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Sample records for carboxylesterases

  1. Carboxylesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, M. Jason; Potter, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Carboxylesterases play major roles in the hydrolysis of numerous therapeutically active compounds. This is, in part, due to the prevalence of the ester moiety in these small molecules. However, the impact these enzymes may play on drug stability and pharmacokinetics is rarely considered prior to molecule development. Therefore, the application of selective inhibitors of this class of proteins may have utility in modulating the metabolism, distribution and toxicity of agents that are subjected to enzyme hydrolysis. Areas covered This review details the development of all such compounds dating back to 1986, but principally focuses on the very recent identification of selective human carboxylesterases inhibitors. Expert opinion The implementation of carboxylesterase inhibitors may significantly revolutionize drug discovery. Such molecules may allow for improved efficacy of compounds inactivated by this class of enzymes and/or reduce the toxicity of agents that are activated by these proteins. Furthermore, since lack of carboxylesterase activity appears to have no obvious biological consequence, these compounds could be applied in combination with virtually any esterified drug. Therefore, inhibitors of these proteins may have utility in altering drug hydrolysis and distribution in vivo. The characteristics, chemical and biological properties, and potential uses of such agents, are discussed here. PMID:21609191

  2. Age-Dependent Human Hepatic Carboxylesterase 1 (Ces1) and Carboxylesterase 2 (Ces2) Postnatal Ontogeny

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human hepatic carboxylesterase 1 and 2 (CES1 and CES2) are important for ester- and amide- bond containing pharmaceutical and environmental chemical disposition. Despite concern regarding juvenile sensitivity to such compounds, CES1 and CES2 ontogeny has not been well characteriz...

  3. The carboxylesterase/cholinesterase gene family in invertebrate deuterostomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Glynis; Moore, Samuel W

    2012-06-01

    Carboxylesterase/cholinesterase family members are responsible for controlling the nerve impulse, detoxification and various developmental functions, and are a major target of pesticides and chemical warfare agents. Comparative structural analysis of these enzymes is thus important. The invertebrate deuterostomes (phyla Echinodermata and Hemichordata and subphyla Urochordata and Cephalochordata) lie in the transition zone between invertebrates and vertebrates, and are thus of interest to the study of evolution. Here we have investigated the carboxylesterase/cholinesterase gene family in the sequenced genomes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Echinodermata), Saccoglossus kowalevskii (Hemichordata), Ciona intestinalis (Urochordata) and Branchiostoma floridae (Cephalochordata), using sequence analysis of the catalytic apparatus and oligomerisation domains, and phylogenetic analysis. All four genomes show blurring of structural boundaries between cholinesterases and carboxylesterases, with many intermediate enzymes. Non-enzymatic proteins are well represented. The Saccoglossus and Branchiostoma genomes show evidence of extensive gene duplication and retention. There is also evidence of domain shuffling, resulting in multidomain proteins consisting either of multiple carboxylesterase domains, or of carboxylesterase/cholinesterase domains linked to other domains, including RING finger, chitin-binding, immunoglobulin, fibronectin type 3, CUB, cysteine-rich-Frizzled, caspase activation and 7tm-1, amongst others. Such gene duplication and domain shuffling in the carboxylesterase/cholinesterase family appears to be unique to the invertebrate deuterostomes, and we hypothesise that these factors may have contributed to the evolution of the morphological complexity, particularly of the nervous system and neural crest, of the vertebrates.

  4. Identification of carboxylesterase-dependent dabigatran etexilate hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Laizure, S Casey; Parker, Robert B; Herring, Vanessa L; Hu, Zhe-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (DABE) is an oral prodrug that is rapidly converted to the active thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran (DAB), by serine esterases. The aims of the present study were to investigate the in vitro kinetics and pathway of DABE hydrolysis by human carboxylesterase enzymes, and the effect of alcohol on these transformations. The kinetics of DABE hydrolysis in two human recombinant carboxylesterase enzymes (CES1 and CES2) and in human intestinal microsomes and human liver S9 fractions were determined. The effects of alcohol (a known CES1 inhibitor) on the formation of DABE metabolites in carboxylesterase enzymes and human liver S9 fractions were also examined. The inhibitory effect of bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate on the carboxylesterase-mediated metabolism of DABE and the effect of alcohol on the hydrolysis of a classic carboxylesterase substrate (cocaine) were studied to validate the in vitro model. The ethyl ester of DABE was hydrolyzed exclusively by CES1 to M1 (Km 24.9 ± 2.9 μM, Vmax 676 ± 26 pmol/min per milligram protein) and the carbamate ester of DABE was exclusively hydrolyzed by CES2 to M2 (Km 5.5 ± 0.8 μM; Vmax 71.1 ± 2.4 pmol/min per milligram protein). Sequential hydrolysis of DABE in human intestinal microsomes followed by hydrolysis in human liver S9 fractions resulted in complete conversion to DAB. These results suggest that after oral administration of DABE to humans, DABE is hydrolyzed by intestinal CES2 to the intermediate M2 metabolite followed by hydrolysis of M2 to DAB in the liver by CES1. Carboxylesterase-mediated hydrolysis of DABE was not inhibited by alcohol.

  5. Tissue carboxylesterase activity of rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Charron, K.A.; Stott, W.T.; Duvall, S.E.

    1999-11-01

    The activity of carboxylesterase (CaE), a class of nonspecific serine hydrolases, was evaluated in vitro in tissues and microsomes of rainbow trout and compared to esterase activity in rats, other fish species, and embryo to adult life stages of trout. Trout gill and liver microsomes exhibited substantial CaE activity and limited variation over the range of 2 to 40 C, with a temperature optimum of approximately 22 C. Trout sera and rat liver microsomes exhibited a temperature optimum of approximately 35 to 40 C. The CaE of trout liver (maximum reaction rate [V{sub max}] = 672 nmol/min/mg microsomal protein) was four times less than in rats. Apparent Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) values ranged from 28 (trout liver) to 214 (trout sera) {micro}M. Values of V{sub max}/K{sub m} suggested that in vivo CaE activity of trout liver would be about three times higher than serum, 135 times higher than gill, and three times lower than rat liver. The CaE activity in whole rainbow trout homogenates significantly increased 300% per gram of tissue to 1,200% per milligram of protein between the yolk-sac and juvenile stages. The CaE activity of whole fish homogenates was not significantly different in juvenile rainbow trout, channel catfish, fathead minnows, and bluegill. The results demonstrate that rainbow trout had high esterase activity over a broad range of temperatures, the CaE activity significantly increased between the yolk-sac and juvenile life stages, and that variation between the CaE activity in trout and three other families of freshwater fish was limited. The CaE activity in fish is expected to substantially influence the accumulation and toxicity of pesticides and other esters entering the aquatic environment.

  6. Characterization of a Novel Thermostable Carboxylesterase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 Shows the Existence of a New Carboxylesterase Family▿

    PubMed Central

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Navarro-Fernández, José; Takami, Hideto; García-Carmona, Francisco; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro

    2009-01-01

    The gene GK3045 (741 bp) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 was cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed into Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3). The deduced protein was a 30-kDa monomeric esterase with high homology to carboxylesterases from Geobacillus thermoleovorans NY (99% identity) and Geobacillus stearothermophilus (97% identity). This protein suffered a proteolytic cut in E. coli, and the problem was overcome by introducing a mutation in the gene (K212R) without affecting the activity. The resulting Est30 showed remarkable thermostability at 65°C, above the optimum growth temperature of G. kaustophilus HTA426. The optimum pH of the enzyme was 8.0. In addition, the purified enzyme exhibited stability against denaturing agents, like organic solvents, detergents, and urea. The protein catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters of different acyl chain lengths, confirming the esterase activity. The sequence analysis showed that the protein contains a catalytic triad formed by Ser93, Asp192, and His222, and the Ser of the active site is located in the conserved motif Gly91-X-Ser93-X-Gly95 included in most esterases and lipases. However, this carboxylesterase showed no more than 17% sequence identity with the closest members in the eight families of microbial carboxylesterases. The three-dimensional structure was modeled by sequence alignment and compared with others carboxylesterases. The topological differences suggested the classification of this enzyme and other Geobacillus-related carboxylesterases in a new α/β hydrolase family different from IV and VI. PMID:19304850

  7. Activity screening of environmental metagenomic libraries reveals novel carboxylesterase families

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Ana; Hai, Tran; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw; Khusnutdinova, Anna N.; Brown, Greg; Glinos, Julia; Flick, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chernikova, Tatyana N.; Yim, Veronica; Brüls, Thomas; Paslier, Denis Le; Yakimov, Michail M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshina, Olga V.; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshin, Peter N.; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2017-01-01

    Metagenomics has made accessible an enormous reserve of global biochemical diversity. To tap into this vast resource of novel enzymes, we have screened over one million clones from metagenome DNA libraries derived from sixteen different environments for carboxylesterase activity and identified 714 positive hits. We have validated the esterase activity of 80 selected genes, which belong to 17 different protein families including unknown and cyclase-like proteins. Three metagenomic enzymes exhibited lipase activity, and seven proteins showed polyester depolymerization activity against polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Detailed biochemical characterization of four new enzymes revealed their substrate preference, whereas their catalytic residues were identified using site-directed mutagenesis. The crystal structure of the metal-ion dependent esterase MGS0169 from the amidohydrolase superfamily revealed a novel active site with a bound unknown ligand. Thus, activity-centered metagenomics has revealed diverse enzymes and novel families of microbial carboxylesterases, whose activity could not have been predicted using bioinformatics tools. PMID:28272521

  8. Carboxylesterase-mediated insecticide resistance: Quantitative increase induces broader metabolic resistance than qualitative change.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Li, Mei-Xia; Chang, Hai-Jing; Mao, Yun; Zhang, Han-Ying; Lu, Li-Xia; Yan, Shuai-Guo; Lang, Ming-Lin; Liu, Li; Qiao, Chuan-Ling

    2015-06-01

    Carboxylesterases are mainly involved in the mediation of metabolic resistance of many insects to organophosphate (OP) insecticides. Carboxylesterases underwent two divergent evolutionary events: (1) quantitative mechanism characterized by the overproduction of carboxylesterase protein; and (2) qualitative mechanism caused by changes in enzymatic properties because of mutation from glycine/alanine to aspartate at the 151 site (G/A151D) or from tryptophan to leucine at the 271 site (W271L), following the numbering of Drosophila melanogaster AChE. Qualitative mechanism has been observed in few species. However, whether this carboxylesterase mutation mechanism is prevalent in insects remains unclear. In this study, wild-type, G/A151D and W271L mutant carboxylesterases from Culex pipiens and Aphis gossypii were subjected to germline transformation and then transferred to D. melanogaster. These germlines were ubiquitously expressed as induced by tub-Gal4. In carboxylesterase activity assay, the introduced mutant carboxylesterase did not enhance the overall carboxylesterase activity of flies. This result indicated that G/A151D or W271L mutation disrupted the original activities of the enzyme. Less than 1.5-fold OP resistance was only observed in flies expressing A. gossypii mutant carboxylesterases compared with those expressing A. gossypii wild-type carboxylesterase. However, transgenic flies universally showed low resistance to OP insecticides compared with non-transgenic flies. The flies expressing A. gossypii W271L mutant esterase exhibited 1.5-fold resistance to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide compared with non-transgenic flies. The present transgenic Drosophila system potentially showed that a quantitative increase in carboxylesterases induced broader resistance of insects to insecticides than a qualitative change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of alcohol on human carboxylesterase drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert B.; Hu, Zhe-Yi; Meibohm, Bernd; Laizure, S. Casey

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Human carboxylesterase-1 (CES1) and human carboxylesterase-2 (CES2) play an important role in metabolizing many medications. Alcohol is a known inhibitor of these enzymes but the relative effect on CES1 and CES2 is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of alcohol on the metabolism of specific probes for CES1 (oseltamivir) and CES2 (aspirin). Methods The effect of alcohol on CES1- and CES2-mediated probe drug hydrolysis was determined in vitro using recombinant human carboxylesterase. To characterize the in vivo effects of alcohol, healthy volunteers received each probe drug alone and in combination with alcohol followed by blood sample collection and determination of oseltamivir, aspirin, and respective metabolite pharmacokinetics. Results Alcohol significantly inhibited oseltamivir hydrolysis by CES1 in vitro but did not affect aspirin metabolism by CES2. Alcohol increased the oseltamivir area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0-6 h by 27% (range 11-46%, p=0.011) and decreased the metabolite/oseltamivir AUC 0-6 h ratio by 34% (range 25-41%, p<0.001). Aspirin pharmacokinetics were not affected by alcohol. Conclusions Alcohol significantly inhibited the hydrolysis of oseltamivir by CES1 both in vitro and in humans, but did not affect the hydrolysis of aspirin to salicylic acid by CES2. These results suggest that alcohol's inhibition of CES1 could potentially result in clinically significant drug interactions with other CES1-substrate drugs, but it is unlikely to significantly affect CES2-substrate drug hydrolysis. PMID:25511794

  10. Effects of alcohol on human carboxylesterase drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Parker, Robert B; Hu, Zhe-Yi; Meibohm, Bernd; Laizure, S Casey

    2015-06-01

    Human carboxylesterase-1 (CES1) and human carboxylesterase-2 (CES2) play an important role in metabolizing many medications. Alcohol is a known inhibitor of these enzymes but the relative effect on CES1 and CES2 is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of alcohol on the metabolism of specific probes for CES1 (oseltamivir) and CES2 (aspirin). The effect of alcohol on CES1- and CES2-mediated probe drug hydrolysis was determined in vitro using recombinant human carboxylesterase. To characterize the in vivo effects of alcohol, healthy volunteers received each probe drug alone and in combination with alcohol followed by blood sample collection and determination of oseltamivir, aspirin, and respective metabolite pharmacokinetics. Alcohol significantly inhibited oseltamivir hydrolysis by CES1 in vitro but did not affect aspirin metabolism by CES2. Alcohol increased the oseltamivir area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0 to 6 h (AUC0 → 6 h) by 27% (range 11-46%, p = 0.011) and decreased the metabolite/oseltamivir AUC0 → 6 h ratio by 34% (range 25-41%, p < 0.001). Aspirin pharmacokinetics were not affected by alcohol. Alcohol significantly inhibited the hydrolysis of oseltamivir by CES1 both in vitro and in humans, but did not affect the hydrolysis of aspirin to salicylic acid by CES2. These results suggest that alcohol's inhibition of CES1 could potentially result in clinically significant drug interactions with other CES1-substrate drugs, but it is unlikely to significantly affect CES2-substrate drug hydrolysis.

  11. Carboxylesterase overexpression in the male reproductive tract: a universal safeguarding mechanism?

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, A T; Torrado, M

    1999-01-01

    Data on expression patterns of carboxylesterases in the male reproductive tract of different animal groups (i.e. bivalve mollusks, fruitflies and rodents) are summarized to highlight some particularly interesting questions in the context of sperm differentiation, maturation and function. The male reproductive system, in spite of extreme variation in the anatomical/morphological organization in different species, is characterized by similar patterns of male-dependent carboxylesterase overexpression. The phenomenon of conserved carboxylesterase overexpression indicates similar male sex-associated functions of the enzymes. There is possible evidence of carboxylesterase recruitment by male reproductive-tract tissues indicating that it could be adaptive for spermatogenesis, sperm maturation and sperm use. Moreover, this idea can be extended to include a sperm cell lineage protection. This issue is discussed in the light of recent data on environmental reproductive xenobiotics that can provide a basis for a hypothetical explanation of carboxylesterase overexpression in the male reproductive tract. Based on a well-known role of carboxylesterases in detoxification of environmental chemicals such as organophosphate pesticides, it is proposed that various male genital tract carboxylesterases may be characterized by a similar physiological function to protect the male reproductive system against xenobiotic influences that could provoke its dysfunction, thus altering sperm differentiation and maturation.

  12. Activity screening of environmental metagenomic libraries reveals novel carboxylesterase families

    DOE PAGES

    Popovic, Ana; Hai, Tran; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; ...

    2017-03-08

    Metagenomics has made accessible an enormous reserve of global biochemical diversity. In order to tap into this vast resource of novel enzymes, we have screened over one million clones from metagenome DNA libraries derived from sixteen different environments for carboxylesterase activity and identified 714 positive hits. Here, we validated the esterase activity of 80 selected genes, which belong to 17 different protein families including unknown and cyclase-like proteins. Three metagenomic enzymes exhibited lipase activity, and seven proteins showed polyester depolymerization activity against polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Detailed biochemical characterization of four new enzymes revealed their substrate preference, whereas their catalyticmore » residues were identified using site-directed mutagenesis. The crystal structure of the metal-ion dependent esterase MGS0169 from the amidohydrolase superfamily revealed a novel active site with a bound unknown ligand. Thus, activity-centered metagenomics has revealed diverse enzymes and novel families of microbial carboxylesterases, whose activity could not have been predicted using bioinformatics tools.« less

  13. Purification and characterization of carboxylesterases from rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Gaustad, R; Sletten, K; Løvhaug, D; Fonnum, F

    1991-01-01

    Carboxylesterase (EC 3.1.1.1) has played an important part in our understanding of the toxicokinetic behaviour of the organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitors. Carboxylesterases are a heterogeneous group of enzymes that can be separated on the basis of their isoelectric points and by their substrate-specificity. We have purified the isoenzyme (pI 5.8) present in greatest activity in rat lung to near homogeneity. The enzyme was purified by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, gel filtration, chromatofocusing, separation on anion- and cation-exchangers and hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. The purified enzyme has a molecular mass of approx. 180 kDa with subunits of 60 kDa. The substrate and inhibitor specificities of the enzyme have been characterized. Edman degradation revealed the first 19 amino acid residues of the enzyme. The N-terminus was found to be tyrosine. Inhibition of the enzyme by organophosphorus compounds differed greatly from that of cholinesterases, despite the partial analogy at the N-terminal region. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2012599

  14. Human carboxylesterase 1: from drug metabolism to drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Redinbo, M R; Bencharit, S; Potter, P M

    2003-06-01

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a serine esterase involved in both drug metabolism and activation, as well as other biological processes. hCE1 catalyses the hydrolysis of heroin and cocaine, and the transesterification of cocaine in the presence of ethanol to the toxic metabolite cocaethylene. We have determined the crystal structures of hCE1 in complex with either the cocaine analogue homatropine or the heroin analogue naloxone. These are the first structures of a human carboxylesterase, and they provide details about narcotic metabolism in humans. hCE1's active site contains rigid and flexible pockets, explaining the enzyme's ability to act both specifically and promiscuously. hCE1 has also been reported to contain cholesteryl ester hydrolase, fatty acyl-CoA hydrolase and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activities, and thus appears to be involved in cholesterol metabolism. Since the enzyme may be useful as a treatment for cocaine overdose, and may afford protection against chemical weapons like Sarin, Soman and VX gas, hCE1 could serve as both a drug and a drug target. Selective hCE1 inhibitors targeted to several sites on the enzyme may also pave the way for novel clinical tools to manage cholesterol homoeostasis in humans.

  15. Detoxication of paraoxon by rat liver homogenate and serum carboxylesterases and A-esterases.

    PubMed

    Tang, J; Chambers, J E

    1999-01-01

    Paraoxon, the active metabolite of parathion, can be detoxified through a noncatalytic pathway by carboxylesterases and a catalytic pathway by calcium-dependent A-esterases, producing p-nitrophenol as a common metabolite. The detoxication patterns of carboxylesterases and A-esterases were investigated in vitro in the present study with a high tissue concentration (75 mg/mL rat liver homogenate or 50% rat serum solution) to more closely reflect enzyme concentrations in intact tissues. A final paraoxon concentration of 3.75 microM was used to incubate with liver homogenates or serum solutions for 5 seconds or 3, 5, 15, or 25 minutes; also 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 3.125, 3.75, or 5.0 microM paraoxon (final concentration) was incubated with liver homogenates or serum solutions for 15 minutes. Phenyl saligenin cyclic phosphate and EDTA were used to inhibit carboxylesterases and A-esterases, respectively. Significant amounts of p-nitrophenol were generated with or without either inhibitor during a 15 minute incubation with paraoxon from low (0.625 microM) to high (5.0 microM) concentrations. The amount of p-nitrophenol generated via carboxylesterase phosphorylation was greater than via A-esterase-mediated hydrolysis in the initial period of incubation or when incubating with a low concentration of paraoxon. Plateau shape curves of p-nitrophenol concentration versus time or paraoxon concentration indicated that carboxylesterase phosphorylation was saturable. When incubated for long time intervals or with high concentrations of paraoxon, more p-nitrophenol was generated via A-esterase-mediated hydrolysis than from carboxylesterase phosphorylation. The ratio of paraoxon concentration to tissue amount used in in vitro assays of this study was equivalent to dosing a rat with toxicologically relevant dosages. These in vitro data suggest that both carboxylesterases and A-esterases detoxify paraoxon in vivo; carboxylesterases may be an important mode of paraoxon detoxication in initial

  16. Regulations of Xenobiotics and Endobiotics on Carboxylesterases: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanjiao; Zhang, Chengliang; He, Wenxi; Liu, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Carboxylesterases (CESs) play major roles in catalyzing the hydrolysis of a wide range of ester- and amide-containing compounds. CESs dominate both the biotransformation of numerous therapeutic drugs and the detoxification of environmental toxicants, and the activity alteration of CESs may be a determinant reason for modification of the resultant pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile when two or more drugs are concurrently used. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the current literature involving of induction and inhibition on CESs by both exogenous and endogenous compounds. In particular, the inhibition constant and inhibition pattern of inhibitors on CESs in studies using animal microsomes or human recombinant CESs are summarized. Further studies are needed to clarify the underlying regulation mechanism, and alterations in CESs activity should be taken into consideration for safe clinical therapy.

  17. Effect of chlorpromazine on human and murine intracellular carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Radenovic, L; Kartelija, G

    2004-04-01

    Clinical use of chlorpromazine (CPZ), an antipsychotic drug, is limited due to its hepatotoxicity. CPZ is found to inhibit in vitro intracellular carboxylesterases (CE), such as alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase, naphthol AS-D chloroacetate esterase, and alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase in polymorphonuclear neutrophils, hepatocytes, and neuronal brain cells from mice. CPZ inhibits CE of all these cell types, whereby the degree of the inhibition depends on the incubation time and CPZ concentration. The polymorphonuclear neutrophils are most sensitive to CPZ. Comparable results were obtained with polymorphonuclear neutrophils from mice and humans. Since leukocytes are much more available than hepatocytes or neuronal cells in humans, we assume that CE in peripheral blood leukocytes (neutrophils and monocytes) can be used as markers for indication of pending liver damage by CPZ.

  18. Identification of aspirinase with one of the carboxylesterases requiring a thiol group.

    PubMed Central

    White, K N; Hope, D B

    1981-01-01

    Aspirin-hydrolysing activity in guinea-pig liver is located mainly in the microsomal fraction. This activity was found by electrophoresis to be due to a single carboxylesterase band, out of 12 bands revealed with alpha-naphthyl acetate as substrate. The activity is inhibited completely and irreversibly by the carboxylesterase inhibitor bis-(-4-nitrophenyl) hydrogen phosphate, and also by thiol-blocking reagents. Images Fig. 2. PMID:7325988

  19. The roles of carboxylesterase and CYP isozymes on the in vitro metabolism of T-2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ni-Ni; Chen, Jia; Xu, Bin; Wei, Xia; Guo, Lei; Xie, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    T-2 toxin poses a great threat to human health because it has the highest toxicity of the currently known trichothecene mycotoxins. To understand the in vivo toxicity and transformation mechanism of T-2 toxin, we investigated the role of one kind of principal phase I drug-metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450 [CYP450] enzymes) on the metabolism of T-2 toxin, which are crucial to the metabolism of endogenous substances and xenobiotics. We also investigated carboxylesterase, which also plays an important role in the metabolism of toxic substances. A chemical inhibition method and a recombinant method were employed to investigate the metabolism of the T-2 toxin by the CYP450 enzymes, and a chemical inhibition method was used to study carboxylesterase metabolism. Samples incubated with human liver microsomes were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (HPLC- QqQ MS) after a simple pretreatment. In the presence of a carboxylesterase inhibitor, only 20 % T-2 toxin was metabolized. When CYP enzyme inhibitors and a carboxylesterase inhibitor were both present, only 3 % of the T-2 toxin was metabolized. The contributions of the CYP450 enzyme family to T-2 toxin metabolism followed the descending order CYP3A4, CYP2E1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6 or CYP2D6 or CYP2C19. Carboxylesterase and CYP450 enzymes are of great importance in T-2 toxin metabolism, in which carboxylesterase is predominant and CYP450 has a subordinate role. CYP3A4 is the principal member of the CYP450 enzyme family responsible for T-2 toxin metabolism. The primary metabolite produced by carboxylesterase is HT-2, and the main metabolite produced by CYP 3A4 is 3'-OH T-2. The different metabolites show different toxicities. Our results will provide useful data concerning the toxic mechanism, the safety evaluation, and the health risk assessment of T-2 toxin.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; ...

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of themore » substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  1. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  2. Two single mutations commonly cause qualitative change of nonspecific carboxylesterases in insects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Lin, Zhe; Wang, Hongsheng; Liu, Silu; Chang, Haijing; Reeck, Gerald; Qiao, Chuanling; Raymond, Michel; Kang, Le

    2011-01-01

    Carboxylesterases provide key mechanisms of resistance to insecticides, particularly organophosphates (OPs), in insects. One resistance mechanism is a qualitative change in the properties of a carboxylesterase. Two mutant forms, G151D and W271L, have been observed, mostly in dipteran species, to affect substrate specificity of enzymes. But whether these two single mutations can commonly change character of insect carboxylesterases is unknown. In our study carboxylesterase genes from seven insects distributed among four orders were cloned, mutated at position 151 or 271 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The kinetics of the purified recombinant proteins was examined towards an artificial carboxylester and two OP insecticides. The G/A151D and W271L mutation significantly reduced carboxylesterase activity in 87.5% and 100% cases, respectively, and at the same time conferred OP hydrolase activities in 62.5% and 87.5% cases, respectively. Thus, the change at position 271 is more effective to influence substrate specificity than that at position 151. These results may suggest that these two mutations have the potential to cause insecticide resistance broadly in insects.

  3. [Interaction of various dithio- and thiophosphates containing amino acid fragments with carboxylesterase from rat liver].

    PubMed

    Makhaeva, G F; Veselova, V L; Mastriukova, T A; Shipov, A E; Zhdanova, G V

    1983-07-01

    The interaction of insecto-acaricides of the general formula (EtO)2P(S)SCH2CONH(CH2)nCH(R1)COOR2 and their activation metabolites (P = O analog) and detoxication products (R2 = H) with rat liver carboxylesterase was studied. The beta-alanine derivative (n = 1, R1 = H, R2 = Et) was rapidly hydrolyzed by carboxylesterase. The valine derivative (n = 0, R1 = H, R2 = Et) was hydrolytically stable, due to steric hindrances imposed by the isopropyl group, and proved to be a reversible competitive inhibitor of carboxylesterase. The corresponding monothiophosphates were not hydrolyzed by carboxylesterase, but inhibited it irreversibly. It was found that monothiophosphate derivatives of R- and S-valine irreversibly inhibit carboxylesterase, R-enantiomer being somewhat more active than S-antipode. On the other hand, under the conditions of reversible inhibition by the corresponding dithiophosphates, S-enantiomer was more active. Using model compounds, (R)- and (S)-N-chloroacetyl valine ethyl esters, it was shown that both on irreversible and reversible inhibition the differences in stereospecificity can be attributed to changes in the inhibitor orientation in the enzyme active site.

  4. The role of human carboxylesterases in drug metabolism: have we overlooked their importance?

    PubMed

    Laizure, S Casey; Herring, Vanessa; Hu, Zheyi; Witbrodt, Kevin; Parker, Robert B

    2013-02-01

    Carboxylesterases are a multigene family of mammalian enzymes widely distributed throughout the body that catalyze the hydrolysis of esters, amides, thioesters, and carbamates. In humans, two carboxylesterases, hCE1 and hCE2, are important mediators of drug metabolism. Both are expressed in the liver, but hCE1 greatly exceeds hCE2. In the intestine, only hCE2 is present and highly expressed. The most common drug substrates of these enzymes are ester prodrugs specifically designed to enhance oral bioavailability by hydrolysis to the active carboxylic acid after absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. Carboxylesterases also play an important role in the hydrolysis of some drugs to inactive metabolites. It has been widely believed that drugs undergoing hydrolysis by hCE1 and hCE2 are not subject to clinically significant alterations in their disposition, but evidence exists that genetic polymorphisms, drug-drug interactions, drug-disease interactions and other factors are important determinants of the variability in the therapeutic response to carboxylesterase-substrate drugs. The implications for drug therapy are far-reaching, as substrate drugs include numerous examples from widely prescribed therapeutic classes. Representative drugs include angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, antiplatelet drugs, statins, antivirals, and central nervous system agents. As research interest increases in the carboxylesterases, evidence is accumulating of their important role in drug metabolism and, therefore, the outcomes of pharmacotherapy.

  5. Identification and characterization of a novel carboxylesterase (FpbH) that hydrolyzes aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenghong; Qiu, Jiguo; Yang, Youjian; Zheng, Jinwei; He, Jian; Li, Shunpeng

    2017-04-01

    To identify and characterize a novel aryloxyphenoxypropionate (AOPP) herbicide-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase from Aquamicrobium sp. FPB-1. A carboxylesterase gene, fpbH, was cloned from Aquamicrobium sp. FPB-1. The gene is 798 bp long and encodes a protein of 265 amino acids. FpbH is smaller than previously reported AOPP herbicide-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases and shares only 21-35% sequence identity with them. FpbH was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and the product was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified FpbH hydrolyzed a wide range of AOPP herbicides with catalytic efficiency in the order: haloxyfop-P-methyl > diclofop-methyl > fenoxaprop-P-ethyl > quizalofop-P-ethyl > fluazifop-P-butyl > cyhalofop-butyl. The optimal temperature and pH for FpbH activity were 37 °C and 7, respectively. FpbH is a novel AOPP herbicide-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase; it is a good candidate for mechanistic study of AOPP herbicide-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases and for bioremediation of AOPP herbicide-contaminated environments.

  6. Rat serum carboxylesterase partly hydrolyses gamma-butyrobetaine esters.

    PubMed

    Bagdoniene, Lida; Labeikyte, Danute; Kalviņs, Ivars; Borutinskaite, Veronika; Prokofjevs, Aleksandrs; Trapencieris, Pēteris; Juodka, Benediktas; Sjakste, Nikolajs

    2009-06-01

    Although described some time ago, gamma-butyrobetaine esters and related compounds have not gained much attention from researchers, and their physiological function remains obscure. Formerly we detected GBB-esterase enzymatic activity in rat blood serum using phenylated gamma-butyrobetaine as an artificial substrate of the enzyme and HPLC. The aim of the present work was to develop an assay that would enable spectrophotometric or colorimetric determination of the reaction products of GBB-esterase activity and to reveal individual proteins performing GBB-esterase activity in rat blood serum. For this purpose gamma-butyrobetaine 1-naphthyl ester was synthesised. Hydrolysis of this ester releases 1-naphthol, which increases the optical absorbance at 322 nm. We have shown that the enzymatic hydrolysis of GBB 1-naphthyl ester to 1-naphthol in rat blood serum is due to GBB-esterase activity. An attempt was done to purify the enzyme from rat blood serum. By combining DEAE Sepharose at pH 4.2 and affinity chromatography with procainamide we achieved a 68-fold enrichment of GBB-esterase activity in our preparations. Separation of fraction proteins in 2D protein electrophoresis with following mass-spectrometry indicated that GBB esterase activity in rat blood serum is performed in part by carboxylesterase.

  7. Immobilization of Active Human Carboxylesterase 1 in Biomimetic Silica Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jonathan S.; Kumbhar, Amar; Roberts, Adam; Hemmert, Andrew C.; Edwards, Carol C.; Potter, Philip M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The encapsulation of proteins in biomimetic silica has recently been shown to successfully maintain enzymes in their active state. Organophosphate (OP) compounds are employed as pesticides as well as potent chemical warfare nerve agents. Because these toxicants are life threatening, we sought to generate biomimetic silicas capable of responding to OPs. Here, we present the silica encapsulation of human drug metabolism enzyme carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) in the presence of a range of catalysts. hCE1 was successfully encapsulated into silica particles when lysozyme or the peptide R5 were used as catalysts; in contrast, polyethyleneimine (PEI), a catalyst employed to encapuslate other enzymes, did not facilitate hCE1 entrapment. hCE1 silica particles in a column chromatography format respond to the presence of the organophosphate (OP) pesticides paraoxon and dimethyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate in solution. These results may lead to novel approaches to detect OP pesticides or other weaponized agents that bind hCE1. PMID:21509954

  8. Heterologous expression and characterization of a malathion-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase from a thermophilic bacterium, Alicyclobacillus tengchongensis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhenrong; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Liu, Lingyun; Zhang, Xuelin; Li, Junjun; Huang, Zunxi

    2013-08-01

    A carboxylesterase gene from thermophilic bacterium, Alicyclobacillus tengchongensis, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The gene coded for a 513 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 57.82 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence had structural features highly conserved among serine hydrolases, including Ser204, Glu325, and His415 as a catalytic triad, as well as type-B carboxylesterase serine active site (FGGDPENITIGGQSAG) and type-B carboxylesterase signature 2 (EDCLYLNIWTP). The purified enzyme exhibited optimum activity with β-naphthyl acetate at 60 °C and pH 7 as well as stability at 25 °C and pH 7. One unit of the enzyme hydrolyzed 5 mg malathion l(-1) by 50 % within 25 min and 89 % within 100 min. The enzyme strongly degraded malathion and has a potential use for the detoxification of malathion residues.

  9. Function and application of a non-ester-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase discovered in tulip.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taiji

    2017-01-01

    Plants have evolved secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways of immense rich diversity. The genes encoding enzymes for secondary metabolite biosynthesis have evolved through gene duplication followed by neofunctionalization, thereby generating functional diversity. Emerging evidence demonstrates that some of those enzymes catalyze reactions entirely different from those usually catalyzed by other members of the same family; e.g. transacylation catalyzed by an enzyme similar to a hydrolytic enzyme. Tuliposide-converting enzyme (TCE), which we recently discovered from tulip, catalyzes the conversion of major defensive secondary metabolites, tuliposides, to antimicrobial tulipalins. The TCEs belong to the carboxylesterase family in the α/β-hydrolase fold superfamily, and specifically catalyze intramolecular transesterification, but not hydrolysis. This non-ester-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase is an example of an enzyme showing catalytic properties that are unpredictable from its primary structure. This review describes the biochemical and physiological aspects of tulipalin biogenesis, and the diverse functions of plant carboxylesterases in the α/β-hydrolase fold superfamily.

  10. Human and rodent carboxylesterases: immunorelatedness, overlapping substrate specificity, differential sensitivity to serine enzyme inhibitors, and tumor-related expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingxing; Yang, Dongfang; Liu, Lan; Xue, Bob; Yan, Bingfang

    2002-05-01

    Carboxylesterases hydrolyze numerous endogenous and foreign compounds with diverse structures. Humans and rodents express multiple forms of carboxylesterases, which share a high degree of sequence identity (approximately 70%). Alignment analyses locate in carboxylesterases several functional subsites such the catalytic triad as seen in acetylcholinesterase. The aim of this study was to determine among human and rodent carboxylesterases the immunorelatedness, overlapping substrate specificity, differential sensitivity to serine enzyme inhibitors, tissue distribution, and tumor-related expression. Six antibodies against whole carboxylesterases or synthetic peptides were tested for their reactivity toward 11 human or rodent recombinant carboxylesterases. The antibodies against whole proteins generally exhibited a broader cross-reactivity than the anti-peptide antibodies. All carboxylesterases hydrolyzed para-nitrophenylacetate and para-nitrophenylbutyrate. However, the relative activity varied markedly from enzyme to enzyme (>20-fold), and some carboxylesterases showed a clear substrate preference. Carboxylesterases with the same functional subsites had a similar profile on substrate specificity and sensitivity toward phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and paraoxon, suggesting that these subsites play determinant roles in the recognition of substrates and inhibitors. Among three human carboxylesterases, HCE-1 hydrolyzed both substrates to a similar extent, whereas HCE-2 and HCE-3 showed an opposite substrate preference. All three enzymes were inhibited by PMSF and paraoxon, but they showed a marked difference in relative sensitivities. Based on immunoblotting analyses, HCE-1 was present in all tissues examined, whereas HCE-2 and HCE-3 were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Colon carcinomas expressed slightly higher levels of HCE-1 and HCE-2 than the adjacent normal tissues, whereas the opposite was true with HCE-3.

  11. Carboxylesterase 1 as a determinant of clopidogrel metabolism and activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao-Jie; Wang, Xinwen; Gawronski, Brian E; Brinda, Bryan J; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Markowitz, John S

    2013-03-01

    Clopidogrel pharmacotherapy is associated with substantial interindividual variability in clinical response, which can translate into an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Clopidogrel, a recognized substrate of hepatic carboxylesterase 1 (CES1), undergoes extensive hydrolytic metabolism in the liver. Significant interindividual variability in the expression and activity of CES1 exists, which is attributed to both genetic and environmental factors. We determined whether CES1 inhibition and CES1 genetic polymorphisms would significantly influence the biotransformation of clopidogrel and alter the formation of the active metabolite. Coincubation of clopidogrel with the CES1 inhibitor bis(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate in human liver s9 fractions significantly increased the concentrations of clopidogrel, 2-oxo-clopidogrel, and clopidogrel active metabolite, while the concentrations of all formed carboxylate metabolites were significantly decreased. As anticipated, clopidogrel and 2-oxo-clopidogrel were efficiently hydrolyzed by the cell s9 fractions prepared from wild-type CES1 transfected cells. The enzymatic activity of the CES1 variants G143E and D260fs were completely impaired in terms of catalyzing the hydrolysis of clopidogrel and 2-oxo-clopidogrel. However, the natural variants G18V, S82L, and A269S failed to produce any significant effect on CES1-mediated hydrolysis of clopidogrel or 2-oxo-clopidogrel. In summary, deficient CES1 catalytic activity resulting from CES1 inhibition or CES1 genetic variation may be associated with higher plasma concentrations of clopidogrel-active metabolite, and hence may enhance antiplatelet activity. Additionally, CES1 genetic variants have the potential to serve as a biomarker to predict clopidogrel response and individualize clopidogrel dosing regimens in clinical practice.

