacts. Common electrolytes, such as sodium chloride and potassium chloride, promote agglomeration of nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. On the contrary, we discovered that acetic electrolytes enhanced the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with carboxyl functional group through the strong hydrogen bond, which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectrometry, dispersion observations and aerosolization-quantification method. When concentrations of acetate electrolytes such as ammonium acetate (CH3CO2NH4) and sodium acetate (CH3CO2Na) were lower than 0.03 mol per liter, MWCNT suspensions showed better dispersion and had higher mobility in porous media. The effects by the acetic environment are also applicable to other nanoparticles with the carboxyl functional group, which was demonstrated with polystyrene latex particles as an example.

  4. Functional group analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.T. Jr.; Patterson, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    Analytical methods for functional group analysis are reviewed. Literature reviewed is from the period of December 1983 through November 1985 and presents methods for determining the following compounds: acids, acid halides, active hydrogen, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, amines, amino acids, anhydrides, aromatic hydrocarbons, azo compounds, carbohydrates, chloramines, esters, ethers, halogen compounds, hydrazines, isothiocyanates, nitro compounds, nitroso compounds, organometallic compounds, oxiranes, peroxides, phenols, phosphorus compounds, quinones, silicon compounds, sulfates, sulfonyl chlorides, thioamides, thiols, and thiosemicarbazones. 150 references.

  5. Preparation of carboxyl group-modified palladium nanoparticles in an aqueous solution and their conjugation with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifei; Li, Hongying; Zhen, Shuang; He, Nongyue

    2012-05-01

    The use of nanomaterials in biomolecular labeling and their corresponding detection has been attracting much attention, recently. There are currently very few studies on palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) due to their lack of appropriate surface functionalities for conjugation with DNA. In this paper, we thus firstly present an approach to prepare carboxyl group-modified Pd NPs (with an average size of 6 nm) by the use of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA) as a stabilizer in the aqueous solution. The effect of the various reducing reaction conditions on the morphology of the Pd NPs was investigated. The particles were further characterized by TEM, UV-vis, FT-IR and XPS techniques. DNA was finally covalently conjugated to the surface of the Pd NPs through the activation of the carboxyl group, which was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence analysis. The resulting Pd NPs-DNA conjugates show high single base pair mismatch discrimination capabilities. This work therefore sets a good foundation for further applications of Pd NPs in bio-analytical research.

  6. Activation of carboxyl group with cyanate: peptide bond formation from dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Danger, Grégoire; Charlot, Solenne; Boiteau, Laurent; Pascal, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The reaction of cyanate with C-terminal carboxyl groups of peptides in aqueous solution was considered as a potential pathway for the abiotic formation of peptide bonds under the condition of the primitive Earth. The catalytic effect of dicarboxylic acids on cyanate hydrolysis was definitely attributed to intramolecular nucleophilic catalysis by the observation of the 1H-NMR signal of succinic anhydride when reacting succinic acid with KOCN in aqueous solution (pH 2.2-5.5). The formation of amide bonds was noticed when adding amino acids or amino acid derivatives into the solution. The reaction of N-acyl aspartic acid derivatives was observed to proceed similarly and the scope of the cyanate-promoted reaction was analyzed from the standpoint of prebiotic peptide formation. The role of cyanate in activating peptide C-terminus constitutes a proof of principle that intramolecular reactions of adducts of peptides C-terminal carboxyl groups with activating agents represent a pathway for peptide activation in aqueous solution, the relevance of which is discussed in connexion with the issue of the emergence of homochirality.

  7. Incorporating Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles into Calcite Crystals: Do Anionic Carboxylate Groups Alone Ensure Efficient Occlusion?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    New spherical diblock copolymer nanoparticles were synthesized via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) at 70 °C and 20% w/w solids using either poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) or poly(proline methacrylate) as the steric stabilizer block. Both of these stabilizers contain carboxylic acid groups, but poly(proline methacrylate) is anionic above pH 9.2, whereas poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) has zwitterionic character at this pH. When calcite crystals are grown at an initial pH of 9.5 in the presence of these two types of nanoparticles, it is found that the anionic poly(proline methacrylate)-stabilized particles are occluded uniformly throughout the crystals (up to 6.8% by mass, 14.0% by volume). In contrast, the zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate)-stabilized particles show no signs of occlusion into calcite crystals grown under identical conditions. The presence of carboxylic acid groups alone therefore does not guarantee efficient occlusion: overall anionic character is an additional prerequisite. PMID:27042383

  8. Chemical Derivatization of Peptide Carboxyl Groups for Highly Efficient Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Brian L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Jue, April L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-11-01

    The carboxyl groups of tryptic peptides were derivatized with a tertiary or quaternary amine labeling reagent to generate more highly charged peptide ions that fragment efficiently by electron transfer dissociation (ETD). All peptide carboxyl groups—aspartic and glutamic acid side-chains as well as C-termini—were derivatized with an average reaction efficiency of 99 %. This nearly complete labeling avoids making complex peptide mixtures even more complex because of partially-labeled products, and it allows the use of static modifications during database searching. Alkyl tertiary amines were found to be the optimal labeling reagent among the four types tested. Charge states are substantially higher for derivatized peptides: a modified tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) generates ~90% of its precursor ions with z > 2, compared with less than 40 % for the unmodified sample. The increased charge density of modified peptide ions yields highly efficient ETD fragmentation, leading to many additional peptide identifications and higher sequence coverage (e.g., 70 % for modified versus only 43 % for unmodified BSA). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated on a tryptic digest of ribosomal proteins isolated from yeast cells. Peptide derivatization of this sample produced an increase in the number of identified proteins, a >50 % increase in the sequence coverage of these proteins, and a doubling of the number of peptide spectral matches. This carboxyl derivatization strategy greatly improves proteome coverage obtained from ETD-MS/MS of tryptic digests, and we anticipate that it will also enhance identification and localization of post-translational modifications.

  9. Optical characterization of ultrasmall, hydrogen-terminated and carboxyl-functionalized silicon nanoparticles in aqueous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhoff, Dean Alan

    The primary theme of this dissertation is to characterize the optical and chemical properties of ultrasmall (˜1 nm) silicon nanoparticles (Si-np) in aqueous environments, focusing on their potential for use as luminescent markers in biophysical and biological applications. Two systems are presented in detail: hydrogen-terminated Si-np prepared through electrochemical dispersion of a crystalline Si wafer and carboxyl-functionalized Si-np prepared via thermal hydrosilylation of surface Si-H bonds with an o-ester 1-alkene. Chemical and physical characterizations are done using nuclear magnetic resonance, size exclusion chromatography, and infrared spectroscopy. Optical characterization is done via absorption and steady-state photoluminescence (PL) and using capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The behavior of the hydrogen-terminated Si-np is studied over time as-prepared in isopropanol and during treatments with water, NaOH, HCl, and H2O 2. The PL spectra show three distinct, near-Gaussian states with a FWHM ˜0.45 eV and their respective emissions in the UV-B (˜305 nm), UV-A (˜340 nm), and 'hard-blue' (˜400 nm) regions of the spectrum. The 'hard-blue' emission is shown to have a simple pH dependence with a pKa ˜3, demonstrating the possibility of using Si-np as environmental probes. These results offer some promise for tailoring the PL properties of ultrasmall Si-np through control of their surface chemistry. In the second part, three central elements establish that the carboxyl-functionalized Si-np have excellent potential for use as a luminescent marker in aqueous systems. First, they are shown to be ultrasmall, with a diameter of ˜1 nm, comparable to that of common organic fluorophores. Second, they are shown to have narrow PL in the near-UV with a nearly-symmetric lineshape and a FWHM as small as 30 nm. Third, it is shown that standard chemical means can be used to functionalize the Si-np with carboxyl groups, giving

  10. Bimane: A Visible Light Induced Fluorescent Photoremovable Protecting Group for the Single and Dual Release of Carboxylic and Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Amrita; Venkatesh, Yarra; Behara, Krishna Kalyani; Singh, N D Pradeep

    2017-03-10

    A series of ester conjugates of carboxylic and amino acids were synthesized based on bimane fluorescent photoremovable protecting group (FPRPG). The photorelease of single and dual (same as well as different) carboxylic and amino acids is demonstrated from a single bimane molecule on irradiation with visible light (λ ≥ 410 nm). The detailed mechanistic study of photorelease revealed that the release of two caged acids is simultaneous but in a stepwise pathway.

  11. Introduction of aldehyde vs. carboxylic groups to cellulose nanofibers using laccase/TEMPO mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jaušovec, Darja; Vogrinčič, Robert; Kokol, Vanja

    2015-02-13

    The chemo-enzymatic modification of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) using laccase as biocatalysts and TEMPO or 4-Amino-TEMPO as mediators under mild aqueous conditions (pH 5, 30 °C) has been investigated to introduce surface active aldehyde groups. 4-Amino TEMPO turned out to be kinetically 0.5-times (50%) more active mediator, resulting to oxoammonium cation intermediacy generated and its in situ regeneration during the modification of CNFs. Accordingly, beside of around 750 mmol/kg terminally-located aldehydes, originated during CNFs isolation, the reaction resulted to about 140% increase of C6-located aldehydes at optimal conditions, without reducing CNFs crystallinity. While only the C6-aldehydes were wholly transformed into the carboxyls after additional post-treatment using NaOH according to the Cannizzaro reaction, the post-oxidation with air-oxygen in EtOH/water medium or NaClO2 resulted to no- or very small amounts of carboxyls created, respectively, at a simultaneous loss of all C6- and some terminal-aldehydes in the latter due to the formation of highly-resistant hemiacetal covalent linkages with available cellulose hydroxyls. The results indicated a new way of preparing and stabilizing highly reactive C6-aldehydes on cellulose, and their exploitation in the development of new nanocellulose-based materials.

  12. Study of carboxylic functionalization of polypropylene surface using the underwater plasma technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. S.; Friedrich, J. F.; Wagner, M. H.

    2009-08-01

    Non-equilibrium solution plasma treatment of polymer surfaces in water offers the possibility of more dense and selective polymer surface functionalization in comparison to the well-known and frequently used low-pressure oxygen plasma. Functional groups are introduced when the polymer surface contacts the plasma moderated solution especially water solutions. The emission of ions, electrons, energy-rich neutrals and complexes, produced by the ion avalanche are limited by quenching, with the aid of the ambient water phase. The UV-radiation produced in plasma formation also helps to moderate the reaction solution further by producing additional excited, ionized/dissociated molecules. Thus, monotype functional groups equipped polymer surfaces, preferably OH groups, originating from the dissociated water molecules, could be produced more selectively. An interesting feature of the technique is its flexibility to use a wide variety of additives in the water phase. Another way to modify polymer surfaces is the deposition of plasma polymers carrying functional groups as carboxylic groups used in this work. Acetic acid, acrylic acid, maleic and itaconic acid were used as additive monomers. Acetic acid is not a chemically polymerizing monomer but it could polymerize by monomer/molecular fragmentation and recombination to a cross linked layer. The other monomers form preferably water-soluble polymers on a chemical way. Only the fragmented fraction of these monomers could form an insoluble coating by cross linking to substrate. The XPS analysis was used to track the alterations in -O-CO- bond percentage on the PP surface. To identify the -COOH groups on substrate surface unambiguously, which have survived the plasma polymerization process, the derivatization with trifluoroethanol was performed.

  13. Target-Specific Capture of Environmentally Relevant Gaseous Aldehydes and Carboxylic Acids with Functional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Campbell, McKenzie L; Guerra, Fernanda D; Dhulekar, Jhilmil; Alexis, Frank; Whitehead, Daniel C

    2015-10-12

    Aldehyde and carboxylic acid volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present significant environmental concern due to their prevalence in the atmosphere. We developed biodegradable functional nanoparticles comprised of poly(d,l-lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ethyleneimine) (PDLLA-PEG-PEI) block co-polymers that capture these VOCs by chemical reaction. Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) preparation involved nanoprecipitation and surface functionalization with branched PEI. The PDLLA-PEG-PEI NPs were characterized by using TGA, IR, (1) H NMR, elemental analysis, and TEM. The materials feature 1°, 2°, and 3° amines on their surface, capable of capturing aldehydes and carboxylic acids from gaseous mixtures. Aldehydes were captured by a condensation reaction forming imines, whereas carboxylic acids were captured by acid/base reaction. These materials reacted selectively with target contaminants obviating off-target binding when challenged by other VOCs with orthogonal reactivity. The NPs outperformed conventional activated carbon sorbents.

  14. Binding of suprofen to human serum albumin. Role of the suprofen carboxyl group.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, T; Lin, C C; Yamasaki, K; Miyoshi, T; Imai, T; Yamasaki, M; Otagiri, M

    1993-03-09

    The binding of suprofen (SP), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug of the arylpropionic acid class, and its methyl ester derivative (SPM) to human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by dialysis and spectroscopic techniques. In spite of the remarkable differences in the physicochemical properties of SP and SPM, the binding of each molecule to HSA was quantitatively very similar. Thermodynamic analysis suggests that the interaction of SP with HSA may be caused by electrostatic as well as hydrophobic forces, whereas the interactions with SPM may be explained by hydrophobic and van der Waals forces. Similarities in the difference UV absorption spectra between ligand-detergent micelle and -HSA systems indicate that the SP and SPM molecules are inserted into a hydrophobic crevice on HSA. The same studies suggest that the carboxyl group of SP interacts with a cationic sub-site which is closely associated with the SP binding site. Proton relaxation rate measurements indicate that the thiophen ring and propanoate portion of the SP molecule is the major binding site for HSA. The locations of SP and SPM binding sites were identified by using fluorescence probes which bind to a known site on HSA. The displacement data implied that SP primarily binds to Site II, while the high affinity site of SPM as well as low affinity site of SP are at the warfarin binding site in the Site I area. From binding data with chemically modified HSA derivatives, it is likely that highly reactive tyrosine (Tyr) and lysine (Lys) residues, which may be Tyr-411 and Lys-195, are specifically involved in SP binding. In contrast, these two residues are clearly separated from the SPM binding site. The binding of SP and SPM is independent of conformational changes on HSA that accompany N-B transition. There is evidence that the carboxyl group may play a crucial role in the high affinity binding processes of SP to HSA.

  15. Carbodiimide-mediated immobilization of serratiopeptidase on amino-, carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and characterization for target delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Jana, Asim K.; Maiti, Mithu; Dhamija, Isha

    2014-02-01

    A hybrid biomaterial of serratiopeptidase enzyme was prepared with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via carboxyl and amino-functionalization and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) for direct immobilization. The average size of prepared MNPs was found to be 15.05 ± 3.06 nm. Attachment of amino and carboxyl groups was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction confirmed the purity and phase integrity of Fe3O4. The MNPs and enzyme-loaded-MNPs (EMNPs) were of saturation magnetization 58 and 50 emu g-1, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis of EDC-MNPs and EMNPs showed the presence of organic coating over MNPs. Serratiopeptidase immobilized on amino-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles showed loss of enzyme activity due to crosslinking of enzyme, while serratiopeptidase immobilized on carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was better and gave 115.78 mg protein g-1 MNPs, enzyme loading 168.32 U g-1 MNPs at optimized MNPs-to-enzyme ratio 1.0 mg mg-1. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that EMNPs with magnetic targeting is more effective in drug permeation and reduction in edema than free enzyme.

  16. Determination of Thermodynamic Surface Properties of Carboxylic Acid Functionalized Silanes at Silica/Water Interfaces with Second Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musorrafiti, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Using the χ^( 3 ) method of second harmonic generation, we report surface pKa values for a monoprotic carboxylic acid functionalized silica/water interface. We observe two pKa values at 9(1) and 5.6(2). The acidic pKa is similar to pKa values of organic acids in solution. The more basic pKa is consistent with lateral hydrogen-bonding stabilization among the interfacial carboxylic acid groups. From the measured data, we obtained relative surface potentials and surface charge densities. Using these values in the Lippmann equation, we can tracked the changes in interfacial energy relative to the neutral reference state over seven orders of magnitude, from 10-7 mJ/m^2 to several mJ/m^2.

  17. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  18. Carboxyl functionalized carbon fibers with preserved tensile strength and electrochemical performance used as anodes of structural lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Mengjie; Wang, Shubin; Yu, Yalin; Feng, Qihang; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Boming

    2017-01-01

    Carboxyl functionalized carbon fibers with preserved tensile strength and electrochemical properties were acquired through a simple chemical oxidation method, and the proposed underlying mechanism was verified. The surface of carboxyl functionalizing carbon fibers is necessary in acquiring functional groups on the surface of carbon fibers to further improve the thermal, electrical or mechanical properties of the fibers. Functionalization should preserve the tensile strength and electrochemical properties of carbon fibers, because the anodes of structural batteries need to have high strength and electrochemical properties. Functionalized with mixed H2SO4/HNO3 considerably reduced the tensile strength of carbon fibers. By contrast, the appearance of H3PO4 preserved the tensile strength of functionalized carbon fibers, reduced the dispersion level of tensile strength values, and effectively increased the concentration of functional acid groups on the surface of carbon fibers. The presence of phosphoric acid hindered the over-oxidation of turbostratic carbon, and consequently preserved the tensile strength of carbon fibers. The increased proportion of turbostratic carbon on the surface of carbon fibers concurrently enhanced the electrochemical properties of carbon fibers.

  19. Enumeration of carboxyl groups carried on individual components of humic systems using deuteromethylation and Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zherebker, Alexander; Kostyukevich, Yury; Kononikhin, Alexey; Kharybin, Oleg; Konstantinov, Andrey I; Zaitsev, Kirill V; Nikolaev, Eugene; Perminova, Irina V

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report a novel approach to enumeration of carboxylic groups carried by individual molecules of humic substances using selective chemical modification and isotopic labeling (deuteromethylation) and high-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FTICR MS). Esterification was conducted with a use of thionyl chloride-deuteromethanol reagent under mild conditions to avoid transesterification. The deuteromethylated products were subjected to solid phase extraction using PPL Bond Elute cartridges prior to FTICR MS analysis. An amount of carboxyl groups in the individual molecular component was estimated from the length of identified deuteromethylation series. The method allowed for discerning between compounds with close elemental compositions possessing different protolytic properties. We found that different carboxylic moieties occupy distinct regions in molecular space of humic substances (HS) projected onto Van Krevelen diagram. These locations do not depend on the source of the humic material and can be assigned to carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (5 to 6 COOH), hydrolyzable tannins (3-4 COOH), lignins (1 to 2 COOH), condensed tannins and lignans (0 to 1 COOH), and carbohydrates (0 COOH). At the same time, the alignment pattern of these carboxylated species along the structural evolution lines in Van Krevelen diagrams was characteristic to the specific transformation processes undergone by the humic materials in the different environments. The obtained data enable mapping of molecular ensemble of HS with regards to their specific acidic compartments and might be used for directed fractionation of HS. Graphical abstract Selective isotopic labeling followed by FTICR MS enables discerning between humic molecules with close elemental compositions carrying different numbers of carboxylic groups.

  20. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses analytical methods selected from current research articles. Groups information by topics of general interest, including acids, aldehydes and ketones, nitro compounds, phenols, and thiols. Cites 97 references. (CS)

  1. Functional group-selective adsorption using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Min, Young Hwan; Park, Eun Hee; Kim, Do Hwan; Kim, Sehun

    2012-04-24

    In this study, we selectively enhanced two types of adsorption of 3-mercaptoisobutyric acid on a Ge(100) surface by using the tunneling electrons from an STM and the catalytic effect of an STM tip. 3-Mercaptoisobutyric acid has two functional groups: a carboxylic acid group at one end of the molecule and a thiol group at the other end. It was found that the adsorption occurring through the carboxylic acid group was selectively enhanced by the application of electrons tunneling between an STM tip and the surface. Using this enhancement, it was possible to make thiol group-terminated surfaces at any desired location. In addition, via the use of a tungsten STM tip coated with a tungsten oxide (WO(3)) layer, we selectively catalyzed the adsorption through the thiol group. Using this catalysis, it was possible to generate carboxylic acid group-terminated surfaces at any desired location. This functional group-selective adsorption using STM could be applied in positive lithographic methods to produce semiconductor substrates terminated by desired functional groups.

  2. Relative binding affinity of carboxylate-, phosphonate-, and bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles targeted to damaged bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ryan D.; Cole, Lisa E.; Roeder, Ryan K.

    2012-10-01

    Functionalized Au NPs have received considerable recent interest for targeting and labeling cells and tissues. Damaged bone tissue can be targeted by functionalizing Au NPs with molecules exhibiting affinity for calcium. Therefore, the relative binding affinity of Au NPs surface functionalized with either carboxylate ( l-glutamic acid), phosphonate (2-aminoethylphosphonic acid), or bisphosphonate (alendronate) was investigated for targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue in vitro. Targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue was qualitatively verified by visual observation and backscattered electron microscopy, and quantitatively measured by the surface density of Au NPs using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The surface density of functionalized Au NPs was significantly greater within damaged tissue compared to undamaged tissue for each functional group. Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs exhibited a greater surface density labeling damaged tissue compared to glutamic acid- and phosphonic acid-functionalized Au NPs, which was consistent with the results of previous work comparing the binding affinity of the same functionalized Au NPs to synthetic hydroxyapatite crystals. Targeted labeling was enabled not only by the functional groups but also by the colloidal stability in solution. Functionalized Au NPs were stabilized by the presence of the functional groups, and were shown to remain well dispersed in ionic (phosphate buffered saline) and serum (fetal bovine serum) solutions for up to 1 week. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs have potential for targeted delivery to damaged bone tissue in vitro and provide motivation for in vivo investigation.

  3. The structure-anticoagulant activity relationships of sulfated lacquer polysaccharide: effect of carboxyl group and position of sulfation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhong; Du, Yumin; Huang, Ronghua; Wan, Yunyang; Wen, Yan

    2005-07-01

    Regiospecific oxidation of the primary hydroxyl groups in lacquer polysaccharide (LPL, Mw 6.85 x 10(4)) and its NaIO4 oxidation derivatives (LPLde) to C-6 carboxy groups was achieved with NaOCl in the presence of Tempo and NaBr. Sulfate groups were incorporated into the oxidated polysaccharides using Py.SO3 complex as a reagent. Reactivity of polysaccharide hydroxyl group was C-6 > C-2 > C-4. Sulfate groups were mainly linked to the second hydroxy at C-2 in the products. The results of APTT assay showed after incorporation of carboxyl groups into lacquer polysaccharides, the intrinsic coagulation pathway was promoted, and all sulfated polysaccharides had very weak anticoagulant activity within the scope of studied DS (0.39-1.11). These indicated that carboxyl groups and sulfate groups had the synergistic action. At the same time, the anticoagulant activity increased very slowly with the DS in the second hydroxy. This indicated that 6-O-SO3- in the side chains took an important role in the anticoagulant activity.

  4. Bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides as potent, selective, and functionally active CCR4 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cyrille F; Bazin, Marc; Philippe, Laurence; Zhang, Jiansu; Tylaska, Laurie; Miret, Juan; Bauer, Paul H

    2007-09-01

    A cell-based assay for the chemokine G-protein-coupled receptor CCR4 was developed, and used to screen a small-molecule compound collection in a multiplex format. A series of bipiperidinyl carboxylic acid amides amenable to parallel chemistry were derived that were potent and selective antagonists of CCR4. One prototype compound was shown to be active in a functional model of chemotaxis, making it a useful chemical tool to explore the role of CCR4 in asthma, allergy, diabetes, and cancer.

  5. “Fifty Shades” of Black and Red or How Carboxyl Groups Fine Tune Eumelanin and Pheomelanin Properties

    PubMed Central

    Micillo, Raffaella; Panzella, Lucia; Koike, Kenzo; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Napolitano, Alessandra; d’Ischia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of melanins have begun to disclose a number of important structure-property-function relationships of crucial relevance to the biological role of human pigments, including skin (photo) protection and UV-susceptibility. Even slight variations in the monomer composition of black eumelanins and red pheomelanins have been shown to determine significant differences in light absorption, antioxidant, paramagnetic and redox behavior, particle morphology, surface properties, metal chelation and resistance to photo-oxidative wear-and-tear. These variations are primarily governed by the extent of decarboxylation at critical branching points of the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways, namely the rearrangement of dopachrome to 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA), and the rearrangement of 5-S-cysteinyldopa o-quinoneimine to 1,4-benzothiazine (BTZ) and its 3-carboxylic acid (BTZCA). In eumelanins, the DHICA-to-DHI ratio markedly affects the overall antioxidant and paramagnetic properties of the resulting pigments. In particular, a higher content in DHICA decreases visible light absorption and paramagnetic response relative to DHI-based melanins, but markedly enhances antioxidant properties. In pheomelanins, likewise, BTZCA-related units, prevalently formed in the presence of zinc ions, appear to confer pronounced visible and ultraviolet A (UVA) absorption features, accounting for light-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas non-carboxylated benzothiazine intermediates seem to be more effective in inducing ROS production by redox cycling mechanisms in the dark. The possible biological and functional significance of carboxyl retention in the eumelanin and pheomelanin pathways is discussed. PMID:27196900

  6. Variation in optoelectronic properties of azo dye-sensitized TiO2 semiconductor interfaces with different adsorption anchors: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl and pyridyl groups.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M; Dai, Chencheng

    2014-05-28

    The optoelectronic properties of four azo dye-sensitized TiO2 interfaces are systematically studied as a function of a changing dye anchoring group: carboxylate, sulfonate, hydroxyl, and pyridyl. The variation in optoelectronic properties of the free dyes and those in dye/TiO2 nanocomposites are studied both experimentally and computationally, in the context of prospective dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. Experimental UV/vis absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and DSSC device performance testing reveal a strong dependence on the nature of the anchor of the optoelectronic properties of these dyes, both in solution and as dye/TiO2 nanocomposites. First-principles calculations on both an isolated dye/TiO2 cluster model (using localized basis sets) and each dye modeled onto the surface of a 2D periodic TiO2 nanostructure (using plane wave basis sets) are presented. Detailed examination of these experimental and computational results, in terms of light harvesting, electron conversion and photovoltaic device performance characteristics, indicates that carboxylate is the best anchoring group, and hydroxyl is the worst, whereas sulfonate and pyridyl groups exhibit competing potential. Different sensitization solvents are found to affect critically the extent of dye adsorption achieved in the dye-sensitization of the TiO2 semiconductor, especially where the anchor is a pyridyl group.

  7. New coumarin carboxylates having trifluoromethyl, diethylamino and morpholino terminal groups: Synthesis and mesomorphic characterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, Hosapalya Thimmaiah; Harishkumar, Hosanagara Narayana; Palakshamurthy, Bandrehalli Siddagangappa

    2017-03-01

    New set of trifluromethyl, diethylamino and morpholino derived coumarin compounds were prepared by reacting various coumarin 3-carboxylic acids with various phenyl esters with peripheral alkyl, ester and polar cyano moieties in the presence of EDC.HCl/DMAP as esterification agent. The chemical structures of new coumarin derivatives were confirmed by standard spectroscopic techniques and mesomorphic behaviours were established by polarised optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Trifluoromethane and morpholino derivatives show SmA/Nematic phase, while diethylamino derivatives did not show liquid crystalline property.

  8. Pd(II)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalizations Directed by Distal Weakly Coordinating Functional Groups

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Wan, Li; Zhang, Guofu; Leow, Dasheng; Spangler, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    Ortho-C(sp2)–H olefination and acetoxylation of broadly useful synthetic building blocks phenylacetyl Weinreb amides, esters, and ketones are developed without installing an additional directing group. The interplay between the distal weak coordination and the ligand-acceleration is crucial for these reactions to proceed under mild conditions. The tolerance of longer distance between the target C–H bonds and the directing functional groups also allows for the functionalizations of more distal C–H bonds in hydrocinnamoyl ketones, Weinreb amides and biphenyl Weinreb amides. Mechanistically, the coordination of these carbonyl groups and the bisdentate amino acid ligand with Pd(II) centers provides further evidence for our early hypothesis that the carbonyl groups of the potassium carboxylate is responsible for the directed C–H activation of carboxylic acids. PMID:25768039

  9. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Lassalas, Pierrik; Gay, Bryant; Lasfargeas, Caroline; James, Michael J; Tran, Van; Vijayendran, Krishna G; Brunden, Kurt R; Kozlowski, Marisa C; Thomas, Craig J; Smith, Amos B; Huryn, Donna M; Ballatore, Carlo

    2016-04-14

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure-property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group.

  10. Structure Property Relationships of Carboxylic Acid Isosteres

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a carboxylic acid with a surrogate structure, or (bio)-isostere, is a classical strategy in medicinal chemistry. The general underlying principle is that by maintaining the features of the carboxylic acid critical for biological activity, but appropriately modifying the physicochemical properties, improved analogs may result. In this context, a systematic assessment of the physicochemical properties of carboxylic acid isosteres would be desirable to enable more informed decisions of potential replacements to be used for analog design. Herein we report the structure–property relationships (SPR) of 35 phenylpropionic acid derivatives, in which the carboxylic acid moiety is replaced with a series of known isosteres. The data set generated provides an assessment of the relative impact on the physicochemical properties that these replacements may have compared to the carboxylic acid analog. As such, this study presents a framework for how to rationally apply isosteric replacements of the carboxylic acid functional group. PMID:26967507

  11. THz and mid-IR spectroscopy of interstellar ice analogs: methyl and carboxylic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Ioppolo, S; McGuire, B A; Allodi, M A; Blake, G A

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in astrochemistry concerns the synthesis and survival of complex organic molecules (COMs) throughout the process of star and planet formation. While it is generally accepted that most complex molecules and prebiotic species form in the solid phase on icy grain particles, a complete understanding of the formation pathways is still largely lacking. To take full advantage of the enormous number of available THz observations (e.g., Herschel Space Observatory, SOFIA, and ALMA), laboratory analogs must be studied systematically. Here, we present the THz (0.3-7.5 THz; 10-250 cm(-1)) and mid-IR (400-4000 cm(-1)) spectra of astrophysically-relevant species that share the same functional groups, including formic acid (HCOOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH), and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) and acetone ((CH3)2CO), compared to more abundant interstellar molecules such as water (H2O), methanol (CH3OH), and carbon monoxide (CO). A suite of pure and mixed binary ices are discussed. The effects on the spectra due to the composition and the structure of the ice at different temperatures are shown. Our results demonstrate that THz spectra are sensitive to reversible and irreversible transformations within the ice caused by thermal processing, suggesting that THz spectra can be used to study the composition, structure, and thermal history of interstellar ices. Moreover, the THz spectrum of an individual species depends on the functional group(s) within that molecule. Thus, future THz studies of different functional groups will help in characterizing the chemistry and physics of the interstellar medium (ISM).

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of novel dental monomer with branched carboxyl acid group

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linyong; Ye, Qiang; Ge, Xueping; Misra, Anil; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Berrie, Cynthia L.; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the water miscibility and increase the mechanical properties of dentin adhesives, a new glycerol-based monomer with vinyl and carboxylic acid, 4-((1,3-bis(-methacryloyloxy)propan-2-yl)oxy)-2-methylene-4-oxobutanoic acid (BMPMOB), was synthesized and characterized. Dentin adhesive formulations containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (BisGMA), and BMPMOB were characterized with regard to real-time photopolymerization behavior, water sorption, dynamic mechanical analysis, and microscale three-dimensional internal morphologies and compared with HEMA/BisGMA controls. The experimental adhesive copolymers showed higher glass transition temperature and rubbery moduli, as well as improved water miscibility compared to the controls. The enhanced properties of the adhesive copolymers indicated that BMPMOB is a promising comonomer for dental restorative materials. PMID:24596134

  13. Synthesis of a novel poly-thiolated magnetic nano-platform for heavy metal adsorption. Role of thiol and carboxyl functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odio, Oscar F.; Lartundo-Rojas, Luis; Palacios, Elia Guadalupe; Martínez, Ricardo; Reguera, Edilso

    2016-11-01

    We report a novel strategy for the synthesis of magnetic nano-platforms containing free thiol groups. It first involves the synthesis of a poly(acrylic acid) copolymer containing disulfide bridges between the linear chains through di-ester linkages, followed by the anchoring of this new ligand to magnetite nanoparticles using a ligand exchange reaction. Finally, free sbnd SH groups are obtained by treating the resulting disulfide-functionalized magnetic nano-system with tributyl phosphine as reducing agent. The characterization of the resulting 17 nm nanoparticles (Fe3O4@PAA-HEDred) by FTIR and TGA confirms the attachment of the copolymer through iron carboxylates. XRD, TEM and magnetic measurements indicate an increase in the inorganic core diameter and the occurrence of strong magnetic inter-particle interactions during the exchange reaction, although coercitivity and remanence drop to near zero at room temperature. Afterwards, Fe3O4@PAA-HEDred nanoparticles were tested as sorbent for Pb2+ and Cd2+ cations in aqueous media. XPS measurements were performed in order to unravel the role of both carboxyl and thiol functions in the adsorption process. For the sake of comparison, the same study was performed using bare Fe3O4 nanoparticles and a nanosystem with disulfide groups (Fe3O4@DMSA). The joint analysis of the Pb 4f, Cd 3d, Fe 2p and S 2p high resolution spectra for the nanostructured materials indicates that metal-sulfur interactions are dominant if free sbnd SH groups are present, but if not, the main adsorption route entails metal-carboxyl interactions. Even in presence of unbound thiol moieties, carboxyl groups participate due to favoured steric availability.

  14. Carboxylate-assisted ruthenium-catalyzed alkyne annulations by C-H/Het-H bond functionalizations.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Lutz

    2014-02-18

    To improve the atom- and step-economy of organic syntheses, researchers would like to capitalize upon the chemistry of otherwise inert carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds. During the past decade, remarkable progress in organometallic chemistry has set the stage for the development of increasingly viable metal catalysts for C-H bond activation reactions. Among these methods, oxidative C-H bond functionalizations are particularly attractive because they avoid the use of prefunctionalized starting materials. For example, oxidative annulations that involve sequential C-H and heteroatom-H bond cleavages allow for the modular assembly of regioselectively decorated heterocycles. These structures serve as key scaffolds for natural products, functional materials, crop protecting agents, and drugs. While other researchers have devised rhodium or palladium complexes for oxidative alkyne annulations, my laboratory has focused on the application of significantly less expensive, yet highly selective ruthenium complexes. This Account summarizes the evolution of versatile ruthenium(II) complexes for annulations of alkynes via C-H/N-H, C-H/O-H, or C-H/N-O bond cleavages. To achieve selective C-H bond functionalizations, we needed to understand the detailed mechanism of the crucial C-H bond metalation with ruthenium(II) complexes and particularly the importance of carboxylate assistance in this process. As a consequence, our recent efforts have resulted in widely applicable methods for the versatile preparation of differently decorated arenes and heteroarenes, providing access to among others isoquinolones, 2-pyridones, isoquinolines, indoles, pyrroles, or α-pyrones. Most of these reactions used Cu(OAc)2·H2O, which not only acted as the oxidant but also served as the essential source of acetate for the carboxylate-assisted ruthenation manifold. Notably, the ruthenium(II)-catalyzed oxidative annulations also occurred under an ambient atmosphere of air with cocatalytic amounts of Cu(OAc)2

  15. Synthesis and characterization of bifunctional surfaces with tunable functional group pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, John M.; Kung, Mayfair; Kung, Harold H.

    2016-06-01

    Grafting of pairs of functional groups onto a silica surface was demonstrated by tethering both terminals of an organochlorosilane precursor molecule, Cl2(CH3)Si(CH2)4(CO)(OSi(i-Pr)2)(CH2)2Si(CH3)Cl2, that possess a cleavable silyl ester bond, onto a silica surface. Hydrolytic cleavage of the silyl ester bond of the grafted molecule resulted in the generation of organized pairs of carboxylic acid and organosilanol groups. This organosilanol moiety was easily transformed into other functional groups through condensation reactions to form, together with the neighboring acid group, pairs such as carboxylic acid/secondary amine, carboxylic acid/pyridine, and carboxylic acid/phosphine. In the case of carboxylic acid/amine pairing, there was evidence of the formation of amide. A sample grafted with amine-carboxylic acid pairs was three times more active (per free amine) than a sample without such pairs for the nitroaldol condensation of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and nitromethane.

  16. Functional calcium release channel formed by the carboxyl-terminal portion of ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, M B; Zhao, J; Takeshima, H; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is one of the key proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in skeletal muscle, where it functions as a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. RyR consists of a single polypeptide of approximately 560 kDa normally arranged in a homotetrameric structure, which contains a carboxyl (C)-terminal transmembrane domain and a large amino (N)-terminal cytoplasmic domain. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal portion of RyR is sufficient to form a Ca2+ release channel, we expressed the full-length (RyR-wt) and C-terminal (RyR-C, approximately 130 kDa) RyR proteins in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and measured their Ca2+ release channel functions in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The single-channel properties of RyR-wt were found to be similar to those of RyR from skeletal muscle SR. The RyR-C protein forms a cation-selective channel that shares some of the channel properties with RyR-wt, including activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+ and regulation by ryanodine. Unlike RyR-wt, which exhibits a linear current-voltage relationship and inactivates at millimolar Ca2+, the channels formed by RyR-C display significant inward rectification and fail to close at high cytoplasmic Ca2+. Our results show that the C-terminal portion of RyR contains structures sufficient to form a functional Ca2+ release channel, but the N-terminal portion of RyR also affects the ion-conduction and calcium-dependent regulation of the Ca2+ release channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9284301

  17. Carboxyl-functionalized magnetic microparticle carrier for isolation and identification of DNA in dairy products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horák, Daniel; Rittich, Bohuslav; Španová, Alena

    2007-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles about 14 nm in diameter were obtained by chemical coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with aqueous ammonia in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) microspheres about 1 μm in diameter were prepared by dispersion polymerization of GMA in aqueous ethanol in the presence of PEG-coated magnetite nanoparticles. The microspheres were hydrolyzed and carboxyl groups introduced by oxidation with KMnO4. The particles reversibly bound bacterial DNA of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genera in the presence of high concentrations of PEG 6000 and sodium chloride from crude cell lysates of various dairy products (butter milk, cheese, yoghurt, probiotic tablets) or from cell lyophilisates. The presence of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus DNA in samples was confirmed by PCR amplification.

  18. Study on Utilization of Carboxyl Group Decorated Carbon Nanotubes and Carbonation Reaction for Improving Strengths and Microstructures of Cement Paste

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiantong; Cui, Hongzhi; Qin, Qinghua; Tang, Waiching; Zhou, Xiangming

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have excellent mechanical properties and can be used to reinforce cement-based materials. On the other hand, the reaction product of carbonation with hydroxides in hydrated cement paste can reduce the porosity of cement-based materials. In this study, a novel method to improve the strength of cement paste was developed through a synergy of carbon nanotubes decorated with carboxyl group and carbonation reactions. The experimental results showed that the carboxyl group (–COOH) of decorated carbon nanotubes and the surfactant can control the morphology of the calcium carbonate crystal of carbonation products in hydrated cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals showed great morphological differences from those observed in the conventional carbonation of cement paste. The spindle-like calcium carbonate crystals can serve as fiber-like reinforcements to reinforce the cement paste. By the synergy of the carbon nanotubes and carbonation reactions, the compressive and flexural strengths of cement paste were significantly improved and increased by 14% and 55%, respectively, when compared to those of plain cement paste. PMID:28335281

  19. Enzymatic grafting of carboxyl groups on to chitosan--to confer on chitosan the property of a cationic dye adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chao, An-Chong; Shyu, Shin-Shing; Lin, Yu-Chuang; Mi, Fwu-Long

    2004-01-01

    Chitosan (CTS) is a good adsorbent for dyes but lacks the ability to adsorb cationic dyes. In this study, chitosan was modified to possess the ability to adsorb cationic dyes from water. Four kinds of phenol derivatives: 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (BA), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DBA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-acetic acid (PA), hydrocaffeic acid (CA) were used individually as substrates of tyrosinase to graft onto chitosan. FTIR analysis provided supporting evidence of phenol derivatives being grafted. The grafting amounts of these phenol derivatives onto chitosan were examined by the adsorption of an anionic dye (amaranth) and reached a plateau value. The final contents of carboxyl groups in chitosan (mmol carboxyl groups per kg chitosan) were measured as 46.36 for BA, 70.32 for DBA, 106.44 for PA, and 113.15 for CA. These modified chitosans were used in experiments on uptake of the cationic dyes crystal violet (CV) and bismarck brown Y (BB) by a batch adsorption technique at pH 7 for CV and at pH 9 for BB and 30 degrees C. Langmuir type adsorption was found, and the maximum adsorption capacities for both dyes were increased with the following order CTS-CA>CTS-PA>CTS-DBA>CTS-BA.

  20. The mixing effect of amine and carboxyl groups on electrorheological properties and its analysis by in situ FT-IR under an electric field.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Gun; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Park, Yong Sung; Woo, Je Wan; Choi, Ung Su

    2013-10-21

    Herein, the mixing effect of amine and carboxyl groups on electrorheological (ER) properties has been presented with the chitosan and alginic acid dispersed suspensions. Chitosan (for the amine group) and alginic acid (for the carboxyl group) are used to investigate the mixing effect of the amine and carboxyl groups on ER properties with the control of their mixing ratio in the silicone oil. The surface-chemical structure of the mixture of the chitosan and alginic acid particles in the silicone oil is demonstrated by in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy at various electric fields for the first time. This study focuses on whether the mixture of chemical groups in the ER fluid can promote ER properties or not, and in situ FT-IR analysis of the interface between ER particles in the silicone oil at various DC electric fields. The ER fluids exhibited the increase of the yield stress values with the increase of the counter group addition up to the weight ratio of 50 : 50 (chitosan : alginic acid). A noteworthy result is that the mixing effect of the amine and carboxyl groups resulting in enhanced ER properties is clearly proved. In the in situ FT-IR study, the complex form of amine and carboxyl groups of particles in the ER fluid was confirmed under the electric field.

  1. [Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on titanium surface with bioactive water-soluble copolymers bearing sulfonate, phosphate or carboxylate functions].

    PubMed

    Poussard, L; Ouédraogo, C P; Pavon-Djavid, G; Migonney, V

    2012-04-01

    Implanted prostheses are sometimes subject to bacterial infections, which can threat their benefit rule on a long-term basis. Various methods are studied to fight against these infections. Among them, the grafting of bioactive polymers onto the prosthesis surface shows up as a promising way to the problem of infections. This work presents the influence of various water-soluble bioactive polymers on the inhibition of the Staphylococcus epidermidis adhesion on the titanium samples surfaces initially preadsorbed with various proteins. Whatever the studied protein is, it is shown that the bioactive polymer containing sulfonate functions generates an inhibition of the adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis. For a plasma preadsorption, the inhibition rate rises up to 68% when the concentration of sulfonate function is 2.5μmol/L. Titanium surfaces grafted with the bioactive polymer were also tested. We find an inhibitive activity of the adhesion close to that of the previous case. These preliminary results can point up a clinical interest in the fight against the medical devices infection, because they highlight a clear local effect of S. epidermidis adhesion inhibition. Copolymers containing other functional groups (phosphate or carboxylate) were dissolved in a bacterial suspension to monitor the influence of the composition on the adhesion inhibition. Their inhibition rates are not significantly lower than those of pNaSS homopolymers, as much as the sulfonate function proportion remains higher than 50%. Thus, the sulfonate function is the main responsible for the inhibition of the S. epidermidis adhesion.

  2. Carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide composites as SPR biosensors with enhanced sensitivity for immunoaffinity detection.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Nan-Fu; Fan, Shi-Yuan; Yang, Cheng-Du; Huang, Teng-Yi

    2017-03-15

    This work demonstrates the excellent potential of carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-COOH) composites to form biocompatible surfaces on sensing films for use in surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based immunoaffinity biosensors. Carboxyl-functionalization of graphene carbon can modulate its visible spectrum, and can therefore be used to improve and control the plasmonic coupling mechanism. The binding properties of the molecules between a sensing film and a protein were elucidated at various flow rates of those molecules. The bio-specific binding interaction among the molecules was investigated by performing an antigen and antibody affinity immunoassay. The results thus obtained revealed that the overall affinity binding value, KA, of the Au/GO-COOH chip can be significantly enhanced by up to ∼5.15 times that of the Au/GO chip. With respect to the shifts of the SPR angles of the chips, the affinity immunoassay interaction at a BSA concentration of 1μg/ml for an Au/GO-COOH chip, an Au/GO chip and a traditional SPR chip are 35.5m°, 9.128m° and 8.816m°, respectively. The enhancement of the antigen-antibody interaction of the Au/GO-COOH chip cause this chip to become four times as sensitive to the SPR angle shift and to have the lowest antibody detection limit of 0.01pg/ml. These results indicate the potential of the chip in detecting specific proteins, and the development of real-time in vivo blood analysis and diagnosis based on cancer tumor markers.

  3. A new fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic groups for use in dental adhesive compositions.

    PubMed

    Buruiana, Tinca; Melinte, Violeta; Aldea, Horia; Pelin, Irina M; Buruiana, Emil C

    2016-05-01

    A urethane macromer containing hexafluoroisopropylidene, poly(ethylene oxide) and carboxylic moieties (UF-DMA) was synthesized and used in proportions varying between 15 and 35 wt.% (F1-F3) in dental adhesive formulations besides BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The FTIR and (1)H ((13)C) NMR spectra confirmed the chemical structure of the UF-DMA. The experimental adhesives were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion, water sorption/solubility, contact angle, diffusion coefficient, Vickers hardness, and morphology of the crosslinked networks and compared with the specimens containing 10 wt.% hydroxyapatite (HAP) or calcium phosphate (CaP). The conversion degree (after 180 s of irradiation with visible light) ranged from 59.5% (F1) to 74.8% (F3), whereas the water sorption was between 23.15 μg mm(-3) (F1) and 40.52 μg mm(-3) (F3). Upon the addition of HAP or CaP this parameter attained values of 37.82-49.14 μg mm(-3) (F1-F3-HAP) and 34.58-45.56 μg mm(-3), respectively. Also, the formation of resin tags through the infiltration of a dental composition (F3) was visualized by SEM analysis. The results suggest that UF-DMA taken as co-monomer in dental adhesives of acrylic type may provide improved properties in the moist environment of the mouth.

  4. Synthesis, structural characterization and antimicrobial activities of diorganotin(IV) complexes with azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand: Crystal structure and topological study of a doubly phenoxide-bridged dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Manojit; Roy, Subhadip; Devi, N. Manglembi; Singh, Ch. Brajakishor; Singh, Keisham Surjit

    2016-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) complexes appended with free carboxylic acids were synthesized by reacting diorganotin(IV) dichlorides [R2SnCl2; R = Me (1), Bu (2) and Ph (3)] with an azo-imino carboxylic acid ligand i.e. 2-{4-hydroxy-3-[(2-hydroxyphenylimino)methyl]phenylazo}benzoic acid in presence of triethylamine. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 119Sn) spectroscopy. The structure of 1 in solid state has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Crystal structure of 1 reveals that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c and is a dimeric dimethyltin(IV) complex appended with free carboxylic acid groups. In the structure of 1, the Sn(IV) atoms are hexacoordinated and have a distorted octahedral coordination geometry in which two phenoxy oxygen atoms and the azomethine nitrogen atom of the ligand coordinate to each tin atom. One of the phenoxy oxygen atom bridges the two tin centers resulting in a planar Sn2O2 core. Topological analysis is used for the description of molecular packing in 1. Tin NMR spectroscopy study indicates that the complexes have five coordinate geometry around tin atom in solution state. Since the complexes have free carboxylic acids, these compounds could be further used as potential metallo-ligands for the synthesis of other complexes. The synthesized diorganotin(IV) complexes were also screened for their antimicrobial activities and compound 2 showed effective antimicrobial activities.

  5. An active-site peptide containing the second essential carboxyl group of dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides by chemical modifications.

    PubMed

    Funane, K; Shiraiwa, M; Hashimoto, K; Ichishima, E; Kobayashi, M

    1993-12-14

    The treatment of Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F dextransucrase with 10 mM 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide (EDC) and glycine ethyl ester (GEE) inactivated the enzyme almost completely within 24 min where the modification of one carboxyl group/mol of the enzyme by EDC was attained. Though 30 mM diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEP) also inactivated the enzyme, about 35% of the activity remained during a 36-min incubation. When 10 mol of imidazole residues/mol of the enzyme was modified by DEP, 50% of the activity was still retained. The addition of the substrate sucrose greatly retarded the enzyme inactivation by EDC. However, the addition of dextran slightly protected the inactivation of the glucosyl-transferring activity and accelerated the inactivation of the sucrose-cleaving activity. In the case of DEP, the addition of sucrose or dextran gave no influence on the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, the carboxyl group seemed to play a more important role in the substrate binding and in the catalytic activity of the dextransucrase than the imidazolium group. Differential labeling of Leuconostoc dextransucrase by EDC was conducted in the presence of a sucrose analog, sucrose monocaprate. The fluorescent probe N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (EDAN) was used as the nucleophile instead of GEE. A fluorescent labeled peptide was isolated from a trypsin digest of the EDC-EDAN modified enzyme. The amino acid sequence of the isolated peptide was Leu-Gln-Glu-Asp-Asn-Ser-Asn-Val-Val-Val-Glu-Ala.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Accessibility and ion exchange stoichiometry of ionized carboxylic groups in the active layer of FT30 reverse osmosis membrane.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; Mariñas, Benito I; Cahill, David G

    2009-07-01

    We have experimentally determined the concentration of Ba2+ that associates with the accessible ionized R-COO- groups in the polyamide active layer of the FT30 reverse osmosis membrane in the pH range 3.42-10.30. Ba2+ concentrations in the active layer ([Ba2+]) were measured using the ion-probing/Rutherford backscattering spectrometry procedure reported in our previous work. We found that at all but the lowest experimental pH 3.42, [Ba2+] was lower than the corresponding total concentrations of R-COO- groups; their difference was consistent with steric and charge effects determining the accessibility and association, respectively, of Ba2+ to R-COO- groups. Accordingly, we propose two descriptors, the accessibility ratio (AR) and the neutralization number (NN), to account for the observed difference. AR, the fraction of R-COO- groups accessible to Ba2+ ions, and NN, the average number of R-COO- groups neutralized per Ba2+ ion, were determined experimentally performing Ag(+)-Ba2+ ion-exchange tests. The resulting AR = 0.40 indicated that on average only 40% of ionizable carboxylic groups were accessible to Ba2+. [Ba2+] values calculated using R-COO- concentrations and the AR and NN concepts were in agreement with experimental [Ba2+] results.

  7. A functional model of extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases: mimicking the 2-his-1-carboxylate facial triad.

    PubMed

    Paria, Sayantan; Halder, Partha; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2010-05-17

    The synthesis and characterization of an iron-catecholate model complex of a tridentate 2-N-1-carboxylate ligand derived from L-proline are reported. The X-ray crystal structure of the complex [(L)(3)Fe(3)(DBC)(3)] (1) (where L is 1-(2-pyridylmethyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylate and DBC is the dianion of 3,5-di-tert-butyl catechol) reveals that the tridentate ligand binds to the iron center in a facial manner and mimics the 2-his-1-carboxylate facial triad motif observed in extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases. The iron(III)-catecholate complex (1) reacts with dioxygen in acetonitrile in ambient conditions to cleave the C-C bond of catecholate. In the reaction, an equal amount of extra- and intradiol cleavage products are formed without any auto-oxidation product. The iron-catecholate complex is a potential functional model of extradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenases.

  8. Heterogeneous expression and functional relevance of the ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wulfänger, Jens; Biehl, Katharina; Tetzner, Anja; Wild, Peter; Ikenberg, Kristian; Meyer, Stefanie; Seliger, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    The expression of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) is deregulated in human cancer cells with tumor inhibiting or promoting functions. Due to less knowledge on the role of UCHL1 in melanoma progression, the expression pattern and function of UCHL1 as well as the deregulated signaling pathways were characterized. A large number of melanoma cell lines, tissue microarrays of melanoma lesions and control tissues were analyzed for UCHL1 expression using PCR, Western blot and/or immunohistochemistry. The analysis revealed that melanocyte cultures, 24 of 331 melanoma lesions, two of 18 short-term cultures and two of 19 melanoma cell lines tested, respectively, heterogeneously expressed UCHL1. The low frequency of UCHL1 expression in melanoma cells was due to gene silencing by promoter DNA hypermethylation. Using different transfection models an enzyme activity-dependent growth promoting function of UCHL1 via the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway was found in melanoma cells. Under oxygen stress a dose-dependent effect of UCHL1 was detected, which was mediated by a dynamic modification of the PI3K-Akt signaling. Thus, the aberrant UCHL1 expression in melanoma cells is linked to dynamic changes in growth properties and signal transduction cascades suggesting that UCHL1 provides a novel marker and/or therapeutic target at least for a subset of melanoma patients.