  12. Age-Dependent Human Hepatic Carboxylesterase 1 (Ces1) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human hepatic carboxylesterase 1 and 2 (CES1 and CES2) are important for ester- and amide- bond containing pharmaceutical and environmental chemical disposition. Despite concern regarding juvenile sensitivity to such compounds, CES1 and CES2 ontogeny has not been well characterized. To define human hepatic microsomal and cytosolic CES1 and CES2 expression during early postnatal life, microsomal and cytosolic fractions were prepared using liver samples from subjects without liver disease [N=165, 1d-18 yrs]. Proteins were fractionated, detected and quantitated by western blotting. Median microsomal CES1 was lower among samples from subjects < 3 weeks of age (N=36) compared to the rest of the population (N=126; 6.27 vs 17.5 pmoles/mg microsomal protein, respectively; p<0.001; Kruskal Wallis test). Cytosolic CES1 increased sequentially with expression being lowest among samples from individuals between birth and 3 weeks of age (N=36), markedly greater among those from ages 3 weeks to 6 years (N=90), and then modestly greater still among those over 6 years of age (N=36; median values = 4.7, 15.8, and 16.6 pmoles/mg cytosolic protein, respectively; p values <0.001 and 0.05, respectively, Kruskal Wallis test). Microsomal CES2 also increased sequentially across the same three age groups with median values of 1.8, 2.9, and 4.2 pmoles/mg microsomal protein, respectively (p<0.001, both), whereas for cytosolic CES2, only the youngest age group differed from the two older g

  13. Oxime-induced reactivation of carboxylesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.M.; Lieske, C.N.; Brecht, K.M.

    1994-06-01

    A structure-activity analysis of the ability of oximes to reactivate rat plasma carboxylesterase (CaE) that was inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) compounds revealed that uncharged oximes, such as 2,3-butanedione monoxime (diacetylmonoxime) or monoisonitrosoacetone, were better reactivators than cationic oximes. Cationic oximes that are excellent reactivators of OP-inhibited acetylcholinesterase, such as pyridine-2-aldoxime or the bis-pyridine aldoximes, HI-6 and TMB. 4, produced poor reactivation of OP-inhibited CaE. The best uncharged reactivator was 2,3. butanedione monoxime, which produced complete reactivation at 0.3 mM in 2 h of CaE that was inhibited by phosphinates, alkoxy-containing phosphates, and alkoxy-containing phosphonates. Complete reactivation of CaE could be achieved even after inhibition by phosphonates with highly branched alkoxy groups, such as sarin and soman, that undergo rapid aging with acetylcholinesterase. CaE that was inhibited by phosphonates or phosphates that contained aryloxy groups were reactivated to a lesser extent. The cause of this decreased reactivation appears to be an oxime-induced aging reaction that competes with the reactivation reaction. This oxime-induced aging reaction is accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents on the aryloxy groups of phosphonates and by the presence of multiple aryloxy groups on phosphates. Thus, reactivation and aging of OP-inhibited CaE differ from the same processes for OP- inhibited acetylcholinesterase in both their oxime specificity and inhibitor specificity and, presumably, in their underlying mechanisms.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of atorvastatin esters as prodrugs metabolically activated by human carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Mizoi, Kenta; Takahashi, Masato; Haba, Masami; Hosokawa, Masakiyo

    2016-02-01

    We synthesized 11 kinds of prodrug with an esterified carboxylic acid moiety of atorvastatin in moderate to high yields. We discovered that they underwent metabolic activation specifically by the human carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) isozyme. The results suggested that these ester compounds of atorvastatin have the potential to act as prodrugs in vivo.

  15. Identification of a carboxylesterase associated with resistance to naled in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Compared to other organophosphate-resistant and -susceptible (S) lines of Bactrocera dorsalis, the carboxylesterase (CBE) BdE5 in the naled-resistant(nal-r) line has been found to possess remarkable quantitative elevation. Our study attempts to identify the role of BdE5 in naled resistance, and we d...

  16. Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroids by human and other mammalian carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Ross, Matthew K; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Edwards, Carol C; Potter, Philip M

    2006-02-28

    Pyrethroid chemicals are attractive alternatives to the organophosphates (OPs) because of their selective toxicity against pests rather than mammals. The carboxylesterases (CEs) are hepatic enzymes that metabolize ester-containing xenobiotics such as pyrethroids. The primary aim of this study was to gain insight into the catalytic properties of the CE enzymes in humans that metabolize pyrethroids, while a secondary aim was to investigate pyrethroid metabolism using CEs from other mammalian species. Pure human CEs (hCE-1 and hCE-2), a rabbit CE (rCE), and two rat CEs (Hydrolases A and B) were used to study the hydrolytic metabolism of the following pyrethroids: 1Rtrans-resmethrin (bioresmethrin), 1RStrans-permethrin, and 1RScis-permethrin. hCE-1 and hCE-2 hydrolyzed trans-permethrin 8- and 28-fold more efficiently than cis-permethrin (when k(cat)/K(m) values were compared), respectively. In contrast, hydrolysis of bioresmethrin was catalyzed efficiently by hCE-1, but not by hCE-2. The kinetic parameters for the pure rat and rabbit CEs were qualitatively similar to the human CEs when hydrolysis rates of the investigated pyrethroids were evaluated. Further, a comparison of pyrethroid hydrolysis by hepatic microsomes from rats, mice, and humans indicated that the rates for each compound were similar between species, which further supports the use of rodent models for pyrethroid metabolism studies. An eight-fold range in hydrolytic rates for 11 individual human liver samples toward trans-permethrin was also found, although this variability was not related to the levels of hCE-1 protein in each sample. We also determined that the CE inhibitor 2-chloro-3,4-dimethoxybenzil blocked hCE-2-catalyzed trans-permethrin hydrolysis 36 times more potently than hCE-1. Thus, this inhibitor will be useful in future studies that examine CE-mediated metabolism of pyrethroids. While there are likely other esterases in human liver that hydrolyze pyrethroids, the results of this study

  17. Bovine chromaffin cells in culture show carboxylesterase activities sensitive to organophosphorus compounds.

    PubMed

    Sogorb, M A; Vilanova, E; Quintanar, J L; Viniegra, S

    1996-09-01

    Carboxylesterase activities are widely distributed in a great variety of tissues; however, the biological function of these enzymes remains unclear. Some organophosphorus compounds induce a neurodegenarative syndrome related to the covalent modification of a carboxylesterase known as neuropathy target esterase. We investigated the expression of neuropathy target esterase and related carboxylesterase in bovine chromaffin cells with the aim of developing a potential in vitro model for studying the cellular function of carboxylesterase enzymes and toxic effects of organophosphorus compounds. Total phenyl valerate esterase exhibited an activity of 1.27 +/- 0.19 mU/10(5) cells (SD, n = 15). From the phenyl valerate esterase paraoxon and mipafox inhibition curves the following activities have been determined: B-activity (resistant to 40 microM paraoxon), 1.05 +/- 0.08 mU/10(5) cells (n = 8); C-activity (resistant to 40 microM paraoxon plus 250 microM mipafox), 0.12 +/- 0.05 mU/10(5) cells (n = 8); and neuropathy target esterase, calculated by the difference between B- and C-activities, 0.93 +/- 0.08 mU/10(5) cells (n = 8). All of these activities increased linearly with the number of cells and time of incubation with the substrate. Most of the phenol product of the reaction was released and detected in the extracellular medium. None of the components of the reaction were shown to affect cell viability when assessed by trypan blue exclusion. The study shows that bovine chromaffin cells possess carboxylesterase activities and respond to inhibition by paraoxon and mipafox, thus facilitating the discrimination of neuropathy target esterase. In conclusion, bovine chromaffin cells are appropriate as an in vitro cell model for studying toxic effects of organophosphorus compounds.

  18. Effects of phenobarbital and p,p'-DDT on carboxylesterase activity and hydrolysis of propanidid in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, U

    1985-01-01

    Time-dependent responses of microsomal and cytosolic carboxylesterases (EC 3.1.1.1) to administration of phenobarbital or p,p'-DDT were studied in rat liver using p-nitrophenylacetate and propanidid as substrates. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the hepatic carboxylesterases are induced by phenobarbital and p,p'-DDT. The induced metabolism of propanidid does not appear to be due to the microsomal polysubstrate monooxygenase system of the liver.

  19. Applications of carboxylesterase activity in environmental monitoring and toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs).

    PubMed

    Wheelock, Craig E; Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Miller, Jeff L; Miller, Mike J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2008-01-01

    This review has examined a number of issues surrounding the use of carboxylesterase activity in environmental monitoring. It is clear that carboxylesterases are important enzymes that deserve increased study. This class of enzymes appears to have promise for employment in environmental monitoring with a number of organisms and testing scenarios, and it is appropriate for inclusion in standard monitoring assays. Given the ease of most activity assays, it is logical to report carboxylesterase activity levels as well as other esterases (e.g., acetylcholinesterase). Although it is still unclear as to whether acetylcholinesterase or carboxylesterase is the most "appropriate" biomarker, there are sufficient data to suggest that at the very least further studies should be performed with carboxylesterases. Most likely, data will show that it is optimal to measure activity for both enzymes whenever possible. Acetylcholinesterase has the distinct advantage of a clear biological function, whereas the endogenous role of carboxylesterases is still unclear. However, a combination of activity measurements for the two enzyme systems will provide a much more detailed picture of organism health and insecticide exposure. The main outstanding issues are the choice of substrate for activity assays and which tissues/organisms are most appropriate for monitoring studies. Substrate choice is very important, because carboxylesterase activity consists of multiple isozymes that most likely fluctuate on an organism- and tissue-specific basis. It is therefore difficult to compare work in one organism with a specific substrate with work performed in a different organism with a different substrate. An attempt should therefore be made to standardize the method. The most logical choice is PNPA (p-nitrophenyl acetate), as this substrate is commercially available, requires inexpensive optics for assay measurements, and has been used extensively in the literature. However, none of these beneficial

  20. Identification and Expression Profiles of Six Transcripts Encoding Carboxylesterase Protein in Vitis flexuosa Infected with Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Zaherul; Yun, Hae Keun

    2016-01-01

    Plants protect themselves from pathogen attacks via several mechanisms, including hypersensitive cell death. Recognition of pathogen attack by the plant resistance gene triggers expression of carboxylesterase genes associated with hypersensitive response. We identified six transcripts of carboxylesterase genes, Vitis flexuosa carboxylesterase 5585 (VfCXE5585), VfCXE12827, VfCXE13132, VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674, which showed different expression patterns upon transcriptome analysis of V. flexuosa inoculated with Elsinoe ampelina. The lengths of genes ranged from 1,098 to 1,629 bp, and their encoded proteins consisted of 309 to 335 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed hydrolase like domains in all six transcripts and contained two conserved motifs, GXSXG of serine hydrolase characteristics and HGGGF related to the carboxylesterase family. The deduced amino acid sequence also contained a potential catalytic triad consisted of serine, aspartic acid and histidine. Of the six transcripts, VfCXE12827 showed upregulated expression against E. ampelina at all time points. Three genes (VfCXE5585, VfCXE12827, and VfCXE13132) showed upregulation, while others (VfCXE17159, VfCXE18231, and VfCXE47674) were down regulated in grapevines infected with Botrytis cinerea. All transcripts showed upregulated expression against Rhizobium vitis at early and later time points except VfCXE12827, and were downregulated for up to 48 hours post inoculation (hpi) after upregulation at 1 hpi in response to R. vitis infection. All tested genes showed high and differential expression in response to pathogens, indicating that they all may play a role in defense pathways during pathogen infection in grapevines. PMID:27493610

  1. Novel Metagenome-Derived Carboxylesterase That Hydrolyzes β-Lactam Antibiotics▿†

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jeong Ho; Kim, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyun Sook; Cha, Sun-Shin; Lee, Jung Hun; Yoon, Sang-Hong; Koo, Bon-Sung; Lee, Chang-Muk; Choi, Sang Ho; Lee, Sang Hee; Kang, Sung Gyun; Lee, Jung-Hyun

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that family VIII carboxylesterases and class C β-lactamases are phylogenetically related; however, none of carboxylesterases has been reported to hydrolyze β-lactam antibiotics except nitrocefin, a nonclinical chromogenic substrate. Here, we describe the first example of a novel carboxylesterase derived from a metagenome that is able to cleave the amide bond of various β-lactam substrates and the ester bond of p-nitrophenyl esters. A clone with lipolytic activity was selected by functional screening of a metagenomic library using tributyrin agar plates. The sequence analysis of the clone revealed the presence of an open reading frame (estU1) encoding a polypeptide of 426 amino acids, retaining an S-X-X-K motif that is conserved in class C β-lactamases and family VIII carboxylesterases. The gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant protein (EstU1) was further characterized. EstU1 showed esterase activity toward various chromogenic p-nitrophenyl esters. In addition, it exhibited hydrolytic activity toward nitrocefin, leading us to investigate whether EstU1 could hydrolyze β-lactam antibiotics. EstU1 was able to hydrolyze first-generation β-lactam antibiotics, such as cephalosporins, cephaloridine, cephalothin, and cefazolin. In a kinetic study, EstU1 showed a similar range of substrate affinities for both p-nitrophenyl butyrate and first-generation cephalosporins while the turnover efficiency for the latter was much lower. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that the catalytic triad of EstU1 plays a crucial role in hydrolyzing both ester bonds of p-nitrophenyl esters and amide bonds of the β-lactam ring of antibiotics, implicating the predicted catalytic triad of EstU1 in both activities. PMID:21908637

  2. Bacterial Expression and Kinetic Analysis of Carboxylesterase 001D from Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqiang; Liu, Jianwei; Lu, Mei; Ma, Zhiqing; Cai, Chongling; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Carboxylesterasesare an important class of detoxification enzymes involved in insecticide resistance in insects. A subgroup of Helicoverpa armigera esterases, known as Clade 001, was implicated in organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticide resistance due to their overabundance in resistant strains. In this work, a novel carboxylesterasegene 001D of H. armigera from China was cloned, which has an open reading frame of 1665 nucleotides encoding 554 amino acid residues. We used a series of fusion proteins to successfully express carboxylesterase 001D in Escherichia coli. Three different fusion proteins were generated and tested. The enzyme kinetic assay towards 1-naphthyl acetate showed all three purified fusion proteins are active with a Kcat between 0.35 and 2.29 s−1, and a Km between 7.61 and 19.72 μM. The HPLC assay showed all three purified fusion proteins had low but measurable hydrolase activity towards β-cypermethrin and fenvalerate insecticides (specific activities ranging from 0.13 to 0.67 μM·min−1·(μM−1·protein)). The enzyme was stable up to 40 °C and at pH 6.0–11.0. The results imply that carboxylesterase 001D is involved in detoxification, and this moderate insecticide hydrolysis may suggest that overexpression of the gene to enhance insecticide sequestration is necessary to allow carboxylesterases to confer resistance to these insecticides in H. armigera. PMID:27049381

  3. Carboxylesterase converts Amplex red to resorufin: Implications for mitochondrial H2O2 release assays

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Satomi; Treumann, Achim; Bell, Amy; Vistoli, Giulio; Nelson, Glyn; Hay, Sam; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Amplex Red is a fluorescent probe that is widely used to detect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a reaction where it is oxidised to resorufin by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a catalyst. This assay is highly rated amongst other similar probes thanks to its superior sensitivity and stability. However, we report here that Amplex Red is readily converted to resorufin by a carboxylesterase without requiring H2O2, horseradish peroxidase or oxygen: this reaction is seen in various tissue samples such as liver and kidney as well as in cultured cells, causing a serious distortion of H2O2 measurements. The reaction can be inhibited by Phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) at concentrations which do not disturb mitochondrial function nor the ability of the Amplex Red-HRP system to detect H2O2.In vitro experiments and in silico docking simulations indicate that carboxylesterases 1 and 2 recognise Amplex Red with the same kinetics as carboxylesterase-containing mitochondria. We propose two different approaches to correct for this problem and re-evaluate the commonly performed experimental procedure for the detection of H2O2 release from isolated liver mitochondria. Our results call for a serious re-examination of previous data. PMID:26577176

  4. Organophosphate inhibitors: the reactions of bis(p-nitrophenyl) methyl phosphate with liver carboxylesterases and alpha-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S E; Dudman, A P; De Jersey, J; Stoops, J K; Zerner, B

    1975-02-19

    Bis(p-nitrophenyl) methyl phosphate (BNMP) has been tested as a spectrophotometric titrant for a group of serine hydrolases. Bis(p-nitrophenyl) methyl phosphate reacts rapidly with liver carboxylesterases from chicken, sheep, and horse, and more slowly with alpha-chymotrypsin, releasing 2 mol of p-nitrophenol per active site titrated, and producing a phosphorylated enzyme very stable to dephosphorylation. However, pig liver carboxylesterase produces 2.2 mol of p-nitrophenol per active site titratedmreaction of pig and chicken liver carboxylesterases with bis(p-nitrophenyl) [3H]methyl [32P]phosphate clarified this differencemone molecule of the chicken enzyme reacts with one molecule of bis(p-nitrophenyl) methyl phosphate, releasing both p-nitrophenol residues, and resulting in an inhibited enzyme with one phosphorus atom and one methyl group covalently bound. Pig enzyme reacts rapidly, forming (presumably) methyl p-nitrophenyl phosphoryl-carboxylesterasemthis further reacts, concurrently producing methyl phosphoryl-carboxylesterase plus p-nitrophenol, or free enzyme plus methyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate, in the ratio of about 5 : 1 at pH 7.55. The free enzyme produced undergoes further reaction with bis(p-nitrophenyl) methyl phosphate until all the carboxylesterase is inhibited.

  5. Identification of a novel intracellular cholesteryl ester hydrolase (carboxylesterase 3) in human macrophages: compensatory increase in its expression after carboxylesterase 1 silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Bie, Jinghua; Wang, Jing; Marqueen, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester (CE) hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in the removal of free cholesterol (FC) from macrophage foam cells, and several enzymes have been identified as intracellular CE hydrolases in human macrophages. We have previously reported the antiatherogenic role of a carboxylesterase [carboxylesterase 1 (CES1)], and the objective of the present study was to determine the contribution of CES1 to total CE hydrolytic activity in human macrophages. Two approaches, namely, immune depletion and short hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated knockdown, were used. Immuneprecipitation by a CES1-specific antibody resulted in a 70–80% decrease in enzyme activity, indicating that CES1 is responsible for >70% of the total CE hydrolytic activity. THP1-shRNA cells were generated by stably transfecting human THP1 cells with four different CES1-specific shRNA vectors. Despite a significant (>90%) reduction in CES1 expression both at the mRNA and protein levels, CES1 knockdown neither decreased intracellular CE hydrolysis nor decreased FC efflux. Examination of the underlying mechanisms for the observed lack of effects of CES1 knockdown revealed a compensatory increase in the expression of a novel CES, CES3, which is only expressed at <30% of the level of CES1 in human macrophages. Transient overexpression of CES3 led to an increase in CE hydrolytic activity, mobilization of intracellular lipid droplets, and a reduction in cellular CE content, establishing CES3 as a bona fide CE hydrolase. This study provides the first evidence of functional compensation whereby increased expression of CES3 restores intracellular CE hydrolytic activity and FC efflux in CES1-deficient cells. Furthermore, these data support the concept that intracellular CE hydrolysis is a multienzyme process. PMID:22700792

  6. Organophosphorus Flame Retardants Inhibit Specific Liver Carboxylesterases and Cause Serum Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Humans are prevalently exposed to organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) contained in consumer products and electronics, though their toxicological effects and mechanisms remain poorly understood. We show here that OPFRs inhibit specific liver carboxylesterases (Ces) and cause altered hepatic lipid metabolism. Ablation of the OPFR target Ces1g has been previously linked to dyslipidemia in mice. Consistent with OPFR inhibition of Ces1g, we also observe OPFR-induced serum hypertriglyceridemia in mice. Our findings suggest novel toxicities that may arise from OPFR exposure and highlight the utility of chemoproteomic and metabolomic platforms in the toxicological characterization of environmental chemicals. PMID:24597639

  7. Recent progress in the discovery of natural inhibitors against human carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Dan; Zou, Li-Wei; Jin, Qiang; Hou, Jie; Ge, Guang-Bo; Yang, Ling

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterases (CEs) are important serine hydrolases catalyzing the hydrolysis of ester- or amide-containing compounds into the corresponding alcohols and carboxylic acids. In human, two primary carboxylesterases including hCE1 and hCE2 have been identified and extensively studied in the past decade. hCE1 is known to play crucial roles in the metabolism of a wide variety of endogenous esters, clinical drugs and insecticides, while hCE2 plays a key role in the metabolic activation of anticancer agents including irinotecan and capecitabine. The key roles of hCEs in both human health and xenobiotic metabolism arouse great interest in the discovery of potent and selective hCEs inhibitors to modulate endobiotic metabolism or to improve the outcomes of patients administrated with ester drugs. This review covers the significance and recent progress in the discovery of natural inhibitors against hCEs. The tools for screening and characterization of inhibitors against human CEs, including traditional LC-based approaches and the newly developed optical substrate-based assays, are summarized and discussed for the first time. Furthermore, the structural information and inhibitory capacities of all reported hCEs inhibitors including fatty acids, flavonoids, tanshinones and triterpenoids have been systematically summarized. All information and knowledge presented in this review will be very helpful for medicinal chemists to develop more potent and highly selective inhibitors against hCEs for potential biomedical applications.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Preliminary Evaluation of Doxazolidine Carbamates as Prodrugs Activated by Carboxylesterases

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, David J.; Barthel, Benjamin L.; Post, Glen C.; Kalet, Brian T.; Nafie, Jordan W.; Shoemaker, Richard K.; Koch, Tad H.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and tumor cell growth inhibition by Doxazolidine carbamate prodrugs are reported. The carbamates were designed for selective hydrolysis by one or more human carboxylesterases to release Doxazolidine (Doxaz), the formaldehyde-oxazolidine of doxorubicin that cross-links DNA to trigger cell death. Simple butyl and pentyl, but not ethyl, carbamate prodrugs inhibited the growth of cancer cells that overexpress carboxylesterase CES1 (hCE1) and CES2 (hiCE). Relative CES1 and CES2 expression levels were determined by reverse transcription of the respective mRNAs followed by PCR amplification. More complex structures with a p-aminobenzyl alcohol (PABA) self-eliminating spacer showed better growth inhibition (IC50 50 nM for Hep G2 liver cancer cells) while exhibiting reduced toxicity toward rat cardiomyocytes, relative to the parent drug doxorubicin. Pentyl 4-(Ndoxazolidinylcarbonyloxymethyl) phenylcarbamate (pentyl PABC-Doxaz) the lead compound for further investigation, appears to be activated in Hep G2 cells that express both CES1 and CES2. PMID:17125253

  9. Enzymatic hydrolysis of indometacin farnesil, a prodrug of indomethacin, by carboxylesterase in cultured synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Mishima, M; Kobayashi, S; Hashida, R; Yuzuriha, T; Sato, T; Satoh, T

    1991-05-01

    The hydrolysis of indometacin farnesil (IMF) in the synovial cells of rat and human and the subcellular fractions of rat liver were investigated in relation to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in the synovial cells. The inhibition of PGE2 production in cultured human synovial cells by anti-inflammatory drugs was potent in the order of IND, IMF and acetyl salicylic acid. However, when the cells were pretreated with IMF, the inhibitory activity of IMF was retained even after the compound was washed out from the medium. No duration of the inhibition was seen in the pretreatment of the cells with IND or acetyl salicylic acid. These results suggest that IMF incorporated into the synovial cells was hydrolyzed gradually to IND. In fact, IMF was taken up by rat synovial cells in culture and considerable amount of IND, which increased with culture period, was found out in the cells. Furthermore, the IMF hydrolase activity was found in microsomal and lysosomal fractions of rat liver, and the hydrolase was identified as carboxylesterase by using bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate, a specific inhibitor of carboxylesterase.

  10. Crystal Structure of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus Carboxylesterase Est55 and Its Activation of Prodrug CPT-11

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Ewis, Hosam E.; Tai, Phang C.; Lu, Chung-Dar; Weber, Irene T.

    2007-01-01

    Several mammalian carboxylesterases were shown to activate the prodrug irinotecan (CPT-11) to produce SN-38, a topoisomerase inhibitor used in cancer therapy. However, the potential use of bacterial carboxylesterases, which have the advantage of high stability, has not been explored. We present the crystal structure of the carboxyesterase Est55 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus and evaluation of its enzyme activity on CPT-11. Crystal structures were determined at pH 6.2 and 6.8 and resolution of 2.0 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Est55 folds into three domains, a catalytic domain, an α/β domain and a regulatory domain. The structure is in an inactive form; the side chain of His409, one of the catalytic triad residues, is directed away from the other catalytic residues Ser194 and Glu310. Moreover, the adjacent Cys408 is triply oxidized and lies in the oxyanion hole, which would block the binding of substrate, suggesting a regulatory role. However, Cys408 is not essential for enzyme activity. Mutation of Cys408 showed that hydrophobic side chains were favorable, while polar serine was unfavorable for enzyme activity. Est55 was shown to hydrolyze CPT-11 into the active form SN-38. The mutant C408V provided a more stable enzyme for activation of CPT-11. Therefore, engineered thermostable Est55 is a candidate for use with irinotecan in enzyme-prodrug cancer therapy. PMID:17239398

  11. Insecticide resistance and malathion carboxylesterase in the sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina.

    PubMed

    Whyard, S; Russell, R J; Walker, V K

    1994-02-01

    Resistance to the organophosphorus insecticide malathion in genetically related strains of the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina was examined. Separate lines of blowflies were established by homozygosis of the fourth chromosome of the parental RM strain. Both the RM and the derived resistant (der-R) strains are approximately 100 times more resistant to malathion than the related susceptible der-S strain, resistance being correlated with a 45- to 50-fold increase in a malathion carboxylesterase (MCE) activity. MCE has a pH optimum ranging between 6.6 and 8.0 and is strongly inhibited by the carboxylesterase inhibitors triphenyl phosphate, paraoxon, and diisopropylfluorophosphate. Subcellular fractionation revealed that MCE was localized predominantly to the cytosol and mitochondria in both resistant and susceptible blowflies. A single MCE was purified to homogeneity from RM blowflies. It has a pI of 5.5, is a monomer of 60.5 kDa, and hydrolyzes malathion with a Vmax of 755 nmol/min/mg protein and a Km of 11.0 microM. L. cuprina have thus evolved a remarkable MCE which is faster and more efficient at hydrolyzing a specific insecticide than any other insect esterase vet described.

  12. Demonstration of carboxylesterase in cytology samples of human nasal respiratory epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, D.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Avila, K.

    1995-12-01

    The epithelial lining of the nasal airways is a target for responses induced by a variety of toxicant exposures. The high metabolic capacity of this tissue has been suggested to play a role in both protection of the airways through detoxication of certain toxicants, as well as in activation of other compounds to more toxic metabolites. Specifically, nasal carboxylesterase (CE) has been shown to mediate the toxicity of inhaled esters and acrylates by converting them to more toxic acid and alcohol metabolites which can be cytotoxic and/or carcinogenic to the nasal mucosa. Due to difficulties in extrapolating rodent models to human, new paradigms using human cells and tissues are essential to understanding and evaluating the metabolic processes in human nasal epithelium.

  13. Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface upon lipid raft fluidization.

    PubMed

    Orihashi, Kaoru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Tashima, Yuko; Morita, Takashi; Kondoh, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) is well known as a biotransformation enzyme for prodrugs and xenobiotics. Here, we purified CES as a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-releasing factor (GPIase) that releases such protein from the cell surface. All five isoforms of CES showed this activity to various degrees. When the serine residue of the catalytic triad for esterase was replaced by alanine, esterase activity was completely disrupted, while full GPIase activity remained, suggesting that these two activities are exhibited via different mechanisms. CES6, a new class of mammalian CES, exhibited the highest GPIase activity and released specific GPI-APs from the cell surface after lipid raft fluidization. The released product contained a GPI component, indicating that GPI-AP was released by cleavage in GPI. These results revealed for the first time that CES recognizes and catalyzes macromolecule GPI-AP as well as small molecules.

  14. Recommended nomenclature for five mammalian carboxylesterase gene families: human, mouse, and rat genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Wright, Matthew W; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Cox, Laura A; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Imai, Teruko; Ishibashi, Shun; Lehner, Richard; Miyazaki, Masao; Perkins, Everett J; Potter, Phillip M; Redinbo, Matthew R; Robert, Jacques; Satoh, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Yan, Bingfan; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Zechner, Rudolf; Maltais, Lois J

    2010-10-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES or Ces) genes encode enzymes that participate in xenobiotic, drug, and lipid metabolism in the body and are members of at least five gene families. Tandem duplications have added more genes for some families, particularly for mouse and rat genomes, which has caused confusion in naming rodent Ces genes. This article describes a new nomenclature system for human, mouse, and rat carboxylesterase genes that identifies homolog gene families and allocates a unique name for each gene. The guidelines of human, mouse, and rat gene nomenclature committees were followed and "CES" (human) and "Ces" (mouse and rat) root symbols were used followed by the family number (e.g., human CES1). Where multiple genes were identified for a family or where a clash occurred with an existing gene name, a letter was added (e.g., human CES4A; mouse and rat Ces1a) that reflected gene relatedness among rodent species (e.g., mouse and rat Ces1a). Pseudogenes were named by adding "P" and a number to the human gene name (e.g., human CES1P1) or by using a new letter followed by ps for mouse and rat Ces pseudogenes (e.g., Ces2d-ps). Gene transcript isoforms were named by adding the GenBank accession ID to the gene symbol (e.g., human CES1_AB119995 or mouse Ces1e_BC019208). This nomenclature improves our understanding of human, mouse, and rat CES/Ces gene families and facilitates research into the structure, function, and evolution of these gene families. It also serves as a model for naming CES genes from other mammalian species.

  15. Expression and partial purification of a recombinant secretory form of human liver carboxylesterase.

    PubMed

    Scott, D F; Chacko, T L; Maxwell, D M; Schlager, J J; Lanclos, K D

    1999-10-01

    Serine-dependent carboxylesterases (EC 3.1.1.1) are found in a variety of tissues with high activity detected in the liver. Carboxylesterases (CaE) hydrolyze aliphatic and aromatic esters, and aromatic amides, and play an important role in the detoxification of xenobiotic chemicals that contain organophosphate (OP) compounds. The detoxifying ability of CaE is limited by its low concentration in serum where it encounters OP compounds. Studies in our laboratory have shown that a pRC/CMV-hCaE plasmid construct, stably integrated into 293T cells, expresses a human liver CaE in culture. However, the enzyme remained inside the cell and reached a low steady-state level of expression. The goals of this study were to overexpress a functional human liver CaE from a recombinant cDNA in a human cell line and to isolate and purify the recombinant protein. To accomplish these goals, a single amino acid change was made in the C-terminal retrieval signal, HIEL (His-Ile-Glu-Leu), of human liver CaE. The mutation produced a unique Eco47III restriction site, which aided in clone selection. The recombinant plasmid, pRc/CMV-mhCaE, was isolated and stably integrated into human 293T cells. Expression of the altered cDNA resulted in secretion of an active CaE up to levels of 500 enzyme units per liter of growth medium. Secretory CaE displayed isoelectric focusing patterns similar to those of the native enzyme with no observable changes in activity. The secreted enzyme was partially purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and Cibacron blue affinity chromatography. Partial enzyme purification was achieved, and CaE retained a high level of enzymatic activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Identification of Carboxylesterase Genes Implicated in Temephos Resistance in the Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Poupardin, Rodolphe; Srisukontarat, Wannaporn; Yunta, Cristina; Ranson, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    Background Thailand is currently experiencing one of its worst dengue outbreaks in decades. As in most countries where this disease is endemic, dengue control in Thailand is largely reliant on the use of insecticides targeting both immature and adult stages of the Aedes mosquito, with the organophosphate insecticide, temephos, being the insecticide of choice for attacking the mosquito larvae. Resistance to temephos was first detected in Aedes aegypti larvae in Thailand approximately 25 years ago but the mechanism responsible for this resistance has not been determined. Principal Findings Bioassays on Ae. aegypti larvae from Thailand detected temephos resistance ratios ranging from 3.5 fold in Chiang Mai to nearly 10 fold in Nakhon Sawan (NS) province. Synergist and biochemical assays suggested a role for increased carboxylesterase (CCE) activities in conferring temephos resistance in the NS population and microarray analysis revealed that the CCE gene, CCEae3a, was upregulated more than 60 fold in the NS population compared to the susceptible population. Upregulation of CCEae3a was shown to be partially due to gene duplication. Another CCE gene, CCEae6a, was also highly regulated in both comparisons. Sequencing and in silico structure prediction of CCEae3a showed that several amino acid polymorphisms in the NS population may also play a role in the increased resistance phenotype. Significance Carboxylesterases have previously been implicated in conferring temephos resistance in Ae aegypti but the specific member(s) of this family responsible for this phenotype have not been identified. The identification of a strong candidate is an important step in the development of new molecular diagnostic tools for management of temephos resistant populations and thus improved control of dengue. PMID:24651719

  17. Hydrolysis of organophosphorus insecticides by in vitro modified carboxylesterase E3 from Lucilia cuprina.

    PubMed

    Heidari, R; Devonshire, A L; Campbell, B E; Bell, K L; Dorrian, S J; Oakeshott, J G; Russell, R J

    2004-04-01

    Resistance of the blowfly, Lucilia cuprina, to organophosphorus (OP) insecticides is due to mutations in LcalphaE7, the gene encoding carboxylesterase E3, that enhance the enzyme's ability to hydrolyse insecticides. Two mutations occur naturally, G137D in the oxyanion hole of the esterase, and W251L in the acyl binding pocket. Previous in vitro mutagenesis and expression of these modifications to the cloned gene have confirmed their functional significance. G137D enhances hydrolysis of diethyl and dimethyl phosphates by 55- and 33-fold, respectively. W251L increases dimethyl phosphate hydrolysis similarly, but only 10-fold for the diethyl homolog; unlike G137D however, it also retains ability to hydrolyse carboxylesters in the leaving group of malathion (malathion carboxylesterase, MCE), conferring strong resistance to this compound. In the present work, we substituted these and nearby amino acids by others expected to affect the efficiency of the enzyme. Changing G137 to glutamate or histidine was less effective than aspartate in improving OP hydrolase activity and like G137D, it diminished MCE activity, primarily through increases in Km. Various substitutions of W251 to other smaller residues had a broadly similar effect to W251L on OP hydrolase and MCE activities, but at least two were quantitatively better in kinetic parameters relating to malathion resistance. One, W251G, which occurs naturally in a malathion resistant hymenopterous parasitoid, improved MCE activity more than 20-fold. Mutations at other sites near the bottom of the catalytic cleft generally diminished OP hydrolase and MCE activities but one, F309L, also yielded some improvements in OP hydrolase activities. The results are discussed in relation to likely steric effects on enzyme-substrate interactions and future evolution of this gene.

  18. Purification and characterization of pranlukast hydrolase from rat liver microsomes: the hydrolase is identical to carboxylesterase pI 6.2.

    PubMed

    Luan, L; Sugiyama, T; Takai, S; Usami, Y; Adachi, T; Katagiri, Y; Hirano, K

    1997-01-01

    Two carboxylesterases with pI 6.0 and 6.2 derived from rat liver microsomes were purified. The two isozymes were remarkably different in substrate specificity, but they had equal enzymatic activity for alpha-naphthyl acetate and were inhibited equally by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and bis-(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP). Carboxylesterases pI 6.0 and 6.2 are identical to the enzymes referred to as hydrolase A and B, respectively, from the results of amino acid sequence analyses. Pranlukast was effectively hydrolyzed by carboxylesterase pI 6.2 but not by the pI 6.0 enzyme, and the difference in the pranlukast metabolism between the human and the rat could be explained by the substrate specificity of carboxylesterase. Furthermore, prodrugs of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors were found to be converted to the active drugs after hydrolysis by the carboxylesterases pI 6.0 and 6.2. Carboxylesterases generally catalyze the hydrolysis of ester-type drugs preferentially rather than amide-type drugs.

  19. Structure-Activity Relationships of Substituted 1-Pyridyl-2-Phenyl-1,2-Ethanediones: Potent, Selective Carboxylesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Young, Brandon M.; Hyatt, Janice L.; Bouck, David C.; Chen, Taosheng; Hanumesh, Parimala; Price, Jeanine; Boyd, Vincent A.; Potter, Philip M.; Webb, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of intestinal carboxylesterases may allow modification of the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamic profile of existing drugs by altering half-life or toxicity. Since previously identified diaryl ethane-1,2-dione inhibitors are decidedly hydrophobic, a modified dione scaffold was designed and elaborated into a >300 member library, which was subsequently screened to establish the SAR for esterase inhibition. This allowed the identification of single digit nanomolar hiCE inhibitors that showed improvement in both selectivity and measured solubility. PMID:21105730

  20. Identification of the chloramphenicol-hydrolyzing enzyme of guinea pig liver as one of the nonspecific carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, D; Heymann, E

    1982-03-01

    Guinea pig liver has the highest chloramphenicol-hydrolyzing capacity among the livers of various mammals. The enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of the amide-bond in chloramphenicol is one of the isoenzymes of the microsomal nonspecific carboxylesterases. This isoenzyme is related to the well-known acetanilide-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases/amidases of pig and rat liver. The guinea pig liver enzyme is purified 24-fold starting with microsomes. The purified enzyme is essentially free from other proteins except other carboxylesterase isoenzymes with similar properties. The chloramphenicol-hydrolyzing esterase has an apparent molecular weight of about 180,000, a subunit weight of 60,000 and a pH optimum at 8.5. It also hydrolyzes methyl butyrate and acetanilide and it is completely inhibited by diethyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate. Two assay procedures for the enzymatic chloramphenicol hydrolysis are described: a thin-layer chromatographic assay using radioactive chloramphenicol and a colorimetric assay utilizing the reaction of the liberated amine with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid.