  9. Carboxyl-terminal modulator protein induces apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial function in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soon-Kyung; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Kee-Ho; Park, Jongsun; Beck, George R; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-05-01

    Serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is involved in cell survival and growth. Carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP), a novel Akt binding partner, prevents Akt activation at the plasma membrane in response to various stimuli, and thus possesses a tumor suppressor-like function. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that CTMP inhibits tumor progression by facilitating apoptosis in a mouse lung cancer model. However, the precise mechanism of CTMP-induced apoptosis remains to be elucidated. The present study was performed to examine the role of CTMP in mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and regulation of mitochondrial function in human lung carcinoma cells. Our results showed that CTMP altered mitochondrial morphology and caused the release of cytochrome c by inhibiting OPA1 expression. Additionally, CTMP facilitated mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting heat-shock protein 27 and preventing cytochrome c interaction with Apaf-1. Our data suggest that CTMP may therefore play a critical role in mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

  10. Phosphorescent biscyclometallated iridium(III) ethylenediamine complexes functionalised with polar ester or carboxylate groups as bioimaging and visualisation reagents.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tommy Siu-Ming; Leung, Kam-Keung; Louie, Man-Wai; Liu, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Shuk Han; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2015-03-21

    We report the synthesis, characterisation and photophysical properties of new phosphorescent biscyclometallated iridium(III) ethylenediamine (en) complexes functionalised with polar ester or carboxylate groups [Ir(N^C)2(en)](n)(X) (n = +1, X = Cl(-), HN^C = methyl 4-(2-pyridyl)benzoate Hppy-COOMe (1a), methyl 2-phenyl-4-quinolinecarboxylate Hpq-COOMe (2a); n = -1, X = Li(+), HN^C = 4-(2-pyridyl)benzoate Hppy-COO(-) (1b), 2-phenyl-4-quinolinecarboxylate Hpq-COO(-) (2b)). In aqueous solutions, the carboxylate complexes 1b and 2b displayed emission quenching (ca. 7 and 74 fold, respectively) and lifetime shortening upon protonation, and their pKa values were determined to be 5.13 and 3.46, respectively. The pq complexes 2a and 2b exhibited hypsochromic shifts in their emission maxima and a significant increase in emission intensity (ca. 84 and 15 fold, respectively) upon nonspecific binding to the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) results revealed that the ester complexes 1a and 2a were efficiently internalised by the human cervix epithelioid carcinoma (HeLa) cells through energy-requiring pathways and subsequently localised in endosomes and mitochondria, respectively. They showed good biocompatibility in the dark, but became significantly cytotoxic upon photoirradiation due to the generation of singlet oxygen. In contrast, in aqueous solutions of physiological pH, the carboxylate complexes 1b and 2b existed as the anionic form and hardly entered cells due to limited membrane permeability, as evidenced by the intense emission surrounding the plasma membrane of the cells. They showed negligible cytotoxicity and the cell viability remained over 95% for an incubation period of 24 hours. In view of the low cytotoxicity and strongly emissive nature of the hydrophilic ppy-COO(-) complex 1b in an aqueous medium, the potential application of the complex as a visualisation

  11. Importance of the carboxyl terminus in the folding and function of alpha-hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Sangha, N; Kaur, S; Sharma, V; Krishnasastry, M V

    1999-04-02

    The physical state of two model mutants of alpha-hemolysin (alphaHL), alphaHL(1-289), a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (CDM), and alphaHL(1-331), a carboxyl-terminal extension mutant (CEM), were examined in detail to identify the role of the carboxyl terminus in the folding and function of native alphaHL. Denatured alphaHL can be refolded efficiently with nearly total recovery of its activity upon restoration of nondenaturing conditions. Various biophysical and biochemical studies on the three proteins have revealed the importance of an intact carboxyl terminus in the folding of alphaHL. The CDM exhibits a marked increase in susceptibility to proteases as compared with alphaHL. alphaHL and CEM exhibit similar fluorescence emission maxima, and that of the CDM is red-shifted by 9 nm, which indicates a greater solvent exposure of the tryptophan residues of the CDM. In addition, the CDM binds 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) and increases its fluorescence intensity significantly unlike alphaHL and CEM, which show marginal binding. The circular dichroism studies point that the CDM possesses significant secondary structure, but its tertiary structure is greatly diminished as compared with alphaHL. These data show that the CDM has several of the features that characterize a molten globule state. Experiments with freshly translated mutants, using coupled in vitro transcription and translation, have further supported our observations that deletion at the carboxyl terminus leads to major structural perturbations in the water-soluble form of alphaHL. The studies demonstrate a critical role of the carboxyl terminus of alphaHL in attaining the native folded state.

  12. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotube-functionalized chiral polymer monoliths for affinity capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunyue; Bai, Ruihan; Xu, Shujuan; Hong, Tingting; Ji, Yibing

    2017-03-03

    Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (c-SWNTs) were incorporated into poly(glycidylmethacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) [poly(GMA-co-EDMA)] monoliths to develop a novel monolithic stationary phase for capillary electrochromatography. The prepared monoliths were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption. Additionally, pepsin, which is a chiral selector, was bonded to the c-SWNT-incorporated monoliths via epoxide groups as reactive sites and glutaraldehyde as the spacer. The effects of the c-SWNT concentration on chiral separation were investigated, and the results suggested that the c-SWNTs played a significant role in improving the separation efficiency, although pepsin was the dominant element in determining the chiral recognition ability of the monolith. Moreover, the influences of buffer pH, operating voltage and sample volume were also studied with (±)-nefopam as a model drug. Under the optimized conditions, the pepsin-modified poly(GMA-c-SWNTs-EDMA) monolith exhibited excellent enantioseparation performance for ten pairs of basic chiral drugs and extended the scope of chiral separation of drug enantiomers.

  13. Comparative Study on Single-Molecule Junctions of Alkane- and Benzene-Based Molecules with Carboxylic Acid/Aldehyde as the Anchoring Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Peng, Lin-Lu; Hong, Ze-Wen; Mao, Jin-Chuan; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Shao, Yong; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2016-08-01

    We have measured the alkane and benzene-based molecules with aldehyde and carboxylic acid as anchoring groups by using the electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The results show that molecule with benzene backbone has better peak shape and intensity than those with alkane backbone. Typically, high junction formation probability for same anchoring group (aldehyde and carboxylic acid) with benzene backbone is found, which contributes to the stronger attractive interaction between Cu and molecules with benzene backbone. The present work shows the import role of backbone in junction, which can guide the design molecule to form effective junction for studying molecular electronics.

  14. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    DOE PAGES

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; ...

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to usemore » in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.« less

  15. A simple colorimetric chemosensor bearing a carboxylic acid group with high selectivity for CN-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyeong Jin; Choi, Ye Won; Lee, Dongkuk; Kim, Cheal

    2014-11-01

    A new simple ‘naked eye' chemosensor 1 (sodium (E)-2-((2-(3-hydroxy-2-naphthoyl)hydrazono)methyl)benzoate) has been synthesized for detection of CN- in a mixture of DMF/H2O (9:1). The sensor 1 comprises of a naphthoic hydrazide as efficient hydrogen bonding donor group and a benzoic acid as the moiety with the water solubility. The receptor 1 showed high selectivity toward cyanide ions in a 1:1 stoichiometric manner, which induces a fast color change from colorless to yellow for CN- over other anions. Therefore, receptor 1 could be useful for cyanide detection in aqueous environment, displaying a high distinguishable selectivity from hydrogen bonded anions and being clearly visible to the naked eye.

  16. Kinetics of the esterification of active pharmaceutical ingredients containing carboxylic acid functionality in polyethylene glycol: formulation implications.

    PubMed

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Moesgaard, Birthe; Østergaard, Jesper

    2014-08-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are attractive as excipients in the manufacture of drug products because they are water soluble and poorly immunogenic. They are used in various pharmaceutical preparations. However, because of their terminal hydroxyl groups, PEGs can participate in esterification reactions. In this study, kinetics of two active pharmaceutical ingredients, cetirizine and indomethacin possessing carboxylic acid functionality, has been studied in PEG 400 and PEG 1000 at 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C, and 80 °C. HPLC-UV was applied for the determination of concentrations in the kinetic studies, whereas HPLC-MS was used to identify reaction products. The esterification reactions were observed to be reversible. A second-order reversible kinetic model was applied and rate constants were determined. The rate constants demonstrated that cetirizine was esterified about 240 times faster than indomethacin at 80 °C. The shelf-life for cetirizine in a PEG 400 formulation at 25 °C expressed as t(95%) was predicted to be only 30 h. Further, rate constants for esterification of cetirizine in PEG 1000 in relation to PEG 400 decreased by a factor of 10, probably related to increased viscosity. However, it is important to be aware of this drug-excipient interaction, as it can reduce the shelf-life of a low-average molecular weight PEG formulation considerably.

  17. Optical behaviour of functional groups of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanam, Pavan K.; Sankaran, K.

    2016-10-01

    Optical properties of graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in aqueous medium with aging and pH variations were investigated along with concurrent changes of oxygen functional groups of GO. Freshly prepared GO exhibit strong excitation wavelength dependent luminescence, which gets gradually nullified with aging due to the drastic reduction in fraction of polar hydroxyl groups. Fourier transform infrared studies indicated that functional groups of GO undergo spontaneous modification with aging in aqueous medium, resulting in suppression of epoxide groups and enriched adsorption of water molecules. When the pH of GO dispersed in aqueous medium was varied, unique transformations of functional groups take place causing major disruption to the sp2 hybridised carbon domains of GO. Concurrent changes in luminescence of GO infer that the broad emission from freshly prepared GO has large contribution from disorder induced localised states due to hydroxyl, epoxide, carboxyl groups and changes in relative fractions of these groups with aging and pH variations of GO dispersions strongly influence the intensity as well as emission wavelength region of GO. Especially emission features of GO are strongly influenced by the presence, fraction and transformations of epoxide and hydroxyl groups of GO.

  18. Polymethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid coatings with controllable concentration of surface carboxyl groups: A novel approach in fabrication of polymeric platforms for potential bio-diagnostic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Samira; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Djordjevic, Ivan; Koole, Leo H.

    2014-05-01

    The generally accepted strategy in development of bio-diagnostic devices is to immobilize proteins on polymeric surfaces as a part of detection process for diseases and viruses through antibody/antigen coupling. In that perspective, polymer surface properties such as concentration of functional groups must be closely controlled in order to preserve the protein activity. In order to improve the surface characteristics of transparent polymethacrylate plastics that are used for diagnostic devices, we have developed an effective fabrication procedure of polymethylmetacrylate-co-metacrylic acid (PMMA-co-MAA) coatings with controlled number of surface carboxyl groups. The polymers were processed effectively with the spin-coating technique and the detailed control over surface properties is here by demonstrated through the variation of a single synthesis reaction parameter. The chemical structure of synthesized and processed co-polymers has been investigated with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS). The surface morphology of polymer coatings have been analyzed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We demonstrate that the surface morphology and the concentration of surface -COOH groups (determined with UV-vis surface titration) on the processed PMMA-co-MAA coatings can be precisely controlled by variation of initial molar ratio of reactants in the free-radical polymerization reaction. The wettability of developed polymer surfaces also varies with macromolecular structure.

  19. Influence of carboxylic acid functionalization on the cytotoxic effects induced by single wall carbon nanotubes on human endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Pichardo, Silvia; Sánchez, Elena; Grilo, Antonio; Cameán, Ana Maria; Jos, Angeles

    2011-12-01

    A vast variety of nanomaterials have been developed in the recent years, being carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the ones that have attracted more attention, due to its unique properties which make them suitable for numerous applications. Consequently, it is predicted that tons of CNTs will be produced worldwide every year, being its exposure of toxicological concern. Nanomaterials, once into the body, can translocate from the uptake sites to the blood circulation or the lymphatic system, resulting in distribution throughout the body. Thus, the vascular endothelium can be in contact with them and can suffer from their toxic effects. In this regard, the aim of this work was to investigate the cytotoxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on human endothelial cells evaluating the influence of acid carboxylic functionalization and also the exposure time (24 and 48 h). Biomarkers assessed were neutral red uptake, protein content, a tetrazolium salt metabolization and cell viability by means of the Trypan blue exclusion test. Cells were exposed to concentrations between 0 and 800 μg/mL SWCNTs for 24 and 48 h. Results have shown that both SWCNTs and carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-SWCNTs) induce toxic effects in HUVEC cells in a concentration- and time-dependent way. Moreover, the carboxylic acid functionalization results in a higher toxicity compared to the SWCNTs.

  20. Chemical reactions in dense monolayers: in situ thermal cleavage of grafted esters for preparation of solid surfaces functionalized with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Vincent; Chevalier, Yves

    2011-12-06

    The thermodynamics of a chemical reaction confined at a solid surface was investigated through kinetic measurements of a model unimolecular reaction. The thermal cleavage of ester groups grafted at the surface of solid silica was investigated together with complementary physicochemical characterization of the grafted species. The ester molecules were chemically grafted to the silica surface and subsequently cleaved into the carboxylic acids. A grafting process of a reproducible monolayer was designed using the reaction of monofunctional organosilane from its gas phase. The thermal deprotection step of the ester end-group was investigated. The thermal deprotection reaction behaves in quite a specific manner when it is conducted at a surface in a grafted layer. Different organosilane molecules terminated by methyl, isopropyl and tert-butyl ester groups were grafted to silica surface; such functionalized materials were characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, and the thermodynamic parameters of the thermal elimination reaction at the surface were measured. The limiting factor of such thermal ester cleavage reaction is the thermal stability of grafted ester group according to the temperature order: tert-butyl < i-propyl < methyl. Methyl ester groups were not selectively cleaved by temperature. The thermal deprotection of i-propyl ester groups took place at a temperature close to the thermal degradation of the organofunctional tail of the silane. The low thermolysis temperature of the grafted tert-butyl esters allowed their selective cleavage. There is a definite influence of the surface on the reaction. The enthalpy of activation is lower than in the gas phase because of the polarity of the reaction site. The major contribution is entropic; the negative entropy of activation comes from lateral interactions with the neighbor grafted molecules because of the high grafting density. Such reaction is an original strategy

  1. Floral Benzenoid Carboxyl Methyltransferases: From in Vitro to in Planta Function

    SciTech Connect

    Effmert,U.; Saschenbrecker, S.; Ross, J.; Negre, F.; Fraser, C.; Noel, J.; Dudareva, N.; Piechulla, B.

    2005-01-01

    Benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases synthesize methyl esters (e.g., methyl benzoate and methyl salicylate), which are constituents of aromas and scents of many plant species and play important roles in plant communication with the surrounding environment. Within the past five years, eleven such carboxyl methyltransferases were isolated and most of them were comprehensively investigated at the biochemical, molecular and structural level. Two types of enzymes can be distinguished according to their substrate preferences: the SAMT-type enzymes isolated from Clarkia breweri, Stephanotis floribunda, Antirrhinum majus, Hoya carnosa, and Petunia hybrida, which have a higher catalytic efficiency and preference for salicylic acid, while BAMT-type enzymes from A. majus, Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Nicotiana suaveolens prefer benzoic acid. The elucidation of C. breweri SAMT's three-dimensional structure allowed a detailed modelling of the active sites of the carboxyl methyltransferases and revealed that the SAM binding pocket is highly conserved among these enzymes while the methyl acceptor binding site exhibits some variability, allowing a classification into SAMT-type and BAMT-type enzymes. The analysis of expression patterns coupled with biochemical characterization showed that these carboxyl methyltransferases are involved either in floral scent biosynthesis or in plant defense responses. While the latter can be induced by biotic or abiotic stress, the genes responsible for floral scent synthesis exhibit developmental and rhythmic expression pattern. The nature of the product and efficiency of its formation in plants depend on the availability of substrates, the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward benzoic acid and/or salicylic acid, and the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational regulation at the enzyme level. The biochemical properties of benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases suggest that the genes involved in plant defenses

  2. Floral benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases: From in vitro to in planta function

    PubMed Central

    Effmert, Uta; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Ross, Jeannine; Negre, Florence; Fraser, Chris M.; Noel, Joseph P.; Dudareva, Natalia; Piechulla, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    Benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases synthesize methyl esters (e.g., methyl benzoate and methyl salicylate), which are constituents of aromas and scents of many plant species and play important roles in plant communication with the surrounding environment. Within the past five years, eleven such carboxyl methyltransferases were isolated and most of them were comprehensively investigated at the biochemical, molecular and structural level. Two types of enzymes can be distinguished according to their substrate preferences: the SAMT-type enzymes isolated from Clarkia breweri, Stephanotis floribunda, Antirrhinum majus, Hoya carnosa, and Petunia hybrida, which have a higher catalytic efficiency and preference for salicylic acid, while BAMT-type enzymes from A. majus, Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Nicotiana suaveolens prefer benzoic acid. The elucidation of C. breweri SAMT’s three-dimensional structure allowed a detailed modelling of the active sites of the carboxyl methyltransferases and revealed that the SAM binding pocket is highly conserved among these enzymes while the methyl acceptor binding site exhibits some variability, allowing a classification into SAMT-type and BAMT-type enzymes. The analysis of expression patterns coupled with biochemical characterization showed that these carboxyl methyltransferases are involved either in floral scent biosynthesis or in plant defense responses. While the latter can be induced by biotic or abiotic stress, the genes responsible for floral scent synthesis exhibit developmental and rhythmic expression pattern. The nature of the product and efficiency of its formation in planta depend on the availability of substrates, the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward benzoic acid and/or salicylic acid, and the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational regulation at the enzyme level. The biochemical properties of benzenoid carboxyl methyltransferases suggest that the genes involved in plant defenses

  3. Facile one-pot fabrication of nano-Fe3O4/carboxyl-functionalized baker's yeast composites and their application in methylene blue dye adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zongjun; Zhang, Yue; Li, Zhengjie; Chen, Hui; Wang, Ying; Wang, Guangtu; Zou, Ping; Chen, Huaping; Zhang, Yunsong

    2017-01-01

    Nano-Fe3O4/carboxyl-functionalized baker's yeast composites (NF/CF-BYs) were prepared for the first time based on the ultrasonic cavitation assisted oxygen implosion method using single Fe2+ as iron source. The series of characterization analysis results showed that the obtained NF/CF-BYs had not only the superparamagnetic properties of nano-Fe3O4, but their surface also had plenty of functional groups (especially carboxyl groups) introduced by strong oxidization. The adsorption properties of NF/CF-BYs for methylene blue (MB) were also evaluated. The results displayed that the uptakes of NF/CF-BYs for MB were higher than that of pristine baker's yeast (P-BYs), and the adsorption process was followed by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity of NF/CF-BYs for MB was estimated to be 141.75 mg g-1 at pH 6. The regeneration efficiency of the obtained NF/CF-BYs was attained to be more than 90%.

  4. Novel vitamin D receptor ligands having a carboxyl group as an anchor to arginine 274 in the ligand-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Toshie; Tsuji, Genichiro; Tanaka, Chika; Harayama, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Vitamin D3 is metabolized into the hormonally active form, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1), via 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (2) which is the most abundant circulating metabolite. Introduction of the 1alpha-hydroxyl group into 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (2) to produce 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) increases the VDR binding affinity by approximately 1000-fold. The X-ray crystal structure of human VDR in complex with 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) shows that, together with Ser-237, the 1alpha-hydroxyl group of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1) makes hydrogen bonds with Arg-274, single mutation of which results in impaired ligand recognition. In 2002, lithocholic acid, which possesses a carboxyl group at position C24, was demonstrated to be a weak VDR ligand. We speculated that the carboxylic acid of lithocholic acid could be recognized by Arg-274 in the ligand-binding domain of VDR. In view of the significance of Arg-274 to direct the 1alpha-hydroxyl group, as well as the results with lithocholic acid and its derivatives, we designed the C2 modified analogues of 25-hydroxylvitamin D3 (2) having a carboxyl group, instead of the 1-hydroxyl group, for better electrostatic interaction to the guanidinium side-chain of arginine.

  5. A Functional Analytic Approach to Group Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberghe, Luc

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a particular view on the use of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (FAP) in a group therapy format. This view is based on the author's experiences as a supervisor of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Groups, including groups for women with depression and groups for chronic pain patients. The contexts in which this approach…

  6. An NHC-catalyzed in situ activation strategy to β-functionalize saturated carboxylic acid: an enantioselective formal [3+2] annulation for spirocyclic oxindolo-γ-butyrolactones.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuanwei; Yu, Chenxia; Li, Tuanjie; Tu, Shujiang; Yao, Changsheng

    2015-03-27

    An in situ NHC-catalyzed activation strategy to β-functionalize saturated carboxylic acid was developed. This asymmetric formal [3+2] annulation could deliver spirocyclic oxindolo-γ-butyrolactones from saturated carboxylic acid and isatin in good yields with high to excellent enantioselectivities. The easy availability of the starting materials, direct installation of functional units at unreactive carbon atom and the convergent assembly make this protocol attractive in the field of organic synthesis.

  7. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine.

    PubMed

    Deborah, M; Jawahar, A; Mathavan, T; Dhas, M Kumara; Benial, A Milton Franklin

    2015-03-15

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (002) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  8. Spectroscopic studies on sidewall carboxylic acid functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with valine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deborah, M.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-03-01

    The valine functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were prepared and characterized by using XRD, UV-Vis, FT-IR, EPR, SEM, and EDX, spectroscopic techniques. The enhanced XRD peak (0 0 2) intensity was observed for valine functionalized MWCNTs compared with oxidized MWCNTs, which is likely due to sample purification by acid washing. UV-Vis study shows the formation of valine functionalized MWCNTs. FT-IR study confirms the presence of functional groups of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The ESR line shape analysis indicates that the observed EPR line shape is a Gaussian line shape. The g-values indicate that the systems are isotropic in nature. The morphology study was carried out for oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs by using SEM. The EDX spectra revealed that the high purity of oxidized MWCNTs and valine functionalized MWCNTs. The functionalization has been chosen because, functionalization of CNTs with amino acids makes them soluble and biocompatible. Thus, they have potential applications in the field of biosensors and targeted drug delivery.

  9. [The distribution of free and esterified carboxyl groups within the pectin molecule after the action of pectin esterase from Aspergillus niger and oranges].

    PubMed

    Kohn, R; Dongowski, G; Bock, W

    1985-01-01

    By reaction of pectin esterase (PE) from Aspergillus niger and oranges as well as lye, with 95% esterified citrus and apple pectin we prepared series of preparations with degrees of esterification between 35 and 77%. In these partial deesterified pectins the form of distribution of the free and esterified carboxyl groups has been determined from the activity coefficient gamma Ca2+ of the calcium counterions in the solutions of the corresponding calcium pectinates, from the electrostatic free enthalpy delta (Gel/N)KCa of the ion exchange Ca2+----2K+ in these systems as well as from the relative activity of the polygalacturonase reacting with sodium pectinate. The PE from A niger hydrolyzes the esterified carboxyl groups more or less randomly, in a manner similar to the effect of lye on pectin. On the other hand PE from oranges brings about block-like groupings of free carboxyl groups in the pectin molecule. The study revealed different reaction mechanisms of the pectin deesterification by pectin esterases from Aspergillus species and higher plants.

  10. Interaction between carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles and porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, fullerene, and graphene, have received considerable attention due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics, leading to mass production and widespread application in industrial, commercial, and environmental fields. During their life cycle from production to disposal, however, carbon nanomaterials are inevitably released into water and soil environments, which have resulted in concern about their health and environmental impacts. Carbon black is a nano-sized amorphous carbon powder that typically contains 90-99% elemental carbon. It can be produced from incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons in petroleum and coal. Carbon black is widely used in chemical and industrial products or applications such as ink pigments, coating plastics, the rubber industry, and composite reinforcements. Even though carbon black is strongly hydrophobic and tends to aggregate in water, it can be dispersed in aqueous media through surface functionalization or surfactant use. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media. Column experiments were performed for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs under saturated flow conditions. Column experiments was conducted in duplicate using quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS) to examine the effect of metal (Fe, Al) oxide presence on the transport of CBNPs. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of CBNPs and chloride were obtained by monitoring effluent, and then mass recovery was quantified from these curves. Additionally, interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry. The BTCs of chloride had relative peak concentrations ranging from 0.895 to 0.990. Transport parameters (pore-water velocity v, hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient D) obtained by the model fit from the

  11. Adsorption of Cu(II) to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Importance of the carboxyl group for Cu mobility in natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2012-09-01

    :bacteria mass ratio of the composite. EXAFS shows that Cu adsorbs to ferrihydrite as an inner-sphere, (CuO4Hn)n - 6 bidentate edge-sharing complex; and to ferrihydrite composites as an inner-sphere, (CuO5Hn)n - 8 monodentate complex with carboxyl surface functional groups present on the bacterial fraction plus the bidentate edge-sharing complex on the ferrihydrite fraction. Our new results combined with previous work on Cu sorption to bacteria, humic substances and iron (hydr)oxides coated with humics, demonstrate the universal importance of the carboxyl moiety for Cu sorption and mobility in natural environments. Taken together these results show that Cu-carboxyl binding is the predominant mechanism by which Cu interacts with abiotic and biotic organic matter, and provides a ubiquitous control on Cu fate and mobility in natural waters, soils and sediments. Our results indicate that in environments where a significant proportion of iron (hydr)oxides are intimately intermixed with an organic fraction, we must consider Cu sequestration by these composites in addition to pure mineral phases.

  12. Evidence for a reactive gamma-carboxyl group (Glu-418) at the herbicide glyphosate binding site of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Q K

    1988-08-25

    Incubation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, a target for the nonselective herbicide glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide in the presence of glycine ethyl ester resulted in a time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. The inactivation followed pseudo-first order kinetics, with a second order rate constant of 2.2 M-1 min-1 at pH 5.5 and 25 degrees C. The inactivation is prevented by preincubation of the enzyme with a combination of the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate plus glyphosate, but not by shikimate 3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate, or glyphosate alone. Increasing the concentration of glyphosate during preincubation resulted in decreasing the rate of inactivation of the enzyme. Complete inactivation of the enzyme required the modification of 4 carboxyl groups per molecule of the enzyme. However, statistical analysis of the residual activity and the extent of modification showed that among the 4 modifiable carboxyl groups, only 1 is critical for activity. Tryptic mapping of the enzyme modified in the absence of shikimate 3-phosphate and glyphosate by reverse phase chromatography resulted in the isolation of a [14C]glycine ethyl ester-containing peptide that was absent in the enzyme modified in the presence of shikimate 3-phosphate and glyphosate. By amino acid sequencing of this labeled peptide, the modified critical carboxyl group was identified as Glu-418. The above results suggest that Glu-418 is the most accessible reactive carboxyl group under these conditions and is located at or close to the glyphosate binding site.

  13. Amino acid ester prodrugs conjugated to the α-carboxylic acid group do not display affinity for the L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1).

    PubMed

    Rautio, Jarkko; Kärkkäinen, Jussi; Huttunen, Kristiina M; Gynther, Mikko

    2015-01-23

    L-type amino acid transporter (LAT1) is an intriguing target for carrier-mediated transport of drugs as it is highly expressed in the blood-brain barrier and also in various types of cancer. Several studies have proposed that in order for compounds to act as LAT1 substrates they should possess both negatively charged α-carboxyl and positively charged α-amino groups. However, in some reports, such as in two recent publications describing an isoleucine-quinidine ester prodrug (1), compounds having no free α-carboxyl group have been reported to exhibit high affinity for LAT1 in vitro. In the present study, 1 was synthesized and its affinity for LAT1 was evaluated both with an in situ rat brain perfusion technique and in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 in vitro. 1 showed no affinity for LAT1 in either model nor did it show any affinity for LAT2 in an in vitro study. Our results confirm the earlier reported requirements for LAT1 substrates. Thus drugs or prodrugs with substituted α-carboxyl group cannot bind to LAT with high affinity.

  14. Functionally Important Carboxyls in a Bacterial Homologue of the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter (VMAT)*

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Dana; Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Shuster, Yonatan; Listov, Dina; Meena, Sitaram; Singh, Satinder K.; Forrest, Lucy R.; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Transporters essential for neurotransmission in mammalian organisms and bacterial multidrug transporters involved in antibiotic resistance are evolutionarily related. To understand in more detail the evolutionary aspects of the transformation of a bacterial multidrug transporter to a mammalian neurotransporter and to learn about mechanisms in a milieu amenable for structural and biochemical studies, we identified, cloned, and partially characterized bacterial homologues of the rat vesicular monoamine transporter (rVMAT2). We performed preliminary biochemical characterization of one of them, Brevibacillus brevis monoamine transporter (BbMAT), from the bacterium B. brevis. BbMAT shares substrates with rVMAT2 and transports them in exchange with >1H+, like the mammalian transporter. Here we present a homology model of BbMAT that has the standard major facilitator superfamily fold; that is, with two domains of six transmembrane helices each, related by 2-fold pseudosymmetry whose axis runs normal to the membrane and between the two halves. The model predicts that four carboxyl residues, a histidine, and an arginine are located in the transmembrane segments. We show here that two of the carboxyls are conserved, equivalent to the corresponding ones in rVMAT2, and are essential for H+-coupled transport. We conclude that BbMAT provides an excellent experimental paradigm for the study of its mammalian counterparts and bacterial multidrug transporters. PMID:25336661

  15. Synthesis, Aqueous Reactivity, and Biological Evaluation of Carboxylic Acid Ester-Functionalized Platinum–Acridine Hybrid Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Leigh A.; Suryadi, Jimmy; West, Tiffany K.; Kucera, Gregory L.; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of platinum–acridine hybrid agents containing carboxylic acid ester groups is described. The most active derivatives and the unmodified parent compounds showed up to 6-fold higher activity in ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3) and breast cancer (MCF-7, MDA-MB-23) cell lines than cisplatin. Inhibition of cell proliferation at nanomolar concentrations was observed in pancreatic (PANC-1) and non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLC, NCI-H460) of 80- and 150-fold, respectively. Introduction of the ester groups did not affect the cytotoxic properties of the hybrids, which form the same monofunctional–intercalative DNA adducts as the parent compounds, as demonstrated in a plasmid unwinding assay. In-line high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESMS) shows that the ester moieties undergo platinum-mediated hydrolysis in a chloride concentration-dependent manner to form carboxylate chelates. Potential applications of the chloride-sensitive ester hydrolysis as a self-immolative release mechanism for tumor-selective delivery of platinum–acridines are discussed. PMID:22871158

  16. Control of Surface Functional Groups on Pertechntate Sorption on Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wang; H. Gao; R. Yeredla; H. Xu; M. Abrecht; G.D. Stasio

    2006-07-05

    {sup 99}Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) varying from 9.5 x 10{sup 5} to 3.2 x 10{sup 3} mL/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with K{sub d} remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10{sup 3} - 1.8 x 10{sup 3} mL/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified to be carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups A, B, and C in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO{sub 4}{sup -} can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during material processing.

  17. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  18. Copper-Catalyzed Carboxylation of Aryl Iodides with Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Vu, Hung; Daugulis, Olafs

    2013-01-01

    A method for carboxylation of aryl iodides with carbon dioxide has been developed. The reaction employs low loadings of copper iodide/TMEDA or DMEDA catalyst, 1 atm of CO2, DMSO or DMA solvent, and proceeds at 25–70 °C. Good functional group tolerance is observed, with ester, bromide, chloride, fluoride, ether, hydroxy, amino, and ketone functionalities tolerated. Additionally, hindered aryl iodides such as iodomesitylene can also be carboxylated PMID:24288654

  19. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    PubMed

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  20. The central role of ketones in reversible and irreversible hydrothermal organic functional group transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ziming; Gould, Ian R.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Shock, Everett L.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of hydrothermal reactions involving organic compounds suggest complex, possibly reversible, reaction pathways that link functional groups from reduced alkanes all the way to oxidized carboxylic acids. Ketones represent a critical functional group because they occupy a central position in the reaction pathway, at the point where Csbnd C bond cleavage is required for the formation of the more oxidized carboxylic acids. The mechanisms for the critical bond cleavage reactions in ketones, and how they compete with other reactions are the focus of this experimental study. We studied a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK), in H2O at 300 °C and 70 MPa for up to 528 h. Product analysis was performed as a function of time at low DBK conversions to reveal the primary reaction pathways. Reversible interconversion between ketone, alcohol, alkene and alkane functional groups is observed in addition to formation of radical coupling products derived from irreversible Csbnd C and Csbnd H homolytic bond cleavage. The product distributions are time-dependent but the bond cleavage products dominate. The major products that accumulate at longer reaction times are toluene and larger, dehydrogenated structures that are initially formed by radical coupling. The hydrogen atoms generated by dehydrogenation of the coupling products are predominantly consumed in the formation of toluene. Even though bond cleavage products dominate, no carboxylic acids were observed on the timescale of the reactions under the chosen experimental conditions.

  1. The pH-dependence of the Escherichia coli RNase HII-catalysed reaction suggests that an active site carboxylate group participates directly in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bastock, James A; Webb, Michelle; Grasby, Jane A

    2007-04-27

    RNase HII specifically catalyses the hydrolysis of phosphate diester linkages contained within the RNA portion of DNA/RNA hybrids. The catalytic parameters of the enzyme derived from Escherichia coli BL21 have been measured using 5'-fluorescent oligodeoxynucleotide substrates containing embedded ribonucleotides. The products of the reaction and the chemistry of phosphate diester hydrolysis were assigned unequivocally using mass spectrometry. The pH-dependence of the catalytic parameters was measured under conditions of optimal magnesium ion concentration. The logarithm of the turnover number of the enzyme increases steeply with pH until a pH-independent region is reached close to neutrality. The slope of the pH-dependent region is 2, indicating that the catalytically proficient form of RNase HII is di-anionic. The pH-dependence of log 1/K(M) is a sigmoidal curve reaching a maximal value at higher pH, suggesting deprotonation of a residue stabilises substrate binding. Possible mechanisms for the RNase HII-catalysed reaction consistent with the pH-dependent behaviour of the enzyme are discussed. The active sites of RNase H enzymes contain a cluster of four strictly conserved carboxylate groups. Together, the data suggest a requirement for ionisation of an active site carboxylic acid for metal ion binding or correct positioning of metal ion(s) in the enzyme-substrate complex and a role for a second active site carboxylate in general base catalysis.

  2. Preparation and characterization of multi-carboxyl-functionalized silica gel for removal of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Ming-yu; Feng, Chang-gen; Zeng, Qing-xuan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the multi-carboxyl-functionalized silica gel was prepared by surface grafting method and applied for the removal of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) from aqueous solution. The adsorbent was characterized by FT-IR, thermogravimetry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and elemental analysis, and it proved that the organic functional group, carboxyl group, was grafted successfully onto the silica gel surface. The effect of solution pH on removal efficiencies of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) was investigated and it was found that with the exception of Zn (II), the removal efficiencies of the rest of metal ions increased with the increasing of pH in the solution, the maximum removal efficiency occurred at pH 6.0, whereas the maximum removal efficiency for Zn (II) was found to be at pH 7.0. Adsorption equilibrium data were well fitted to Langmuir than Freundlich isotherm model and the maximum adsorption capacity for Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) was 47.07, 41.48, 30.80 and 39.96 mg/g, respectively. Competitive adsorption experiments demonstrated that the adsorbent material had excellent adsorption amount and high affinity for the Cu (II) in the binary systems. In addition, the column experiments were used to investigate stability and reusability of the adsorbent, the dynamic adsorption performance, and desorption of metal ions absorbed from the adsorbent. The results confirmed that the adsorbent presents good dynamic adsorption performance for Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) and these metal ions adsorbed were easy to be desorbed from the adsorbent. The adsorption capacities of metal ions did not present an obvious decrease after five cycles of adsorption-desorption.

  3. Aqueous infrared carboxylate absorbances: Aliphatic di-acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabaniss, S.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; McVey, I.F.

    1998-01-01

    Aqueous attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra of 18 aliphatic di-carboxylic acids are reported as a function of pH. The spectra show isosbestic points and intensity changes which indicate that Beer's law is obeyed, and peak frequencies lie within previously reported ranges for aqueous carboxylates and pure carboxylic acids. Intensity sharing from the symmetric carboxylate stretch is evident in many cases, so that bands which are nominally due to alkyl groups show increased intensity at higher pH. The asymmetric stretch of the HA- species is linearly related to the microscopic acidity constant of the H2A species, with ??pK 2 intervening atoms). The results suggest that aqueous ATR-FTIR may be able to estimate 'intrinsic' pKa values of carboxylic acids, in addition to providing quantitative estimates of ionization. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Silsesquioxane nanoparticles with reactive internal functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozek, Eric M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Zharov, Ilya

    2017-02-01

    A series of silsesquioxane nanoparticles containing reactive internal organic functionalities throughout the entire particle body have been synthesized using a surfactant-free method with organosilanes as the sole precursors and a base catalyst. The organic functional groups incorporated are vinyl, allyl, mercapto, cyanoethyl, and cyanopropyl groups. The sizes and morphologies of the particles were characterized using SEM and nitrogen adsorption, while the compositions were confirmed using TGA, FT-IR, solid state NMR, and elemental analysis. The accessibility and reactivity of the functional groups inside the particles were demonstrated by performing bromination and reduction reactions in the interior of the particles.

  5. Synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotubes and carbon fiber for improved electro-activated polymeric shape-memory nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Min Huang, Wei

    2013-06-01

    The present work studies the synergistic effect of self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon fiber on the electrical property and electro-activated recovery behavior of shape memory polymer (SMP) nanocomposites. The combination of CNT and carbon fiber results in improved electrical conductivity in the SMP nanocomposites. Carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs are grafted onto the carbon fibers and then self-assembled by deposition to significantly enhance the reliability of the bonding between carbon fiber and SMP via van der Waals and covalent crosslink. Furthermore, the self-assembled carboxylic acid-functionalized CNTs and carbon fibers enable the SMP nanocomposites for Joule heating triggered shape recovery.

  6. FTIR Analysis of Functional Groups in Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, S. M.; McKenzie, G.; Dransfield, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are suspensions of particulate matter composed of compounds formed from chemical reactions of organic species in the atmosphere. Atmospheric particulate matter can have impacts on climate, the environment and human health. Standardized techniques to analyze the characteristics and composition of complex secondary organic aerosols are necessary to further investigate the formation of SOA and provide a better understanding of the reaction pathways of organic species in the atmosphere. While Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can provide detailed information about the elemental composition of a sample, it reveals little about the chemical moieties which make up the particles. This work probes aerosol particles deposited on Teflon filters using FTIR, based on the protocols of Russell, et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, 2009) and the spectral fitting algorithm of Takahama, et al (submitted, 2012). To validate the necessary calibration curves for the analysis of complex samples, primary aerosols of key compounds (e.g., citric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium benzoate) were generated, and the accumulated masses of the aerosol samples were related to their IR absorption intensity. These validated calibration curves were then used to classify and quantify functional groups in SOA samples generated in chamber studies by MIT's Kroll group. The fitting algorithm currently quantifies the following functionalities: alcohols, alkanes, alkenes, amines, aromatics, carbonyls and carboxylic acids.

  7. Macroevolutionary trends of atomic composition and related functional group proportion in eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Juan; Yang, Chun-Lin; Hao, You-Jin; Li, Ying; Chen, Bin; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2014-01-25

    To fully explore the trends of atomic composition during the macroevolution from prokaryote to eukaryote, five atoms (oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen) and related functional groups in prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins were surveyed and compared. Genome-wide analysis showed that eukaryotic proteins have more oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen atoms than prokaryotes do. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) analysis revealed that oxygen, sulfur, carbon and hydrogen frequencies are higher in eukaryotic proteins than in their prokaryotic orthologs. Furthermore, functional group analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic proteins tend to have higher proportions of sulfhydryl, hydroxyl and acylamino, but lower of sulfide and carboxyl. Taken together, an apparent trend of increase was observed for oxygen and sulfur atoms in the macroevolution; the variation of oxygen and sulfur compositions and their related functional groups in macroevolution made eukaryotic proteins carry more useful functional groups. These results will be helpful for better understanding the functional significances of atomic composition evolution.

  8. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-08-28

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)](+)) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru-H](+), which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources.

  9. Cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates as catalyst prototypes for self-induced hydrogenation of carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Naruto, Masayuki; Saito, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in bio-renewable and petrochemical sources of carbon. Hydrogenation of carboxylic acids to yield alcohols produces water as the only byproduct, and thus represents a possible next generation, sustainable method for the production of these alternative energy carriers/platform chemicals on a large scale. Reported herein are molecular insights into cationic mononuclear ruthenium carboxylates ([Ru(OCOR)]+) as prototypical catalysts for the hydrogenation of carboxylic acids. The substrate-derived coordinated carboxylate was found to function initially as a proton acceptor for the heterolytic cleavage of dihydrogen, and subsequently also as an acceptor for the hydride from [Ru–H]+, which was generated in the first step (self-induced catalysis). The hydrogenation proceeded selectively and at high levels of functional group tolerance, a feature that is challenging to achieve with existing heterogeneous/homogeneous catalyst systems. These fundamental insights are expected to significantly benefit the future development of metal carboxylate-catalysed hydrogenation processes of bio-renewable resources. PMID:26314266

  10. Metabolic Fate of the Carboxyl Groups of Malate and Pyruvate and their Influence on δ13C of Leaf-Respired CO2 during Light Enhanced Dark Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Marco M.; Wegener, Frederik; Barthel, Matti; Maurino, Veronica G.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Christiane; Werner, Roland A.

    2016-01-01

    The enhanced CO2 release of illuminated leaves transferred into darkness, termed “light enhanced dark respiration (LEDR)”, is often associated with an increase in the carbon isotope ratio of the respired CO2 (δ13CLEDR). The latter has been hypothesized to result from different respiratory substrates and decarboxylation reactions in various metabolic pathways, which are poorly understood so far. To provide a better insight into the underlying metabolic processes of δ13CLEDR, we fed position-specific 13C-labeled malate and pyruvate via the xylem stream to leaves of species with high and low δ13CLEDR values (Halimium halimifolium and Oxalis triangularis, respectively). During respective label application, we determined label-derived leaf 13CO2 respiration using laser spectroscopy and the 13C allocation to metabolic fractions during light–dark transitions. Our results clearly show that both carboxyl groups (C-1 and C-4 position) of malate similarly influence respiration and metabolic fractions in both species, indicating possible isotope randomization of the carboxyl groups of malate by the fumarase reaction. While C-2 position of pyruvate was only weakly respired, the species-specific difference in natural δ13CLEDR patterns were best reflected by the 13CO2 respiration patterns of the C-1 position of pyruvate. Furthermore, 13C label from malate and pyruvate were mainly allocated to amino and organic acid fractions in both species and only little to sugar and lipid fractions. In summary, our results suggest that respiration of both carboxyl groups of malate (via fumarase) by tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions or by NAD-malic enzyme influences δ13CLEDR. The latter supplies the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction, which in turn determines natural δ13CLEDR pattern by releasing the C-1 position of pyruvate. PMID:27375626

  11. Intramolecular hydrogen bond between 4-oxo and 3-carboxylic groups in quinolones and their analogs. Crystal structures of 7-methyl- and 6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxocinnoline-3-carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Główka, Marek L.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Olczak, Andrzej; Bojarska, Joanna; Szczesio, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Krystyna

    2003-09-01

    Crystal structures of two cinnoline analogs of quinolones and statistics on quinolones molecular forms observed in the crystal state have been determined. It has been shown that common quinolones may be divided into two main types, depending on presence of proton acceptor, usually aliphatic amine group, capable of protonation under mild conditions. Quinolones lacking amine group or having one(s) bound to an aromatic system exist at physiological pH mainly in a free acid form, in which acidic hydrogen atom is locked into an intramolecular hydrogen bond. The phenomenon enhances permeability of quinolones through lipophilic cell membranes but decreases the concentration of carboxylate form capable of specific binding with bacterial DNA. Molecular (neutral) form was observed exclusively in the crystalline state for these quinolones. The dominant forms seem different for quinolones having amine substituents with unconjugated lone pair electrons at N atom. Even in the crystalline state, they may exist also in a zwitterionic form, which was found to dominate in secondary amines crystallised at neutral pH. Our limited data suggest that position and order of amine group may play important role in controlling quinolones absorption, transport and concentration and thus their biological profile.

  12. Cu(I)-catalyzed (11)C carboxylation of boronic acid esters: a rapid and convenient entry to (11)C-labeled carboxylic acids, esters, and amides.

    PubMed

    Riss, Patrick J; Lu, Shuiyu; Telu, Sanjay; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Pike, Victor W

    2012-03-12

    Rapid and direct: the carboxylation of boronic acid esters with (11)CO(2) provides [(11)C]carboxylic acids as a convenient entry into [(11)C]esters and [(11)C]amides. This conversion of boronates is tolerant to diverse functional groups (e.g., halo, nitro, or carbonyl).

  13. Self-assembly of amphiphilic homopolymers bearing ferrocene and carboxyl functionalities: effect of polymer concentration, β-cyclodextrin, and length of alkyl linker.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun; Lu, Guolin; Li, Yongjun; Huang, Xiaoyu

    2013-08-27

    Three new acrylamide monomers containing ferrocene and tert-butyl ester groups were first synthesized via multistep nucleophilic substitution reaction under mild conditions followed by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) homopolymerization to give well-defined homopolymers with narrow molecular weight distributions (M(w)/M(n) ≤ 1.36). The target amphiphilic homopolymers were obtained by the acidic hydrolysis of tert-butyoxycarbonyls to carboxyls in every repeating unit using CF3COOH. The self-assembly behaviors of these amphiphilic homopolymers bearing both ferrocene and carboxyl moieties in each repeating unit in aqueous media were investigated by transmission emission microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Large compound micelles with different morphologies were formed by these amphiphilic homopolymers, which consist of the corona formed by hydrophilic carboxyls and the core containing numerous reverse micelles with hydrophilic islands of carboxyls in continuous hydrophobic phase of ferrocene-based segments. The morphologies of the formed micelles could be tuned by the concentration of amphiphilic homopolymers, pH value of the solution, the length of -CH2 linker between ferrocene group and carboxyl, and the amount of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD).

  14. Nafion-assisted cross-linking of sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) bearing carboxylic acid groups and their composite membranes for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haidan; Zhao, Chengji; Na, Hui

    In this study, a new type of cross-linked composite membrane is prepared and considered for its potential applications in direct methanol fuel cell. Nafion and sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone) bearing carboxylic acid groups (SPAEK-C) are blended and subsequently cross-linked by a Friedel-Craft reaction using the carboxylic acid groups in the SPAEK-C to achieve lower methanol permeability. The perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acid groups of Nafion act as a benign solid catalyst, which assist the cross-linking of SPAEK-C. The physical and chemical characterizations of the cross-linked composite membranes are performed by varying the contents of SPAEK-C. The c-Nafion-15% membrane exhibits appropriate water uptake (10.49-25.22%), low methanol permeability (2.57 × 10 -7 cm 2 s -1), and high proton conductivity (0.179 S cm -1 at 80 °C). DSC and FTIR analyze suggest the cross-linking reaction. These results show that the self-cross-linking of SPAEK-C in the Nafion membrane can effectively reduce methanol permeability while maintaining high proton conductivity.

  15. Identifying organic aerosol sources by comparing functional group composition in chamber and atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Russell, Lynn M; Bahadur, Ranjit; Ziemann, Paul J

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of submicron particles by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in 14 campaigns in North America, Asia, South America, and Europe were used to identify characteristic organic functional group compositions of fuel combustion, terrestrial vegetation, and ocean bubble bursting sources, each of which often accounts for more than a third of organic mass (OM), and some of which is secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from gas-phase precursors. The majority of the OM consists of alkane, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups. The organic functional groups formed from combustion and vegetation emissions are similar to the secondary products identified in chamber studies. The near absence of carbonyl groups in the observed SOA associated with combustion is consistent with alkane rather than aromatic precursors, and the absence of organonitrate groups can be explained by their hydrolysis in humid ambient conditions. The remote forest observations have ratios of carboxylic acid, organic hydroxyl, and nonacid carbonyl groups similar to those observed for isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, but in biogenic aerosols transported downwind of urban areas the formation of esters replaces the acid and hydroxyl groups and leaves only nonacid carbonyl groups. The carbonyl groups in SOA associated with vegetation emissions provides striking evidence for the mechanism of esterification as the pathway for possible oligomerization reactions in the atmosphere. Forest fires include biogenic emissions that produce SOA with organic components similar to isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, also resulting in nonacid carbonyl groups in SOA.

  16. Fluorescent macrocyclic probes with pendant functional groups as markers of acidic organelles within live cells.

    PubMed

    Wadhavane, Prashant D; Izquierdo, M Ángeles; Lutters, Dennis; Burguete, M Isabel; Marín, María J; Russell, David A; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V

    2014-02-07

    A new family of acidity sensitive fluorescent macrocycles has been synthesized and fully characterized. Their photophysical properties including emission quantum yield and fluorescence lifetime have been determined. The acid-base properties of the new molecules can be tuned by the incorporation of pendant functional groups. The nature of such functional groups (carboxylic acid or ester) influences dramatically the pKa of the probes, two compounds of which exhibit low values. Preliminary intracellular studies using confocal microscopy together with emission spectra of the probes from the cellular environment have shown that the synthesized fluorescent macrocycles mark the acidic organelles of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells.

  17. Group entropies, correlation laws, and zeta functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempesta, Piergiulio

    2011-08-01

    The notion of group entropy is proposed. It enables the unification and generaliztion of many different definitions of entropy known in the literature, such as those of Boltzmann-Gibbs, Tsallis, Abe, and Kaniadakis. Other entropic functionals are introduced, related to nontrivial correlation laws characterizing universality classes of systems out of equilibrium when the dynamics is weakly chaotic. The associated thermostatistics are discussed. The mathematical structure underlying our construction is that of formal group theory, which provides the general structure of the correlations among particles and dictates the associated entropic functionals. As an example of application, the role of group entropies in information theory is illustrated and generalizations of the Kullback-Leibler divergence are proposed. A new connection between statistical mechanics and zeta functions is established. In particular, Tsallis entropy is related to the classical Riemann zeta function.

  18. Silver-Catalyzed Decarboxylative Bromination of Aliphatic Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xinqiang; Song, Tao; Wang, Zhentao; Chen, He; Cui, Lei; Li, Chaozhong

    2017-03-13

    The silver-catalyzed Hunsdiecker bromination of aliphatic carboxylic acids is described. With Ag(Phen)2OTf as the catalyst and dibromoisocyanuric acid as the brominating agent, various aliphatic carboxylic acids underwent decarboxylative bromination to provide the corresponding alkyl bromides under mild conditions. This method not only is efficient and general but also enjoys wide functional group compatibility. An oxidative radical mechanism involving Ag(II) intermediates is proposed.

  19. Identifying copepod functional groups from species functional traits

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Fabio; Gasparini, Stéphane; Ayata, Sakina-Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    We gathered information on the functional traits of the most representative copepod species in the Mediterranean Sea. Our database includes 191 species described by 7 traits encompassing diverse ecological functions: minimal and maximal body length, trophic group, feeding type, spawning strategy, diel vertical migration and vertical habitat. Cluster analysis in the functional trait space revealed that Mediterranean copepods can be separated into groups with distinct ecological roles. PMID:26811565

  20. Functional Group Chemistry (by James R. Hanson)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karty, Joel M.

    2002-06-01

    Given its density and brevity and the apparent requirement of previous organic chemistry knowledge, Functional Group Chemistry is inappropriate as a stand-alone text for first-year organic students. It is also difficult to imagine using it as a supplement to a traditional textbook, since the textbook would presumably provide the same material in greater depth and with better clarity. The end-of-chapter problems in Functional Group Chemistry, however, would provide excellent exam and supplemental homework questions, and would be appropriate given the greater emphasis on reaction mechanisms in the traditional textbook. Perhaps the best use for Functional Group Chemistry, then, is for students returning after having had a year of organic chemistry, either for a quick reference, or for an in-depth review in studying for a standardized exam.

  1. Hygroscopic Characteristics of Alkylaminium Carboxylate Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Hernandez, Mario; McKeown, Megan; Secrest, Jeremiah; Marrero-Ortiz, Wilmarie; Lavi, Avi; Rudich, Yinon; Collins, Don R; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-03-01

    The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity for a series of alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols have been measured using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer coupled to a condensation particle counter and a CCN counter. The particles, consisting of the mixtures of mono- (acetic, propanoic, p-toluic, and cis-pinonic acid) and dicarboxylic (oxalic, succinic, malic, adipic, and azelaic acid) acid with alkylamine (mono-, di-, and trimethylamines), represent those commonly found under diverse environmental conditions. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of the alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols was derived from the HGF and CCN results and theoretically calculated. The HGF at 90% RH is in the range of 1.3 to 1.8 for alkylaminium monocarboxylates and 1.1 to 2.2 for alkylaminium dicarboxylates, dependent on the molecular functionality (i.e., the carboxylic or OH functional group in organic acids and methyl substitution in alkylamines). The κ value for all alkylaminium carboxylates is in the range of 0.06-1.37 derived from the HGF measurements at 90% RH, 0.05-0.49 derived from the CCN measurements, and 0.22-0.66 theoretically calculated. The measured hygroscopicity of the alkylaminium carboxylates increases with decreasing acid to base ratio. The deliquescence point is apparent for several of the alkylaminium dicarboxylates but not for the alkylaminium monocarboxylates. Our results reveal that alkylaminium carboxylate aerosols exhibit distinct hygroscopic and deliquescent characteristics that are dependent on their molecular functionality, hence regulating their impacts on human health, air quality, and direct and indirect radiative forcing on climate.

  2. Transesterification of PHA to Oligomers Covalently Bonded with (Bio)Active Compounds Containing Either Carboxyl or Hydroxyl Functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecień, Iwona; Radecka, Iza; Kowalczuk, Marek; Adamus, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript presents the synthesis and structural characterisation of novel biodegradable polymeric controlled-release systems of pesticides with potentially higher resistance to weather conditions in comparison to conventional forms of pesticides. Two methods for the preparation of pesticide-oligomer conjugates using the transesterification reaction were developed. The first method of obtaining conjugates, which consist of bioactive compounds with the carboxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) oligomers, is "one-pot" transesterification. In the second method, conjugates of bioactive compounds with hydroxyl group and polyhydroxyalkanoates oligomers were obtained in two-step method, through cyclic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) oligomers. The obtained pesticide-PHA conjugates were comprehensively characterised using GPC, 1H NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. The structural characterisation of the obtained products at the molecular level with the aid of mass spectrometry confirmed that both of the synthetic strategies employed led to the formation of conjugates in which selected pesticides were covalently bonded to PHA oligomers via a hydrolysable ester bond. PMID:25781908

  3. Carboxyl- and amino-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles differentially affect the polarization profile of M1 and M2 macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ann-Kathrin; Syrovets, Tatiana; Haas, Karina A; Loos, Cornelia; Musyanovych, Anna; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Simmet, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are key regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Exposure to microenvironmental stimuli determines their polarization into proinflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. M1 exhibit high expression of proinflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β, and M2 promote tissue repair, but likewise support tumor growth and cause immune suppression by expressing IL-10. Thus, the M1/M2 balance critically determines tissue homeostasis. By using carboxyl- (PS-COOH) and amino-functionalized (PS-NH2) polystyrene nanoparticles, the effects of surface decoration on the polarization of human macrophages were investigated. The nanoparticles did not compromise macrophage viability nor did they affect the expression of the M1 markers CD86, NOS2, TNF-α, and IL-1β. By contrast, in M2, both nanoparticles impaired expression of scavenger receptor CD163 and CD200R, and the release of IL-10. PS-NH2 also inhibited phagocytosis of Escherichia coli by both, M1 and M2. PS-COOH did not impair phagocytosis by M2, but increased protein mass in M1 and M2, TGF-β1 release by M1, and ATP levels in M2. Thus, nanoparticles skew the M2 macrophage polarization without affecting M1 markers. Given the critical role of the M1 and M2 polarization for the immunological balance in patients with cancer or chronic inflammation, functionalized nanoparticles might serve as tools for reprogramming the M1/M2 polarization.