  1. Simultaneous bioremediation and biodetection of mercury ion through surface display of carboxylesterase E2 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kun; Lv, Min; Wang, Qiaoning; Wu, Yixuan; Liao, Chunyang; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-10-15

    Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and presents significant threats to organisms and natural ecosystems. Recently, the mercury remediation as well as its detection by environmental-friendly biotechnology has received increasing attention. In this study, carboxylesterase E2 from mercury-resistant strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA1 has been successfully displayed on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli Top10 bacteria to simultaneously adsorb and detect mercury ion (Hg(2+)). The transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that Hg(2+) can be absorbed by carboxylesterase E2 and accumulated on the outer membrane of surface-displayed E. coli bacteria. The adsorption of Hg(2+) followed a physicochemical, equilibrated and saturatable mechanism, which well fits the traditional Langmuir adsorption model. The surface-displayed system can be regenerated through regulating pH values. As its activity can be inhibited by Hg(2+), carboxylesterase E2 has been used to detect the concentration of Hg(2+) in water samples. The developed surface display system will be of great potential in the simultaneous bioremediation and biodetection of environmental mercury pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biochemical and genetic polymorphisms for carboxylesterase and acetylesterase in grape clones of Vitis vinifera L. (Vitaceae) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Orasmo, Gleice Ribeiro; Oliveira-Collet, Sandra A; Lapenta, Ana Sílvia; de Fátima P S Machado, Maria

    2007-10-01

    Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was employed to show the highest number of esterase loci and to detect alpha- and beta-esterase polymorphisms in leaf buds of Vitis vinifera cultivars. A total of 16 esterase isozymes were detected in leaf buds from 235 plants including Italia, Rubi, Benitaka, and Brasil cultivars. Biochemical characterization of the grape esterases using ester substrates revealed alpha-, beta-, and alpha/beta-esterases with inhibitor tests distinguishing both carboxylesterases (EST-2, EST-3, EST-5, EST-6, EST-7, EST-8, EST-9, EST-10, and EST-16 isozymes) and acetylesterases (EST-4, EST-11, EST-12, EST-13, EST-14, EST-15 isozymes). No allele variation for alpha-, beta-, and alpha/beta-esterases was detected; however, EST-3 alpha-carboxylesterase was absent in 61.7% of vines, and EST-4 alpha/beta-acetylesterase was absent in one vine of Rubi cv. Null EST-3 carboxylesterase phenotype (61.7%) cannot be explained in this article, but the high genetic polymorphism in four V. vinifera clones is a positive aspect for genetic selection and development of new clones with different characteristics.

  3. Substrate specificity and kinetic properties of enzymes belonging to the hormone-sensitive lipase family: comparison with non-lipolytic and lipolytic carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Chahinian, Henri; Ali, Yassine Ben; Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Petry, Stefan; Mandrich, Luigi; Manco, Guiseppe; Canaan, Stephane; Sarda, Louis

    2005-12-30

    We have studied the kinetics of hydrolysis of triacylglycerols, vinyl esters and p-nitrophenyl butyrate by four carboxylesterases of the HSL family, namely recombinant human hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), EST2 from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, AFEST from Archeoglobus fulgidus, and protein RV1399C from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The kinetic properties of enzymes of the HSL family have been compared to those of a series of lipolytic and non-lipolytic carboxylesterases including human pancreatic lipase, guinea pig pancreatic lipase related protein 2, lipases from Mucor miehei and Thermomyces lanuginosus, cutinase from Fusarium solani, LipA from Bacillus subtilis, porcine liver esterase and Esterase A from Aspergilus niger. Results indicate that human HSL, together with other lipolytic carboxylesterases, are active on short chain esters and hydrolyze water insoluble trioctanoin, vinyl laurate and olive oil, whereas the action of EST2, AFEST, protein RV1399C and non-lipolytic carboxylesterases is restricted to solutions of short chain substrates. Lipolytic and non-lipolytic carboxylesterases can be differentiated by their respective value of K(0.5) (apparent K(m)) for the hydrolysis of short chain esters. Among lipolytic enzymes, those possessing a lid domain display higher activity on tributyrin, trioctanoin and olive oil suggesting, then, that the lid structure contributes to enzyme binding to triacylglycerols. Progress reaction curves of the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate by lipolytic carboxylesterases with lid domain show a latency phase which is not observed with human HSL, non-lipolytic carboxylesterases, and lipolytic enzymes devoid of a lid structure as cutinase.

  4. Structure-Activity Relationships of Pentacyclic Triterpenoids as Potent and Selective Inhibitors against Human Carboxylesterase 1

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Wei; Dou, Tong-Yi; Wang, Ping; Lei, Wei; Weng, Zi-Miao; Hou, Jie; Wang, Dan-Dan; Fan, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Ge, Guang-Bo; Yang, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1), one of the most important serine hydrolases distributed in liver and adipocytes, plays key roles in endobiotic homeostasis and xenobiotic metabolism. This study aimed to find potent and selective inhibitors against hCE1 from phytochemicals and their derivatives. To this end, a series of natural triterpenoids were collected and their inhibitory effects against human carboxylesterases (hCEs) were assayed using D-Luciferin methyl ester (DME) and 6,8-dichloro-9,9-dimethyl-7-oxo-7,9-dihydroacridin-2-yl benzoate (DDAB) as specific optical substrate for hCE1, and hCE2, respectively. Following screening of a series of natural triterpenoids, oleanolic acid (OA), and ursolic acid (UA) were found with strong inhibitory effects on hCE1 and relative high selectivity over hCE2. In order to get the highly selective and potent inhibitors of hCE1, a series of OA and UA derivatives were synthesized from OA and UA by chemical modifications including oxidation, reduction, esterification, and amidation. The inhibitory effects of these derivatives on hCEs were assayed and the structure-activity relationships of tested triterpenoids as hCE1 inhibitors were carefully investigated. The results demonstrated that the carbonyl group at the C-28 site is essential for hCE1 inhibition, the modifications of OA or UA at this site including esters, amides and alcohols are unbeneficial for hCE1 inhibition. In contrast, the structural modifications on OA and UA at other sites, such as converting the C-3 hydroxy group to 3-O-β-carboxypropionyl (compounds 20 and 22), led to a dramatically increase of the inhibitory effects against hCE1 and very high selectivity over hCE2. 3D-QSAR analysis of all tested triterpenoids including OA and UA derivatives provide new insights into the fine relationships linking between the inhibitory effects on hCE1 and the steric-electrostatic properties of triterpenoids. Furthermore, both inhibition kinetic analyses and docking simulations

  5. Structure-Activity Relationships of Pentacyclic Triterpenoids as Potent and Selective Inhibitors against Human Carboxylesterase 1.

    PubMed

    Zou, Li-Wei; Dou, Tong-Yi; Wang, Ping; Lei, Wei; Weng, Zi-Miao; Hou, Jie; Wang, Dan-Dan; Fan, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Ge, Guang-Bo; Yang, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1), one of the most important serine hydrolases distributed in liver and adipocytes, plays key roles in endobiotic homeostasis and xenobiotic metabolism. This study aimed to find potent and selective inhibitors against hCE1 from phytochemicals and their derivatives. To this end, a series of natural triterpenoids were collected and their inhibitory effects against human carboxylesterases (hCEs) were assayed using D-Luciferin methyl ester (DME) and 6,8-dichloro-9,9-dimethyl-7-oxo-7,9-dihydroacridin-2-yl benzoate (DDAB) as specific optical substrate for hCE1, and hCE2, respectively. Following screening of a series of natural triterpenoids, oleanolic acid (OA), and ursolic acid (UA) were found with strong inhibitory effects on hCE1 and relative high selectivity over hCE2. In order to get the highly selective and potent inhibitors of hCE1, a series of OA and UA derivatives were synthesized from OA and UA by chemical modifications including oxidation, reduction, esterification, and amidation. The inhibitory effects of these derivatives on hCEs were assayed and the structure-activity relationships of tested triterpenoids as hCE1 inhibitors were carefully investigated. The results demonstrated that the carbonyl group at the C-28 site is essential for hCE1 inhibition, the modifications of OA or UA at this site including esters, amides and alcohols are unbeneficial for hCE1 inhibition. In contrast, the structural modifications on OA and UA at other sites, such as converting the C-3 hydroxy group to 3-O-β-carboxypropionyl (compounds 20 and 22), led to a dramatically increase of the inhibitory effects against hCE1 and very high selectivity over hCE2. 3D-QSAR analysis of all tested triterpenoids including OA and UA derivatives provide new insights into the fine relationships linking between the inhibitory effects on hCE1 and the steric-electrostatic properties of triterpenoids. Furthermore, both inhibition kinetic analyses and docking simulations

  6. Hydrolysis of pyrethroids by human and rat tissues: Examination of intestinal, liver and serum carboxylesterases

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K. . E-mail: mross@cvm.msstate.edu

    2007-05-15

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are {approx} 2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts ({approx} 40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be

  7. Hydrolysis of pyrethroids by human and rat tissues: examination of intestinal, liver and serum carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Crow, J Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M; Ross, Matthew K

    2007-05-15

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are approximately 2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts (approximately 40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products

  8. Hydrolysis of Pyrethroids by Human and Rat Tissues: Examination of Intestinal, Liver and Serum Carboxylesterases

    PubMed Central

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver, and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are ~2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts (~40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin, and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be detected. Together

  9. Age-Related Inducibility of Carboxylesterases by the Antiepileptic Agent Phenobarbital and Implications in Drug Metabolism and Lipid Accumulation 1, 2

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Da; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Yang, Dongfang; Yan, Bingfang

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CES) constitute a class of hydrolytic enzymes that play critical roles in drug metabolism and lipid mobilization. Previous studies with a large number of human liver samples have suggested that the inducibility of carboxylesterases is inversely related with age. To directly test this possibility, neonatal (10 days of age) and adult mice were treated with the antiepileptic agent phenobarbital. The expression and hydrolytic activity were determined on six major carboxylesterases including ces1d, the ortholog of human CES1. Without exception, all carboxylesterases tested were induced to a greater extent in neonatal than adult mice. The induction was detected at mRNA, protein and catalytic levels. Ces1d was greatly induced and found to rapidly hydrolyze the antiplatelet agent clopidogrel and support the accumulation of neutral lipids. Phenobarbital represents a large number of therapeutic agents that induce drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in a species-conserved manner. The higher inducibility of carboxylesterases in the developmental age likely represents a general phenomenon cross species including human. Consequently, individuals in the developmental age may experience greater drug-drug interactions. The greater induction of ces1d also provides a molecular explanation to the clinical observation that children on antiepileptic drugs increase plasma lipids. PMID:22513142

  10. Effect of environmental contaminants in the Mississippi River Basin on carboxylesterases from four aquatic species

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, R.; Huang, T.; Obih, P.; Hartley, W.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the sensitivity of different classes of esterases in various aquatic species to environmental contaminants and the possible use of these enzymes as biomarkers for monitoring the effects of pollutants. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), and the non-specific carboxylesterases (CaE) were analyzed in three fish species, Ictiobus bubalus (small mouth buffalo), Ictiobus cyprinellus (big mouth buffalo) and Lepisosteus oculatus (spotted gar) and the green tree frog, Hyla cinerea. These samples were collected from the Devil`s Swamp Site (DSS), an industrial site known to be highly contaminated at the Mississippi River Basin, and Lake Tunica, a nonindustrial site. ACHE and BuChE activities in the subcellular fractions of liver and brain were significantly lower in fishes and frogs obtained from DSS when compared to the same species obtained from Tunica swamp site. The greatest decrease was observed with ACHE activity in the liver and brain of Ictiobus bubalus from DSS. CaE activity analyzed with p-nitrophenyl acetate was found to be significantly lower in the liver of all three fish species collected from DSS when compared to the same fish species obtained from the Tunica swamp site.

  11. Identification and Characterization of Carboxylesterases from Brachypodium distachyon Deacetylating Trichothecene Mycotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Schmeitzl, Clemens; Varga, Elisabeth; Warth, Benedikt; Kugler, Karl G.; Malachová, Alexandra; Michlmayr, Herbert; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Krska, Rudolf; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Increasing frequencies of 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3-ADON)-producing strains of Fusarium graminearum (3-ADON chemotype) have been reported in North America and Asia. 3-ADON is nearly nontoxic at the level of the ribosomal target and has to be deacetylated to cause inhibition of protein biosynthesis. Plant cells can efficiently remove the acetyl groups of 3-ADON, but the underlying genes are yet unknown. We therefore performed a study of the family of candidate carboxylesterases (CXE) genes of the monocot model plant Brachypodium distachyon. We report the identification and characterization of the first plant enzymes responsible for deacetylation of trichothecene toxins. The product of the BdCXE29 gene efficiently deacetylates T-2 toxin to HT-2 toxin, NX-2 to NX-3, both 3-ADON and 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15-ADON) into deoxynivalenol and, to a lesser degree, also fusarenon X into nivalenol. The BdCXE52 esterase showed lower activity than BdCXE29 when expressed in yeast and accepts 3-ADON, NX-2, 15-ADON and, to a limited extent, fusarenon X as substrates. Expression of these Brachypodium genes in yeast increases the toxicity of 3-ADON, suggesting that highly similar genes existing in crop plants may act as susceptibility factors in Fusarium head blight disease. PMID:26712789

  12. An in vitro screening with emerging contaminants reveals inhibition of carboxylesterase activity in aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Solé, Montserrat; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2015-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) form part of the new generation of pollutants present in many freshwater and marine ecosystems. Although environmental concentrations of these bioactive substances are low, they cause sublethal effects (e.g., enzyme inhibition) in non-target organisms. However, little is known on metabolism of PPCPs by non-mammal species. Herein, an in vitro enzyme trial was performed to explore sensitivity of carboxylesterase (CE) activity of aquatic organisms to fourteen PPCPs. The esterase activity was determined in the liver of Mediterranean freshwater fish (Barbus meridionalis and Squalius laietanus), coastal marine fish (Dicentrarchus labrax and Solea solea), middle-slope fish (Trachyrhynchus scabrus), deep-sea fish (Alepocephalus rostratus and Cataetix laticeps), and in the digestive gland of a decapod crustacean (Aristeus antennatus). Results showed that 100μM of the lipid regulators simvastatin and fenofibrate significantly inhibited (30-80% of controls) the CE activity of all target species. Among the personal care products, nonylphenol and triclosan were strong esterase inhibitors in most species (36-68% of controls). Comparison with literature data suggests that fish CE activity is as sensitive to inhibition by some PPCPs as that of mammals, although their basal activity levels are lower than in mammals. Pending further studies on the interaction between PPCPs and CE activity, we postulate that this enzyme may act as a molecular sink for certain PPCPs in a comparable way than that described for the organophosphorus pesticides.

  13. Inhibition of human carboxylesterases hCE1 and hiCE by cholinesterase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tsurkan, Lyudmila G.; Hatfield, M. Jason; Edwards, Carol C.; Hyatt, Janice L.; Potter, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are ubiquitously expressed proteins that are responsible for the detoxification of xenobiotics. They tend to be expressed in tissues likely to be exposed to such agents (e.g., lung and gut epithelia, liver) and can hydrolyze numerous agents, including many clinically used drugs. Due to the considerable structural similarity between cholinesterases (ChE) and CEs, we have assessed the ability of a series of ChE inhibitors to modulate the activity of the human liver (hCE1) and the human intestinal CE (hiCE) isoforms, We observed inhibition of hCE1 and hiCE by carbamate-containing small molecules, including those used for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. For example, rivastigmine resulted in greater than 95% inhibition of hiCE that was irreversible under the conditions used. Hence, the administration of esterified drugs, in combination with these carbamates, may inadvertently result in decreased hydrolysis of the former, thereby limiting their efficacy. Therefore drug:drug interactions should be carefully evaluated in individuals receiving ChE inhibitors. PMID:23123248

  14. Human Carboxylesterase 2 Reverses Obesity-Induced Diacylglycerol Accumulation and Glucose Intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Maxwell A; Massart, Julie; Hunerdosse, Devon M; Schönke, Milena; Correia, Jorge C; Louie, Sharon M; Ruas, Jorge L; Näslund, Erik; Nomura, Daniel K; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-01-17

    Serine hydrolases are a large family of multifunctional enzymes known to influence obesity. Here, we performed activity-based protein profiling to assess the functional level of serine hydrolases in liver biopsies from lean and obese humans in order to gain mechanistic insight into the pathophysiology of metabolic disease. We identified reduced hepatic activity of carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) and arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC) in human obesity. In primary human hepatocytes, CES2 knockdown impaired glucose storage and lipid oxidation. In mice, obesity reduced CES2, whereas adenoviral delivery of human CES2 reversed hepatic steatosis, improved glucose tolerance, and decreased inflammation. Lipidomic analysis identified a network of CES2-regulated lipids altered in human and mouse obesity. CES2 possesses triglyceride and diacylglycerol lipase activities and displayed an inverse correlation with HOMA-IR and hepatic diacylglycerol concentrations in humans. Thus, decreased CES2 is a conserved feature of obesity and plays a causative role in the pathogenesis of obesity-related metabolic disturbances. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of carboxylesterase 2 genetic polymorphisms on mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics in Japanese renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, N; Miura, M; Satoh, S; Inoue, K; Kagaya, H; Saito, M; Habuchi, T; Suzuki, T

    2009-05-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA), converted from the prodrug mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), is generated by intestinal and hepatic esterases. The role of carboxylesterase (CES) in MMF hydrolysis was examined in vitro using human liver microsomes. V(max) and K(m) values of MMF hydrolysis in pooled human liver microsomes were 1368 +/- 44 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein and 1030 +/- 65 microM, respectively. Hydrolytic activity was inhibited by the CES inhibitors phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, bis-p-nitorophenylphosphate and diisopropylfluorophosphate, with IC(50) values of 77.1, 3.59 and 0.0312 microM, respectively. Eighty Japanese renal transplant recipients that received repeated-doses of MMF, tacrolimus and prednisolone,were evaluated for MPA pharmacokinetics 28 days after transplantation to investigate the relationship between MPA pharmacokinetics and CES2 genetic polymorphisms. No significant differences in MPA pharmacokinetics were observed between CES2 A4595G, C8721T orA-1548G genotype groups. CES2 allelic variants also did not appear to affect plasma MPA concentrations between individuals. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that while CES1 and/or CES2 are involved in the hydrolysis of MMF to MPA, CES2 allelic variants appeared to make only a minor contribution to inter-personal differences in MPA pharmacokinetics.

  16. A Two-Photon Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Carboxylesterase 2 in Living Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiang; Feng, Lei; Wang, Dan-Dan; Dai, Zi-Ru; Wang, Ping; Zou, Li-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Jia-Yue; Yu, Yang; Ge, Guang-Bo; Cui, Jing-Nan; Yang, Ling

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a two-photon ratiometric fluorescent probe NCEN has been designed and developed for highly selective and sensitive sensing of human carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2) based on the catalytic properties and substrate preference of hCE2. Upon addition of hCE2, the probe could be readily hydrolyzed to release 4-amino-1,8-naphthalimide (NAH), which brings remarkable red-shift in fluorescence (90 nm) spectrum. The newly developed probe exhibits good specificity, ultrahigh sensitivity, and has been successfully applied to determine the real activities of hCE2 in complex biological samples such as cell and tissue preparations. NCEN has also been used for two-photon imaging of intracellular hCE2 in living cells as well as in deep-tissues for the first time, and the results showed that the probe exhibited high ratiometric imaging resolution and deep-tissue imaging depth. All these findings suggested that this probe holds great promise for applications in bioimaging of endogenous hCE2 in living cells and in exploring the biological functions of hCE2 in complex biological systems.

  17. Overexpression of carboxylesterase contributes to the attenuation of cyanotoxin microcystin-LR toxicity.

    PubMed

    Takumi, Shota; Shimono, Tai; Ikema, Satoshi; Hotta, Yuki; Chigwechokha, Petros K; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Sugiyama, Yasumasa; Hashimoto, Mitsuru; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Komatsu, Masaharu

    2017-04-01

    Microcystin-LR is a hepatotoxin produced by several cyanobacteria. Its toxicity is mainly due to a inhibition of protein phosphatase, PP1 and PP2A. Previously, we used a cell line stably expressing uptake transporter for microcystin-LR, OATP1B3 (HEK293-OATP1B3 cells). In this study, to determine whether overexpression of carboxylesterase (CES), which degrades ester-group and amide-group, attenuates the cytotoxicity of microcystin-LR, we generated the HEK293-OATP1B3/CES2 double-transfected cells. HEK293-OATP1B3/CES2 cells showed high hydrolysis activity of p-nitrophenyl acetate (PNPA), which is an authentic substrate for esterase. CES activity in HEK293-OATP1B3/CES2 cells was approximately 3-fold higher than that in the HEK293-OATP1B3 cells. HEK293-OATP1B3/CES2 cells (IC50: 25.4±7.7nM) showed approximately 2.1-fold resistance to microcystin-LR than HEK293-OATP1B3 cells (IC50: 12.0±1.5nM). Moreover, the CES inhibition assay and microcystin-agarose pull down assay showed the possibility of the interaction between CES2 and microcystin-LR. Our results indicated that the overexpression of CES2 attenuates the cytotoxicity of microcystin-LR via interaction with microcystin-LR.

  18. Optimization of a Neural Stem-Cell-Mediated Carboxylesterase/Irinotecan Gene Therapy for Metastatic Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gutova, Margarita; Goldstein, Leanne; Metz, Marianne; Hovsepyan, Anahit; Tsurkan, Lyudmila G; Tirughana, Revathiswari; Tsaturyan, Lusine; Annala, Alexander J; Synold, Timothy W; Wan, Zesheng; Seeger, Robert; Anderson, Clarke; Moats, Rex A; Potter, Philip M; Aboody, Karen S

    2017-03-17

    Despite improved survival for children with newly diagnosed neuroblastoma (NB), recurrent disease is a significant problem, with treatment options limited by anti-tumor efficacy, patient drug tolerance, and cumulative toxicity. We previously demonstrated that neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing a modified rabbit carboxylesterase (rCE) can distribute to metastatic NB tumor foci in multiple organs in mice and convert the prodrug irinotecan (CPT-11) to the 1,000-fold more toxic topoisomerase-1 inhibitor SN-38, resulting in significant therapeutic efficacy. We sought to extend these studies by using a clinically relevant NSC line expressing a modified human CE (hCE1m6-NSCs) to establish proof of concept and identify an intravenous dose and treatment schedule that gave maximal efficacy. Human-derived NB cell lines were significantly more sensitive to treatment with hCE1m6-NSCs and irinotecan as compared with drug alone. This was supported by pharmacokinetic studies in subcutaneous NB mouse models demonstrating tumor-specific conversion of irinotecan to SN-38. Furthermore, NB-bearing mice that received repeat treatment with intravenous hCE1m6-NSCs and irinotecan showed significantly lower tumor burden (1.4-fold, p = 0.0093) and increased long-term survival compared with mice treated with drug alone. These studies support the continued development of NSC-mediated gene therapy for improved clinical outcome in NB patients.

  19. Involvement of Carboxylesterase in Hydrolysis of Propranolol Prodrug during Permeation across Rat Skin

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Teruko; Takase, Yuko; Iwase, Harunobu; Hashimoto, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    The use of a prodrug, a conjugate of an active drug with a lipophilic substituent, is a good way of increasing the cutaneous absorption of a drug. However, the activity of dermal hydrolases has rarely been investigated in humans, or experimental animals. In the present study, we focused on the identification of rat dermal esterases and the hydrolysis of a prodrug during permeation across rat skin. We found that carboxylesterase (CES), especially the rat CES1 isozyme, Hydrolase A, is expressed in rat skin and that the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acyl derivatives and caproyl-propranolol (PL) was 20-fold lower in the 9000g supernatant fraction of skin homogenate than in liver microsomes. A permeation study of caproyl-PL was performed in rat full-thickness and stripped skin using a flow-through diffusion cell. Caproyl-PL was easily partitioned into the stratum corneum and retained, not only in the stratum corneum, but also in viable epidermis and dermis. Caproyl-PL could barely be detected in the receptor fluid after application to either full-thickness or stripped skin. PL, derived from caproyl-PL, was, however, detected in receptor fluid after extensive hydrolysis of caproyl-PL in viable skin. Permeation of PL was markedly decreased under CES inhibition, indicating that the net flux of caproyl-PL is dependent on its conversion rate to PL. PMID:24300511

  20. Comparison of the Structure and Activity of Glycosylated and Aglycosylated Human Carboxylesterase 1

    PubMed Central

    Arena de Souza, Victoria; Scott, David J.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Rahman, Nahid; Charlton, Michael H.; Walsh, Martin A.; Owens, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Human Carboxylesterase 1 (hCES1) is the key liver microsomal enzyme responsible for detoxification and metabolism of a variety of clinical drugs. To analyse the role of the single N-linked glycan on the structure and activity of the enzyme, authentically glycosylated and aglycosylated hCES1, generated by mutating asparagine 79 to glutamine, were produced in human embryonic kidney cells. Purified enzymes were shown to be predominantly trimeric in solution by analytical ultracentrifugation. The purified aglycosylated enzyme was found to be more active than glycosylated hCES1 and analysis of enzyme kinetics revealed that both enzymes exhibit positive cooperativity. Crystal structures of hCES1 a catalytically inactive mutant (S221A) and the aglycosylated enzyme were determined in the absence of any ligand or substrate to high resolutions (1.86 Å, 1.48 Å and 2.01 Å, respectively). Superposition of all three structures showed only minor conformational differences with a root mean square deviations of around 0.5 Å over all Cα positions. Comparison of the active sites of these un-liganded enzymes with the structures of hCES1-ligand complexes showed that side-chains of the catalytic triad were pre-disposed for substrate binding. Overall the results indicate that preventing N-glycosylation of hCES1 does not significantly affect the structure or activity of the enzyme. PMID:26657071

  1. Structural Insights into Drug Processing by Human Carboxylesterase 1: Tamoxifen, Mevastatin, and Inhibition by Benzil

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Christopher D.; Bencharit, Sompop; Edwards, Carol C.; Hyatt, Janice L.; Tsurkan, Lyudmila; Bai, Feng; Fraga, Charles; Morton, Christopher L.; Howard-Williams, Escher L.; Potter, Philip M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-07-19

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) exhibits broad substrate specificity and is involved in xenobiotic processing and endobiotic metabolism. We present and analyze crystal structures of hCE1 in complexes with the cholesterol-lowering drug mevastatin, the breast cancer drug tamoxifen, the fatty acyl ethyl ester (FAEE) analogue ethyl acetate, and the novel hCE1 inhibitor benzil. We find that mevastatin does not appear to be a substrate for hCE1, and instead acts as a partially non-competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. Similarly, we show that tamoxifen is a low micromolar, partially non-competitive inhibitor of hCE1. Further, we describe the structural basis for the inhibition of hCE1 by the nanomolar-affinity dione benzil, which acts by forming both covalent and non-covalent complexes with the enzyme. Our results provide detailed insights into the catalytic and non-catalytic processing of small molecules by hCE1, and suggest that the efficacy of clinical drugs may be modulated by targeted hCE1 inhibitors.

  2. Multisite Promiscuity in the Processing of Endogenous Substrates By Human Carboxylesterase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bencharit, S.; Edwards, C.C.; Morton, C.L.; Howard-Williams, E.L.; Kuhn, P.; Potter, P.M.; Redinbo, M.R.; /North Carolina U. /St. Jude Children's Hosp., Memphis /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-16

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a drug and endobiotic-processing serine hydrolase that exhibits relatively broad substrate specificity. It has been implicated in a variety of endogenous cholesterol metabolism pathways including the following apparently disparate reactions: cholesterol ester hydrolysis (CEH), fatty acyl Coenzyme A hydrolysis (FACoAH), acyl-Coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransfer (ACAT), and fatty acyl ethyl ester synthesis (FAEES). The structural basis for the ability of hCE1 to perform these catalytic actions involving large substrates and products has remained unclear. Here we present four crystal structures of the hCE1 glycoprotein in complexes with the following endogenous substrates or substrate analogues: Coenzyme A, the fatty acid palmitate, and the bile acids cholate and taurocholate. While the active site of hCE1 was known to be promiscuous and capable of interacting with a variety of chemically distinct ligands, these structures reveal that the enzyme contains two additional ligand-binding sites and that each site also exhibits relatively non-specific ligand-binding properties. Using this multisite promiscuity, hCE1 appears structurally capable of assembling several catalytic events depending, apparently, on the physiological state of the cellular environment. These results expand our understanding of enzyme promiscuity and indicate that, in the case of hCE1, multiple non-specific sites are employed to perform distinct catalytic actions.

  3. Multisite Promiscuity in the Processing of Endogenous Substrates by Human Carboxylesterase 1

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Edwards, Carol C.; Morton, Christopher L.; Howard-Williams, Escher L.; Kuhn, Peter; Potter, Philip M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2006-01-01

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a drug- and endobiotic-processing serine hydrolase that exhibits relatively broad substrate specificity. It has been implicated in a variety of endogenous cholesterol metabolism pathways including the following apparently disparate reactions: cholesterol ester hydrolysis (CEH), fatty acyl Coenzyme A hydrolysis (FACoAH), acyl-CoenzymeA:cholesterol acyltransfer (ACAT), and fatty acyl ethyl ester synthesis (FAEES). The structural basis for the ability of hCE1 to perform these catalytic actions involving large substrates and products has remained unclear. Here we present four crystal structures of the hCE1 glycoprotein in various complexes with endogenous substrates or substrate analogues: Coenzyme A, the fatty acid palmitate, and the bile acids cholate and taurocholate. While the active site of hCE1 was known to be promiscuous and capable of interacting with a variety of chemically-distinct ligands, these structures reveal that the enzyme contains two additional ligand binding sites and that each site also exhibits relatively non-specific ligand binding properties. Using this multisite promiscuity, hCE1 appears structurally capable of assembling several catalytic events depending, apparently, on the physiological state of the cellular environment. These results expand our understanding of enzyme promiscuity and indicate that, in the case of hCE1, multiple non-specific sites are employed to perform distinct catalytic actions. PMID:16962139

  4. Identification and Characterization of Carboxylesterases from Brachypodium distachyon Deacetylating Trichothecene Mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Schmeitzl, Clemens; Varga, Elisabeth; Warth, Benedikt; Kugler, Karl G; Malachová, Alexandra; Michlmayr, Herbert; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Mayer, Klaus F X; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Krska, Rudolf; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-12-25

    Increasing frequencies of 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3-ADON)-producing strains of Fusarium graminearum (3-ADON chemotype) have been reported in North America and Asia. 3-ADON is nearly nontoxic at the level of the ribosomal target and has to be deacetylated to cause inhibition of protein biosynthesis. Plant cells can efficiently remove the acetyl groups of 3-ADON, but the underlying genes are yet unknown. We therefore performed a study of the family of candidate carboxylesterases (CXE) genes of the monocot model plant Brachypodium distachyon. We report the identification and characterization of the first plant enzymes responsible for deacetylation of trichothecene toxins. The product of the BdCXE29 gene efficiently deacetylates T-2 toxin to HT-2 toxin, NX-2 to NX-3, both 3-ADON and 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15-ADON) into deoxynivalenol and, to a lesser degree, also fusarenon X into nivalenol. The BdCXE52 esterase showed lower activity than BdCXE29 when expressed in yeast and accepts 3-ADON, NX-2, 15-ADON and, to a limited extent, fusarenon X as substrates. Expression of these Brachypodium genes in yeast increases the toxicity of 3-ADON, suggesting that highly similar genes existing in crop plants may act as susceptibility factors in Fusarium head blight disease.

  5. Covalent Inhibition of Recombinant Human Carboxylesterase 1 and 2 and Monoacylglycerol Lipase by the Carbamates JZL184 and URB597

    PubMed Central

    Crow, J. Allen; Bittles, Victoria; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2012-01-01

    Carboxylesterase type 1 (CES1) and CES2 are serine hydrolases located in the liver and small intestine. CES1 and CES2 actively participate in the metabolism of several pharmaceuticals. Recently, carbamate compounds were developed to inhibit members of the serine hydrolase family via covalent modification of the active site serine. URB597 and JZL184 inhibit fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), respectively; however, carboxylesterases in liver have been identified as a major off-target. We report the kinetic rate constants for inhibition of human recombinant CES1 and CES2 by URB597 and JZL184. Bimolecular rate constants (kinact/Ki) for inhibition of CES1 by JZL184 and URB597 were similar [3.9 (±0.2) × 103 M-1 s-1 and 4.5 (±1.3) × 103 M-1 s-1, respectively]. However, kinact/Ki for inhibition of CES2 by JZL184 and URB597 were significantly different [2.3 (±1.3) × 102 M-1 s-1 and 3.9 (±1.0) × 103 M-1 s-1, respectively]. Rates of inhibition of CES1 and CES2 by URB597 were similar; however, CES1 and MAGL were more potently inhibited by JZL184 than CES2. We also determined kinetic constants for spontaneous reactivation of CES1 carbamoylated by either JZL184 or URB597 and CES1 diethylphosphorylated by paraoxon. The reactivation rate was significantly slower (4.5x) for CES1 inhibited by JZL184 than CES1 inhibited by URB597. Half life of reactivation for CES1 carbamoylated by JZL184 was 49 ± 15 h, which is faster than carboxylesterase turnover in HepG2 cells. Together, the results define the kinetics of inhibition for a class of drugs that target hydrolytic enzymes involved in drug and lipid metabolism. PMID:22943979

  6. Characteristics of carboxylesterase genes and their expression-level between acaricide-susceptible and resistant Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval).

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng; Shi, Li; Shen, Guangmao; Xu, Zhifeng; Liu, Jialu; Pan, Yu; He, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) play important roles in metabolism and detoxification of dietary and environmental xenobiotics in insects and mites. On the basis of the Tetranychuscinnabarinus transcriptome dataset, 23 CarE genes (6 genes are full sequence and 17 genes are partial sequence) were identified. Synergist bioassay showed that CarEs were involved in acaricide detoxification and resistance in fenpropathrin- (FeR) and cyflumetofen-resistant (CyR) strains. In order to further reveal the relationship between CarE gene's expression and acaricide-resistance in T. cinnabarinus, we profiled their expression in susceptible (SS) and resistant strains (FeR, and CyR). There were 8 and 4 over-expressed carboxylesterase genes in FeR and CyR, respectively, from which the over-expressions were detected at mRNA level, but not DNA level. Pesticide induction experiment elucidated that 4 of 8 and 2 of 4 up-regulated genes were inducible with significance in FeR and CyR strains, respectively, but they could not be induced in SS strain, which indicated that these genes became more enhanced and effective to withstand the pesticides' stress in resistant T. cinnabarinus. Most expression-changed and all inducible genes possess the Abhydrolase_3 motif, which is a catalytic domain for hydrolyzing. As a whole, these findings in current study provide clues for further elucidating the function and regulation mechanism of these carboxylesterase genes in T. cinnabarinus' resistance formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular identification of tuliposide B-converting enzyme: a lactone-forming carboxylesterase from the pollen of tulip.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taiji; Murase, Tatsunori; Ogita, Shinjiro; Kato, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    6-Tuliposides A (PosA) and B (PosB), which are the major secondary metabolites in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana), are enzymatically converted to the antimicrobial lactonized aglycons, tulipalins A (PaA) and B (PaB), respectively. We recently identified a PosA-converting enzyme (TCEA) as the first reported member of the lactone-forming carboxylesterases. Herein, we describe the identification of another lactone-forming carboxylesterase, PosB-converting enzyme (TCEB), which preferentially reacts with PosB to give PaB. This enzyme was isolated from tulip pollen, which showed high PosB-converting activity. Purified TCEB exhibited greater activity towards PosB than PosA, which was contrary to that of the TCEA. Novel cDNA (TgTCEB1) encoding the TCEB was isolated from tulip pollen. TgTCEB1 belonged to the carboxylesterase family and was approximately 50% identical to the TgTCEA polypeptides. Functional characterization of the recombinant enzyme verified that TgTCEB1 catalyzed the conversion of PosB to PaB with an activity comparable with the native TCEB. RT-qPCR analysis of each part of plant revealed that TgTCEB1 transcripts were limited almost exclusively to the pollen. Furthermore, the immunostaining of the anther cross-section using anti-TgTCEB1 polyclonal antibody verified that TgTCEB1 was specifically expressed in the pollen grains, but not in the anther cells. N-terminal transit peptide of TgTCEB1 was shown to function as plastid-targeted signal. Taken together, these results indicate that mature TgTCEB1 is specifically localized in plastids of pollen grains. Interestingly, PosB, the substrate of TgTCEB1, accumulated on the pollen surface, but not in the intracellular spaces of pollen grains. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. USE OF CARBOXYLESTERASE ACTIVITY TO REMOVE PYRETHROID-ASSOCIATED TOXICITY TO CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA AND HYALELLA AZTECA IN TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wheelock, Craig E.; Miller, Jeff L.; Miller, Mike J.; Phillips, Bryn M.; Huntley, Sarah A.; Gee, Shirley J.; Tjeerdema, Ronald S.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Increases in the use and application of pyrethroid insecticides have resulted in concern regarding potential effects on aquatic ecosystems. Methods for the detection of pyrethroids in receiving waters are required to monitor environmental levels of these insecticides. One method employed for the identification of causes of toxicity in aquatic samples is the toxicity identification evaluation (TIE); however, current TIE protocols do not include specific methods for pyrethroid detection. Recent work identified carboxylesterase treatment as a useful method for removing/detecting pyrethroid-associated toxicity. The present study has extended this earlier work and examined the ability of carboxylesterase activity to remove permethrin- and bifenthrin-associated toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca in a variety of matrices, including laboratory water, Sacramento River (CA, USA) water, and Salinas River (CA, USA) interstitial water. Esterase activity successfully removed 1,000 ng/L of permethrin-associated toxicity and 600 ng/L of bifenthrin-associated toxicity to C. dubia in Sacramento River water. In interstitial water, 200 ng/L of permethrin-associated toxicity and 60 ng/L of bifenthrin-associated toxicity to H. azteca were removed. The selectivity of the method was validated using heat-inactivated enzyme and bovine serum albumin, demonstrating that catalytically active esterase is required. Further studies showed that the enzyme is not significantly inhibited by metals. Matrix effects on esterase activity were examined with municipal effluent and seawater in addition to the matrices discussed above. Results confirmed that the esterase retains catalytic function in a diverse array of matrices, suggesting that this technique can be adapted to a variety of aquatic samples. These data demonstrate the utility of carboxylesterase treatment as a viable step to detect the presence of pyrethroids in receiving waters. PMID:16629136

  9. RNA interference revealed the roles of two carboxylesterase genes in insecticide detoxification in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Ge, Pingting; Yang, Meiling; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-10-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) play key roles in metabolism of specific hormones and detoxification of dietary and environmental xenobiotics in insects. We sequenced and characterized CarE cDNAs putatively derived from two different genes named LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most important agricultural pests in the world. The full-length cDNAs of LmCesA1 (1892 bp) and LmCesA2 (1643 bp) encode 543 and 501 amino acid residues, respectively. The two deduced CarEs share a characteristic α/β-hydrolase structure, including a catalytic triad composed of Ser-Glu (Asp)-His and a consensus sequence GQSAG, which suggests that both CarEs are biologically active. Phylogenetic analysis grouped both LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 into clade A which has been suggested to be involved in dietary detoxification. Both transcripts were highly expressed in all the nymphal and adult stages, but only slightly expressed in eggs. Analyses of tissue-dependent expression and in situ hybridization revealed that both transcripts were primarily expressed in gastric caeca. RNA interference (RNAi) of LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 followed by a topical application of carbaryl or deltamethrin did not lead to a significantly increased mortality with either insecticide. However, RNAi of LmCesA1 and LmCesA2 increased insect mortalities by 20.9% and 14.5%, respectively, when chlorpyrifos was applied. These results suggest that these genes might not play a significant role in detoxification of carbaryl and deltamethrin but are most likely to be involved in detoxification of chlorpyrifos in L. migratoria.