  4. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force between functional groups in protein and polymer brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-18

    To understand interactions between polymer surfaces and different functional groups in proteins, interaction forces were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Various polymer brush surfaces were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization as well-defined model surfaces to understand protein adsorption behavior. The polymer brush layers consisted of phosphorylcholine groups (zwitterionic/hydrophilic), trimethylammonium groups (cationic/hydrophilic), sulfonate groups (anionic/hydrophilic), hydroxyl groups (nonionic/hydrophilic), and n-butyl groups (nonionic/hydrophobic) in their side chains. The interaction forces between these polymer brush surfaces and different functional groups (carboxyl groups, amino groups, and methyl groups, which are typical functional groups existing in proteins) were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Furthermore, the amount of adsorbed protein on the polymer brush surfaces was quantified by surface plasmon resonance using albumin with a negative net charge and lysozyme with a positive net charge under physiological conditions. The amount of proteins adsorbed on the polymer brush surfaces corresponded to the interaction forces generated between the functional groups on the cantilever and the polymer brush surfaces. The weakest interaction force and least amount of protein adsorbed were observed in the case of the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine groups in the side chain. On the other hand, positive and negative surfaces generated strong forces against the oppositely charged functional groups. In addition, they showed significant adsorption with albumin and lysozyme, respectively. These results indicated that the interaction force at the functional group level might be

  5. Functional Assessment of Residues in the Amino- and Carboxyl-Termini of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) in the Mud Crab Scylla olivacea Using Point-Mutated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Huang, Shiau-Shan; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To assess functional importance of the residues in the amino- and carboxyl-termini of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the mud crab Scylla olivacea (Sco-CHH), both wild-type and point-mutated CHH peptides were produced with an amidated C-terminal end. Spectral analyses of circular dichroism, chromatographic retention time, and mass spectrometric analysis of the recombinant peptides indicate that they were close in conformation to native CHH and were produced with the intended substitutions. The recombinant peptides were subsequently used for an in vivo hyperglycemic assay. Two mutants (R13A and I69A rSco-CHH) completely lacked hyperglycemic activity, with temporal profiles similar to that of vehicle control. Temporal profiles of hyperglycemic responses elicited by 4 mutants (I2A, F3A, D12A, and D60A Sco-CHH) were different from that elicited by wild-type Sco-CHH; I2A was unique in that it exhibited significantly higher hyperglycemic activity, whereas the remaining 3 mutants showed lower activity. Four mutants (D4A, Q51A, E54A, and V72A rSco-CHH) elicited hyperglycemic responses with temporal profiles similar to those evoked by wild-type Sco-CHH. In contrast, the glycine-extended version of V72A rSco-CHH (V72A rSco-CHH-Gly) completely lost hyperglycemic activity. By comparing our study with previous ones of ion-transport peptide (ITP) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) using deleted or point-mutated mutants, detail discussion is made regarding functionally important residues that are shared by both CHH and ITP (members of Group I of the CHH family), and those that discriminate CHH from ITP, and Group-I from Group-II peptides. Conclusions summarized in the present study provide insights into understanding of how functional diversification occurred within a peptide family of multifunctional members. PMID:26261986

  6. Simultaneous determination of interfacial molarities of amide bonds, carboxylate groups, and water by chemical trapping in micelles of amphiphiles containing peptide bond models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Romsted, Laurence S; Zhuang, Lanzhen; de Jong, Sander

    2013-01-15

    Chemical trapping is a powerful approach for obtaining experimental estimates of interfacial molarities of weakly basic nucleophiles in the interfacial regions of amphiphile aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that the chemical probe 4-hexadecyl-2,6-dimethylbenzenediazonium ion (16-ArN(2)(+)) reacts competitively with interfacial water, with the amide carbonyl followed by cleavage of the headgroups from the tail at the amide oxygen, and with the terminal carboxylate groups in micelles of two N-acyl amino-acid amphiphiles, sodium N-lauroylsarcosinate (SLS) and sodium N-lauroylglycinate (SLG), simple peptide bond model amphiphiles. Interfacial molarities (in moles per liter of interfacial volume) of these three groups were obtained from product yields, assuming that selectivity toward a particular nucleophile compared to water is the same in an aqueous reference solution and in the interfacial region. Interfacial carboxylate group molarities are ~1.5 M in both SLS and SLG micelles, but the concentration of the amide carbonyl for SLS micelles is ~4.6-5 times less (ca. 0.7 M) than that of SLG micelles (~3 M). The proton on the secondary N of SLG helps solubilize the amide bond in the aqueous region, but the methyl on the tertiary N of SLS helps solubilize the amide bond in the micellar core, reducing its reaction with 16-ArN(2)(+). Application of chemical trapping to proteins in membrane mimetic interfaces should provide insight into the topology of the protein within the interface because trapping of the amide carbonyl and cleavage at the C-N bond occurs only within the interface, and fragment characterization marks those peptide bonds located within the interface.

  7. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  8. Water makes the difference: rearrangement of water solvation layer triggers non-additivity of functional group contributions in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Biela, Adam; Betz, Michael; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2012-08-01

    The binding of four congeneric peptide-like thermolysin inhibitors has been studied by high-resolution crystal structure analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The ligands differ only by a terminal carboxylate and/or methyl group. A surprising non-additivity of functional group contributions for the carboxylate and/or methyl groups is detected. Adding the methyl first and then the carboxylate group results in a small Gibbs free energy increase and minor enthalpy/entropy partitioning for the first modification, whereas the second involves a strong affinity increase combined with large enthalpy/entropy changes. However, first adding the carboxylate and then the methyl group yields reverse effects: the acidic group attachment now causes minor effects, whereas the added methyl group provokes large changes. As all crystal structures show virtually identical binding modes, affinity changes are related to rearrangements of the first solvation layer next to the S(2)' pocket. About 20-25 water molecules are visible next to the studied complexes. The added COO(-) groups perturb the local water network in both carboxylated complexes, and the attached methyl groups provide favorable interaction sites for water molecules. Apart from one example, a contiguously connected water network between protein and ligand functional groups is observed in all complexes. In the complex with the carboxylated ligand, which still lacks the terminal methyl group, the water network is unfavorably ruptured. This results in a surprising thermodynamic signature showing only a minor affinity increase upon COO(-) group attachment. Because the further added methyl group provides a favorable interaction site for water, the network can be reestablished, and a strong affinity increase with a large enthalpy/entropy signature is then detected.

  9. Carboxyl Group Footprinting Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Identify Key Interactions in the HER2-HER3 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Interface* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Timothy S.; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Monsey, John; Shen, Wei; Sept, David; Bose, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase is a driver oncogene in many human cancers, including breast and gastric cancer. Under physiologic levels of expression, HER2 heterodimerizes with other members of the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB family, and the HER2-HER3 dimer forms one of the most potent oncogenic receptor pairs. Previous structural biology studies have individually crystallized the kinase domains of HER2 and HER3, but the HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimer structure has yet to be solved. Using a reconstituted membrane system to form HER2-HER3 kinase domain heterodimers and carboxyl group footprinting mass spectrometry, we observed that HER2 and HER3 kinase domains preferentially form asymmetric heterodimers with HER3 and HER2 monomers occupying the donor and acceptor kinase positions, respectively. Conformational changes in the HER2 activation loop, as measured by changes in carboxyl group labeling, required both dimerization and nucleotide binding but did not require activation loop phosphorylation at Tyr-877. Molecular dynamics simulations on HER2-HER3 kinase dimers identify specific inter- and intramolecular interactions and were in good agreement with MS measurements. Specifically, several intermolecular ionic interactions between HER2 Lys-716-HER3 Glu-909, HER2 Glu-717-HER3 Lys-907, and HER2 Asp-871-HER3 Arg-948 were identified by molecular dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of the cancer-associated mutations HER2 D769H/D769Y, HER3 E909G, and HER3 R948K (also numbered HER3 E928G and R967K) on kinase activity in the context of this new structural model. This study provides valuable insights into the EGF receptor/HER/ErbB kinase structure and interactions, which can guide the design of future therapies. PMID:23843458

  10. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Functionalized with Carboxylic Acid for Fabricating Polymeric Composite Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Otuka, Adriano José Galvani; Tribuzi, Vinicius; Cardoso, Marcos Roberto; de Almeida, Gustavo Foresto Brito; Zanatta, Antonio Ricardo; Corrêa, Daniel Souza; Mendonça, Cleber Renato

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotube composites are promising materials for mechanical and electrical applications. However, methodologies to incorporate carbon nanotubes in polymeric matrices are on high demand, especially for fabricating devices in the micro-nanoscale. In this paper we show the fabrication of 3D polymeric microstructures with functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), by means of two-photon polymerization (2PP). We used a range of SWCNT concentrations (0.01-1 wt%) in the resin to fabricate the composite material. Scanning electron microscopy images show the fabricated microstructures surface quality. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence and evaluate the distribution of SWCNT in the microstructures. Atomic force microscopy was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the fabricated microstructures.

  11. Biocompatible polymers coated on carboxylated nanotubes functionalized with betulinic acid for effective drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Julia M; Karthivashan, Govindarajan; Abd Gani, Shafinaz; Fakurazi, Sharida; Hussein, Mohd Zobir

    2016-02-01

    Chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes are highly suitable and promising materials for potential biomedical applications like drug delivery due to their distinct physico-chemical characteristics and unique architecture. However, they are often associated with problems like insoluble in physiological environment and cytotoxicity issue due to impurities and catalyst residues contained in the nanotubes. On the other hand, surface coating agents play an essential role in preventing the nanoparticles from excessive agglomeration as well as providing good water dispersibility by replacing the hydrophobic surfaces of nanoparticles with hydrophilic moieties. Therefore, we have prepared four types of biopolymer-coated single walled carbon nanotubes systems functionalized with anticancer drug, betulinic acid in the presence of Tween 20, Tween 80, polyethylene glycol and chitosan as a comparative study. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies confirm the bonding of the coating molecules with the SWBA and these results were further supported by Raman spectroscopy. All chemically coated samples were found to release the drug in a slow, sustained and prolonged fashion compared to the uncoated ones, with the best fit to pseudo-second order kinetic model. The cytotoxic effects of the synthesized samples were evaluated in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (3T3) at 24, 48 and 72 h. The in vitro results reveal that the cytotoxicity of the samples were dependent upon the drug release profiles as well as the chemical components of the surface coating agents. In general, the initial burst, drug release pattern and cytotoxicity could be well-controlled by carefully selecting the desired materials to suit different therapeutic applications.

  12. Antibiotic inhibition of group I ribozyme function.

    PubMed

    von Ahsen, U; Davies, J; Schroeder, R

    1991-09-26

    The discovery of catalytically active RNA has provided the basis for the evolutionary concept of an RNA world. It has been proposed that during evolution the functions of ancient catalytic RNA were modulated by low molecular weight effectors, related to antibiotics, present in the primordial soup. Antibiotics and RNA may have coevolved in the formation of the modern ribosome. Here we report that a set of aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are known to interact with the decoding region of the 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli, inhibit the second step of splicing of the T4 phage-derived td intron. Thus catalytic RNA seems to interact not only with a mononucleotide and an amino acid, but also with another class of biomolecules, the sugars. Splicing of other group I introns but not group II introns was inhibited. The similarity in affinity and specificity of these antibiotics for group I introns and rRNAs may result from recognition of evolutionarily conserved structures.

  13. A layered mixed zirconium phosphate/phosphonate with exposed carboxylic and phosphonic groups: X-ray powder structure and proton conductivity properties.

    PubMed

    Donnadio, Anna; Nocchetti, Morena; Costantino, Ferdinando; Taddei, Marco; Casciola, Mario; da Silva Lisboa, Fábio; Vivani, Riccardo

    2014-12-15

    A novel mixed zirconium phosphate/phosphonate based on glyphosine, of formula Zr2(PO4)H5(L)2·H2O [L = (O3PCH2)2NCH2COO], was synthesized in mild conditions. The compound has a layered structure that was solved ab initio from laboratory PXRD data. It crystallizes in the monoclinic C2/c space group with the following cell parameters: a = 29.925(3), b = 8.4225(5), c = 9.0985(4) Å, and β = 98.474(6)°. Phosphate groups are placed inside the sheets and connect the zirconium atoms in a tetradentate fashion, while uncoordinated carboxylate and P-OH phosphonate groups are exposed on the layer surface. Due to the presence of these acidic groups, the compound showed remarkable proton conductivity properties, which were studied in a wide range of temperature and relative humidity (RH). The conductivity is strongly dependent on RH and reaches 1 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 140 °C and 95% RH. At this RH, the activation energy of conduction is 0.15 eV in the temperature range 80-140 °C. The similarities of this structure with related structures already reported in the literature were also discussed.

  14. Functional properties and structural characterization of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar; Ruszkowski, Milosz; Nocek, Bogusław

    2015-07-28

    The majority of plant species accumulate high intracellular levels of proline to cope with hyperosmotic stress conditions. Proline synthesis from glutamate is tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels, yet little is known about the mechanisms for post-translational regulation of the enzymatic activities involved. The gene coding in rice (Oryza sativa L.) for δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the second and final step in this pathway, was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and functional properties of the affinity-purified protein were characterized. As for most species, rice P5C reductase was able to use in vitro either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. However, strikingly different effects of cations and anions were found depending on the pyridine nucleotide used, namely inhibition of NADH-dependent activity and stimulation of NADPH-dependent activity. Moreover, physiological concentrations of proline and NADP+ were strongly inhibitory for the NADH-dependent reaction, whereas the NADPH-dependent activity was mildly affected. Our results suggest that only NADPH may be used in vivo and that stress-dependent variations in ion homeostasis and NADPH/NADP+ ratio could modulate enzyme activity, being functional in promoting proline accumulation and potentially also adjusting NADPH consumption during the defense against hyperosmotic stress. The apparent molecular weight of the native protein observed in size exclusion chromatography indicated a high oligomerization state. We also report the first crystal structure of a plant P5C reductase at 3.40-Å resolution, showing a decameric quaternary assembly. It was possible to identify dynamic structural differences among rice, human, and bacterial enzymes.

  15. Functional renormalization group in Floquet space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissing, Anna Katharina; Meden, Volker; Kennes, Dante Marvin

    2016-12-01

    We present an extension of the functional renormalization group to Floquet space, which enables us to treat the long time behavior of interacting time periodically driven quantum dots. It is one of its strength that the method is neither bound to small driving amplitudes nor to small driving frequencies, i.e., very general time periodic signals can be considered. It is applied to the interacting resonant level model, a prototype model of a spinless, fermionic quantum dot. The renormalization in several setups with different combinations of time periodic parameters is studied, where the numerical results are complemented by analytic expressions for the renormalization in the limit of small driving amplitude. We show how the driving frequency acts as an infrared cutoff of the underlying renormalization group flow which manifests in novel power laws. We utilize the tunability of the effective reservoir distribution function in a periodically driven onsite energy setup to show how its shape is directly reflected in the renormalization group flow. This allows us to flexibly tune the power-law renormalization generically encountered in quantum dot structures. Finally, an in-phase quantum pump as well as a single parameter pump are investigated in the whole regime of driving frequency, demonstrating that the new power law in the driving frequency is reflected in the mean current of the latter.

  16. Transmembrane carboxyl residues are essential for cation-dependent function in the gastric H,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Rabon, E C; Hoggatt, M; Smillie, K

    1996-12-13

    unique residue present in each of the proteolytic preparations of the H,K-ATPase modified by [14C]DCCD. These data provide functional evidence of the selective inactivation of the K+-dependent partial reactions of the H,K-ATPase and show that Glu857 located at the M7 boundary in the C terminus of the pump molecule is a significant site of DCCD modification. These data are interpreted to indicate that this carboxyl residue is important for cation binding function.

  17. High fluorescence emission of carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene/BaTiO3 nanocomposites and rare earth metal complexes: Preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X. T.; Showkat, A. M.; Wang, Z.; Lim, K. T.

    2015-03-01

    Noble fluorescence nanocomposite compound based on barium titanate nanoparticles (BTO), polystyrene (PSt), and terbium ion (Tb3+) was synthesized by a combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and coordinate chemistry. Initially, a modification of surface of BTO was conducted by an exchange process with S-benzyl S'-trimethoxysilylpropyltrithiocarbonate to create macro-initiator for polymerization of styrene. Subsequently, aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-COOH) was generated by substitution reaction between 4-(Chloromethyl) benzoic acid and PSt chains. The coordination of the nanohybrids with Tb3+ ions afforded fluorescent Tb3+ tagged aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+) complexes. Structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR and SEM analyses confirmed the formation of BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+nanohybrids. Furthermore, TGA profiles demonstrated the grafting of aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene on BTO surface. Optical properties of BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+ complexes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  18. High fluorescence emission of carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene/BaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposites and rare earth metal complexes: Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, X. T.; Showkat, A. M.; Wang, Z.; Lim, K. T.

    2015-03-30

    Noble fluorescence nanocomposite compound based on barium titanate nanoparticles (BTO), polystyrene (PSt), and terbium ion (Tb{sup 3+}) was synthesized by a combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and coordinate chemistry. Initially, a modification of surface of BTO was conducted by an exchange process with S-benzyl S’-trimethoxysilylpropyltrithiocarbonate to create macro-initiator for polymerization of styrene. Subsequently, aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-COOH) was generated by substitution reaction between 4-(Chloromethyl) benzoic acid and PSt chains. The coordination of the nanohybrids with Tb{sup 3+} ions afforded fluorescent Tb{sup 3+} tagged aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+}) complexes. Structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR and SEM analyses confirmed the formation of BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+}nanohybrids. Furthermore, TGA profiles demonstrated the grafting of aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene on BTO surface. Optical properties of BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+} complexes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  19. High-throughput aided synthesis of the porous metal-organic framework-type aluminum pyromellitate, MIL-121, with extra carboxylic acid functionalization.

    PubMed

    Volkringer, Christophe; Loiseau, Thierry; Guillou, Nathalie; Férey, Gérard; Haouas, Mohamed; Taulelle, Francis; Elkaim, Erik; Stock, Norbert

    2010-11-01

    A new porous metal-organic framework (MOF)-type aluminum pyromellitate (MIL-121 or Al(OH)[H(2)btec]·(guest), (guest = H(2)O, H(4)btec = pyromellitic acid) has been isolated by using a high-throughput synthesis method under hydrothermal conditions. Its structure was determined from powder X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation (Soleil, France) and exhibits a network closely related to that of the MIL-53 series. It is a three-dimensional (3D) framework containing one-dimensional (1D) channels delimited by infinite trans-connected aluminum-centered octahedra AlO(4)(OH)(2) linked through the pyromellitate ligand. Here the organic ligand acts as tetradendate linker via two of the carboxylate groups. The two others remain non-bonded in their protonated form, and this constitutes a rare case of the occurrence of both bonding and non-bonding organic functionalities of the MOF family. The non-coordinated -COOH groups points toward the channels to get them an open form configuration. Within the tunnels are located unreacted pyromellitic acid and water species, which are evacuated upon heating, and a porous MIL-121 phase is obtained with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 162 m(2) g(-1). MIL-121 has been characterized by IR, thermogravimetry (TG) analyses, and solid state NMR spectroscopy employing a couple of two-dimensional (2D) techniques such as (1)H-(1)H SQ-DQ BABA, (1)H-(1)H SQ-SQ RFDR, (27)Al{(1)H} CPHETCOR and (27)Al MQMAS.

  20. Role of functional groups in fiber in the binding of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, K.

    1986-03-01

    The binding of zinc by purified cellulose, xylan, methylated xylan, pectin and methylated pectin was measured in vitro. Methylated xylan and methylated pectin were prepared chemically from xylan and pectin, respectively, to block hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Comparison of zinc binding capacities was made between xylan and methylated xylan, and between pectin and methylated pectin to assess the role of the two functional groups in binding minerals. The binding of zinc was conducted at pH 2.6, 4.0, 5.4 and 6.8 in various concentrations of ZnSO/sub 4/ solution containing /sup 65/Zn using a dialysis system for water-soluble pectin and an incubation-centrifugation model for the other four water-insoluble fibers. The results showed that zinc binding by each fiber was pH dependent and it increased from pH 2.6 to 6.8 (p < 0.001). At pH 6.8, % Zn bound to fiber decreased as concentration of ZnSO/sub 4/ increased from 1 ..mu..M to 96 ..mu..M (p less than or equal to 0.01). mean zinc binding ratio of pectin to methylated xylan was 5.1, whereas the ratio of pectin t methylated pectin was only 1.7. This suggests that the hydroxyl group in xylan plays a more important role than the carboxyl group in pectin in the binding of zinc.

  1. FT-IR quantification of the carbonyl functional group in aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol from phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kathryn M.; Ruthenburg, Travis C.; Smith, Jeremy; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Qi; Anastasio, Cort; Dillner, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from aqueous-phase reactions of some organic species, including phenols, contribute significantly to particulate mass in the atmosphere. In this study, we employ a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic technique to identify and quantify the functional group makeup of phenolic SOA. Solutions containing an oxidant (hydroxyl radical or 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde) and either one phenol (phenol, guaiacol, or syringol) or a mixture of phenols mimicking softwood or hardwood emissions were illuminated to make SOA, atomized, and collected on a filter. We produced laboratory standards of relevant organic compounds in order to develop calibrations for four functional groups: carbonyls (Cdbnd O), saturated C-H, unsaturated C-H and O-H. We analyzed the SOA samples with transmission FT-IR to identify and determine the amounts of the four functional groups. The carbonyl functional group accounts for 3-12% of the SOA sample mass in single phenolic SOA samples and 9-14% of the SOA sample mass in mixture samples. No carbonyl functional groups are present in the initial reactants. Varying amounts of each of the other functional groups are observed. Comparing carbonyls measured by FT-IR (which could include aldehydes, ketones, esters, and carboxylic acids) with eight small carboxylic acids measured by ion chromatography indicates that the acids only account for an average of 20% of the total carbonyl reported by FT-IR.

  2. Carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres in drug design.

    PubMed

    Ballatore, Carlo; Huryn, Donna M; Smith, Amos B

    2013-03-01

    The carboxylic acid functional group can be an important constituent of a pharmacophore, however, the presence of this moiety can also be responsible for significant drawbacks, including metabolic instability, toxicity, as well as limited passive diffusion across biological membranes. To avoid some of these shortcomings while retaining the desired attributes of the carboxylic acid moiety, medicinal chemists often investigate the use of carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres. The same type of strategy can also be effective for a variety other purposes, for example, to increase the selectivity of a biologically active compound or to create new intellectual property. Several carboxylic acid isosteres have been reported, however, the outcome of any isosteric replacement cannot be readily predicted as this strategy is generally found to be dependent upon the particular context (i.e., the characteristic properties of the drug and the drug-target). As a result, screening of a panel of isosteres is typically required. In this context, the discovery and development of novel carboxylic acid surrogates that could complement the existing palette of isosteres remains an important area of research. The goal of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the most commonly employed carboxylic acid (bio)isosteres and to present representative examples demonstrating the use and utility of each isostere in drug design.

  3. Effects of chemical functional groups on elemental mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Cheney, Marcos A; Wu, Fan; Li, Meng

    2011-02-15

    A systematic theoretical study using density functional theory is performed to provide molecular-level understanding of the effects of chemical functional groups on mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces. The zigzag and armchair edges were used in modeling the carbonaceous surfaces to simulate different adsorption sites. The edge atoms on the upper side of the models are unsaturated to simulate active sites. All calculations (optimizations, energies, and frequencies) were made at B3PW91 density functional theory level, using RCEP60VDZ basis set for mercury and 6-31G(d) pople basis set for other atoms. The results indicate that the embedding of halogen atom can increase the activity of its neighboring site which in turn increases the adsorption capacity of the carbonaceous surface for Hg(0). The adsorption belongs to chemisorptions, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. For the effects of oxygen functional groups, lactone, carbonyl and semiquinone favor Hg(0) adsorption because they increase the neighboring site's activity for mercury adsorption. On the contrary, phenol and carboxyl functional groups show a physisorption of Hg(0), and reduce Hg capture. This result can explain the seemingly conflicting experimental results reported in the literature concerning the influence of oxygen functional groups on mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surface.

  4. Transport of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles in saturated porous media: Column experiments and model analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol; Park, Jeong-Ann; Kim, Song-Bae; Kim, Hyunjung; Han, Yosep; Kim, Pil-Je; Eom, Ig-Chun; Jo, Eunhye

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media including quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS). Two sets of column experiments were performed under saturated flow conditions for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs. Breakthrough curves were analyzed to obtain mass recovery and one-dimensional transport model parameters. The first set of experiments was conducted to examine the effects of metal (Fe, Al) oxides and flow rate (0.25 and 0.5 mL min- 1) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in deionized water. The results showed that the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand (flow rate = 0.5 mL min- 1) was 83.1%, whereas no breakthrough of CBNPs (mass recovery = 0%) was observed in IOCS and AOCS at the same flow rate, indicating that metal (Fe, Al) oxides can play a significant role in the attachment of CBNPs to porous media. In addition, the mass recovery of CBNPs in quartz sand decreased to 76.1% as the flow rate decreased to 0.25 mL min- 1. Interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry, demonstrating that the interaction energy for CBNP-quartz sand was repulsive, whereas the interaction energies for CBNP-IOCS and CBNP-AOCS were attractive with no energy barriers. The second set of experiments was conducted in quartz sand to observe the effect of ionic strength (NaCl = 0.1 and 1.0 mM; CaCl2 = 0.01 and 0.1 mM) and pH (pH = 4.5 and 5.4) on the transport of CBNPs suspended in electrolyte. The results showed that the mass recoveries of CBNPs in NaCl = 0.1 and 1.0 mM were 65.3 and 6.4%, respectively. The mass recoveries of CBNPs in CaCl2 = 0.01 and 0.1 mM were 81.6 and 6.3%, respectively. These results demonstrated that CBNP attachment to quartz sand can be enhanced by increasing the electrolyte concentration. Interaction energy profiles demonstrated that

  5. A water-soluble carboxylic-functionalized chemosensor for detecting Al(3+) in aqueous media and living cells: Experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Jun Lee, Jae; Jin Park, Gyeong; Sung Kim, Yong; Young Lee, Sun; Ji Lee, Hyun; Noh, Insup; Kim, Cheal

    2015-07-15

    A new water-soluble carboxylic-functionalized chemosensor 1 was designed and synthesized. 1 exhibited the selective fluorescence enhancement toward aluminum ions with a 1:1 complexation stoichiometry in aqueous solution. The detection limit (24nM) of 1 for Al(3+) is about two order lower than the WHO guideline (7.41μM) for the drinking water. 1 was successfully applied to living cells and real samples for detecting Al(3+). Moreover, the sensing mechanism originated from the inhibited excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process and the chelation-enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect, as supported by theoretical calculations.

  6. Carboxyl and negative charge-functionalized superparamagnetic nanochains with amorphous carbon shell and magnetic core: synthesis and their application in removal of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Qian-Wang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Bin-Xing; Hu, Xian-Yi

    2011-11-01

    This communication describes carboxyl-functionalized nanochains with amorphous carbon shell (18 nm) and magnetic core using ferrocene as a single reactant under the induction of an external magnetic field (0.40 T), which shows a superparamagnetic behavior and magnetization saturation of 38.6 emu g(-1). Because of mesoporous structure (3.8 nm) and surface negative charge (-35.18 mV), the nanochains can be used as adsorbent for removing the heavy metal ions (90%) from aqueous solution.

  7. Self-assembly of Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu Solder in Thermoplastic Resin Containing Carboxyl Group and its Interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Yukihiko; Suzuki, Naoya; Takano, Nozomu

    2014-09-01

    The self-assembly of solder powder on pads is attractive as a novel interconnection method between chips and substrates. However, the solder used in this method is limited to Sn-58Bi and Sn-52In. In contrast, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu has been relatively less studied despite its wide use as a lead-free solder in assembling semiconductor packages. Hence, here, polymeric materials incorporating Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu solder powder were investigated for the self-assembly of the solder on pads at temperatures up to 260°C in a lead-free reflow process. The self-assembly of the solder was observed with an optical microscope through transparent glass chips placed on substrates covered with the polymeric materials incorporating the solder powder. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were performed to confirm the behaviors of the reaction of the resins and the melting of the solder. When epoxy resin with a fluxing additive was used as a matrix, self-assembly of the solder was prevented by the cross-linking reaction. Conversely, when thermoplastic resin containing carboxyl groups was used as a matrix, the self-assembly of solder was successfully achieved in the absence of fluxing additives. The shear strength of interconnection using reflowfilm with lamination was sufficient and significantly increased during the reflow process. However, the shear strength of the reflowfilm showed cohesive failure, possibly because of the brittle intermetallic compounds (Ag3Sn, Au4Sn) network in bulk was lower than that of conventional solder paste that showed interfacial failure after the reflow process with a rapid cooling rate.

  8. Griseochelin, a novel carboxylic acid antibiotic from Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, U; Schade, W; Roth, M; Radics, L; Incze, M; Ujszászy, K

    1984-08-01

    Griseochelin, C33H60O7, isolated from an asporogenous strain of Streptomyces griseus represents a novel carboxylic acid antibiotic. The metabolite, which is active against Gram-positive bacteria, forms water-insoluble salts with mono- and divalent cations and binds alkaline-earth metal ions specifically in 2:1 (X2M) stoichiometry. Detailed spectral (IR, MS and NMR) studies provide full characterization of its constitution featuring a carboxylic acid function, a substituted tetrahydropyran ring, an allylic OH group which are accommodated within a tetrahydroxylated-octamethyl-C25 diene backbone.

  9. Affinity of functional groups for membrane surfaces: implications for physically irreversible fouling.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Hiroshi; Kimura, Katsuki; Okajima, Takaharu; Tokumoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yoshimasa

    2008-07-15

    Fouling in membranes used for water treatment has been attributed to the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) in water. There have been reports recently on the contribution of hydrophilic fractions of NOM (e.g., carbohydrate-like substances) to fouling, but there is still little information about the physicochemical interactions between membranes and carbohydrate-like substances. In this study, the affinity of carbohydrate-like substances to two different microfiltration (MF) membranes was investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and functionally modified microspheres. Microspheres were attached to the tip of the cantilever in an AFM apparatus and the adhesion forces working between the microspheres and the membranes were determined. The microspheres used in this study were coated with either hydroxyl groups or carboxyl groups to be used as surrogates of carbohydrate-like substances or humic acid, respectively. Measurements of adhesion force were carried out at pH of 6.8 and the experimental results demonstrated that the adhesion force to membranes was strong in the case of hydroxyl groups but weak in the case of carboxyl groups. The strong adhesion between the hydroxyl group and the membrane surface is explained by the strong hydrogen bond generated. It was also found that the affinity of the hydroxyl group to a polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) membrane was much higher than that to a polyethylene (PE) membrane, possibly due to the high electronegative nature of the PVDF polymer. The time course of changes in the affinity of hydroxyl group to a membrane used in a practical condition was investigated by repeatedly carrying out AFM force measurements with PE membrane specimens sampled from a pilot plant operated at an existing water treatment plant. Microspheres exhibited strong affinity to the membrane at the initial stage of operation (within 5 days), but subsequently exponential reduction of the affinity was seen until the end of operation, as a result

  10. Functional group diversity increases with modularity in complex food webs

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, D.; Yallop, M.L.; Memmott, J.

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity increases the ability of ecosystems to provide multiple functions. Most studies report a positive relationship between species richness and the number of ecosystem functions. However, it is not known whether the number of functional groups is related to the structure of the underlying species interaction network. Here we present food web data from 115 salt marsh islands and show that network structure is associated with the number of functional groups present. Functional group diversity is heterogeneously distributed across spatial scales, with some islands hosting more functional groups than others. Functional groups form modules within the community so that food webs with more modular architectures have more functional group diversity. Further, in communities with different interaction types, modularity can be seen as the multifunctional equivalent of trophic complementarity. Collectively, these findings reveal spatial heterogeneity in the number of functional groups that emerges from patterns in the structure of the food web. PMID:26059871

  11. Functional group diversity increases with modularity in complex food webs.

    PubMed

    Montoya, D; Yallop, M L; Memmott, J

    2015-06-10

    Biodiversity increases the ability of ecosystems to provide multiple functions. Most studies report a positive relationship between species richness and the number of ecosystem functions. However, it is not known whether the number of functional groups is related to the structure of the underlying species interaction network. Here we present food web data from 115 salt marsh islands and show that network structure is associated with the number of functional groups present. Functional group diversity is heterogeneously distributed across spatial scales, with some islands hosting more functional groups than others. Functional groups form modules within the community so that food webs with more modular architectures have more functional group diversity. Further, in communities with different interaction types, modularity can be seen as the multifunctional equivalent of trophic complementarity. Collectively, these findings reveal spatial heterogeneity in the number of functional groups that emerges from patterns in the structure of the food web.

  12. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. )

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  13. Refinements to the structure of graphite oxide: absolute quantification of functional groups via selective labelling.

    PubMed

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2015-12-21

    Chemical modification and functionalization of inherent functional groups within graphite oxide (GO) are essential aspects of graphene-based nano-materials used in wide-ranging applications. Despite extensive research, there remains some discrepancy in its structure, with current knowledge limited primarily to spectroscopic data from XPS, NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. We report herein an innovative electrochemistry-based approach. Four electroactive labels are chosen to selectively functionalize groups in GO, and quantification of each group is achieved by voltammetric analysis. This allows for the first time quantification of absolute amounts of each group, with a further advantage of distinguishing various carbonyl species: namely ortho- and para-quinones from aliphatic ketones. Intrinsic variations in the compositions of permanganate versus chlorate-oxidized GOs were thus observed. Principal differences include permanganate-GO exhibiting substantial quinonyl content, in comparison to chlorate-GO with the vast majority of its carbonyls as isolated ketones. The results confirm that carboxylic groups are rare in actuality, and are in fact entirely absent from chlorate-GO. These observations refine and advance our understanding of GO structure by addressing certain disparities in past models resulting from employment of different oxidation routes, with the vital implication that GO production methods cannot be used interchangeably in the manufacture of graphene-based devices.

  14. Functional group analysis of natural organic colloids and clay association kinetics using C(1s) spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, T.; Hertkorn, N.; Artinger, R.; Claret, F.; Bauer, A.

    2003-03-01

    The quantification of natural humic colloid functional group content and chemical association of humic substances with clay minerals exerts a crucial role in the colloid-borne mobility of actinides due to the functional group dependent strong interaction with multivalent metal ions. Functional group quantification in isolated fulvic acids of the Gorleben groundwater (Lower Saxony, NW Germany) by comparison of high resolution C(1s) NEXAFS spectra deconvolution with ^{13}C-NMR measurements showed good correlation (r^2> 0.9) and gives a potential quantification tool in complex natural groundwater Systems. Time resolved soft X-ray spectromicroscopy on dissolved organic carbon stabilized SWy-2 smectite colloids revealed an enrichment of carboxyl groups on broken edges (silanol/aluminol groups) at short contact times (1h). With longer contact times (7d, 6 months) the clay associated organic carbon increases and significantly higher aromatic content associated with basal surfaces were detected. The enhanced sorption of aromatic compounds can be related to an increase in mineral surface hydrophobicity and/or preferential sorption on charged siloxane surfaces.

  15. Direct enantioselective conjugate addition of carboxylic acids with chiral lithium amides as traceless auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Jackson, Jeffrey J; Eickhoff, John A; Zakarian, Armen

    2015-01-21

    Michael addition is a premier synthetic method for carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bond formation. Using chiral dilithium amides as traceless auxiliaries, we report the direct enantioselective Michael addition of carboxylic acids. A free carboxyl group in the product provides versatility for further functionalization, and the chiral reagent can be readily recovered by extraction with aqueous acid. The method has been applied in the enantioselective total synthesis of the purported structure of pulveraven B.

  16. Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-02

    cycloadditions to modify reactive groups within the phospholipid membrane structure and how the nature of the reactive elements, the copper catalyst ...within the phospholipid membrane structure and how the nature of the reactive elements, the copper catalyst , the azide, and the alkyne, affect the...the copper catalyst , the azide, and the alkyne, affect the location and yield of the resulting product in the phospholipid membrane. 2. Reasons why

  17. 1-Azaniumylcyclobutane-1-carboxylate monohydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butcher, Ray J.; Brewer, Greg; Burton, Aaron S.; Dworkin, Jason

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, C5H9NO2H2O, the amino acid is in the usual zwitterionic form involving the carboxylate group. The cyclobutane backbone of the amino acid is disordered over two conformations, with occupancies of 0.882 (7) and0.118 (7). In the crystal, NH O and OH O hydrogen bonds link the zwitterions [with the water molecule involved as both acceptor (with the NH3+) and donor (through a single carboxylate O from two different aminocyclobutane carboxylatemoities)], resulting in a two-dimensional layered structure lying parallel to (100).

  18. Simultaneous decolorization and biohydrogen production from xylose by Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 in presence of azo dyes with sulfonate and carboxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Cao, Ming-Yue; Wang, Peng-Tao; Wang, Shi; Yue, Ying-Rong; Yuan, Wen-Duo; Qiao, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Fei; Song, Xin

    2017-03-10

    Biohydrogen production from the pulp and paper effluent containing rich lignocellulosic material could be achieved by the fermentation process. Xylose, an important hemicellulose hydrolysis product, is used less efficiently as a substrate for biohydrogen production. Moreover, azo dyes are usually added to fabricate anti-counterfeiting paper, which further increases the complexity of wastewater. This study is the first paper to report that xylose could serve as the sole carbon source for a pure culture-Klebsiella oxytoca GS-4-08 to achieve simultaneous decolorization and biohydrogen production. With 2 g l(-1) of xylose as the substrate, a maximum xylose utilization rate (URXyl) and a hydrogen molar yield (HMY) were obtained as 93.99% and 0.259 mol H2 mol(-1) xylose, respectively. Biohydrogen kinetics and e(-) equiv balance calculations indicated that MR penetrates and intracellularly inhibits on both pentose phosphate pathway and pyruvate fermentation pathway, while MO was independent of the glycolysis and biohydrogen pathway. The data demonstrate that biohydrogen pathways in the presence of azo dyes with sulfonate and carboxyl groups were different, but the azo dyes could be completely reduced during the biohydrogen production period whether with the presence of MO or MR. The feasibility of hydrogen production from industrial pulp and paper effluent by the strain was also proved if the xylose is sufficient, and not affected by toxic substances which usually exists in such wastewater except for chlorophenol. This study offers a promising energy-recycling strategy for treating pulp and paper wastewaters, especially for those containing azo dyes.Importance The pulp and paper industry is a major industry in many developing countries and the global market of pulp and paper wastewater treatment is expected to increase by 60% between 2012 and 2020. Such wastewater contains large amount of refractory contaminants, such as lignin, whose reclamation is considered economic

  19. Photochemical and antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated chitosan functionalized with photoactive groups.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Thomas V; Kuriakose, Sunny

    2013-10-01

    Chitosan was functionalized with 4-((E)-2-(3-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)diazen-1-yl)benzoic acid by the coupling of the hydroxyl functional groups of chitosan with carboxylic acid group of the dye by DCC coupling method. The silver nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel method of nanoparticle synthesis. Silver nanoparticle-encapsulated functionalized chitosan was prepared by the phase transfer method. The products were characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopic methods and by SEM and TEM analysis. The photochemical properties of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated chitosan functionalized with 4-((E)-2-(3-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)diazen-1-yl)benzoic acid was studied in detail. The light-fastening properties of the chromophoric system was enhanced when attached to chitosan, and it can be further improved by the encapsulation of silver nanoparticles. The antibacterial analysis of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated functionalized chitosan was carried out against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and against fungal species such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus. This study showed that silver nanoparticles-encapsulated functionalized chitosan can be used for antibacterial and antifungal applications.

  20. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework.

    PubMed

    Demir, Selvan; Brune, Nicholas K; Van Humbeck, Jeffrey F; Mason, Jarad A; Plakhova, Tatiana V; Wang, Shuao; Tian, Guoxin; Minasian, Stefan G; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tohru; Kalmykov, Stepan N; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Shuh, David K; Long, Jeffrey R

    2016-04-27

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr(2+), Fe(3+), Nd(3+), and Am(3+), from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity.

  1. Extraction of Lanthanide and Actinide Ions from Aqueous Mixtures Using a Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Porous Aromatic Framework

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) incorporating a high concentration of acid functional groups possess characteristics that are promising for use in separating lanthanide and actinide metal ions, as required in the treatment of radioactive waste. These materials have been shown to be indefinitely stable to concentrated acids and bases, potentially allowing for multiple adsorption/stripping cycles. Additionally, the PAFs combine exceptional features from MOFs and inorganic/activated carbons giving rise to tunable pore surfaces and maximum chemical stability. Herein, we present a study of the adsorption of selected metal ions, Sr2+, Fe3+, Nd3+, and Am3+, from aqueous solutions employing a carbon-based porous aromatic framework, BPP-7 (Berkeley Porous Polymer-7). This material displays high metal loading capacities together with excellent adsorption selectivity for neodymium over strontium based on Langmuir adsorption isotherms and ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations. Based in part upon X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies, the stronger adsorption of neodymium is attributed to multiple metal ion and binding site interactions resulting from the densely functionalized and highly interpenetrated structure of BPP-7. Recyclability and combustibility experiments demonstrate that multiple adsorption/stripping cycles can be completed with minimal degradation of the polymer adsorption capacity. PMID:27163056

  2. Immobilization of proline-specific endoprotease on nonporous silica nanoparticles functionalized with amino group.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fuhua; Hou, Tonggang; Wang, Jianxun; Jiang, Yijun; Huang, Shuxia; Wang, Qiao; Xian, Mo; Mu, Xindong

    2017-01-01

    Enzyme immobilization is believed to provide an excellent base for increasing environmental tolerance of enzyme and considerable period of time. In this work, a kind of nonporous silica nanoparticles functionalized with amino group was synthesized to immobilize proline-specific endoprotease (PSEP). PSEP is known to specifically cleave peptides (or esters) at the carboxyl side of proline, thus can prevent the formation of haze and prolong the shelf life of beer. After immobilization, the environmental tolerance (temperature and pH, respectively) was obviously improved, and the immobilized enzyme can retain above 90 % of its original activity after 6 uses. Moreover, the immobilized enzyme can effectively prevent the formation of chill-haze using fresh beer fermentation liquid.

  3. Preparation for Group Therapy: The Effects of Preparer and Modality on Group Process and Individual Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Vicki E.; DeLucia, Janice L.

    1993-01-01

    Examined effects of preparer (leader versus other personnel) and modality (group versus individual) on expectations about therapy, anxiety, group and individual functioning, and leader functioning in group therapy preparation program. Findings from 32 graduate students revealed that preparation can have positive effect on clients' beliefs,…

  4. Carboxylic acid functionalization prevents the translocation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes at predicted environmentally relevant concentrations into targeted organs of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouara, Abdelli; Wu, Qiuli; Li, Yinxia; Tang, Meng; Wang, Haifang; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Dayong

    2013-06-01

    Carboxyl (-COOH) surface modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-COOH) can be used for targeted delivery of drugs and imaging. However, whether MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations exert certain toxic effects on multicellular organisms and the underlying mechanisms are still largely unclear. In the present study, we applied the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate the properties of MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations by comparing the effects of MWCNTs and MWCNTs-COOH exposure on C. elegans from L1-larvae to adult at concentrations of 0.001-1000 μg L-1. Exposure to MWCNTs could potentially damage the intestine (primary targeted organ) at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg L-1 and functions of neurons and reproductive organ (secondary targeted organs) at concentrations greater than 0.001 μg L-1. Carboxyl modification prevented the toxicity of MWCNTs on the primary and the secondary targeted organs at concentrations less than 100 μg L-1, suggesting that carboxyl modification can effectively prevent the adverse effects of MWCNTs at environmentally relevant concentrations. After exposure, MWCNTs-COOH (1 mg L-1) were translocated into the spermatheca and embryos in the body through the primary targeted organs. However, MWCNTs-COOH (10 μg L-1) were not observed in spermatheca and embryos in the body of nematodes. Moreover, relatively high concentrations of MWCNTs-COOH exposed nematodes might have a hyper-permeable intestinal barrier, whereas MWCNTs-COOH at environmentally relevant concentrations effectively sustained the normally permeable state for the intestinal barrier. Therefore, we elucidated the cellular basis of carboxyl modification to prevent toxicity of MWCNTs at environmentally relevant concentrations. Our data highlights the key role of biological barriers in the primary targeted organs to block toxicity formation from MWCNTs, which will be useful for the design of effective prevention strategies against

  5. Functional specialization and differential regulation of short-chain carboxylic acid transporters in the pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Neide; Casal, Margarida; Johansson, Björn; MacCallum, Donna M; Brown, Alistair JP; Paiva, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The major fungal pathogen Candida albicans has the metabolic flexibility to assimilate a wide range of nutrients in its human host. Previous studies have suggested that C. albicans can encounter glucose-poor microenvironments during infection and that the ability to use alternative non-fermentable carbon sources contributes to its virulence. JEN1 encodes a monocarboxylate transporter in C. albicans and we show that its paralogue, JEN2, encodes a novel dicarboxylate plasma membrane transporter, subjected to glucose repression. A strain deleted in both genes lost the ability to transport lactic, malic and succinic acids by a mediated mechanism and it displayed a growth defect on these substrates. Although no significant morphogenetic or virulence defects were found in the double mutant strain, both JEN1 and JEN2 were strongly induced during infection. Jen1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and Jen2-GFP were upregulated following the phagocytosis of C. albicans cells by neutrophils and macrophages, displaying similar behaviour to an Icl1-GFP fusion. In the murine model of systemic candidiasis approximately 20–25% of C. albicans cells infecting the kidney expressed Jen1-GFP and Jen2-GFP. Our data suggest that Jen1 and Jen2 are expressed in glucose-poor niches within the host, and that these short-chain carboxylic acid transporters may be important in the early stages of infection. PMID:19968788

  6. Peptide coupling between amino acids and the carboxylic acid of a functionalized chlorido-gold(I)-phosphane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaum, Margit; List, Manuela; Himmelsbach, Markus; Redhammer, Günther J; Monkowius, Uwe

    2014-10-06

    We have developed a protocol for the direct coupling between methyl ester protected amino acids and the chlorido-gold(I)-phosphane (p-HOOC(C6H4)PPh2)AuCl. By applying the EDC·HCl/NHS strategy (EDC·HCl = N-ethyl-N'-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride, NHS = N-hydroxysuccinimide), the methyl esters of l-phenylalanine, glycine, l-leucine, l-alanine, and l-methionine are coupled with the carboxylic acid of the gold complex in moderate to good yields (62-88%). All amino acid tagged gold complexes were characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry. As corroborated by measurement of the angle of optical rotation, no racemization occurred during the reaction. The molecular structure of the leucine derivative was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In the course of developing an efficient coupling protocol, the acyl chlorides (p-Cl(O)C(C6H4)PPh2)AuX (X = Cl, Br) were also prepared and characterized.

  7. ATR-FTIR characterization of organic functional groups and inorganic ions in ambient aerosols at a rural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coury, Charity; Dillner, Ann M.

    An Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic method was used to measure organic functional groups and inorganic ions at Tonto National Monument (TNM), an Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sampling site in a rural area near Phoenix, Arizona. Functional groups and ions from common aerosol compound classes such as aliphatic and aromatic CH, methylene, methyl, aldehydes/ketones, carboxylic acids, ammonium sulfate and nitrate as well as functional groups from difficult to measure compound classes such as esters/lactones, acid anhydrides, carbohydrate hydroxyl and ethers, amino acids, and amines were quantified. On average, ˜33% of the PM 1.0 mass was composed of organic aerosol. The average (standard deviation) composition of the organic aerosol at TNM was 34% (6%) biogenic functional groups, 21% (5%) oxygenated functional groups, 28% (7%) aliphatic hydrocarbon functional groups (aliphatic CH, methylene and methyl) and 17% (1%) aromatic hydrocarbon functional groups. Compositional analysis, functional group correlations, and back trajectories were used to identify three types of events with source signatures: primary biogenic-influenced, urban-influenced, and regional background. The biogenic-influenced event had high concentrations of amino acids and carbohydrate hydroxyl and ether, as well as aliphatic CH and aromatic CH functional groups and qualitatively high levels of silicate. The urban-influenced events had back trajectories traveling directly from the Phoenix area and high concentrations of hydrocarbons, oxygenated functional groups, and inorganic ions. This aerosol characterization suggests that both primary emissions in Phoenix and secondary formation of aerosols from Phoenix emissions had a major impact on the aerosol composition and concentration at TNM. The regional background source had low concentrations of all functional groups, but had higher concentrations of biogenic functional

  8. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly report, January 1--March 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    Over the course of the studies on catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic residues in coal by carbon monoxide, the author performed preliminary investigations into the removal of other heteroatom groups. This report describes the attempted carbonylation of phenyl amido complexes. These studies resulted in the surprisingly facile formation of amidines. The amidine group is the nitrogen analog of carboxylic acids and esters. This functional group combines the properties of an azomethane-like C=N double bond with an amide-like C-N single bond. This group, like the related allyl (C-C-C), aza-allyl (C-N-C), and carboxylato (O-C-O) groups, form a number of transition metal derivatives, with both early and late transition metals. Various bonding modes of the amidino group have been reported. However, most isolated complexes have the amidino ligand as a chelating ligand or bridging two metals. This is due to the preference of amidines to bond via the nitrogen lone pairs, in contrast to the {eta}3 bonding observed in metal-allyl complexes. The experimental section of the paper describes the synthesis of platinum complexes, X-ray diffraction data for one Pt complex, and its reaction with carbon monoxide. Results are presented on the crystal and molecular structure of a platinum complex.

  9. Carboxylated magnetic polymer nanolatexes: Preparation, characterization and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weiming; Gao, Feng; Gu, Hongchen

    2005-05-01

    Carboxylated magnetic polymer nanolatexes were prepared by miniemulsion polymerization using 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanopentanoic acid) (ACPA) as initiator, which provided carboxyl end groups on the latex surface directly. The colloidal stability and the magnetic properties showed that these resulting carboxylated magnetic polymer nanolatexes were applicable in biomedical separation, which was performed by covalent coupling of activated antibody.

  10. Perfluorinated carbon-chain copolymers with functional groups and cation exchange membranes based on them: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsh, Yu E.; Smirnov, S. A.; Popkov, Yu M.; Timashev, Sergei F.

    1990-06-01

    The review is devoted to perfluorinated polymers with sulphonic and carboxylic acid groups and to cation exchange membranes based on them. The synthesis is described of copolymers of tetrafluoroethylene with perfluorovinyl ethers containing functional groups by radical copolymerisation in an organic medium and in aqueous emulsions. Special features of the copolymerisation and approaches to obtaining copolymers with set characteristics are discussed. Data are presented on the structure and physicochemical properties of the polymeric films. Attempts to form membranes from the polymers obtained, the means of strengthening them and methods for chemical modification are described. Data are correlated on the influence of structure and polymer composition and the nature of the functional groups on the electrochemical characteristics of membranes. Special features of the functioning of perfluorinated membranes in the process for making chlorine and alkali by the electrolysis of sodium chloride solution are considered. The bibliography has 104 references.

  11. Carboxyl-functionalized polyurethane nanoparticles with immunosuppressive properties as a new type of anti-inflammatory platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yen-Jang; Hung, Kun-Che; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with the body immune system is critically important for their biomedical applications. Most NPs stimulate the immune response of macrophages. Here we show that synthetic polyurethane nanoparticles (PU NPs, diameter 34-64 nm) with rich surface COO- functional groups (zeta potential -70 to -50 mV) can suppress the immune response of macrophages. The specially-designed PU NPs reduce the gene expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) for endotoxin-treated macrophages. The PU NPs increase the intracellular calcium of macrophages (4.5-6.5 fold) and activate autophagy. This is in contrast to the autophagy dysfunction generally observed upon NP exposure. These PU NPs may further decrease the nuclear factor-κB-related inflammation via autophagy pathways. The immunosuppressive activities of PU NPs can prevent animal death by inhibiting the macrophage recruitment and proinflammatory responses, confirmed by an in vivo zebrafish model. Therefore, the novel biodegradable PU NPs demonstrate COO- dependent immunosuppressive properties without carrying any anti-inflammatory agents. This study suggests that NP surface chemistry may regulate the immune response, which provides a new paradigm for potential applications of NPs in anti-inflammation and immunomodulation.The interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with the body immune system is critically important for their biomedical applications. Most NPs stimulate the immune response of macrophages. Here we show that synthetic polyurethane nanoparticles (PU NPs, diameter 34-64 nm) with rich surface COO- functional groups (zeta potential -70 to -50 mV) can suppress the immune response of macrophages. The specially-designed PU NPs reduce the gene expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) for endotoxin-treated macrophages. The PU NPs increase the intracellular calcium of macrophages (4.5-6.5 fold) and activate autophagy. This is in contrast

  12. Surface modification influencing adsorption of red wine constituents: The role of functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption of wine constituents at solid surfaces is important in applications such as filtration and membrane fouling, binding to tanks and fittings and interactions with processing aids such as bentonite. The interaction of wine constituents with surfaces is mediated through adsorbed wine components, where the type of constituents, amount, orientation, and conformation are of consequence for the surface response. This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of red wine constituents. Plasma-polymerized films rich in amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, formyl and methyl functional groups were generated on solid substrates whereas, glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride was covalently attached to allylamine plasma-polymer modified surface and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) was electrostatically adsorbed to an amine plasma-polymerized surface. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ability of different substrates to adsorb red wine constituents was evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that substrates modified with -SO3H and -COOH groups can adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds whereas -NH2 and -NR3 groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. Red wine constituents after filtration were adsorbed in higher extend on -NR3 and -CHO surfaces. The -OH modified surfaces had the lowest ability to absorb wine components.

  13. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    DOE PAGES

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-19

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict themore » effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid–liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.« less

  14. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid-liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.

  15. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon.

    PubMed

    Khanal, S P; Mahfuz, H; Rondinone, A J; Leventouri, Th

    2016-03-01

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was studied. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5 wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6±0.3 MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1 wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This value is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases.

  16. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon

    SciTech Connect

    Khanal, Suraj P.; Mahfuz, Hassan; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Leventouri, Th.

    2015-11-12

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was researched. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5 wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6 ± 0.3 MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1 wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This value is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Lastly, the increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases.