  10. Regulatory effects of genomic translocations at the human carboxylesterase-1 (CES1) gene locus.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Jonathan C; Wang, Xinwen; Shi, Jian; Barrie, Elizabeth S; Wang, Danxin; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    CES1 encodes carboxylesterase-1, an important drug-metabolizing enzyme with high expression in the liver. Previous studies have reported a genomic translocation of the 5' region from the poorly expressed pseudogene CES1P1, to CES1, yielding the structural variant CES1VAR. The aim of this study was to characterize this translocation and its effect on CES1 expression in the human liver. Experiments were conducted in human liver tissues and cell culture (HepG2). The promoter and exon 1 of CES1 were sequenced by Sanger and Ion Torrent sequencing to identify gene translocations. The effects of CES1 5'UTRs on mRNA and protein expression were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, allelic ratio mRNA analysis by primer extension (SNaPshot), quantitative targeted proteomics, and luciferase reporter gene assays. Sequencing of CES1 identified two translocations: first, CES1VAR (17% minor allele frequency) comprising the 5'UTR, exon 1, and part of intron 1. A second shorter translocation, CES1SVAR, was observed excluding exon 1 and intron 1 regions (<0.01% minor allele frequency). CES1VAR is associated with 2.6-fold decreased CES1 mRNA and ∼1.35-fold lower allelic mRNA. Luciferase reporter constructs showed that CES1VAR decreases luciferase activity 1.5-fold, whereas CES1SVAR slightly increases activity. CES1VAR was not associated with CES1 protein expression or metabolism of the CES1 substrates enalapril, clopidogrel, or methylphenidate in the liver. The frequent translocation variant CES1VAR reduces mRNA expression of CES1 in the liver by ∼30%, but protein expression and metabolizing activity in the liver were not detectably altered - possibly because of variable CES1 expression masking small allelic effects. Whether drug therapies are affected by CES1VAR will require further in-vivo studies.

  11. Human Carboxylesterase 1 Stereoselectively Binds the Nerve Agent Cyclosarin and Spontaneously Hydrolyzes the Nerve Agent Sarin

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmert, Andrew C.; Otto, Tamara C.; Wierdl, Monika; Edwards, Carol C.; Fleming, Christopher D.; MacDonald, Mary; Cashman, John R.; Potter, Philip M.; Cerasoli, Douglas M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-10-28

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents are potent toxins that inhibit cholinesterases and produce a rapid and lethal cholinergic crisis. Development of protein-based therapeutics is being pursued with the goal of preventing nerve agent toxicity and protecting against the long-term side effects of these agents. The drug-metabolizing enzyme human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a candidate protein-based therapeutic because of its similarity in structure and function to the cholinesterase targets of nerve agent poisoning. However, the ability of wild-type hCE1 to process the G-type nerve agents sarin and cyclosarin has not been determined. We report the crystal structure of hCE1 in complex with the nerve agent cyclosarin. We further use stereoselective nerve agent analogs to establish that hCE1 exhibits a 1700- and 2900-fold preference for the P{sub R} enantiomers of analogs of soman and cyclosarin, respectively, and a 5-fold preference for the P{sub S} isomer of a sarin analog. Finally, we show that for enzyme inhibited by racemic mixtures of bona fide nerve agents, hCE1 spontaneously reactivates in the presence of sarin but not soman or cyclosarin. The addition of the neutral oxime 2,3-butanedione monoxime increases the rate of reactivation of hCE1 from sarin inhibition by more than 60-fold but has no effect on reactivation with the other agents examined. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hCE1 is only reactivated after inhibition with the more toxic P{sub S} isomer of sarin. These results provide important insights toward the long-term goal of designing novel forms of hCE1 to act as protein-based therapeutics for nerve agent detoxification.

  12. Identification of a carboxylesterase associated with resistance to naled in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Kai; Huang, Li-Hsin; Geib, Scott M; Hsu, Ju-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Compared to other organophosphate-resistant and -susceptible (S) lines of Bactrocera dorsalis, the carboxylesterase (CBE) BdE5 in the naled-resistant (nal-r) line has been found to possess remarkable quantitative elevation. Our study attempts to identify the role of BdE5 in naled resistance, and we discovered several points of interest. Firstly, activity staining on native PAGE revealed that the percentage of flies with intensive BdE5 bands in the nal-r line was substantially higher than in the S line, indicating that the BdE5 band correlates with naled susceptibility. Secondly, in vitro and in vivo inhibition assays showed that BdE5 was inhibited by naled in both lines; under diagnostic doses of naled, the overall extent of inhibition on CBEs was much greater in the S line than in the nal-r line. Thirdly, NanoLC-nanoESi-MS/MS analysis used the NCBI database to identify and annotate BdE5 as an esterase FE4-like (XP_011200445.1) in B. dorsalis. Fourthly, rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to obtain the 2012-bp full-length BdE5 cDNA, which contained an open reading frame of 1770bp and encoded a putative protein of 590 amino acid residues. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BdE5 is a secreted β-esterase (E clade) closely related to CG6414 (NP_570089), a CBE in Drosophila melanogaster. Finally, our relative quantification real-time PCR data showed a significant elevation in transcript levels of the BdE5 gene in nal-r line. Our results confirmed that BdE5 is correlated with naled resistance and provides further understanding about the identification and molecular characteristics of BdE5 in B. dorsalis.

  13. Effect of Cellular Location of Human Carboxylesterase 2 on CPT-11 Hydrolysis and Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Lin, Hsuan-Pei; Chen, Bing-Mae; Huang, Ping-Ting; Roffler, Steve R.

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is an anticancer prodrug that is clinically used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Hydrolysis of CPT-11 by human carboxylesterase 2 (CE2) generates SN-38, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that is the active anti-tumor agent. Expression of CE2 in cancer cells is under investigation for the tumor-localized activation of CPT-11. CE2 is normally expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells but can be engineered to direct expression of active enzyme on the plasma membrane or as a secreted form. Although previous studies have investigated different locations of CE2 expression in cancer cells, it remains unclear if CE2 cellular location affects CPT-11 anticancer activity. In the present study, we directly compared the influence of CE2 cellular location on substrate hydrolysis and CPT-11 cytotoxicity. We linked expression of CE2 and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) via a foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (F2A) peptide to facilitate fluorescence-activated cell sorting to achieve similar expression levels of ER-located, secreted or membrane-anchored CE2. Soluble CE2 was detected in the medium of cells that expressed secreted and membrane-anchored CE2, but not in cells that expressed ER-retained CE2. Cancer cells that expressed all three forms of CE2 were more sensitive to CPT-11 as compared to unmodified cancer cells, but the membrane-anchored and ER-retained forms of CE2 were consistently more effective than secreted CE2. We conclude that expression of CE2 in the ER or on the membrane of cancer cells is suitable for enhancing CPT-11 anticancer activity. PMID:26509550

  14. Involvement of carboxylesterase 1 and 2 in the hydrolysis of mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, Nobuhiro; Miura, Masatomo; Kato, Shoutaro; Sone, Tomomichi; Isobe, Masakazu; Satoh, Shigeru

    2010-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is the ester prodrug of the immunosuppressant agent mycophenolic acid (MPA) and is rapidly activated by esterases after oral administration. However, the role of isoenzymes in MMF hydrolysis remains unclear. Although human plasma, erythrocytes, and whole blood contain MMF hydrolytic activities, the mean half-lives of MMF in vitro were 15.1, 1.58, and 3.20 h, respectively. Thus, blood esterases seemed to contribute little to the rapid MMF disappearance in vivo. In vitro analyses showed that human intestinal microsomes exposed to 5 and 10 μM MMF exhibited hydrolytic activities of 2.38 and 4.62 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively. Human liver microsomes exhibited hydrolytic activities of 14.0 and 26.1 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively, approximately 6-fold higher than those observed for intestinal microsomes. MMF hydrolytic activities in human liver cytosols were 1.40 and 3.04 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively. Because hepatic cytosols generally contain 5-fold more protein than microsomes, MMF hydrolysis in human liver cytosols corresponded to approximately 50% of that observed in microsomes. Fractions obtained by 9000g centrifugation of supernatants from COS-1 cells expressing human carboxylesterase (CES) 1 or 2 exhibited MMF hydrolytic activity, with CES1-containing fractions showing higher catalytic efficiency than CES2-containing fractions. The CES inhibitor bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate inhibited MMF hydrolysis in human liver microsomes and cytosols with IC(50) values of 0.51 and 0.36 μM, respectively. In conclusion, both intestinal and hepatic CESs and in particular CES1 may be involved in MMF hydrolysis and play important roles in MMF bioactivation. Hepatic CES1 activity levels may help explain the between-subject variability observed for MMF usage.

  15. Transcription factor-mediated regulation of carboxylesterase enzymes in livers of mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Cheng, Xingguo; Aleksunes, Lauren; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2012-06-01

    The induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by chemicals is one of the major reasons for drug-drug interactions. In the present study, the regulation of mRNA expression of one arylacetamide deacetylase (Aadac) and 11 carboxylesterases (Cess) by 15 microsomal enzyme inducers (MEIs) was examined in livers of male C57BL/6 mice. The data demonstrated that Aadac mRNA expression was suppressed by three aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands, two constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activators, two pregnane X receptor (PXR) ligands, and one nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activator. Ces1 subfamily mRNA expression was not altered by most of the MEIs, whereas Ces2 subfamily mRNA was readily induced by the activators of CAR, PXR, and Nrf2 but not by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α activators. Studies using null mice demonstrated that 1) AhR was required for the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-mediated suppression of Aadac and Ces3a; 2) CAR was involved in the 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene-mediated induction of Aadac, Ces2c, Ces2a, and Ces3a; 3) PXR was required for the pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile-mediated induction of Aadac, Ces2c, and Ces2a; 4) Nrf2 was required for the oltipraz-mediated induction of Ces1g and Ces2c; and 5) PXR was not required for the DEX-mediated suppression of Cess in livers of mice. In conclusion, the present study systematically investigated the regulation of Cess by MEIs in livers of mice and demonstrated that MEIs modulated mRNA expression of mouse hepatic Cess through the activation of AhR, CAR, PXR, and/or Nrf2 transcriptional pathways.

  16. Transcription Factor-Mediated Regulation of Carboxylesterase Enzymes in Livers of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youcai; Cheng, Xingguo; Aleksunes, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    The induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes by chemicals is one of the major reasons for drug-drug interactions. In the present study, the regulation of mRNA expression of one arylacetamide deacetylase (Aadac) and 11 carboxylesterases (Cess) by 15 microsomal enzyme inducers (MEIs) was examined in livers of male C57BL/6 mice. The data demonstrated that Aadac mRNA expression was suppressed by three aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligands, two constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activators, two pregnane X receptor (PXR) ligands, and one nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activator. Ces1 subfamily mRNA expression was not altered by most of the MEIs, whereas Ces2 subfamily mRNA was readily induced by the activators of CAR, PXR, and Nrf2 but not by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α activators. Studies using null mice demonstrated that 1) AhR was required for the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin–mediated suppression of Aadac and Ces3a; 2) CAR was involved in the 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene–mediated induction of Aadac, Ces2c, Ces2a, and Ces3a; 3) PXR was required for the pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile–mediated induction of Aadac, Ces2c, and Ces2a; 4) Nrf2 was required for the oltipraz-mediated induction of Ces1g and Ces2c; and 5) PXR was not required for the DEX-mediated suppression of Cess in livers of mice. In conclusion, the present study systematically investigated the regulation of Cess by MEIs in livers of mice and demonstrated that MEIs modulated mRNA expression of mouse hepatic Cess through the activation of AhR, CAR, PXR, and/or Nrf2 transcriptional pathways. PMID:22429928

  17. Effect of diet on carboxylesterase activity of tadpoles (Rhinella arenarum) exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Attademo, A M; Sanchez-Hernandez, J C; Lajmanovich, R C; Peltzer, P M; Junges, C

    2017-01-01

    An outdoor microcosm was performed with tadpoles (Rhinella arenarum) exposed to 125μgL(-1) chlorpyrifos and fed two types of food, i.e., lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and a formulated commercial pellet. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and carboxylesterase (CbE) activities were measured in liver and intestine after 10 days of pesticide exposure. Non-exposed tadpoles fed lettuce had an intestinal AChE activity almost two-fold higher than that of pellet-fed tadpoles. No significant differences were observed, however, in liver AChE activity between diets. Likewise, intestinal CbE activity - measured using two substrates, i.e. 1-naphthyl acetate (1-NA) and 4-nitrophenyl valerate (4-NPV) - was higher in tadpoles fed lettuce than in those fed pellets. However, the diet-dependent response of liver CbE activity was opposite to that in the intestine. Chlorpyrifos caused a significant inhibition of both esterase activities, which was tissue- and diet-specific. The highest inhibition degree was found in the intestinal AChE and CbE activities of lettuce-fed tadpoles (42-78% of controls) compared with pellet-fed tadpoles (<60%). Although chlorpyrifos significantly inhibited liver CbE activity of the group fed lettuce, this effect was not observed in the group fed pellets. In general, intestinal CbE activity was more sensitive to chlorpyrifos inhibition than AChE activity. This finding, together with the high levels of basal CbE activity found in the intestine, may be understood as a detoxification system able to reduce intestinal OP uptake. Moreover, the results of this study suggest that diet is a determinant factor in toxicity testing with tadpoles to assess OP toxicity, because it modulates levels of this potential detoxifying enzyme activity.

  18. Effects of three reputed carboxylesterase inhibitors upon rat serum esterase activity.

    PubMed

    Chambers, J P; Hartgraves, S L; Murphy, M R; Wayner, M J; Kumar, N; Valdes, J J

    1991-01-01

    Rats have very high endogenous levels of serum carboxylesterase (CAE) compared to primates. This difference accounts for the lower sensitivity of rats to toxic organophosphates, which interact with CAE instead of the more critical acetylcholinesterase. Pretreatment of rats with CAE inhibitors potentiates the effects of organophosphates. In this study, the effects of three putative CAE inhibitors, 2-(o-Cresyl)-4H-1:3:2-benzodioxaphosphorin-2-oxide (CBDP), bis-p-nitrophenyl-phosphate (BNPP), and tetraisopropyl pyrophosphoramide (Iso-OMPA), on the hydrolysis of several commercially available substrates were determined. Respective kinetic constants Km and Vmax were derived and effects of inhibitors compared using saturating amounts of substrate. Data presented here indicate significant differences in substrate affinity (Km), reactivity (Vmax), as well as effects of inhibitors. CBDP inhibits hydrolysis of specific naphthyl and paranitrophenyl esters at relatively low concentrations (1-10 microM). In contrast, significantly higher concentrations (mM) of BNPP and Iso-OMPA were required for inhibition of serum esterase activity. Of the inhibitors tested, Iso-OMPA in general exhibited the smallest inhibitory effect on ester hydrolysis. Although inhibition of hydrolysis of specific paranitrophenyl and naphthyl esters occurred in the presence of similar amounts of CBDP, the degree of inhibition differed significantly (50-75% vs. greater than 90%, respectively). These data suggest that there exists in rat serum, a pool of naphthyl ester esterase activity that is very sensitive ex vivo (greater than 90% inhibition) to CBDP and may be very useful in validating a rodent model for soman toxicity.

  19. Constitutive expression of a fungus-inducible carboxylesterase improves disease resistance in transgenic pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Ko, Moonkyung; Cho, Jung Hyun; Seo, Hyo-Hyoun; Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Kang, Ha-Young; Nguyen, Thai Son; Soh, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Young Soon; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-08-01

    Resistance against anthracnose fungi was enhanced in transgenic pepper plants that accumulated high levels of a carboxylesterase, PepEST in anthracnose-susceptible fruits, with a concurrent induction of antioxidant enzymes and SA-dependent PR proteins. A pepper esterase gene (PepEST) is highly expressed during the incompatible interaction between ripe fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and a hemibiotrophic anthracnose fungus (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides). In this study, we found that exogenous application of recombinant PepEST protein on the surface of the unripe pepper fruits led to a potentiated state for disease resistance in the fruits, including generation of hydrogen peroxide and expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes that encode mostly small proteins with antimicrobial activity. To elucidate the role of PepEST in plant defense, we further developed transgenic pepper plants overexpressing PepEST under the control of CaMV 35S promoter. Molecular analysis confirmed the establishment of three independent transgenic lines carrying single copy of transgenes. The level of PepEST protein was estimated to be approximately 0.002 % of total soluble protein in transgenic fruits. In response to the anthracnose fungus, the transgenic fruits displayed higher expression of PR genes, PR3, PR5, PR10, and PepThi, than non-transgenic control fruits did. Moreover, immunolocalization results showed concurrent localization of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and PR3 proteins, along with the PepEST protein, in the infected region of transgenic fruits. Disease rate analysis revealed significantly low occurrence of anthracnose disease in the transgenic fruits, approximately 30 % of that in non-transgenic fruits. Furthermore, the transgenic plants also exhibited resistance against C. acutatum and C. coccodes. Collectively, our results suggest that overexpression of PepEST in pepper confers enhanced resistance against the anthracnose fungi by activating the defense signaling

  20. Interspecies Differences in the Metabolism of a Multiester Prodrug by Carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jing; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G D; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Marson, Lesley; Jay, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The pentaethyl ester prodrug of the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) referred to as C2E5 is being developed as an orally bioavailable radionuclide decorporation agent. The predicted human efficacy obtained in these experimental animals is confounded by interspecies variations of metabolism. Therefore, in the present study, carboxylesterase-mediated metabolism of [(14)C]-C2E5 was compared in the S9 intestinal and hepatic fractions of human, dog, and rat and their respective plasma. Intestinal hydrolysis of C2E5, resulting in the formation of the tetraethyl ester of DTPA (C2E4), was only detected in human and rat. The primary metabolite in human and dog hepatic fractions was C2E4, whereas the predominant species identified in rat hepatic fractions was the triethyl ester (C2E3). Hepatic hydrolysis of C2E5 causes the formation of C2E4 in human, dog, and rat and C2E3 in rat only. Minimal C2E5 hydrolysis was observed in human and dog plasma, whereas in rat plasma C2E5 converted to C2E3 rapidly, followed by slower further metabolism. Both recombinant CES1 and CES2 play roles in C2E5 metabolism. Together, these data suggest that dogs may be the most appropriate species for predicting human C2E5 metabolism, whereas rats might be useful for clarifying the potential toxicity of C2E5 metabolites. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Interspecies Differences in the Metabolism of a Multi-Ester Prodrug by Carboxylesterases

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jing; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G. D.; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Marson, Lesley; Jay, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The penta-ethyl ester prodrug of the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) referred to as C2E5, is being developed as an orally bioavailable radionuclide decorporation agent. The predicted human efficacy obtained in these experimental animals is confounded by interspecies variations of metabolism. Therefore, in the present study, carboxylesterase-mediated metabolism of [14C]-C2E5 was compared in the S9 intestinal and hepatic fractions of human, dog and rat and their respective plasma. Intestinal hydrolysis of C2E5, resulting in the formation of the tetraethyl ester of DTPA (C2E4), was only detected in human and rat. The primary metabolite in human and dog hepatic fractions was C2E4 whereas the predominant species identified in rat hepatic fractions was the triethyl ester (C2E3). Hepatic hydrolysis of C2E5 causes the formation of C2E4 in human, dog and rat and C2E3 in rat only. Minimal C2E5 hydrolysis was observed in human and dog plasma whereas in rat plasma C2E5 converted to C2E3 rapidly, followed by slower further metabolism. Both recombinant CES1 and CES2 play roles in C2E5 metabolism. Together, these data suggest that dogs may be the most appropriate species for predicting human C2E5 metabolism whereas rats might be useful for clarifying the potential toxicity of C2E5 metabolites. PMID:26344572

  2. Biochemical and molecular analysis of carboxylesterase-mediated hydrolysis of cocaine and heroin

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, MJ; Tsurkan, L; Hyatt, JL; Yu, X; Edwards, CC; Hicks, LD; Wadkins, RM; Potter, PM

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Carboxylesterases (CEs) metabolize a wide range of xenobiotic substrates including heroin, cocaine, meperidine and the anticancer agent CPT-11. In this study, we have purified to homogeneity human liver and intestinal CEs and compared their ability with hydrolyse heroin, cocaine and CPT-11. Experimental approach: The hydrolysis of heroin and cocaine by recombinant human CEs was evaluated and the kinetic parameters determined. In addition, microsomal samples prepared from these tissues were subjected to chromatographic separation, and substrate hydrolysis and amounts of different CEs were determined. Key results: In contrast to previous reports, cocaine was not hydrolysed by the human liver CE, hCE1 (CES1), either as highly active recombinant protein or as CEs isolated from human liver or intestinal extracts. These results correlated well with computer-assisted molecular modelling studies that suggested that hydrolysis of cocaine by hCE1 (CES1), would be unlikely to occur. However, cocaine, heroin and CPT-11 were all substrates for the intestinal CE, hiCE (CES2), as determined using both the recombinant protein and the tissue fractions. Again, these data were in agreement with the modelling results. Conclusions and implications: These results indicate that the human liver CE is unlikely to play a role in the metabolism of cocaine and that hydrolysis of this substrate by this class of enzymes is via the human intestinal protein hiCE (CES2). In addition, because no enzyme inhibition is observed at high cocaine concentrations, potentially this route of hydrolysis is important in individuals who overdose on this agent. PMID:20649590

  3. Human carboxylesterase 1 stereoselectively binds the nerve agent cyclosarin and spontaneously hydrolyzes the nerve agent sarin.

    PubMed

    Hemmert, Andrew C; Otto, Tamara C; Wierdl, Monika; Edwards, Carol C; Fleming, Christopher D; MacDonald, Mary; Cashman, John R; Potter, Philip M; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2010-04-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents are potent toxins that inhibit cholinesterases and produce a rapid and lethal cholinergic crisis. Development of protein-based therapeutics is being pursued with the goal of preventing nerve agent toxicity and protecting against the long-term side effects of these agents. The drug-metabolizing enzyme human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a candidate protein-based therapeutic because of its similarity in structure and function to the cholinesterase targets of nerve agent poisoning. However, the ability of wild-type hCE1 to process the G-type nerve agents sarin and cyclosarin has not been determined. We report the crystal structure of hCE1 in complex with the nerve agent cyclosarin. We further use stereoselective nerve agent analogs to establish that hCE1 exhibits a 1700- and 2900-fold preference for the P(R) enantiomers of analogs of soman and cyclosarin, respectively, and a 5-fold preference for the P(S) isomer of a sarin analog. Finally, we show that for enzyme inhibited by racemic mixtures of bona fide nerve agents, hCE1 spontaneously reactivates in the presence of sarin but not soman or cyclosarin. The addition of the neutral oxime 2,3-butanedione monoxime increases the rate of reactivation of hCE1 from sarin inhibition by more than 60-fold but has no effect on reactivation with the other agents examined. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hCE1 is only reactivated after inhibition with the more toxic P(S) isomer of sarin. These results provide important insights toward the long-term goal of designing novel forms of hCE1 to act as protein-based therapeutics for nerve agent detoxification.

  4. Hydrolysis of retinyl esters by non-specific carboxylesterases from rat liver endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Mentlein, R; Heymann, E

    1987-01-01

    The four most important non-specific carboxylesterases from rat liver were assayed for their ability to hydrolyse retinyl esters. Only the esterases with pI 6.2 and 6.4 (= esterase ES-4) are able to hydrolyse retinyl palmitate. Their specific activities strongly depend on the emulsifier used (maximum rate: 440 nmol of retinol liberated/h per mg of esterase). Beside retinyl palmitate, these esterases cleave palmitoyl-CoA and monoacylglycerols with much higher rates, as well as certain drugs (e.g. aspirin and propanidid). However, no transacylation between palmitoyl-CoA and retinol occurs. Retinyl acetate also is a substrate for the above esterases and for another one with pI 5.6 (= esterase ES-3). Again the emulsifier influences the hydrolysis by these esterases (maximum rates: 475 nmol/h per mg for ES-4 and 200 nmol/h per mg for ES-3). Differential centrifugation of rat liver homogenate reveals that retinyl palmitate hydrolase activity is highly enriched in the plasma membranes, but only moderately so in the endoplasmic reticulum, where the investigated esterases are located. Since the latter activity can be largely inhibited with the selective esterase inhibitor bis-(4-nitrophenyl) phosphate, it is concluded that the esterases with pI 6.2 and 6.4 (ES-4) represent the main retinyl palmitate hydrolase of rat liver endoplasmic reticulum. In view of this cellular localization, the enzyme could possibly be involved in the mobilization of retinol from the vitamin A esters stored in the liver. However, preliminary experiments in vivo have failed to demonstrate such a biological function. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3663197

  5. Acylsugar Acylhydrolases: Carboxylesterase-Catalyzed Hydrolysis of Acylsugars in Tomato Trichomes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gilgallon, Karin; Ghosh, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    Glandular trichomes of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and many other species throughout the Solanaceae produce and secrete mixtures of sugar esters (acylsugars) on the plant aerial surfaces. In wild and cultivated tomato, these metabolites consist of a sugar backbone, typically glucose or sucrose, and two to five acyl chains esterified to various positions on the sugar core. The aliphatic acyl chains vary in length and branching and are transferred to the sugar by a series of reactions catalyzed by acylsugar acyltransferases. A phenotypic screen of a set of S. lycopersicum M82 × Solanum pennellii LA0716 introgression lines identified a dominant genetic locus on chromosome 5 from the wild relative that affected total acylsugar levels. Genetic mapping revealed that the reduction in acylsugar levels was consistent with the presence and increased expression of two S. pennellii genes (Sopen05g030120 and Sopen05g030130) encoding putative carboxylesterase enzymes of the α/β-hydrolase superfamily. These two enzymes, named ACYLSUGAR ACYLHYDROLASE1 (ASH1) and ASH2, were shown to remove acyl chains from specific positions of certain types of acylsugars in vitro. A survey of related genes in M82 and LA0716 identified another trichome-expressed ASH gene on chromosome 9 (M82, Solyc09g075710; LA0716, Sopen09g030520) encoding a protein with similar activity. Characterization of the in vitro activities of the SpASH enzymes showed reduced activities with acylsugars produced by LA0716, presumably contributing to the high-level production of acylsugars in the presence of highly expressed SpASH genes. PMID:26811191

  6. Inhibition behavior of fructus psoraleae's ingredients towards human carboxylesterase 1 (hCES1).

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong-Xue; Ge, Guang-Bo; Dong, Pei-Pei; Cao, Yun-Feng; Fu, Zhi-Wei; Ran, Rui-Xue; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Hua, Hui-Ming; Zhao, Zhenying; Fang, Zhong-Ze

    2016-01-01

    1. Fructus psoraleae (FP) is the dried ripe seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae) widely used in Asia, and has been reported to exert important biochemical and pharmacological activities. The adverse effects of FP remain unclear. The present study aims to determine the inhibition of human carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) by FP's major ingredients, including neobavaisoflavone, corylifolinin, coryfolin, psoralidin, corylin and bavachinin. 2. The probe substrate of CES1 2-(2-benzoyl-3-methoxyphenyl) benzothiazole (BMBT) was derived from 2-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HMBT), and human liver microsomes (HLMs)-catalyzed BMBT metabolism was used to phenotype the activity of CES1. In silico docking method was employed to explain the inhibition mechanism. 3. All the tested compounds exerted strong inhibition towards the activity of CES1 in a concentration-dependent behavior. Furthermore, the inhibition kinetics was determined for the inhibition of neobavaisoflavone, corylifolinin, coryfolin, corylin and bavachinin towards CES1. Both Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots showed that neobavaisoflavone, corylifolinin, coryfolin and corylin noncompetitively inhibited the activity of CES1, and bavachinin competitively inhibited the activity of CES1. The inhibition kinetic parameters (Ki) were calculated to be 5.3, 9.4, 1.9, 0.7 and 0.5 μM for neobavaisoflavone, corylifolinin, coryfolin, corylin and bavachinin, respectively. In conclusion, the inhibition behavior of CES1 by the FP's constituents was given in this article, indicating the possible adverse effects of FP through the disrupting CES1-catalyzed metabolism of endogenous substances and xenobiotics.

  7. Identification of carboxylesterase genes and their expression profiles in the Colorado potato beetle Leptinotarsa decemlineata treated with fipronil and cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    Lü, Feng-Gong; Fu, Kai-Yun; Li, Qian; Guo, Wen-Chao; Ahmat, Tursun; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-07-01

    Based on the Leptinotarsa decemlineata transcriptome dataset and the GenBank sequences, 70 novel carboxylesterases and 2 acetylcholinesterases were found. The 72 members belong to a multifunctional carboxylesterase/cholinesterase superfamily (CCE). A phylogenetic tree including the 72 LdCCEs and the CCEs from Tribolium castaneum, Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera revealed that all CCEs fell into three main phylogenetic groups: dietary/detoxification, hormone/semiochemical processing, and neurodevelopmental classes. Numbers of L. decemlineata CCEs in the three classes were 52, 12 and 8, respectively. The dietary/detoxification class includes two clades: coleopteran xenobiotic metabolizing and α-esterase type CCEs. CCEs in the two clades have independently expanded in L. decemlineata. The hormone/semiochemical processing class has three clades: integument CCEs, β- and pheromone CCEs and juvenile hormone CCEs. Integument CCEs in L. decemlineata have also expanded. The neurodevelopmental CCEs are implicated the most ancient class, containing acetylcholinesterase, neuroligin, neurotactin, glutactin, gliotactin and others. Among the 70 novel CCE genes, KM220566, KM220530, KM220576, KM220527 and KM220541 were fipronil-inducible, and KM220578, KM220566, KM220542, KM220564, KM220561, KM220554, KM220527, KM220538 and KM220541 were cyhalothrin-inducible. They were the candidates involving in insecticide detoxification. Moreover, our results also provided a platform to understand the functions and evolution of L. decemlineata CCE genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective production of 1-monocaprin by porcine liver carboxylesterase-catalyzed esterification: Its enzyme kinetics and catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Hong, Sung-Chul; Kwon, Chang Woo; Jo, Minje; Choi, Seung Jun; Kim, Keesung; Chang, Pahn-Shick

    2016-01-01

    Porcine liver carboxylesterase (PLE) belongs to carboxylesterase family (EC 3.1.1.1) as a serine-type esterase. The PLE-catalyzed esterification of capric acid with glycerol in reverse micelles was investigated on the catalytic performance and enzyme kinetics. The most suitable structure of reverse micelles was comprised of isooctane (reaction medium) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT, anionic surfactant) with 0.1 of R-value ([water]/[surfactant]) and 3.0 of G/F-value ([glycerol]/[fatty acid]) for the PLE-catalyzed esterification. In the aspect of regio-selectivity, the PLE mainly produced 1-monocaprin without any other products (di- and/or tricaprins of subsequent reactions). Furthermore, the degree of esterification at equilibrium state (after 4 h from the initiation) was 62.7% under the optimum conditions at pH 7.0 and 60 °C. Based on Hanes-Woolf plot, the apparent Km and Vmax values were calculated to be 16.44 mM and 38.91 μM/min/mg protein, respectively.

  9. Purification and characterization of a carboxylesterase involved in malathion-specific resistance from Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Haubruge, Eric; Amichot, Marcel; Cuany, André; Berge, Jean-Baptiste; Arnaud, Ludovic

    2002-09-01

    Specific resistance to malathion in a strain of Tribolium castaneum is due to a 44-fold increase in malathion carboxylesterase (MCE) activity relative to a susceptible strain, whereas non-specific esterase levels are slightly lower. Unlike the overproduced esterase of some mosquito and aphid species, MCE in Tribolium castaneum accounts for only a small fraction (0.033-0.045%) of the total extractable protein respectively in resistant and susceptible strains. The enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity from these two strains and has a similar molecular weight of 62,000. However, preparative isoelectricfocusing indicated that resistant insects possess one MCE with pI of 7.3, while susceptible insects possess a MCE with a pI of 6.6. Purified MCE from both populations had different K(m) and V(m) values for hydrolysis of malathion as well as for alpha-naphthyl acetate. The kinetic analysis suggests that MCE of resistant insects hydrolyses malathion faster than the purified carboxylesterase from susceptible beetles and that this enzyme has greater affinity for malathion than for naphthyl esters. Malathion-specific resistance is due to the presence of a qualitatively different esterase in the resistant strain.

  10. Malathion resistance and prevalence of the malathion carboxylesterase mechanism in populations of mosquito vectors of disease in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed Central

    Karunaratne, S. H.; Hemingway, J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the levels of malathion resistance and prevalence of the malathion carboxylesterase mechanism among mosquitoes in Sri Lanka. METHODS: Bioassays were carried out using WHO-recommended methods on samples of the following Sri Lankan mosquito vectors: Culex quinquefasciatus, C. tritaeniorhynchus, C gelidus, Anopheles culicifacies B, A. subpictus, Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus. FINDINGS Malathion-specific carboxylesterase mechanisms were found in A. culicifaies and A. subpictus, both giving high rates of insecticide metabolism. In contrast, malathion resistance in C. quinquefasciatus and C. tritaeniorhynchus is linked to broad-spectrum resistance to organophosphorus compounds due to elevated levels of esterases that sequester malaoxon, but are unable to metabolize malathion. CONCLUSIONS: Resistance among the Anophelesspp. must have occurred as a direct result of antimalarial activities, since malathion use in Sri Lanka is limited to public health treatments. In contrast, resistance among Culex spp. has resulted from large-scale use of the organophosphorus insecticide group as larvicides for filariasis control and on rice paddy, where C tritaeniorhynchus predominantly breeds, for agricultural purposes. PMID:11731814

  11. Elevated carboxylesterase activity contributes to the lambda-cyhalothrin insensitivity in quercetin fed Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner).

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengyu; Liu, Ying; Shi, Xueyan; Desneux, Nicolas; Han, Peng; Gao, Xiwu

    2017-01-01

    Quercetin as one of the key plant secondary metabolite flavonol is ubiquitous in terrestrial plants. In this study, the decrease in sensitivity to lambda-cyhalothrin was observed in quercetin-fed Helicoverpa armigera larvae. In order to figure out the mechanisms underlying the decreased sensitivity of H. armigera larvae to lambda-cyhalothrin by quercetin induction, the changes in carboxylesterase activity and in-vitro hydrolytic metabolic capacity to lambda-cyhalothrin were examined. The LC50 value of quercetin-fed H. armigera larvae to lambda-cyhalothrin showed 2.41-fold higher than that of the control. S, S, S-Tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF) treatment showed a synergism effect on lambda-cyhalothrin toxicity to quercetin-fed H. armigera. Moreover, the activity of carboxylesterase was significantly higher in quercetin-fed H. armigera larvae after fed on quercetin for 48 h. The in-vitro hydrolytic metabolic capacity to lambda-cyhalothrin in quercetin-fed H. armigera larvae midgut was 289.82 nmol 3-PBA/mg protein/min, which is significant higher than that in the control group (149.60 nmol 3-PBA/mg protein/min). The elevated CarE enzyme activity and corresponding increased hydrolytic metabolic capacity to lambda-cyhalothrin in quercetin-fed H. armigera contributed to the enhanced tolerance to lambda-cyhalothrin.

  12. Carboxylesterase-involved metabolism of di-n-butyl phthalate in pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqi; Chen, Siyuan; Chao, Yuanqing; Huang, Xiongfei; Wang, Shizhong; Qiu, Rongliang

    2017-01-01

    Uptake and accumulation by plants is a significant pathway in the migration and transformation of phthalate esters (PAEs) in the environment. However, limited information is available on the mechanisms of PAE metabolism in plants. Here, we investigated the metabolism of di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), one of the most frequently detected PAEs, in pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) seedlings via a series of hydroponic experiments with an initial concentration of 10 mg L(-1). DnBP hydrolysis occurred primarily in the root, and two of its metabolites, mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP) and phthalic acid (PA), were detected in all plant tissues. The MnBP concentration was an order of magnitude higher than that of PA in shoots, which indicated MnBP was more readily transported to the shoot than was PA because of the former's dual hydrophilic and lipophilic characteristics. More than 80% of MnBP and PA were located in the cell water-soluble component except that 96% of MnBP was distributed into the two solid cellular fractions (i.e., cell wall and organelles) at 96 h. A 13-20% and 29-54% increase of carboxylesterase (CXE) activity shown in time-dependent and concentration-dependent experiments, respectively, indicated the involvement of CXEs in plant metabolism of DnBP. The level of CXE activity in root subcellular fractions was in the order: the cell water-soluble component (88-94%) > cell wall (3-7%) > cell organelles (3-4%), suggesting that the cell water-soluble component is the dominant locus of CXE activity and also the domain of CXE-catalyzed hydrolysis of DnBP. The addition of triphenyl phosphate, a CXE inhibitor, led to 43-56% inhibition of CXE activity and 16-25% increase of DnBP content, which demonstrated the involvement of CXEs in plant metabolism of DnBP. This study contributes to our understanding of enzymitic mechanisms of PAE transformation in plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional analysis of carboxylesterase in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Kabeya, Tomoki; Matsumura, Wakana; Iwao, Takahiro; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2017-04-22

    Human carboxylesterase (CES) is a key esterase involved in the metabolism and biotransformation of drugs. Hydrolysis activity in the human small intestine is predominantly mediated by CES2A1 rather than CES1A. In drug development studies, Caco-2 cells are commonly used as a model to predict drug absorption in the human small intestine. However, the expression patterns of CES2A1 and CES1A in Caco-2 cells differ from those in the human small intestine. There are also species-specific differences in CES expression patterns between human and experimental animals. Furthermore, it is difficult to obtain primary human intestinal epithelial cells. Therefore, there is currently no system that can precisely predict features of drug absorption, such as CES-mediated metabolism, in the human intestine. To develop a novel system to evaluate intestinal pharmacokinetics, we analyzed CES expression and function in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived enterocytes. CES2A1 mRNA and protein levels in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes were comparable to Caco-2 cells, whereas CES1A levels were lower in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes compared with Caco-2 cells. p-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes was significantly inhibited by the CES2A1-specific inhibitor telmisartan. Hydrolysis levels of the CES2A1-specific substrate aspirin were similar in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes and Caco-2 cells, whereas hydrolysis of the CES1A-specific substrate monoethylglycylxylidine was observed in Caco-2 cells but not in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes. These findings demonstrated that the expression and activity of CES isozymes in human iPS cell-derived enterocytes are more similar to the human small intestine compared with Caco-2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A carboxylesterase, Esterase-6, modulates sensory physiological and behavioral response dynamics to pheromone in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Insects respond to the spatial and temporal dynamics of a pheromone plume, which implies not only a strong response to 'odor on', but also to 'odor off'. This requires mechanisms geared toward a fast signal termination. Several mechanisms may contribute to signal termination, among which odorant-degrading enzymes. These enzymes putatively play a role in signal dynamics by a rapid inactivation of odorants in the vicinity of the sensory receptors, although direct in vivo experimental evidences are lacking. Here we verified the role of an extracellular carboxylesterase, esterase-6 (Est-6), in the sensory physiological and behavioral dynamics of Drosophila melanogaster response to its pheromone, cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Est-6 was previously linked to post-mating effects in the reproductive system of females. As Est-6 is also known to hydrolyze cVA in vitro and is expressed in the main olfactory organ, the antenna, we tested here its role in olfaction as a putative odorant-degrading enzyme. Results We first confirm that Est-6 is highly expressed in olfactory sensilla, including cVA-sensitive sensilla, and we show that expression is likely associated with non-neuronal cells. Our electrophysiological approaches show that the dynamics of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) responses is strongly influenced by Est-6, as in Est-6° null mutants (lacking the Est-6 gene) cVA-sensitive ORN showed increased firing rate and prolonged activity in response to cVA. Est-6° mutant males had a lower threshold of behavioral response to cVA, as revealed by the analysis of two cVA-induced behaviors. In particular, mutant males exhibited a strong decrease of male-male courtship, in association with a delay in courtship initiation. Conclusions Our study presents evidence that Est-6 plays a role in the physiological and behavioral dynamics of sex pheromone response in Drosophila males and supports a role of Est-6 as an odorant-degrading enzyme (ODE) in male antennae. Our results

  15. Earthworm-induced carboxylesterase activity in soil: Assessing the potential for detoxification and monitoring organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Notario del Pino, J; Domínguez, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Soil enzyme activities are attracting widespread interest due to its potential use in contaminant breakdown, and as indicators of soil deterioration. However, given the multiple environmental and methodological factors affecting their activity levels, assessment of soil pollution using these biochemical endpoints is still complex. Taking advantage of the well-known stimulatory effect of earthworms on soil microbes, and their associated enzyme activities, we explored some toxicological features of carboxylesterases (CbEs) in soils inoculated with Lumbricus terrestris. A microplate-scale spectrophotometric assay using soil-water suspensions was first optimized, in which kinetic assay parameters (Km, Vmax, dilution of soil homogenate, and duration of soil homogenization) were established for further CbE determinations. Optimal conditions included a soil-to-water ratio of 1:50 (w/v), 30-min of shaking, and 2.5mM of substrate concentration. As expected, CbE activity increased significantly in soils treated with L. terrestris. This bioturbed soil was used for exploring the role of CbE activity as a bioscavenger for organophosphorus (OP) pesticides. Soil treated with two formulations of chlorpyrifos revealed that CbE activity was a significant molecular sink for this pesticide, reducing its impact on soil microbial activity as shown by the unchanged dehydrogenase activity. Dose-dependent curves were adjusted to an exponential kinetic model, and the median ecological dose (ED50) for both pesticide formulations was calculated. ED50 values decreased as the time of pesticide exposure increased (14 d-ED50s=20.4-26.7 mg kg(-1), and 28 d-ED50s=1.8-2.3 mg kg(-1)), which suggested that chlorpyrifos was progressively transformed into its highly toxic metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon, but simultaneously was inactivated by CbEs. These results were confirmed by in vitro assays that showed chlorpyrifos-oxon was a more potent CbE inhibitor (IC50=35.5-4.67 nM) than chlorpyrifos (0.41-0.84

  16. Effects of chlorpyrifos on soil carboxylesterase activity at an aggregate-size scale.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Sandoval, Marco

    2017-08-01

    The impact of pesticides on extracellular enzyme activity has been mostly studied on the bulk soil scale, and our understanding of the impact on an aggregate-size scale remains limited. Because microbial processes, and their extracellular enzyme production, are dependent on the size of soil aggregates, we hypothesized that the effect of pesticides on enzyme activities is aggregate-size specific. We performed three experiments using an Andisol to test the interaction between carboxylesterase (CbE) activity and the organophosphorus (OP) chlorpyrifos. First, we compared esterase activity among aggregates of different size spiked with chlorpyrifos (10mgkg(-1) wet soil). Next, we examined the inhibition of CbE activity by chlorpyrifos and its metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon in vitro to explore the aggregate size-dependent affinity of the pesticides for the active site of the enzyme. Lastly, we assessed the capability of CbEs to alleviate chlorpyrifos toxicity upon soil microorganisms. Our principal findings were: 1) CbE activity was significantly inhibited (30-67% of controls) in the microaggregates (<0.25mm size) and smallest macroaggregates (<1.0 - 0.25mm), but did not change in the largest macroaggregates (>1.0mm) compared with the corresponding controls (i.e., pesticide-free aggregates), 2) chlorpyrifos-oxon was a more potent CbE inhibitor than chlorpyrifos; however, no significant differences in the CbE inhibition were found between micro- and macroaggregates, and 3) dose-response relationships between CbE activity and chlorpyrifos concentrations revealed the capability of the enzyme to bind chlorpyrifos-oxon, which was dependent on the time of exposure. This chemical interaction resulted in a safeguarding mechanism against chlorpyrifos-oxon toxicity on soil microbial activity, as evidenced by the unchanged activity of dehydrogenase and related extracellular enzymes in the pesticide-treated aggregates. Taken together, these results suggest that environmental risk

  17. P-glycoprotein, CYP3A, and plasma carboxylesterase determine brain and blood disposition of the mTOR Inhibitor everolimus (Afinitor) in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Seng Chuan; Sparidans, Rolf W; Cheung, Ka Lei; Fukami, Tatsuki; Durmus, Selvi; Wagenaar, Els; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; van Vlijmen, Bart J M; Beijnen, Jos H; Schinkel, Alfred H

    2014-06-15

    To clarify the role of ABCB1, ABCG2, and CYP3A in blood and brain exposure of everolimus using knockout mouse models. We used wild-type, Abcb1a/1b(-/-), Abcg2(-/-), Abcb1a/1b;Abcg2(-/-), and Cyp3a(-/-) mice to study everolimus oral bioavailability and brain accumulation. Following everolimus administration, brain concentrations and brain-to-liver ratios were substantially increased in Abcb1a/1b(-/-)and Abcb1a/1b;Abcg2(-/-), but not Abcg2(-/-)mice. The fraction of everolimus located in the plasma compartment was highly increased in all knockout strains. In vitro, everolimus was rapidly degraded in wild-type but not knockout plasma. Carboxylesterase 1c (Ces1c), a plasma carboxylesterase gene, was highly upregulated (∼80-fold) in the liver of knockout mice relative to wild-type mice, and plasma Ces1c likely protected everolimus from degradation by binding and stabilizing it. This binding was prevented by preincubation with the carboxylesterase inhibitor BNPP. In vivo knockdown experiments confirmed the involvement of Ces1c in everolimus stabilization. Everolimus also markedly inhibited the hydrolysis of irinotecan and p-nitrophenyl acetate by mouse plasma carboxylesterase and recombinant human CES2, respectively. After correcting for carboxylesterase binding, Cyp3a(-/-), but not Abcb1a/1b(-/-), Abcg2(-/-), or Abcb1a/1b;Abcg2(-/-)mice, displayed highly (>5-fold) increased oral availability of everolimus. Brain accumulation of everolimus was restricted by Abcb1, but not Abcg2, suggesting the use of coadministered ABCB1 inhibitors to improve brain tumor treatment. Cyp3a, but not Abcb1a/1b, restricted everolimus oral availability, underscoring drug-drug interaction risks via CYP3A. Upregulated Ces1c likely mediated the tight binding and stabilization of everolimus, causing higher plasma retention in knockout strains. This Ces upregulation might confound other pharmacologic studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Automated evaluation of pharmaceutically active ionic liquids' (eco)toxicity through the inhibition of human carboxylesterase and Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Costa, Susana P F; Justina, Vanessa D; Bica, Katharina; Vasiloiu, Maria; Pinto, Paula C A G; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2014-01-30

    The toxicity of 16 pharmaceutical active ionic liquids (IL-APIs) was evaluated by automated approaches based on sequential injection analysis (SIA). The implemented bioassays were centered on the inhibition of human carboxylesterase 2 and Vibrio fischeri, in the presence of the tested compounds. The inhibitory effects were quantified by calculating the inhibitor concentration required to cause 50% of inhibition (EC50). The EC50 values demonstrated that the cetylpyridinium group was one of the most toxic cations and that the imidazolium group was the less toxic. The obtained results provide important information about the safety of the studied IL-APIs and their possible use as pharmaceutical drugs. The developed automated SIA methodologies are robust screening bioassays, and can be used as a generic tools to identify the (eco)toxicity of the structural elements of ILs, contributing to a sustainable development of drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel lactone-forming carboxylesterase: molecular identification of a tuliposide A-converting enzyme in tulip.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taiji; Ogita, Shinjiro; Kato, Yasuo

    2012-06-01

    Tuliposides, the glucose esters of 4-hydroxy-2-methylenebutanoate and 3,4-dihydroxy-2-methylenebutanoate, are major secondary metabolites in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana). Their lactonized aglycons, tulipalins, function as defensive chemicals due to their biological activities. We recently found that tuliposide-converting enzyme (TCE) purified from tulip bulbs catalyzed the conversion of tuliposides to tulipalins, but the possibility of the presence of several TCE isozymes was raised: TCE in tissues other than bulbs is different from bulb TCE. Here, to prove this hypothesis, TCE was purified from petals, which have the second highest TCE activity after bulbs. The purified enzyme, like the bulb enzyme, preferentially accepted tuliposides as substrates, with 6-tuliposide A the best substrate, which allowed naming the enzyme tuliposide A-converting enzyme (TCEA), but specific activity and molecular mass differed between the petal and bulb enzymes. After peptide sequencing, a novel cDNA (TgTCEA) encoding petal TCEA was isolated, and the functional characterization of the recombinant enzyme verified that TgTCEA catalyzes the conversion of 6-tuliposide A to tulipalin A. TgTCEA was transcribed in all tulip tissues but not in bulbs, indicating the presence of a bulb-specific TgTCEA, as suggested by the distinct enzymatic characters between the petal and bulb enzymes. Plastidial localization of TgTCEA enzyme was revealed, which allowed proposing a cytological mechanism of TgTCE-mediated tulipalin formation in the tulip defensive strategy. Site-directed mutagenesis of TgTCEA suggested that the oxyanion hole and catalytic triad characteristic of typical carboxylesterases are essential for the catalytic process of TgTCEA enzyme. To our knowledge, TgTCEA is the first identified member of the lactone-forming carboxylesterases, specifically catalyzing intramolecular transesterification.

  20. A Novel Lactone-Forming Carboxylesterase: Molecular Identification of a Tuliposide A-Converting Enzyme in Tulip1[W

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Taiji; Ogita, Shinjiro; Kato, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Tuliposides, the glucose esters of 4-hydroxy-2-methylenebutanoate and 3,4-dihydroxy-2-methylenebutanoate, are major secondary metabolites in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana). Their lactonized aglycons, tulipalins, function as defensive chemicals due to their biological activities. We recently found that tuliposide-converting enzyme (TCE) purified from tulip bulbs catalyzed the conversion of tuliposides to tulipalins, but the possibility of the presence of several TCE isozymes was raised: TCE in tissues other than bulbs is different from bulb TCE. Here, to prove this hypothesis, TCE was purified from petals, which have the second highest TCE activity after bulbs. The purified enzyme, like the bulb enzyme, preferentially accepted tuliposides as substrates, with 6-tuliposide A the best substrate, which allowed naming the enzyme tuliposide A-converting enzyme (TCEA), but specific activity and molecular mass differed between the petal and bulb enzymes. After peptide sequencing, a novel cDNA (TgTCEA) encoding petal TCEA was isolated, and the functional characterization of the recombinant enzyme verified that TgTCEA catalyzes the conversion of 6-tuliposide A to tulipalin A. TgTCEA was transcribed in all tulip tissues but not in bulbs, indicating the presence of a bulb-specific TgTCEA, as suggested by the distinct enzymatic characters between the petal and bulb enzymes. Plastidial localization of TgTCEA enzyme was revealed, which allowed proposing a cytological mechanism of TgTCE-mediated tulipalin formation in the tulip defensive strategy. Site-directed mutagenesis of TgTCEA suggested that the oxyanion hole and catalytic triad characteristic of typical carboxylesterases are essential for the catalytic process of TgTCEA enzyme. To our knowledge, TgTCEA is the first identified member of the lactone-forming carboxylesterases, specifically catalyzing intramolecular transesterification. PMID:22474185

  1. Effect of plasma and carboxylesterase on the stability, mutagenicity, and DNA cross-linking activity of some direct-acting N-nitroso compounds.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Brundrett, R B; Hilton, J; Hartman, P E

    1983-01-01

    The effects of mouse plasma, human plasma, and purified porcine liver carboxylesterase on nitrosourea, nitrosamide, and nitrosocarbamate chemical stability, mutagenicity, and DNA cross-linking activity were compared. These three classes of N-nitroso compounds are chemically similar but displayed different biological activities and were affected differently by plasma and carboxylesterase. Nitrosourea stability as well as mutagenicity and DNA cross-linking activity were affected negligibly by esterase or plasma. In contrast, nitrosamide and nitrosocarbamate stability, mutagenicity, and DNA cross-linking activity were rapidly decreased in the presence of plasma or carboxylesterase. For example, chemical half-lives were from 10- to 20-fold shorter for the nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates in the presence of 5% mouse plasma. Similar decreases were seen for mutagenicity and DNA cross-linking activity. Preliminary studies indicated one active plasma component to be an enzyme, possibly an esterase. Additional factors such as sulfhydryls may also participate. Whereas some nitrosoureas are active antitumor agents, the lack of antitumor activity for analogous nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates may reside predominantly in their rapid in vivo inactivation. These results may help to account for the high in vitro mutagenicity as compared with the low in vivo activities of nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates.

  2. Functional characterization of BdB1, a well-conserved carboxylesterase among tephritid fruit flies associated with malathion resistance in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    PubMed

    Wang, Luo-Luo; Lu, Xue-Ping; Smagghe, Guy; Meng, Li-Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-10-01

    There are many evidences that insect carboxylesterase possess important physiological roles in xenobiotic metabolism and are implicated in the detoxification of organophosphate (OP) insecticides. Despite the ongoing resistance development in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), the molecular basis of carboxylesterase and its ability to confer OP resistance remain largely obscure. This study was initiated to provide a better understanding of carboxylesterase-mediated resistance mechanism in a tephritid pest fly. Here, we narrow this research gap by demonstrating a well-conserved esterase B1 gene, BdB1, mediates malathion resistance development via gene upregulation with the use of a laboratory selected malathion-resistant strain (MR) of B. dorsalis. No sequence mutation of BdB1 was detected between MR and the susceptible strain (MS) of B. dorsalis. BdB1 is predominantly expressed in the midgut, a key insect tissue for detoxification. As compared with transcripts in MS, BdB1 was significantly more abundant in multiple tissues in the MR. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of BdB1 significantly increased malathion susceptibility. Furthermore, heterologous expression along with cytotoxicity assay revealed BdB1 could probably have the function of malathion detoxification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Spodoptera frugiperda, and COS7 cells for recombinant gene expression. Application to a rabbit liver carboxylesterase.

    PubMed

    Morton, C L; Potter, P M

    2000-11-01

    Expression of a rabbit liver carboxylesterase has been achieved in several different model systems including Escherichia coli, Pichia pastoris, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Spodoptera frugiperda, and COS7 cells. Although, recombinant protein was observed in E. coli sonicates, little or no enzymatic activity was detected. Similarly, no activity was observed following expression in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, active protein was produced in P. pastoris, from S. frugiperda following baculoviral infection and in COS7 cells following transient transfection of plasmid DNA. For the preparation of small amounts of protein for kinetic and biochemical studies, enzyme expressed in P. pastoris has proved sufficient. However, to produce large amounts of carboxylesterase for structural studies, baculoviral-mediated expression of a secreted form of the protein in S. frugiperda was the most efficient. Using this system, we have generated and purified milligram quantities of essentially pure protein. These results demonstrate that the choice of in vitro system for the generation of large amounts of active carboxylesterase, and probably most endoplasmic reticulum processed proteins, is crucial for high level expression and subsequent purification.

  4. Inhibition of recombinant human carboxylesterase 1 and 2 and monoacylglycerol lipase by chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon and methyl paraoxon

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, J. Allen; Bittles, Victoria; Herring, Katye L.; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2012-01-01

    Oxons are the bioactivated metabolites of organophosphorus insecticides formed via cytochrome P450 monooxygenase-catalyzed desulfuration of the parent compound. Oxons react covalently with the active site serine residue of serine hydrolases, thereby inactivating the enzyme. A number of serine hydrolases other than acetylcholinesterase, the canonical target of oxons, have been reported to react with and be inhibited by oxons. These off-target serine hydrolases include carboxylesterase 1 (CES1), CES2, and monoacylglycerol lipase. Carboxylesterases (CES, EC 3.1.1.1) metabolize a number of xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds containing ester, amide, and thioester bonds and are important in the metabolism of many pharmaceuticals. Monoglyceride lipase (MGL, EC 3.1.1.23) hydrolyzes monoglycerides including the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). The physiological consequences and toxicity related to the inhibition of off-target serine hydrolases by oxons due to chronic, low level environmental exposures are poorly understood. Here, we determined the potency of inhibition (IC{sub 50} values; 15 min preincubation, enzyme and inhibitor) of recombinant CES1, CES2, and MGL by chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon and methyl paraoxon. The order of potency for these three oxons with CES1, CES2, and MGL was chlorpyrifos oxon > paraoxon > methyl paraoxon, although the difference in potency for chlorpyrifos oxon with CES1 and CES2 did not reach statistical significance. We also determined the bimolecular rate constants (k{sub inact}/K{sub I}) for the covalent reaction of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon and methyl paraoxon with CES1 and CES2. Consistent with the results for the IC{sub 50} values, the order of reactivity for each of the three oxons with CES1 and CES2 was chlorpyrifos oxon > paraoxon > methyl paraoxon. The bimolecular rate constant for the reaction of chlorpyrifos oxon with MGL was also determined and was less than the values determined for chlorpyrifos oxon with CES1

  5. The in vitro metabolism of irinotecan (CPT-11) by carboxylesterase and β-glucuronidase in human colorectal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Peter; Clarke, Stephen; Seale, J Paul; Lee, Soon; Solomon, Michael; Aulds, Sally; Crawford, Michael; Gallagher, James; Eyers, Tony; Rivory, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Aims Irinotecan (CPT-11) is a prodrug that is used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer. It is activated to the topoisomerase poison SN-38 by carboxylesterases. SN-38 is metabolized to its inactive glucuronide, SN-38 glucuronide. The aim of this study was to determine, the reactivation of SN-38 from SN-38 glucuronide by β-glucuronidase may represent a significant pathway of SN-38 formation. Methods The production of SN-38 from irinotecan and SN-38 glucuronide (2.4, 9.6 and 19.2 µm) was measured in homogenates of human colorectal tumour, and matched normal colon mucosa from 21 patients). Results The rate of conversion of irinotecan (9.6 µM) was lower in tumour tissue than matched normal colon mucosa samples (0.30 ± 0.14 pmol min−1 mg−1 protein and 0.77 ± 0.59 pmol min−1 mg−1 protein, respectively; P < 0.005). In contrast, no significant difference was observed in β-glucuronidase activity between tumour and matched normal colon samples (4.56 ± 6.9 pmol min−1 mg−1 protein and 3.62 ± 2.95 pmol min−1 mg−1 protein, respectively, using 9.6 µM SN-38 glucuronide; P > 0.05). β-Glucuronidase activity in tumour correlated to that observed in matched normal tissue (r2 > 0.23, P < 0.05), whereas this was not the case for carboxylesterase activity. At equal concentrations of irinotecan and SN-38 glucuronide, the rate of β-glucuronidase-mediated SN-38 production was higher than that formed from irinotecan in both tumour and normal tissue (P < 0.05). However, at concentrations that reflect the relative plasma concentrations observed in patients, the rate of SN-38 production via these two pathways was comparable. Conclusions Tumour β-glucuronidase may play a significant role in the exposure of tumours to SN-38 in vivo. PMID:16842384

  6. Expression of Carboxylesterase Isozymes and Their Role in the Behavior of a Fexofenadine Prodrug in Rat Skin.

    PubMed

    Imai, Teruko; Ariyoshi, Satomi; Ohura, Kayoko; Sawada, Takashi; Nakada, Yuichiro

    2016-02-01

    The expression of carboxylesterase (CES) and the transdermal movement of an ester prodrug were studied in rat skin. Ethyl-fexofenadine (ethyl-FXD) was used as a model lipophilic prodrug that is slowly hydrolyzed to its parent drug, FXD (MW 502). Among the CES1 and CES2 isozymes, Hydrolase A is predominant in rat skin and this enzyme was involved in 65% of the cutaneous hydrolysis of ethyl-FXD. The similarity of the permeation behavior of ethyl-FXD in full thickness and stripped skin indicated that the stratum corneum was not a barrier to penetration. However, only FXD was observed in receptor fluid, not ethyl-FXD, presumably because of the high degree of binding of ethyl-FXD in viable skin. The rate of hydrolysis of ethyl-FXD was much faster than steady-state flux, such that the influx rate was the rate-limiting process for transdermal permeation. Although Hydrolase A levels gradually increased in skin taken from rats aged from 8 to 90 weeks, variations in the expression levels of the esterase hardly affected the conversion of prodrug. The present data suggest that the slow hydrolysis of the prodrug of an active ingredient in viable skin followed by slow diffusion of active drug may provide a useful approach to topical application.

  7. Identification of Putative Carboxylesterase and Glutathione S-transferase Genes from the Antennae of the Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Gong, Zhong-Jun; Rao, Xiang-Jun; Li, Mao-Ye; Li, Shi-Guang

    2015-01-01

    In insects, rapid degradation of odorants in antennae is extremely important for the sensitivity of olfactory receptor neurons. Odorant degradation in insect antennae is mediated by multiple enzymes, especially the carboxylesterases (CXEs) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). The Asiatic rice borer, Chilo suppressalis, is an economically important lepidopteran pest which causes great economic damage to cultivated rice crops in many Asian countries. In this study, we identified 19 putative CXE and 16 GST genes by analyzing previously constructed antennal transcriptomes of C. suppressalis. BLASTX best hit results showed that these genes are most homologous to their respective orthologs in other lepidopteran species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that these CXE and GST genes were clustered into various clades. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays showed that three CXE genes (CsupCXE8, CsupCXE13, and CsupCXE18) are antennae-enriched. These genes are candidates for involvement in odorant degradation. Unexpectedly, none of the GST genes were found to be antennae-specific. Our results pave the way for future researches of the odorant degradation mechanism of C. suppressalis at the molecular level. PMID:26198868

  8. Disruption of genes involved in CORVET complex leads to enhanced secretion of heterologous carboxylesterase only in protease deficient Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Lukas; Gruber, Clemens; Altmann, Friedrich; Aleschko, Markus; Mattanovich, Diethard; Gasser, Brigitte; Puxbaum, Verena

    2017-02-23

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (Komagataella spp.) is a popular microbial host for the production of recombinant proteins. Previous studies have shown that mis-sorting to the vacuole can be a bottleneck during production of recombinant secretory proteins in yeast, however, no information was available for P. pastoris. In this work the authors have therefore generated vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutant strains disrupted in genes involved in the CORVET (class C core vacuole/endosome tethering) complex at the early stages of endosomal sorting. Both Δvps8 and Δvps21 strains contained lower extracellular amounts of heterologous carboxylesterase (CES) compared to the control strain, which could be attributed to a high proteolytic activity present in the supernatants of CORVET engineered strains due to rerouting of vacuolar proteases. Serine proteases were identified to be responsible for this proteolytic degradation by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and protease inhibitor assays. Deletion of the major cellular serine protease Prb1 in Δvps8 and Δvps21 strains did not only rescue the extracellular CES levels, but even outperformed the parental CES strain (56 and 80% higher yields, respectively). Further deletion of Ybr139W, another serine protease, did not show a further increase in secretion levels. Higher extracellular CES activity and low proteolytic activity were detected also in fed batch cultivation of Δvps21Δprb1 strains, thus confirming that modifying early steps in the vacuolar pathway has a positive impact on heterologous protein secretion.

  9. In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation of Intestinal Availability for Carboxylesterase Substrates Using Portal Vein-Cannulated Monkey.

    PubMed

    Trapa, Patrick E; Beaumont, Kevin; Atkinson, Karen; Eng, Heather; King-Ahmad, Amanda; Scott, Dennis O; Maurer, Tristan S; Di, Li

    2017-03-01

    Prediction of intestinal availability (FaFg) of carboxylesterase (CES) substrates is of critical importance in designing oral prodrugs with optimal properties, projecting human pharmacokinetics and dose, and estimating drug-drug interaction potentials. A set of ester prodrugs were evaluated using in vitro permeability (parallel artificial membrane permeability assay and Madin-Darby canine kidney cell line-low efflux) and intestinal stability (intestine S9) assays, as well as in vivo portal vein-cannulated cynomolgus monkey. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of FaFg was developed with a number of modeling approaches, including a full physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model as well as a simplified competitive-rate analytical solution. Both methods converged as in the PBPK simulations enterocyte blood flow behaved as a sink, a key assumption in the competitive-rate analysis. For this specific compound set, the straightforward analytical solution therefore can be used to generate in vivo predictions. Strong IVIVE of FaFg was observed for cynomolgus monkey with R(2) of 0.71-0.93. The results suggested in vitro assays can be used to predict in vivo FaFg for CES substrates with high confidence. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystal Structures of Human Carboxylesterase 1 in Covalent Complexes with the Chemical Warfare Agents Soman and Tabun†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Christopher D.; Edwards, Carol C.; Kirby, Stephen D.; Maxwell, Donald M.; Potter, Philip M.; Cerasoli, Douglas M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2008-01-01

    The organophosphorus nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX exert their toxic effects by inhibiting the action of human acetylcholinesterase, a member of the serine hydrolase superfamily of enzymes. The current treatments for nerve agent exposure must be administered quickly to be effective and they often do not eliminate long-term toxic side effects associated with organophosphate poisoning. Thus, there is significant need for effective prophylactic methods to protect at-risk personnel from nerve agent exposure, and protein-based approaches have emerged as promising candidates. We present the 2.7 Å resolution crystal structures of the serine hydrolase human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1), a broad-spectrum drug metabolism enzyme, in covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate complexes with the chemical weapons soman and tabun. The structures reveal that hCE1 binds stereoselectively to these nerve agents; for example, hCE1 appears to react preferentially with the 104-fold more lethal PS stereoisomer of soman relative to the PR form. In addition, structural features of the hCE1 active site indicate that the enzyme may be resistant to dead-end organophosphate aging reactions that permanently inactivate other serine hydrolases. Taken together, these data provide important structural details toward the goal of engineering hCE1 into an organophosphate hydrolase and protein-based therapeutic for nerve agent exposure. PMID:17407327

  11. A dual enzyme system composed of a polyester hydrolase and a carboxylesterase enhances the biocatalytic degradation of polyethylene terephthalate films.

    PubMed

    Barth, Markus; Honak, Annett; Oeser, Thorsten; Wei, Ren; Belisário-Ferrari, Matheus R; Then, Johannes; Schmidt, Juliane; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    TfCut2 from Thermobifida fusca KW3 and the metagenome-derived LC-cutinase are bacterial polyester hydrolases capable of efficiently degrading polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films. Since the enzymatic PET hydrolysis is inhibited by the degradation intermediate mono-(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalate (MHET), a dual enzyme system consisting of a polyester hydrolase and the immobilized carboxylesterase TfCa from Thermobifida fusca KW3 was employed for the hydrolysis of PET films at 60°C. HPLC analysis of the reaction products obtained after 24 h of hydrolysis showed an increased amount of soluble products with a lower proportion of MHET in the presence of the immobilized TfCa. The results indicated a continuous hydrolysis of the inhibitory MHET by the immobilized TfCa and demonstrated its advantage as a second biocatalyst in combination with a polyester hydrolase for an efficient degradation oft PET films. The dual enzyme system with LC-cutinase produced a 2.4-fold higher amount of degradation products compared to TfCut2 after a reaction time of 24 h confirming the superior activity of his polyester hydrolase against PET films.

  12. The environment shapes microbial enzymes: five cold-active and salt-resistant carboxylesterases from marine metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Tran, Hai; Popovic, Ana; Kovacic, Filip; Brown, Greg; Flick, Robert; Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Egorova, Olga; Somody, Joseph C; Tchigvintsev, Dmitri; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Savchenko, Alexei; Golyshin, Peter N; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-03-01

    Most of the Earth's biosphere is cold and is populated by cold-adapted microorganisms. To explore the natural enzyme diversity of these environments and identify new carboxylesterases, we have screened three marine metagenome gene libraries for esterase activity. The screens identified 23 unique active clones, from which five highly active esterases were selected for biochemical characterization. The purified metagenomic esterases exhibited high activity against α-naphthyl and p-nitrophenyl esters with different chain lengths. All five esterases retained high activity at 5 °C indicating that they are cold-adapted enzymes. The activity of MGS0010 increased more than two times in the presence of up to 3.5 M NaCl or KCl, whereas the other four metagenomic esterases were inhibited to various degrees by these salts. The purified enzymes showed different sensitivities to inhibition by solvents and detergents, and the activities of MGS0010, MGS0105 and MGS0109 were stimulated three to five times by the addition of glycerol. Screening of purified esterases against 89 monoester substrates revealed broad substrate profiles with a preference for different esters. The metagenomic esterases also hydrolyzed several polyester substrates including polylactic acid suggesting that they can be used for polyester depolymerization. Thus, esterases from marine metagenomes are cold-adapted enzymes exhibiting broad biochemical diversity reflecting the environmental conditions where they evolved.

  13. Integrating structure, bioinformatics and enzymology to discover function : BioH, a new carboxylesterase from E. coli.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanishvili, R.; Yakunin, A. F.; Laskowski, R. A.; Skarina, T.; Evdokimova, E.; Doherty-Kirby, A.; Lajoie, G. A.; Thornton, J. M.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Savchenko, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Edwards, A. M.; Univ. of Toronto; Clinical Genomics Centre European Bioinformatics Inst.; Univ. of Western Ontario

    2003-07-11

    Structural proteomics projects are generating three-dimensional structures of novel, uncharacterized proteins at an increasing rate. However, structure alone is often insufficient to deduce the specific biochemical function of a protein. Here we determined the function for a protein using a strategy that integrates structural and bioinformatics data with parallel experimental screening for enzymatic activity. BioH is involved in biotin biosynthesis in Escherichia coli and had no previously known biochemical function. The crystal structure of BioH was determined at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. An automated procedure was used to compare the structure of BioH with structural templates from a variety of different enzyme active sites. This screen identified a catalytic triad (Ser{sup 82}, His{sup 235}, and Asp{sup 207}) with a configuration similar to that of the catalytic triad of hydrolases. Analysis of BioH with a panel of hydrolase assays revealed a carboxylesterase activity with a preference for short acyl chain substrates. The combined use of structural bioinformatics with experimental screens for detecting enzyme activity could greatly enhance the rate at which function is determined from structure.

  14. Hepatic carboxylesterase 3 (Ces3/Tgh) is downregulated in the early stages of liver cancer development in the rat.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Ariel D; Ceballos, María P; Parody, Juan P; Comanzo, Carla G; Lorenzetti, Florencia; Pisani, Gerardo B; Ronco, María T; Alvarez, María de L; Carrillo, María C

    2016-11-01

    It is accepted that cancer development is associated with metabolic changes. Previously, we established a model of hepatic preneoplasia in which adult rats were subjected to a 2-phase model of hepatocarcinogenesis (initiated-promoted, IP) for 6weeks until they develop altered hepatic foci (AHF). Here, we found that a whole metabolic shift occurs in order to favor cancer development. IP animals presented with increased plasma lipids due to increased VLDL secretion as well as increased liver lipid accretion due to stimulated transacetylase activity rather than lipogenesis, compared to control rats. We found that carboxylesterase 3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/Tgh) presented with a perilobular distribution surrounding lipid droplets in normal livers. However, it is downregulated both at the protein and mRNA level in liver homogenates and is almost undetectable inside the AHF with no changes in the surrounding tissue. Ces3/Tgh expression is regulated by ω-3 fatty acids, thus, supplementation of diet with fish oil, allowed the restoration of Ces3/Tgh expression inside the foci and, more interestingly, led to the decrease in number and volume of the AHF. These studies show a preventive role of Ces3/Tgh in liver cancer development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A highly selective near-infrared fluorescent probe for carboxylesterase 2 and its bioimaging applications in living cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiang; Feng, Lei; Wang, Dan-Dan; Wu, Jing-Jing; Hou, Jie; Dai, Zi-Ru; Sun, Shi-Guo; Wang, Jia-Yue; Ge, Guang-Bo; Cui, Jing-Nan; Yang, Ling

    2016-09-15

    A near-infrared fluorescent probe (DDAB) for highly selective and sensitive detection of carboxylesterase 2 (CE2) has been designed, synthesized, and systematically studied both in vitro and in vivo. Upon addition of CE2, the ester bond of DDAB could be rapidly cleaved and then release a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore DDAO, which brings a remarkable yellow-to-blue color change and strong NIR fluorescence emission in physiological solutions. The newly developed probe exhibits excellent properties including good specificity, ultrahigh sensitivity and high imaging resolution. Moreover, DDAB has been applied to measure the real activities of CE2 in complex biological samples, as well as to screen CE2 inhibitors by using tissue preparations as the enzymes sources. The probe has also been successfully used to detect endogenous CE2 in living cells and in vivo for the first time, and the results demonstrate that such detection is highly reliable. All these prominent features of DDAB make it holds great promise for further investigation on CE2-associated biological process and for exploring the physiological functions of CE2 in living systems.

  16. Two homologous carboxylesterase genes from Locusta migratoria with different tissue expression patterns and roles in insecticide detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqin; Ge, Pingting; Li, Daqi; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2015-06-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) play a crucial role in detoxification of xenobiotics and resistance to insecticides in insects. In this study, two cDNAs of CarE genes (LmCesA4 and LmCesA5) were sequenced from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. The cDNAs of LmCesA4 and LmCesA5 putatively encoded 538 and 470 amino acid residues, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two CarE genes showed 45.0% identities, possessed highly conserved catalytic triads (Ser-Glu-His), and clustered in phylogenetic analysis. These results suggest that they are homologous genes. Both CarE genes were expressed throughout the developmental stages. However, LmCesA4 was predominately expressed in the midgut (including the gastric caeca) and fat bodies, whereas LmCesA5 was mainly expressed in the gastric caeca. The in situ hybridization results showed that the transcripts of the two genes were localized in apical and basal regions of the columnar cells in the gastric caeca. Gene silencing followed by insecticide bioassay increased the mortalities of deltamethrin-, malathion-, and carbaryl-treated locusts by 29.5%, 31.0% and 20.4%, respectively, after the locusts were injected with LmCesA4 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). In contrast, the injection of LmCesA5 dsRNA did not significantly increase the susceptibility of the locusts to any of these insecticides. These results suggest that these genes not only show different tissue expression patterns but also play different roles in insecticide detoxification.

  17. Inhibition of cholinesterases and carboxylesterases of two invertebrate species, Biomphalaria glabrata and Lumbriculus variegatus, by the carbamate pesticide carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Guerrero, Noemi R Verrengia; Cochón, Adriana C

    2010-01-31

    In this study, the effects of sublethal concentrations of the carbamate carbaryl on the cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxylesterase (CES) activities present in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus and in the pigmented Biomphalaria glabrata gastropod were investigated. The results showed that ChE activity from both species was inhibited by in vivo and in vitro exposure to carbaryl, with EC(50) and IC(50) values approximately 20 times lower for the oligochaete than for the gastropod. On the other hand, the recovery process in uncontaminated media was more efficient in oligochaetes than in snails. Thus, in only 2h the oligochaetes showed no inhibition with respect to control values whereas the snails did not reach control values even after 48h of being in pesticide-free water. CES activity was investigated in whole body soft tissue homogenates using three different substrates: p-nitrophenyl butyrate, 1-naphthyl acetate (NA) and 2-NA. In addition, the presence of multiple CES isozymes in L. variegatus and B. glabrata extracts, with activity towards 1- and 2-NA, was confirmed by native polyacrylamide electrophoresis. In both species, the activities measured using the naphthyl substrates were higher than the activity towards p-nitrophenyl butyrate. In addition, B. glabrata showed a higher CES activity than L. variegatus independently of the substrate used. In L. variegatus, in vivo CES activity towards the different substrates was less sensitive to carbaryl inhibition than ChE activity. In contrast, in B. glabrata, CES activity towards p-nitrophenyl butyrate was inhibited at lower insecticide concentrations than ChE. The results of this study contribute to the knowledge of the sensitivity of non-target freshwater invertebrate Type B-esterases towards pesticides.