  17. Improvement of the fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporation of carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and nylon

    DOE PAGES

    Khanal, Suraj P.; Mahfuz, Hassan; Rondinone, Adam Justin; ...

    2015-11-12

    The potential of improving the fracture toughness of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) by incorporating carboxyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (CfSWCNTs) and polymerized ε-caprolactam (nylon) was researched. A series of HAp samples with CfSWCNTs concentrations varying from 0 to 1.5 wt.%, without, and with nylon addition was prepared. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the samples. The three point bending test was applied to measure the fracture toughness of the composites. A reproducible value of 3.6 ± 0.3 MPa.√m was found for samples containing 1 wt.% CfSWCNTs and nylon. This valuemore » is in the range of the cortical bone fracture toughness. Lastly, the increase of the CfSWCNTs content results to decrease of the fracture toughness, and formation of secondary phases.« less

  18. Ionization behavior, stoichiometry of association, and accessibility of functional groups in the active layers of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; González, Mari I; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2010-09-01

    We characterized the fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layers of six commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes and found that in contrast to their similar elemental composition, total concentration of functional groups, and degree of polymerization, the ionization behavior and spatial distribution of carboxylic (R-COOH) groups within the active layers can be significantly different. We also studied the steric effects experienced by barium ion (Ba2+) in the active layers by determining the fraction of carboxylate (R-COO-) groups accessible to Ba2+; such fraction, referred to as the accessibility ratio (AR), was found to vary within the range AR=0.40-0.81, and to be generally independent of external solution pH. Additionally, we studied an NF membrane with a sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) active layer, and found that the concentration of sulfonate (R-SO3-) groups in the active layer was 1.67 M, independent of external solution pH and approximately three times higher than the maximum concentration (approximately 0.45+/-0.25 M) of R-COO- groups in PA active layers. The R-SO3- groups were found to be highly accessible to Ba2+ (AR=0.95+/-0.01).

  19. Doping Level of Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes Controls the Grafting Density of Functional Groups for DNA Assays.

    PubMed

    Švorc, Ĺubomír; Jambrec, Daliborka; Vojs, Marian; Barwe, Stefan; Clausmeyer, Jan; Michniak, Pavol; Marton, Marián; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-09-02

    The impact of different doping levels of boron-doped diamond on the surface functionalization was investigated by means of electrochemical reduction of aryldiazonium salts. The grafting efficiency of 4-nitrophenyl groups increased with the boron levels (B/C ratio from 0 to 20,000 ppm). Controlled grafting of nitrophenyldiazonium was used to adjust the amount of immobilized single-stranded DNA strands at the surface and further on the hybridization yield in dependence on the boron doping level. The grafted nitro functions were electrochemically reduced to the amine moieties. Subsequent functionalization with a succinic acid introduced carboxyl groups for subsequent binding of an amino-terminated DNA probe. DNA hybridization significantly depends on the probe density which is in turn dependent on the boron doping level. The proposed approach opens new insights for the design and control of doped diamond surface functionalization for the construction of DNA hybridization assays.

  20. Various fates of neuronal progenitor cells observed on several different chemical functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi; Wang, Ying; He, Jin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Xu, Quan-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    Neuronal progenitor cells cultured on gold-coated glass surfaces modified by different chemical functional groups, including hydroxyl (-OH), carboxyl (-COOH), amino (-NH2), bromo (-Br), mercapto (-SH), - Phenyl and methyl (-CH3), were studied here to investigate the influence of surface chemistry on the cells' adhesion, morphology, proliferation and functional gene expression. Focal adhesion staining indicated in the initial culture stage cells exhibited morphological changes in response to different chemical functional groups. Cells cultured on -NH2 grafted surface displayed focal adhesion plaque and flattened morphology and had the largest contact area. However, their counter parts on -CH3 grafted surface displayed no focal adhesion and rounded morphology and had the smallest contact area. After 6 days culture, the proliferation trend was as follows: -NH2 > -SH> -COOH> - Phenyl > - Br > -OH> -CH3. To determine the neural functional properties of the cells affected by surface chemistry, the expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), nerve growth factor (NGF) and brainderived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were characterized. An increase of GAD67 expression was observed on -NH2, -COOH and -SH grafted surfaces, while no increase in NGF and BDNF expression was observed on any chemical surfaces. These results highlight the importance of surface chemistry in the fate determination of neuronal progenitor cells, and suggest that surface chemistry must be considered in the design of biomaterials for neural tissue engineering.

  1. Are carboxyl groups the most acidic sites in amino acids? Gas-phase acidities, photoelectron spectra, and computations on tyrosine, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and their conjugate bases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhixin; Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Kass, Steven R

    2009-01-28

    Deprotonation of tyrosine in the gas phase was found to occur preferentially at the phenolic site, and the conjugate base consists of a 70:30 mixture of phenoxide and carboxylate anions at equilibrium. This result was established by developing a chemical probe for differentiating these two isomers, and the presence of both ions was confirmed by photoelectron spectroscopy. Equilibrium acidity measurements on tyrosine indicated that deltaG(acid)(o) = 332.5 +/- 1.5 kcal mol(-1) and deltaH(acid)(o) = 340.7 +/- 1.5 kcal mol(-1). Photoelectron spectra yielded adiabatic electron detachment energies of 2.70 +/- 0.05 and 3.55 +/- 0.10 eV for the phenoxide and carboxylate anions, respectively. The H/D exchange behavior of deprotonated tyrosine was examined using three different alcohols (CF3CH2OD, C6H5CH2OD, and CH3CH2OD), and incorporation of up to three deuterium atoms was observed. Two pathways are proposed to account for these results, and all of the experimental findings are supplemented with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ and G3B3 calculations. In addition, it was found that electrospray ionization of tyrosine from a 3:1 (v/v) CH3OH/H2O solution using a commercial source produces a deprotonated [M-H]- anion with the gas-phase equilibrium composition rather than the structure of the ion that exists in aqueous media. Electrospray ionization from acetonitrile, however, leads largely to the liquid-phase (carboxylate) structure. A control molecule, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, was found to behave in a similar manner. Thus, the electrospray conditions that are employed for the analysis of a compound can alter the isomeric composition of the resulting anion.

  2. Assignment of functional domains involved in ADP-ribosylation and B-oligomer binding within the carboxyl terminus of the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K M; Barbieri, J T

    1994-01-01

    The roles of the carboxyl terminus of the S1 subunit (composed of 235 amino acids) of pertussis toxin in the ADP-ribosylation of transducin (Gt) and in B-oligomer binding were defined by analysis of two carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants of the recombinant S1 (rS1) subunit: C204, which is composed of amino acids 1 through 204 of S1, and C219, which is composed of amino acids 1 through 219 of S1. C204 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a stable, soluble peptide that had an apparent molecular mass of 23.4 kDa. In a linear velocity assay, the specific activity of C180 was 2% and that of C204 was 80% of the activity displayed by rS1 in catalyzing the ADP-ribosylation of Gt. In addition, C204 possessed catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) that were 110% at variable Gt concentrations and 40% at variable NAD concentrations of those reported for rS1. These data showed that the catalytic activity of C204 approached the activity of S1. C204 and C219 were unable to associate with the B oligomer under conditions which promoted association of rS1 with the B oligomer. Consistent with these results, mixtures of C204 or C219 with the B oligomer did not elicit a clustering phenotype in CHO cells, whereas rS1 which had associated with the B oligomer was as cytotoxic as native pertussis toxin. These data indicate that residues between 219 and 235 are important in the association of the S1 subunit with the B oligomer. These data allow the assignment of functional regions to the carboxyl terminus of S1. Residues 195 to 204 are required for optimal ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, residues 205 to 219 link the catalytic region of S1 and a B-oligomer-binding region of S1, and residues 220 to 235 are required for association of S1 with the B oligomer. Images PMID:8168972

  3. Refinements to the structure of graphite oxide: absolute quantification of functional groups via selective labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Chemical modification and functionalization of inherent functional groups within graphite oxide (GO) are essential aspects of graphene-based nano-materials used in wide-ranging applications. Despite extensive research, there remains some discrepancy in its structure, with current knowledge limited primarily to spectroscopic data from XPS, NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. We report herein an innovative electrochemistry-based approach. Four electroactive labels are chosen to selectively functionalize groups in GO, and quantification of each group is achieved by voltammetric analysis. This allows for the first time quantification of absolute amounts of each group, with a further advantage of distinguishing various carbonyl species: namely ortho- and para-quinones from aliphatic ketones. Intrinsic variations in the compositions of permanganate versus chlorate-oxidized GOs were thus observed. Principal differences include permanganate-GO exhibiting substantial quinonyl content, in comparison to chlorate-GO with the vast majority of its carbonyls as isolated ketones. The results confirm that carboxylic groups are rare in actuality, and are in fact entirely absent from chlorate-GO. These observations refine and advance our understanding of GO structure by addressing certain disparities in past models resulting from employment of different oxidation routes, with the vital implication that GO production methods cannot be used interchangeably in the manufacture of graphene-based devices.Chemical modification and functionalization of inherent functional groups within graphite oxide (GO) are essential aspects of graphene-based nano-materials used in wide-ranging applications. Despite extensive research, there remains some discrepancy in its structure, with current knowledge limited primarily to spectroscopic data from XPS, NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. We report herein an innovative electrochemistry-based approach. Four electroactive labels are chosen to selectively

  4. Poly(ethylene glycol)- and carboxylate-functionalized gold nanoparticles using polymer linkages: single-step synthesis, high stability, and plasmonic detection of proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, Garam; Seo, Daeha; Chung, Im Sik; Song, Hyunjoon

    2013-11-05

    Gold nanoparticles with suitable surface functionalities have been widely used as a versatile nanobioplatform. However, functionalized gold nanoparticles using thiol-terminated ligands have a tendency to aggregate, particularly in many enzymatic reaction buffers containing biological thiols, because of ligand exchange reactions. In the present study, we developed a one-step synthesis of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)ylated gold nanoparticles using poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) in PEG as a polyol solvent. Because of the chelate effect of polymeric functionalities on the gold surface, the resulting PEGylated gold nanoparticles (Au@P-PEG) are very stable under the extreme conditions at which the thiol-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles are easily coagulated. Using the solvent mixture of PEG and ethylene glycol (EG) and subsequent hydrolysis, gold nanoparticles bearing mixed functionalities of PEG and carboxylate are generated. The resulting particles exhibit selective adsorption of positively charged chymotrypsin (ChT) without nonselective adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The present nanoparticle system has many advantages, including high stability, simple one-step synthesis, biocompatibility, and excellent binding specificity; thus, this system can be used as a versatile platform for potential bio-related applications, such as separation, sensing, imaging, and assays.

  5. Integrated engineering of β-oxidation reversal and ω-oxidation pathways for the synthesis of medium chain ω-functionalized carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Clomburg, James M; Blankschien, Matthew D; Vick, Jacob E; Chou, Alexander; Kim, Seohyoung; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2015-03-01

    An engineered reversal of the β-oxidation cycle was exploited to demonstrate its utility for the synthesis of medium chain (6-10-carbons) ω-hydroxyacids and dicarboxylic acids from glycerol as the only carbon source. A redesigned β-oxidation reversal facilitated the production of medium chain carboxylic acids, which were converted to ω-hydroxyacids and dicarboxylic acids by the action of an engineered ω-oxidation pathway. The selection of a key thiolase (bktB) and thioesterase (ydiI) in combination with previously established core β-oxidation reversal enzymes, as well as the development of chromosomal expression systems for the independent control of pathway enzymes, enabled the generation of C6-C10 carboxylic acids and provided a platform for vector based independent expression of ω-functionalization enzymes. Using this approach, the expression of the Pseudomonas putida alkane monooxygenase system, encoded by alkBGT, in combination with all β-oxidation reversal enzymes resulted in the production of 6-hydroxyhexanoic acid, 8-hydroxyoctanoic acid, and 10-hydroxydecanoic acid. Following identification and characterization of potential alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, chnD and chnE from Acinetobacter sp. strain SE19 were expressed in conjunction with alkBGT to demonstrate the synthesis of the C6-C10 dicarboxylic acids, adipic acid, suberic acid, and sebacic acid. The potential of a β-oxidation cycle with ω-oxidation termination pathways was further demonstrated through the production of greater than 0.8 g/L C6-C10 ω-hydroxyacids or about 0.5 g/L dicarboxylic acids of the same chain lengths from glycerol (an unrelated carbon source) using minimal media.

  6. Mechanism Studies of Ir-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao-Lin; Yang, Shuang; Su, Xun-Cheng; Wu, Hui-Ling; Yang, Liang-Liang; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2017-01-11

    The Ir-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of olefins is widely used for production of value-added bulk and fine chemicals. The iridium catalysts with chiral spiro phosphine-oxazoline ligands developed in our group show high activity and high enantioselectivity in the hydrogenation of olefins bearing a coordinative carboxyl group, such as α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids, β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids, and γ,δ-unsaturated carboxylic acids. Here we conducted detailed mechanistic studies on these Ir-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation reactions by using (E)-2-methyl-3-phenylacrylic acid as a model substrate. We isolated and characterized several key intermediates having Ir-H bonds under the real hydrogenation conditions. Particularly, an Ir(III) migratory insertion intermediate was first isolated in an asymmetric hydrogenation reaction promoted by chiral Ir catalysts. That this intermediate cannot undergo reductive elimination in the absence of hydrogen strongly supports the involvement of an Ir(III)/Ir(V) cycle in the hydrogenation. On the basis of the structure of the Ir(III) intermediate, variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations, we elucidated the mechanistic details of the Ir-catalyzed hydrogenation of unsaturated carboxylic acids and explained the enantioselectivity of the reactions. These findings experimentally and computationally elucidate the mechanism of Ir-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of olefins with a strong coordinative carboxyl group and will likely inspire further catalyst design.

  7. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy for Interpersonal Process Groups: A Behavioral Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoekstra, Renee

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an adaptation of Kohlenberg and Tsai's work, Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (1991), or FAP, to group psychotherapy. This author applied a behavioral rationale for interpersonal process groups by illustrating key points with a hypothetical client. Suggestions are also provided for starting groups, identifying goals, educating…

  8. Differential Item Functioning Detection across Two Methods of Defining Group Comparisons: Pairwise and Composite Group Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Halil Ibrahim; Huggins, Anne Corinne

    2015-01-01

    This study compares two methods of defining groups for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF): (a) pairwise comparisons and (b) composite group comparisons. We aim to emphasize and empirically support the notion that the choice of pairwise versus composite group definitions in DIF is a reflection of how one defines fairness in DIF…

  9. Organic Mass Fragments and Organic Functional Groups in Aged Biomass Burning and Fossil Fuel Combustion Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, D. A.; Hawkins, L. N.; Russell, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    Organic functional group concentrations in submicron aerosol particles collected from 27 June to 17 September at the Scripps Pier in La Jolla, California as part of AeroSCOPE 2008 were quantified using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Organic and inorganic non-refractory components in the same air masses were quantified using a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS). Previous measurements at the Scripps pier indicate that a large fraction of submicron particle mass originates in Los Angeles and the port of Long Beach. Additional particle sources to the region include local urban emissions and periodic biomass burning during large wildfires. Three distinct types of organic aerosol components were identified from organic composition and elemental tracers, including biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion, and polluted marine components. Fossil fuel combustion organic aerosol was dominated by unsaturated alkane and was correlated with sulfur, vanadium, and nickel supporting ship and large trucks in and around the Los Angeles/Long Beach region as the dominant source. Biomass burning organic aerosol comprised a smaller unsaturated alkane fraction and larger fractions of non-acid carbonyl, amine, and carboxylic acid and was correlated with potassium and bromine. Polluted marine organic aerosol was dominated by organic hydroxyl and unsaturated alkane and was not correlated with any elemental tracers. Mass spectra of the organic aerosol support the aerosol sources determined by organic functional groups and elemental tracers and contain fragments commonly attributed to oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), and biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA). Comparisons of the PMF-derived Q-AMS source spectra with FTIR source spectra and functional group composition provide additional information on the relationship between commonly reported organic aerosol factors and organic functional groups in specific organic aerosol

  10. Carboxylator: incorporating solvent-accessible surface area for identifying protein carboxylation sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Shu-An; Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Cheng, Tzu-Hsiu; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2011-10-01

    In proteins, glutamate (Glu) residues are transformed into γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla) residues in a process called carboxylation. The process of protein carboxylation catalyzed by γ-glutamyl carboxylase is deemed to be important due to its involvement in biological processes such as blood clotting cascade and bone growth. There is an increasing interest within the scientific community to identify protein carboxylation sites. However, experimental identification of carboxylation sites via mass spectrometry-based methods is observed to be expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Thus, we were motivated to design a computational method for identifying protein carboxylation sites. This work aims to investigate the protein carboxylation by considering the composition of amino acids that surround modification sites. With the implication of a modified residue prefers to be accessible on the surface of a protein, the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA) around carboxylation sites is also investigated. Radial basis function network is then employed to build a predictive model using various features for identifying carboxylation sites. Based on a five-fold cross-validation evaluation, a predictive model trained using the combined features of amino acid sequence (AA20D), amino acid composition, and ASA, yields the highest accuracy at 0.874. Furthermore, an independent test done involving data not included in the cross-validation process indicates that in silico identification is a feasible means of preliminary analysis. Additionally, the predictive method presented in this work is implemented as Carboxylator (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/Carboxylator/), a web-based tool for identifying carboxylated proteins with modification sites in order to help users in investigating γ-glutamyl carboxylation.

  11. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J; Angenent, Largus T; Dangl, Jeffrey L; Fowler, Douglas M; Ley, Ruth E

    2015-12-04

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate.

  12. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C.; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J.; Angenent, Largus T.; Dangl, Jeffrey L.; Fowler, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate. PMID:26637602

  13. Synthesis of Carboxylated-Graphenes by the Kolbe-Schmitt Process.

    PubMed

    Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Pumera, Martin

    2017-02-28

    Graphene oxide is an oxidized form of graphene containing a large variety of oxygen groups. Although past models have suggested carboxylic acids to be present in significant amounts, recent evidence has shown otherwise. Toward the production of carboxyl-graphene, a synthetic method is presented herein based on the Kolbe-Schmitt process. A modified procedure of heating graphite oxide in the presence of a KOH/CaO mixture results in up to 11 atom % of carboxylic groups. The graphite oxide starting material and reaction temperature were investigated as two important factors, where a crumpled morphology of graphite oxide flakes and a lower 220 °C temperature preferentially led to greater carboxyl functionalization. Successful carboxylation caused a band gap opening of ∼2.5 eV in the smallest carboxyl-graphene particles, which also demonstrated a yellow fluorescence under UV light unseen in its counterpart produced at 500 °C. These results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations showing band gap opening and spin polarization of impurity states. This demonstrates the current synthetic process as yet another approach toward tuning the physical properties of graphene.

  14. Palladium-catalyzed fluorocarbonylation using N-formylsaccharin as CO source: general access to carboxylic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Hideyuki; Manabe, Kei

    2013-10-18

    N-formylsaccharin, an easily accessible crystalline compound, has been employed as an efficient CO source in Pd-catalyzed fluorocarbonylation of aryl halides to afford the corresponding acyl fluorides in high yields. The reactions use a near-stoichiometric amount of the CO source (1.2 equiv) and tolerate diverse functional groups. The acyl fluorides obtained could be readily transformed into various carboxylic acid derivatives such as carboxylic acid, esters, thioesters, and amides in a one-pot procedure.

  15. Rapid determination of memantine in human plasma by using nanoring carboxyl-functionalized paramagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer d-μ-SPE and UFLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hai-Wen; Xia, Lei; Gong, Li-Min; Ruan, Lie-Min; Zhao, Yong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    A novel, simple, and sensitive method based on the use of dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (d-μ-SPE) procedure combined with ultra-fast liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) for the determination of memantine (ME) was developed and validated over the linearity range 0.05-10.0 µg/L with 100 μL of human plasma using memantine-D6 (ME-D6) as the internal standard. The novel nanoring carboxyl-functionalized paramagnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (NR-CF-Mag-MIP) was synthesized by ultrasound-assisted suspension polymerization, using ME as a template molecule, methacrylic acid as a functional monomer, and divinylbenzene as a cross-linking agent. The NR-CF-Mag-MIP was used as the d-μ-SPE sorbent to extract ME from human plasma samples. The obtained results demonstrated the higher extraction capacity of NR-CF-Mag-MIP with recoveries between 97.6 and 101%. The limits of quantification (LOQs) for ME was 0.015 µg/L. Validation results on linearity, specificity, accuracy, precision, and stability, as well as on application to the analysis of samples taken up to 480 h after oral administration of 20 mg (two 10 mg capsules) of ME in healthy volunteers demonstrated the applicability to bioequivalence studies.

  16. Functional Grouping in Residential Homes for People with Intellectual Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansell, Jim; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Macdonald, Susan; Ashman, Bev

    2003-01-01

    The effects of functional grouping of 303 people with intellectual disabilities on care practices in English group homes were investigated. Residents who were non-ambulant were rated as receiving care with less interpersonal warmth and residents with severe challenging behavior were rated as receiving care with less interpersonal warmth and…

  17. The conserved carboxyl domain of MorC, an inner membrane protein of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, is essential for membrane function.

    PubMed

    Smith, K P; Voogt, R D; Ruiz, T; Mintz, K P

    2016-02-01

    Morphogenesis protein C (MorC) of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is important for maintaining the membrane morphology and integrity of the cell envelope of this oral pathogen. The MorC sequence and operon organization were found to be conserved in Gammaproteobacteria, based on a bioinformatic analysis of 435 sequences from representative organisms. Functional conservation of MorC was investigated using an A. actinomycetemcomitans morC mutant as a model system to express MorC homologs from four phylogenetically diverse representatives of the Gammaproteobacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Moraxella catarrhalis. The A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressing the homologous proteins were assessed for sensitivity to bile salts, leukotoxin secretion, autoaggregation and membrane morphology. MorC from the most closely related organism (H. influenzae) was functionally identical to MorC from A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the genes from more distantly related organisms restored some but not all A. actinomycetemcomitans mutant phenotypes. In addition, deletion mutagenesis indicated that the most conserved portion of the protein, the C-terminus DUF490 domain, was necessary to maintain the integrity of the membrane. Deletion of the last 10 amino acids of this domain of the A. actinomycetemcomitans MorC protein was sufficient to disrupt membrane stability and leukotoxin secretion. The data suggest that the MorC sequence is functionally conserved across Gammaproteobacteria and the C-terminus of the protein is essential for maintaining membrane physiology.

  18. An efficient tandem approach for the synthesis of functionalized 2-pyridone-3-carboxylic acids using three-component reaction in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Mehrparvar, Saber; Balalaie, Saeed; Rabbanizadeh, Mahnaz; Ghabraie, Elmira; Rominger, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Novel analogs of 2-pyridone-3-carboxylic acids 4a-l have been prepared by the three-component reaction of 3-formyl chromone, Meldrum's acid, and primary amines in the presence of a catalytic amount of diammonium hydrogen phosphate in water. Good-to-high yields, easy work-up, and an environmentally friendly profile are the advantages of this method for the synthesis of 2-pyridone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives.

  19. Nanoparticles made of multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol containing periodic side-chain carboxyl groups for oral delivery of cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Ankola, D. D.; Battisti, A.; Solaro, R.; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of new carboxylated multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol (EL14) for nanoparticle (NP) formation and their ability to deliver high molecular weight hydrophobic drug—cyclosporine A (CsA). CsA-loaded EL14 NPs were compared with traditional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs, both prepared by emulsion–diffusion–evaporation process. On the one hand, the increase in drug payload from 10 to 30 per cent for EL14 NPs showed no difference in particle size, however the entrapment efficiency tends to decrease from 50 to 43 per cent; on the other hand, the more hydrophobic PLGA showed an increasing trend in entrapment efficiency from 20 to 62 per cent with increasing particle size. Over 90 per cent of CsA was released in vitro from both the nanoparticulates; however, the release was much slower in the case of more hydrophobic PLGA. On in vivo evaluation in rats, the NPs made of EL14 showed a higher Cmax, a faster Tmax and enhanced tissue levels to that of PLGA that are crucial for CsA's activity and toxicity; however, the overall bioavailability of the nanoparticulates was similar and higher than Neoral. Together these data demonstrate the feasibility of NPs made of low molecular weight, hydrophilic polymer EL14 for efficient delivery of CsA. PMID:20504806

  20. Multipole model for the electron group functions method.

    PubMed

    Tchougréeff, A L; Tokmachev, A M; Dronskowski, R

    2009-10-22

    Electron groups provide a natural way to introduce local concepts into quantum chemistry, and the wave functions based on the group products can be considered as a framework for constructing efficient computational methods in terms of "observable" parts of molecular systems. The elements of the group wave functions (electronic structure variables) can be optimized by requiring the number of operations proportional to the size of the molecule. This directly leads to computational methods linearly scaling for large molecular systems. In the present work we consider a particular case of such a wave function implemented for the semiempirical NDDO Hamiltonian. The electron groups are expressed in terms of optimized atomic (hybrid) orbitals with chemical bonds described by geminals and the delocalized groups described by Slater determinants (with or without spin restriction). This scheme is very fast by itself but its speed is considerably limited by the computations of the interatomic Coulomb interactions. Here we develop a consistent method based on group functions which uses the multipole scheme for interatomic interactions. The explicit usage of the atomic multipoles makes the method extremely fast, although the numerical efficiency is largely achieved due to the local character of the electron groups involved. We discuss numerical characteristics of the new method as well as its possible parametrization. We apply this method to study dodecahedral water clusters with hydrogen fluoride substitution and base the analysis on the exhaustive calculation of all symmetry-independent hydrogen-bond networks.

  1. The Inhibitory Effect of Kakkonto, Japanese Traditional (Kampo) Medicine, on Brain Penetration of Oseltamivir Carboxylate in Mice with Reduced Blood-Brain Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Kousuke; Oshima, Shinji; Fukuda, Nanami; Ochiai, Yumiko; Maruyama, Ayumi; Kanamuro, Aki; Negishi, Akio; Honma, Seiichi; Ohshima, Shigeru; Akimoto, Masayuki; Takenaka, Shingo; Kobayashi, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate (OP) is used to treat influenza virus infections. However, its use may result in central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects. In Japan, OP is used with Kampo formulations to improve clinical effectiveness. We evaluated the potential for using Kampo formulations to reduce CNS adverse effects by quantifying the CNS distribution of oseltamivir and its active metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) when administered with maoto and kakkonto. We administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by intraperitoneal injection to C57BL/6 mice to reduce blood-brain barrier function. Saline, maoto, and kakkonto were administered orally at the same time as LPS. OP was orally administered 4 hours after the last LPS injection and the migration of oseltamivir and OC was examined. Additionally, we examined the brain distribution of OC following intravenous administration. Changes in OC concentrations in the brain suggest that, in comparison to LPS-treated control mice, both Kampo formulations increased plasma levels of OC, thereby enhancing its therapeutic effect. Additionally, our findings suggest kakkonto may not only improve the therapeutic effect of oseltamivir but also reduce the risk of CNS-based adverse effects. Considering these findings, it should be noted that administration of kakkonto during periods of inflammation has led to increased OAT3 expression. PMID:25788966

  2. The effect of different functional groups on the ligand-promoted dissolution of NiO and other oxide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Christian; Devidal, Jean-Luc; Casey, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Sets of homologous ligands were used to probe the dissolution of oxide minerals through experiments on bunsenite (NiO). The ligand sets have primary amine, hydroxyl, and carboxyl functional groups and form five-membered, bidentate, ring complexes at the mineral surface. A set of ligands that has only two metal-coordinating functional groups ( ox, en, gly) was compared with a set of larger, but similar, ligands ( nta, tren) that link three sets of functional groups with a tertiary amine. Experiments were also conducted with hydroxyl ligands ( tea), ammonia (NH 3), and ligands containing ring nitrogen ( pic). The dissolution rates of NiO(s) in the presence of these ligands established close consistency between metal detachment from a dissolving surface and the mechanisms of ligand exchange around dissolved Ni(II)-ligand complexes. The solution pH, however, is an important complicating factor. Metals compete with protons for ligand sites and this protonation changes the ligand structure and reactivity. Several types of protonation lead to different species at the mineral surface and this greatly complicates the rate laws for dissolution. The speciation will be particularly complicated for large-molecular-weight ligands with functional groups that protonate over a wide pH range. In terms of a rate law, protonation of ligand functional groups at the surface is distinct from protonation of structural oxygens at the mineral surface. These are different surface complexes (species) for the purpose of the rate law.

  3. Implement the medical group revenue function. Create competitive advantage.

    PubMed

    Colucci, C

    1998-01-01

    This article shows medical groups how they can employ new financial management and information technology techniques to safeguard their revenue and income streams. These managerial techniques stem from the application of the medical group revenue function, which is defined herein. This article also describes how the medical group revenue function can be used to create value by employing a database and a decision support system. Finally, the article describes how the decision support system can be used to create competitive advantage. Through the wise use of internally generated information, medical groups can negotiate better contract terms, improve their operations, cut their costs, embark on capital investment programs and improve market share. As medical groups gain market power by improving in these areas, they will be more attractive to potential strategic allies, payers and investment bankers.

  4. Detection of rare functional variants using group ISIS.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yue S; Hao, Ning; An, Lingling

    2011-11-29

    Genome-wide association studies have been firmly established in investigations of the associations between common genetic variants and complex traits or diseases. However, a large portion of complex traits and diseases cannot be explained well by common variants. Detecting rare functional variants becomes a trend and a necessity. Because rare variants have such a small minor allele frequency (e.g., <0.05), detecting functional rare variants is challenging. Group iterative sure independence screening (ISIS), a fast group selection tool, was developed to select important genes and the single-nucleotide polymorphisms within. The performance of the group ISIS and group penalization methods is compared for detecting important genes in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data. The results suggest that the group ISIS is an efficient tool to discover genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated to phenotypes.

  5. Activation of carboxylic acids in asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Poladura, Belén; Diaz de Los Bernardos, Miriam; Leutzsch, Markus; Goddard, Richard; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Organocatalysis, catalysis using small organic molecules, has recently evolved into a general approach for asymmetric synthesis, complementing both metal catalysis and biocatalysis. Its success relies to a large extent upon the introduction of novel and generic activation modes. Remarkably though, while carboxylic acids have been used as catalyst directing groups in supramolecular transition-metal catalysis, a general and well-defined activation mode for this useful and abundant substance class is still lacking. Herein we propose the heterodimeric association of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acid catalysts as a new activation principle for organocatalysis. This self-assembly increases both the acidity of the phosphoric acid catalyst and the reactivity of the carboxylic acid. To illustrate this principle, we apply our concept in a general and highly enantioselective catalytic aziridine-opening reaction with carboxylic acids as nucleophiles.

  6. Roles of functional groups of naproxen in its sorption to kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chenglong; Bi, Erping

    2015-11-01

    The sorption of acidic anti-inflammatory drugs to soils is important for evaluating their fate and transformations in the water-soil environment. However, roles of functional groups of ionisable drugs onto mineral surfaces have not been sufficiently studied. In this study, batch experiments of naproxen (NPX, anti-inflammatory drug) and two kinds of competitors to kaolinite were studied. The Kd of naproxen to kaolinite is 1.30-1.62 L kg(-1). The n-π electron donor-acceptor (n-π EDA) interaction between diaromatic ring of naproxen (π-electron acceptors) and the siloxane oxygens (n-donors) of kaolinite is the dominant sorption mechanism. The carboxyl group of naproxen can contribute to the overall sorption. A conception model was put forward to elucidate to sorption mechanisms, in which the contribution of n-π EDA and hydrogen bond to overall sorption was quantified. These sorption mechanisms can be helpful for estimating the fate and mobility of acid pharmaceuticals in soil-water environment.

  7. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76 degrees C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92 degrees C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface.

  8. Single or functionalized fullerenes interacting with heme group

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Wallison Chaves; Diniz, Eduardo Moraes

    2014-09-15

    The heme group is responsible for iron transportation through the bloodstream, where iron participates in redox reactions, electron transfer, gases detection etc. The efficiency of such processes can be reduced if the whole heme molecule or even the iron is somehow altered from its original oxidation state, which can be caused by interactions with nanoparticles as fullerenes. To verify how such particles alter the geometry and electronic structure of heme molecule, here we report first principles calculations based on density functional theory of heme group interacting with single C{sub 60} fullerene or with C{sub 60} functionalized with small functional groups (−CH{sub 3}, −COOH, −NH{sub 2}, −OH). The calculations shown that the system heme + nanoparticle has a different spin state in comparison with heme group if the fullerene is functionalized. Also a functional group can provide a stronger binding between nanoparticle and heme molecule or inhibit the chemical bonding in comparison with single fullerene results. In addition heme molecule loses electrons to the nanoparticles and some systems exhibited a geometry distortion in heme group, depending on the binding energy. Furthermore, one find that such nanoparticles induce a formation of spin up states in heme group. Moreover, there exist modifications in density of states near the Fermi energy. Although of such changes in heme electronic structure and geometry, the iron atom remains in the heme group with the same oxidation state, so that processes that involve the iron might not be affected, only those that depend on the whole heme molecule.

  9. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behavior of carboxyl functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/poly (vinyl alcohol) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrin, Sayed; Deshpande, V. D.

    2017-03-01

    We study the dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity behavior of MWCNT-COOH/Polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposite films in the temperature (T) range 303-423 K and in the frequency (f) range 0.1 Hz-1 MHz. The dielectric constant increases with an increase in temperature and also with an increase in MWCNT-COOH loading into the polymer matrix, as a result of interfacial polarization. The permittivity data were found to fit well with the modified Cole-Cole equation. Temperature dependent values of the relaxation times, free charge carrier conductivity and space charge carrier conductivity were extracted from the equation. An observed increment in the ac conductivity for the nanocomposites was analysed by a Jonscher power law which suggests that the correlated barrier hopping is the dominant charge transport mechanism for the nanocomposite films. The electric modulus study revealed deviations from ideal Debye-type behavior which are explained by considering a generalized susceptibility function. XRD and DSC results show an increase in the degree of crystallinity.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Carboxyl Esterases of Gill Chamber-Associated Microbiota in the Deep-Sea Shrimp Rimicaris exoculata by Using Functional Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, María; Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Popovic, Ana; Reva, Oleg N.; Lafraya, Álvaro; Bargiela, Rafael; Nechitaylo, Taras Y.; Matesanz, Ruth; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Jebbar, Mohamed; Yakimov, Michail M.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshina, Olga V.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata dominates the fauna in deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (depth, 2,320 m). Here, we identified and biochemically characterized three carboxyl esterases from microbial communities inhabiting the R. exoculata gill that were isolated by naive screens of a gill chamber metagenomic library. These proteins exhibit low to moderate identity to known esterase sequences (≤52%) and to each other (11.9 to 63.7%) and appear to have originated from unknown species or from genera of Proteobacteria related to Thiothrix/Leucothrix (MGS-RG1/RG2) and to the Rhodobacteraceae group (MGS-RG3). A library of 131 esters and 31 additional esterase/lipase preparations was used to evaluate the activity profiles of these enzymes. All 3 of these enzymes had greater esterase than lipase activity and exhibited specific activities with ester substrates (≤356 U mg−1) in the range of similar enzymes. MGS-RG3 was inhibited by salts and pressure and had a low optimal temperature (30°C), and its substrate profile clustered within a group of low-activity and substrate-restricted marine enzymes. In contrast, MGS-RG1 and MGS-RG2 were most active at 45 to 50°C and were salt activated and barotolerant. They also exhibited wider substrate profiles that were close to those of highly active promiscuous enzymes from a marine hydrothermal vent (MGS-RG2) and from a cold brackish lake (MGS-RG1). The data presented are discussed in the context of promoting the examination of enzyme activities of taxa found in habitats that have been neglected for enzyme prospecting; the enzymes found in these taxa may reflect distinct habitat-specific adaptations and may constitute new sources of rare reaction specificities. PMID:25595762

  11. Breaking the Carboxyl Rule

    PubMed Central

    Balashov, Sergei P.; Petrovskaya, Lada E.; Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Lukashev, Evgeniy P.; Dioumaev, Andrei K.; Wang, Jennifer M.; Sychev, Sergey V.; Dolgikh, Dmitriy A.; Rubin, Andrei B.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2013-01-01

    A lysine instead of the usual carboxyl group is in place of the internal proton donor to the retinal Schiff base in the light-driven proton pump of Exiguobacterium sibiricum (ESR). The involvement of this lysine in proton transfer is indicated by the finding that its substitution with alanine or other residues slows reprotonation of the Schiff base (decay of the M intermediate) by more than 2 orders of magnitude. In these mutants, the rate constant of the M decay linearly decreases with a decrease in proton concentration, as expected if reprotonation is limited by the uptake of a proton from the bulk. In wild type ESR, M decay is biphasic, and the rate constants are nearly pH-independent between pH 6 and 9. Proton uptake occurs after M formation but before M decay, which is especially evident in D2O and at high pH. Proton uptake is biphasic; the amplitude of the fast phase decreases with a pKa of 8.5 ± 0.3, which reflects the pKa of the donor during proton uptake. Similarly, the fraction of the faster component of M decay decreases and the slower one increases, with a pKa of 8.1 ± 0.2. The data therefore suggest that the reprotonation of the Schiff base in ESR is preceded by transient protonation of an initially unprotonated donor, which is probably the ϵ-amino group of Lys-96 or a water molecule in its vicinity, and it facilitates proton delivery from the bulk to the reaction center of the protein. PMID:23696649

  12. Extraordinary properties of functional integrals and groups of diffeomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokurov, V. V.; Shavgulidze, E. T.

    2017-03-01

    A review of the work of the authors is presented, in which corollaries of the quasi-invariance of functional integrals on the Wiener measure with respect to the action of a group of diffeomorphisms are studied, and the behavior of functional integrals with nonlinear nonlocal change of variables of integration is investigated as well. Using these substitutions, the functional integrals over discontinuous paths can be determined. The simplest models of the (Euclidean) quantum field theory are offered, in which the presence of hidden internal symmetries or the allowance for discontinuous paths in functional integrals leads to a number of paradoxical properties contradicting the conventional view.

  13. Density functional theory study the effects of oxygen-containing functional groups on oxygen molecules and oxygen atoms adsorbed on carbonaceous materials.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xuejun; Song, Wenwu; Shi, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to study the effects of different types of oxygen-containing functional groups on the adsorption of oxygen molecules and single active oxygen atoms on carbonaceous materials. During gasification or combustion reactions of carbonaceous materials, oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl(-OH), carbonyl(-CO), quinone(-O), and carboxyl(-COOH) are often present on the edge of graphite and can affect graphite's chemical properties. When oxygen-containing functional groups appear on a graphite surface, the oxygen molecules are strongly adsorbed onto the surface to form a four-member ring structure. At the same time, the O-O bond is greatly weakened and easily broken. The adsorption energy value indicates that the adsorption of oxygen molecules changes from physisorption to chemisorption for oxygen-containing functional groups on the edge of a graphite surface. In addition, our results indicate that the adsorption energy depends on the type of oxygen-containing functional group. When a single active oxygen atom is adsorbed on the bridge site of graphite, it gives rise to a stable epoxy structure. Epoxy can cause deformation of the graphite lattice due to the transition of graphite from sp2 to sp3 after the addition of an oxygen atom. For quinone group on the edge of graphite, oxygen atoms react with carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. Similarly, the single active oxygen atoms of carbonyl groups can interact with edge carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. The results show that oxygen-containing functional groups on graphite surfaces enhance the activity of graphite, which promotes adsorption on the graphite surface.

  14. Density functional theory study the effects of oxygen-containing functional groups on oxygen molecules and oxygen atoms adsorbed on carbonaceous materials

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenwu; Shi, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Density functional theory was used to study the effects of different types of oxygen-containing functional groups on the adsorption of oxygen molecules and single active oxygen atoms on carbonaceous materials. During gasification or combustion reactions of carbonaceous materials, oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl(-OH), carbonyl(-CO), quinone(-O), and carboxyl(-COOH) are often present on the edge of graphite and can affect graphite’s chemical properties. When oxygen-containing functional groups appear on a graphite surface, the oxygen molecules are strongly adsorbed onto the surface to form a four-member ring structure. At the same time, the O-O bond is greatly weakened and easily broken. The adsorption energy value indicates that the adsorption of oxygen molecules changes from physisorption to chemisorption for oxygen-containing functional groups on the edge of a graphite surface. In addition, our results indicate that the adsorption energy depends on the type of oxygen-containing functional group. When a single active oxygen atom is adsorbed on the bridge site of graphite, it gives rise to a stable epoxy structure. Epoxy can cause deformation of the graphite lattice due to the transition of graphite from sp2 to sp3 after the addition of an oxygen atom. For quinone group on the edge of graphite, oxygen atoms react with carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. Similarly, the single active oxygen atoms of carbonyl groups can interact with edge carbon atoms to form the precursor of CO2. The results show that oxygen-containing functional groups on graphite surfaces enhance the activity of graphite, which promotes adsorption on the graphite surface. PMID:28301544

  15. Solving renormalization group equations with the Lambert W function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, H.

    2013-04-01

    It has been known for some time that 2-loop renormalization group equations of a dimensionless parameter can be solved in a closed form in terms of the Lambert W function. We apply the method to a generic theory with a Gaussian fixed point to construct renormalization group invariant physical parameters such as a coupling constant and a physical squared mass. As a further application, we speculate a possible exact effective potential for the O(N) linear sigma model in four dimensions.

  16. Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Kabalka, George W.; Srivastava, Rajiv R.

    2000-03-14

    Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

  17. Species, functional groups, and thresholds in ecological resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundstrom, Shana M.; Allen, Craig R.; Barichievy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The cross-scale resilience model states that ecological resilience is generated in part from the distribution of functions within and across scales in a system. Resilience is a measure of a system's ability to remain organized around a particular set of mutually reinforcing processes and structures, known as a regime. We define scale as the geographic extent over which a process operates and the frequency with which a process occurs. Species can be categorized into functional groups that are a link between ecosystem processes and structures and ecological resilience. We applied the cross-scale resilience model to avian species in a grassland ecosystem. A species’ morphology is shaped in part by its interaction with ecological structure and pattern, so animal body mass reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of resources. We used the log-transformed rank-ordered body masses of breeding birds associated with grasslands to identify aggregations and discontinuities in the distribution of those body masses. We assessed cross-scale resilience on the basis of 3 metrics: overall number of functional groups, number of functional groups within an aggregation, and the redundancy of functional groups across aggregations. We assessed how the loss of threatened species would affect cross-scale resilience by removing threatened species from the data set and recalculating values of the 3 metrics. We also determined whether more function was retained than expected after the loss of threatened species by comparing observed loss with simulated random loss in a Monte Carlo process. The observed distribution of function compared with the random simulated loss of function indicated that more functionality in the observed data set was retained than expected. On the basis of our results, we believe an ecosystem with a full complement of species can sustain considerable species losses without affecting the distribution of functions within and across aggregations, although

  18. Psychosocial functioning of two groups of morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Rosen, L W; Aniskiewicz, A S

    1983-01-01

    Fourteen morbidly obese women who were candidates for intestinal bypass surgery were compared in terms of psychosocial functioning and dietary behavior to 14 morbidly obese women who elected not to undergo the bypass procedure. Each patient underwent a psychiatric evaluation which included a developmental and dietary history, a mental status exam, and the administration of the MMPI. Diagnoses were based on the DSM-III multi-axial system. There was no difference between the bypass group and the non-bypass group on the Axis I diagnoses, however the bypass group did have a significantly higher frequency of Axis II diagnoses. The bypass group demonstrated significantly higher levels of psychosocial stressors (Axis IV) and lower levels of adaptive functioning (Axis V) when compared to the non-bypass group. The bypass patients also had a significantly higher frequency of past suicide attempts. On the MMPI, the bypass group had significantly higher elevations on scales 2 (depression), 4 (psychopathic deviate), 6 (paranoia), and 0 (social introversion). There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of dietary history and behavior, except that significantly fewer bypass patients could place a numerical estimate on their daily energy intake. These results were discussed in terms of their implications for the assessment and treatment of morbidly obese patients.

  19. Understanding biocatalyst inhibition by carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Jarboe, Laura R; Royce, Liam A; Liu, Ping

    2013-09-03

    Carboxylic acids are an attractive biorenewable chemical in terms of their flexibility and usage as precursors for a variety of industrial chemicals. It has been demonstrated that such carboxylic acids can be fermentatively produced using engineered microbes, such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, like many other attractive biorenewable fuels and chemicals, carboxylic acids become inhibitory to these microbes at concentrations below the desired yield and titer. In fact, their potency as microbial inhibitors is highlighted by the fact that many of these carboxylic acids are routinely used as food preservatives. This review highlights the current knowledge regarding the impact that saturated, straight-chain carboxylic acids, such as hexanoic, octanoic, decanoic, and lauric acids can have on E. coli and S. cerevisiae, with the goal of identifying metabolic engineering strategies to increase robustness. Key effects of these carboxylic acids include damage to the cell membrane and a decrease of the microbial internal pH. Certain changes in cell membrane properties, such as composition, fluidity, integrity, and hydrophobicity, and intracellular pH are often associated with increased tolerance. The availability of appropriate exporters, such as Pdr12, can also increase tolerance. The effect on metabolic processes, such as maintaining appropriate respiratory function, regulation of Lrp activity and inhibition of production of key metabolites such as methionine, are also considered. Understanding the mechanisms of biocatalyst inhibition by these desirable products can aid in the engineering of robust strains with improved industrial performance.

  20. Carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes induce an inflammatory response in human primary monocytes through oxidative stress and NF-κB activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shefang; Zhang, Honggang; Wang, Yifang; Jiao, Fei; Lin, Cuilin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2011-09-01

    A mechanistic understanding of interactions between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and living systems has become imperative owing to the growing nanomedicine applications and the mounting societal concerns on nanosafety. The addition of different chemical groups leads to a significant change in the properties of CNTs, and the resulting functionalized CNTs are generating great interest in many biological applications, such as biosensors and transporters. This study aimed to assess the toxicity exhibited by carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) (with a diameter of 1-2 nm and mean length of 500 nm) and to elucidate possible molecular mechanisms underlying the biological effects of carboxylated SWCNTs in human primary monocytes. The results demonstrated that carboxylated SWCNTs were cytotoxic, triggering apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in human primary monocytes. Flow cytometric and confocal microscopic analysis indicated that internalized carboxylated SWCNTs were mainly accumulated in the cytoplasm. Exposure of human primary monocytes to carboxylated SWCNTs led to interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in human primary monocytes. Pretreatment of human primary monocytes with antioxidants or NF-κB-specific inhibitor before exposure to carboxylated SWCNTs significantly abolished carboxylated SWCNTs-induced IL-8 and IL-6 expression. These results provide novel insights into the carboxylated SWCNTs-mediated chemokine induction and inflammatory responses in vitro.

  1. Victimization in the Peer Group and Children's Academic Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, David; Gorman, Andrea Hopmeyer; Nakamoto, Jonathan; Toblin, Robin L.

    2005-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal investigation focused on associations between victimization in the peer group and academic functioning over a 1-year period. The authors used a multi-informant approach to assess peer victimization, symptoms of depression, and academic outcomes for 199 elementary school children (average age of 9.0 years; 105 boys, 94…

  2. Functional characterization and expression analysis of rice δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase provide new insight into the regulation of proline and arginine catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Zarattini, Marco; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    While intracellular proline accumulation in response to various stress conditions has been investigated in great detail, the biochemistry and physiological relevance of proline degradation in plants is much less understood. Moreover, the second and last step in proline catabolism, the oxidation of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylic acid (P5C) to glutamate, is shared with arginine catabolism. Little information is available to date concerning the regulatory mechanisms coordinating these two pathways. Expression of the gene coding for P5C dehydrogenase was analyzed in rice by real-time PCR either following the exogenous supply of amino acids of the glutamate family, or under hyperosmotic stress conditions. The rice enzyme was heterologously expressed in E. coli, and the affinity-purified protein was thoroughly characterized with respect to structural and functional properties. A tetrameric oligomerization state was observed in size exclusion chromatography, which suggests a structure of the plant enzyme different from that shown for the bacterial P5C dehydrogenases structurally characterized to date. Kinetic analysis accounted for a preferential use of NAD+ as the electron acceptor. Cations were found to modulate enzyme activity, whereas anion effects were negligible. Several metal ions were inhibitory in the micromolar range. Interestingly, arginine also inhibited the enzyme at higher concentrations, with a mechanism of uncompetitive type with respect to P5C. This implies that millimolar levels of arginine would increase the affinity of P5C dehydrogenase toward its specific substrate. Results are discussed in view of the involvement of the enzyme in either proline or arginine catabolism. PMID:26300893

  3. Functional grouping in residential homes for people with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mansell, Jim; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Macdonald, Susan; Ashman, Bev

    2003-01-01

    The effects of functional grouping of people with intellectual disabilities on care practices in small residential homes in the community were investigated. A group comparison and a matched-pairs comparison were carried out in settings where less than or more than 75% residents were non-verbal, non-ambulant, had severe challenging behaviour, severe social impairment or were verbal and ambulant. Further analysis, focused on those with challenging behaviour was carried out using ordinal regression. In the group-comparison study, no significant differences were found for three of the five groups. Residents who were non-ambulant were rated as receiving care with less interpersonal warmth in grouped settings; residents with severe challenging behaviour were rated as receiving less good care practices in four respects (interpersonal warmth, assistance from staff, level of speech and staff teamwork) in grouped settings. The matched-pairs comparison found significant differences only for people with challenging behaviour, where grouped settings achieved less good results in terms of interpersonal warmth and staff teamwork. Higher adaptive behaviour and mixed settings were predictive of better care practices on 13 of 14 items of the Active Support Measure (ASM), with some setting variables also predictive for some items. Care practices only appear to vary for people with challenging behaviour, where grouped settings appear to offer less good results in some respects.

  4. Linking functional group richness and ecosystem functions of dung beetles: an experimental quantification.

    PubMed

    Milotić, Tanja; Quidé, Stijn; Van Loo, Thomas; Hoffmann, Maurice

    2017-01-01

    Dung beetles form an insect group that fulfils important functions in terrestrial ecosystems throughout the world. These include nutrient cycling through dung removal, soil bioturbation, plant growth, secondary seed dispersal and parasite control. We conducted field experiments at two sites in the northern hemisphere temperate region in which dung removal and secondary seed dispersal were assessed. Dung beetles were classified in three functional groups, depending on their size and dung manipulation method: dwellers, large and small tunnelers. Other soil inhabiting fauna were included as a fourth functional group. Dung removal and seed dispersal by each individual functional group and combinations thereof were estimated in exclusion experiments using different dung types. Dwellers were the most diverse and abundant group, but tunnelers were dominant in terms of biomass. All dung beetle functional groups had a clear preference for fresh dung. The ecosystem services in dung removal and secondary seed dispersal provided by dung beetles were significant and differed between functional groups. Although in absolute numbers more dwellers were found, large tunnelers were disproportionally important for dung burial and seed removal. In the absence of dung beetles, other soil inhabiting fauna, such as earthworms, partly took over the dung decomposing role of dung beetles while most dung was processed when all native functional groups were present. Our results, therefore, emphasize the need to conserve functionally complete dung ecosystems to maintain full ecosystem functioning.

  5. Functional gene group analysis identifies synaptic gene groups as risk factor for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lips, E S; Cornelisse, L N; Toonen, R F; Min, J L; Hultman, C M; Holmans, P A; O'Donovan, M C; Purcell, S M; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Sullivan, P F; Visscher, P M; Posthuma, D

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a polygenic pattern of inheritance and a population prevalence of ∼1%. Previous studies have implicated synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia. We tested the accumulated association of genetic variants in expert-curated synaptic gene groups with schizophrenia in 4673 cases and 4965 healthy controls, using functional gene group analysis. Identifying groups of genes with similar cellular function rather than genes in isolation may have clinical implications for finding additional drug targets. We found that a group of 1026 synaptic genes was significantly associated with the risk of schizophrenia (P=7.6 × 10−11) and more strongly associated than 100 randomly drawn, matched control groups of genetic variants (P<0.01). Subsequent analysis of synaptic subgroups suggested that the strongest association signals are derived from three synaptic gene groups: intracellular signal transduction (P=2.0 × 10−4), excitability (P=9.0 × 10−4) and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling (P=2.4 × 10−3). These results are consistent with a role of synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia and imply that impaired intracellular signal transduction in synapses, synaptic excitability and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling play a role in the pathology of schizophrenia. PMID:21931320

  6. Functional gene group analysis identifies synaptic gene groups as risk factor for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lips, E S; Cornelisse, L N; Toonen, R F; Min, J L; Hultman, C M; Holmans, P A; O'Donovan, M C; Purcell, S M; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Sullivan, P F; Visscher, P M; Posthuma, D

    2012-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a polygenic pattern of inheritance and a population prevalence of ~1%. Previous studies have implicated synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia. We tested the accumulated association of genetic variants in expert-curated synaptic gene groups with schizophrenia in 4673 cases and 4965 healthy controls, using functional gene group analysis. Identifying groups of genes with similar cellular function rather than genes in isolation may have clinical implications for finding additional drug targets. We found that a group of 1026 synaptic genes was significantly associated with the risk of schizophrenia (P=7.6 × 10(-11)) and more strongly associated than 100 randomly drawn, matched control groups of genetic variants (P<0.01). Subsequent analysis of synaptic subgroups suggested that the strongest association signals are derived from three synaptic gene groups: intracellular signal transduction (P=2.0 × 10(-4)), excitability (P=9.0 × 10(-4)) and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling (P=2.4 × 10(-3)). These results are consistent with a role of synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia and imply that impaired intracellular signal transduction in synapses, synaptic excitability and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling play a role in the pathology of schizophrenia.

  7. Mass spectrometric behaviour of carboxylated polyethylene glycols and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates.