  18. Transcriptome Profiling and Genetic Study Reveal Amplified Carboxylesterase Genes Implicated in Temephos Resistance, in the Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Grigoraki, Linda; Lagnel, Jacques; Kioulos, Ilias; Kampouraki, Anastasia; Morou, Evangelia; Labbé, Pierrick; Weill, Mylene; Vontas, John

    2015-05-01

    The control of Aedes albopictus, a major vector for viral diseases, such as dengue fever and chikungunya, has been largely reliant on the use of the larvicide temephos for many decades. This insecticide remains a primary control tool for several countries and it is a potential reliable reserve, for emergency epidemics or new invasion cases, in regions such as Europe which have banned its use. Resistance to temephos has been detected in some regions, but the mechanism responsible for the trait has not been investigated. Temephos resistance was identified in an Aedes albopictus population isolated from Greece, and subsequently selected in the laboratory for a few generations. Biochemical assays suggested the association of elevated carboxylesterases (CCE), but not target site resistance (altered AChE), with this phenotype. Illumina transcriptomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of three transcripts encoding CCE genes in the temephos resistant strain. CCEae3a and CCEae6a showed the most striking up-regulation (27- and 12-folds respectively, compared to the reference susceptible strain); these genes have been previously shown to be involved in temephos resistance also in Ae. aegypti. Gene amplification was associated with elevated transcription levels of both CCEae6a and CCEae3a genes. Genetic crosses confirmed the genetic link between CCEae6a and CCEae3a amplification and temephos resistance, by demonstrating a strong association between survival to temephos exposure and gene copy numbers in the F2 generation. Other transcripts, encoding cytochrome P450s, UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs), cuticle and lipid biosynthesis proteins, were upregulated in resistant mosquitoes, indicating that the co-evolution of multiple mechanisms might contribute to resistance. The identification of specific genes associated with insecticide resistance in Ae. albopictus for the first time is an important pre-requirement for insecticide resistance management. The genomic resources that

  19. An antennal carboxylesterase from Drosophila melanogaster, esterase 6, is a candidate odorant-degrading enzyme toward food odorants

    PubMed Central

    Chertemps, Thomas; Younus, Faisal; Steiner, Claudia; Durand, Nicolas; Coppin, Chris W.; Pandey, Gunjan; Oakeshott, John G.; Maïbèche, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Reception of odorant molecules within insect olfactory organs involves several sequential steps, including their transport through the sensillar lymph, interaction with the respective sensory receptors, and subsequent inactivation. Odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs) putatively play a role in signal dynamics by rapid degradation of odorants in the vicinity of the receptors, but this hypothesis is mainly supported by in vitro results. We have recently shown that an extracellular carboxylesterase, esterase-6 (EST-6), is involved in the physiological and behavioral dynamics of the response of Drosophila melanogaster to its volatile pheromone ester, cis-vaccenyl acetate. However, as the expression pattern of the Est-6 gene in the antennae is not restricted to the pheromone responding sensilla, we tested here if EST-6 could play a broader function in the antennae. We found that recombinant EST-6 is able to efficiently hydrolyse several volatile esters that would be emitted by its natural food in vitro. Electrophysiological comparisons of mutant Est-6 null flies and a control strain (on the same genetic background) showed that the dynamics of the antennal response to these compounds is influenced by EST-6, with the antennae of the null mutants showing prolonged activity in response to them. Antennal responses to the strongest odorant, pentyl acetate, were then studied in more detail, showing that the repolarization dynamics were modified even at low doses but without modification of the detection threshold. Behavioral choice experiments with pentyl acetate also showed differences between genotypes; attraction to this compound was observed at a lower dose among the null than control flies. As EST-6 is able to degrade various bioactive odorants emitted by food and plays a role in the response to these compounds, we hypothesize a role as an ODE for this enzyme toward food volatiles. PMID:26594178

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of the Inhibitory Potential of Pharmaceutical Excipients on Human Carboxylesterase 1A and 2

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiaoni; Li, Xiping; Gao, Ping; Feng, Chengyang; Chu, Qian; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Two major forms of human carboxylesterase (CES), CES1A and CES2, dominate the pharmacokinetics of most prodrugs such as imidapril and irinotecan (CPT-11). Excipients, largely used as insert vehicles in formulation, have been recently reported to affect drug enzyme activity. The influence of excipients on the activity of CES remains undefined. In this study, the inhibitory effects of 25 excipients on the activities of CES1A1 and CES2 were evaluated. Imidapril and CPT-11 were used as substrates and cultured with liver microsomes in vitro. Imidapril hydrolase activities of recombinant CES1A1 and human liver microsomes (HLM) were strongly inhibited by sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and polyoxyl 40 hydrogenated castor oil (RH40) [Inhibition constant (Ki) = 0.04±0.01 μg/ml and 0.20±0.09 μg/ml for CES1A1, and 0.12±0.03 μg/ml and 0.76±0.33 μg/ml, respectively, for HLM]. The enzyme hydrolase activity of recombinant CES2 was substantially inhibited by Tween 20 and polyoxyl 35 castor oil (EL35) (Ki = 0.93±0.36 μg/ml and 4.4±1.24 μg/ml, respectively). Thus, these results demonstrate that surfactants such as SLS, RH40, Tween 20 and EL35 may attenuate the CES activity; such inhibition should be taken into consideration during drug administration. PMID:24699684

  1. Carboxylesterase 2 as a Determinant of Response to Irinotecan and Neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX Therapy in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Capello, Michela; Lee, Minhee; Wang, Hong; Babel, Ingrid; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Maitra, Anirban; Wang, Huamin; Tian, Weihua; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Serine hydrolases (SHs) are among the largest classes of enzymes in humans and play crucial role in many pathophysiological processes of cancer. We have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis to assess the differential expression and cellular localization of SHs, which uncovered distinctive expression of Carboxylesterase 2 (CES2), the most efficient carboxyl esterase in activating the prodrug irinotecan into SN-38, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We therefore assessed the extent of heterogeneity in CES2 expression in PDAC and its potential relevance to irinotecan based therapy. Methods: CES2 expression in PDAC and paired nontumor tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. CES2 activity was assessed by monitoring the hydrolysis of the substrate p-NPA and correlated with irinotecan IC50 values by means of Pearson’s correlation. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were applied to assess the association between overall survival and CES2 expression in patients who underwent neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX treatment. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Statistically significant overexpression of CES2, both at the mRNA and protein levels, was observed in PDAC compared with paired nontumor tissue (P < .001), with 48 of 118 (40.7%) tumors exhibiting high CES2 expression. CES2 activity in 11 PDAC cell lines was inversely correlated with irinotecan IC50 values (R = -0.68, P = .02). High CES2 expression in tumor tissue was associated with longer overall survival in resectable and borderline resectable patients who underwent neoadjuvant FOLFIRINOX treatment (hazard ratio = 0.14, 95% confidence interval = 0.04 to 0.51, P = .02). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CES2 expression and activity, by mediating the intratumoral activation of irinotecan, is a contributor to FOLFIRINOX sensitivity in pancreatic cancer and CES2 assessment may define a subset of patients likely to respond to irinotecan based therapy. PMID:26025324

  2. Association of a carboxylesterase 1 polymorphism with appetite reduction in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder treated with methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Bruxel, E M; Salatino-Oliveira, A; Genro, J P; Zeni, C P; Polanczyk, G V; Chazan, R; Rohde, L A; Hutz, M H

    2013-10-01

    Carboxylesterase 1 is the enzyme involved in methylphenidate (MPH) metabolism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between a -75 T>G polymorphism and appetite reduction in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A sample of 213 children with ADHD was investigated. The primary outcome was appetite reduction measured by the Barkley Stimulant Side Effect Rating Scale applied at baseline, at 1 and 3 months of treatment. MPH doses were augmented until no further clinical improvement or significant adverse events occurred. The G allele presented a trend for association with appetite reduction scores (P=0.05). A significant interaction between the G allele and treatment over time for appetite reduction scores was also observed (P=0.03). The G allele carriers presented a higher risk for appetite reduction worsening when compared with T allele homozygotes (odds ratio=3.47, P=0.01). The present results suggest an influence of carboxylesterase 1 -75 T>G polymorphism on the worsening of appetite reduction with MPH treatment in youths with ADHD.

  3. A simple allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method to detect the Gly143Glu polymorphism in the human carboxylesterase 1 gene: importance of genotyping for pharmacogenetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Walter Soria, Néstor; Belaus, Andrea; Galván, Cristian; Ana Pasquali, María; Velez, Pablo; Del Carmen Montes, Cecilia; Beltramo, Dante M

    2010-12-01

    Human carboxylesterases 1 and 2 (CES1 and CES2) catalyze the hydrolysis of many exogenous compounds. Alterations in CES sequences could lead to variability in both the inactivation of drugs and the activation of prodrugs. The human CES1 gene encodes for the enzyme carboxylesterase 1, a serine esterase governing both metabolic deactivation and activation of numerous therapeutic agents. Some of theses drugs are the antiviral oseltamivir used to treat some types of influenza infections and the methylphenidate employed in the treatment of patients with attention deficit. The Gly143Glu polymorphism in CES1 gene has been shown to reduce enzyme activity. The aim of the present study was to develop an easy and cheap method to detect this polymorphism. For this, we studied a group of people from Córdoba, a Mediterranean area from Argentina. Our results show that our methodology could detect the presence of this polymorphism with a frequency around 1.8%, only in the heterozygote form. These results could be relevant to patients before the treatment with some drugs where the CES1 enzyme is involved.

  4. Molecular and functional characterization of cDNAs putatively encoding carboxylesterases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqin; Li, Daqi; Ge, Pingting; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) belong to a superfamily of metabolic enzymes encoded by a number of genes and are widely distributed in microbes, plants and animals including insects. These enzymes play important roles in detoxification of insecticides and other xenobiotics, degradation of pheromones, regulation of neurodevelopment, and control of animal development. In this study, we characterized a total of 39 full-length cDNAs putatively encoding different CarEs from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, one of the most severe insect pests in many regions of the world, and evaluated the role of four CarE genes in insecticide detoxification. Our phylogenetic analysis grouped the 39 CarEs into five different clades including 20 CarEs in clade A, 3 in D, 13 in E, 1 in F and 2 in I. Four CarE genes (LmCesA3, LmCesA20, LmCesD1, LmCesE1), representing three different clades (A, D and E), were selected for further analyses. The transcripts of the four genes were detectable in all the developmental stages and tissues examined. LmCesA3 and LmCesE1 were mainly expressed in the fat bodies and Malpighian tubules, whereas LmCesA20 and LmCesD1 were predominately expressed in the muscles and hemolymph, respectively. The injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) synthesized from each of the four CarE genes followed by the bioassay with each of four insecticides (chlorpyrifos, malathion, carbaryl and deltamethrin) increased the nymphal mortalities by 37.2 and 28.4% in response to malathion after LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 were silenced, respectively. Thus, we proposed that both LmCesA20 and LmCesE1 played an important role in detoxification of malathion in the locust. These results are expected to help researchers reveal the characteristics of diverse CarEs and assess the risk of insecticide resistance conferred by CarEs in the locust and other insect species.

  5. Pharmacodynamic Impact of Carboxylesterase 1 Gene Variants in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Treated with Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Peter; Ferrero, Laura; Bjerre, Ditte; Bruun, Niels E.; Egfjord, Martin; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Hansen, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Variation in the carboxylesterase 1 gene (CES1) may contribute to the efficacy of ACEIs. Accordingly, we examined the impact of CES1 variants on plasma angiotensin II (ATII)/angiotensin I (ATI) ratio in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) that underwent ACEI dose titrations. Five of these variants have previously been associated with drug response or increased CES1 expression, i.e., CES1 copy number variation, the variant of the duplicated CES1 gene with high transcriptional activity, rs71647871, rs2244613, and rs3815583. Additionally, nine variants, representatives of CES1Var, and three other CES1 variants were examined. Methods Patients with CHF, and clinical indication for ACEIs were categorized according to their CES1 genotype. Differences in mean plasma ATII/ATI ratios between genotype groups after ACEI dose titration, expressed as the least square mean (LSM) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), were assessed by analysis of variance. Results A total of 200 patients were recruited and 127 patients (63.5%) completed the study. The mean duration of the CHF drug dose titration was 6.2 (SD 3.6) months. After ACEI dose titration, there was no difference in mean plasma ATII/ATI ratios between subjects with the investigated CES1 variants, and only one previously unexplored variation (rs2302722) qualified for further assessment. In the fully adjusted analysis of effects of rs2302722 on plasma ATII/ATI ratios, the difference in mean ATII/ATI ratio between the GG genotype and the minor allele carriers (GT and TT) was not significant, with a relative difference in LSMs of 0.67 (95% CI 0.43–1.07; P = 0.10). Results of analyses that only included enalapril-treated patients remained non-significant after Bonferroni correction for multiple parallel comparisons (difference in LSM 0.60 [95% CI 0.37–0.98], P = 0.045). Conclusion These findings indicate that the included single variants of CES1 do not significantly influence plasma ATII/ATI ratios in CHF

  6. Opossum carboxylesterases: sequences, phylogeny and evidence for CES gene duplication events predating the marsupial-eutherian common ancestor

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Carboxylesterases (CES) perform diverse metabolic roles in mammalian organisms in the detoxification of a broad range of drugs and xenobiotics and may also serve in specific roles in lipid, cholesterol, pheromone and lung surfactant metabolism. Five CES families have been reported in mammals with human CES1 and CES2 the most extensively studied. Here we describe the genetics, expression and phylogeny of CES isozymes in the opossum and report on the sequences and locations of CES1, CES2 and CES6 'like' genes within two gene clusters on chromosome one. We also discuss the likely sequence of gene duplication events generating multiple CES genes during vertebrate evolution. Results We report a cDNA sequence for an opossum CES and present evidence for CES1 and CES2 like genes expressed in opossum liver and intestine and for distinct gene locations of five opossum CES genes,CES1, CES2.1, CES2.2, CES2.3 and CES6, on chromosome 1. Phylogenetic and sequence alignment studies compared the predicted amino acid sequences for opossum CES with those for human, mouse, chicken, frog, salmon and Drosophila CES gene products. Phylogenetic analyses produced congruent phylogenetic trees depicting a rapid early diversification into at least five distinct CES gene family clusters: CES2, CES1, CES7, CES3, and CES6. Molecular divergence estimates based on a Bayesian relaxed clock approach revealed an origin for the five mammalian CES gene families between 328–378 MYA. Conclusion The deduced amino acid sequence for an opossum cDNA was consistent with its identity as a mammalian CES2 gene product (designated CES2.1). Distinct gene locations for opossum CES1 (1: 446,222,550–446,274,850), three CES2 genes (1: 677,773,395–677,927,030) and a CES6 gene (1: 677,585,520–677,730,419) were observed on chromosome 1. Opossum CES1 and multiple CES2 genes were expressed in liver and intestine. Amino acid sequences for opossum CES1 and three CES2 gene products revealed conserved

  7. Opossum carboxylesterases: sequences, phylogeny and evidence for CES gene duplication events predating the marsupial-eutherian common ancestor.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Chan, Jeannie; Cox, Laura A; Murphy, William J; VandeBerg, John L

    2008-02-20

    Carboxylesterases (CES) perform diverse metabolic roles in mammalian organisms in the detoxification of a broad range of drugs and xenobiotics and may also serve in specific roles in lipid, cholesterol, pheromone and lung surfactant metabolism. Five CES families have been reported in mammals with human CES1 and CES2 the most extensively studied. Here we describe the genetics, expression and phylogeny of CES isozymes in the opossum and report on the sequences and locations of CES1, CES2 and CES6 'like' genes within two gene clusters on chromosome one. We also discuss the likely sequence of gene duplication events generating multiple CES genes during vertebrate evolution. We report a cDNA sequence for an opossum CES and present evidence for CES1 and CES2 like genes expressed in opossum liver and intestine and for distinct gene locations of five opossum CES genes,CES1, CES2.1, CES2.2, CES2.3 and CES6, on chromosome 1. Phylogenetic and sequence alignment studies compared the predicted amino acid sequences for opossum CES with those for human, mouse, chicken, frog, salmon and Drosophila CES gene products. Phylogenetic analyses produced congruent phylogenetic trees depicting a rapid early diversification into at least five distinct CES gene family clusters: CES2, CES1, CES7, CES3, and CES6. Molecular divergence estimates based on a Bayesian relaxed clock approach revealed an origin for the five mammalian CES gene families between 328-378 MYA. The deduced amino acid sequence for an opossum cDNA was consistent with its identity as a mammalian CES2 gene product (designated CES2.1). Distinct gene locations for opossum CES1 (1: 446,222,550-446,274,850), three CES2 genes (1: 677,773,395-677,927,030) and a CES6 gene (1: 677,585,520-677,730,419) were observed on chromosome 1. Opossum CES1 and multiple CES2 genes were expressed in liver and intestine. Amino acid sequences for opossum CES1 and three CES2 gene products revealed conserved residues previously reported for human CES1

  8. [A comparative study of the cholinesterase and carboxylesterase sensitivities of mammals and arthropods to new phenyl and glycidyl esters of dialkyl thiophosphoric acid].

    PubMed

    Brestkin, A P; Kormilitsyn, B N; Kugusheva, L I; Maĭzel', E B; Moralev, S N; Mukanova, K D; Khovanskikh, A E; Abduvakhabov, A A; Babaev, B N; Dalimov, D N

    1996-01-01

    The antienzymic activities of 14 organophosphorous compounds, the derivatives of dialkyl thiophosphoric acid, towards the acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and carboxylesterase (CE) from the spring grain aphid and mammals were investigated. The dependence of inhibitory activity of the compounds on their alkyl radical length was shown to be different for the AchE from the aphid and man. Some less pronounced differences in this dependence were revealed between the BuChEs from the aphid and horse as well as between the CEs from the aphid, mouse and red spider mite. The data give evidence of a distinction in structure of the active surfaces of the enzymes from the aphid and mammals. Some peculiar properties of the aphid cholinesterases are discussed taking account of the results of the present and previous papers.

  9. Toxicity of parathion on embryo and yolk-sac larvae of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata l.): effects on survival, cholinesterase, and carboxylesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M Isabel; Arellano, Juana M; Albendín, Gemma; Sarasquete, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    This study was conducted to examine the acute toxicity of the organophosphorus pesticide (OP) parathion on embryos and yolk-sac larvae of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), and to investigate the effects of this compound on cholinesterase and carboxylesterase activity of seabream larvae in the phase of endogenous feeding. The 72-h LC50 for yolk-sac larvae (0.523 mg L⁻¹) was about two-fold lower than the 48-h LC50 for embryos (1.005 mg L⁻¹). Parathion significantly inhibited the activity of ChE and CaE activity in yolk sac larvae but there were not significant differences in the sensitivity of both esterases to parathion as inferred by their 72-h IC50 values. Larvae exposed to parathion for 72 h showed a 70% inhibition of the whole body acetylcholinesterase at approximately the LC50.

  10. Activity of carboxylesterase and glutathione S-transferase in different life-stages of carabid beetle (Poecilus cupreus) exposed to toxic metal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grazyna; Kramarz, Paulina; Babczyńska, Agnieszka

    2003-04-01

    Among the cytoplasmatic enzymes responsible for neutralization of organic xenobiotics, carboxylesterases (CarE) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) play important roles. Our study tested to what extent dietary Zn or Cd could modify the activity of CarE and GST at different life-stages of the carabid beetle Poecilus cupreus. Treatment and stage effects generally were statistically significant. For CarE activity in the beetles exposed to cadmium, only treatment was a significant factor. In all cases, the interaction between studied factors was statistically significant, implying that the physiological condition of the animals may enhance or reduce enzyme activity. We also observed differences between animals treated with cadmium and zinc in the pattern of enzyme activity, and a difference in GST activity measured with two different substrates. Our results confirmed that in studying enzyme activity under metal stress one should consider the animal's life-stage and sex.

  11. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of two juvenile hormone esterase-like carboxylesterase cDNAs in Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Zhao, Muzi; Deng, Yanfei; Yang, Yuanjie; Li, Xuguang; Lu, Quanping; Ge, Jiachun; Pan, Jianlin; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2017-03-01

    Precise regulation of methyl farnesoate (MF) titer is of prime importance throughout the crustacean life-cycle. Although the synthetic pathway of MF is well-documented, little is known about its degradation and recycling in crustaceans. Juvenile hormone esterase-like (JHE-like) carboxylesterase (CXE) is a key enzyme in MF degradation, thus playing a significant role in regulating the MF titer. We identified and characterized two cDNAs, Es-CXE1 and Es-CXE2, encoding JHE-like CXEs in Chinese mitten crab. Full-length cDNAs of Es-CXE1 and Es-CXE2 encode proteins composed of 584 and 597 amino acids, respectively, both of which contain a typical carboxylesterase domain. Alignment and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Es-CXEs are highly similar to those of other crustaceans. To further validate their functions, we evaluated the mRNA expression patterns of the Es-CXEs in various tissues and in different physiological conditions. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that the two Es-CXEs were predominantly expressed in the hepatopancreas and ovaries, which are the major tissues for MF metabolism. Es-CXE2 expression levels in the hepatopancreas and ovaries were about 100 and 25-fold higher, than the respective Es-CXE1 expressions. During ovarian rapid development stage, the global expressions of Es-CXEs were up-regulated in the hepatopancreas and down-regulated in the ovaries. After eyestalk ablation (ESA), the mRNA expressions of the two Es-CXEs were up-regulated in the hepatopancreas, further indicating their potential in degrading MF. Taken together, our results suggest that Es-CXEs, the key component of the juvenile hormone degradation pathway, may play vital roles in the development and reproduction of the Chinese mitten crab. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sacubitril Is Selectively Activated by Carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) in the Liver and the Activation Is Affected by CES1 Genetic Variation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Wang, Xinwen; Nguyen, Jenny; Wu, Audrey H; Bleske, Barry E; Zhu, Hao-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Sacubitril was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in combination with valsartan for the treatment of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. As a prodrug, sacubitril must be metabolized (hydrolyzed) to its active metabolite sacubitrilat (LBQ657) to exert its intended therapeutic effects. Thus, understanding the determinants of sacubitril activation will lead to the improvement of sacubitril pharmacotherapy. The objective of this study was to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for the activation of sacubitril, and determine the impact of genetic variation on sacubitril activation. First, an incubation study of sacubitril with human plasma and the S9 fractions of human liver, intestine, and kidney was conducted. Sacubitril was found to be activated by human liver S9 fractions only. Moreover, sacubitril activation was significantly inhibited by the carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) inhibitor bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate in human liver S9. Further incubation studies with recombinant human CES1 and carboxylesterase 2 confirmed that sacubitril is a selective CES1 substrate. The in vitro study of cell lines transfected with wild-type CES1 and the CES1 variant G143E (rs71647871) demonstrated that G143E is a loss-of-function variant for sacubitril activation. Importantly, sacubitril activation was significantly impaired in human livers carrying the G143E variant. In conclusion, sacubitril is selectively activated by CES1 in human liver. The CES1 genetic variant G143E can significantly impair sacubitril activation. Therefore, CES1 genetic variants appear to be an important contributing factor to interindividual variability in sacubitril activation, and have the potential to serve as biomarkers to optimize sacubitril pharmacotherapy.

  13. Gene expression analysis and enzyme assay reveal a potential role of the carboxylesterase gene CpCE-1 from Cydia pomonella in detoxification of insecticides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Carboxylesterases (CarEs) are responsible for metabolism of xenobiotics including insecticides in insects. Understanding the expression patterns of a such detoxifying gene and effect of insecticides on its enzyme activity are important to clarify the function of this gene relevant to insecticides-detoxifying process, but little information is available in the codling moth Cydia pomonella (L.). In this study, we investigated the expression profiles of CarE gene CpCE-1 at different developmental stages and in different tissues of C. pomonella, as well as the larvae exposed to chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin by using absolute real-time quantitative PCR (absolute RT-qPCR). Results indicated that CpCE-1 expression was significantly altered during C. pomonella development stages, and this expression differed between sexes, with a higher transcript in females than males. Meanwhile, CpCE-1 is overexpressed in cuticle, midgut and head than silk gland, fat body and Malpighian tubules. Exposure of third instar larvae to a non-lethal dosage of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin resulted in induction of CpCE-1 transcript. The total carboxylesterase enzyme activity was inhibited by chlorpyrifos-ethyl in vivo; in contrast, the activity of Escherichia coli produced recombinant CpCE-1 was significantly inhibited by both lambda-cyhalothrin and chlorpyrifos-ethyl in vitro. These results suggested that CpCE-1 in C. pomonella is potentially involved in the development and in detoxification of chlorpyrifos-ethyl and lambda-cyhalothrin.

  14. Gastrointestinal Degradation of Fumonisin B₁ by Carboxylesterase FumD Prevents Fumonisin Induced Alteration of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Turkey and Swine.

    PubMed

    Masching, Sabine; Naehrer, Karin; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi-Elisabeth; Sărăndan, Mihai; Schaumberger, Simone; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schatzmayr, Dian

    2016-03-21

    The mycotoxin fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) is a frequent contaminant of feed and causes various adverse health effects in domestic animals. Hence, effective strategies are needed to prevent the impact of fumonisins on livestock productivity. Here we evaluated the capability of the fumonisin carboxylesterase FumD to degrade FB₁ to its less toxic metabolite hydrolyzed FB₁ (HFB₁) in the gastrointestinal tract of turkeys and pigs. First, an ex vivo pig model was used to examine the activity of FumD under digestive conditions. Within 2 h of incubation with FumD, FB₁ was completely degraded to HFB₁ in the duodenum and jejunum, respectively. To test the efficacy of the commercial application of FumD (FUMzyme) in vivo, female turkeys (n = 5) received either basal feed (CON), fumonisin-contaminated feed (15 mg/kg FB₁+FB₂; FB) or fumonisin-contaminated feed supplemented with FUMzyme (15 U/kg; FB+FUMzyme) for 14 days ad libitum. Addition of FUMzyme resulted in significantly decreased levels of FB₁ in excreta, whereas HFB₁ concentrations were significantly increased. Compared to the FB group (0.24 ± 0.02), the mean serum sphinganine-to-sphingosine (Sa/So) ratio was significantly reduced in the FB+FUMzyme group (0.19 ± 0.02), thus resembling values of the CON group (0.16 ± 0.02). Similarly, exposure of piglets (n = 10) to 2 mg/kg FB₁+FB₂ for 42 days caused significantly elevated serum Sa/So ratios (0.39 ± 0.15) compared to the CON group (0.14 ± 0.01). Supplementation with FUMzyme (60 U/kg) resulted in gastrointestinal degradation of FB₁ and unaffected Sa/So ratios (0.16 ± 0.02). Thus, the carboxylesterase FumD represents an effective strategy to detoxify FB₁ in the digestive tract of turkeys and pigs.

  15. Detection of carboxylesterase and esterase activity in culturable gut bacterial flora isolated from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus), from India and its possible role in indoxacarb degradation.

    PubMed

    Ramya, Shanivarsanthe Leelesh; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Srinivasa Murthy, Kottilingam; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Verghese, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus), is a notorious pest of brassica crops worldwide and is resistant to all groups of insecticides. The insect system harbors diverse groups of microbiota, which in turn helps in enzymatic degradation of xenobiotic-like insecticides. The present study aimed to determine the diversity of gut microflora in DBM, quantify esterase activity and elucidate their possible role in degradation of indoxacarb. We screened 11 geographic populations of DBM in India and analyzed them for bacterial diversity. The culturable gut bacterial flora underwent molecular characterization with 16S rRNA. We obtained 25 bacterial isolates from larvae (n=13) and adults (n=12) of DBM. In larval gut isolates, gammaproteobacteria was the most abundant (76%), followed by bacilli (15.4%). Molecular characterization placed adult gut bacterial strains into three major classes based on abundance: gammaproteobacteria (66%), bacilli (16.7%) and flavobacteria (16.7%). Esterase activity from 19 gut bacterial isolates ranged from 0.072 to 2.32μmol/min/mg protein. Esterase bands were observed in 15 bacterial strains and the banding pattern differed in Bacillus cereus - KC985225 and Pantoea agglomerans - KC985229. The bands were characterized as carboxylesterase with profenofos used as an inhibitor. Minimal media study showed that B. cereus degraded indoxacarb up to 20%, so it could use indoxacarb for metabolism and growth. Furthermore, esterase activity was greater with minimal media than control media: 1.87 versus 0.26μmol/min/mg protein. Apart from the insect esterases, bacterial carboxylesterase may aid in the degradation of insecticides in DBM.

  16. Sacubitril Is Selectively Activated by Carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) in the Liver and the Activation Is Affected by CES1 Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian; Wang, Xinwen; Nguyen, Jenny; Wu, Audrey H.; Bleske, Barry E.

    2016-01-01

    Sacubitril was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in combination with valsartan for the treatment of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. As a prodrug, sacubitril must be metabolized (hydrolyzed) to its active metabolite sacubitrilat (LBQ657) to exert its intended therapeutic effects. Thus, understanding the determinants of sacubitril activation will lead to the improvement of sacubitril pharmacotherapy. The objective of this study was to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for the activation of sacubitril, and determine the impact of genetic variation on sacubitril activation. First, an incubation study of sacubitril with human plasma and the S9 fractions of human liver, intestine, and kidney was conducted. Sacubitril was found to be activated by human liver S9 fractions only. Moreover, sacubitril activation was significantly inhibited by the carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) inhibitor bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate in human liver S9. Further incubation studies with recombinant human CES1 and carboxylesterase 2 confirmed that sacubitril is a selective CES1 substrate. The in vitro study of cell lines transfected with wild-type CES1 and the CES1 variant G143E (rs71647871) demonstrated that G143E is a loss-of-function variant for sacubitril activation. Importantly, sacubitril activation was significantly impaired in human livers carrying the G143E variant. In conclusion, sacubitril is selectively activated by CES1 in human liver. The CES1 genetic variant G143E can significantly impair sacubitril activation. Therefore, CES1 genetic variants appear to be an important contributing factor to interindividual variability in sacubitril activation, and have the potential to serve as biomarkers to optimize sacubitril pharmacotherapy. PMID:26817948

  17. Use of a carboxylesterase inhibitor of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride to stabilize epothilone D in rat plasma for a validated UHPLC-MS/MS assay.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Long; Fu, Yunlin; Zhang, Duxi; Xia, Yuan-Qing; Peng, Qianping; Aubry, Anne-Françoise; Arnold, Mark E

    2014-10-15

    A sensitive, accurate and rugged UHPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the quantitation of Epothilone D (EpoD), a microtubule stabilizer in development for treatment of Alzeimer's disease, in rat plasma. The ester group in EpoD can be hydrolyzed by esterases in blood or plasma, which creates a stability concern for the bioanalysis of EpoD. Species differences in the stability of EpoD in plasma were observed. Carboxylesterases were identified as the likely esterases responsible for the hydrolysis of EpoD in plasma ex vivo, and the cause of the species different stability. Phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, a carboxylesterase inhibitor, was used to stabilize EpoD in rat blood during sample collection, processing, and storage. A systematic method screening and optimization strategy was used to improve the assay sensitivity and minimize potential bioanalytical risks. The stabilized plasma samples were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acquity UPLC BEH Phenyl column with a gradient elution. EpoD and its stable isotope labeled internal standards were detected by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The standard curve, which ranged from 0.100 to 100ng/mL was fitted to a 1/x(2) weighted linear regression model. The intra-assay precision was within ±3.6% CV and inter-assay precision was within ±4.2% CV. The assay accuracy was within ±8.3% of the nominal values. Assay recovery of EpoD was high (∼90%) and matrix effect was minimal (1.02-1.05). EpoD was stable in stabilized rat plasma for at least 30h at room temperature, 180 days at -20°C, and following three freeze-thaw cycles. The validated method was successfully applied to sample analysis in toxicology studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Contribution of carboxylesterase and cytochrome P450 to the bioactivation and detoxification of isocarbophos and its enantiomers in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiao-Mei; Wei, Xia; Tan, Yan; Xiao, Wei-Bin; Yang, Hai-Ying; Xie, Jian-Wei; Lu, Chuang; Li, Hua

    2014-07-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in modern agricultural systems to ensure good harvests. Isocarbophos (ICP), with a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitory effect is widely utilized to control a variety of leaf-eating and soil insects. However, the characteristics of the bioactivation and detoxification of ICP in humans remain unclear. In this study, the oxidative metabolism, esterase hydrolysis, and chiral inversion of ICP in human liver microsomes (HLMs) were investigated with the aid of a stereoselective LC/MS/MS method. The depletion of ICP in HLMs was faster in the absence of carboxylesterase inhibitor (BNPP) than in the presence of NADPH and BNPP, with t1/2 of 5.2 and 90 min, respectively. Carboxylesterase was found to be responsible for the hydrolysis of ICP, the major metabolic pathway. CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and CYP2C19 were all involved in the secondary metabolism pathway of desulfuration of ICP. Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) did not contribute to the clearance of ICP. The hydrolysis and desulfuration of (±)ICP, (+)ICP, and (-)ICP in HLMs follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Individual enantiomers of ICP and its oxidative desulfuration metabolite isocarbophos oxon (ICPO) were found to be inhibitors of acetylcholinesterases at different extents. For example, (±)ICPO is more potent than ICP (IC50 0.031μM vs. 192μM), whereas (+)ICPO is more potent than (-)ICPO (IC50 0.017μM vs. 1.55μM). Given the finding of rapid hydrolysis of ICP and low abundance of oxidative metabolites presence in human liver, the current study highlights that human liver has a greater capacity for detoxification of ICP.

  19. Gastrointestinal Degradation of Fumonisin B1 by Carboxylesterase FumD Prevents Fumonisin Induced Alteration of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Turkey and Swine

    PubMed Central

    Masching, Sabine; Naehrer, Karin; Schwartz-Zimmermann, Heidi-Elisabeth; Sărăndan, Mihai; Schaumberger, Simone; Dohnal, Ilse; Nagl, Veronika; Schatzmayr, Dian

    2016-01-01

    The mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a frequent contaminant of feed and causes various adverse health effects in domestic animals. Hence, effective strategies are needed to prevent the impact of fumonisins on livestock productivity. Here we evaluated the capability of the fumonisin carboxylesterase FumD to degrade FB1 to its less toxic metabolite hydrolyzed FB1 (HFB1) in the gastrointestinal tract of turkeys and pigs. First, an ex vivo pig model was used to examine the activity of FumD under digestive conditions. Within 2 h of incubation with FumD, FB1 was completely degraded to HFB1 in the duodenum and jejunum, respectively. To test the efficacy of the commercial application of FumD (FUMzyme) in vivo, female turkeys (n = 5) received either basal feed (CON), fumonisin-contaminated feed (15 mg/kg FB1+FB2; FB) or fumonisin-contaminated feed supplemented with FUMzyme (15 U/kg; FB+FUMzyme) for 14 days ad libitum. Addition of FUMzyme resulted in significantly decreased levels of FB1 in excreta, whereas HFB1 concentrations were significantly increased. Compared to the FB group (0.24 ± 0.02), the mean serum sphinganine-to-sphingosine (Sa/So) ratio was significantly reduced in the FB+FUMzyme group (0.19 ± 0.02), thus resembling values of the CON group (0.16 ± 0.02). Similarly, exposure of piglets (n = 10) to 2 mg/kg FB1+FB2 for 42 days caused significantly elevated serum Sa/So ratios (0.39 ± 0.15) compared to the CON group (0.14 ± 0.01). Supplementation with FUMzyme (60 U/kg) resulted in gastrointestinal degradation of FB1 and unaffected Sa/So ratios (0.16 ± 0.02). Thus, the carboxylesterase FumD represents an effective strategy to detoxify FB1 in the digestive tract of turkeys and pigs. PMID:27007395

  20. Gene Cloning and Characterization of the Geobacillus thermoleovorans CCR11 Carboxylesterase CaesCCR11, a New Member of Family XV.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Luna, Graciela; Sánchez-Otero, María Guadalupe; Quintana-Castro, Rodolfo; Matus-Toledo, Rodrigo Eloir; Oliart-Ros, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    A gene encoding a carboxylesterase produced by Geobacillus thermoleovoras CCR11 was cloned in the pET-3b cloning vector, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Gene sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 750 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 250 amino acid residues (27.3 kDa) named CaesCCR11. The enzyme showed its maximum activity at 50 °C and pH 5-8, with preference for C4 substrates, confirming its esterase nature. It displayed good resistance to temperature, pH, and the presence of organic solvents and detergents, that makes this enzyme biotechnologically applicable in the industries such as fine and oleo-chemicals, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, organic synthesis, biodiesel production, detergents, and food industries. A 3D model of CaesCCR11 was predicted using the Bacillus sp. monoacyl glycerol lipase bMGL H-257 structure as template (PBD code 3RM3, 99 % residue identity with CaesCCR11). Based on its canonical α/β hydrolase fold composed of 7 β-strands and 6 α-helices, the α/β architecture of the cap domain, the GLSTG pentapeptide, and the formation of distinctive salt bridges, we are proposing CaesCCR11 as a new member of family XV of lipolytic enzymes.

  1. Correlation between electrophoretic types B1 and B2 of carboxylesterase B and host-dependent factors in Escherichia coli septicaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, B.; Goullet, P.

    1988-01-01

    Electrophoretic types B1 and B2 of carboxylesterase B produced by strains of Escherichia coli isolated from 100 septicaemia cases were correlated with alpha-haemolysin and mannose resistant haemagglutinin (MRHA) production and with clinical data including eventual underlying diseases, origin of septicaemia and evolution. Electrophoretic type B2 was phenotypically linked with alpha-haemolysin and MRHA production. The proportion of type B2 isolates varied significantly with occurrence of an underlying illness (45% for patients without an underlying disease and 22% for compromised patients) and with the site of origin of the septicaemia (40% for those of urinary origin and 18% for infection of digestive origin). In the former infections, type B2 isolates were obtained in the majority from male patients while type B1 isolates predominated in women. The septicaemias associated with type B1 were characterized by a lower proportion of isolates producing alpha-haemolysin and MRHA and by a greater frequency of septic shock and death than those associated with type B2. These facts emphasize the importance of host-dependent factors in E. coli septicaemia. PMID:3276540

  2. Identification of amino acids related to catalytic function of Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 carboxylesterase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Ho; Lee, Ye-Na; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hee-Bong

    2016-01-01

    The archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 carboxylesterase is a thermostable enzyme with a molecular mass of 33.5 kDa belonging to the mammalian hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family. In our previous study, we purified the enzyme and suggested the expected amino acids related to its catalysis by chemical modification and a sequence homology search. For further validating these amino acids in this study, we modified them using site-directed mutagenesis and examined the activity of the mutant enzymes using spectrophotometric analysis and then estimated by homology modeling and fluorescence analysis. As a result, it was identified that Ser151, Asp244, and His274 consist of a catalytic triad, and Gly80, Gly81, and Ala152 compose an oxyanion hole of the enzyme. In addition, it was also determined that the cysteine residues are located near the active site or at the positions inducing any conformational changes of the enzyme by their replacement with serine residues. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 349-354] PMID:27222124

  3. Human anti-endoplasmic reticulum antibodies in sera of patients with halothane-induced hepatitis are directed against a trifluoroacetylated carboxylesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, H; Martin, B M; Schulick, A H; Christ, D D; Kenna, J G; Pohl, L R

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with halothane-induced hepatitis have serum antibodies that are directed against novel liver microsomal neoantigens and have suggested that these neoantigens may play an immunopathological role in development of the patients' liver damage. These investigations have further revealed that the antibodies are directed against distinct polypeptide fractions (100 kDa, 76 kDa, 59 kDa, 57 kDa, 54 kDa) that have been covalently modified by the reactive trifluoroacetyl halide metabolite of halothane. In this paper, the trifluoroacetylated (TFA) 59-kDa neoantigen (59-kDa-TFA) recognized by the patients' antibodies was isolated from liver microsomes of halothane-treated rats by chromatography on an immunoaffinity column of anti-TFA IgG. Antibodies were raised against the 59-kDa-TFA protein and were used to purify the native protein from liver microsomes of untreated rats. Based upon its apparent monomeric molecular mass, NH2-terminal amino acid sequence, catalytic activity, and other physical properties, the protein has been identified as a previously characterized microsomal carboxylesterase (EC 3.1.1.1). A similar strategy may be used to purify and characterized neoantigens associated with other drug toxicities that are believed to have an immunopathological basis. Images PMID:2911577

  4. Carboxylesterase 1 Is Regulated by Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α and Protects Against Alcohol- and MCD diet-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiesi; Xu, Yang; Li, Yuanyuan; Jadhav, Kavita; You, Min; Yin, Liya; Zhang, Yanqiao

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a major organ that controls hepatic and systemic homeostasis. Dysregulation of liver metabolism may cause liver injury. Previous studies have demonstrated that carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) regulates hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protects against liver steatosis. In the present study, we investigated whether CES1 played a role in the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet-induced liver injury. Both hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) and CES1 were markedly reduced in patients with alcoholic steatohepatitis. Alcohol repressed both HNF4α and CES1 expression in primary hepatocytes. HNF4α regulated CES1 expression by directly binding to the proximal promoter of CES1. Global inactivation of CES1 aggravated alcohol- or MCD diet-induced liver inflammation and liver injury, likely as a result of increased production of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunctions. Knockdown of hepatic CES1 exacerbated ethanol-induced steatohepatitis. These data indicate that CES1 plays a crucial role in protection against alcohol- or MCD diet-induced liver injury. PMID:27075303

  5. A cluster of at least three esterase genes in Lucilia cuprina includes malathion carboxylesterase and two other esterases implicated in resistance to organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, K.A. |; Russell, R.J.; Oakeshott, J.G.

    1994-12-01

    Three distinct malathion carboxylesterase (MCE) phenotypes have been identified among strains of Lucilia cuprina. The high-activity phenotype shows 1.6- and 3.3-fold more MCE specific activity than the intermediate- and low-activity phenotypes, respectively. Flies with high MCE activity are 1000-fold more resistant to malathion than flies with either low or intermediate MCE phenotypes, which are equally susceptible. High and low MCE specific activity are allelic and encoded by the Rmal gene on chromosome 4. Rmal is clustered within one map unit of two other esterase genes, Rop1 and E9, which are implicated in resistance to other organophosphate insecticides. Intermediate MCE specific activity is also inherited within the cluster, although its allelism to Rmal, Rop1, or E9 is unclear. The cluster does not contain the gene for the hemolymph esterase E4, which maps 6.1 map units from Rop1, on the other side of the bubbled wing marker. The cluster appears to be homologous to part of a tandem array of 11 esterase genes on chromosome 3R of Drosophila melanogaster. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Detection of activity and mass spectrometric identification of mouse liver carboxylesterase and aldehyde dehydrogenase separated by non-denaturing two-dimensional electrophoresis after extraction with detergents.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Youji; Manabe, Takashi

    2005-05-20

    To examine the activities and identity of enzymes associated with organelles such as microsomes and mitochondria, proteins from mouse liver were extracted using the non-ionic detergents Nonidet P-40 (NP-40), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), polyoxyethylene isooctylphenyl ester (Triton X), n-octyl beta-D-glucoside (octyl glycoside) or anionic detergent sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) after the removal of cytosolic proteins. The proteins extracted by detergents were separated by non-denaturing two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). The activities of esterase and aldehyde dehydrogenase were retained by non-denaturing 2-DE after treatment with each non-ionic detergent, but the activities were reduced or lost when the proteins were extracted with more than 0.5% SDS. For proteomic analysis of the organelle-associated proteins in mouse liver, proteins were separated by non-denaturing 2-DE and were identified using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) after the proteins were solubilized by octyl glycoside, NP-40 and 0.1% SDS. Several organelle-associated proteins such as carboxylesterase, aldehyde dehydrogenase, glucose regulated protein and HSP60 were identified. These results indicate that the activities and identity of detergent-soluble enzymes can be examined by this non-denaturing 2-DE and mass spectrometry.

  7. Effect of temperature and sorbitol in improving the solubility of carboxylesterases protein CpCE-1 from Cydia pomonella and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xueqing; Zhang, Yalin

    2013-12-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are enzymes responsible for the detoxification of insecticides in insects. In the Cydia pomonella, CEs are involved in synthetic pyrethroid, neonicotinoid, carbamate, and organophosphate detoxification. However, functional overexpression of CEs proteins in Escherichia coli systems often results in insoluble proteins. In this study, we expressed the fusion protein CpCE-1 in E. coli BL21 (DE3). This recombinant protein was overexpressed as inclusion bodies at 37 °C whereas it produced a higher percentage of soluble protein at lower growth temperatures. Production of soluble proteins and enzyme activity increased in the presence of sorbitol in the growth medium. The fusion protein was purified from the lysate supernatant using a Ni(2+)-NTA agarose gel column. The enzyme exhibited a higher affinity and substrate specificity for α-naphthyl acetate (α-NA), with k cat/K m of 100 s(-1) μM(-1) for α-NA, and the value is 29.78 s(-1) μM(-1) for β-naphthyl acetate. The V max and K m were also determined to be 12.9 μmol/min/mg protein and 13.4 μM using substrate α-NA. The optimum pH was 7.0 and temperature was 25 °C. An enzyme inhibition assay shows that PMSF and DEPC strongly inhibit the enzyme activity, while the metal ions Cu(2+) and Mg(2+) significantly activated the activity. More importantly, cypermethrin, methomyl, and acephate were found to suppress enzyme activity. The data demonstrated here provide information for heterologous expression of soluble protein and further study on insecticide metabolism in C. pomonella in vitro. This is the first report of the characterization of CEs protein from C. pomonella.

  8. Functional and immunohistochemical characterization of CCEae3a, a carboxylesterase associated with temephos resistance in the major arbovirus vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus.

    PubMed

    Grigoraki, Linda; Balabanidou, Vassileia; Meristoudis, Christos; Miridakis, Antonis; Ranson, Hilary; Swevers, Luc; Vontas, John

    2016-07-01

    Temephos is a major organophosphate (OP) larvicide that has been used extensively for the control of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti, the major vectors for viral diseases, such as dengue fever, zika and chikungunya. Resistance to temephos has been recently detected and associated with the upregulation of carboxylesterases (CCEs) through gene amplification, in both species. Here, we expressed the CCEae3a genes which showed the most striking up-regulation in resistant Aedes strains, using the baculovirus system. All CCEae3a variants encoded functional enzymes, with high activity and preference for p-nitrophenyl butyrate, a substrate that was shown capable to differentiate temephos resistant from susceptible Aedes larvae. Enzyme kinetic studies showed that CCEae3as from both Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus (CCEae3a_aeg and CCEae3a_alb, respectively) strongly interact with temephos oxon and slowly released the OP molecule, indicating a sequestration resistance mechanism. No difference was detected between resistant and susceptible CCEae3a_aeg variants (CCEae3a_aegR and CCEae3a_aegS, respectively), indicating that previously reported polymorphism is unlikely to play a role in temephos resistance. HPLC/MS showed that CCEae3as were able to metabolize temephos oxon to the temephos monoester [(4-hydroxyphenyl) sulfanyl] phenyl O,O-dimethylphosphorothioate. Western blot and immunolocalization studies, based on a specific antibody raised against the CCEae3a_alb showed that the enzyme is expressed at higher levels in resistant insects, primarily in malpighian tubules (MT) and nerve tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Homology modeling and metabolism prediction of human carboxylesterase-2 using docking analyses by GriDock: a parallelized tool based on AutoDock 4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vistoli, Giulio; Pedretti, Alessandro; Mazzolari, Angelica; Testa, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic problems lead to numerous failures during clinical trials, and much effort is now devoted to developing in silico models predicting metabolic stability and metabolites. Such models are well known for cytochromes P450 and some transferases, whereas less has been done to predict the activity of human hydrolases. The present study was undertaken to develop a computational approach able to predict the hydrolysis of novel esters by human carboxylesterase hCES2. The study involved first a homology modeling of the hCES2 protein based on the model of hCES1 since the two proteins share a high degree of homology (≅73%). A set of 40 known substrates of hCES2 was taken from the literature; the ligands were docked in both their neutral and ionized forms using GriDock, a parallel tool based on the AutoDock4.0 engine which can perform efficient and easy virtual screening analyses of large molecular databases exploiting multi-core architectures. Useful statistical models (e.g., r 2 = 0.91 for substrates in their unprotonated state) were calculated by correlating experimental pKm values with distance between the carbon atom of the substrate's ester group and the hydroxy function of Ser228. Additional parameters in the equations accounted for hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between substrates and contributing residues. The negatively charged residues in the hCES2 cavity explained the preference of the enzyme for neutral substrates and, more generally, suggested that ligands which interact too strongly by ionic bonds (e.g., ACE inhibitors) cannot be good CES2 substrates because they are trapped in the cavity in unproductive modes and behave as inhibitors. The effects of protonation on substrate recognition and the contrasting behavior of substrates and products were finally investigated by MD simulations of some CES2 complexes.

  10. Human liver carboxylesterase 1 outperforms alpha-fetoprotein as biomarker to discriminate hepatocellular carcinoma from other liver diseases in Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Na, Keun; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lee, Min Jung; Cho, Sang Yun; Kim, Sun A; Lee, Min-Ji; Song, Si Young; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Kyung Sik; Lee, Hyun Woong; Paik, Young-Ki

    2013-07-15

    Although alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is currently the major serologic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it cannot efficiently distinguish this cancer from other forms of liver disease in early diagnosis due to its low sensitivity. The aim of this study is to compare sensitivity and specificity of human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) and AFP biomarker. Antibody-based assays for hCE1 and AFP were used to test both biomarkers with respect to diagnostic efficiency, Youden's index and the area under the curve (AUC) through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in plasma from 208 patients with HCC (n=57), liver cirrhosis (n=27), chronic hepatitis (n=37), cholangiocarcinoma (n=22), gastric cancer (n=31) and pancreatic cancer (n=34), along with 52 healthy donors (HDs). The levels of hCE1 were significantly higher in patients with HCC than HDs and the other diseases (p<0.005), further verified by AUC values and Youden's index. In the set of HCC versus liver cirrhosis the AUC values were 0.744 (AFP), 0.918 (hCE1) and 0.938 (combination of AFP and hCE1), respectively. These results indicate that hCE1 is not only a more potent and specific marker in distinguishing cancer from liver diseases, in particular cirrhosis, but the combination of hCE1 and AFP shows also synergistic potential for greater sensitivity and specificity in early diagnosis. Therefore the antibody-based hCE1 assay appears to have high diagnostic efficiency for discriminating HCC from other forms of liver disease. It is now feasible to further validate this novel plasma-based biomarker in the large cohort we assembled. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  11. Enzymatic stability of 2'-ethylcarbonate-linked paclitaxel in serum and conversion to paclitaxel by rabbit liver carboxylesterase for use in prodrug/enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanino, Tadatoshi; Nawa, Akihiro; Miki, Yasuyoshi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2008-07-01

    In prodrug/enzyme therapy for cancer, information on the sensitivity of hydrolytic enzymes to prodrug is required to reduce adverse effects of the parental drug and to find the activating enzyme. The aim of this study was to characterize the enzymatic stability of 2'-ethylcarbonate-linked paclitaxel (TAX-2'-Et) in the sera of several different species including humans. TAX-2'-Et disposition in serum was kinetically analysed using models with hydrolytic and/or degradation processes. To further evaluate the capability of liver carboxylesterases (CESs) in TAX-2'-Et hydrolysis, a CES isolated from rabbit liver (Ra-CES) was utilized as a model enzyme. Rat serum provided rapid enzymatic hydrolysis of TAX-2'-Et with a half-life of 4 min. The degradation of paclitaxel (TAX) (degradation rate constant, 0.16 h(-1)) was accompanied by the formation of an unknown compound. The conversion to TAX was almost completely inhibited by phenylmethyl sulfonylfluoride (PMSF) and bis(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP). In human and rabbit sera, the degradation rate constant of TAX-2'-Et was 5.1 x 10(-2) and 0.15 h(-1), respectively, when excepting hydrolysis. The degradation products had the same molecular weight as TAX-2'-Et. The amount of TAX produced accounted for only 8-11% of the decrease in TAX-2'-Et after a 9 h exposure to rabbit or human serum. PMSF, but not BNPP, inhibited more than 90% of the TAX production in a 1.5 h incubation with human or rabbit serum. Ra-CES enzyme converted TAX-2'-Et to TAX with V(max) and K(m) of 74.7+/-13.8 nmol/min/mg protein and 8.8+/-2.8 microM, respectively. These results indicate that TAX-2'-Et is sensitive to serum CESs, but not cholinesterases. However, serum CESs show species-dependent hydrolysis of TAX-2'-Et. Although human serum allows the slow release of TAX, TAX-2'-Et is expected to reduce the side-effects of TAX. The Ra-CES enzyme is capable of hydrolysing TAX-2'-Et, which may be beneficial for the development of a TAX-2'-Et/enzyme therapy

  12. Oral Delivery Mediated RNA Interference of a Carboxylesterase Gene Results in Reduced Resistance to Organophosphorus Insecticides in the Cotton Aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover

    PubMed Central

    Gong, You-Hui; Yu, Xin-Rui; Shang, Qing-Li; Shi, Xue-yan; Gao, Xi-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is an effective tool to examine the function of individual genes. Carboxylesterases (CarE, EC 3.1.1.1) are known to play significant roles in the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds in many insect species. Previous studies in our laboratory found that CarE expression was up-regulated in Aphis gossypii (Glover) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) adults of both omethoate and malathion resistant strains, indicating the potential involvement of CarE in organophosphorus (OP) insecticide resistance. Functional analysis (RNAi) is therefore warranted to investigate the role of CarE in A. gossypii to OPs resistance. Result CarE expression in omethoate resistant individuals of Aphis gossypii was dramatically suppressed following ingestion of dsRNA-CarE. The highest knockdown efficiency (33%) was observed at 72 h after feeding when dsRNA-CarE concentration was 100 ng/µL. The CarE activities from the CarE knockdown aphids were consistent with the correspondingly significant reduction in CarE expression. The CarE activity in the individuals of control aphids was concentrated in the range of 650–900 mOD/per/min, while in the individuals of dsRNA-CarE-fed aphids, the CarE activity was concentrated in the range of 500–800 mOD/per/min. In vitro inhibition experiments also demonstrated that total CarE activity in the CarE knockdown aphids decreased significantly as compared to control aphids. Bioassay results of aphids fed dsRNA-CarE indicated that suppression of CarE expression increased susceptibility to omethoate in individuals of the resistant aphid strains. Conclusion The results of this study not only suggest that ingestion of dsRNA through artificial diet could be exploited for functional genomic studies in cotton aphids, but also indicate that CarE can be considered as a major target of organophosphorus insecticide (OPs) resistance in A. gossypii. Further, our results suggest that the CarE would be a propitious target for OPs resistant aphid

  13. A new carboxylesterase from Brevibacterium linens IFO 12171 responsible for the conversion of 1,4-butanediol diacrylate to 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate: purification, characterization, gene cloning, and gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Y; Ishikawa, J; Fukasaka, S; Yurimoto, H; Mitsui, R; Yanase, H; Kato, N

    1999-04-01

    A carboxylesterase that is responsible for conversion of 1,4-butanediol diacrylate (BDA) to 4-hydroxybutyl acrylate (4HBA) was found in Brevibacterium lines IFO 12171, and purified to homogeneity. The purified enzyme was active toward a variety of diesters of ethylene glycol, 1,4-butanediol, and 1,6-hexanediol. The K(m) and kcat of the enzyme for BDA were 3.04 mM and 203,000 s-1, respectively. The reaction with the purified enzyme gave 98 mM 4HBA from 100 mM BDA for 60 min. The enzyme gene was cloned from the chromosomal DNA of the bacterium. The open reading frame encoding the enzyme was 1176 bp long, corresponding to a protein of 393 amino acid residues (molecular mass = 42,569 Da). The deduced amino acid sequence contained the tetra peptide motif sequence, STTK, and the serine residue was confirmed to be the catalytic center of BDA esterase by site-directed mutagenesis for several amino acid residues. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the lac promoter, and the gene product (a fusion protein with 6 amino acid residues from beta-galactosidase) showed the same catalytic properties as the enzyme from the parent strain.

  14. Multifactorial resistance to aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug CHR2863 in myeloid leukemia cells: down-regulation of carboxylesterase 1, drug sequestration in lipid droplets and pro-survival activation ERK/Akt/mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Al, Marjon; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Kammerer, Sarah; Chandrupatla, Durga M.S.H.; Honeywell, Richard; Musters, Rene P.J.; Giovannetti, Elisa; O'Toole, Tom; Scheffer, George L.; Krige, David; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Niessen, Hans W.M.; Lems, Willem F.; Kramer, Pieternella A.; Scheper, Rik J.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Jansen, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Aminopeptidase inhibitors are receiving attention as combination chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of refractory acute myeloid leukemia. However, the factors determining therapeutic efficacy remain elusive. Here we identified the molecular basis of acquired resistance to CHR2863, an orally available hydrophobic aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug with an esterase-sensitive motif, in myeloid leukemia cells. CHR2863 enters cells by diffusion and is retained therein upon esterase activity-mediated conversion to its hydrophilic active metabolite drug CHR6768, thereby exerting amino acid depletion. Carboxylesterases (CES) serve as candidate prodrug activating enzymes given CES1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia specimens. We established two novel myeloid leukemia sublines U937/CHR2863(200) and U937/CHR2863(5uM), with low (14-fold) and high level (270-fold) CHR2863 resistance. The latter drug resistant cells displayed: (i) complete loss of CES1-mediated drug activation associated with down-regulation of CES1 mRNA and protein, (ii) marked retention/sequestration of the prodrug, (iii) a substantial increase in intracellular lipid droplets, and (iv) a dominant activation of the pro-survival Akt/mTOR pathway. Remarkably, the latter feature coincided with a gain of sensitivity to the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. These finding delineate the molecular basis of CHR2863 resistance and offer a novel modality to overcome this drug resistance in myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:26496029

  15. Mosquito carboxylesterase Est alpha 2(1) (A2). Cloning and sequence of the full-length cDNA for a major insecticide resistance gene worldwide in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, A; Hemingway, J

    1995-07-14

    Organophosphorus insecticide resistance in Culex mosquitoes is commonly caused by increased activity of one or more esterases. The commonest phenotype involves elevation of the esterases Est alpha 2 (A2) and Est beta 2 (B2). A cDNA encoding the Est alpha 2 esterase has now been isolated from a Sri Lankan insecticide-resistant mosquito (Culex quinquefasciatus, Say) expression library. In line with a recently suggested nomenclature system (Karunaratne, S. H. P. P. (1994) Characterization of Multiple Variants of Carboxylesterases Which Are Involved in Insecticide Resistance in the Mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. Ph.D. thesis, University of London), as the first sequenced variant of this esterase, it is now referred to as Est alpha 2(1). The full-length cDNA of est alpha 2(1) codes for a 540-amino acid protein, which has high homology with other esterases and lipases and belongs to the serine or B-esterase enzyme family. The predicted secondary structure of Est alpha 2(1) is similar to the consensus secondary structure of proteins within the esterase/lipase family where the secondary and tertiary structures have been resolved. The level of identity (approximately 47% at the amino acid level) between the est alpha 2(1) and the various Culex est beta (B1 and B2) cDNA alleles that have been cloned and sequenced suggests that the two esterase loci are closely related and arose originally from duplication of a common ancestral gene. The lack of a distinct hydrophobic signal sequence for Est alpha 2(1) and two possible N-linked glycosylation sites, both situated close to the active site serine, suggest that it is a nonglycosylated protein that is not exported from the cell. Southern and dot blot analysis of genomic DNA from various insecticide-resistant and susceptible mosquito strains show that the est alpha 2(1) gene, like est beta 2(1), is amplified in resistant strains. The restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns, after probing Southern blots of Eco

  16. In vitro and in vivo studies of cholinesterases and carboxylesterases in Planorbarius corneus exposed to a phosphorodithioate insecticide: Finding the most sensitive combination of enzymes, substrates, tissues and recovery capacity.

    PubMed

    Otero, Sofía; Kristoff, Gisela

    2016-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides (OPs) continue to be an important class of agrochemicals used in modern agriculture worldwide. Even though these pesticides persist in the environment for a relatively short time, they show a high acute toxicity that may represent a serious hazard for wildlife. Sub-lethal effects on non-target species are a focus in pest management programs and should be used as biomarkers. Cholinesterases (ChEs) are the most used biomarker of OP exposure in vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, the combined monitoring of ChE and carboxylesterase (CE) activities may provide a more useful indication of exposure and effect of the organisms. The objective of the present work was to find the most sensitive combination of enzyme, substrate, tissue and capacity to recovery of B-esterases in the freshwater gastropod Planorbarius corneus exposed to the OP azinphos-methyl. For this purpose, ChE and CE activities in different tissues of P. corneus (head-foot, pulmonary region, digestive gland, gonads and whole organism soft tissue) were studied. Measurements of ChE activity were performed using three substrates: acetylthiocholine, propionylthiocholine and butyrylthiocholine and CE activity using four different substrates: p-nitrophenyl acetate, p-nitrophenyl butyrate, 1-naphthyl acetate, and 2-naphthyl acetate in control and exposed organisms. Finally, the recovery rates of ChE and CE activities following 48h exposure to azinphos-methyl were analyzed. Our results show a preference for acetylthiocholine as substrate, a high inhibition with eserine (a selective ChE inhibitor) and inhibition with excess of substrate in all the analyzed tissues. The highest ChE and CE activity was found in the pulmonary region and in the digestive gland, respectively. The highest CE Vmax was obtained with 1 and 2-naphthyl acetate in all the tissues. CEs were more sensitive than ChE to azinphos-methyl exposure. The highest sensitivity was found using p-nitrophenyl acetate and

  17. Kinetics of Carboxylesterase: An Experiment for Biochemistry and Physical Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, C. S.; Cromartie, T. H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a convenient, inexpensive experiment in enzyme kinetics developed for the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory at the University of Virginia. Required are a single beam visible spectrophotometer with output to a recorder, a constant temperature, a commercially available enzyme, substrates, and buffers. (BT)

  18. Hypolipidemic agent Z-guggulsterone: metabolism interplays with induction of carboxylesterase and bile salt export pump.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongfang; Yang, Jian; Shi, Deshi; Xiao, Da; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Black, Chris; Deng, Ruitang; Yan, Bingfang

    2012-03-01

    Z-Guggulsterone is a major ingredient in the Indian traditional hypolipidemic remedy guggul. A study in mice has established that its hypolipidemic effect involves the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), presumably by acting as an antagonist of this receptor. It is generally assumed that the antagonism leads to induction of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme converting free cholesterol to bile acids. In this study, we tested whether Z-guggulsterone indeed induces human CYP7A1. In addition, the expression of cholesteryl ester hydrolase CES1 and bile salt export pump (BSEP) was monitored. Contrary to the general assumption, Z-guggulsterone did not induce CYP7A1. Instead, this phytosterol significantly induced CES1 and BSEP through transactivation. Z-Guggulsterone underwent metabolism by CYP3A4, and the metabolites greatly increased the induction potency on BSEP but not on CES1. BSEP induction favors cholesterol elimination, whereas CES1 involves both elimination and retention (probably when excessively induced). Interestingly, clinical trials reported the hypolipidemic response rates from 18% to 80% and showed that higher dosages actually increased VLDL cholesterol. Our findings predict that better hypolipidemic outcomes likely occur in individuals who have a relatively higher capacity of metabolizing Z-guggulsterone with moderate CES1 induction, a scenario possibly achieved by lowering the dosing regimens.

  19. Kinetics of Carboxylesterase: An Experiment for Biochemistry and Physical Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, C. S.; Cromartie, T. H.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a convenient, inexpensive experiment in enzyme kinetics developed for the undergraduate biochemistry laboratory at the University of Virginia. Required are a single beam visible spectrophotometer with output to a recorder, a constant temperature, a commercially available enzyme, substrates, and buffers. (BT)

  20. Biochemical and Structural Insights into Enzymatic Depolymerization of Polylactic Acid and Other Polyesters by Microbial Carboxylesterases.

    PubMed

    Hajighasemi, Mahbod; Nocek, Boguslaw P; Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Brown, Greg; Flick, Robert; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Hai, Tran; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Golyshin, Peter N; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2016-06-13

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a biodegradable polyester derived from renewable resources, which is a leading candidate for the replacement of traditional petroleum-based polymers. Since the global production of PLA is quickly growing, there is an urgent need for the development of efficient recycling technologies, which will produce lactic acid instead of CO2 as the final product. After screening 90 purified microbial α/β-hydrolases, we identified hydrolytic activity against emulsified PLA in two uncharacterized proteins, ABO2449 from Alcanivorax borkumensis and RPA1511 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Both enzymes were also active against emulsified polycaprolactone and other polyesters as well as against soluble α-naphthyl and p-nitrophenyl monoesters. In addition, both ABO2449 and RPA1511 catalyzed complete or extensive hydrolysis of solid PLA with the production of lactic acid monomers, dimers, and larger oligomers as products. The crystal structure of RPA1511 was determined at 2.2 Å resolution and revealed a classical α/β-hydrolase fold with a wide-open active site containing a molecule of polyethylene glycol bound near the catalytic triad Ser114-His270-Asp242. Site-directed mutagenesis of both proteins demonstrated that the catalytic triad residues are important for the hydrolysis of both monoester and polyester substrates. We also identified several residues in RPA1511 (Gln172, Leu212, Met215, Trp218, and Leu220) and ABO2449 (Phe38 and Leu152), which were not essential for activity against soluble monoesters but were found to be critical for the hydrolysis of PLA. Our results indicate that microbial carboxyl esterases can efficiently hydrolyze various polyesters making them attractive biocatalysts for plastics depolymerization and recycling.

  1. Activity of carboxylesterases, glutathione-S-transferase and monooxygenase on Rhipicephalus microplus exposed to fluazuron.

    PubMed

    Gaudêncio, Fabrício Nascimento; Klafke, Guilherme Marcondes; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Ferreira, Thaís Paes; Coelho, Cristiane Nunes; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; da Costa Angelo, Isabele; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of the exposure to fluazuron on the activity of common pesticide detoxification enzyme groups in the cattle tick (Rhipicephalus microplus). Engorged females of a susceptible strain (POA) and a resistant strain (Jaguar) were exposed in vitro to fluazuron and their eggs and larvae were used to compare the activities of the general esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The results showed significant elevation in MFO contents and esterases activity in the resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain, in eggs and larvae respectively. In the POA strain, the MFO activity in eggs was down-regulated by fluazuron exposure. Based on these results, it can be concluded that different detoxification enzymes can act in distinct pathways depending on the tick's development stage, and may be related to fluazuron detoxification in resistant strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MOLECULAR MODELS OF PARATHYROID METABOLISM BY CARBOXYLESTERASES: DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS DUE TO STEREOCHEMISTRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARATHYROIDS ARE A CHEMICAL CLASS OF WIDELY USED INSECTICIDES, & AT LEAST 16 CHEMICALS IN THIS CLASS ARE REGISTERED FOR USE IN THE US. IN ORDER TO EXTRAPOLATE THE KNOWLEDGE FROM RODENTS TO HUMANS, PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (pbpk) MODELS ARE CURRENTLY BEING DEVELOPED.

  3. Tumor-specific gene therapy for pancreatic cancer using human neural stem cells encoding carboxylesterase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seon-A; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Kim, Seung U.; Lee, Hong J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignant human diseases lacking effective treatment. Its extremely low survival rate necessitates development of novel therapeutic approach. Human neural stem cells (NSCs) are known to have tumor-tropic effect. We genetically engineered them to express rabbit carboxyl esterase (F3.CE), which activates prodrug CPT-11(irinotecan) into potent metabolite SN-38. We found significant inhibition of the growth of BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cell line in vitro by F3.CE in presence of CPT-11. Apoptosis was also markedly increased in BxPC3 cells treated with F3.CE and CPT-11. The ligand VEGF and receptor VEGF-1(Flt1) were identified to be the relevant tumor-tropic chemoattractant. We confirmed in vivo that in mice injected with BxPC3 on their skin, there was significant reduction of tumor size in those treated with both F3.CE and BxPC3 adjacent to the cancer mass. Administration of F3.CE in conjunction with CPT-11 could be a new possibility as an effective treatment regimen for patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:27659534

  4. Tumor-specific gene therapy for pancreatic cancer using human neural stem cells encoding carboxylesterase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung S; Yoon, Kichul; Choi, Seon-A; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Kim, Seung U; Lee, Hong J

    2016-11-15

    Advanced pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignant human diseases lacking effective treatment. Its extremely low survival rate necessitates development of novel therapeutic approach. Human neural stem cells (NSCs) are known to have tumor-tropic effect. We genetically engineered them to express rabbit carboxyl esterase (F3.CE), which activates prodrug CPT-11(irinotecan) into potent metabolite SN-38. We found significant inhibition of the growth of BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cell line in vitro by F3.CE in presence of CPT-11. Apoptosis was also markedly increased in BxPC3 cells treated with F3.CE and CPT-11. The ligand VEGF and receptor VEGF-1(Flt1) were identified to be the relevant tumor-tropic chemoattractant. We confirmed in vivo that in mice injected with BxPC3 on their skin, there was significant reduction of tumor size in those treated with both F3.CE and BxPC3 adjacent to the cancer mass. Administration of F3.CE in conjunction with CPT-11 could be a new possibility as an effective treatment regimen for patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer.

  5. Liver-specific expression of carboxylesterase 1g/esterase-x reduces hepatic steatosis, counteracts dyslipidemia and improves insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Bahitham, Wesam; Watts, Russell; Nelson, Randal; Lian, Jihong; Lehner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Ces1g/Es-x deficiency in mice results in weight gain, insulin resistance, fatty liver and hyperlipidemia through upregulation of de novo lipogenesis and oversecretion of triacylglycerol (TG)-rich lipoproteins. Here, we show that restoration of Ces1g/Es-x expression only in the liver significantly reduced hepatic TG concentration accompanied by decreased size of lipid droplets, reduced secretion of very low-density lipoproteins and improved insulin-mediated signal transduction in the liver. Collectively, these results demonstrate that hepatic Ces1g/Es-x plays a critical role in limiting hepatic steatosis, very low-density lipoprotein assembly and in augmenting insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Characterization of Carboxylesterases in Rat and Guinea Pig - Their Heterogeneity and Role in Detoxication of Organophosphorus Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    involve onset and termina- tion of hormone action (Leinweber, 1987). Most steroid hormones exist as fatty acid esters. The estradiol ester acts as an... hormones during metamorphosis in insects is an other example of termination of hormone action by esterolytic activity. The juvenile hormone esterase is...of hormone action represents an analogy to bioinactivation of xenobiotic esters. 2 OBJECT OF THE INVESTIGATION The present study is focussed on the

  7. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, 5 BAC clone sequencing, including two encoding Cytochrome P450s and one encoding CzEst9 carboxylesterase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has a genome over 2.4 times the size of the human genome, and with over 70% of repetitive DNA, this genome would prove very costly to sequence at today's prices and difficult to assemble and analyze. BAC clones give insight into the genome struct...

  8. Substrate specificity of xenobiotic metabolizing esterases in the liver of two catfish species

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, R.G.; Huang, T.L.; Obih, P.O.

    1994-12-31

    The preliminary studies were conducted on the characterization of substrate specificity in the liver microsomes and cytosol of two catfish species, Ictalurus punctatus and Ictalurus natalie. A series of five esters of p-nitrophenol were used as calorimetric substrates to assay the carboxylesterases. The substrate specificity of liver microsomal and cytosolic carboxylesterases were remarkably different from each other. The valerate ester of p-nitrophenol was most rapidly hydrolyzed by the microsomal carboxylesterases, whereas the prioponate ester was the best substrate for cytosolic carboxylesterases. The Ictalurus natalie catfish species were obtained from the Devil Swamp site of the Mississippi River Basin which is known to be heavily contaminated with toxic and hazardous industrial wastes. These results will be discussed in relation to the responses of xenobiotic metabolizing esterases to environmental pollutants and their possible use as biomarkers.

  9. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by human or rat liver in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON) are considered...

  10. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by human or rat liver in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON) are considered...

  11. Undesired vs. Designed Enzymatic Cleavage of Linkers for Liver Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chirapu, Srinivas R.; Bauman, Jonathan N.; Eng, Heather; Goosen, Theunis C.; Strelevitz, Timothy J.; Sinha, Subhash C.; Dow, Robert L.; Finn, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    A design for the selective release of drug molecules in the liver was tested, involving the attachment of a representative active agent by an ester linkage to various 2-substituted 5-aminovaleric acid carbamates. The anticipated pathway of carboxylesterase-1-mediated carbamate cleavage followed by lactamization and drug release was frustrated by unexpectedly high sensitivity of the ester linkage toward hydrolysis by carboxylesterase-2 and other microsomal components. PMID:24461291

  12. Hydrolysis of a series of parabens by skin microsomes and cytosol from human and minipigs and in whole skin in short-term culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, Christopher; Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J.; Ackermann, Chrisita; Payne, N. Ann; Fate, Gwendolyn; Voorman, Richard; Williams, Faith M.

    2007-12-01

    Parabens are esters of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and used as anti-microbial agents in a wide variety of toiletries, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. It is of interest to understand the dermal absorption and hydrolysis of parabens, and to evaluate their disposition after dermal exposure and their potential to illicit localised toxicity. The use of minipig as a surrogate model for human dermal metabolism and toxicity studies, justifies the comparison of paraben metabolism in human and minipig skin. Parabens are hydrolysed by carboxylesterases to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. The effects of the carboxylesterase inhibitors paraoxon and bis-nitrophenylphosphate provided evidence of the involvement of dermal carboxylesterases in paraben hydrolysis. Loperamide, a specific inhibitor of human carboxylesterase-2 inhibited butyl- and benzylparaben hydrolysis in human skin but not methylparaben or ethylparaben. These results show that butyl- and benzylparaben are more selective substrates for human carboxylesterase-2 in skin than the other parabens examined. Parabens applied to the surface of human or minipig skin were absorbed to a similar amount and metabolised to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid during dermal absorption. These results demonstrate that the minipig is a suitable model for man for assessing dermal absorption and hydrolysis of parabens, although the carboxylesterase profile in skin differs between human and minipig.

  13. A Method for Fast Assessment of OP/CB Exposure in the Japanese Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) Using Combined Esterases Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Abass, Kasim Sakran

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of different esterase activities in plasma and liver for Japanese quail and to combine determination of both carboxylesterase and cholinesterase as biochemical biomarker in order to identify the effects of carbamate and organophosphate compounds exposure. Carboxylesterase exhibits larger sensitivity to carbamate and organophosphate compounds than to cholinesterase and is present at higher levels. This permitted nature and distribution of carboxylesterase or cholinesterase to be measured. One predominant toxicological form of enzyme level constant in its patterns of motivation and inhibition with cholinesterase was identified in plasma with an apparent Michaelis constant for butyrylthiocholine iodide of 0.394 mM. Carboxylesterase activity in liver was considered by its preferential hydrolysis of the S-phenyl thioacetate. A concentration dependent decrease of carboxylesterase and cholinesterase has demonstrated during in vitro incubation of malathion, parathion, and trichlorfon in the range 0.125–2 mM, while with methomyl was in the range 0.25–4 mM. When quail (n = 15) was exposed orally for 48 h to concentrations of carbamate or organophosphate compounds of 3–200 mg/kg, the percentage inhibition of cholinesterase was in each case larger than that of carboxylesterase and reached statistical significance (P < 0.05) at lower concentrations. PMID:24527206

  14. Enzymatic inactivation of N-nitroso compounds in murine blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, R B; Aukerman, S L

    1985-03-01

    Murine blood plasma rapidly inactivates nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates but not nitrosoureas. The mechanism of this inactivation in murine blood plasma has been investigated. The vast majority of activity (greater than 97%) was inhibited by serine hydroxylase inhibitors. Also, 92% of the activity was inhibited by bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate, a selective inhibitor of carboxylesterases. Decomposition products formed after blood plasma action on N-ethyl-N-nitrosoacetamide or N-methyl-N-nitrosoethylcarbamate were separated and identified by gas chromatography. The products formed were consistent with a hydrolytic cleavage of the amidic bond. These observations are consistent with the idea that the major active factor(s) in plasma is a carboxylesterase(s).

  15. PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES: ISOFORM-DEPENDENT HYDROLYSIS, INDUCTION OF CYTOCHROME P450 3A4 AND EVIDENCE ON THE INVOLVEMENT OF THE PREGNANE X RECEPTOR

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongfang; Wang, Xiliang; Chen, Yi-tzai; Deng, Ruitang; Yan, Bingfang

    2009-01-01

    Pyrethroids account for more than one-third of the insecticides currently marketed in the world. In mammals, these insecticides undergo extensive metabolism by carboxylesterases and cytochrome P450s (CYPs). In addition, some pyrethroids are found to induce the expression of CYPs. The aim of this study was to determine whether pyrethroids induce carboxylesterases and CYP3A4, and whether the induction is correlated inversely with their hydrolysis. Human liver microsomes were pooled and tested for the hydrolysis of 11 pyrethroids. All pyrethroids were hydrolyzed by the pooled microsomes, but the hydrolytic rates varied by as many as 14 fold. Some pyrethroids such as bioresmethrin were preferably hydrolyzed by carboxylesterase HCE1, whereas others such as bifenthrin preferably by HCE2. In primary human hepatocytes, all pyrethroids except tetramethrin significantly induced CYP3A4. In contrast, insignificant changes were detected on the expression of carboxylesterases. The induction of CYP3A4 was confirmed in multiple cell lines including HepG2, Hop92 and LS180. Overall, the magnitude of the induction was correlated inversely with the rates of hydrolysis, but positively with the activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR). Transfection of a carboxylesterase markedly decreased the activation of PXR, and the decrease was in agreement with carboxylesterase-based preference for hydrolysis. In addition, human PXR variants as well as rat PXR differed from human PXR (wild-type) in responding to certain pyrethroids (e.g., lambda-cyhalothrin), suggesting that induction of PXR target genes by these pyrethroids varies depending on polymorphic variants and the PXR species identity. PMID:19249324

  16. Pyrethroid insecticides: Isoform-dependent hydrolysis, induction of cytochrome P450 3A4 and evidence on the involvement of the pregnane X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Dongfang; Wang Xiliang; Chen Yitzai; Deng Ruitang; Yan Bingfang

    2009-05-15

    Pyrethroids account for more than one-third of the insecticides currently marketed in the world. In mammals, these insecticides undergo extensive metabolism by carboxylesterases and cytochrome P450s (CYPs). In addition, some pyrethroids are found to induce the expression of CYPs. The aim of this study was to determine whether pyrethroids induce carboxylesterases and CYP3A4, and whether the induction is correlated inversely with their hydrolysis. Human liver microsomes were pooled and tested for the hydrolysis of 11 pyrethroids. All pyrethroids were hydrolyzed by the pooled microsomes, but the hydrolytic rates varied by as many as 14 fold. Some pyrethroids such as bioresmethrin were preferably hydrolyzed by carboxylesterase HCE1, whereas others such as bifenthrin preferably by HCE2. In primary human hepatocytes, all pyrethroids except tetramethrin significantly induced CYP3A4. In contrast, insignificant changes were detected on the expression of carboxylesterases. The induction of CYP3A4 was confirmed in multiple cell lines including HepG2, Hop92 and LS180. Overall, the magnitude of the induction was correlated inversely with the rates of hydrolysis, but positively with the activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR). Transfection of a carboxylesterase markedly decreased the activation of PXR, and the decrease was in agreement with carboxylesterase-based preference for hydrolysis. In addition, human PXR variants as well as rat PXR differed from human PXR (wild-type) in responding to certain pyrethroids (e.g., lambda-cyhalothrin), suggesting that induction of PXR target genes by these pyrethroids varies depending on polymorphic variants and the PXR species identity.