    PubMed

    Frańska, Magdalena; Zgoła, Agnieszka; Rychłowska, Joanna; Szymański, Andrzej; Łukaszewski, Zenon; Frański, Rafał

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometric behaviour of mono- and di-carboxylated polyethylene glycols (PEGCs and CPEGCs) and carboxylated octylphenol ethoxylates (OPECs) are discussed. The tendency for ionisation (deprotonation, protonation and cationisation by alkali metal cations) of carboxylated PEGs was compared with that of non-carboxylated correspondents by using both secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and electrospray ionisation (ESI). The fragmentation of the PEGCs and CPEGCs is discussed and also compared with their neutral correspondents, PEGs. The B/E mass spectra were recorded, using secondary ion mass spectrometry as a method for generation, for deprotonated and protonated molecules and molecules cationised by alkali metal cations. The fragmentation behaviour of PEGs is found to be different from that of CPEGCs, The presence of carboxylic groups may be confirmed not only by the determination of molecular weights of the ethoxylates studied, but also on the basis of the fragment ions formed. The metastable decomposition of the [OPEC-H](-) ions proceed through the cleavage of the bond between the octylphenol moiety and the ethoxylene chain leading to the octylphenoxy anions. It permits determination of the mass of the hydrophobic moiety of the studied carboxylated alkylphenol ethoxylate. ESI mass spectra recorded in the negative ion mode were found to be more suitable for the determination of the average molecular weight of carboxylated ethoxylates than SI mass spectra.

  8. [Identification of the functional groups of yeast thiamine pyrophosphokinase].

    PubMed

    Voskoboev, A I; Grinevich, V P

    1978-10-01

    The content of free sulfhydril groups in yeast thiamine pyrophosphokinase (EC 2.7.6.2) was studied. Their blocking was found not to affect considerably the enzyme activity. N-bromsuccinimide developes the inhibitory effect only if taken in excessive concentrations, which indicates that tryptophane has no key position for the enzyme-substrate complex formation. On account of high speed of photoinactivation with Rose bengale and methilene blue, sigmoid dependence of activity loss on pH under irradiation, characteristic narrowing of the modified enzyme absorption spectrum, it is suggested that imidazole residue of the histidine is one of the functional groups of thiamine pyrophosphokinase.

  9. Density functional study of hydrogen bond formation between methanol and organic molecules containing Cl, F, NH2, OH, and COOH functional groups.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Stefan K; St Petkov, Petko; Rangelov, Miroslav A; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2011-12-08

    Various hydrogen-bonded complexes of methanol with different proton accepting and proton donating molecules containing Cl, F, NH(2), OH, OR, and COOH functional groups have been modeled using DFT with hybrid B3LYP and M05-2X functionals. The latter functional was found to provide more accurate estimates of the structural and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes of halides, amines, and alcohols. The characteristics of these complexes are influenced not only by the principle hydrogen bond of the methanol OH with the proton acceptor heteroatom, but also by additional hydrogen bonds of a C-H moiety with methanol oxygen as a proton acceptor. The contribution of the former hydrogen bond in the total binding enthalpy increases in the order chlorides < fluorides < alcohols < amines, while the contribution of the second type of hydrogen bond increases in the reverse order. A general correlation was found between the binding enthalpy of the complex and the electrostatic potential at the hydrogen center participating in the formation of the hydrogen bond. The calculated binding enthalpies of different complexes were used to clarify which functional groups can potentially form a hydrogen bond to the 2'-OH hydroxyl group in ribose, which is strong enough to block it from participation in the intramolecular catalytic activation of the peptide bond synthesis. Such blocking could result in inhibition of the protein biosynthesis in the living cell if the corresponding group is delivered as a part of a drug molecule in the vicinity of the active site in the ribosome. According to our results, such activity can be accomplished by secondary or tertiary amines, alkoxy groups, deprotonated carboxyl groups, and aliphatic fluorides, but not by the other modeled functional groups.

  10. The effect of PAMAM dendrimer concentration, generation size and surface functional group on the aqueous solubility of candesartan cilexetil.

    PubMed

    Ertürk, Ali Serol; Gürbüz, Mustafa Ulvi; Tülü, Metin

    2017-02-01

    This article investigates the aqueous solubility of the poorly soluble drug candesartan cilexetil (CC) in the presence of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers. The effect of variables such as concentration, generation size (G2-G4), and surface groups (NH2, COOH and TRIS) of PAMAMs on the aqueous solubility of CC was studied. A two-factor factorial (3 × 3) ANOVA design was used to study the effect of generation size and surface functional group of the PAMAMs. The results showed that the aqueous solubility of CC in the presence of carboxyl and TRIS-terminated PAMAMs was higher than those of amine-terminated PAMAMs, and the effect of surface functional group of the PAMAMs on the aqueous solubility of CC was dependent on the generation size (p < 0.05). The sequence of the observed solubility fold enhancement due to PAMAMs was G4.COOH (8378)>G3.COOH (3456)>G4.TRIS (2362)>G2.COOH (1013)>G3.TRIS (749)>G2.TRIS (293)>G4.NH2 (91)>G3.NH2 (50)>G2.NH2 (37). The CC-PAMAM dendrimer inclusion complexes were characterized by UV-Vis, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques. Regarding the results of these techniques, improvement in the solubility of CC is expected primarily through the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the drug and internal tertiary and surface functional groups of the studied PAMAMs.

  11. Oxygen functional groups in graphitic carbon nitride for enhanced photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shizhen; Li, Degang; Sun, Hongqi; Ang, Ha Ming; Tadé, Moses O; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-04-15

    Metal-free semiconductors offer a new opportunity for environmental photocatalysis toward a potential breakthrough in high photo efficiency with complete prevention of metal leaching. In this study, graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) modified by oxygen functional groups was synthesized by a hydrothermal treatment of pristine GCN at different temperatures with H2O2. Insights into the emerging characteristics of the modified GCN in photocatalysis were obtained by determining the optical properties, band structure, electrochemical activity and pollutant degradation efficiency. It was found that the introduction of GCN with oxygen functional groups can enhance light absorption and accelerate electron transfer so as to improve the photocatalytic reaction efficiency. The photoinduced reactive radicals and the associated photodegradation were investigated by in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The reactive radicals, O2(-) and OH, were responsible for organic degradation.

  12. Functional group dependent dissociative electron attachment to simple organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Nandi, Dhananjay; Kelkar, Aditya H.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2008-04-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) cross sections for simple organic molecules, namely, acetic acid, propanoic acid, methanol, ethanol, and n-propyl amine are measured in a crossed beam experiment. We find that the H- ion formation is the dominant channel of DEA for these molecules and takes place at relatively higher energies (>4eV) through the core excited resonances. Comparison of the cross sections of the H- channel from these molecules with those from NH3, H2O, and CH4 shows the presence of functional group dependence in the DEA process. We analyze this new phenomenon in the context of the results reported on other organic molecules. This discovery of functional group dependence has important implications such as control in electron induced chemistry and understanding radiation induced damage in biological systems.

  13. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; Poole, Loree J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  14. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Poole, L.J.

    1995-05-02

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. 10 figs.

  15. Keldysh functional renormalization group for electronic properties of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fräßdorf, Christian; Mosig, Johannes E. M.

    2017-03-01

    We construct a nonperturbative nonequilibrium theory for graphene electrons interacting via the instantaneous Coulomb interaction by combining the functional renormalization group method with the nonequilibrium Keldysh formalism. The Coulomb interaction is partially bosonized in the forward scattering channel resulting in a coupled Fermi-Bose theory. Quantum kinetic equations for the Dirac fermions and the Hubbard-Stratonovich boson are derived in Keldysh basis, together with the exact flow equation for the effective action and the hierarchy of one-particle irreducible vertex functions, taking into account a possible nonzero expectation value of the bosonic field. Eventually, the system of equations is solved approximately under thermal equilibrium conditions at finite temperature, providing results for the renormalized Fermi velocity and the static dielectric function, which extends the zero-temperature results of Bauer et al., Phys. Rev. B 92, 121409 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.121409.

  16. Functional renormalization group for the U (1 )-T56 tensorial group field theory with closure constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoche, Vincent; Ousmane Samary, Dine

    2017-02-01

    This paper is focused on the functional renormalization group applied to the T56 tensor model on the Abelian group U (1 ) with closure constraint. For the first time, we derive the flow equations for the couplings and mass parameters in a suitable truncation around the marginal interactions with respect to the perturbative power counting. For the second time, we study the behavior around the Gaussian fixed point, and show that the theory is nonasymptotically free. Finally, we discuss the UV completion of the theory. We show the existence of several nontrivial fixed points, study the behavior of the renormalization group flow around them, and point out evidence in favor of an asymptotically safe theory.

  17. Chemoselective Boron-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Activation of Carboxylic Acids for Mannich-Type Reactions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hideoki; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-06-10

    The carboxyl group (COOH) is an omnipresent functional group in organic molecules, and its direct catalytic activation represents an attractive synthetic method. Herein, we describe the first example of a direct catalytic nucleophilic activation of carboxylic acids with BH3·SMe2, after which the acids are able to act as carbon nucleophiles, i.e. enolates, in Mannich-type reactions. This reaction proceeds with a mild organic base (DBU) and exhibits high levels of functional group tolerance. The boron catalyst is highly chemoselective toward the COOH group, even in the presence of other carbonyl moieties, such as amides, esters, or ketones. Furthermore, this catalytic method can be extended to highly enantioselective Mannich-type reactions by using a (R)-3,3'-I2-BINOL-substituted boron catalyst.

  18. Water-enhanced solubility of carboxylic acids in organic solvents and its applications to extraction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, J.N.; King, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    The solubilities of carboxylic acids in certain organic solvents increase remarkably with an increasing amount of water in the organic phase. This phenomenon leads to a novel extract regeneration process in which the co-extracted water is selectively removed from an extract, and the carboxylic acid precipitates. This approach is potentially advantageous compared to other regeneration processes because it removes a minor component of the extract in order to achieve a large recovery of acid from the extract. Carboxylic acids of interest include adipic acid, fumaric acid, and succinic acid because of their low to moderate solubilities in organic solvents. Solvents were screened for an increase in acid solubility with increased water concentration in the organic phase. Most Lewis-base solvents were found to exhibit this increased solubility phenomena. Solvents that have a carbonyl functional group showed a very large increase in acid solubility. 71 refs., 52 figs., 38 tabs.

  19. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and

  20. Modeling the antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrational modes of aqueous carboxylate anions.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Catherine C R; Franks, George V; da Silva, Gabriel

    2015-01-05

    The infrared spectra of six aqueous carboxylate anions have been calculated at the M05-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory with the SMD solvent model, and validated against experimental data from the literature over the region of 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1); this region corresponds to the stretching modes of the carboxylate group, and is often interrogated when probing bonding of carboxylates to other species and surfaces. The anions studied here were formate, acetate, oxalate, succinate, glutarate and citrate. For the lowest energy conformer of each anion, the carboxylate moiety antisymmetric stretching peak was predicted with a mean signed error of only 4 cm(-1) using the SMD solvent model, while the symmetric peak was slightly overestimated. Performing calculations in vacuum and scaling was found to generally over-predict the antisymmetric vibrational frequencies and under predict the symmetric peak. Different conformers of the same anion were found to have only slightly different spectra in the studied region and the inclusion of explicit water molecules was not found to significantly change the calculated spectra when the implicit solvent model is used. Overall, the use of density functional theory in conjunction with an implicit solvent model was found to result in infra-red spectra that are the best reproduction of the features found experimentally for the aqueous carboxylate ions in the important 1700 cm(-1) to 1250 cm(-1) region. The development of validated model chemistries for simulating the stretching modes of aqueous carboxylate ions will be valuable for future studies that investigate how carboxylate anions complex with multivalent metal cations and related species in solution.

  1. Hydrothermal Mineral-Assisted Organic Transformations of Carboxylic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. N.; Gould, I.; Williams, L. B.; Hartnett, H. E.; Shock, E.

    2014-12-01

    decarboxylation product formation and activation of additional product pathways including diphenyl alkanes, alkenes, ketones and more. Our investigations involving reactivity of abundant functional groups, including carboxylic acids, reveal the varieties of processes available both on the Earth today and at the dawn of life.

  2. [Functional feeding groups of macroinvertebrates in Gaira river, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barrios, Javier; Ospina-Tórres, Rodulfo; Turizo-Correa, Rodrigo

    2011-12-01

    Tropical rivers are frequently described on their biodiversity but few studies have considered the ecological value of this richness in their food webs. We determined the trophic structure of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities (expressed in the richness and abundance of taxa and biomass proportions of different functional feeding groups) at the level of the river, stretch and microhabitats (functional units - UFs). We evaluated the spatial and temporal variation of these descriptors during wet and dry events, and selected three sites associated with different altitudinal belts. We reported 109 taxa, with 11167 individuals who contributed 107.11g of biomass. Density of macroinvertebrates was favored with increasing height, and biomass showed the opposite pattern (K-W = 10.1, d.f. = 1, p < 0.05), due to the addition of large crustaceans (Macrobrachium), and the taxa diversity was higher in the middle stretch of the river (H'=3.16). The Gaira stream runs through a mid-sized river basin, for this reason we found mainly bedrock (epilithon = 50.5%), gravel and sand (43.7%). The functional unit with more habitat and food resources that contains a higher abundance of leaf litter macroinvertebrates was foliage followed by epilithon, fine sediment and gravel-sand (K-W = 25.3, d.f. = 3, p < 0.05). The biomass values of these organisms were higher in leaves followed by gravel-sands, epilithon and sediment (K-W = 15.3, d.f. = 3, p < 0.05). Autochthonous biomass input by different functional feeding groups can be considered very low, but they define the functionality of the stream, being represented almost exclusively by shredders (Macrobrachium, 73%), present only in the lower reaches, followed by shredder Leptonema with 15%, located mostly in the upper reaches and predatory stoneflies of the genus Anacroneuria to 6.56%, which dominated in the middle stretch of stream. Excluding Macrobrachium from the analysis, there was dominance of Anacroneuria in the lower reaches

  3. Evaluation of a diverse set of potential P1 carboxylic acid bioisosteres in hepatitis C virus NS3 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rönn, Robert; Gossas, Thomas; Sabnis, Yogesh A; Daoud, Hanna; Kerblom, Eva; Danielson, U Helena; Sandström, Anja

    2007-06-15

    There is an urgent need for more efficient therapies for people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV NS3 protease inhibitors have shown proof-of-concept in clinical trials, which make the virally encoded NS3 protease an attractive drug target. Product-based NS3 protease inhibitors comprising a P1 C-terminal carboxylic acid have shown to be effective and we were interested in finding alternatives to this crucial carboxylic acid group. Thus, a series of diverse P1 functional groups with different acidity and with possibilities to form a similar, or an even more powerful, hydrogen bond network as compared to the carboxylic acid were synthesized and incorporated into potential inhibitors of the NS3 protease. Biochemical evaluation of the inhibitors was performed in both enzyme and cell-based assays. Several non-acidic C-terminal groups, such as amides and hydrazides, were evaluated but failed to produce inhibitors more potent than the corresponding carboxylic acid inhibitor. The tetrazole moiety, although of similar acidity to a carboxylic acid, provided an inhibitor with mediocre potencies in both assays. However, the acyl cyanamide and the acyl sulfinamide groups rendered compounds with low nanomolar inhibitory potencies and were more potent than the corresponding carboxylic acid inhibitor in the enzymatic assay. Additionally, results from a pH-study suggest that the P(1) C-terminal of the inhibitors comprising a carboxylic acid, an acyl sulfonamide or an acyl cyanamide group binds in a similar mode in the active site of the NS3 protease.

  4. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Marchena, Martin H.; Granada, Mara; Bordoni, Andrea V.; Joselevich, Maria; Troiani, Horacio; Williams, Federico J.; Wolosiuk, Alejandro

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  5. Finding sequence motifs in groups of functionally related proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, H O; Annau, T M; Chandrasegaran, S

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a method for rapidly finding patterns of conserved amino acid residues (motifs) in groups of functionally related proteins. All 3-amino acid patterns in a group of proteins of the type aa1 d1 aa2 d2 aa3, where d1 and d2 are distances that can be varied in a range up to 24 residues, are accumulated into an array. Segments of the proteins containing those patterns that occur most frequently are aligned on each other by a scoring method that obtains an average relatedness value for all the amino acids in each column of the aligned sequence block based on the Dayhoff relatedness odds matrix. The automated method successfully finds and displays nearly all of the sequence motifs that have been previously reported to occur in 33 reverse transcriptases, 18 DNA integrases, and 30 DNA methyltransferases.

  6. Nitric Acid Dehydration Using Perfluoro Carboxylate and Mixed Sulfonate/Carboxylate Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, Richard L.

    2004-09-01

    (Nafion™ 111). Additionally, nitric acid separation efficiencies (α) were approximately one order of magnitude higher for the carboxylate solution cast films when compared to Nafion™ 111. The second phase of our work included the generation of thin carboxylate films made by the chemical synthesis perfluoro sulfonate and mixed sulfonate/carboxylate polymers from a perfluoro sulfonyl fluoride precursor, the characterization of the newly generated material, and a study of the transport characteristics of these membranes. Transport studies consisted of the dehydration of nitric acid feeds by pervaporation. In addition, the initial hypothesis was expanded to include demonstration that transmembrane flux and separation efficiencies are a function of the ratio between sulfonate and carboxylate terminated side chains of the perfluoro ionomer. Investigations demonstrated the ability to generate in- house films with varying sulfonate/carboxylate concentrations from commercially available perfluoro sulfonyl fluoride material, and showed that the converted films could be characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Finally, the mixed films where subjected to nitric acid dehydration transport tests and a relationship was found to exist between sulfonate/carboxylate pendant chain ratio and both flux and water separation capability. In summary, experimental results confirmed that, when compared to Nafion 111™, the mixed film's bulk fluxes decrease by approximately three orders of magnitude and the water separation factor increases by as much as two orders of magnitude as the carboxylate side-chain content was increased from 0 (pure sulfonate film) to 53 mole%, supporting the hypothesis given for this effort. It was observed that the water selectivity improved for both the solution cast perfluoro carboxylate and mixed perfluoro sulfonate/carboxylate films when judged against similar perfluoro sulfonate materials. Of great benefit

  7. Functional renormalization group study of nuclear and neutron matter

    SciTech Connect

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-01-22

    A chiral model based on nucleons interacting via boson exchange is investigated. Fluctuation effects are included consistently beyond the mean-field approximation in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The liquid-gas phase transition of symmetric nuclear matter is studied in detail. No sign of a chiral restoration transition is found up to temperatures of about 100 MeV and densities of at least three times the density of normal nuclear matter. Moreover, the model is extended to asymmetric nuclear matter and the constraints from neutron star observations are discussed.

  8. ESG: extended similarity group method for automated protein function prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chitale, Meghana; Hawkins, Troy; Park, Changsoon; Kihara, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Importance of accurate automatic protein function prediction is ever increasing in the face of a large number of newly sequenced genomes and proteomics data that are awaiting biological interpretation. Conventional methods have focused on high sequence similarity-based annotation transfer which relies on the concept of homology. However, many cases have been reported that simple transfer of function from top hits of a homology search causes erroneous annotation. New methods are required to handle the sequence similarity in a more robust way to combine together signals from strongly and weakly similar proteins for effectively predicting function for unknown proteins with high reliability. Results: We present the extended similarity group (ESG) method, which performs iterative sequence database searches and annotates a query sequence with Gene Ontology terms. Each annotation is assigned with probability based on its relative similarity score with the multiple-level neighbors in the protein similarity graph. We will depict how the statistical framework of ESG improves the prediction accuracy by iteratively taking into account the neighborhood of query protein in the sequence similarity space. ESG outperforms conventional PSI-BLAST and the protein function prediction (PFP) algorithm. It is found that the iterative search is effective in capturing multiple-domains in a query protein, enabling accurately predicting several functions which originate from different domains. Availability: ESG web server is available for automated protein function prediction at http://dragon.bio.purdue.edu/ESG/ Contact: cspark@cau.ac.kr; dkihara@purdue.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19435743

  9. Metabolism of Cyclohexane Carboxylic Acid by Alcaligenes Strain W1

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David G.; Trudgill, Peter W.

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-three microorganisms capable of growth with cyclohexane carboxylate as the sole source of carbon were isolated from mud, water, and soil samples from the Aberystwyth area. Preliminary screening and whole-cell oxidation studies suggested that, with one exception, all of the strains metabolized the growth substrate by beta-oxidation of the coenzyme A ester. This single distinctive strain, able to oxidize rapidly trans-4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate, 4-ketocyclohexane carboxylate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and protocatechuate when grown with cyclohexane carboxylate, was classified as a strain of Alcaligenes and given the number W1. Enzymes capable of converting cyclohexane carboxylate to p-hydroxybenzoate were induced by growth with the alicyclic acid and included the first unambiguous specimen of a cyclohexane carboxylate hydroxylase. Because it is a very fragile protein, attempts to stabilize the cyclohexane carboxylate hydroxylase so that a purification procedure could be developed have consistently failed. In limited studies with crude cell extracts, we found that hydroxylation occurred at the 4 position, probably yielding the trans isomer of 4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidation, coupled with an assessment of reactant stoichiometry, showed the enzyme to be a mixed-function oxygenase. Mass spectral analysis enabled the conversion of cyclohexane carboxylate to p-hydroxybenzoate by cell extracts to be established unequivocally, and all of our data were consistent with the pathway: cyclohexane carboxylate → trans-4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate → 4-ketocyclohexane carboxylate → p-hydroxybenzoate. The further metabolism of p-hydroxybenzoate proceeded by meta fission and by the oxidative branch of the 2-hydroxy-4-carboxymuconic semialde-hyde-cleaving pathway. PMID:207665

  10. Characterization of acid functional groups of carbon dots by nonlinear regression data fitting of potentiometric titration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Larissa A.; de Castro, Arthur H.; de Mendonça, Fernanda G.; de Mesquita, João P.

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenated functional groups present on the surface of carbon dots with an average size of 2.7 ± 0.5 nm were characterized by a variety of techniques. In particular, we discussed the fit data of potentiometric titration curves using a nonlinear regression method based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The results obtained by statistical treatment of the titration curve data showed that the best fit was obtained considering the presence of five Brønsted-Lowry acids on the surface of the carbon dots with constant ionization characteristics of carboxylic acids, cyclic ester, phenolic and pyrone-like groups. The total number of oxygenated acid groups obtained was 5 mmol g-1, with approximately 65% (∼2.9 mmol g-1) originating from groups with pKa < 6. The methodology showed good reproducibility and stability with standard deviations below 5%. The nature of the groups was independent of small variations in experimental conditions, i.e. the mass of carbon dots titrated and initial concentration of HCl solution. Finally, we believe that the methodology used here, together with other characterization techniques, is a simple, fast and powerful tool to characterize the complex acid-base properties of these so interesting and intriguing nanoparticles.

  11. Poly[triaquabis-(μ(2)-3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ato)dilithium(I)].

    PubMed

    Tombul, Mustafa; Güven, Kutalmış; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2008-02-20

    In the title compound, [Li(2)(C(6)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(3)](n), the coordination number for both independent Li(+) cations is five. One of the Li(+) ions has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one of the carboxyl O atoms of a 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligand, two O atoms from two water mol-ecules, and an N and a carboxyl-ate O atom of a second 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligand. The other Li(+) ion also has a distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry, coordinated by one water mol-ecule and two 3-carboxy-pyrazine-2-carboxyl-ate ligands through an N and a carboxyl-ate O atom from each. One of the carboxyl groups of the two ligands takes part in an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. The stabilization of the crystal structure is further assisted by O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter-actions involving the water mol-ecules and carboxyl-ate O atoms.

  12. Stabilization of calcium- and terbium-carboxylate bonds by NH...O hydrogen bonds in a mononuclear complex: a functional model of the active site of calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Akira; Yamada, Yusuke; Nakayama, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Adachi, Hiroshi; Okamura, Taka-Aki; Nakamura, Akira; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Ueyama, Norikazu; Vyprachticky, Drahomir; Okamoto, Yoshi

    2004-07-12

    Novel benzoic acid ligands with bulky amide groups at the ortho position, 2,6-(MeCONH)(2)C(6)H(3)CO(2)H (1) and 2,6-(t-BuCONH)(2)C(6)H(3)CO(2)H (2), and their tris- and tetrakis(carboxylate) complexes with Ca(II) and Tb(III) ions, (NEt(4))(2)[Ca(II)[O(2)C-2,6-(t-BuCONH)(2)C(6)H(3)](4)] (4), [Tb[O(2)C-2,6-(t-BuNHCO)(2)C(6)H(3)](3)(H(2)O)(3)

  13. Congener-specific numbering systems for the environmentally relevant C4 through C8 perfluorinated homologue groups of alkyl sulfonates, carboxylates, telomer alcohols, olefins, and acids, and their derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rayne, Sierra; Forest, Kaya; Friesen, Ken J

    2008-10-01

    We introduce a congener-specific numbering system for the C4 through C8 perfluorinated homologue groups of alkyl sulfonates, carboxylates, telomer alcohols, olefins, and acids, and their derivatives. Increasing length of the carbon chain beyond C3 leads to a corresponding rapid increase in the number of potential isomers (C4 = 4, C5 = 8, C6 = 17, C7 = 39, and C8 = 89 congeners). There is a need for clear and unambiguous chemical shorthand to ensure accuracy and consistency in the future perfluorinated alkyl substance (PFA) literature, and to correct previous misconceptions that may have restricted research efforts into developing full-congener PFA analysis. If adopted by the research community, introduction of a numbering system at this relatively early stage of investigations into the congener-specific analysis, environmental behavior, and toxicology of PFAs would not require an arduous and difficult reassignment of historical structures and naming conventions presented in the prior art. Many PFA congeners are chiral, necessitating a consideration of their enantiospecific environmental behavior and toxicology.

  14. Water mediated ligand functional group cooperativity: the contribution of a methyl group to binding affinity is enhanced by a COO(-) group through changes in the structure and thermodynamics of the hydration waters of ligand-thermolysin complexes.

    PubMed

    Nasief, Nader N; Tan, Hongwei; Kong, Jing; Hangauer, David

    2012-10-11

    Ligand functional groups can modulate the contributions of one another to the ligand-protein binding thermodynamics, producing either positive or negative cooperativity. Data presented for four thermolysin phosphonamidate inhibitors demonstrate that the differential binding free energy and enthalpy caused by replacement of a H with a Me group, which binds in the well-hydrated S2' pocket, are more favorable in presence of a ligand carboxylate. The differential entropy is however less favorable. Dissection of these differential thermodynamic parameters, X-ray crystallography, and density-functional theory calculations suggest that these cooperativities are caused by variations in the thermodynamics of the complex hydration shell changes accompanying the H→Me replacement. Specifically, the COO(-) reduces both the enthalpic penalty and the entropic advantage of displacing water molecules from the S2' pocket and causes a subsequent acquisition of a more enthalpically, less entropically, favorable water network. This study contributes to understanding the important role water plays in ligand-protein binding.

  15. Water Mediated Ligand Functional Group Cooperativity: The Contribution of a Methyl Group to Binding Affinity is Enhanced by a COO− Group Through Changes in the Structure and Thermo dynamics of the Hydration Waters of Ligand-Thermolysin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nasief, Nader N; Tan, Hongwei; Kong, Jing; Hangauer, David

    2012-01-01

    Ligand functional groups can modulate the contributions of one another to the ligand-protein binding thermodynamics, producing either positive or negative cooperativity. Data presented for four thermolysin phosphonamidate inhibitors demonstrate that the differential binding free energy and enthalpy caused by replacement of a H with a Me group, which binds in the well-hydrated S2′ pocket, are more favorable in presence of a ligand carboxylate. The differential entropy is however less favorable. Dissection of these differential thermodynamic parameters, X-ray crystallography, and density-functional theory calculations suggest that these cooperativities are caused by variations in the thermodynamics of the complex hydration shell changes accompanying the H→Me replacement. Specifically, the COO− reduces both the enthalpic penalty and the entropic advantage of displacing water molecules from the S2′ pocket, and causes a subsequent acquisition of a more enthalpically, less entropically, favorable water network. This study contributes to understanding the important role water plays in ligand-protein binding. PMID:22894131

  16. A role for coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid) in a bacterial pathway of aliphatic epoxide carboxylation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Daniel D.; Krum, Jonathan G.; Ensign, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    The bacterial metabolism of short-chain aliphatic alkenes occurs via oxidation to epoxyalkanes followed by carboxylation to β-ketoacids. Epoxyalkane carboxylation requires four enzymes (components I–IV), NADPH, NAD+, and a previously unidentified nucleophilic thiol. In the present work, coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid), a compound previously found only in the methanogenic Archaea where it serves as a methyl group carrier and activator, has been identified as the thiol and central cofactor of aliphatic epoxide carboxylation in the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthobacter strain Py2. Component I catalyzed the addition of coenzyme M to epoxypropane to form a β-hydroxythioether, 2-(2-hydroxypropylthio)ethanesulfonate. Components III and IV catalyzed the NAD+-dependent stereoselective dehydrogenation of R- and S-enantiomers of 2-(2-hydroxypropylthio)ethanesulfonate to form 2-(2-ketopropylthio)ethanesulfonate. Component II catalyzed the NADPH-dependent cleavage and carboxylation of the β-ketothioether to form acetoacetate and coenzyme M. These findings evince a newfound versatility for coenzyme M as a carrier and activator of alkyl groups longer in chain-length than methane, a function for coenzyme M in a catabolic pathway of hydrocarbon oxidation, and the presence of coenzyme M in the bacterial domain of the phylogenetic tree. These results serve to unify bacterial and Archaeal metabolism further and showcase diverse biological functions for an elegantly simple organic molecule. PMID:10411892

  17. Guest-Host Chemistry with Dendrimers—Binding of Carboxylates in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes F.; Hansen, Jon S.; Christensen, Jørn B.

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and binding of anions in water is difficult due to the ability of water molecules to form strong hydrogen bonds and to solvate the anions. The complexation of two different carboxylates with 1-(4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers was studied in aqueous solution using NMR and ITC binding models. Sodium 2-naphthoate and sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate were chosen as carboxylate model compounds, since they carry structural similarities to many non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and they possess only a limited number of functional groups, making them ideal to study the carboxylate-dendrimer interaction selectively. The binding stoichiometry for 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate was found to be two strongly bound guest molecules per dendrimer and an additional 40 molecules with weak binding affinity. The NOESY NMR showed a clear binding correlation of sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate with the lyophilic dendrimer core, possibly with the two high affinity guest molecules. In comparison, sodium 2-naphthoate showed a weaker binding strength and had a stoichiometry of two guests per dendrimer with no additional weakly bound guests. This stronger dendrimer interaction with sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate is possibly a result of the additional interactions of the dendrimer with the extra hydroxyl group and an internal stabilization of the negative charge due to the hydroxyl group. These findings illustrate the potential of the G4 1-(4-carbomethoxy) pyrrolidone dendrimer to complex carboxylate guests in water and act as a possible carrier of such molecules. PMID:26448138

  18. Nutrient resorption patterns of plant functional groups in a tropical savanna: variation and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, Jayashree; Sankaran, Mahesh; Hanan, Niall P; Grant, Rina C; Zambatis, Nick

    2008-08-01

    Green and senesced leaf nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations of different plant functional groups in savanna communities of Kruger National Park, South Africa were analyzed to determine if nutrient resorption was regulated by plant nutritional status and foliar N:P ratios. The N and P concentrations in green leaves and the N concentrations in senesced leaves differed significantly between the dominant plant functional groups in these savannas: fine-leaved trees, broad-leaved trees and grasses. However, all three functional groups reduced P to comparable and very low levels in senesced leaves, suggesting that P was tightly conserved in this tropical semi-arid savanna ecosystem. Across all functional groups, there was evidence for nutritional control of resorption in this system, with both N and P resorption efficiencies decreasing as green leaf nutrient concentrations increased. However, specific patterns of resorption and the functional relationships between nutrient concentrations in green and senesced leaves varied by nutrient and plant functional group. Functional relationships between N concentrations in green and senesced leaves were indistinguishable between the dominant groups, suggesting that variation in N resorption efficiency was largely the result of inter-life form differences in green leaf N concentrations. In contrast, observed differences in P resorption efficiencies between life forms appear to be the result of both differences in green leaf P concentrations as well as inherent differences between life forms in the fraction of green leaf P resorbed from senescing leaves. Our results indicate that foliar N:P ratios are poor predictors of resorption efficiency in this ecosystem, in contrast to N and P resorption proficiencies, which are more responsive to foliar N:P ratios.

  19. Correlation functions from a unified variational principle: Trial Lie groups

    SciTech Connect

    Balian, R.; Vénéroni, M.

    2015-11-15

    Time-dependent expectation values and correlation functions for many-body quantum systems are evaluated by means of a unified variational principle. It optimizes a generating functional depending on sources associated with the observables of interest. It is built by imposing through Lagrange multipliers constraints that account for the initial state (at equilibrium or off equilibrium) and for the backward Heisenberg evolution of the observables. The trial objects are respectively akin to a density operator and to an operator involving the observables of interest and the sources. We work out here the case where trial spaces constitute Lie groups. This choice reduces the original degrees of freedom to those of the underlying Lie algebra, consisting of simple observables; the resulting objects are labeled by the indices of a basis of this algebra. Explicit results are obtained by expanding in powers of the sources. Zeroth and first orders provide thermodynamic quantities and expectation values in the form of mean-field approximations, with dynamical equations having a classical Lie–Poisson structure. At second order, the variational expression for two-time correlation functions separates–as does its exact counterpart–the approximate dynamics of the observables from the approximate correlations in the initial state. Two building blocks are involved: (i) a commutation matrix which stems from the structure constants of the Lie algebra; and (ii) the second-derivative matrix of a free-energy function. The diagonalization of both matrices, required for practical calculations, is worked out, in a way analogous to the standard RPA. The ensuing structure of the variational formulae is the same as for a system of non-interacting bosons (or of harmonic oscillators) plus, at non-zero temperature, classical Gaussian variables. This property is explained by mapping the original Lie algebra onto a simpler Lie algebra. The results, valid for any trial Lie group, fulfill

  20. Functional Group Analysis of Biomass Burning Particles Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrell, K.; Lau, A.; Bond, T.; Iraci, L. T.

    2008-12-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere. These particles affect the energy balance of the atmosphere directly by absorbing and scattering solar radiation, and indirectly through their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The chemical composition of biomass burning particles influences their ability to act as CCN, thus understanding the chemistry of these particles is required for understanding their effects on climate and air quality. As climate change influences the frequency and severity of boreal forest fires, the influence of biomass burning aerosols on the atmosphere may become significantly greater. Only a small portion of the organic carbon (OC) fraction of these particles has been identified at the molecular level, although several studies have explored the general chemical classes found in biomass burning smoke. To complement those studies and provide additional information about the reactive functional groups present, we are developing a method for polarity-based separation of compound classes found in the OC fraction, followed by infrared (IR) spectroscopic analysis of each polarity fraction. It is our goal to find a simple, relatively low-tech method which will provide a moderate chemical understanding of the entire suite of compounds present in the OC fraction of biomass burning particles. Here we present preliminary results from pine and oak samples representative of Midwestern United States forests burned at several different temperatures. Wood type and combustion temperature are both seen to affect the composition of the particles. The latter seems to affect relative contributions of certain functional groups, while oak demonstrates at least one additional chemical class of compounds, particularly at lower burning temperatures, where gradual solid-gas phase reactions can produce relatively large amounts of incompletely oxidized products.

  1. γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle functionalized with carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube: Synthesis, characterization, analytical and biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılınç, Ersin

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanoparticles attained special interest in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine due to their uniqe properties and biocompatibilities. From this perspective, hybride nanostructure composed from γ-Fe2O3 magnetic nanoparticle and carboxylated multi walled carbon nanotube was synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, VSM, SEM, HR-TEM and ICP-OES. Microscopy images showed that magnetic nanoparticles were nearly spherical structure that arranged on the axis of carboxylated MWCNT. Particle size was found lower than 10 nm. VSM results showed that the obtained magnetic nanoparticles presented superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. The magnetic saturation value was determined as 35.2 emu/g. It was used for the adsorption and controlled release of harmane, a potent tremor-producing neurotoxin. Maximum adsorption capacity was calculated as 151.5 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. Concentration of harmane was determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The antimicrobial activity of synthesized magnetic nanoparticle was investigated against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. However, no activity was observed.

  2. Functional renormalization group studies of nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) methods applied to calculations of isospin-symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron matter are reviewed. The approach is based on a chiral Lagrangian expressed in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom as appropriate for the hadronic phase of QCD with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated solving Wetterich's FRG flow equations. Nuclear thermodynamics and the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition are investigated in detail, both in symmetric matter and as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with advanced ab-initio many-body computations. Contacts with perturbative many-body approaches (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) are discussed. As an interesting test case, the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium is investigated. The question of chiral symmetry restoration in nuclear and neutron matter is addressed. A stabilization of the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry is found to persist up to high baryon densities once fluctuations beyond mean-field are included. Neutron star matter including beta equilibrium is discussed under the aspect of the constraints imposed by the existence of two-solar-mass neutron stars.

  3. EFFECT OF FUNCTIONAL GROUP CONFORMATION ON THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF SOME GEM DIFUNCTIONAL PHENYLETHYLENE DERIVATIVES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    each functional group . The two bands for similar functional groups have been ascribed to S-cis- and S-trans- conformations of the carbonyl groups with...Except for the benzalmalononitriles, two functional group stretching vibrations occur in the infrared (i.r.) spectra of the beta,beta-difunctional...styrenes with similar functional groups . For geometrically homogeneous compounds with dissimilar functional groups only one absorption band occurs for

  4. Observations of Adolescent Peer Group Interactions as a Function of Within- and Between-Group Centrality Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Wendy E.; Dumas, Tara M.; Mahdy, Jasmine C.; Wolfe, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of adolescent (n = 258; M age = 15.45) peer group triads (n = 86) were analyzed to identify conversation and interaction styles as a function of within-group and between-group centrality status. Group members' discussions about hypothetical dilemmas were coded for agreements, disagreements, commands, and opinions. Interactions during…

  5. A comprehensive classification and nomenclature of carboxyl–carboxyl(ate) supramolecular motifs and related catemers: implications for biomolecular systems

    PubMed Central

    D’Ascenzo, Luigi; Auffinger, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Carboxyl and carboxylate groups form important supramolecular motifs (synthons). Besides carboxyl cyclic dimers, carboxyl and carboxylate groups can associate through a single hydrogen bond. Carboxylic groups can further form polymeric-like catemer chains within crystals. To date, no exhaustive classification of these motifs has been established. In this work, 17 association types were identified (13 carboxyl–carboxyl and 4 carboxyl–carboxylate motifs) by taking into account the syn and anti carboxyl conformers, as well as the syn and anti lone pairs of the O atoms. From these data, a simple rule was derived stating that only eight distinct catemer motifs involving repetitive combinations of syn and anti carboxyl groups can be formed. Examples extracted from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for all identified dimers and catemers are presented, as well as statistical data related to their occurrence and conformational preferences. The inter-carboxyl(ate) and carboxyl(ate)–water hydrogen-bond properties are described, stressing the occurrence of very short (strong) hydrogen bonds. The precise characterization and classification of these supramolecular motifs should be of interest in crystal engineering, pharmaceutical and also biomolecular sciences, where similar motifs occur in the form of pairs of Asp/Glu amino acids or motifs involving ligands bearing carboxyl(ate) groups. Hence, we present data emphasizing how the analysis of hydrogen-containing small molecules of high resolution can help understand structural aspects of larger and more complex biomolecular systems of lower resolution. PMID:25827369

  6. Carboxylic Acid to Thioamide Hydrogen Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Suchitra; Lightner, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The lactam groups of dipyrrinones avidly engage in amide-amide hydrogen bonding to form dimeric association complexes in nonpolar solvents (in CHCl3, KD ~25,000 M-1 at 22°C). The corresponding thioamides (dipyrrinthiones), prepared from dipyrrinones by reaction with Lawesson’s reagent, also form intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded dimers in nonpolar solvents, albeit with much weaker association constants (in CHCl3, KD ~200 M-1 at 22°C). When a carboxylic acid group is tethered to C(9) of the dipyrrinone, as in the hexanoic acid of [6]-semirubin, tight intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the carboxylic acid group and the lactam moiety (intramolecular Kassoc ≫25,000) is found in CHCl3 with no evidence of dimers. In contrast, the analogous dipyrrinthione, [6]-thiosemirubin, eschews intramolecular hydrogen bonds, as determined using NMR spectroscopy and vapor pressure osmometry, preferring to form intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded dimers of the thioamide-thioamide type. PMID:20049064

  7. On the Mechanism of Pd(0)-Catalyzed, Cu(I) Carboxylate-Mediated Thioorganic-Boronic Acid Desulfitative Coupling. A Non-innocent Role for Carboxylate Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G.; Liebeskind, Lanny S.

    2009-01-01

    Computational studies of the mechanism of the Pd-catalyzed, Cu(I)-carboxylate-mediated desulfitative coupling of thioorganics with boronic acids have determined that the requisite Cu(I)-carboxylate plays multiple important roles. The Cu(I)-carboxylate enhances both the transmetalation and the C-C reductive elimination steps: it acts as a reactive transmetalation center and it provides a vital carboxylate ligand. The carboxylate ligand functions not only as an activator for the boronic acid, but it also displaces a phosphine ligand at the palladium center generating a catalytically competent mono-phosphine-palladium intermediate. PMID:20161122

  8. Nano-graphene oxide carboxylation for efficient bioconjugation applications: a quantitative optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imani, Rana; Emami, Shahriar Hojjati; Faghihi, Shahab

    2015-02-01

    A method for carboxylation of graphene oxide (GO) with chloroacetic acid that precisely optimizes and controls the efficacy of the process for bioconjugation applications is proposed. Quantification of COOH groups on nano-graphene oxide sheets (NGOS) is performed by novel colorimetric methylene blue (MB) assay. The GO is synthesized and carboxylated by chloroacetic acid treatment under strong basic condition. The size and morphology of the as-prepared NGOS are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The effect of acid to base molar ratio on the physical, chemical, and morphological properties of NGOS is analyzed by Fourier-transformed infrared spectrometry (FTIR), UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), AFM, and zeta potential. For evaluation of bioconjugation efficacy, the synthesized nano-carriers with different carboxylation ratios are functionalized by octaarginine peptide sequence (R8) as a biomolecule model containing amine groups. The quantification of attached R8 peptides to graphene nano-sheets' surface is performed with a colorimetric-based assay which includes the application of 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The results show that the thickness and lateral size of nano-sheets are dramatically decreased to 0.8 nm and 50-100 nm after carboxylation process, respectively. X-ray analysis shows the nano-sheets interlaying space is affected by the alteration of chloroacetic acid to base ratio. The MB assay reveals that the COOH groups on the surface of NGOS are maximized at the acid to base ratio of 2 which is confirmed by FTIR, XRD, and zeta potential. The TNBS assay also shows that bioconjugation of the optimized carboxylated NGOS sample with octaarginine peptide is 2.5 times more efficient compared to bare NGOS. The present work provides evidence that treatment of GO by chloroacetic acid under an optimized condition would create a functionalized high surface

  9. Lysine carboxylation: unveiling a spontaneous post-translational modification

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Adamian, Larisa; Shi, Dashuang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A computational method for the prediction of lysine carboxylation (KCX) in protein structures is described. The method accurately identifies misreported KCXs and predicts previously unknown KCX sites. The carboxylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification (PTM) that plays a critical role in the catalytic mechanisms of several important enzymes. It occurs spontaneously under certain physicochemical conditions, but is difficult to detect experimentally. Its full impact is unknown. In this work, the signature microenvironment of lysine-carboxylation sites has been characterized. In addition, a computational method called Predictor of Lysine Carboxylation (PreLysCar) for the detection of lysine carboxylation in proteins with available three-dimensional structures has been developed. The likely prevalence of lysine carboxylation in the proteome was assessed through large-scale computations. The results suggest that about 1.3% of large proteins may contain a carboxylated lysine residue. This unexpected prevalence of lysine carboxylation implies an enrichment of reactions in which it may play functional roles. The results also suggest that by switching enzymes on and off under appropriate physicochemical conditions spontaneous PTMs may serve as an important and widely used efficient biological machinery for regulation.

  10. Changes in bird functional diversity across multiple land uses: interpretations of functional redundancy depend on functional group identity.

    PubMed

    Luck, Gary W; Carter, Andrew; Smallbone, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Examinations of the impact of land-use change on functional diversity link changes in ecological community structure driven by land modification with the consequences for ecosystem function. Yet, most studies have been small-scale, experimental analyses and primarily focussed on plants. There is a lack of research on fauna communities and at large-scales across multiple land uses. We assessed changes in the functional diversity of bird communities across 24 land uses aligned along an intensification gradient. We tested the hypothesis that functional diversity is higher in less intensively used landscapes, documented changes in diversity using four diversity metrics, and examined how functional diversity varied with species richness to identify levels of functional redundancy. Functional diversity, measured using a dendogram-based metric, increased from high to low intensity land uses, but observed values did not differ significantly from randomly-generated expected values. Values for functional evenness and functional divergence did not vary consistently with land-use intensification, although higher than expected values were mostly recorded in high intensity land uses. A total of 16 land uses had lower than expected values for functional dispersion and these were mostly low intensity native vegetation sites. Relations between functional diversity and bird species richness yielded strikingly different patterns for the entire bird community vs. particular functional groups. For all birds and insectivores, functional evenness, divergence and dispersion showed a linear decline with increasing species richness suggesting substantial functional redundancy across communities. However, for nectarivores, frugivores and carnivores, there was a significant hump-shaped or non-significant positive linear relationship between these functional measures and species richness indicating less redundancy. Hump-shaped relationships signify that the most functionally diverse

  11. Changes in Bird Functional Diversity across Multiple Land Uses: Interpretations of Functional Redundancy Depend on Functional Group Identity

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Gary W.; Carter, Andrew; Smallbone, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Examinations of the impact of land-use change on functional diversity link changes in ecological community structure driven by land modification with the consequences for ecosystem function. Yet, most studies have been small-scale, experimental analyses and primarily focussed on plants. There is a lack of research on fauna communities and at large-scales across multiple land uses. We assessed changes in the functional diversity of bird communities across 24 land uses aligned along an intensification gradient. We tested the hypothesis that functional diversity is higher in less intensively used landscapes, documented changes in diversity using four diversity metrics, and examined how functional diversity varied with species richness to identify levels of functional redundancy. Functional diversity, measured using a dendogram-based metric, increased from high to low intensity land uses, but observed values did not differ significantly from randomly-generated expected values. Values for functional evenness and functional divergence did not vary consistently with land-use intensification, although higher than expected values were mostly recorded in high intensity land uses. A total of 16 land uses had lower than expected values for functional dispersion and these were mostly low intensity native vegetation sites. Relations between functional diversity and bird species richness yielded strikingly different patterns for the entire bird community vs. particular functional groups. For all birds and insectivores, functional evenness, divergence and dispersion showed a linear decline with increasing species richness suggesting substantial functional redundancy across communities. However, for nectarivores, frugivores and carnivores, there was a significant hump-shaped or non-significant positive linear relationship between these functional measures and species richness indicating less redundancy. Hump-shaped relationships signify that the most functionally diverse

  12. Functional movement screen scores in a group of running athletes.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Janice K; Parkerson-Mitchell, Amy J; Hildebrand, Laurie D; Teague, Connie

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mean values of the functional movement screen (FMS) in a group of long-distance runners. The secondary aims were to investigate whether the FMS performance differed between sexes and between young and older runners. Forty-three runners, 16 women (mean age = 33.5 years, height = 165.2 cm, weight = 56.3 kg, and body mass index [BMI] = 20.6) and 27 men (mean age = 39.3 years, height = 177.6 cm, weight = 75.8 kg, and BMI = 24.2) performed the FMS. All the runners were injury-free and ran >30 km·wk. Independent t-tests were performed on the composite scores to examine the differences between men and women and also between young (<40 years) and older runners (>40 years). Contingency tables (2 × 2) were developed for each of the 7 screening tests to further look at the differences in groups for each single test. The χ values were calculated to determine significant differences. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. There was no significant difference in the composite score between women and men. There were significant differences between the sexes in the push-up and straight leg test scores, with the women scoring better on each test. A significant difference was found in the composite scores between younger and older runners (p < 0.000). Additional score differences were found for the squat, hurdle step, and in-line lunge tests with the younger runners scoring better. This study provided mean values for the FMS in a cohort of long-distance runners. These values can be used as a reference for comparing FMST scores in other runners who are screened with this tool.

  13. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that "there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies" to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only

  14. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Pan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and other technologies have been offering evidence and insights showing that altered brain functional networks are associated with neurological illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease. Exploring brain networks of clinical populations compared to those of controls would be a key inquiry to reveal underlying neurological processes related to such illnesses. For such a purpose, group-level inference is a necessary first step in order to establish whether there are any genuinely disrupted brain subnetworks. Such an analysis is also challenging due to the high dimensionality of the parameters in a network model and high noise levels in neuroimaging data. We are still in the early stage of method development as highlighted by Varoquaux and Craddock (2013) that “there is currently no unique solution, but a spectrum of related methods and analytical strategies” to learn and compare brain connectivity. In practice the important issue of how to choose several critical parameters in estimating a network, such as what association measure to use and what is the sparsity of the estimated network, has not been carefully addressed, largely because the answers are unknown yet. For example, even though the choice of tuning parameters in model estimation has been extensively discussed in the literature, as to be shown here, an optimal choice of a parameter for network estimation may not be optimal in the current context of hypothesis testing. Arbitrarily choosing or mis-specifying such parameters may lead to extremely low-powered tests. Here we develop highly adaptive tests to detect group differences in brain connectivity while accounting for unknown optimal choices of some tuning parameters. The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not

  15. Isolation of an 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase gene from mulberry (Morus alba L.) and analysis of the function of this gene in plant development and stresses response.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Lou, Chengfu

    2008-07-31

    Mulberry (Morus alba) is an important crop tree involved in sericulture and pharmaceuticals. To further understand the development and the environmental adaptability mechanism of mulberry, a cDNA of the gene MaACO1 encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase was isolated from mulberry. This was used to investigate stress-responsive expression in mulberry. Developmental expression of ACC oxidase in mulberry leaves and spatial expression in mulberry flowers were also investigated. Damage and low-temperature treatment promoted the expression of MaACO1 in mulberry. In leaves, expression of the MaACO1 gene increased in cotyledons and the lowest leaves with leaf development, but showed reduced levels in emerging leaves. In flowers, the pollinated stigma showed the highest expression level, followed by the unpollinated stigma, ovary, and immature flowers. These results suggest that high MaACO1 expression may be predominantly associated with tissue aging or senescence in mulberry.

  16. High-performance functional Renormalization Group calculations for interacting fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, J.; Sánchez de la Peña, D.; Rohe, D.; Di Napoli, E.; Honerkamp, C.; Maier, S. A.

    2017-04-01

    We derive a novel computational scheme for functional Renormalization Group (fRG) calculations for interacting fermions on 2D lattices. The scheme is based on the exchange parametrization fRG for the two-fermion interaction, with additional insertions of truncated partitions of unity. These insertions decouple the fermionic propagators from the exchange propagators and lead to a separation of the underlying equations. We demonstrate that this separation is numerically advantageous and may pave the way for refined, large-scale computational investigations even in the case of complex multiband systems. Furthermore, on the basis of speedup data gained from our implementation, it is shown that this new variant facilitates efficient calculations on a large number of multi-core CPUs. We apply the scheme to the t ,t‧ Hubbard model on a square lattice to analyze the convergence of the results with the bond length of the truncation of the partition of unity. In most parameter areas, a fast convergence can be observed. Finally, we compare to previous results in order to relate our approach to other fRG studies.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of furan-2-carboxylic and 3-(2-furyl)-2-propenoic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobechko, I. B.; Van-Chin-Syan, Yu. Ya.; Kochubei, V. V.; Prokop, R. T.; Velychkivska, N. I.; Gorak, Yu. I.; Dibrivnyi, V. N.; Obushak, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The standard enthalpies of combustion, formation, fusion, and sublimation of crystalline furan-2-carboxylic and 3-(2-furyl)-2-propenoic acids are determined by experimental methods and recalculated to 298 K. The possibility of using additive calculation schemes based on the principle of group contributions to calculate the standard enthalpies of vaporization and formation of substances with similar combinations of functional fragments in the gas phase is analyzed.

  18. Boron-Catalyzed N-Alkylation of Amines using Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ming-Chen; Shang, Rui; Cheng, Wan-Min; Fu, Yao

    2015-07-27

    A boron-based catalyst was found to catalyze the straightforward alkylation of amines with readily available carboxylic acids in the presence of silane as the reducing agent. Various types of primary and secondary amines can be smoothly alkylated with good selectivity and good functional-group compatibility. This metal-free amine alkylation was successfully applied to the synthesis of three commercial medicinal compounds, Butenafine, Cinacalcet. and Piribedil, in a one-pot manner without using any metal catalysts.

  19. Synthesis, photophysical studies and ¹O₂ generation of carboxylate-terminated zinc phthalocyanine dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Setaro, Francesca; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Nonell, Santi; Hahn, Uwe; Torres, Tomás

    2014-07-01

    Highly water-soluble dendrimers have been prepared consisting of a central zinc phthalocyanine moiety and dendritic wedges with terminal carboxylate groups. The biggest polyelectrolyte comprises 32 negative charges at the dendrimer surface. The photophysical studies reveal a strong correlation between the degree of dendritic environment, the extent of aggregation, and the ability to generate singlet oxygen in aqueous media. Compared to dendrimers having an axial derivatization the functionalization on the outer rim also significantly improves the phthalocyanine's ability to photosensitize singlet oxygen.

  20. Quantification of glycated N-terminal peptide of hemoglobin using derivatization for multiple functional groups of amino acids followed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yohei; Kinumi, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Taichi; Takatsu, Akiko

    2016-02-01

    A novel method of amino acid analysis using derivatization of multiple functional groups (amino, carboxyl, and phenolic hydroxyl groups) was applied to measure glycated amino acids in order to quantify glycated peptides and evaluate the degree of glycation of peptide. Amino and carboxyl groups of amino acids were derivatized with 1-bromobutane so that the hydrophobicities and basicities of the amino acids, including glycated amino acids, were improved. These derivatized amino acids could be detected with high sensitivity using LC-MS/MS. In this study, 1-deoxyfructosyl-VHLTPE and VHLTPE, which are N-terminal peptides of the β-chains of hemoglobin, were selected as target compounds. After reducing the peptide sample solution with sodium borohydride, the obtained peptides were hydrolyzed with hydrochloric acid. The released amino acids were then derivatized with 1-bromobutane and analyzed with LC-MS/MS. The derivatized amino acids, including glycated amino acids, could be separated using an octadecyl silylated silica column and good sharp peaks were detected. We show a confirmatory experiment that the proposed method can be applied to evaluate the degree of glycation of peptides, using mixtures of glycated and non-glycated peptide.

  1. 14 CFR Section 11 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating... ACCOUNTS AND REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 11 Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group II and Group III Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations....

  2. Functional trait responses to grazing are mediated by soil moisture and plant functional group identity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shuxia; Li, Wenhuai; Lan, Zhichun; Ren, Haiyan; Wang, Kaibo

    2015-01-01

    Abundant evidence has shown that grazing alters plant functional traits, community structure and ecosystem functioning of grasslands. Few studies, however, have tested how plant responses to grazing are mediated by resource availability and plant functional group identity. We examined the effects of grazing on functional traits across a broad range of species along a soil moisture gradient in Inner Mongolia grassland. Our results showed that trait syndromes of plant size (individual biomass) and shoot growth (leaf N content and leaf density) distinguished plant species responses to grazing. The effects of grazing on functional traits were mediated by soil moisture and dependent on functional group identity. For most species, grazing decreased plant height but increased leaf N and specific leaf area (SLA) along the moisture gradient. Grazing enhanced the community-weighted attributes (leaf NCWM and SLACWM), which were triggered mainly by the positive trait responses of annuals and biennials and perennial grasses, and increased relative abundance of perennial forbs. Our results suggest that grazing-induced species turnover and increased intraspecific trait variability are two drivers for the observed changes in community weighted attributes. The dominant perennial bunchgrasses exhibited mixed tolerance–resistance strategies to grazing and mixed acquisitive–conservative strategies in resource utilization. PMID:26655858

  3. Synthesis of functionalized silica nanostructure: Unexpected conversion of cyanopropyl group in chloropropyl one during HCl-catalysed hydrolysis of the corresponding triethoxysilane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitriu, Ana-Maria-Corina; Balan, Mihaela; Bargan, Alexandra; Shova, Sergiu; Varganici, Cristian-Dragos; Cazacu, Maria

    2016-04-01

    During acid hydrolysis of 3-cyanopropyltriethoxysilane (CyTES) in a molar ratio HCl:CyTES - 4.6:1 in methanol, with the intention to prepare the properly polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSSQ) or carboxyl derivative, the conversion of organic functional group occurred by replacing the CN group with Cl forming octakis(chloropropyl)octasilsesquioxane (Cl-POSSQ). The structure was determined through X-ray single crystal diffraction, spectral (FTIR and NMR) techniques and elemental analysis. The stepwise conversion of the CN group during the 3-cyanopropyltriethoxysilane hydrolysis was monitored through IR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Thermal behavior was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Moisture sorption capacity was evaluated by water vapor sorption in dynamic regime (DVS). The biological activity was in vitro tested against three fungi and two bacteria.

  4. Inactivation of the RTEM-1 cysteine beta-lactamase by iodoacetate. The nature of active-site functional groups and comparisons with the native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Knap, A K; Pratt, R F

    1991-01-01

    The pH-rate profile for inactivation of the RTEM-1 cysteine beta-lactamase by iodoacetate supports previous evidence [Knap & Pratt (1989) Proteins Struct. Funct. Genet. 6, 316-323] for the activation of the active-site thiol group by adjacent functional groups. The enhanced reactivity of iodoacetate, with respect to that of iodoacetamide, suggests the influence of a positive charge in the active site. The reactivity of iodoacetate is not affected by dissociation of an active-site functional group of pKa 6.7, which increases the reactivity of neutral reagents, probably because of a compensation phenomenon; it is, however, lost on dissociation of an acid of pKa 8.1. It is concluded that the active cysteine beta-lactamase has four functional groups at the active site, one nucleophilic thiolate of Cys-70, one neutral acid (most probably the carboxy group of Glu-166, from the crystal structures) and two cationic residues (most probably Lys-73 and Lys-234). A comparison of these results with the pH-dependence of reactivity of the native RTEM-2 beta-lactamase suggests that the active form of the latter enzyme is also monocationic, although the nucleophile (Ser-70) is likely to be neutral in this case and the carboxylic acid dissociated. A mechanism of class A beta-lactamase catalysis is discussed where the Glu-166 carboxylate acts as a general base/acid catalyst and Lys-73 is principally required for electrostatic stabilization of the anionic tetrahedral intermediate.

  5. Ecosystem functions and densities of contributing functional groups respond in a different way to chemical stress.

    PubMed

    De Laender, Frederik; Taub, Frieda B; Janssen, Colin R

    2011-12-01

    Understanding whether and to what extent ecosystem functions respond to chemicals is a major challenge in environmental toxicology. The available data gathered by ecosystem-level experiments (micro- and mesocosms) often describe the responses of taxa densities to stress. However, whether these responses are proportional to the responses of associated ecosystem functions to stress is unclear. By combining a carbon budget modeling technique with data from a standardized microcosm experiment with a known community composition, we quantified three ecosystem functions (net primary production [NPP], net mesozooplankton production [NZP], and net bacterial production [NBP]) at three Cu concentrations, with a control. Changes of these ecosystem functions with increasing chemical concentrations were not always proportional to the Cu effects on the densities of the contributing functional groups. For example, Cu treatments decreased mesozooplankton density by 100-fold and increased phytoplankton density 10- to 100-fold while increasing NZP and leaving NPP unaltered. However, in contrast, Cu affected microzooplankton and the associated function (NBP) in a comparable way. We illustrate that differences in the response of phytoplankton/mesozooplankton densities and the associated ecosystem functions to stress occur because functional rates (e.g., photosynthesis rates/ingestion rates) vary among Cu treatments and in time. These variations could be explained by food web ecology but not by direct Cu effects, indicating that ecology may be a useful basis for understanding environmental effects of stressors.

  6. Plant Species and Functional Group Combinations Affect Green Roof Ecosystem Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Jeremy; MacIvor, J. Scott; MacDougall, Zachary; Ranalli, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Background Green roofs perform ecosystem services such as summer roof temperature reduction and stormwater capture that directly contribute to lower building energy use and potential economic savings. These services are in turn related to ecosystem functions performed by the vegetation layer such as radiation reflection and transpiration, but little work has examined the role of plant species composition and diversity in improving these functions. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a replicated modular extensive (shallow growing- medium) green roof system planted with monocultures or mixtures containing one, three or five life-forms, to quantify two ecosystem services: summer roof cooling and water capture. We also measured the related ecosystem properties/processes of albedo, evapotranspiration, and the mean and temporal variability of aboveground biomass over four months. Mixtures containing three or five life-form groups, simultaneously optimized several green roof ecosystem functions, outperforming monocultures and single life-form groups, but there was much variation in performance depending on which life-forms were present in the three life-form mixtures. Some mixtures outperformed the best monocultures for water capture, evapotranspiration, and an index combining both water capture and temperature reductions. Combinations of tall forbs, grasses and succulents simultaneously optimized a range of ecosystem performance measures, thus the main benefit of including all three groups was not to maximize any single process but to perform a variety of functions well. Conclusions/Significance Ecosystem services from green roofs can be improved by planting certain life-form groups in combination, directly contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. The strong performance by certain mixtures of life-forms, especially tall forbs, grasses and succulents, warrants further investigation into niche complementarity or facilitation as mechanisms

  7. Effects of benthos on sediment transport: difficulties with functional grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumars, P. A.; Nowell, A. R. M.

    No consistent functional grouping of organisms as stabilizers vs destabilizers, respectively decreasing or enhancing erodibility, is possible. Benthic organisms can affect erodibility in particular—and sediment transport in general—via alternation (1) of fluid momentum impinging on the bed, (2) of particle exposure to the flow, (3) of adhesion between particles, and (4) of particle momentum. The net effects of a species or individual on erosion and deposition thresholds or on transport rates are not in general predictable from extant data. Furthermore, they depend upon the context of flow conditions, bed configuration, and community composition into which the organism is set. Separation of organism effects into these four categories does, however, allow their explicit incorporation into DuBoys-type and stochastic sediment dynamic models already in use and thus permits the specification of parameters whose measurement will enhance predictability of sediment transport modes and rates in natural, organism-influenced, marine settings. If the variable of prime concern is the total amount of sediment transported, rather than the frequency of transport events or the spatial pattern of erosion and eposition, and if most transport occurs in rare but intense bouts (e.g., winter storms on boreal continental shelves), then it may be possible to ignore organism effects without major sacrifices in accuracy or precision. Under high transport rates, suspended load effects override organism-produced bottom roughness, abrasion removes adhesives from transporting grains, and transport rates (normalized per unit width of the channel or bed) exceed feeding and pelletization rates. Moreover, at high rates most material transports as suspended load, effectively out of reach of the benthos. The transport rates at which organism effects are overridden, however, remain to be determined. For lower transport rates, foraging theory promises to provide insights into organism effects.

  8. Chemical Interactions of Polyethylene Glycols (PEG) and Glycerol with Protein Functional Groups: Applications to PEG, Glycerol Effects on Protein Processes

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, DB; Shkel, Irina A; Phan, Noel M; Sternke, Matt; Lingeman, Emily; Cheng, Xian; Cheng, Lixue; O’Connor, Kevin; Record, M. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Here we obtain the data needed to predict chemical interactions of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and glycerol with proteins and related organic compounds, and thereby interpret or predict chemical effects of PEGs on protein processes. To accomplish this we determine interactions of glycerol and tetraEG with >30 model compounds displaying the major C, N, and O functional groups of proteins. Analysis of these data yields coefficients (α-values) quantifying interactions of glycerol, tetraEG and PEG end (-CH2OH) and interior (-CH2OCH2-) groups with these groups, relative to interactions with water. TetraEG (strongly) and glycerol (weakly) interact favorably with aromatic C, amide N, and cationic N, but unfavorably with amide O, carboxylate O and salt ions. Strongly unfavorable O and salt anion interactions help make both small and large PEGs effective protein precipitants. Interactions of tetraEG and PEG interior groups with aliphatic C are quite favorable, while interactions of glycerol and PEG end groups with aliphatic C are not. Hence tetraEG and PEG 300 favor unfolding of the DNA-binding domain of lac repressor (lacDBD) while glycerol, di- and mono-ethylene glycol are stabilizers. Favorable interactions with aromatic and aliphatic C explain why PEG400 greatly increases the solubility of aromatic hydrocarbons and steroids. PEG400-steroid interactions are unusually favorable, presumably because of simultaneous interactions of multiple PEG interior groups with the fused ring system of the steroid. Using α-values reported here, chemical contributions to PEG m-values can be predicted or interpreted in terms of changes in water-accessible surface area (ΔASA), and separated from excluded volume effects. PMID:25962980

  9. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational…

  10. Structural Characterization and Function Determination of a Nonspecific Carboxylate Esterase from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily with a Promiscuous Ability To Hydrolyze Methylphosphonate Esters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The uncharacterized protein Rsp3690 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes. In this investigation the gene for Rsp3690 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity, and the three-dimensional structure was determined to a resolution of 1.8 Å. The protein folds as a distorted (β/α)8-barrel, and the subunits associate as a homotetramer. The active site is localized to the C-terminal end of the β-barrel and is highlighted by the formation of a binuclear metal center with two manganese ions that are bridged by Glu-175 and hydroxide. The remaining ligands to the metal center include His-32, His-34, His-207, His-236, and Asp-302. Rsp3690 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of a wide variety of carboxylate esters, in addition to organophosphate and organophosphonate esters. The best carboxylate ester substrates identified for Rsp3690 included 2-naphthyl acetate (kcat/Km = 1.0 × 105 M–1 s–1), 2-naphthyl propionate (kcat/Km = 1.5 × 105 M–1 s–1), 1-naphthyl acetate (kcat/Km = 7.5 × 103 M–1 s–1), 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate (kcat/Km = 2.7 × 103 M–1 s–1), 4-nitrophenyl acetate (kcat/Km = 2.3 × 105 M–1 s–1), and 4-nitrophenyl butyrate (kcat/Km = 8.8 × 105 M–1 s–1). The best organophosphonate ester substrates included ethyl 4-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (kcat/Km = 3.8 × 105 M–1 s–1) and isobutyl 4-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate (kcat/Km = 1.1 × 104 M–1 s–1). The (SP)-enantiomer of isobutyl 4-nitrophenyl methylphosphonate was hydrolyzed 10 times faster than the less toxic (RP)-enantiomer. The high inherent catalytic activity of Rsp3690 for the hydrolysis of the toxic enantiomer of methylphosphonate esters make this enzyme an attractive target for directed evolution investigations. PMID:24832101

  11. The influence of oxygen-containing functional groups on the dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in amide solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, S. D. F.; Andrada, D.; Mesquita, A. F.; Santos, A. P.; Gorgulho, H. F.; Paniago, R.; Pimenta, M. A.; Fantini, C.; Furtado, C. A.

    2010-08-01

    Surface composition plays an important role in carbon nanotube dispersibility in different environments. Indeed, it determines the choice of dispersion medium. In this paper the effect of oxidation on the dispersion of HiPCO single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in N-methyl-pyrrolidinone (NMP), N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-dodecyl-pyrrolidinone (N12P) and cyclohexyl-pyrrolidinone (CHP) was systematically studied. During the oxidation process, similar amounts of carboxylic acid and phenolic groups were introduced to mostly already existing defects. For each solvent the dispersion limits and the absorption coefficients were estimated by optical absorption analysis over a range of SWNT concentrations. The presence of acid oxygenated groups increased SWNT dispersibility in NMP, DMF and DMA, but decreased in N12P and CHP. The absorption coefficients, however, decreased for all solvents after oxidation, reflecting the weakening of the effective transition dipole of the π-π transition with even limited extension functionalization and solvent interaction. The analysis of the results in terms of Hansen and Flory-Huggins solubility parameters evidenced the influence of dipolar interactions and hydrogen bonding on the dispersibility of oxidized SWNTs.

  12. The influence of oxygen-containing functional groups on the dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in amide solvents.

    PubMed

    Brandão, S D F; Andrada, D; Mesquita, A F; Santos, A P; Gorgulho, H F; Paniago, R; Pimenta, M A; Fantini, C; Furtado, C A

    2010-08-25

    Surface composition plays an important role in carbon nanotube dispersibility in different environments. Indeed, it determines the choice of dispersion medium. In this paper the effect of oxidation on the dispersion of HiPCO single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in N-methyl-pyrrolidinone (NMP), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-dodecyl-pyrrolidinone (N12P) and cyclohexyl-pyrrolidinone (CHP) was systematically studied. During the oxidation process, similar amounts of carboxylic acid and phenolic groups were introduced to mostly already existing defects. For each solvent the dispersion limits and the absorption coefficients were estimated by optical absorption analysis over a range of SWNT concentrations. The presence of acid oxygenated groups increased SWNT dispersibility in NMP, DMF and DMA, but decreased in N12P and CHP. The absorption coefficients, however, decreased for all solvents after oxidation, reflecting the weakening of the effective transition dipole of the π-π transition with even limited extension functionalization and solvent interaction. The analysis of the results in terms of Hansen and Flory-Huggins solubility parameters evidenced the influence of dipolar interactions and hydrogen bonding on the dispersibility of oxidized SWNTs.

  13. Controls of functional group chemistry on calcium carbonate nucleation: Insights into systematics of biomolecular innovations for skeletal mineralization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Hamm, L. M.; Giuffre, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    free energy. A second study tested the hypothesis that polysaccharides can also confer reactivity through their functional group chemistry. Using high purity polysaccharides with regular monomer sequences as simple model compounds, we quantify the effect of functional group chemistry (chitosan, hyaluronic acid, heparin, alginic acid) and monomer sequencing (two stereoisomers of alginic acid) on the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers to CaCO3 formation. Analysis of the data indicates the barriers to nucleation are correlated by a systematic relationship to charge as the number of carboxyl groups per monomer of polysaccharide. The findings demonstrate a physical basis for how organic surfaces regulate the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation through interfacial free energy and suggest the chemical basis for recurring motifs that are seen in modern organisms. We also show that polysaccharides may indeed have active roles in promoting calcite mineralization and suggest their presumed function as inert framework molecules should be revisited.

  14. Moral Judgment as a Function of Peer Group Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maitland, Karen A.; Goldman, Jacquelin R.

    1974-01-01

    This article presents an investigation into the effects of peer group interaction on moral judgment among 36 male and female eleventh and twelfth graders. The results indicate greater social conflict and pressure in a group discussion induces greater change in the level of moral judgment. (DE)

  15. Perceptual Visual Grouping under Inattention: Electrophysiological Functional Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razpurker-Apfeld, Irene; Pratt, Hillel

    2008-01-01

    Two types of perceptual visual grouping, differing in complexity of shape formation, were examined under inattention. Fourteen participants performed a similarity judgment task concerning two successive briefly presented central targets surrounded by task-irrelevant simple and complex grouping patterns. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were…

  16. Dominant Functional Group Effects on the Invasion Resistance at Different Resource Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Ge, Yuan; Zhang, Chong B.; Bai, Yi; Du, Zhao K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional group composition may affect invasion in two ways the effect of abundance, i.e. dominance of functional group; and the effect of traits, i.e. identity of functional groups. However, few studies have focused on the role of abundance of functional group on invasion resistance. Moreover, how resource availability influences the role of the dominant functional group in invasion resistance is even less understood. Methodology/Principal Findings In this experiment, we established experimental pots using four different functional groups (annual grass, perennial grass, deciduous shrub or arbor and evergreen shrub or arbor), and the dominant functional group was manipulated. These experimental pots were respectively constructed at different soil nitrogen levels (control and fertilized). After one year of growth, we added seeds of 20 different species (five species per functional group) to the experimental pots. Fertilization significantly increased the overall invasion success, while dominant functional group had little effect on overall invasion success. When invaders were grouped into functional groups, invaders generally had lower success in pots dominated by the same functional group in the control pots. However, individual invaders of the same functional group exhibited different invasion patterns. Fertilization generally increased success of invaders in pots dominated by the same than by another functional group. However, fertilization led to great differences for individual invaders. Conclusions/Significance The results showed that the dominant functional group, independent of functional group identity, had a significant effect on the composition of invaders. We suggest that the limiting similarity hypothesis may be applicable at the functional group level, and limiting similarity may have a limited role for individual invaders as shown by the inconsistent effects of dominant functional group and fertilization. PMID:24167565

  17. Crystal structures of ethyl 6-(4-methyl-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate and ethyl 6-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ligia R; Low, John Nicolson; Fernandes, Carlos; Gaspar, Alexandra; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of two chromone derivatives, viz. ethyl 6-(4-methyl-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate, C19H16O4, (1), and ethyl 6-(4-fluoro-phen-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-2-carboxyl-ate C18H13FO4, (2), have been determined: (1) crystallizes with two mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit. A comparison of the dihedral angles beween the mean planes of the central chromone core with those of the substituents, an ethyl ester moiety at the 2-position and a para-substituted phenyl ring at the 6-position shows that each mol-ecule differs significantly from the others, even the two independent mol-ecules (a and b) of (1). In all three mol-ecules, the carbonyl groups of the chromone and the carboxyl-ate are trans-related. The supra-molecular structure of (1) involves only weak C-H⋯π inter-actions between H atoms of the substituent phenyl group and the phenyl group, which link mol-ecules into a chain of alternating mol-ecules a and b, and weak π-π stacking inter-actions between the chromone units. The packing in (2) involves C-H⋯O inter-actions, which form a network of two inter-secting ladders involving the carbonyl atom of the carboxyl-ate group as the acceptor for H atoms at the 7-position of the chromone ring and from an ortho-H atom of the exocyclic benzene ring. The carbonyl atom of the chromone acts as an acceptor from a meta-H atom of the exocyclic benzene ring. π-π inter-actions stack the mol-ecules by unit translation along the a axis.

  18. Hydrolysis of organonitrate functional groups in aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shang; Shilling, John E.; Song, Chen; Hiranuma, Naruki; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2012-10-19

    Organonitrate (ON) groups are important substituents in secondary organic aerosols. Model simulations and laboratory studies indicate a large fraction of ON groups in aerosol particles, but much lower quantities are observed in the atmosphere. Hydrolysis of ON groups in aerosol particles has been proposed recently. To test this hypothesis, we simulated formation of ON molecules in a reaction chamber under a wide range of relative humidity (0% to 90%). The mass fraction of ON groups (5% to 20% for high-NOx experiments) consistently decreased with increasing relative humidity, which was best explained by hydrolysis of ON groups at a rate of 4 day-1 (lifetime of 6 hours) for reactions under relative humidity greater than 20%. In addition, we found that secondary nitrogen-containing molecules absorb light, with greater absorption under dry and high-NOx conditions. This work provides the first evidence for particle-phase hydrolysis of ON groups, a process that could substantially reduce ON group concentration in the atmosphere.

  19. Trypanosoma brucei prenylated-protein carboxyl methyltransferase prefers farnesylated substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S; Kateete, David P; Lubega, George W; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Yokoyama, Kohei

    2002-01-01

    Carboxyl methylation of the C-terminal prenylated cysteine, which occurs in most farnesylated and geranylgeranylated proteins, is a reversible step and is implicated in the regulation of membrane binding and cellular functions of prenylated proteins such as GTPases. The gene coding for prenylated-protein carboxyl methyltransferase (PPMT) of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei has been cloned and expressed in the baculovirus/Sf9 cell system. The protein of 245 amino acids has 24-28% sequence identity to the orthologues from other species including human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Methyltransferase activity was detected in the membrane fraction from Sf9 cells infected with the recombinant baculovirus using N -acetyl- S -farnesylcysteine (AFC) and S -adenosyl[ methyl -(3)H]methionine ([(3)H]AdoMet) as substrates. Recombinant T. brucei PPMT prefers AFC to N -acetyl- S -geranylgeranylcysteine (AGGC) by 10-50-fold based on the V (max)/ K (m) values. Native PPMT activity detected in the membrane fraction from T. brucei procyclics displays similar substrate specificity ( approximately 40-fold preference for AFC over AGGC). In contrast, mouse liver PPMT utilizes both AFC and AGGC as substrates with similar catalytic efficiencies. Several cellular proteins of the T. brucei bloodstream form were shown to be carboxyl methylated in a cell-free system. Incorporation of [(3)H]methyl group from [(3)H]AdoMet into most of the proteins was significantly inhibited by AFC but not AGGC at 20 microM, suggesting that T. brucei PPMT acts on farnesylated proteins in the cell. Cells of the T. brucei bloodstream form show higher sensitivity to AFC and AGGC (EC(50)=70-80 microM) compared with mouse 3T3 cells (EC(50)>150 microM). PMID:12141948

  20. Synthesis and Structures of Cadmium Carboxylate and Thiocarboxylate Compounds with a Sulfur-Rich Coordination Environment: Carboxylate Exchange Kinetics Involving Tris(2-mercapto-1-t-butylimidazolyl)hydroborato Cadmium Complexes, [TmBut]Cd(O2CR)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A series of cadmium carboxylate compounds in a sulfur-rich environment provided by the tris(2-tert-butylmercaptoimidazolyl)hydroborato ligand, namely, [TmBut]CdO2CR, has been synthesized via the reactions of the cadmium methyl derivative [TmBut]CdMe with RCO2H. Such compounds mimic aspects of cadmium-substituted zinc enzymes and also the surface atoms of cadmium chalcogenide crystals, and have therefore been employed to model relevant ligand exchange processes. Significantly, both 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy demonstrate that the exchange of carboxylate groups between [TmBut]Cd(κ2-O2CR) and the carboxylic acid RCO2H is facile on the NMR time scale, even at low temperature. Analysis of the rate of exchange as a function of concentration of RCO2H indicates that reaction occurs via an associative rather than dissociative pathway. In addition to carboxylate compounds, the thiocarboxylate derivative [TmBut]Cd[κ1-SC(O)Ph] has also been synthesized via the reaction of [TmBut]CdMe with thiobenzoic acid. The molecular structure of [TmBut]Cd[κ1-SC(O)Ph] has been determined by X-ray diffraction, and an interesting feature is that, in contrast to the carboxylate derivatives [TmBut]Cd(κ2-O2CR), the thiocarboxylate ligand binds in a κ1 manner via only the sulfur atom. PMID:25826184

  1. 4-Carboxypiperidinium 1-carboxycyclobutane-1-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Belandria, Lusbely M; Mora, Asiloé J; Delgado, Gerzon E; Briceño, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    The title salt, C(6)H(12)NO(2)(+)·C(6)H(7)O(4)(-) or ISO(+)·CBDC(-), is an ionic ensemble assisted by hydrogen bonds. The amino acid moiety (ISO or piperidine-4-carboxylic acid) has a protonated ring N atom (ISO(+) or 4-carboxypiperidinium), while the semi-protonated acid (CBDC(-) or 1-carboxycyclobutane-1-carboxylate) has the negative charge residing on one carboxylate group, leaving the other as a neutral -COOH group. The -(+)NH(2)- state of protonation allows the formation of a two-dimensional crystal packing consisting of zigzag layers stacked along a separated by van der Waals distances. The layers extend in the bc plane connected by a complex network of N-H···O and O-H···O hydrogen bonds. Wave-like ribbons, constructed from ISO(+) and CBDC(-) units and described by the graph-set symbols C(3)(3)(10) and R(3)(3)(14), run alternately in opposite directions along c. Intercalated between the ribbons are ISO(+) cations linked by hydrogen bonds, forming rings described by the graph-set symbols R(6)(6)(30) and R(4)(2)(18). A detailed analysis of the structures of the individual components and the intricate hydrogen-bond network of the crystal structure is given.

  2. Effects of spatial grouping on the functional response of predators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosner, C.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Ault, J.S.; Olson, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    A unified mechanistic approach is given for the derivation of various forms of functional response in predator-prey models. The derivation is based on the principle-of-mass action but with the crucial refinement that the nature of the spatial distribution of predators and/or opportunities for predation are taken into account in an implicit way. If the predators are assumed to have a homogeneous spatial distribution, then the derived functional response is prey-dependent. If the predators are assumed to form a dense colony or school in a single (possibly moving) location, or if the region where predators can encounter prey is assumed to be of limited size, then the functional response depends on both predator and prey densities in a manner that reflects feeding interference between predators. Depending on the specific assumptions, the resulting functional response may be of Beddington-DeAngelis type, of Hassell-Varley type, or ratio-dependent.

  3. Nonequilibrium functional renormalization group for interacting quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Severin G; Meden, Volker; Schoeller, Herbert

    2007-10-12

    We propose a nonequilibrium version of functional renormalization within the Keldysh formalism by introducing a complex-valued flow parameter in the Fermi or Bose functions of each reservoir. Our cutoff scheme provides a unified approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium situations. We apply it to nonequilibrium transport through an interacting quantum wire coupled to two reservoirs and show that the nonequilibrium occupation induces new power law exponents for the conductance.

  4. Influence of molecular interactions on the stability of hydrogen-bonded dimers of carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbe, Alfred; Plass, Monika; Kresse, Horst; Kolbe, Adelheid; Drabowicz, Jozef; Zurawinski, Remiguisz

    1997-12-01

    Possibilities to change the molecular arrangement of hydrogen bonded dimers of carboxylic acids by offering other acceptor groups are investigated in different species of molecules, namely in amino acid conjugates, in sulfinyl- and phosphinyl-carboxylic acids and in some p- n-alkoxybenzoic acids. As a result it was found that the carboxylic dimers are rather easily broken by lattice forces, by forming other intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds to stronger acceptor groups, and by increasing the temperature.

  5. Submicron aerosol organic functional groups, ions, and water content at the Centreville SEARCH site (Alabama), during SOAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Ergin, G.; Modini, R. L.; Takahama, S.

    2013-12-01

    aerosol during the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 110, n/a-n/a. [4]- Takahama, S., Johnson, A., Russell, L.M., 2013. Quantification of Carboxylic and Carbonyl Functional Groups in Organic Aerosol Infrared Absorbance Spectra. Aerosol Science and Technology 47, 310-325. [5]- Pankow, J.F., Asher, W.E., 2008. SIMPOL.1: a simple group contribution method for predicting vapor pressures and enthalpies of vaporization of multifunctional organic compounds. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 8, 2773-2796. [6]- Clegg, S.L., Brimblecombe, P., Wexler, A.S., 1998. Thermodynamic Model of the System H+-NH4+-SO42--NO3--H2O at Tropospheric Temperatures. J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 2137-2154. [7]- Zuend, A., Marcolli, C., Booth, A.M., Lienhard, D.M., Soonsin, V., Krieger, U.K., Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G., Peter, T., Seinfeld, J.H., 2011. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11, 9155-9206.

  6. The modification of benzene adsorption on zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes by carboxylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadanian, Masood; Tavangar, Zahra; Naseh, Sara

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the adsorption of benzene molecule on (10,0) functionalized zigzag single-wall carbon nanotubes was studied using density functional theory. Geometric structures, adsorption energies and electronic properties of five supercells were investigated. It was found that the carboxylation causes a notable increment in the adsorption capability of SWCNT in uptaking benzene as a pollutant molecule. The highest absorbency was achieved when benzene molecule had interaction with both SWCNT and COOH functional group through π-π interaction and hydrogen bonding.

  7. Modification of agarose with carboxylation and grafting dopamine for promotion of its cell-adhesiveness.

    PubMed

    Su, Yixue; Chu, Bin; Gao, Yuan; Wu, Chaoxi; Zhang, Lingmin; Chen, Peng; Wang, Xiaoying; Tang, Shunqing

    2013-02-15

    In order to improve bioactivity of agarose, we modified agarose by carboxylation and grafting dopamine. Under alkaline condition, carboxylated agarose was prepared using 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) oxidation system by oxidizing C(6) hydroxyl on D-galactose ring into carboxyl group, and the maximum value of the degree of carboxylation reached 30%. With the increase of the amount of oxidant, the molecular weight of the carboxylated agarose decreased to 4 kDa by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measure. Carboxylated agarose reacted with dopamine through EDC condensation reaction to obtain agarose grafting dopamine (Ag-g-DA), and the grafting rate of dopamine was determined to be 9.3% by UV spectroscopy at 280 nm. The structures of these modified agaroses were determined by FT-IR and (13)C NMR. Both carboxylated agarose and Ag-g-DA showed no cytotoxicity and promoted cell-adhesiveness.

  8. Oleic acid-based gemini surfactants with carboxylic acid headgroups.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Umemoto, Naoki; Matsuda, Wataru; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Anionic gemini surfactants with carboxylic acid headgroups have been synthesized from oleic acid. The hydrocarbon chain is covalently bound to the terminal carbonyl group of oleic acid via an ester bond, and the carboxylic acid headgroups are introduced to the cis double bond of oleic acid via disuccinyl units. The surfactants exhibit pH-dependent protonation-deprotonation behavior in aqueous solutions. In alkaline solutions (pH 9 in the presence of 10 mmol dm(-3) NaCl as the background electrolyte), the surfactants can lower the surface tension as well as form molecular assemblies, even in the region of low surfactant concentrations. Under acidic (pH 3) or neutral (pH 6-7) conditions, the surfactants are intrinsically insoluble in aqueous media and form a monolayer at the air/water interface. In this study, we have investigated physicochemical properties such as the function of the hydrocarbon chain length by means of static surface tension, pyrene fluorescence, dynamic light scattering, surface pressure-area isotherms, and infrared external reflection measurements.

  9. A method to quantify organic functional groups and inorganic compounds in ambient aerosols using attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate chemometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coury, Charity; Dillner, Ann M.

    An attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic technique and a multivariate calibration method were developed to quantify ambient aerosol organic functional groups and inorganic compounds. These methods were applied to size-resolved particulate matter samples collected in winter and summer of 2004 at three sites: a downtown Phoenix, Arizona location, a rural site near Phoenix, and an urban fringe site between the urban and rural site. Ten organic compound classes, including four classes which contain a carbonyl functional group, and three inorganic species were identified in the ambient samples. A partial least squares calibration was developed and applied to the ambient spectra, and 13 functional groups related to organic compounds (aliphatic and aromatic CH, methylene, methyl, alkene, aldehydes/ketones, carboxylic acids, esters/lactones, acid anhydrides, carbohydrate hydroxyl and ethers, amino acids, and amines) as well as ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate were quantified. Comparison of the sum of the mass measured by the ATR-FTIR technique and gravimetric mass indicates that this method can quantify nearly all of the aerosol mass on sub-micrometer size-segregated samples. Analysis of sample results shows that differences in organic functional group and inorganic compound concentrations at the three sampling sites can be measured with these methods. Future work will analyze the quantified data from these three sites in detail.

  10. Oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate is required for reductive carboxylation in cancer cells with mitochondrial defects

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Andrew R.; Hu, Zeping; Shi, Xiaolei; Jiang, Lei; Boroughs, Lindsey K.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Boriack, Richard; Rakheja, Dinesh; Sullivan, Lucas B.; Linehan, W. Marston; Chandel, Navdeep S.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mammalian cells generate citrate by decarboxylating pyruvate in the mitochondria to supply the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In contrast, hypoxia and other impairments of mitochondrial function induce an alternative pathway that produces citrate by reductively carboxylating α-ketoglutarate (AKG) via NADPH-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). It is unknown how cells generate reducing equivalents necessary to supply reductive carboxylation in the setting of mitochondrial impairment. Here we identified shared metabolic features in cells using reductive carboxylation. Paradoxically, reductive carboxylation was accompanied by concomitant AKG oxidation in the TCA cycle. Inhibiting AKG oxidation decreased reducing equivalent availability and suppressed reductive carboxylation. Interrupting transfer of reducing equivalents from NADH to NADPH by nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase increased NADH abundance and decreased NADPH abundance while suppressing reductive carboxylation. The data demonstrate that reductive carboxylation requires bidirectional AKG metabolism along oxidative and reductive pathways, with the oxidative pathway producing reducing equivalents used to operate IDH in reverse. PMID:24857658

  11. Pear ACO genes encoding putative 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase homologs are functionally expressed during fruit ripening and involved in response to salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Xing

    2012-10-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase catalyzes the final reaction of the ethylene biosynthetic pathway, converting ACC into ethylene. Past studies have shown a possible link between ACC oxidase and salicylic acid during fruit ripening in pear, but the relationship has received no more than modest study at the gene expression level. In this study, two cDNA clones encoding putative ACC oxidase, PpACO1 and PpACO2, were isolated from a cDNA library constructed by our own laboratory and produced using mRNA from mesocarp of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai. cv.Whangkeumbae). One cDNA clone, designated PpACO1 (GenBank accession No. JN807390), comprised an open reading frame of 945 bp encoding a protein of 314 amino acids. The other cDNA, designated PpACO2 (GenBank accession No. JN807392), encodes a protein with 322 amino acids that shares high similarity with the known plant ACOs. Using PCR amplification techniques, two genomic clones corresponding to PpACO1 and PpACO2 were isolated and shown to contain independently three introns with typical GT/AG boundaries defining the splice junctions. The PpACO1 gene product shared 99 % identity with an ACC oxidase from pear (Pyrus × bretschneideri Rehd.cv.Yali), and phylogenetic analyses clearly placed the gene product in the ACC oxidase cluster of the pear 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily tree. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the two PpACO genes are differentially expressed in pear tissues. PpACO1 and PpACO2 were predominantly expressed in fruit. The transcripts of PpACO1 were accumulated at relatively low levels in early fruit, but strongly high levels in fruit ripening and senescence stages, while the transcripts of PpACO2 were accumulated at higher levels in early fruit and much lower levels with further fruit cell development than the transcripts of PpACO1. In addition, PpACO1 gene was down-regulated in fruit by salicylic acid (SA). Nevertheless, PpACO2 gene was dramatically up-regulated in

  12. Effects of Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups on Supercapacitor Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Vijayakumar, M.

    2014-07-03

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the interface between graphene and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BMIM OTf) were carried out to gain molecular-level insights into the performance of graphene-based supercapacitors and, in particular, determine the effects of the presence of oxygen-containing defects at the graphene surface on their integral capacitance. The MD simulations predict that increasing the surface coverage of hydroxyl groups negatively affects the integral capacitance, whereas the effect of the presence of epoxy groups is much less significant. The calculated variations in capacitance are found to be directly correlated to the interfacial structure. Indeed, hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups and SO3 anion moieties prevents BMIM+ and OTf- molecules from interacting favorably in the dense interfacial layer and restrains the orientation and mobility of OTf- ions, thereby reducing the permittivity of the ionic liquid at the interface. The results of the molecular simulations can facilitate the rational design of electrode materials for supercapacitors.

  13. Quantum groups and functional relations for lower rank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirov, Kh. S.; Razumov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A detailed construction of the universal integrability objects related to the integrable systems associated with the quantum loop algebra Uq(L(sl2)) is given. The full proof of the functional relations in the form independent of the representation of the quantum loop algebra on the quantum space is presented. The case of the general gradation and general twisting is treated. The specialization of the universal functional relations to the case when the quantum space is the state space of a discrete spin chain is described. This is a digression of the corresponding consideration for the case of the quantum loop algebra Uq(L(sl3)) with an extension to the higher spin case.

  14. Prediction of phase equilibrium and hydration free energy of carboxylic acids by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Nicolas; Gedik, Ibrahim; Lachet, Véronique; Pigeon, Laurent; Lugo, Rafael

    2013-06-13

    In this work, a new transferable united-atom force field has been developed to predict phase equilibrium and hydration free energy of carboxylic acids. To take advantage of the transferability of the AUA4 force field, all Lennard-Jones parameters of groups involved in the carboxylic acid chemical function are reused from previous parametrizations of this force field. Only a unique set of partial electrostatic charges is proposed to reproduce the experimental gas phase dipole moment, saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures. Phase equilibrium properties of various pure carboxylic acids (acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, pentanoic acid, hexanoic acid) and one diacid (1,5-pentanedioic) are studied through Monte Carlo simulations in the Gibbs ensemble. A good accuracy is obtained for pure compound saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures (average deviation of 2% and 6%, respectively), as well as for critical points. The vaporization enthalpy is, however, poorly predicted for short acids, probably due to a limitation of the force field to correctly describe the significant dimerization in the vapor phase. Pressure-composition diagrams for two binary mixtures (acetic acid + n-butane and propanoic acid + pentanoic acid) are also computed with a good accuracy, showing the transferability of the proposed force field to mixtures. Hydration free energies are calculated for three carboxylic acids using thermodynamic integration. A systematic overestimation of around 10 kJ/mol is observed compared to experimental data. This new force field parametrized only on saturated equilibrium properties appears insufficient to reach an acceptable precision for this property, and only relative hydration free energies between two carboxylic acids can be correctly predicted. This highlights the limitation of the transferability feature of force fields to properties not included in the parametrization database.

  15. Structural characterization of 1,3-propanedithiols that feature carboxylic acids: Homologues of mercury chelating agents.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Wesley; Palmer, Joshua H; Bridges, Christy C; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K; Parkin, Gerard

    2013-11-12

    The molecular structures of a series of 1,3-propanedithiols that contain carboxylic acid groups, namely rac- and meso-2,4-dimercaptoglutaric acid (H4DMGA) and 2-carboxy-1,3-propanedithiol (H3DMCP), have been determined by X-ray diffraction. Each compound exhibits two centrosymmetric intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions between pairs of carboxylic acid groups, which result in a dimeric structure for H3DMCP and a polymeric tape-like structure for rac- and meso-H4DMGA. Significantly, the hydrogen bonding motifs observed for rac- and meso-H4DMGA are very different to those observed for the 1,2-dithiol, rac-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (rac-H4DMSA), in which the two oxygen atoms of each carboxylic acid group hydrogen bond to two different carboxylic acid groups, thereby resulting in a hydrogen bonded sheet-like structure rather than a tape. Density functional theory calculations indicate that 1,3-dithiolate coordination to mercury results in larger S-Hg-S bond angles than does 1,2-dithiolate coordination, but these angles are far from linear. As such, κ(2)-S2 coordination of these dithiolate ligands is expected to be associated with mercury coordination numbers of greater than two. In vivo studies demonstrate that both rac-H 4 DMGA and H3DMCP reduce the renal burden of mercury in rats, although the compounds are not as effective as either 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid (H3DMPS) or meso-H4DMSA.

  16. Influence of substituents and functional groups on the surface composition of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Kolbeck, Claudia; Niedermaier, Inga; Deyko, Alexey; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Taccardi, Nicola; Wei, Wei; Wasserscheid, Peter; Maier, Florian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2014-04-01

    We have performed a systematic study addressing the surface behavior of a variety of functionalized and non-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs). From angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, detailed conclusions on the surface enrichment of the functional groups and the molecular orientation of the cations and anions is derived. The systems include imidazolium-based ILs methylated at the C2 position, a phenyl-functionalized IL, an alkoxysilane-functionalized IL, halo-functionalized ILs, thioether-functionalized ILs, and amine-functionalized ILs. The results are compared with the results for corresponding non-functionalized ILs where available. Generally, enrichment of the functional group at the surface is only observed for systems that have very weak interaction between the functional group and the ionic head groups.

  17. Biocatalytic reduction of carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Winkler, Margit

    2014-06-01

    An increasing demand for non-petroleum-based products is envisaged in the near future. Carboxylic acids such as citric acid, succinic acid, fatty acids, and many others are available in abundance from renewable resources and they could serve as economic precursors for bio-based products such as polymers, aldehyde building blocks, and alcohols. However, we are confronted with the problem that carboxylic acid reduction requires a high level of energy for activation due to the carboxylate's thermodynamic stability. Catalytic processes are scarce and often their chemoselectivity is insufficient. This review points at bio-alternatives: currently known enzyme classes and organisms that catalyze the reduction of carboxylic acids are summarized. Two totally distinct biocatalyst lines have evolved to catalyze the same reaction: aldehyde oxidoreductases from anaerobic bacteria and archea, and carboxylate reductases from aerobic sources such as bacteria, fungi, and plants. The majority of these enzymes remain to be identified and isolated from their natural background in order to evaluate their potential as industrial biocatalysts.

  18. Determination of the enantiomeric excess of chiral carboxylic acids by 31P NMR with phosphorylated derivatizing agents from C2-symmetrical diamines containing the (S)-alpha-phenylethyl group.

    PubMed

    Mastranzo, Virginia M; Quintero, Leticia; de Parrodi, Cecilia Anaya

    2007-06-01

    The use of P(III) and P(V) organophosphorus derivatizing agents prepared from C(2) symmetrical (1R,2R)- and (1S,2S)-trans-N,N'-bis-[(S)-alpha-phenylethyl]-cyclohexane-1,2-diamines 1 and 2, as well as (1R,2R)- and (1S,2S)-trans-N,N'-bis-[(S)-alpha-phenylethyl]-4-cyclohexene-1,2-diamines 3 and 4 for the determination of enantiomeric composition of chiral carboxylic acids by (31)P NMR, is described.

  19. Oxoiron(IV) Tetramethylcyclam Complexes with Axial Carboxylate Ligands: Effect of Tethering the Carboxylate on Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Jennifer O; England, Jason; Klein, Johannes E M N; Farquhar, Erik R; Frisch, Jonathan R; Martinho, Marlène; Mandal, Debasish; Münck, Eckard; Shaik, Sason; Que, Lawrence

    2017-03-20

    Oxoiron(IV) species are implicated as reactive intermediates in nonheme monoiron oxygenases, often acting as the agent for hydrogen-atom transfer from substrate. A histidine is the most likely ligand trans to the oxo unit in most enzymes characterized thus far but is replaced by a carboxylate in the case of isopenicillin N synthase. As the effect of a trans carboxylate ligand on the properties of the oxoiron(IV) unit has not been systematically studied, we have synthesized and characterized four oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by the tetramethylcyclam (TMC) macrocycle and having a carboxylate ligand trans to the oxo unit. Two complexes have acetate or propionate axial ligands, while the other two have the carboxylate functionality tethered to the macrocyclic ligand framework by one or two methylene units. Interestingly, these four complexes exhibit substrate oxidation rates that differ by more than 100-fold, despite having Ep,c values for the reduction of the Fe═O unit that span a range of only 130 mV. Eyring parameters for 1,4-cyclohexadiene oxidation show that reactivity differences originate from differences in activation enthalpy between complexes with tethered carboxylates and those with untethered carboxylates, in agreement with computational results. As noted previously for the initial subset of four complexes, the logarithms of the oxygen atom transfer rates of 11 complexes of the Fe(IV)(O)TMC(X) series increase linearly with the observed Ep,c values, reflecting the electrophilicity of the Fe═O unit. In contrast, no correlation with Ep,c values is observed for the corresponding hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction rates; instead, the HAT rates increase as the computed triplet-quintet spin state gap narrows, consistent with Shaik's two-state-reactivity model. In fact, the two complexes with untethered carboxylates are among the most reactive HAT agents in this series, demonstrating that the axial ligand can play a key role in tuning the HAT reactivity

  20. Polymerization of 1,3-Dienes with Functional Groups. 4.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Katsuhiko; Shibata, Natsuyo; Tsuchida, Shinsuke; Takeshita, Hiroki; Miya, Masamitsu; Shiomi, Tomoo

    Anionic polymerization of N,N-diethyl-2-methylene-3-butenamide (DEA), which is a 1,3-butadiene derivative containing a diethylamide function, was carried out in tetrahydrofurane (THF) under various conditions. When DEA was polymerized in THF at -78°C using potassium naphthalenide (K-Naph) or diphenylmethylpotassium (DPMK) as an initiator, a polymer of predictable molecular weight with a narrow molecular weight distribution was obtained. However, the rate of polymerization was extremely slow to reach 80% conversion after 720 h. When the polymerization temperature was raised to 20°C, a low molecular weight oligomer with a broad molecular weight distribution was obtained because of a chain transfer reaction. On the other hand, no such side reaction occurred even at 20°C, when polymerization was carried out in the presence of LiCl. Also, the chain transfer reaction did not occur in lithium naphthalenide (Li-Naph) initiated polymerization. The microstructure of the polymer prepared using a potassium counter cation was a 1 : 1 mixture of 1,4-E and 1,2- structures. In the case of Li-Naph or DPMK/LiCl systems, the microstructure was a complicated mixture of 1,4-E, 1,4-Z, and 1,2-structures.

  1. Critical effect of dependency groups on the function of networks.

    PubMed

    Parshani, Roni; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-01-18

    Current network models assume one type of links to define the relations between the network entities. However, many real networks can only be correctly described using two different types of relations. Connectivity links that enable the nodes to function cooperatively as a network and dependency links that bind the failure of one network element to the failure of other network elements. Here we present an analytical framework for studying the robustness of networks that include both connectivity and dependency links. We show that a synergy exists between the failure of connectivity and dependency links that leads to an iterative process of cascading failures that has a devastating effect on the network stability. We present exact analytical results for the dramatic change in the network behavior when introducing dependency links. For a high density of dependency links, the network disintegrates in a form of a first-order phase transition, whereas for a low density of dependency links, the network disintegrates in a second-order transition. Moreover, opposed to networks containing only connectivity links where a broader degree distribution results in a more robust network, when both types of links are present a broad degree distribution leads to higher vulnerability.

  2. Critical effect of dependency groups on the function of networks

    PubMed Central

    Parshani, Roni; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    Current network models assume one type of links to define the relations between the network entities. However, many real networks can only be correctly described using two different types of relations. Connectivity links that enable the nodes to function cooperatively as a network and dependency links that bind the failure of one network element to the failure of other network elements. Here we present an analytical framework for studying the robustness of networks that include both connectivity and dependency links. We show that a synergy exists between the failure of connectivity and dependency links that leads to an iterative process of cascading failures that has a devastating effect on the network stability. We present exact analytical results for the dramatic change in the network behavior when introducing dependency links. For a high density of dependency links, the network disintegrates in a form of a first-order phase transition, whereas for a low density of dependency links, the network disintegrates in a second-order transition. Moreover, opposed to networks containing only connectivity links where a broader degree distribution results in a more robust network, when both types of links are present a broad degree distribution leads to higher vulnerability. PMID:21191103

  3. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J. E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  4. Red electroluminescence of ruthenium sensitizer functionalized by sulfonate anchoring groups.

    PubMed

    Shahroosvand, Hashem; Abbasi, Parisa; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Janghouri, Mohammad

    2014-06-28

    We have synthesized five novel Ru(ii) phenanthroline complexes with an additional aryl sulfonate ligating substituent at the 5-position [Ru(L)(bpy)2](BF4)2 (1), [Ru(L)(bpy)(SCN)2] (2), [Ru(L)3](BF4)2 (3), [Ru(L)2(bpy)](BF4)2 (4) and [Ru(L)(BPhen)(SCN)2] (5) (where L = 6-one-[1,10]phenanthroline-5-ylamino)-3-hydroxynaphthalene 1-sulfonic, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, BPhen = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline), as both photosensitizers for oxide semiconductor solar cells (DSSCs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The absorption and emission maxima of these complexes red shifted upon extending the conjugation of the phenanthroline ligand. Ru phenanthroline complexes exhibit broad metal to ligand charge transfer-centered electroluminescence (EL) with a maximum near 580 nm. Our results indicated that a particular structure (2) can be considered as both DSSC and OLED devices. The efficiency of the LED performance can be tuned by using a range of ligands. Device (2) has a luminance of 550 cd m(-2) and maximum efficiency of 0.9 cd A(-1) at 18 V, which are the highest values among the five devices. The turn-on voltage of this device is approximately 5 V. The role of auxiliary ligands in the photophysical properties of Ru complexes was investigated by DFT calculation. We have also studied photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductor solar cells based on Ru phenanthroline complexes and an iodine redox electrolyte. A solar energy to electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 0.67% was obtained for Ru complex (2) under standard AM 1.5 irradiation with a short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) of 2.46 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit photovoltage (Voc) of 0.6 V, and a fill factor (ff) of 40%, which are all among the highest values for ruthenium sulfonated anchoring groups reported so far. Monochromatic incident photon to current conversion efficiency was 23% at 475 nm. Photovoltaic studies clearly indicated dyes with two SCN substituents yielded a higher Jsc for the

  5. Evaluation of a series of prolylamidepyridines as the chiral derivatization reagents for enantioseparation of carboxylic acids by LC-ESI-MS/MS and the application to human saliva.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Tomohiro; Takayama, Takahiro; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Inoue, Koichi; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2014-04-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a popular analytical tool because of its high sensitivity and specificity. The use of a chiral derivatization reagent for the mass spectrometry (MS) detection seems to be efficient for the enantiomeric separation of racemates. However, the number of chiral reagents for the liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS analysis is very limited. According to these observations, we are currently in the process of developing novel labeling reagents for chiral molecules in MS/MS analysis. The derivatization reagent that is effective for enhancing not only the electrospray ionization-MS/MS sensitivity but also the reversed-phase LC resolution of carboxylic acid enantiomers should have a highly proton-affinitive moiety and an asymmetric structure near the reactive functional group. Furthermore, the resulting derivative has to provide a characteristic product ion suitable for the selected reaction monitoring. Based upon these considerations, a series of prolylamidepyridines ((S)-N-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid N-(pyridine-2-yl)amide (PCP2), (S)-N-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid N-(pyridine-3-yl)amide, and (S)-N-pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid N-(pyridine-4-yl)amide) was synthesized as ideal labeling reagents for the enantioseparation of chiral carboxylic acids and evaluated in terms of separation efficiency and detection sensitivity by ultra-performance LC (UPLC)-MS/MS. Among the synthesized reagents, PCP2 was the most efficient chiral derivatization reagent for the enantioseparation of carboxylic acid. The Rs values and the detection limits of the derivatives of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which were selected as the representative carboxylic acids, were in the range of 2.52-6.07 and 49-260 amol, respectively. The sensitive detection of biological carboxylic acids (detection limits, 32-520 amol) was also carried out by the proposed method using PCP2 and UPLC-MS/MS. The PCP2 was applied to the determination of carboxylic acids in human saliva. Several

  6. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.

    2015-06-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%-50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is

  7. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 30, 1996 and April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1997-05-01

    Over the course of his studies on catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic residues in coal by carbon monoxide, the author performed preliminary investigations into the removal of other heteroatom groups. This report describes his attempted carbonylation of phenyl amido complexes. These studies resulted in the surprisingly facile formation of amidines. The amidine group is the nitrogen analog of carboxylic acids and esters. This functional group combines the properties of an azomethane-like C=N double bond with an amide-like C-N single bond. This group, like the related allyl (C-C-C), aza-allyl (C-N-C), and carboxylato (O-C-O) groups, form a number of transition metal derivatives, with both early and late transition metals. Various bonding modes of the amidino group have been reported. However, most isolated complexes have the amidino ligand as a chelating ligand or bridging two metals. This is due to the preference of amidines to bond via the nitrogen lone pairs, in contrast to the {eta}{sup 3} {pi} bonding observed in metal-allyl complexes.

  8. Effects of Oxygen Element and Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups on Surface Wettability of Coal Dust with Various Metamorphic Degrees Based on XPS Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Xu, Cuicui; Cheng, Weimin; Zhang, Qi; Nie, Wen

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the difference of surface oxygen element and oxygen-containing functional groups among coal dusts with different metamorphic degrees and their influence on surface wettability, a series of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments on 6 coal samples are carried out. The result demonstrates that the O/C ratio of coal surface shows an overall increasing trend compared with the result of its elements analysis. As the metamorphic degree increases, the O/C ratio on the surface gradually declines and the hydrophilic groups tend to fall off from coal surface. It could be found that different coals show different surface distributions of carboxyl and hydroxyl which are considered as the greatest promoter to the wettability of coal surface. With the change of metamorphic degree, the distribution of ether group is irregular while the carbonyl distribution keeps stable. In general, as the metamorphic degree goes higher, the content of oxygen-containing polar group tends to reduce. According to the measurement results, the contact angle is negatively related to the content of oxygen element, surface oxygen, and polar groups. In addition, compared with surface oxygen content, the content of oxygen-containing polar group serves as a more reasonable indicator of coal dust wettability. PMID:26257980

  9. Analysis of functional groups in atmospheric aerosols by infrared spectroscopy: sparse methods for statistical selection of relevant absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, Satoshi; Ruggeri, Giulia; Dillner, Ann M.

    2016-07-01

    Various vibrational modes present in molecular mixtures of laboratory and atmospheric aerosols give rise to complex Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra. Such spectra can be chemically informative, but they often require sophisticated algorithms for quantitative characterization of aerosol composition. Naïve statistical calibration models developed for quantification employ the full suite of wavenumbers available from a set of spectra, leading to loss of mechanistic interpretation between chemical composition and the resulting changes in absorption patterns that underpin their predictive capability. Using sparse representations of the same set of spectra, alternative calibration models can be built in which only a select group of absorption bands are used to make quantitative prediction of various aerosol properties. Such models are desirable as they allow us to relate predicted properties to their underlying molecular structure. In this work, we present an evaluation of four algorithms for achieving sparsity in FT-IR spectroscopy calibration models. Sparse calibration models exclude unnecessary wavenumbers from infrared spectra during the model building process, permitting identification and evaluation of the most relevant vibrational modes of molecules in complex aerosol mixtures required to make quantitative predictions of various measures of aerosol composition. We study two types of models: one which predicts alcohol COH, carboxylic COH, alkane CH, and carbonyl CO functional group (FG) abundances in ambient samples based on laboratory calibration standards and another which predicts thermal optical reflectance (TOR) organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass in new ambient samples by direct calibration of infrared spectra to a set of ambient samples reserved for calibration. We describe the development and selection of each calibration model and evaluate the effect of sparsity on prediction performance. Finally, we ascribe

  10. Novel regioselective hydroxylations of pyridine carboxylic acids at position C2 and pyrazine carboxylic acids at position C3.

    PubMed

    Tinschert, A; Tschech, A; Heinzmann, K; Kiener, A

    2000-02-01

    We have previously described the isolation of the new bacterial species, Ralstonia/Burkholderia sp. strain DSM 6920, which grows with 6-methylnicotinate and regioselectively hydroxylates this substrate in the C2 position by the action of 6-methylnicotinate-2-oxidoreductase to yield 2-hydroxy-6-methylnicotinate (Tinschert et al. 1997). In the present study we show that this enzymatic activity can be used for the preparation of a series of hydroxylated heterocyclic carboxylic acid derivatives. The following products were obtained from the unhydroxylated educts by biotransformation using resting cells: 2-hydroxynicotinic acid, 2-hydroxy-6-methylnicotinic acid, 2-hydroxy-6-chloronicotinic acid, 2-hydroxy-5,6-dichloronicotinic acid, 3-hydroxypyrazine-2-carboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-methylpyrazine-2-carboxylic acid and 3-hydroxy-5-chloropyrazine-2-carboxylic acid. Thus the respective educts were all regioselectively mono-hydroxylated at the carbon atom between the ring-nitrogen and the ring-carbon atom carrying the carboxyl group. In contrast to its relatively broad biotransformation abilities, the strain shows a limited heterocyclic nutritional spectrum. It could grow only with three of the seven transformed educts: 6-methylnicotinate, 2-hydroxy-6-methylnicotinate and 5-methylpyrazine-2-carboxylate. 2-Hydroxynicotinate, 2-hydroxy-6-chloronicotinate, 2-hydroxy-5,6-dichloronicotinate, 3-hydroxypyrazine-2-carboxylate and 3-hydroxy-5-chloropyrazine-2-carboxylate were not degraded by the strain. Therefore, unlike 6-methylnicotinate-2-oxidoreductase, which has a broad substrate spectrum, the second enzyme of the 6-methylnicotinate pathway seems to have a much more limited substrate range. Among 28 aromatic heterocyclic compounds tested as the sole source of carbon and energy, only pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylate was found as a further growth substrate, and this was degraded by a pathway which did not involve 6-methylnicotinate-2-oxidoreductase. To the best of our knowledge the

  11. Soft and Bio Nanomaterials Group at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Gang, Oleg

    2016-12-07

    Group leader Oleg Gang talks about the methods his group develops to direct the self-assembly of nanoscale systems from organic and inorganic components into functional materials with desired properties.

  12. Soft and Bio Nanomaterials Group at Brookhaven’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    Gang, Oleg

    2016-12-14

    Group leader Oleg Gang talks about the methods his group develops to direct the self-assembly of nanoscale systems from organic and inorganic components into functional materials with desired properties.

  13. Tunable Oxygen Functional Groups as Electrocatalysts on Graphite Felt Surfaces for All-Vanadium Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Estevez, Luis; Reed, David; Nie, Zimin; Schwarz, Ashleigh M.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kizewski, James P.; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Sprenkle, Vincent; Li, Bin

    2016-05-17

    We decorated the surfaces of graphite felts with some oxygen-containing functional groups, such as C-OH, O=C and HO-C=O. And the mole ratios and amounts of these functional groups were effectively adjusted on the graphite surface by a particular method. The catalytic effects of amounts and mole ratio of different kinds of functional groups on VRB electrode performances were investigated in detail.

  14. Pyrrole-2-Carboxylic Acid as a Ligand for the Cu-Catalyzed Reactions of Primary Anilines with Aryl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Ryan A.; Anderson, Kevin W.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    Pyrrole 2-carboxylic acid (L5) was found to be an effective ligand for the Cu-catalyzed mono-arylation of anilines with aryl iodides and bromides. Under the reported conditions (10% CuI/20% L5/DMSO/K3PO4/80–100 °C/20–24 h), a variety of useful functional groups were tolerated, and moderate to good yields of the diaryl amine products were obtained. PMID:18543973

  15. The effect of concentration ratio and type of functional group on synthesis of CNT-ZnO hybrid nanomaterial by an in situ sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Largani, Sekineh; Akbarzadeh Pasha, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    In this research, MWCNT-ZnO hybrid nanomaterials were synthesized by a simple sol-gel process using Zn(CH3COO)2·2H2O and functionalized MWCNT with carboxyl(COOH) and hydroxyl(OH) groups. Three different mass ratios of MWCNT:ZnO = 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 were examined. The prepared nanomaterials were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Successful growth of MWCNT-ZnO hybrids for both COOH and OH functional groups and all the three mass ratios were obtained. The ZnO nanoparticles attached on the surfaces of CNTs have rather spherical shapes and hexagonal crystal structure. By increasing the concentration of ZnO, the number and average size of ZnO nanoparticles decorated the body of CNTs in hybrid structures increase. By increasing the ZnO precursor, the distribution of ZnO nanoparticles that appeared on the surface of CNTs becomes more uniform. The SEM observation beside EDX analysis revealed that at the same concentration ratio the amount of ZnO loading on the surface of MWCNT-COOH is more than MWCNT-OH. Moreover, the average size of ZnO nanoparticles attached on the surface of COOH functionalized CNTs is relatively smaller than that of OH functionalized ones.

  16. Organometallic carboxylate resists for extreme ultraviolet with high sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, James; Murphy, Michael; Re, Ryan Del; Sortland, Miriam; Hotalen, Jodi; Dousharm, Levi; Fallica, Roberto; Ekinci, Yasin; Neisser, Mark; Freedman, Daniel A.; Brainard, Robert L.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed organometallic carboxylate compounds [RnM)] capable of acting as negative-tone extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. The most sensitive of these resists contain antimony, three R-groups and two carboxylate groups, and carboxylate groups with polymerizable olefins (e.g., acrylate, methacrylate, or styrenecarboxylate). Evidence suggests that high sensitivity is achieved through the polymerization of olefins in the exposed region. We have performed a systematic sensitivity study of the molecules of the type RnM) where we have studied seven R groups, four main group metals (M), and three polymerizable carboxylate groups (O2CR‧). The sensitivity of these resists was evaluated using Emax or dose to maximum resist thickness after exposure and development. We found that the greatest predictor of sensitivity of the RnSb) resists is their level of polymerizable olefins. We mathematically define the polymerizable olefin loading (POL) as the ratio of the number of olefins versus the number of nonhydrogen atoms. Linear and log plots of Emax versus POL for a variety of molecules of the type R3Sb) lend insight into the behavior of these resists.

  17. Vibrational spectra, electronic absorption, nonlinear optical properties, evaluation of bonding, chemical reactivity and thermodynamic properties of ethyl 4-(1-(2-(hydrazinecarbonothioyl)hydrazono)ethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate molecule by ab initio HF and density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Singh, R N; Rawat, Poonam; Sahu, Sangeeta

    2015-01-25

    In this work, detailed vibrational spectral analysis of ethyl 4-(1-(2-(hydrazinecarbonothioyl)hydrazono)ethyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EHCHEDPC) molecule has been carried out using FT-IR spectroscopy and potential energy distribution (PED). Theoretical calculations were performed by ab initio RHF and density functional theory (DFT) method, using 6-31G(d,p) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets. The other carried outwork cover: structural, thermodynamic properties, electronic transitions, bonding, multiple interaction, chemical reactivity and hyperpolarizability analysis. The results of the calculation were applied to the simulated spectra of (EHCHEDPC), which show excellent agreement with observed spectra. The vibrational analysis shows red shift in both group, the proton donor (pyrrole N-H) and proton acceptor (C=O of ester) indicating the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been used to find electronic excitations and their nature. The results of natural bond orbital (NBOs) analysis show the charges transfer and delocalization in various intra- and intermolecular interactions. The binding energy of intermolecular multiple interactions is calculated to be 12.54 kcal mol(-1) using QTAIM calculation. The electronic descriptors analyses reveal the investigated molecule used as precursor for heterocyclic derivatives synthesis. First hyperpolarizability (β0) has been computed to evaluate non-linear optical (NLO) response.

  18. The interaction of carboxylic acids with aluminium oxides: journeying from a basic understanding of alumina nanoparticles to water treatment for industrial and humanitarian applications.

    PubMed

    Barron, Andrew R

    2014-06-14

    Carboxylic acids are found to react with aluminium oxides via a topotactic reaction such that the carboxylate acts as a bridging ligand. This reaction allows for carboxylate-functionalized alumina nanoparticles to be prepared directly from boehmite (AlOOH). Understanding the structural relationship between molecular and surface species allows for the rationalization/prediction of suitable alternative ligands as well as alternative oxide surfaces. The identity of the carboxylate substituent controls the pH stability of a nanoparticle as well as the porosity and processability of ceramics prepared by thermolysis. Through the choice of functional groups on the carboxylic acid the properties of the alumina surface or alumina nanoparticle can be tailored. For example, the solubility/miscibility of nanoparticles can be tuned to the solvent/matrix, and the wettability to be varied from hydrophobic to super hydrophilic. The choice Zwitter ionic substituents on alumina micro-/ultra-filtration membranes are found to enhance the flux and limit fouling while allowing for the facile separation of organic compounds from water. Examples are presented of purification of frac and flow-back water from oil well production as well as providing drinking water from contaminated sources in underdeveloped regions.

  19. A CRM domain protein functions dually in group I and group II intron splicing in land plant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2007-12-01

    The CRM domain is a recently recognized RNA binding domain found in three group II intron splicing factors in chloroplasts, in a bacterial protein that associates with ribosome precursors, and in a family of uncharacterized proteins in plants. To elucidate the functional repertoire of proteins with CRM domains, we studied CFM2 (for CRM Family Member 2), which harbors four CRM domains. RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that CFM2 in maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts is associated with the group I intron in pre-trnL-UAA and group II introns in the ndhA and ycf3 pre-mRNAs. T-DNA insertions in the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog condition a defective-seed phenotype (strong allele) or chlorophyll-deficient seedlings with impaired splicing of the trnL group I intron and the ndhA, ycf3-int1, and clpP-int2 group II introns (weak alleles). CFM2 and two previously described CRM proteins are bound simultaneously to the ndhA and ycf3-int1 introns and act in a nonredundant fashion to promote their splicing. With these findings, CRM domain proteins are implicated in the activities of three classes of catalytic RNA: group I introns, group II introns, and 23S rRNA.

  20. Functional Groups Based on Leaf Physiology: Are they Spatially and Temporally Robust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Tammy E.; Brooks, J. Renee; Quincy, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The functional grouping hypothesis, which suggests that complexity in function can be simplified by grouping species with similar responses, was tested in the Florida scrub habitat. Functional groups were identified based on how species in fire maintained FL scrub function in terms of carbon, water and nitrogen dynamics. The suite of physiologic parameters measured to determine function included both instantaneous gas exchange measurements obtained from photosynthetic light response curves and integrated measures of function. Using cluster analysis, five distinct physiologically-based functional groups were identified. Using non-parametric multivariate analyses, it was determined that these five groupings were not altered by plot differences or by the three different management regimes; prescribed burn, mechanically treated and burn, and fire-suppressed. The physiological groupings also remained robust between the two years 1999 and 2000. In order for these groupings to be of use for scaling ecosystem processes, there needs to be an easy-to-measure morphological indicator of function. Life form classifications were able to depict the physiological groupings more adequately than either specific leaf area or leaf thickness. THe ability of life forms to depict the groupings was improved by separating the parasitic Ximenia americana from the shrub category.

  1. Building functional groups of marine benthic macroinvertebrates on the basis of general community assembly mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandridis, Nikolaos; Bacher, Cédric; Desroy, Nicolas; Jean, Fred

    2017-03-01

    The accurate reproduction of the spatial and temporal dynamics of marine benthic biodiversity requires the development of mechanistic models, based on the processes that shape macroinvertebrate communities. The modelled entities should, accordingly, be able to adequately represent the many functional roles that are performed by benthic organisms. With this goal in mind, we applied the emergent group hypothesis (EGH), which assumes functional equivalence within and functional divergence between groups of species. The first step of the grouping involved the selection of 14 biological traits that describe the role of benthic macroinvertebrates in 7 important community assembly mechanisms. A matrix of trait values for the 240 species that occurred in the Rance estuary (Brittany, France) in 1995 formed the basis for a hierarchical classification that generated 20 functional groups, each with its own trait values. The functional groups were first evaluated based on their ability to represent observed patterns of biodiversity. The two main assumptions of the EGH were then tested, by assessing the preservation of niche attributes among the groups and the neutrality of functional differences within them. The generally positive results give us confidence in the ability of the grouping to recreate functional diversity in the Rance estuary. A first look at the emergent groups provides insights into the potential role of community assembly mechanisms in shaping biodiversity patterns. Our next steps include the derivation of general rules of interaction and their incorporation, along with the functional groups, into mechanistic models of benthic biodiversity.

  2. A comparative study of six different inpatient groups with respect to their basic assumption functioning.

    PubMed

    Karterud, S

    1989-07-01

    Seventy-five group therapy sessions of six different inpatient team groups in one short-term, one intermediate term, and one long-term psychiatric ward were studied with Group Focal Conflict Analysis and the Group Emotionality Rating System. The majority of the group sessions (41) functioned as fight-flight groups, twenty-four sessions functioned at a "pseudogroup" level, and ten sessions were dependency groups. The differences between the fight-flight groups and the dependency group on the variables aggression and dependency were highly significant statistically. A mixture of fight-flight groups and pseudogroups were found in the short-term ward with emergency obligations. The author discusses the assets and shortcomings of fight-flight and dependency cultures within psychiatric wards.

  3. Synthesis of functionalized Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) and the comparative study of their pendant groups on the cellular internalization behavior.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengzhen; Zhang, Yan; Lang, Meidong

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on the synthesis of Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) bearing benzyl-oxycarbonylmethyl and carboxylic groups and the comparative study to investigate the influence of the different pendant groups on the cellular behavior. The functionalized Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) bearing two kinds of pendant groups are synthesized via ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone and 6-(benzyl-oxycarbonyl methyl)-ε-caprolactone and followed by deprotection respectively. The structure of the copolymers is confirmed and the polymeric micelles are formed by an emulsion/solvent evaporation technique. The critical micelle concentrations are improved compared with Pluronic F127, the morphologies of the micelles are spherical with the diameter on nano scale and good colloidal stability. The copolymers have good cytocompatibility and the comparative study reveals that cellular internalization, digesting by lysosome and intracellular distribution are affected by the pendant groups, moreover, the endocytosis pathway is determined by the pendant groups. Therefore, the definite internalization mechanism is beneficial for the design of polymeric micellar carriers to achieve intra- or extracellular modes of drug delivery and provide better access to either cell membrane or intracellular organelles.

  4. [Response of Phytoplankton Functional Groups to Eutrophication in Summer at Xiaoguan Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Li, Qiu-hua; Jiao, Shu-lin; Li, Yue; Xiao, Jing; Deng, Long; Sun, Rong-guo; Gao, Yong-chun; Luo, Lan

    2015-12-01

    Hydrology and Water Resources Bureau of Guizhou Province, Guiyang 550002, China) Abstract: In order to explore the distribution characteristics of phytoplankton functional groups, eutrophication characteristics and response of phytoplankton functional groups to eutrophication in Xiaoguan Reservoir, phytoplankton and water samples were taken once a week from 25th July 2014 to 27th September 2014. The results showed that there were 22 phytoplankton functional groups, groups S1, D, J, B, G, MP, L₀, SN, X1, Y, Xph, F, T and W1 were comparatively common functional groups, Wherein, S1, D and J were the dominant functional groups. Weekly dynamics of phytoplankton functional groups were: S1-->S1-->S1-->S1-->S1--S1-->S1-->J/D/S1-->Sl1- >/1D. group Sl1dominated over other groups, the cell abundance of S1 appeared two peaks at week 5 and week 7 respectively, but there was a slump at week 8, and rose again at last, compared to two peaks before, the cell abundance had dropped from 10⁸cells · L⁻¹ to 10⁷cells · L⁻¹ Water flush caused by discharge gate opening artificially was the main reason. Based on the three methods of eutrophication evaluation, the water was in moderately eutrophic and eutrophic states in Xiaoguan Reservoir in the summer of 2014. Multivariate analysis (RDA) indicated transparency was the main factor affecting the distribution of phytoplankton functional groups, and nutrients were no longer the limiting factor. The study suggested that phytoplankton functional groups could make a good response to eutrophication: groups S1 and J adapted to the turbid eutrophic water bodies, D adapted to shallow turbid waters and was sensitive to nutrient depletion. Also, common functional groups like G, X1, WW1 F etc. mostly adapted to eutrophic water bodies.

  5. Acid-Base Behavior of Carboxylic Acid Groups Covalently Attached at the Surface of Polyethylene: The Usefulness of Contact Angle in Following the Ionization of Surface Functionality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    carbodiimide and N -hydroxysuccinimide followed by tritiated glycine (Scheme I). The sample was . washed to remove excess glycine and, in a subsequent step...L - °-.*. . . .... r."- - - - -o°.*.o ..... . ... .. r.. r -- w r c -. .. .. r . - -u.- 00 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH. It) n mContract NOOO14-83-K-142...University N 6c. ADDRESS (City. See and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City. State and ZIP Code) Department of Chemistry Department of Navy Harvard University

  6. Electrochemiluminescence sensor for melamine based on a Ru(bpy)₃²⁺-doped silica nanoparticles/carboxylic acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Nafion composite film modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaomei; Lian, Sai; Ma, Ying; Peng, Aihong; Tian, Xiaotian; Huang, Zhiyong; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor for the determination of melamine (MEL) was developed based on a Ru(bpy)3(2+)-doped silica nanoparticles (RUDS)/carboxylic acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CMWCNTs)/Nafion composite film modified electrode. The homogeneous spherical RUDS were synthesized by a reverse microemulsion method. As Ru(bpy)3(2+) were encapsulated in the RUDS, Ru(bpy)3(2+) dropping from the modified electrode can be greatly prevented, which is helpful for obtaining a stable ECL signal. Moreover, to improve the conductivity of the film and promote the electron transfer rate on electrode surface, CMWCNTs with excellent electrical conductivity and large surface area were applied in the construction of the sensing film. As CMWCNTs acted as electron bridges making more Ru(bpy)3(2+) participate in the reaction, the ECL intensity was greatly enhanced. Under the optimum conditions, the relative ECL signal (△IECL) was proportional to the logarithmic MEL concentration ranging from 5×10(-13) to 1×10(-7) mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 1×10(-13) mol L(-1). To verify the reliability, the thus-fabricated ECL sensor was applied to determine the concentration of MEL in milk. Based on these investigations, the proposed ECL sensor exhibited good feasibility and high sensitivity for the determination of MEL, promising the applicability of this sensor in practical analysis.

  7. Density functional study of electronic, charge density, and chemical bonding properties of 9-methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3,2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic acid ethyl ester crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshak, A. H.; Kamarudin, H.; Alahmed, Z. A.; Auluck, S.; Chyský, Jan

    2014-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical density functional investigation of the electronic crystal structure, chemical bonding, and the electron charge densities of 9-Methyl-3-Thiophen-2-YI-Thieno [3, 2-e] [1, 2, 4] Thriazolo [4,3-c] Pyrimidine-8-Carboxylic Acid Ethyl Ester (C15H12N4O2S2) is performed. The density of states at Fermi level equal to 5.50 (3.45) states/Ry cell, and the calculated bare electronic specific heat coefficient is found to be 0.95 (0.59) mJ/mole-K2 for the local density approximation (Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation). The electronic charge density space distribution contours in (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) planes were calculated. We find that there are two independent molecules (A and B) in the asymmetric unit exhibit intramolecular C-H…O, C-H…N interactions. This intramolecular interaction is different in molecules A and B, where A molecule show C-H…O interaction while B molecule exhibit C-H…N interaction. We should emphasis that there is π-π interaction between the pyrimidine rings of the two neighbors B molecules gives extra strengths and stabilizations to the superamolecular structure. The calculated distance between the two neighbors pyrimidine rings found to be 3.345 Å, in good agreement with the measured one (3.424(1) Å).

  8. Functionalization of poly-SNS-anchored carboxylic acid with Lys and PAMAM: surface modifications for biomolecule immobilization/stabilization and bio-sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Sema; Emre, Fatma Bilge; Ekiz, Fulya; Oğuzkaya, Funda; Timur, Suna; Tanyeli, Cihangir; Toppare, Levent

    2012-09-21

    Poly(2-(2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrol-1-yl) (SNS) acetic acid) was electrochemically deposited on graphite electrodes and functionalized with lysine (Lys) amino acid and poly(amidoamine) derivatives (PAMAM G2 and PAMAM G4) to investigate their matrix properties for biosensor applications. Glucose oxidase (GOx) was immobilized onto the modified surface as the model enzyme. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to report the surface properties of the matrices in each step of the biosensor construction. The biosensors were characterized in terms of their operational and storage stabilities and the kinetic parameters (K(app)(m) and I(max)). Three new glucose biosensors revealed good stability, featuring low detection limits (19.0 μM, 3.47 μM and 2.93 μM for lysine-, PAMAM G2- and PAMAM G4-functionalized electrodes, respectively) and prolonged the shelf lives (4, 5, and 6 weeks for Lys-, PAMAM G2- and PAMAM G4-modified electrodes, respectively). The proposed biosensors were tested for glucose detection on real human blood serum samples.

  9. Partial androgen insensitivity with phenotypic variation caused by androgen receptor mutations that disrupt activation function 2 and the NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Charmian A; Tan, Jiann-an; He, Bin; Zhou, Zhong-xun; Mebarki, Farida; Morel, Yves; Forest, Maguelone G; Chatelain, Pierre; Ritzén, E Martin; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2004-01-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity with sex phenotype variation in two unrelated families was associated with missense mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene that disrupted the AR NH(2)-terminal/carboxy terminal interaction. Each mutation caused a single amino acid change within the region of the ligand-binding domain that forms activation function 2 (AF2). In one family, the mutation I737T was in alpha helix 4 and in the other F725L was between helices 3 and 4. Neither mutation altered androgen binding as determined by assays of mutant AR in the patient's cultured genital skin fibroblasts or of recombinant mutant receptors transfected into COS cells. In transient cotransfection assays in CV1 cells, transactivation with the AR mutants at low concentrations of DHT was reduced several fold compared with wild-type AR but increased at higher concentrations. Defects in NH(2)-terminal/carboxy terminal interactions were identified in mammalian two hybrid assays. In similar assays, there was reduced binding of the p160 coactivators TIF2/SRC2 and SRC1 to the mutant AR ligand binding domains (LBD). In the family with AR I737T, sex phenotype varied from severely defective masculinization in the proband to a maternal great uncle whose only manifestation of AIS was severe gynecomastia. He was fertile and passed the mutation to two daughters. The proband of the F725L family was also incompletely masculinized but was raised as a male while his half-sibling by a different father was affected more severely and reared as a female. These studies indicate that the function of an AR AF2 mutant in male development can vary greatly depending on the genetic background.

  10. Photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on donor-acceptor pi-conjugated benzofuro[2,3-c]oxazolo[4,5-a]carbazole-type fluorescent dyes with a carboxyl group at different positions of the chromophore skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ooyama, Yousuke; Shimada, Yoshihito; Kagawa, Yusuke; Imae, Ichiro; Harima, Yutaka

    2007-07-07

    Donor-acceptor pi-conjugated benzofuro[2,3-c]oxazolo[4,5-a]carbazole-type fluorescent dyes 3a, 3b, 8a, and 8b with a carboxyl group at different positions of the chromophore skeleton have been designed and synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence spectra and cyclic voltammograms of the fluorescent dyes agree very well, showing that the position of the carboxyl group has a negligible influence on the photophysical and electrochemical properties of these dyes. When these dyes are used in dye-sensitized solar cells, however, their photovolatic performances are considerably different. The short-circuit photocurrents and energy conversion efficiencies under a simulated solar light increase in the order: 3a (2.12 mA cm(-2), 1.00%) approximately 3b (2.10 mA cm(-2), 1.06%) > 8b (1.50 mA cm(-2), 0.67%) > 8a (0.84 mA cm(-2), 0.34%). Based on semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations (AM1 and INDO/S) together with spectral analyses and their photovolatic performance, the relationships between the observed photovolatic properties and the chemical structures of the benzofuro[2,3-c]oxazolo[4,5-a]carbazole-type fluorescent dyes are discussed. It is found that strong interaction between a TiO(2) surface and the electron accepting moiety of the dye leads to a high photovoltaic performance.

  11. Photochromic and Nonphotochromic Luminescent Supramolecular Isomers Based on Carboxylate-Functionalized Bipyridinium Ligand: (4,4)-Net versus Interpenetrated (6,3)-Net.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Li, Shi-Li; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2016-09-21

    Photochromic and nonphotochromic luminescent bipyridinium-based supramolecular isomers [Cd(CPBPY)(BDC)(H2O)]n (1) and {[Cd(CPBPY)(BDC)]·H2O}n (2) (CPBPY = N-(3-carboxyphenyl)-4,4'-bipyridinium, BDC= terephthalate) have been successfully obtained by solvothermal reactions at 100 °C via tuning stoichiometric ratios of starting reagents. Isomer 1 features (4,4)-topological layer constructed by edge-shared Cd2 SBUs and BDC linkers attached by N-pendent CPBPY groups. Isomer 2 has (6,3)-topological layers with Cd atoms as nodes and BDC and double CPBPY as linkers, which are 4-fold interpenetrated into 3D network. Although both 1 and 2 contain bipyridinium ligands, only isomer 1 possesses reversible photochromic behavior with quick-switchable luminescence in the solid state. Compound 2 does not show photochromic behavior even after exposure to UV light for more than 2 h. Photochromism process of 1 originates from photostimulated reduction of CPBPY ligands to generate CPBPY(•-) radicals after irradiation, confirmed by EPR spectra. Careful check on structure reveals that the offset π-π stacking interaction between the pyridine ring of CPBPY and benzene ring of BDC with inter-ring shortest C···C distance of 3.214 Å in 1 is responsible for electron transfer to form the CPBPY(•-) radicals. The speculation is further supported by DFT calculation of frontier orbital matching of electron donor and acceptor. HOMO and HOMO-2 orbitals of BDC involve the carbon atoms of benzene ring while LUMO and LUMO+1 orbitals of CPBPY involve the carbon atoms of pyridinium ring. Importantly, the photoinduced formed CPBPY(•-) radicals in 1 have a long-lived lifetime (at least six months in air and room temperature condition), which is mainly attributed to the close packing mode.

  12. 55 Amino acid linker between helicase and carboxyl terminal domains of RIG-I functions as a critical repression domain and determines inter-domain conformation.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Maiko; Takahasi, Kiyohiro; Narita, Ryo; Hirai, Reiko; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Hiroki; Fujita, Takashi

    2011-11-11

    In virus-infected cells, viral RNA with non-self structural pattern is recognized by DExD/Hbox RNA helicase, RIG-I. Once RIG-I senses viral RNA, it triggers a signaling cascade, resulting in the activation of genes including type I interferon, which activates antiviral responses. Overexpression of N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) is sufficient to activate signaling; however basal activity of full-length RIG-I is undetectable. The repressor domain (RD), initially identified as a.a. 735-925, is responsible for diminished basal activity; therefore, it is suggested that RIG-I is under auto-repression in uninfected cells and the repression is reversed upon its encounter with viral RNA. In this report, we further delimited RD to a.a. 747-801, which corresponds to a linker connecting the helicase and the C-terminal domain (CTD). Alanine substitutions of the conserved residues in the linker conferred constitutive activity to full-length RIG-I. We found that the constitutive active mutants do not exhibit ATPase activity, suggesting that ATPase is required for de-repression but not signaling itself. Furthermore, trypsin digestion of recombinant RIG-I revealed that the wild-type, but not linker mutant conforms to the trypsin-resistant structure, containing CARD and helicase domain. The result strongly suggests that the linker is responsible for maintaining RIG-I in a "closed" structure to minimize unwanted production of interferon in uninfected cells. These findings shed light on the structural regulation of RIG-I function.

  13. Investigation of Carboxylic Acid-Neodymium Conversion Films on Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiufang; Liu, Zhe; Lin, Lili; Jin, Guo; Wang, Haidou; Xu, Binshi

    2015-01-01

    The new carboxylic acid-neodymium anhydrous conversion films were successfully prepared and applied on the AZ91D magnesium alloy surface by taking absolute ethyl alcohol as solvent and four kinds of soluble carboxylic acid as activators. The corrosion resistance of the coating was measured by potentiodynamic polarization test in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution in pH 7.0. The morphology, structure, and constituents of the coating were observed by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersivespectrum, x-ray photoelectron spectrum, and Fourier infrared spectrometer. Results show that corrosion resistance properties of samples coated with four different anhydrous conversion films were improved obviously. The corrosion potential increased, corrosion current density decreased, and polarization resistance increased. Among these four kinds of conversion films the one added with phytic exhibits the best corrosion resistant property. The mechanism of anhydrous-neodymium conversion film formation is also analyzed in this paper. It reveals that the gadolinium conversion coating is mainly composed of stable Nd2O3, MgO, Mg(OH)2, and carboxylate of Nd. And that the sample surface is rich in organic functional groups.

  14. Synthesis, growth, structural, thermal and optical studies of pyrrolidinium-2-carboxylate-4-nitrophenol single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarna Sowmya, N.; Sampathkrishnan, S.; Vidyalakshmi, Y.; Sudhahar, S.; Mohan Kumar, R.

    2015-06-01

    Organic nonlinear optical material, pyrrolidinium-2-carboxylate-4-nitrophenol (PCN) was synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth method. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the structure and lattice parameters of PCN crystals. Infrared, Raman and NMR spectral analyses were used to elucidate the functional groups present in the compound. The thermal behavior of synthesized compound was studied by thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analyses. The photoluminescence property was studied by exciting the crystal at 360 nm. The relative second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of grown crystal was estimated by using Nd:YAG laser with fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm.

  15. Separation of certain carboxylic acids utilizing cation exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Sopher, D.W.

    1983-05-09

    A method of substantially separating monofunctional lower carboxylic acids from a liquid mixture containing the acids wherein the pH of the mixture is adjusted to a value in the range of from about 1 to about 5 to form protonated acids. The mixture is heated to an elevated temperature not greater than about 100/sup 0/C and brought in contact with one side of a perfluorinated cation exchange membrane having sulfonate or carboxylate groups or mixtures thereof with the mixture containing the protonated acids. A pressure gradient can be established across the membrane with the mixture being under higher pressure, so that protonated monofunctional lower carboxylic acids pass through the membrane at a substantially faster rate than the remainder of the mixture thereby substantially separating the acids from the mixture.

  16. Separation of certain carboxylic acids utilizing cation exchange membranes

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Sopher, David W.

    1984-01-01

    A method of substantially separating monofunctional lower carboxylic acids from a liquid mixture containing the acids wherein the pH of the mixture is adjusted to a value in the range of from about 1 to about 5 to form protonated acids. The mixture is heated to an elevated temperature not greater than about 100.degree. C. and brought in contact with one side of a perfluorinated cation exchange membrane having sulfonate or carboxylate groups or mixtures thereof with the mixture containing the protonated acids. A pressure gradient can be established across the membrane with the mixture being under higher pressure, so that protonated monofunctional lower carboxylic acids pass through the membrane at a substantially faster rate than the remainder of the mixture thereby substantially separating the acids from the mixture.

  17. 14 CFR Section 10 - Functional Classification-Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functional Classification-Operating... REPORTS FOR LARGE CERTIFICATED AIR CARRIERS Profit and Loss Classification Section 10 Functional Classification—Operating Expenses of Group I Air Carriers 5100Flying Operations. (a) This function shall...

  18. Biogeographical Boundaries, Functional Group Structure and Diversity of Rocky Shore Communities along the Argentinean Coast

    PubMed Central

    Wieters, Evie A.; McQuaid, Christopher; Palomo, Gabriela; Pappalardo, Paula; Navarrete, Sergio A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which functional structure and spatial variability of intertidal communities coincide with major biogeographical boundaries, areas where extensive compositional changes in the biota are observed over a limited geographic extension. We then investigate whether spatial variation in the biomass of functional groups, over geographic (10′s km) and local (10′s m) scales, could be associated to species diversity within and among these groups. Functional community structure expressed as abundance (density, cover and biomass) and composition of major functional groups was quantified through field surveys at 20 rocky intertidal shores spanning six degrees of latitude along the southwest Atlantic coast of Argentina and extending across the boundaries between the Argentinean and Magellanic Provinces. Patterns of abundance of individual functional groups were not uniformly matched with biogeographical regions. Only ephemeral algae showed an abrupt geographical discontinuity coincident with changes in biogeographic boundaries, and this was limited to the mid intertidal zone. We identified 3–4 main ‘groups’ of sites in terms of the total and relative abundance of the major functional groups, but these did not coincide with biogeographical boundaries, nor did they follow latitudinal arrangement. Thus, processes that determine the functional structure of these intertidal communities are insensitive to biogeographical boundaries. Over both geographical and local spatial scales, and for most functional groups and tidal levels, increases in species richness within the functional group was significantly associated to increased total biomass and reduced spatial variability of the group. These results suggest that species belonging to the same functional group are sufficiently uncorrelated over space (i.e. metres and site-to-site ) to stabilize patterns of biomass variability and, in this manner, provide a buffer, or “insurance”, against spatial

  19. Succession of phytoplankton functional groups regulated by monsoonal hydrology in a large canyon-shaped reservoir.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li-Juan; Wang, Tian; Hu, Ren; Han, Bo-Ping; Wang, Sheng; Qian, Xin; Padisák, Judit

    2011-10-15

    Liuxihe reservoir is a deep, monomictic, oligo-mesotrophic canyon-reservoir in the subtropical monsoon climate region of southern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in the reservoir were investigated and a comparison made between the succession observed in 2008, an exceptionally wet year, and 2009, an average year. The reservoir shows strong annual fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and artificial drawdown. Altogether 28 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, including 79 genera. Twelve of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Because of the oligo-mesotrophic and P-limited condition of the reservoir, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of nutrient (phosphorus) deficiency. The predominant functional groups in the succession process were Groups A (Cyclotella with greatest axial linear dimension<10 μm), B (Cyclotella with greatest axial linear dimension>10 μm), LO (Peridinium), LM (Ceratium and Microcystis), E (Dinobryon and Mallomonas), F (Botryococcus), X1 (Ankistrodesmus, Ankyra, Chlorella and Monoraphidium) and X2 (Chlamydomonas and Chroomonas). The development of groups A, B and LO was remarkably seasonal. Group A was dominant during stratification, when characteristic small size and high surface/volume ratio morphology conferred an advantage. Group LO was dominant during dry stratification, when motility was advantageous. Group B plankton exhibited a high relative biomass during periods of reduced euphotic depth and isothermy. Groups LM, E, F, X1 and X2 occasionally exhibited high relative biomasses attributable to specific environmental events (e.g. drawdown, changes in zooplankton community). A greater diversity of phytoplankton functional groups was apparent during isothermy. This study underscores the usefulness of functional algal groups in studying succession in subtropical impoundments, in which phytoplankton succession can be significantly affected by external factors such as

  20. Microscopic mechanism of electron transfer through the hydrogen bonds between carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Minglang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-11-07

    The atomic structure and the electron transfer properties of hydrogen bonds formed between two carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes are investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Three types of molecular junctions are constructed, in which one carboxyl alkanethiol molecule contains two methylene, –CH{sub 2}, groups and the other one is composed of one, two, or three –CH{sub 2} groups. Our calculations show that, similarly to the cases of isolated carboxylic acid dimers, in these molecular junctions the two carboxyl, –COOH, groups form two H-bonds resulting in a cyclic structure. When self-interaction corrections are explicitly considered, the calculated transmission coefficients of these three H-bonded molecular junctions at the Fermi level are in good agreement with the experimental values. The analysis of the projected density of states confirms that the covalent Au–S bonds localized at the molecule-electrode interfaces and the electronic coupling between –COOH and S dominate the low-bias junction conductance. Following the increase of the number of the –CH{sub 2} groups, the coupling between –COOH and S decreases deeply. As a result, the junction conductance decays rapidly as the length of the H-bonded molecules increases. These findings not only provide an explanation to the observed distance dependence of the electron transfer properties of H-bonds, but also help the design of molecular devices constructed through H-bonds.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of homo- and heterovalent tetra- hexa- hepta- and decanuclear manganese clusters using pyridyl functionalized beta-diketone, carboxylate and triethanolamine ligands.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Chilton, Nicholas F; Massi, Massimiliano; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Berry, Kevin J; Murray, Keith S

    2010-08-21

    The syntheses and characterizations are reported for six new homo- and heterovalent manganese clusters, utilizing pyridyl functionalized beta-diketones ligands. The reaction of the trinuclear complex [Mn3O(O2CPh)6(H2O)(Py)2] with 1,3-di(pyridine-2-yl)propane-1,3-dione (dppdH) in CH2Cl2 resulted in a mixed-valence Mn3(II)Mn6(III)Mn(IV) decanuclear cluster of formula [Mn10O7(dppd)3(O2CPh)11] x 4 CH2Cl2 (1). The structure of the core of 1 is based upon a centred tricapped trigonal prism. Reacting Mn(BF4)2 x xH2O with dppdH and triethylamine (NEt3) in CH2Cl2-MeOH gave a rare, homoleptic hexanuclear cluster of formula [Mn(II)6(dppd)8][BF4]4 (2) which has a triangular based core. Reaction of Mn(Y)2 x xH2O, Y = NO3(-) or BF4(-), with dppdH or 1-phenyl-3-(2-pyridyl)propane-1,3-dione (pppdH) in the presence of triethanolamine (teaH3) and NEt3 gave a heptanuclear 'disc' like manganese core of general formula [Mn(II)7(X)6(tea)(OH)3][Y]2 x solv (3) X = pppd- or dppd- and Y = NO3(-) or BF4(-). The addition of N-(2-pyridinyl)acetoacetamide (paaH) to Mn(Y)2 x 4 H2O Y = NO3(-) or ClO4(-) in MeOH gave a second divalent heptanuclear cluster with a 'disc'-like core of general formula [Mn7(paa)6(OMe)6][X]2 x solv (4) (X = NO3(-) or ClO4(-)), whilst the addition of paaH to a mixture of Mn(NO3)2 x 4 H2O, teaH3 and NEt3 in CH2Cl2-MeOH resulted in the formation of a mixed-valence Mn2(II)Mn2(III) tetranuclear 'butterfly' complex of formula [Mn4(paa)4(teaH)2][NO3]2 x 2 MeOH x 2 CH2Cl2 (5). Compound 5 displays the rare Mn(II/III) oxidation state distribution of the body positions being Mn(II) while the wing tips are Mn(III). The in situ formation of the tetranuclear [Mn4(teaH)2(teaH2)2(O2C(CH3)3)2][O2C(CH3)3]2 'butterfly' complex followed by the addition of Mn(O2CMe)2 x 4 H2O resulted in a mixed-valence Mn4(II)Mn(III)Mn(IV) hexanuclear species of formula [Mn6O2(teaH2)4(O2CMe)4][NO3]2[O2CMe] x CH2Cl2 x MeOH x 2 H2O (6). The core of 6 displays a face sharing dicubane topology. Compounds 1 and

  2. Facile fabrication of siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with different functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zheng-Bai; Tai, Li; Zhang, Da-Ming; Jiang, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with functional groups were prepared by a facile hydrolysis-condensation method in this work. Three different silane coupling agents 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS), 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) were added along with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) into the polymethylacrylic acid (PMAA) microparticle ethanol dispersion to form the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with different functional groups. The core-shell structure and the surface special functional groups of the resulting microparticles were measured by transmission electron microscopy and FTIR. The sizes of these core-shell microparticles were about 350-400 nm. The corresponding preparation conditions and mechanism were discussed in detail. This hydrolysis-condensation method also could be used to functionalize other microparticles which contain active groups on the surface. Meanwhile, the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with carbon-carbon double bonds and amino groups have further been applied to prepare hydrophobic coatings.

  3. Variation of phytoplankton functional groups modulated by hydraulic controls in Hongze Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chang; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Hao, Daping; Doblin, Martina A; Ren, Ying; Wei, Jielin; Feng, Yawei

    2015-11-01

    Hongze Lake is a large, shallow, polymictic, eutrophic lake in the eastern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in this lake were investigated from March 2011 to February 2013, and a comparison was made between the eastern, western, and northern regions. The lake shows strong fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and regular hydraulic controls. By application of the phytoplankton functional group approach, this study aims to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics and analyze their influencing factors. Altogether, 18 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, encompassing 187 species. In order to seek the best variable describing the phytoplankton functional group distribution, 14 of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Due to the turbid condition of the lake, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of low light. The predominant functional groups in the annual succession were D (Cyclotella spp. and Synedra acus), T (Planctonema lauterbornii), P (Fragilaria crotonensis), X1 (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa), C (Cyclotella meneghiniana and Cyclotella ocellata), and Y (Cryptomonas erosa). An opposite relationship between water level and the biomass of predominant groups was observed in the present study. Water level fluctuations, caused by monsoonal climate and artificial drawdown, were significant factors influencing phytoplankton succession in Hongze Lake, since they alter the hydrological conditions and influence light and nutrient availability. The clearly demonstrated factors, which significantly influence phytoplankton dynamics in Hongze Lake, will help government manage the large shallow lakes with frequent water level fluctuations.

  4. Redundancy and response diversity of functional groups: implications for the resilience of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Magnus

    2006-02-01

    To improve coral reef management, a deeper understanding of biodiversity across scales in the context of functional groups is required. The focus of this paper is on the role of diversity within functional groups in securing important ecosystem processes that contribute to the resilience of coral-dominated reef states. Two important components of species biodiversity that confer ecosystem resilience are analyzed: redundancy and the diversity of responses within functional groups to change. Three critical functional groups are used to illustrate the interaction between these two components and their role in coral reef resilience: zooxanthellae (symbiotic micro algae in reef-building corals), reef-building corals, and herbivores. The paper further examines the consequences of undermining functional redundancy and response diversity and addresses strategies to secure ecological processes that are critical for coral reef resilience.

  5. Improved Preparation of Halopropyl Bridged Carboxylic Ortho Esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protection of a carboxylic acid function as a bridged ortho ester derivative enables the use of strongly basic conditions in the synthetic strategy because the protons, alpha to the previous carbonyl carbon, are less acidic. Protected 3-halopropionic acid can behave like an alkyl halide making them...

  6. Chelation-assisted Pd-catalysed ortho-selective oxidative C-H/C-H cross-coupling of aromatic carboxylic acids with arenes and intramolecular Friedel-Crafts acylation: one-pot formation of fluorenones.

    PubMed

    Sun, Denan; Li, Bijin; Lan, Jingbo; Huang, Quan; You, Jingsong

    2016-03-04

    Pd-Catalysed ortho-selective oxidative C-H/C-H cross-coupling of aromatic carboxylic acids with arenes and subsequent intramolecular Friedel-Crafts acylation has been accomplished for the first time through a chelation-assisted C-H activation strategy. Starting from the readily available substrates, a variety of fluorenone derivatives are obtained in one pot. The direct use of naturally occurring carboxylic acid functionalities as directing groups avoids unnecessary steps for installation and removal of an extra directing group.

  7. Metal-Catalyzed Carboxylation of Organic (Pseudo)halides with CO2

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed the development of metal-catalyzed reductive carboxylation of organic (pseudo)halides with CO2 as C1 source, representing potential powerful alternatives to existing methodologies for preparing carboxylic acids, privileged motifs in a myriad of pharmaceuticals and molecules displaying significant biological properties. While originally visualized as exotic cross-coupling reactions, a close look into the literature data indicates that these processes have become a fertile ground, allowing for the utilization of a variety of coupling partners, even with particularly challenging substrate combinations. As for other related cross-electrophile scenarios, the vast majority of reductive carboxylation of organic (pseudo)halides are characterized by their simplicity, mild conditions, and a broad functional group compatibility, suggesting that these processes could be implemented in late-stage diversification. This perspective describes the evolution of metal-catalyzed reductive carboxylation of organic (pseudo)halides from its inception in the pioneering stoichiometric work of Osakada to the present. Specific emphasis is devoted to the reactivity of these coupling processes, with substrates ranging from aryl-, vinyl-, benzyl- to unactivated alkyl (pseudo)halides. Despite the impressive advances realized, a comprehensive study detailing the mechanistic intricacies of these processes is still lacking. Some recent empirical evidence reveal an intriguing dichotomy exerted by the substitution pattern on the ligands utilized; still, however, some elementary steps within the catalytic cycle of these reactions remain speculative, in many instances invoking a canonical cross-coupling process. Although tentative, we anticipate that these processes might fall into more than one distinct mechanistic category depending on the substrate utilized, suggesting that investigations aimed at unraveling the mechanistic underpinnings of these processes will likely

  8. A first principle study of graphene functionalized with hydroxyl, nitrile, or methyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barhoumi, M.; Rocca, D.; Said, M.; Lebègue, S.

    2017-01-01

    By means of ab initio calculations, we study the functionalization of graphene by different chemical groups such as hydroxyl, nitrile, or methyl. Two extreme cases of functionalization are considered: a single group on a supercell of graphene and a sheet of graphene fully functionalized. Once the equilibrium geometry is obtained by density functional theory, we found that the systems are metallic when a single group is attached to the sheet of graphene. With the exception of the nitrile functionalized boat configuration, a large bandgap is obtained at full coverage. Specifically, by using the GW approximation, our calculated bandgaps are direct and range between 5.0 and 5.5 eV for different configurations of hydroxyl functionalized graphene. An indirect GW bandgap of 6.50 eV was found in nitrile functionalized graphene while the methyl group functionalization leads to a direct bandgap with a value of 4.50 eV. Since in the two limiting cases of minimal and full coverage, the electronic structure changes drastically from a metal to a wide bandgap semiconductor, a series of intermediate states might be expected by tuning the amount of functionalization with these different groups.

  9. Electrochemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymer film via sol-gel technology and multi-walled carbon nanotubes-chitosan functional layer for sensitive determination of quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yukun; Fang, Guozhen; Liu, Guiyang; Pan, Mingfei; Wang, Xiaomin; Kong, Lingjie; He, Xinlei; Wang, Shuo

    2013-09-15

    Quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (QCA) is difficult to measure since only trace levels are present in commercial meat products. In this study, a rapid, sensitive and selective molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor for QCA determination was successfully constructed by combination of a novel modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The GCE was fabricated via stepwise modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-chitosan (CS) functional composite and a sol-gel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film on the surface. MWNTs-CS composite was used to enhance the electron transfer rate and expand electrode surface area, and consequently amplify QCA reduction electrochemical response. The imprinted mechanism and experimental parameters affecting the performance of MIP film were discussed in detail. The resulting MIP/sol-gel/MWNTs-CS/GCE was characterized using various electrochemical methods involving cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and DPV. The sensor using MIP/sol-gel/MWNTs-CS/GCE as working electrode showed a linear current response to the target QCA concentration in the wide range from 2.0×10(-6) to 1.0×10(-3)molL(-1) with a low detection limit of 4.4×10(-7)molL(-1) (S/N=3). The established sensor with excellent reproductivity and stability was applied to evaluate commercial pork products. At five concentration levels, the recoveries and standard deviations were calculated as 93.5-98.6% and 1.7-3.3%, respectively, suggesting the proposed sensor is promising for the accurate quantification of QCA at trace levels in meat samples.

  10. a Renormalization Group Calculation of the Velocity - and Density-Density Correlation Functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Mark Timothy

    The velocity-velocity correlation function of a free field theory is obtained. The renormalization group, along with a 4-varepsilon expansion, is then used to find the leading order behavior of the velocity-velocity correlation function for an interacting field theory in the high temperature phase near the critical point. The details of the calculation of the density-density correlation function for Hedgehogs, in the context of a free field theory, is presented next. Finally the renormalization group, along with a 4-varepsilon expansion, is used to find the leading order behavior of the density-density correlation function for Hedgehogs in an interacting field theory near the critical point.

  11. Controlling surface functionality through generation of thiol groups in a self-assembled monolayer.

    SciTech Connect

    Lud, S. Q.; Neppl, S.; Richter, G.; Bruno, P.; Gruen, D. M.; Jordan, R.; Feulner, P.; Stutzmann, M.; Garrido, J. A.; Materials Science Division; Technische Univ. Munchen

    2010-01-01

    A lithographic method to generate reactive thiol groups on functionalized synthetic diamond for biosensor and molecular electronic applications is developed. We demonstrate that ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films covalently functionalized with surface-generated thiol groups allow controlled thiol-disulfide exchange surface hybridization processes. The generation of the thiol functional head groups was obtained by irradiating phenylsulfonic acid (PSA) monolayers on UNCD surfaces. The conversion of the functional headgroup of the self-assembled monolayer was verified by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and fluorescence microscopy. Our findings indicate the selective generation of reactive thiol surface groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate the grafting of yeast cytochrome c to the thiol-modified diamond surface and the electron transfer between protein and electrode.

  12. Illustrating the Use of Nonparametric Regression To Assess Differential Item and Bundle Functioning among Multiple Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an overview of nonparametric regression as it allies to differential item functioning analysis and then provides three examples to illustrate how nonparametric regression can be applied to multilingual, multicultural data to study group differences. (SLD)

  13. Crystal structure of 2-amino-4,6-di-meth-oxy-pyrimidinium thio-phene-2-carboxyl-ate.

    PubMed

    Rajam, Ammaiyappan; Muthiah, P T; Butcher, Ray J; Jasinski, Jerry P

    2015-07-01

    In the title salt, C6H10N3O2 (+)·C5H3O2S(-), the 2-amino-4,6-di-meth-oxy-pyrimidinium cation inter-acts with the carboxyl-ate group of the thio-phene-2-carboxyl-ate anion through a pair of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming an R 2 (2)(8) ring motif. These motifs are centrosymmetrically paired via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming a complementary DDAA array. The separate DDAA arrays are linked by π-π stacking inter-actions between the pyrimidine rings, as well as by a number of weak C-H⋯O and N-H⋯O inter-actions. In the anion, the dihedral angle between the ring plane and the CO2 group is 11.60 (3)°. In the cation, the C atoms of methoxy groups deviate from the ring plane by 0.433 (10) Å.

  14. Functional group placement in protein binding sites: a comparison of GRID and MCSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitetti-Putzer, Ryan; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane; Hogle, James M.; Karplus, Martin

    2001-10-01

    One approach to combinatorial ligand design begins by determining optimal locations (i.e., local potential energy minima) for functional groups in the binding site of a target macromolecule. MCSS and GRID are two methods, based on significantly different algorithms, which are used for this purpose. A comparison of the two methods for the same functional groups is reported. Calculations were performed for nonpolar and polar functional groups in the internal hydrophobic pocket of the poliovirus capsid protein, and on the binding surface of the src SH3 domain. The two approaches are shown to agree qualitatively; i.e., the global characteristics of the functional group maps generated by MCSS and GRID are similar. However, there are significant differences in the relative interaction energies of the two sets of minima, a consequence of the different functional form used to evaluate polar interactions (electrostatics and hydrogen bonding) in the two methods. The single sphere representation used by GRID affords only positional information, supplemented by the identification of hydrogen bonding interactions. By contrast, the multi-atom representation of most MCSS groups yields in both positional and orientational information. The two methods are most similar for small functional groups, while for larger functional groups MCSS yields results consistent with GRID but superior in detail. These results are in accord with the somewhat different purposes for which the two methods were developed. GRID has been used mainly to introduce functionalities at specific positions in lead compounds, in which case the orientation is predetermined by the structure of the latter. The orientational information provided by MCSS is important for its use in the de novo design of large, multi-functional ligands, as well as for improving lead compounds.

  15. A Functional Group Approach for Prediction of APPI Response of Organic Synthetic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurov, Konstantin O.; Menin, Laure; Di Franco, Thomas; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) is a technique of choice for ionization of non-polar molecules in mass spectrometry (MS). Reported APPI-based studies tend to focus on a selected compound class, which may contain a variety of functional groups. These studies demonstrate that APPI response frequently differs substantially, indicating a certain dependence on the functional group present. Although this dependence could be employed for APPI response prediction, its systematic use is currently absent. Here, we apply APPI MS to a judiciously-compiled set of 63 compounds containing a number of diverse functional groups commonly utilized in synthesis, reactive functional groups, as well as those containing boron and silicon. Based on the outcome of APPI MS of these compounds, we propose and evaluate a simple guideline to estimate the APPI response for a novel compound, the key properties of which have not been characterized in the gas phase. Briefly, we first identify key functional groups in the compound and gather knowledge on the known ionization energies from the smallest analogues containing said functional groups. We then consider local inductive and resonance effects on said ionization energies for the compounds of interest to estimate the APPI response. Finally, application of APPI MS to compounds of interest considered herein demonstrated extended upper mass ionization limit of 3.5 kDa for non-polymeric compounds.

  16. Multiple-Group Noncompensatory Differential Item Functioning in Raju's Differential Functioning of Items and Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oshima, T. C.; Wright, Keith; White, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Raju, van der Linden, and Fleer (1995) introduced a framework for differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) for unidimensional dichotomous models. Since then, DFIT has been shown to be a quite versatile framework as it can handle polytomous as well as multidimensional models both at the item and test levels. However, DFIT is still limited…

  17. Identification of Differential Item Functioning in Multiple-Group Settings: A Multivariate Outlier Detection Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; De Boeck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We focus on the identification of differential item functioning (DIF) when more than two groups of examinees are considered. We propose to consider items as elements of a multivariate space, where DIF items are outlying elements. Following this approach, the situation of multiple groups is a quite natural case. A robust statistics technique is…

  18. The Use of Language Functions in Mathematical Group Games. Teacher Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Carolyn; Huerta, Maria G.

    1994-01-01

    Six group games were introduced into a second-grade bilingual classroom. Children's talk during each game was classified using a modification of Dyson's five language functions (representational, directive, heuristic, personal, and interactional). Group games provided many communication opportunities. Some children tried new communication styles.…

  19. Characteristics of Interactional Management Functions in Group Oral by Japanese Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negishi, Junko

    2010-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate the characteristics of interaction dynamics in a group oral interaction carried out by Japanese learners of English. The relationship between the participants' language development and interactional management functions (IMFs) was also explored. Oral performance tests in a paired or a small group have recently…

  20. The use of heterogeneous chemistry for the characterization of functional groups at the gas/particle interface of soot and TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Setyan, A; Sauvain, J-J; Rossi, M J

    2009-08-07

    Six gases [N(CH(3))(3), NH(2)OH, CF(3)COOH, HCl, NO(2) and O(3)] were selected to probe the surface of seven different types of combustion aerosol samples (amorphous carbon, flame soot) and three types of TiO(2) nanoparticles using heterogeneous, i.e. gas-surface reactions. The gas uptake to saturation of the probes was measured under molecular flow conditions in a Knudsen flow reactor and expressed as a density of surface functional groups on a particular aerosol, namely acidic (carboxylic) and basic (conjugated oxides such as pyrone, N-heterocycle and amine) sites, carbonyl (R(1)-C(O)-R(2)) and oxidizable (olefinic, -OH) groups. The limit of detection was generally well below 1% of a formal monolayer of adsorbed probe gas. With few exceptions most investigated aerosol samples interacted with all probe gases to various extents which points to the coexistence of different functional groups on the same aerosol surface such as acidic and basic groups. Generally, the carbonaceous particles displayed significant differences in surface group density: Printex 60 amorphous carbon had the lowest density of surface functional groups throughout, whereas Diesel soot recovered from a Diesel particulate filter had the largest. The presence of basic oxides on carbonaceous aerosol particles was inferred from the ratio of uptakes of CF(3)COOH and HCl owing to the larger stability of the acetate compared to the chloride counterion in the resulting pyrylium salt. Both soots generated from a rich and a lean hexane diffusion flame had a large density of oxidizable groups similar to amorphous carbon FS 101. TiO(2) 15 had the lowest density of functional groups studied for all probe gases among the three TiO(2) nanoparticles despite the smallest size of its primary particles. The technique used enabled the measurement of the uptake probability of the probe gases on the various supported aerosol samples. The initial uptake probability, gamma(0), of the probe gas onto the supported

  1. Functional Groups Based on Leaf Physiology: Are they Spatially and Temporally Robust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Tammy E.; Brooks, J. Renee

    2004-01-01

    The functional grouping hypothesis, which suggests that complexity in ecosystem function can be simplified by grouping species with similar responses, was tested in the Florida scrub habitat. Functional groups were identified based on how species in fire maintained Florida scrub regulate exchange of carbon and water with the atmosphere as indicated by both instantaneous gas exchange measurements and integrated measures of function (%N, delta C-13, delta N-15, C-N ratio). Using cluster analysis, five distinct physiologically-based functional groups were identified in the fire maintained scrub. These functional groups were tested to determine if they were robust spatially, temporally, and with management regime. Analysis of Similarities (ANOSIM), a non-parametric multivariate analysis, indicated that these five physiologically-based groupings were not altered by plot differences (R = -0.115, p = 0.893) or by the three different management regimes; prescribed burn, mechanically treated and burn, and fire-suppressed (R = 0.018, p = 0.349). The physiological groupings also remained robust between the two climatically different years 1999 and 2000 (R = -0.027, p = 0.725). Easy-to-measure morphological characteristics indicating functional groups would be more practical for scaling and modeling ecosystem processes than detailed gas-exchange measurements, therefore we tested a variety of morphological characteristics as functional indicators. A combination of non-parametric multivariate techniques (Hierarchical cluster analysis, non-metric Multi-Dimensional Scaling, and ANOSIM) were used to compare the ability of life form, leaf thickness, and specific leaf area classifications to identify the physiologically-based functional groups. Life form classifications (ANOSIM; R = 0.629, p 0.001) were able to depict the physiological groupings more adequately than either specific leaf area (ANOSIM; R = 0.426, p = 0.001) or leaf thickness (ANOSIM; R 0.344, p 0.001). The ability of

  2. A mechanistic analysis of the increase in the thermal stability of proteins in aqueous carboxylic acid salt solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, J. K.; Bhat, R.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of proteins is known to be affected significantly in the presence of high concentration of salts and is highly pH dependent. Extensive studies have been carried out on the stability of proteins in the presence of simple electrolytes and evaluated in terms of preferential interactions and increase in the surface tension of the medium. We have carried out an in-depth study of the effects of a series of carboxylic acid salts: ethylene diamine tetra acetate, butane tetra carboxylate, propane tricarballylate, citrate, succinate, tartarate, malonate, and gluconate on the thermal stability of five different proteins that vary in their physico-chemical properties: RNase A, cytochrome c, trypsin inhibitor, myoglobin, and lysozyme. Surface tension measurements of aqueous solutions of the salts indicate an increase in the surface tension of the medium that is very strongly correlated with the increase in the thermal stability of proteins. There is also a linear correlation of the increase in thermal stability with the number of carboxylic groups in the salt. Thermal stability has been found to increase by as much as 22 C at 1 M concentration of salt. Such a high thermal stability at identical concentrations has not been reported before. The differences in the heat capacities of denaturation, deltaCp for RNase A, deduced from the transition curves obtained in the presence of varying concentrations of GdmCl and that of carboxylic acid salts as a function of pH, indicate that the nature of the solvent medium and its interactions with the two end states of the protein control the thermodynamics of protein denaturation. Among the physico-chemical properties of proteins, there seems to be an interplay of the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that lead to an overall stabilizing effect. Increase in surface free energy of the solvent medium upon addition of the carboxylic acid salts appears to be the dominant factor in governing the thermal stability of proteins

  3. Percolation galaxy groups and clusters in the sdss redshift survey: identification, catalogs, and the multiplicity function

    SciTech Connect

    Berlind, Andreas A.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Weinberg, David H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Warren, Michael S.; Abazajian, Kevork; Scranton, Ryan; Hogg, David W.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, J.; Gott, J.Richard, III; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, J.; Lee, Brian C.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nitta, Atsuko; Schneider, Donald P.; Tucker, Douglas L.; Zehavi, Idit; /CCPP, New York /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Los Alamos /Pittsburgh U. /Princeton U. /Subaru Telescope /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /LBL, Berkeley /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Fermilab /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Case Western Reserve U.

    2006-01-01

    We identify galaxy groups and clusters in volume-limited samples of the SDSS redshift survey, using a redshift-space friends-of-friends algorithm. We optimize the friends-of-friends linking lengths to recover galaxy systems that occupy the same dark matter halos, using a set of mock catalogs created by populating halos of N-body simulations with galaxies. Extensive tests with these mock catalogs show that no combination of perpendicular and line-of-sight linking lengths is able to yield groups and clusters that simultaneously recover the true halo multiplicity function, projected size distribution, and velocity dispersion. We adopt a linking length combination that yields, for galaxy groups with ten or more members: a group multiplicity function that is unbiased with respect to the true halo multiplicity function; an unbiased median relation between the multiplicities of groups and their associated halos; a spurious group fraction of less than {approx}1%; a halo completeness of more than {approx}97%; the correct projected size distribution as a function of multiplicity; and a velocity dispersion distribution that is {approx}20% too low at all multiplicities. These results hold over a range of mock catalogs that use different input recipes of populating halos with galaxies. We apply our group-finding algorithm to the SDSS data and obtain three group and cluster catalogs for three volume-limited samples that cover 3495.1 square degrees on the sky. We correct for incompleteness caused by fiber collisions and survey edges, and obtain measurements of the group multiplicity function, with errors calculated from realistic mock catalogs. These multiplicity function measurements provide a key constraint on the relation between galaxy populations and dark matter halos.

  4. Loop expansion of the average effective action in the functional renormalization group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, Peter M.; Merzlikin, Boris S.

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a perturbation expansion for the effective action in a new approach to the functional renormalization group method based on the concept of composite fields for regulator functions being their most essential ingredients. We demonstrate explicitly the principal difference between the properties of effective actions in these two approaches existing already on the one-loop level in a simple gauge model.

  5. New method of the functional renormalization group approach for Yang-Mills fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, P. M.; Shapiro, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new formulation of the functional renormalization group (FRG) approach, based on the use of regulator functions as composite operators. In this case one can provide (in contrast with standard approach) on-shell gauge-invariance for the effective average action.

  6. Lung function decline rates according to GOLD group in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joohae; Yoon, Ho Il; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lim, Seong Yong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Sang Yeub; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) groups A–D were introduced, the lung function changes according to group have been evaluated rarely. Objective We investigated the rate of decline in annual lung function in patients categorized according to the 2014 GOLD guidelines. Methods Patients with COPD included in the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease (KOLD) prospective study, who underwent yearly postbronchodilator spirometry at least three times, were included. The main outcome was the annual decline in postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), which was analyzed by random-slope and random-intercept mixed linear regression. Results A total 175 participants were included. No significant postbronchodilator FEV1 decline was observed between the groups (−34.4±7.9 [group A]; −26.2±9.4 [group B]; −22.7±16.0 [group C]; and −24.0±8.7 mL/year [group D]) (P=0.79). The group with less symptoms (−32.3±7.2 vs −25.0±6.5 mL/year) (P=0.44) and the low risk group (−31.0±6.1 vs −23.6±7.7 mL/year) (P=0.44) at baseline showed a more rapid decline in the postbronchodilator FEV1, but the trends were not statistically significant. However, GOLD stages classified by FEV1 were significantly related to the annual lung function decline. Conclusion There was no significant difference in lung function decline rates according to the GOLD groups. Prior classification using postbronchodilator FEV1 predicts decline in lung function better than does the new classification. PMID:26379432

  7. The electrokinetic characterization of gold nanoparticles, functionalized with cationic functional groups, and its' interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Geraldine Genevive; Revaprasadu, Neerish; López-Viota, Julián; Singh, Moganavelli

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted strong biomedical interest for drug delivery due to their low toxic nature, surface plasmon resonance and capability of increasing the stability of the payload. However, gene transfection represents another important biological application. Considering that cellular barriers keep enclosed their secret to deliver genes using nanoparticles, an important step can be achieved by studying the functionalization of nanoparticles with DNA. In the present contribution the synthesis of nanoparticles consisting of a gold core coated with one or more layers of amino acid (l-lysine), and cationic polyelectrolytes (poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine) is reported. All nanoparticles were subjected to dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility measurements, UV-vis optical spectrophotometry analysis and transmission electron microscopy imaging. In addition, the adsorption of DNA plasmid (pSGS) with linear and supercoiled configurations was studied for those gold nanoparticles under the most suitable surface modifications. Preliminary results showed that the gold nanoparticles functionalized with poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine, respectively, and bound to linear DNA configurations, present in absolute value a higher electrophoretic mobility irrespective of the pH of the media, compared to the supercoiled and nicked configuration. The findings from this study suggest that poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine functionalized gold nanoparticles are biocompatible and may be promising in the chemical design and future optimization of nanostructures for biomedical applications such as gene and drug delivery.

  8. Study of cytotoxic effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with different chemical groups on human MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Maoyong; Zeng, Luzhe; Yuan, Shaopeng; Yin, Junfa; Wang, Hailin; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-07-01

    Functionalization is an important technique to increase the solubility and biocompatibility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of four types of SWCNTs functionalized with hydroxyl, amino, carboxyl and polyethyleneglycol on MCF7 cells. These functionalized SWCNTs (f-SWCNTs) have insignificant effects on mitochondrial activity and ROS production in MCF7 cells at all test concentrations. However, explicit results revealed that all the tested f-SWCNTs could cause changes of cell morphology, induce cell membrane damage, decrease cell adhesion, and increase cell apoptosis. Therefore, this study shows the potential side effects of f-SWCNTs accompanying with the increase of dispersibility and stability in environment or serum (to prevent their aggregation), and highlights the need for further research to examine the potential toxicity of f-SWCNTs before they are used in the environmental and biomedical fields.

  9. First principles investigations on the electronic structure of anchor groups on ZnO nanowires and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, A.; Lorke, M.; Rosa, A. L.; Frauenheim, Th.; Schoenhalz, A. L.; Dalpian, G. M.; Rocha, A. R.

    2014-05-28

    We report on density functional theory investigations of the electronic properties of monofunctional ligands adsorbed on ZnO-(1010) surfaces and ZnO nanowires using semi-local and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals. We consider three anchor groups, namely thiol, amino, and carboxyl groups. Our results indicate that neither the carboxyl nor the amino group modify the transport and conductivity properties of ZnO. In contrast, the modification of the ZnO surface and nanostructure with thiol leads to insertion of molecular states in the band gap, thus suggesting that functionalization with this moiety may customize the optical properties of ZnO nanomaterials.

  10. Functional specialization and generalization for grouping of stimuli based on colour and motion

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Semir; Stutters, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to learn whether the principle of functional specialization that is evident at the level of the prestriate visual cortex extends to areas that are involved in grouping visual stimuli according to attribute, and specifically according to colour and motion. Subjects viewed, in an fMRI scanner, visual stimuli composed of moving dots, which could be either coloured or achromatic; in some stimuli the moving coloured dots were randomly distributed or moved in random directions; in others, some of the moving dots were grouped together according to colour or to direction of motion, with the number of groupings varying from 1 to 3. Increased activation was observed in area V4 in response to colour grouping and in V5 in response to motion grouping while both groupings led to activity in separate though contiguous compartments within the intraparietal cortex. The activity in all the above areas was parametrically related to the number of groupings, as was the prominent activity in Crus I of the cerebellum where the activity resulting from the two types of grouping overlapped. This suggests (a) that, the specialized visual areas of the prestriate cortex have functions beyond the processing of visual signals according to attribute, namely that of grouping signals according to colour (V4) or motion (V5); (b) that the functional separation evident in visual cortical areas devoted to motion and colour, respectively, is maintained at the level of parietal cortex, at least as far as grouping according to attribute is concerned; and (c) that, by contrast, this grouping-related functional segregation is not maintained at the level of the cerebellum. PMID:23415950

  11. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups.

  12. The impact of functional group on the electronic structure of coordination center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshmand Gharehbagh, Zahra; L, Duy; Rahman, Talat S.

    While 9, 10 dicyano-anthracene (DCA) forms a coordination network on Cu(111) surface with Cu adatom coordinated by three DCA molecules, its isomers, 9,10-diisocyano-anthracene forms, surprisingly, molecular rows on the same surface. To understand the impact of functional groups on the electronic structure of the coordination center, we have carried out density functional theory based calculations of the electronic structure of a set of naphthalene molecules with different functional groups (N, CN, NC, NH2, COH, COOH) adsorbed on Cu(111), with and without a Cu adatom. Our results show that while the interaction between the naphthalene backbone and the Cu(111) surface is dominated by van der Waals (vdW) forces, in all cases considered the functional group forms a covalent bond with the Cu (ad)atom (on) of the surface. The calculated differential charge redistribution shows that the strongest covalent bond is formed by the NC group, which differs remarkably from that formed by the CN group, while the vdW interaction is very similar in both cases. These results provide insights into the different surface coordination behavior of molecules with above-mentioned functional groups. Work support in part by NSF Grant CHE-1310327.

  13. Clickable SBA-15 to screen functional groups for adsorption of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinsuo; Zhang, Xueying; Xu, Shutao; Liu, Jian; Tan, Feng; Li, Xinyong; Qu, Zhenping; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie

    2014-03-01

    Pharmaceutical antibiotics, as emerging contaminants, are usually composed of several functional groups that endow them with the ability to interact with adsorbents through different interactions. This makes the preparation of adsorbents tedious and time-consuming to screen appropriate functionalized materials. Herein, we describe the synthesis of clickable SBA-15 and demonstrate its feasibility as a screening material for the adsorption of antibiotics based on similar adsorption trends on materials with similar functional groups obtained by a click reaction and cocondensation/grafting methods.

  14. The Role of Reactive Functional Groups in Adhesive Bonding at the Aramid-Epoxy Interface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-15

    sta end ZIP CeO . 800 North Quincy Street i-q ?AiI 3 Arlington, VA 22217 " ae’Iv o. ’to. 6 -o. !The Role of Reactive Functional . . . 1 12. onsRonfaI...Unclassified SICUMI VY’V Ct.ASSiiICATyO OP ’T-S PAGE I Cont ... 11. The Role of Reactive Functional Groups in Adhesive Bonding at the Aramid-Epoxy...T-1 ROLE OF REACTIVE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN ADHESIVI 3ODI;G AT THE ARA fID-EPOXY INTIFA> BY L.S. PENN, T.J. BYERLEY, AND T.K. LIAO 1IDWEST RESEARCR

  15. GPU-based parallel group ICA for functional magnetic resonance data.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yanshan; Zeng, Weiming; Wang, Nizhuan; Ren, Tianlong; Shi, Yingchao; Yin, Jun; Xu, Qi

    2015-04-01

    The goal of our study is to develop a fast parallel implementation of group independent component analysis (ICA) for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using graphics processing units (GPU). Though ICA has become a standard method to identify brain functional connectivity of the fMRI data, it is computationally intensive, especially has a huge cost for the group data analysis. GPU with higher parallel computation power and lower cost are used for general purpose computing, which could contribute to fMRI data analysis significantly. In this study, a parallel group ICA (PGICA) on GPU, mainly consisting of GPU-based PCA using SVD and Infomax-ICA, is presented. In comparison to the serial group ICA, the proposed method demonstrated both significant speedup with 6-11 times and comparable accuracy of functional networks in our experiments. This proposed method is expected to perform the real-time post-processing for fMRI data analysis.

  16. Arrival order among native plant functional groups does not affect invasibility of constructed dune communities.

    PubMed

    Mason, T J; French, K; Jolley, D

    2013-10-01

    Different arrival order scenarios of native functional groups to a site may influence both resource use during development and final community structure. Arrival order may then indirectly influence community resistance to invasion. We present a mesocosm experiment of constructed coastal dune communities that monitored biotic and abiotic responses to different arrival orders of native functional groups. Constructed communities were compared with unplanted mesocosms. We then simulated a single invasion event by bitou (Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata), a dominant exotic shrub of coastal communities. We evaluated the hypothesis that plantings with simultaneous representation of grass, herb and shrub functional groups at the beginning of the experiment would more completely sequester resources and limit invasion than staggered plantings. Staggered plantings in turn would offer greater resource use and invasion resistance than unplanted mesocosms. Contrary to our expectations, there were few effects of arrival order on abiotic variables for the duration of the experiment and arrival order was unimportant in final community invasibility. All planted mesocosms supported significantly more invader germinants and significantly less invader abundance than unplanted mesocosms. Native functional group plantings may have a nurse effect during the invader germination and establishment phase and a competitive function during the invader juvenile and adult phase. Arrival order per se did not affect resource use and community invasibility in our mesocosm experiment. While grass, herb and shrub functional group plantings will not prevent invasion success in restored communities, they may limit final invader biomass.

  17. Driving factors of the phytoplankton functional groups in a deep Mediterranean reservoir.

    PubMed

    Becker, Vanessa; Caputo, Luciano; Ordóñez, Jaime; Marcé, Rafael; Armengol, Joan; Crossetti, Luciane O; Huszar, Vera L M

    2010-06-01

    The control of phytoplankton growth is mainly related to the availability of light and nutrients. Both may select phytoplankton species, but only if they occur in limiting amounts. During the last decade, the functional groups approach, based on the physiological, morphological and ecological attributes of the species, has proved to be a more efficient way to analyze seasonal changes in phytoplankton biomass. We analysed the dynamics of the phytoplankton functional groups sensu Reynolds, recognising the driving forces (light, mixing regime, and nutrients) in the Sau Reservoir, based on a one-year cycle (monthly surface-water sampling). The Sau Reservoir is a Mediterranean water-supply reservoir with a canyon-shaped basin and a clear and mixed epilimnion layer. The long stratification period and high light availability led to high phytoplankton biomass (110.8 fresh-weight mg L(-1)) in the epilimnion during summer. The reservoir showed P-limitation for phytoplankton growth in this period. All functional groups included one or more species (X2-Rhodomonas spp.; Y-Cryptomonas spp.; F-Oocystis lacustris; K-Aphanocapsa spp.) selected by resources, especially phosphorus. Species of Cryptomonas (group Y) dominated during the mixing period (winter season) in conditions of low light and relatively high availability of dissolved nutrients. Increases in water-column stability during spring stratification led to phytoplankton biomass increases due to the dominance of small flagellate functional groups (X2 and X3, chrysophyceans). The colonial chlorophycean O. lacustris (group F) peaked during the mid-summer stratification, when the mixed epilimnion was clearly depleted in nutrients, especially SRP. High temperature and increases in nutrient concentration during the end-summer and mid-autumn resulted in a decrease of green algae (group F) and increase of Aphanocapsa spp. (cyanobacteria, group K) and dinoflagellates (group L(o)). The study also revealed the important role of

  18. In-medium spectral functions of vector- and axial-vector mesons from the functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Christopher; Rennecke, Fabian; Tripolt, Ralf-Arno; von Smekal, Lorenz; Wambach, Jochen

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present the first results on vector- and axial-vector meson spectral functions as obtained by applying the nonperturbative functional renormalization group approach to an effective low-energy theory motivated by the gauged linear sigma model. By using a recently proposed analytic continuation method, we study the in-medium behavior of the spectral functions of the ρ and a1 mesons in different regimes of the phase diagram. In particular, we demonstrate explicitly how these spectral functions degenerate at high temperatures as well as at large chemical potentials, as a consequence of the restoration of chiral symmetry. In addition, we also compute the momentum dependence of the ρ and a1 spectral functions and discuss the various timelike and spacelike processes that can occur.

  19. Modeling phytoplankton community in reservoirs. A comparison between taxonomic and functional groups-based models.

    PubMed

    Di Maggio, Jimena; Fernández, Carolina; Parodi, Elisa R; Diaz, M Soledad; Estrada, Vanina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we address the formulation of two mechanistic water quality models that differ in the way the phytoplankton community is described. We carry out parameter estimation subject to differential-algebraic constraints and validation for each model and comparison between models performance. The first approach aggregates phytoplankton species based on their phylogenetic characteristics (Taxonomic group model) and the second one, on their morpho-functional properties following Reynolds' classification (Functional group model). The latter approach takes into account tolerance and sensitivity to environmental conditions. The constrained parameter estimation problems are formulated within an equation oriented framework, with a maximum likelihood objective function. The study site is Paso de las Piedras Reservoir (Argentina), which supplies water for consumption for 450,000 population. Numerical results show that phytoplankton morpho-functional groups more closely represent each species growth requirements within the group. Each model performance is quantitatively assessed by three diagnostic measures. Parameter estimation results for seasonal dynamics of the phytoplankton community and main biogeochemical variables for a one-year time horizon are presented and compared for both models, showing the functional group model enhanced performance. Finally, we explore increasing nutrient loading scenarios and predict their effect on phytoplankton dynamics throughout a one-year time horizon.

  20. Local and Regional Determinants of an Uncommon Functional Group in Freshwater Lakes and Ponds

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    A combination of local and regional factors and stochastic forces is expected to determine the occurrence of species and the structure of communities. However, in most cases, our understanding is incomplete, with large amounts of unexplained variation. Using functional groups rather than individual species may help explain the relationship between community composition and conditions. In this study, I used survey data from freshwater lakes and ponds to understand factors that determine the presence of the floating plant functional group in the northeast United States. Of the 176 water bodies surveyed, 104 (59.1%) did not contain any floating plant species. The occurrence of this functional group was largely determined by local abiotic conditions, which were spatially autocorrelated across the region. A model predicting the presence of the floating plant functional group performed similarly to the best species-specific models. Using a permutation test, I also found that the observed prevalence of floating plants is no different than expected by random assembly from a species pool of its size. These results suggest that the size of the species pool interacts with local conditions in determining the presence of a functional group. Nevertheless, a large amount of unexplained variation remains, attributable to either stochastic species occurrence or incomplete predictive models. The simple permutation approach in this study can be extended to test alternative models of community assembly. PMID:26121636

  1. The dual roles of functional groups in the photoluminescence of graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujun; Cole, Ivan S; Zhao, Dongyuan; Li, Qin

    2016-04-14

    The photoluminescent properties of graphene nanoparticle (named graphene quantum dots) have attracted significant research attention in recent years owing to their profound application potential. However, the photoluminescence (PL) origin of this class of nanocarbons is still unclear. In this paper, combining direct experimental evidence enabled by a facile size-tunable oxygenated graphene quantum dots (GQDs) synthesis method and theoretical calculations, the roles of the aromatic core, functional groups and disordered structures (i.e. defects and sp(3) carbon) in the PL of oxygenated GQDs are elucidated in detail. In particular, we found that the functional groups on GQDs play dual roles in the overall emission: (1) they enable π* → n and σ* → n transitions, resulting in a molecular type of PL, spectrally invariable with change of particle size or excitation energy; (2) similar to defects and sp(3) carbon, functional groups also induce structural deformation to the aromatic core, leading to mid-gap states or, in other words, energy traps, causing π* → mid-gap states → π transitions. Therefore, functional groups contribute to both the blue edge and the red shoulder of GQDs' PL spectra. The new insights on the role of functional groups in PL of fluorescent nanocarbons will enable better designs of this new class of materials.

  2. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  3. Slow-binding inhibitors of prolyl oligopeptidase with different functional groups at the P1 site.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Jarkko I; Juvonen, Risto O; Garcia-Horsman, J Arturo; Wallén, Erik A A; Christiaans, Johannes A M; Jarho, Elina M; Gynther, Jukka; Männistö, Pekka T

    2004-09-15

    POP (prolyl oligopeptidase) specifically hydrolyses a number of small proline-containing peptides at the carboxy end of the proline residue and POP inhibitors have been shown to have cognition-enhancing properties. It has been noted that certain functional groups at the P1 site of the inhibitor, which correspond to the substrate residue on the N-terminal side of the bond to be cleaved, increase the inhibitory potency. However, detailed mechanistic and kinetic analysis of the inhibition has not been studied. In the present study, we examined the effect of different functional groups at the P1 site of the parent inhibitor isophthalic acid bis-(L-prolylpyrrolidine) amide on the binding kinetics to POP. Addition of CHO, CN or COCH(2)OH groups to the P1 site increased the inhibitory potency by two orders of magnitude (K(i)=11.8-0.1 nM) and caused a clear slow-binding inhibition. The inhibitor containing a CHO group had the lowest association rate constant, k(on)=(2.43+/-0.12) x 10(5) M(-1) x s(-1), whereas the inhibitor with a CN group exhibited the fastest binding, k(on)=(12.0+/-0.08)x10(5) M(-1) x s(-1). In addition, the dissociation rate was found to be crucially dependent on the type of the functional group. Compounds with COCH(2)OH and CHO groups had much longer half-lives of dissociation (over 5 h) compared with the compound with the CN group (25 min), although the K(i) values of the compounds were relatively similar. A possibility to optimize the duration of inhibition by changing the functional group at the P1 site is important when planning therapeutically useful POP inhibitors.

  4. Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals by carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Preez, A.C. du; Preston, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    The solvent extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from nitrate media by solutions of carboxylic acids in xylene has been studied. Commercially available carboxylic acids such as Versatic 10 and naphthenic acids were used, as well as model compounds of known structure, such as 2-ethylhexanoic and 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acids. In a few cases, extraction of the metals from sulphate and chloride solutions was also investigated. The dependence of the extraction properties of the carboxylic acids on the atomic number of the lanthanide shows a definite relationship to the steric bulk of the carboxylic acid molecule quantified by means of the steric parameter, E{sub s}{prime} of the substituent alkyl group. The stoichiometries of the extracted complexes for representative light (La), middle (Gd) and heavy (Lu) rare-earth metals were investigated by the slope-analysis technique for a sterically hindered acid (Versatic 10 acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 3.83) and an acid with low steric hindrance (3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 0.28). 14 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Triclinic modification of diaqua-bis-(5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ato-κ(2)N(3),O(4))iron(II).

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Eriko; Yoshida, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Kazumasa; Uekusa, Hidehiro

    2012-08-01

    The title compound, [Fe(C(5)H(3)N(2)O(4))(2)(H(2)O)(2)], is a triclinic modification of a monoclinic form recently reported by Du et al. [Acta Cryst. (2011) ▶, E67, m997]. The Fe(II) ion lies at an inversion center and is coordinated by two N and two O atoms from two 5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate ligands in trans positions, together with two water mol-ecules, completing a slightly distorted octahedral coordination. Inter-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding between the N-H group of the imidazole ring and the deprotonated carboxyl-ate group builds a chain of 5-carb-oxy-1H-imidazole-4-carboxyl-ate anions along the [101] direction. The water molecules form intermolecular hydrogen bonds to O-C and O=C sites of the carboxylate group in adjacent layers.

  6. Glass transition of polystyrene (PS) studied by Raman spectroscopic investigation of its phenyl functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldo Menezes, D.; Reyer, A.; Marletta, A.; Musso, M.

    2017-01-01

    In polymeric materials the glass transition (GT) is a well-known and very important relaxation process related to movements of functional groups in the polymeric chain. In this work, we show the potential of Raman spectroscopy for exploring the GT process in the polymer polystyrene. We collected Raman spectra during a step-by-step heating process of the sample, which allowed us to collect signatures of the GT process from peak parameters of specific vibrational modes, and to verify the GT temperature. Results of the latter were in accordance with published values obtained via other methods. We identified the aromatic ring vibrational modes of the phenyl functional groups to be those which, due to steric hindrance, suffer the largest influence during the GT process. This confirms that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a complementary technique to perform GT investigations in polymeric materials due to its sensitivity to small intermolecular changes affecting vibrational properties of relevant functional side groups.

  7. Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics: A group representation based construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan; Ali, S. Twareque

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the construction and analysis of the Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics, their marginal distributions, and star-products, following a technique developed earlier, viz, using the unitary irreducible representations of the group GNC, which is the three fold central extension of the Abelian group of ℝ4. These representations have been exhaustively studied in earlier papers. The group GNC is identified with the kinematical symmetry group of noncommutative quantum mechanics of a system with two degrees of freedom. The Wigner functions studied here reflect different levels of non-commutativity—both the operators of position and those of momentum not commuting, the position operators not commuting and finally, the case of standard quantum mechanics, obeying the canonical commutation relations only.

  8. Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics: A group representation based construction

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan; Ali, S. Twareque

    2015-12-15

    This paper is devoted to the construction and analysis of the Wigner functions for noncommutative quantum mechanics, their marginal distributions, and star-products, following a technique developed earlier, viz, using the unitary irreducible representations of the group G{sub NC}, which is the three fold central extension of the Abelian group of ℝ{sup 4}. These representations have been exhaustively studied in earlier papers. The group G{sub NC} is identified with the kinematical symmetry group of noncommutative quantum mechanics of a system with two degrees of freedom. The Wigner functions studied here reflect different levels of non-commutativity—both the operators of position and those of momentum not commuting, the position operators not commuting and finally, the case of standard quantum mechanics, obeying the canonical commutation relations only.

  9. Functional grouping and cortical–subcortical interactions in emotion: A meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Hedy; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Joseph, Josh; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Lindquist, Kristen; Wager, Tor D.

    2009-01-01

    We performed an updated quantitative meta-analysis of 162 neuroimaging studies of emotion using a novel multi-level kernel-based approach, focusing on locating brain regions consistently activated in emotional tasks and their functional organization into distributed functional groups, independent of semantically defined emotion category labels (e.g., “anger,” “fear”). Such brain-based analyses are critical if our ways of labeling emotions are to be evaluated and revised based on consistency with brain data. Consistent activations were limited to specific cortical sub-regions, including multiple functional areas within medial, orbital, and inferior lateral frontal cortices. Consistent with a wealth of animal literature, multiple subcortical activations were identified, including amygdala, ventral striatum, thalamus, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. We used multivariate parcellation and clustering techniques to identify groups of co-activated brain regions across studies. These analyses identified six distributed functional groups, including medial and lateral frontal groups, two posterior cortical groups, and paralimbic and core limbic/brainstem groups. These functional groups provide information on potential organization of brain regions into large-scale networks. Specific follow-up analyses focused on amygdala, periaqueductal gray (PAG), and hypothalamic (Hy) activations, and identified frontal cortical areas co-activated with these core limbic structures. While multiple areas of frontal cortex co-activated with amygdala sub-regions, a specific region of dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC, Brodmann’s Area 9/32) was the only area co-activated with both PAG and Hy. Subsequent mediation analyses were consistent with a pathway from dmPFC through PAG to Hy. These results suggest that medial frontal areas are more closely associated with core limbic activation than their lateral counterparts, and that dmPFC may play a particularly important role in the

  10. Carboxylic Acids Plasma Membrane Transporters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Casal, Margarida; Queirós, Odília; Talaia, Gabriel; Ribas, David; Paiva, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    This chapter covers the functionally characterized plasma membrane carboxylic acids transporters Jen1, Ady2, Fps1 and Pdr12 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, addressing also their homologues in other microorganisms, as filamentous fungi and bacteria. Carboxylic acids can either be transported into the cells, to be used as nutrients, or extruded in response to acid stress conditions. The secondary active transporters Jen1 and Ady2 can mediate the uptake of the anionic form of these substrates by a H(+)-symport mechanism. The undissociated form of carboxylic acids is lipid-soluble, crossing the plasma membrane by simple diffusion. Furthermore, acetic acid can also be transported by facilitated diffusion via Fps1 channel. At the cytoplasmic physiological pH, the anionic form of the acid prevails and it can be exported by the Pdr12 pump. This review will highlight the mechanisms involving carboxylic acids transporters, and the way they operate according to the yeast cell response to environmental changes, as carbon source availability, extracellular pH and acid stress conditions.

  11. Functional network organizations of two contrasting temperament groups in dimensions of novelty seeking and harm avoidance.

    PubMed

    Kyeong, Sunghyon; Kim, Eunjoo; Park, Hae-Jeong; Hwang, Dong-Uk

    2014-08-05

    Novelty seeking (NS) and harm avoidance (HA) are two major dimensions of temperament in Cloninger׳s neurobiological model of personality. Previous neurofunctional and biological studies on temperament dimensions of HA and NS suggested that the temperamental traits have significant correlations with cortical and subcortical brain regions. However, no study to date has investigated the functional network modular organization as a function of the temperament dimension. The temperament dimensions were originally proposed to be independent of one another. However, a meta-analysis based on 16 published articles found a significant negative correlation between HA and NS (Miettunen et al., 2008). Based on this negative correlation, the current study revealed the whole-brain connectivity modular architecture for two contrasting temperament groups. The k-means clustering algorithm, with the temperamental traits of HA and NS as an input, was applied to divide the 40 subjects into two temperament groups: 'high HA and low NS' versus 'low HA and high NS'. Using the graph theoretical framework, we found a functional segregation of whole brain network architectures derived from resting-state functional MRI. In the 'high HA and low NS' group, the regulatory brain regions, such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC), are clustered together with the limbic system. In the 'low HA and high NS' group, however, brain regions lying on the dopaminergic pathways, such as the PFC and basal ganglia, are partitioned together. These findings suggest that the neural basis of inhibited, passive, and inactive behaviors in the 'high HA and low NS' group was derived from the increased network associations between the PFC and limbic clusters. In addition, supporting evidence of topological differences between the two temperament groups was found by analyzing the functional connectivity density and gray matter volume, and by computing the relationships between the morphometry and function of the brain.

  12. Hydrological-niche models predict water plant functional group distributions in diverse wetland types.

    PubMed

    Deane, David C; Nicol, Jason M; Gehrig, Susan L; Harding, Claire; Aldridge, Kane T; Goodman, Abigail M; Brookes, Justin D

    2017-03-06

    Human use of water resources threatens environmental water supplies. If resource managers are to develop policies that avoid unacceptable ecological impacts, some means to predict ecosystem response to changes in water availability is necessary. This is difficult to achieve at spatial-scales relevant for water resource management because of the high natural variability in ecosystem hydrology and ecology. Water plant functional groups classify species with similar hydrological niche preferences together, allowing a qualitative means to generalise community responses to changes in hydrology. We tested the potential for functional groups in making quantitative prediction of water-plant-functional-group distributions across diverse wetland types over a large geographical extent. We sampled wetlands covering a broad range of hydrogeomorphic and salinity conditions in South Australia, collecting both hydrological and floristic data from 697 quadrats across 28 wetland hydrological gradients. We built hydrological-niche models for eight water plant functional groups using a range of candidate models combining different surface inundation metrics. We then tested the predictive performance of top-ranked individual and averaged models for each functional group. Cross validation showed models achieved acceptable predictive performance, with correct classification rates in the range 0.68 - 0.95. Model predictions can be made at any spatial scale that hydrological data are available and could be implemented in a geographical information system. We show the response of water plant functional groups to inundation is consistent enough across diverse wetland types to quantify the probability of hydrological impacts over regional spatial scales. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced by fermentation.

    PubMed

    López-Garzón, Camilo S; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylic acids such as citric, lactic, succinic and itaconic acids are useful products and are obtained on large scale by fermentation. This review describes the options for recovering these and other fermentative carboxylic acids. After cell removal, often a primary recovery step is performed, using liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption, precipitation or conventional electrodialysis. If the carboxylate is formed rather than the carboxylic acid, the recovery process involves a step for removing the cation of the formed carboxylate. Then, bipolar electrodialysis and thermal methods for salt splitting can prevent that waste inorganic salts are co-produced. Final carboxylic acid purification requires either distillation or crystallization, usually involving evaporation of water. Process steps can often be combined synergistically. In-situ removal of carboxylic acid by extraction during fermentation is the most popular approach. Recovery of the extractant can easily lead to waste inorganic salt formation, which counteracts the advantage of the in-situ removal. For industrial production, various recovery principles and configurations are used, because the fermentation conditions and physical properties of specific carboxylic acids differ.

  14. Application of palladium-catalyzed carboxyl anhydride-boronic acid cross coupling in the synthesis of novel bile acids analogs with modified side chains.

    PubMed

    Mayorquín-Torres, Martha C; Flores-Álamo, Marcos; Iglesias-Arteaga, Martin A

    2015-09-01

    Palladium-catalyzed cross coupling of 4-methoxycarbonyl phenyboronic acid with acetylated bile acids in which the carboxyl functions was activated by formation of a mixed anhydride with pivalic anhydride afforded the cross coupled compounds, which were converted in novel side chain modified bile acids by one pot carbonyl reduction/removal of the protecting acetyl groups by Wolff-Kishner reduction. Unambiguous assignments of the NMR signals and crystal characterization of the heretofore unknown compounds are provided.

  15. Protection and deprotection approach for the introduction of functional groups into metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Teppei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2009-05-13

    A noncoordinating hydroxyl group was introduced into a metal-organic framework (MOF) by a procedure involving a protection, complexation, and deprotection (PCD) reaction sequence, and the crystal structure of a novel MOF, [Zn(dhybdc)(bpy)] x 4 DMF (1), was determined. 1 did not have an interpenetrated structure. The three-dimensional pores had large apertures. Results showed that the PCD method is a novel synthetic method for the introduction of various functional groups into MOFs.

  16. Testing Group Differences in Brain Functional Connectivity: Using Correlations or Partial Correlations?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Wozniak, Jeffrey R.; Mueller, Bryon A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows one to study brain functional connectivity, partly motivated by evidence that patients with complex disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, may have altered functional brain connectivity patterns as compared with healthy subjects. A functional connectivity network describes statistical associations of the neural activities among distinct and distant brain regions. Recently, there is a major interest in group-level functional network analysis; however, there is a relative lack of studies on statistical inference, such as significance testing for group comparisons. In particular, it is still debatable which statistic should be used to measure pairwise associations as the connectivity weights. Many functional connectivity studies have used either (full or marginal) correlations or partial correlations for pairwise associations. This article investigates the performance of using either correlations or partial correlations for testing group differences in brain connectivity, and how sparsity levels and topological structures of the connectivity would influence statistical power to detect group differences. Our results suggest that, in general, testing group differences in networks deviates from estimating networks. For example, high regularization in both covariance matrices and precision matrices may lead to higher statistical power; in particular, optimally selected regularization (e.g., by cross-validation or even at the true sparsity level) on the precision matrices with small estimation errors may have low power. Most importantly, and perhaps surprisingly, using either correlations or partial correlations may give very different testing results, depending on which of the covariance matrices and the precision matrices are sparse. Specifically, if the precision matrices are sparse, presumably and arguably a reasonable assumption, then using correlations often yields much higher powered and more

  17. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system.

  18. A novel joint sparse partial correlation method for estimating group functional networks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Advances in graph theory have provided a powerful tool to characterize brain networks. In particular, functional networks at group-level have great appeal to gain further insight into complex brain function, and to assess changes across disease conditions. These group networks, however, often have two main limitations. First, they are popularly estimated by directly averaging individual networks that are compromised by confounding variations. Secondly, functional networks have been estimated mainly through Pearson cross-correlation, without taking into account the influence of other regions. In this study, we propose a sparse group partial correlation method for robust estimation of functional networks based on a joint graphical models approach. To circumvent the issue of choosing the optimal regularization parameters, a stability selection method is employed to extract networks. The proposed method is, therefore, denoted as JGMSS. By applying JGMSS across simulated datasets, the resulting networks show consistently higher accuracy and sensitivity than those estimated using an alternative approach (the elastic-net regularization with stability selection, ENSS). The robustness of the JGMSS is evidenced by the independence of the estimated networks to choices of the initial set of regularization parameters. The performance of JGMSS in estimating group networks is further demonstrated with in vivo fMRI data (ASL and BOLD), which show that JGMSS can more robustly estimate brain hub regions at group-level and can better control intersubject variability than it is achieved using ENSS.

  19. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Interacting Proteins: Fine-Tuning Receptor Functions in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Francesconi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors mediate slow excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and are critical to activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, a cellular substrate of learning and memory. Dysregulated receptor signaling is implicated in neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from neurodevelopmental to neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling functions can be modulated by interacting proteins that mediate receptor trafficking, expression and coupling efficiency to signaling effectors. These interactions afford cell- or pathway-specific modulation to fine-tune receptor function, thus representing a potential target for pharmacological interventions in pathological conditions. PMID:27296642

  20. [Responses of ground arthropod functional groups to the enclosure of grazing grassland in desert steppe].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-tao; Li, Xue-bin; Xin, Ming; Ma, Lin; Liu, Kai

    2011-08-01

    With the support of the National Resources Monitoring Station in Yanchi County of Ningxia, an investigation was conducted on the ground arthropods, vegetations, and soil properties in the enclosed and un-enclosed grazing grassland in desert steppe. In the meantime, the functional groups of ground arthropods were classified according to their feeding habits. The ground arthropods in the desert steppe could be classified into four functional groups, i.e., predatory, phytophagous, saprophagous, and omnivorous, among which, predatory and phytophagous groups were dominant in quantity, and phytophagous and saprophagous groups were predominant in biomass, implying that the ground arthropod in desert steppe was mainly characterized by phytophagous arthropods. Enclosure increased the individual and group number of predatory, phytophagous, and omnivorous arthropods as well as the biomass of predatory and omnivorous arthropods, and enhanced the biodiversity of predatory and phytophagous arthropods, which was closely correlated with the vegetation recovery and soil environment improvement, and demonstrated that the enclosure of grazing grassland increased the diversity and complexity of ground arthropod functional groups in desert steppe. Nevertheless, the individual number and biomass of saprophagous arthropods decreased after the enclosure, reflecting the dependence of these arthropods on grazing grassland.

  1. Chemoselective Reduction and Alkylation of Carbonyl Functions Using Phosphonium Salts as an in Situ Protecting Groups.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Reiya; Fujioka, Hiromichi

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in the chemoselective reduction and alkylation of carbonyl functions using our in situ protection method is described. Methods that enable reversal or control of the reactivity of a carbonyl functional group are potentially useful. They open up new areas of synthetic organic chemistry and change the concept of retrosynthesis because they remove the need for complicated protection/deprotection sequences. In this account, we discuss the strategy and applications of our in situ protection method using phosphonium salts.

  2. A versatile route to polythiophenes with functional pendant groups using alkyne chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Emanuelsson, Rikard; Bergquist, Jonas; Strømme, Maria; Sjödin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A new versatile polythiophene building block, 3-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)prop-1-yne (pyEDOT) (3), is prepared from glycidol in four steps in 28% overall yield. pyEDOT features an ethynyl group on its ethylenedioxy bridge, allowing further functionalization by alkyne chemistry. Its usefulness is demonstrated by a series of functionalized polythiophene derivatives that were obtained by pre- and post-electropolymerization transformations, provided by the synthetic ease of the Sonogashira coupling and click chemistry. PMID:28144339

  3. Multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory: barrier heights and main group and transition metal energetics.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Rebecca K; Li Manni, Giovanni; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-01-13

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory, resting on the representation of the electronic density and kinetic energy by a single Slater determinant, has revolutionized chemistry, but for open-shell systems, the Kohn-Sham Slater determinant has the wrong symmetry properties as compared to an accurate wave function. We have recently proposed a theory, called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), in which the electronic kinetic energy and classical Coulomb energy are calculated from a multiconfiguration wave function with the correct symmetry properties, and the rest of the energy is calculated from a density functional, called the on-top density functional, that depends on the density and the on-top pair density calculated from this wave function. We also proposed a simple way to approximate the on-top density functional by translation of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals. The method is much less expensive than other post-SCF methods for calculating the dynamical correlation energy starting with a multiconfiguration self-consistent-field wave function as the reference wave function, and initial tests of the theory were quite encouraging. Here, we provide a broader test of the theory by applying it to bond energies of main-group molecules and transition metal complexes, barrier heights and reaction energies for diverse chemical reactions, proton affinities, and the water dimerization energy. Averaged over 56 data points, the mean unsigned error is 3.2 kcal/mol for MC-PDFT, as compared to 6.9 kcal/mol for Kohn-Sham theory with a comparable density functional. MC-PDFT is more accurate on average than complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) for main-group small-molecule bond energies, alkyl bond dissociation energies, transition-metal-ligand bond energies, proton affinities, and the water dimerization energy.

  4. Rsp5 WW domains interact directly with the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Chang, A; Cheang, S; Espanel, X; Sudol, M

    2000-07-07

    RSP5 is an essential gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was recently shown to form a physical and functional complex with RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II). The amino-terminal half of Rsp5 consists of four domains: a C2 domain, which binds membrane phospholipids; and three WW domains, which are protein interaction modules that bind proline-rich ligands. The carboxyl-terminal half of Rsp5 contains a HECT (homologous to E6-AP carboxyl terminus) domain that catalytically ligates ubiquitin to proteins and functionally classifies Rsp5 as an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. The C2 and WW domains are presumed to act as membrane localization and substrate recognition modules, respectively. We report that the second (and possibly third) Rsp5 WW domain mediates binding to the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA pol II large subunit. The CTD comprises a heptamer (YSPTSPS) repeated 26 times and a PXY core that is critical for interaction with a specific group of WW domains. An analysis of synthetic peptides revealed a minimal CTD sequence that is sufficient to bind to the second Rsp5 WW domain (Rsp5 WW2) in vitro and in yeast two-hybrid assays. Furthermore, we found that specific "imperfect" CTD repeats can form a complex with Rsp5 WW2. In addition, we have shown that phosphorylation of this minimal CTD sequence on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues acts as a negative regulator of the Rsp5 WW2-CTD interaction. In view of the recent data pertaining to phosphorylation-driven interactions between the RNA pol II CTD and the WW domain of Ess1/Pin1, we suggest that CTD dephosphorylation may be a prerequisite for targeted RNA pol II degradation.

  5. AFM Study of Surface Nanobubbles on Binary Self-Assembled Monolayers on Ultraflat Gold with Identical Macroscopic Static Water Contact Angles and Different Terminal Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Chen, Kun; Schmittel, Michael; Schönherr, Holger

    2016-11-01

    All experimental findings related to surface nanobubbles, such as their pronounced stability and the striking differences of macroscopic and apparent nanoscopic contact angles, need to be addressed in any theory or model of surface nanobubbles. In this work we critically test a recent explanation of surface nanobubble stability and their consequences and contrast this with previously proposed models. In particular, we elucidated the effect of surface chemical composition of well-controlled solid-aqueous interfaces of identical roughness and defect density on the apparent nanoscopic contact angles. Expanding on a previous atomic force microscopy (AFM) study on the systematic variation of the macroscopic wettability using binary self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on ultraflat template stripped gold (TSG), we assessed here the effect of different surface chemical composition for macroscopically identical static water contact angles. SAMs on TSG with a constant macroscopic water contact angle of 81 ± 2° were obtained by coadsorption of a methyl-terminated thiol and a second thiol with different terminal functional groups, including hydroxy, amino, and carboxylic acid groups. In addition, surface nanobubbles formed by entrainment of air on SAMs of a bromoisobutyrate-terminated thiol were analyzed by AFM. Despite the widely differing surface potentials and different functionality, such as hydrogen bond acceptor or donor, and different dipole moments and polarizability, the nanoscopic contact angles (measured through the condensed phase and corrected for AFM tip broadening effects) were found to be 145 ± 10° for all surfaces. Hence, different chemical functionalities at identical macroscopic static water contact angle do not noticeably influence the apparent nanoscopic contact angle of surface nanobubbles. This universal contact angle is in agreement with recent models that rely on contact line pinning and the equilibrium of gas outflux due to the Laplace pressure and

  6. Effect of carboxylic acid of periodic mesoporous organosilicas on the fructose-to-5-hydroxymethylfurfural conversion in dimethylsulfoxide systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Saikat; Wu, Kevin C.-W. E-mail: kevinwu@ntu.edu.tw; Kao, Hsien-Ming E-mail: kevinwu@ntu.edu.tw

    2014-11-01

    This manuscript presents the preparation and catalytic application of highly ordered benzene bridged periodic mesoporous organosilicas (PMOs) functionalized with carboxylic acid (–COOH) group at varied density. The COOH-functionalized PMOs were synthesized by one-step condensation of 1,4-bis (triethoxysilyl) benzene and carboxylic group containing organosilane carboxyethylsilanetriol sodium salt using Brij-76 as the template. The obtained materials were characterized by a mean of methods including powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, scanning- and transmission electron microscopy, and {sup 13}C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The potentials of the obtained PMO materials with ordered mesopores were examined as solid catalysts for the chemical conversion of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in an organic solvent. The results showed that COOH-functionalized PMO with 10% COOH loading exhibited best results for the fructose to HMF conversion and selectivity. The high surface area, the adequate density acid functional group, and the strength of the PMO materials contributing to a promising catalytic ability were observed.

  7. Do carboximide-carboxylic acid combinations form co-crystals? The role of hydroxyl substitution on the formation of co-crystals and eutectics.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Gautam, Raj; Cherukuvada, Suryanarayan; Guru Row, Tayur N

    2015-05-01

    Carboxylic acids, amides and imides are key organic systems which provide understanding of molecular recognition and binding phenomena important in biological and pharmaceutical settings. In this context, studies of their mutual interactions and compatibility through co-crystallization may pave the way for greater understanding and new applications of their combinations. Extensive co-crystallization studies are available for carboxylic acid/amide combinations, but only a few examples of carboxylic acid/imide co-crystals are currently observed in the literature. The non-formation of co-crystals for carboxylic acid/imide combinations has previously been rationalized, based on steric and computed stability factors. In the light of the growing awareness of eutectic mixtures as an alternative outcome in co-crystallization experiments, the nature of various benzoic acid/cyclic imide combinations is established in this paper. Since an additional functional group can provide sites for new intermolecular inter-actions and, potentially, promote supramolecular growth into a co-crystal, benzoic acids decorated with one or more hydroxyl groups have been systematically screened for co-crystallization with one unsaturated and two saturated cyclic imides. The facile formation of an abundant number of hydroxybenzoic acid/cyclic carboximide co-crystals is reported, including polymorphic and variable stoichiometry co-crystals. In the cases where co-crystals did not form, the combinations are shown invariably to result in eutectics. The presence or absence and geometric disposition of hydroxyl functionality on benzoic acid is thus found to drive the formation of co-crystals or eutectics for the studied carboxylic acid/imide combinations.

  8. Effect of surface groups on the electrocatalytic behaviour of Pt-Fe-Co alloy-dispersed carbon electrodes in the phosphoric acid fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyun, Su-Il; Lee, Seung-Bok

    Effect of surface group on the electrocatalytic behaviour of 10 wt.% Pt-Fe-Co alloy-dispersed carbon (Pt-Fe-Co/C) electrode has been investigated as functions of applied potential and duration in 85% H 3PO 4 solution of 145°C, using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, combined with ac-impedance spectroscopy, potentiostatic current transient technique, and potentiodynamic polarization experiment. It was shown from FTIR spectra that surface group formed in this work mainly comprises carboxyl group and that the formation potential of carboxyl group lies between 600 and 700 mV RHE. From increase of charge transfer resistance ( Rct), and decrease of electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction with immersion time, it is suggested that above the formation potential of carboxyl group, further formation of carboxyl group on the carbon support around the catalyst particle reduces active surface area of the catalyst particle with immersion time. On the other hand, below the formation potential, dissolution of carboxyl group previously formed on the carbon support raises active surface area of the catalyst particle. In the present study, relationship between electrocatalytic aspect of the electrode, and the amount of carboxyl group formed on the carbon support around the catalyst particle was well discussed with a schematic illustration. The illustrative representation is underlain by formation on and dissolution from the catalyst particle of carboxyl group which cause the rise and fall in circumferential coverage of carboxyl group, respectively and hence the reduction and elevation in active surface area of the catalyst particle.

  9. Social Resources and Change in Functional Health: Comparing Three Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, G. Kevin; Martin, Peter; Bishop, Alex J.; Johnson, Mary Ann; Poon, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the mediating and moderating role of social resources on the association between age and change in functional health for three age groups of older adults. Data were provided by those in their 60s, 80s, and 100s who participated in the first two phases of the Georgia Centenarian study. Analyses confirmed the study's hypothesis…

  10. Neuropsychological Functioning in Specific Learning Disorders--Reading, Writing and Mixed Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center