  17. Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    52.2 CES7 carboxylesterase 7 46.4 C4BP complement component 4 binding protein 39.2 PI3 peptidase inhibitor 3, skin -derived 38.0 CRISP3 cysteine...polypeptide 10.1 MTUS1 microtubule associated tumor suppressor 1 7.9 NNMT nicotinamide N-methyltransferase 6.6 SNCG synuclein, gamma (breast cancer-specific

  18. Protecting against cocaine, heroin, and sarin gas.

    PubMed

    McRee, Duncan

    2003-04-01

    The first X-ray structure of human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) and the structures of hCE1 with drug analogs bound reveal important molecular details of how the drugs cocaine, heroin, and tacrine are metabolized and cleared.

  19. Peripheral Neuropathy: Prevention and Treatment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AChE, BuChE, neurotoxic esterase, carboxylesterase). Likewise, there were no changes in the compound action potential of either the sural or sciatic...nerve and no changes in the sciatic nerve responsiveness to extracellular potassium. The triceps surae muscles responded normally to tetanic

  20. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are consider...

  1. Correlation between esterase electrophoretic polymorphism and virulence-associated traits in extra-intestinal invasive strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Goullet, P.; Picard, B.; Contrepois, M.; De Rycke, J.; Barnouin, J.

    1994-01-01

    The electrophoretic variations of carboxylesterase B and of esterases A, C and I, the presence of mannose resistant haemagglutinin, alpha-haemolysin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (CNF1) and certain O antigens were compared in 150 strains of Escherichia coli responsible for extra-intestinal infections. Electrophoretic mobilities of outer membrane proteins (OMP) were also studied for strains belonging to O4, O6, O7, O8 and O75 serogroups. Fast migrating allozymes of carboxylesterase B (pattern B1) were correlated with slow migrating allozymes of esterase C, serogroups O7 and O8, lack of virulence factor, and particular OMP patterns, whereas slow migrating allozymes of carboxylesterase B (pattern B2) were correlated with fast migrating allozymes of esterase C, serogroups O2, O4, O6, O18 and O75, virulence factor production, and distinct OMP patterns. Allozymes of esterases A and I were not clearly correlated with the distribution of virulence factors. The pattern B2 was more strongly associated with CNF1 than with alpha-haemolysin and mannose resistant haemagglutinin. These results substantiate the view that the electrophoretic pattern B2 of carboxylesterase B identified most of the highly pathogenic strains implicated in extra-intestinal infection of humans. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7509755

  2. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors using human liver samples in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON1) are consider...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN VITRO ASSAY THAT MAY IDENTIFY WHICH ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDES ARE MORE TOXIC TO THE YOUNG.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some, but not all, organophosphorus pesticides are more acutely toxic to the young as compared to adults. We have developed an in vitro assay which measures the detoxification potential (via carboxylesterase and A-esterases) of tissues. Previous results using this in vitro assay ...

  4. Individual variability in esterase activity and CYP1A levels in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exposed to esfenvalerate and chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Wheelock, Craig E; Eder, Kai J; Werner, Inge; Huang, Huazhang; Jones, Paul D; Brammell, Benjamin F; Elskus, Adria A; Hammock, Bruce D

    2005-08-30

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has traditionally been monitored as a biomarker of organophosphate (OP) and/or carbamate exposure. However, AChE activity may not be the most sensitive endpoint for these agrochemicals, because OPs can cause adverse physiological effects at concentrations that do not affect AChE activity. Carboxylesterases are a related family of enzymes that have higher affinity than AChE for some OPs and carbamates and may be more sensitive indicators of environmental exposure to these pesticides. In this study, carboxylesterase and AChE activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein levels, and mortality were measured in individual juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) following exposure to an OP (chlorpyrifos) and a pyrethroid (esfenvalerate). As expected, high doses of chlorpyrifos and esfenvalerate were acutely toxic, with nominal concentrations (100 and 1 microg/l, respectively) causing 100% mortality within 96 h. Exposure to chlorpyrifos at a high dose (7.3 microg/l), but not a low dose (1.2 microg/l), significantly inhibited AChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue (85% and 92% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure had no effect. In contrast, liver carboxylesterase activity was significantly inhibited at both the low and high chlorpyrifos dose exposure (56% and 79% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure still had little effect. The inhibition of carboxylesterase activity at levels of chlorpyrifos that did not affect AChE activity suggests that some salmon carboxylesterase isozymes may be more sensitive than AChE to inhibition by OPs. CYP1A protein levels were approximately 30% suppressed by chlorpyrifos exposure at the high dose, but esfenvalerate had no effect. Three teleost species, Chinook salmon, medaka (Oryzias latipes) and Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus), were examined for their ability to hydrolyze a series of pyrethroid surrogate substrates and in all cases

  5. Individual variability in esterase activity and CYP1A levels in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exposed to esfenvalerate and chlorpyrifos

    PubMed Central

    Wheelock, Craig E.; Eder, Kai J.; Werner, Inge; Huang, Huazhang; Jones, Paul D.; Brammell, Benjamin F.; Elskus, Adria A.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has traditionally been monitored as a biomarker of organophosphate (OP) and/or carbamate exposure. However, AChE activity may not be the most sensitive endpoint for these agrochemicals, because OPs can cause adverse physiological effects at concentrations that do not affect AChE activity. Carboxylesterases are a related family of enzymes that have higher affinity than AChE for some OPs and carbamates and may be more sensitive indicators of environmental exposure to these pesticides. In this study, carboxylesterase and AChE activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein levels, and mortality were measured in individual juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) following exposure to an OP (chlorpyrifos) and a pyrethroid (esfenvalerate). As expected, high doses of chlorpyrifos and esfenvalerate were acutely toxic, with nominal concentrations (100 and 1 μg/l, respectively) causing 100% mortality within 96 h. Exposure to chlorpyrifos at a high dose (7.3 μg/l), but not a low dose (1.2 μg/l), significantly inhibited AChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue (85% and 92% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure had no effect. In contrast, liver carboxylesterase activity was significantly inhibited at both the low and high chlorpyrifos dose exposure (56% and 79% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure still had little effect. The inhibition of carboxylesterase activity at levels of chlorpyrifos that did not affect AChE activity suggests that some salmon carboxylesterase isozymes may be more sensitive than AChE to inhibition by OPs. CYP1A protein levels were ∼30% suppressed by chlorpyrifos exposure at the high dose, but esfenvalerate had no effect. Three teleost species, Chinook salmon, medaka (Oryzias latipes) and Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus), were examined for their ability to hydrolyze a series of pyrethroid surrogate substrates and in all cases hydrolysis activity was

  6. Individual variability in esterase activity and CYP1A levels in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) exposed to esfenvalerate and chlorpyrifos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheelock, C.E.; Eder, K.J.; Werner, I.; Huang, H.; Jones, P.D.; Brammell, B.F.; Elskus, A.A.; Hammock, B.D.

    2005-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has traditionally been monitored as a biomarker of organophosphate (OP) and/or carbamate exposure. However, AChE activity may not be the most sensitive endpoint for these agrochemicals, because OPs can cause adverse physiological effects at concentrations that do not affect AChE activity. Carboxylesterases are a related family of enzymes that have higher affinity than AChE for some OPs and carbamates and may be more sensitive indicators of environmental exposure to these pesticides. In this study, carboxylesterase and AChE activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein levels, and mortality were measured in individual juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) following exposure to an OP (chlorpyrifos) and a pyrethroid (esfenvalerate). As expected, high doses of chlorpyrifos and esfenvalerate were acutely toxic, with nominal concentrations (100 and 1 ??g/l, respectively) causing 100% mortality within 96 h. Exposure to chlorpyrifos at a high dose (7.3 ??g/l), but not a low dose (1.2 ??g/l), significantly inhibited AChE activity in both brain and muscle tissue (85% and 92% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure had no effect. In contrast, liver carboxylesterase activity was significantly inhibited at both the low and high chlorpyrifos dose exposure (56% and 79% inhibition, respectively), while esfenvalerate exposure still had little effect. The inhibition of carboxylesterase activity at levels of chlorpyrifos that did not affect AChE activity suggests that some salmon carboxylesterase isozymes may be more sensitive than AChE to inhibition by OPs. CYP1A protein levels were ???30% suppressed by chlorpyrifos exposure at the high dose, but esfenvalerate had no effect. Three teleost species, Chinook salmon, medaka (Oryzias latipes) and Sacramento splittail (Pogonichthys macrolepidotus), were examined for their ability to hydrolyze a series of pyrethroid surrogate substrates and in all cases hydrolysis activity was

  7. In vivo studies on inhibition and recovery of B-esterase activities in Biomphalaria glabrata exposed to azinphos-methyl: analysis of enzyme, substrate and tissue dependence.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Gisela; Barrionuevo, Daniela Chiny; Cacciatore, Luis C; Guerrero, Noemí R Verrengia; Cochón, Adriana C

    2012-05-15

    Cholinesterases and carboxylesterases belong to the group of B-esterases, the serine superfamily of esterases that are inhibited by organophosphorus compounds. It is now generally accepted that before using the B-esterases as biomarkers of exposure to organophosphorus and carbamates in a given species, the biochemical characteristics of these enzymes should be carefully studied. In this study, the enzyme/s and the tissue/s to be selected as sensitive biomarkers of organophosphorus exposition in the freshwater gastropod Biomphalaria glabrata were investigated. Firstly, the substrate dependence of cholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities in whole organism soft tissue and in different tissues of the snail (head-foot, pulmonary region, digestive gland, and gonads) was analyzed. Measurements of cholinesterase activity were performed using three substrates: acetylthiocholine (AcSCh), propionylthiocholine (PrSCh), and butyrylthiocholine (BuSCh). Carboxylesterase activity was determined using four different substrates: 1-naphthyl acetate (1-NA), 2-naphthyl acetate (2-NA), p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA), and p-nitrophenyl butyrate (p-NPB). Regardless of the tissue analyzed, the highest specific activity was obtained when using AcSCh, followed by PrSCh. Cholinesterase activity measured with BuSCh was very low in all cases. On the other hand, the highest cholinesterase activity was measured in head-foot and in pulmonary region, representing in the case of AcSCh hydrolysis 196% and 180% of the activity measured in whole organism soft tissue, respectively. In contrast, AcSCh hydrolysis in digestive gland and gonads was 28% and 50% of that measured in whole organism soft tissue. Regarding carboxylesterase activity, although all tissues hydrolyzed the four substrates assayed, substrate preferences varied among tissues. In particular, digestive glands showed higher carboxylesterase activity than the other tissues (299%, 359% and 137% of whole organism soft tissue activity

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-05

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immuno extract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals.

  9. Experimental measurements for the effect of dilution procedure in blood esterases as animals biomarker for exposure to OP compounds.

    PubMed

    Abass, Kasim Sakran

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphate compounds can bind to carboxylesterase, which may lower the concentration of organophosphate pesticides at the target site enzyme, cholinesterase. It is unclear from the literature whether it is the carboxylesterase affinity for the organophosphate and/or the number of carboxylesterase molecules that is the dominant factor in determining the protective potential of carboxylesterase. The fundamental dilutions and kinetic effects of esterase enzyme are still poorly understood. This study aims to confirm and extend our current knowledge about the effects of dilutions on esterases activities in the blood for birds with respect to protecting the enzyme from organophosphate inhibition. There was significantly higher esterases activities in dilution 1 : 10 in the all blood samples from quail, duck, and chick compared to other dilutions (1 : 5, 1 : 15, 1 : 20, and 1 : 25) in all cases. Furthermore, our results also pointed to the importance of estimating different dilutions effects prior to using in birds as biomarker tools of environmental exposure. Concentration-inhibition curves were determined for the inhibitor in the presence of dilutions 1 : 5, 1 : 10, plus 1 : 15 (to stimulate carboxylesterase). Point estimates (concentrations calculated to produce 20, 50, and 80% inhibition) were compared across conditions and served as a measure of esterase-mediated detoxification. Results with well-known inhibitors (malathion) were in agreement with the literature, serving to support the use of this assay. Among the thiol-esters dilution 1 : 5 was observed to have the highest specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)), and the K m and k cat values were 176 μM and 16,765 s(-1), respectively, for S-phenyl thioacetate ester, while detected in dilution 1: 15 was the lowest specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)), and the Km and k cat values were 943 μM and 1154 s(-1), respectively, for acetylthiocholine iodide ester.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immunoextract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  11. Characterization of deltamethrin metabolism by rat plasma and liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Sathanandam S. . E-mail: sanand@rx.uga.edu; Bruckner, James V.; Haines, Wendy T.; Muralidhara, Srinivasa; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Padilla, Stephanie

    2006-04-15

    Deltamethrin, a widely used type II pyrethroid insecticide, is a relatively potent neurotoxicant. While the toxicity has been extensively examined, toxicokinetic studies of deltamethrin and most other pyrethroids are very limited. The aims of this study were to identify, characterize, and assess the relative contributions of esterases and cytochrome P450s (CYP450s) responsible for deltamethrin metabolism by measuring deltamethrin disappearance following incubation of various concentrations (2 to 400 {mu}M) in plasma (esterases) and liver microsomes (esterases and CYP450s) prepared from adult male rats. While the carboxylesterase metabolism in plasma and liver was characterized using an inhibitor, tetra isopropyl pyrophosphoramide (isoOMPA), CYP450 metabolism was characterized using the cofactor, NADPH. Michaelis-Menten rate constants were calculated using linear and nonlinear regression as applicable. The metabolic efficiency of these pathways was estimated by calculating intrinsic clearance (Vmax/Km). In plasma, isoOMPA completely inhibited deltamethrin biotransformation at concentrations (2 and 20 {mu}M of deltamethrin) that are 2- to 10-fold higher than previously reported peak blood levels in deltamethrin-poisoned rats. For carboxylesterase-mediated deltamethrin metabolism in plasma, Vmax = 325.3 {+-} 53.4 nmol/h/ml and Km = 165.4 {+-} 41.9 {mu}M. Calcium chelation by EGTA did not inhibit deltamethrin metabolism in plasma or liver microsomes, indicating that A-esterases do not metabolize deltamethrin. In liver microsomes, esterase-mediated deltamethrin metabolism was completely inhibited by isoOMPA, confirming the role of carboxylesterases. The rate constants for liver carboxylesterases were Vmax = 1981.8 {+-} 132.3 nmol/h/g liver and Km = 172.5 {+-} 22.5 {mu}M. Liver microsomal CYP450-mediated biotransformation of deltamethrin was a higher capacity (Vmax = 2611.3 {+-} 134.1 nmol/h/g liver) and higher affinity (Km = 74.9 {+-} 5.9 {mu}M) process than

  12. Biotransformation and enzymatic reactions of synthetic pyrethroids in mammals.

    PubMed

    Mikata, Kazuki; Isobe, Naohiko; Kaneko, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids, a major insecticide group, are used worldwide for controlling indoor and agricultural pests. Extensive mammalian metabolism studies have been carried out since the late 1960s, and major metabolic reactions have been found to be oxidation of the acid or alcohol moiety, ester cleavage, and conjugation reactions. In addition, various conjugation reactions occur in mammals, forming hydrophilic and lipophilic conjugates. Pyrethroids are generally rapidly metabolized in mammals and completely excreted from the body in a short period. Human and laboratory animals share similar metabolic reactions for pyrethroids. Oxidation reactions in humans are mediated by several CYP isoforms. On the other hand, ester bonds of pyrethroids are hydrolyzed mainly by carboxylesterase(s).

  13. Investigation of the metabolism of rufinamide and its interaction with valproate.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric T; Carlson, J Eric; Lai, W George; Wong, Y Nancy; Yoshimura, Tsutomu; Critchley, David J; Narurkar, Milind

    2011-12-01

    Rufinamide was evaluated in vitro to determine which enzyme(s) are responsible for rufinamide hydrolysis and whether valproate, one of its metabolites (valproyl-CoA), and/or the rufinamide hydrolysis product (CGP 47292) could inhibit hydrolysis. Rufinamide hydrolysis was mediated primarily by human carboxylesterase (hCE) 1 and was nonsaturable up to 500 μM. Two-thirds of rufinamide hydrolysis was estimated to occur in human microsomes and one-third in cytosol. Valproate was a selective inhibitor for hCE1 compared to hCE2 and inhibition had a greater impact on rufinamide hydrolysis in microsomes than in cytosol. Valproyl-CoA caused similar inhibition of rufinamide hydrolysis in both microsomes and cytosol. Carboxylesterases were not significantly inhibited by CGP 47292. Inhibition of in vitro rufinamide hydrolysis by valproate could offer an explanation for the observed in vivo drug-drug interaction between the two antiepileptic drugs.

  14. Toxicological implications of esterases-From molecular structures to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tetsuo . E-mail: satohbri@peach.ifnet.or.jp

    2005-09-01

    This article reports on a keynote lecture at the 10th International Congress of Toxicology sponsored by the International Union of Toxicology and held on July 2004. Current developments in molecular-based studies into the structure and function of cholinesterases, carboxylesterases, and paraoxonases are described. This article covers mechanisms of regulation of gene expression of the various esterases by developmental factors and xenobiotics, as well as the interplay between physiological and chemical regulation of the enzyme activity.

  15. In Vivo Cholinesterase Inhibitory Specificity of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-26

    of the hydrolysis products of V-agents are presumably phoric acid anhydrides , and their structures are very simi- toxic. Also, V-agents may be...slowly with carboxylesterases and phospho- anhydrides . GF contains a cyclohexyl substituent. rylphosphatases than do G-agents [3]. The G-type nerve agents...USA). Tris(hydroxymethyl) 2.4. AChE analysis amino methane was purchased from Fischer Scientific (Fair Lawn, NJ, USA). The bicinchronic (BCA) protein

  16. Acetylation serves as a protective group in noscapine biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T; Chen, Xue; Facchini, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    We have characterized four sequential enzymes that transform 1-hydroxy-N-methylcanadine to narcotoline hemiacetal, completing our elucidation of noscapine biosynthesis in opium poppy. Two cytochromes P450 catalyze hydroxylations at C13 and C8 on the protoberberine scaffold, the latter step inducing ring opening and the formation of an aldehyde moiety. Acetylation at C13 before C8 hydroxylation introduces a protective group subsequently hydrolyzed by a carboxylesterase, which triggers rearrangement to a cyclic hemiacetal.

  17. Species-specific differences in biomarker responses in two ecologically different earthworms exposed to the insecticide dimethoate.

    PubMed

    Velki, Mirna; Hackenberger, Branimir K

    2012-08-01

    Earthworms ingest large amounts of soil and therefore are continuously exposed to contaminants through their alimentary surfaces. Additionally, several studies have shown that earthworm skin is a significant route of contaminant uptake as well. In order to determine effects of dimethoate, a broad-spectrum organophosphorous insecticide, two ecologically different earthworm species were used - Eisenia andrei and Octolasion lacteum. Although several studies used soil organisms to investigate the effects of dimethoate, none of these studies included investigations of dimethoate effects on biochemical biomarkers in earthworms. Earthworms were exposed to 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.5 and 1 μg/cm(2) of dimethoate for 24 h, and the activities of acetylcholinesterase, carboxylesterase, catalase and efflux pump were measured. In both earthworm species dimethoate caused significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities, however in E. andrei an hormetic effect was evident. Efflux pump activity was inhibited only in E. andrei, and catalase activity was significantly inhibited in both earthworm species. Additionally, responses of earthworm acetylcholinesterase, carboxylesterase and catalase activity to dimethoate were examined through in vitro experiments. Comparison of responses between E. andrei and O. lacteum has shown significant differences, and E. andrei has proved to be less susceptible to dimethoate exposure.

  18. Correlation between Pesticide Resistance and Enzyme Activity in the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ya-Jun; Wang, Ze-Hua; Shi, Bao-Cai; Kang, Zong-Jiang; Zhu, Liang; Jin, Gui-Hua; Weig, Shu-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is one of the most important pests that has developed high pesticide resistance. The resistances of five Chinese populations of this moth, four resistant strains (from Beijing, Henan, Fujian, and Guangdong) and one susceptible strain, to five pesticides were determined, and the activities of carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase, and acetylcholine esterase were tested in all five populations. The correlations between pesticide resistance and enzyme activity were analyzed. The results showed that the resistance status to the five pesticides was different among the five populations. The resistance ratios of the Beijing and Henan populations to spinosad were 5.84 and 8.22, respectively, and those to beta-cypermethrin were 4.91 and 4.98, respectively. These ratios were higher than those for the Fujian and Guangdong populations. The Fujian population was more sensitive to abamectin and chlorpyrifos than the susceptible population (the resistance ratios were 0.14 and 0.91, respectively); in fact, the median lethal concentration for P. xylostella was significantly higher for chlorpyrifos than that for any of the other four pesticides. The carboxylesterase activity in P. xylostella showed positive correlations with the resistance to spinosad, beta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, and abamectin, but no correlation was observed between the carboxylesterase activity and resistance to emamectin benzoate, between glutathione S-transferase activity and resistance to any of the five pesticides tested, or between acetylcholine esterase activity and any of the pesticides except for emamectin benzoate. PMID:24766444

  19. Specificity of procaine and ester hydrolysis by human, minipig, and rat skin and liver.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Christopher; Ackermann, Chrisita; Payne, N Ann; Fate, Gwendolyn; Voorman, Richard; Williams, Faith M

    2007-11-01

    The capacity of human, minipig, and rat skin and liver subcellular fractions to hydrolyze the anesthetic ester procaine was compared with carboxylesterase substrates 4-methylumbelliferyl-acetate, phenylvalerate, and para-nitrophenylacetate and the arylesterase substrate phenylacetate. Rates of procaine hydrolysis by minipig and human skin microsomal and cytosolic fractions were similar, with rat displaying higher activity. Loperamide inhibited procaine hydrolysis by human skin, suggesting involvement of human carboxylesterase hCE2. The esterase activity and inhibition profiles in the skin were similar for minipig and human, whereas rat had a higher capacity to metabolize esters and a different inhibition profile. Minipig and human liver and skin esterase activity was inhibited principally by paraoxon and bis-nitrophenyl phosphate, classical carboxylesterase inhibitors. Rat skin and liver esterase activity was inhibited additionally by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and the arylesterase inhibitor mercuric chloride, indicating a different esterase profile. These results have highlighted the potential of skin to hydrolyze procaine following topical application, which possibly limits its pharmacological effect. Skin from minipig used as an animal model for assessing transdermal drug preparations had similar capacity to hydrolyze esters to human skin.

  20. Correlation between pesticide resistance and enzyme activity in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ya-Jun; Wang, Ze-Hua; Shi, Bao-Cai; Kang, Zong-Jiang; Zhu, Liang; Jin, Gui-Hua; Weig, Shu-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is one of the most important pests that has developed high pesticide resistance. The resistances of five Chinese populations of this moth, four resistant strains (from Beijing, Henan, Fujian, and Guangdong) and one susceptible strain, to five pesticides were determined, and the activities of carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase, and acetylcholine esterase were tested in all five populations. The correlations between pesticide resistance and enzyme activity were analyzed. The results showed that the resistance status to the five pesticides was different among the five populations. The resistance ratios of the Beijing and Henan populations to spinosad were 5.84 and 8.22, respectively, and those to beta-cypermethrin were 4.91 and 4.98, respectively. These ratios were higher than those for the Fujian and Guangdong populations. The Fujian population was more sensitive to abamectin and chlorpyrifos than the susceptible population (the resistance ratios were 0.14 and 0.91, respectively); in fact, the median lethal concentration for P. xylostella was significantly higher for chlorpyrifos than that for any of the other four pesticides. The carboxylesterase activity in P. xylostella showed positive correlations with the resistance to spinosad, beta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, and abamectin, but no correlation was observed between the carboxylesterase activity and resistance to emamectin benzoate, between glutathione S-transferase activity and resistance to any of the five pesticides tested, or between acetylcholine esterase activity and any of the pesticides except for emamectin benzoate.

  1. The butyrylcholinesterase knockout mouse a research tool in the study of drug sensitivity, bio-distribution, obesity and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Duysen, Ellen G; Li, Bin; Lockridge, Oksana

    2009-05-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) mutations common in the human population may result in complete or partial BChE deficiency, making the BChE knockout (KO) mouse a model for human deficiencies. The BChE KO mouse cannot tolerate standard doses of the muscle relaxant succinylcholine or the Alzheimer's disease drugs huperzine A and donepezil. It is resistant to the asthma drug bambuterol. The importance of BChE in detoxication of cocaine has been demonstrated by hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in cocaine-challenged BChE KO mice. The BChE KO mouse becomes obese on a high-fat diet, suggesting a role for BChE in fat metabolism. BChE serves as a backup for acetylcholinesterase by hydrolyzing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in acetylcholinesterase knockout mice. Imaging studies show that BChE injected intrathecally crosses the blood-brain barrier. Mice, but not humans, have carboxylesterase in their blood. Carboxylesterase obscures the role of BChE in detoxication of organophosphorus pesticides. Future studies will make a double knockout that has neither BChE nor carboxylesterase. The double knockout is expected to be unusually sensitive to the toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides. Knowledge of drug sensitivities in the mouse model of human BChE deficiency will aid in understanding adverse drug effects in humans.

  2. Influence of polychlorinated aromatic compounds on the biotransformation and toxicity of organophosphorus pesticides (OP) to the Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopii, V.; Zagrebin, A.; Sherstneva, L.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of different polychlorinated aromatics (DDT, Aroclor 1254, certain polychlorinated biphenyls and dibenzofurans) on the toxicity of OP (DDVP paraoxon, malaoxon) to Daphnia magna was studied. Pretreatment of daphnids with chlorinated compounds during 72 hours in nontoxic concentrations (1/5--1/20 CL{sub 50}) has been shown to reduce the toxicity of OP for hydrobionts. For study of influence of chlorinated compounds on biotransformation of OP the activity of enzymes which are hydrolyzing the OP was investigated in Daphnia`s homogenates or microsomes. The activity of carboxylesterase (tributyrinase, aliesterase) and arylesterase (phosphorylphosphatase) with usage as substrates accordingly {alpha}-naphthylacetate and paraoxon was measured. Besides that the activity of cholinesterase with application of propionylthiocholine as substrate was determined. After polychlorinated aromatic compounds treatment of daphnids activities of both aryl-and carboxylesterase increased markedly. It decreased the inhibition of Daphnia`s cholinesterase caused by incubation with OP in concentrations 0.5--1.0 CL{sub 50}. Thus the induction by chlorinate aromatics of OP metabolizing enzymes seems to play the important role in reduction of OP toxicity to Daphnia magna. Perhaps the aryl- and carboxylesterase of Daphnia can be used as biomarkers of pollution by polychlorinated aromatics in water.

  3. Experimental Measurements for the Effect of Dilution Procedure in Blood Esterases as Animals Biomarker for Exposure to OP Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Abass, Kasim Sakran

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphate compounds can bind to carboxylesterase, which may lower the concentration of organophosphate pesticides at the target site enzyme, cholinesterase. It is unclear from the literature whether it is the carboxylesterase affinity for the organophosphate and/or the number of carboxylesterase molecules that is the dominant factor in determining the protective potential of carboxylesterase. The fundamental dilutions and kinetic effects of esterase enzyme are still poorly understood. This study aims to confirm and extend our current knowledge about the effects of dilutions on esterases activities in the blood for birds with respect to protecting the enzyme from organophosphate inhibition. There was significantly higher esterases activities in dilution 1 : 10 in the all blood samples from quail, duck, and chick compared to other dilutions (1 : 5, 1 : 15, 1 : 20, and 1 : 25) in all cases. Furthermore, our results also pointed to the importance of estimating different dilutions effects prior to using in birds as biomarker tools of environmental exposure. Concentration-inhibition curves were determined for the inhibitor in the presence of dilutions 1 : 5, 1 : 10, plus 1 : 15 (to stimulate carboxylesterase). Point estimates (concentrations calculated to produce 20, 50, and 80% inhibition) were compared across conditions and served as a measure of esterase-mediated detoxification. Results with well-known inhibitors (malathion) were in agreement with the literature, serving to support the use of this assay. Among the thiol-esters dilution 1 : 5 was observed to have the highest specificity constant (kcat/Km), and the Km and kcat values were 176 μM and 16,765 s−1, respectively, for S-phenyl thioacetate ester, while detected in dilution 1 : 15 was the lowest specificity constant (kcat/Km), and the Km and kcat values were 943 μM and 1154 s−1, respectively, for acetylthiocholine iodide ester. PMID:24864243

  4. Design of Fexofenadine Prodrugs Based on Tissue-Specific Esterase Activity and Their Dissimilar Recognition by P-Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ohura, Kayoko; Nakada, Yuichiro; Kotani, Shunsuke; Imai, Teruko

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a suitable prodrug for fexofenadine (FXD), a model parent drug, that is resistant to intestinal esterase but converted to FXD by hepatic esterase. Carboxylesterases (CESs), human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) and human carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2), are the major esterases in human liver and intestine, respectively. These two CESs show quite different substrate specificities, and especially, hCE2 poorly hydrolyzes prodrugs with large acyl groups. FXD contains a carboxyl group and is poorly absorbed because of low membrane permeability and efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Therefore, two potential FXD prodrugs, ethyl-FXD and 2-hydroxyethyl-FXD, were synthesized by substitution of the carboxyl group in FXD. Both derivatives were resistant to intestinal hydrolysis, indicating their absorption as intact prodrugs. Ethyl-FXD was hydrolyzed by hepatic hCE1, but 2-hydroxyethyl-FXD was not. Both derivatives showed high membrane permeability in human P-gp-negative LLC-PK1 cells. In LLC-GA5-COL300 cells overexpressing human P-gp, ethyl-FXD was transported by P-gp, but its efflux was easily saturated. Whereas 2-hydroxyethyl-FXD showed more efficient P-gp-mediated transport than FXD. Although the structure of 2-hydroxyethyl-FXD only differs from ethyl-FXD by substitution of a hydroxyl group, 2-hydroxyethyl-FXD is unsuitable as a prodrug. However, ethyl-FXD is a good candidate prodrug because of good intestinal absorption and hepatic conversion by hCE1.

  5. Insecticide resistance of Anopheles sinensis and An. vagus in Hainan Island, a malaria-endemic area of China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qian; Li, Yiji; Zhong, Daibin; Zhou, Ning; Chang, Xuelian; Li, Chunyuan; Cui, Liwang; Yan, Guiyun; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2014-03-03

    Malaria is one of the most important public health problems in Southeast Asia, including Hainan Island, China. Vector control is the main malaria control measure, and insecticide resistance is a major concern for the effectiveness of chemical insecticide control programs. The objective of this study is to determine the resistance status of the main malaria vector species to pyrethroids and other insecticides recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for indoor residual sprays. The larvae and pupae of Anopheles mosquitoes were sampled from multiple sites in Hainan Island, and five sites yielded sufficient mosquitoes for insecticide susceptibility bioassays. Bioassays of female adult mosquitoes three days after emergence were conducted in the two most abundant species, Anopheles sinensis and An. vagus, using three insecticides (0.05% deltamethrin, 4% DDT, and 5% malathion) and following the WHO standard tube assay procedure. P450 monooxygenase, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase activities were measured. Mutations at the knockdown resistance (kdr) gene and the ace-1 gene were detected by DNA sequencing and PCR-RFLP analysis, respectively. An. sinensis and An. vagus were the predominant Anopheles mosquito species. An. sinensis was found to be resistant to DDT and deltamethrin. An. vagus was susceptible to deltamethrin but resistant to DDT and malathion. Low kdr mutation (L1014F) frequency (<10%) was detected in An. sinensis, but no kdr mutation was detected in An. vagus populations. Modest to high (45%-75%) ace-1 mutation frequency was found in An. sinensis populations, but no ace-1 mutation was detected in An. vagus populations. Significantly higher P450 monooxygenase and carboxylesterase activities were detected in deltamethrin-resistant An. sinensis, and significantly higher P450 monooxygenase, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase activities were found in malathion-resistant An. vagus mosquitoes. Multiple insecticide resistance was

  6. Effects of extract of soapnut Sapindus emarginatus on esterases and phosphatases of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Koodalingam, Arunagirinathan; Mullainadhan, Periasamy; Arumugam, Munusamy

    2011-04-01

    Our earlier investigations with kernels from the soapnut Sapindus emarginatus revealed it as a new source of botanical biocide with potent antimosquito activity, as evident from the proven unique ability of the aqueous kernel extract to kill all the developmental stages of three important vector mosquito species, Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus. This extract was also found to be safe for two non-target aquatic insects. As a sequel to these findings, we have further examined quantitative and qualitative changes in total proteins, esterases, and phosphatases in whole body homogenates of fourth instar larvae and pupae of A. aegypti exposed to this extract at an appropriate threshold time for its lethal effect to gain insights into the impact of the botanical biocide on biochemical characteristics of the target vector mosquito at two distinct developmental stages. The profiles of proteins, esterases (acetylcholinesterse, α- and β-carboxylesterases), and phosphatases (acid and alkaline) exhibited distinct patterns of variation during normal development of fourth instar larvae and pupae, indicating intrinsic difference in biochemical features between these two developmental stages of A. aegypti. Upon exposure of the larvae to the extract, significant reduction in the activities of acetylcholinesterse, β-carboxylesterase, and acid phosphatases were recorded, whereas the total proteins, α-carboxylesterase and alkaline phosphatase activities were unaffected. By contrast, only alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly affected in pupae exposed to the extract. Analysis of these enzymes in native PAGE revealed that they exist in isoforms in both the larvae and pupae. The alterations in the levels of enzymatic activities observed from the quantitative assays of various enzymes were reflected by the respective zymograms with perceptible differences in the intensity and the number of bands detected especially with β-carboxylesterase, acid

  7. Interactive toxicity of chlorpyrifos and parathion in neonatal rats: Role of esterases in exposure sequence-dependent toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kacham, R.; Karanth, S.; Baireddy, P.; Liu, J.; Pope, C. . E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2006-01-15

    We previously reported that sequence of exposure to chlorpyrifos and parathion in adult rats can markedly influence toxic outcome. In the present study, we evaluated the interactive toxicity of chlorpyrifos (8 mg/kg, po) and parathion (0.5 mg/kg, po) in neonatal (7 days old) rats. Rats were exposed to the insecticides either concurrently or sequentially (separated by 4 h) and sacrificed at 4, 8, and 24 h after the first exposure for biochemical measurements (cholinesterase activity in brain, plasma, and diaphragm and carboxylesterase activity in plasma and liver). The concurrently-exposed group showed more cumulative lethality (15/24) than either of the sequential dosing groups. With sequential dosing, rats treated initially with chlorpyrifos prior to parathion (C/P) exhibited higher lethality (7/23) compared to those treated with parathion before chlorpyrifos (P/C; 1/24). At 8 h after initial dosing, brain cholinesterase inhibition was significantly greater in the C/P group (59%) compared to the P/C group (28%). Diaphragm and plasma cholinesterase activity also followed a relatively similar pattern of inhibition. Carboxylesterase inhibition in plasma and liver was relatively similar among the treatment groups across time-points. Similar sequence-dependent differences in brain cholinesterase inhibition were also noted with lower binary exposures to chlorpyrifos (2 mg/kg) and parathion (0.35 mg/kg). In vitro and ex vivo studies compared relative oxon detoxification of carboxylesterases (calcium-insensitive) and A-esterases (calcium-sensitive) in liver homogenates from untreated and insecticide pretreated rats. Using tissues from untreated rats, carboxylesterases detoxified both chlorpyrifos oxon and paraoxon, while A-esterases only detoxified chlorpyrifos oxon. With parathion pretreatment, A-esterases still detoxified chlorpyrifos oxon while liver from chlorpyrifos pretreated rats had little apparent effect on paraoxon. We conclude that while neonatal rats are less

  8. Insecticide resistance spectra and resistance mechanisms in populations of Japanese encephalitis vector mosquitoes, Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. gelidus, in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Karunaratne, S H; Hemingway, J

    2000-12-01

    Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles and Cx. gelidus Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae), both vectors of Japanese encephalitis, were collected in 1984 and 1998 from two disease endemic localities in Sri Lanka: Anaradhapura and Kandy. Using wild-caught adult mosquitoes from light traps, log dosage-probit mortality curves for insecticide bioassays were obtained for three insecticides: malathion (organophosphate), propoxur (carbamate) and permethrin (pyrethroid). LD50 values showed that, in 1998, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus was -100-fold more resistant to malathion and 10-fold more resistant to propoxur than was Cx. gelidus. This difference was attributed to Cx. tritaeniorhynchus breeding mostly in irrigated rice paddy fields, where it would have been exposed to pesticide selection pressure, whereas Cx. gelidus breeds in other types of aquatic habitats less prone to pesticide applications. Resistance in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus increased between 1984 and 1998, whereas Cx. gelidus remained predominantly susceptible. Propoxur inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity (the target site of organophosphates and carbamates) indicated that in 1998, frequencies of insensitive AChE-based resistance were 9% in Cx. gelidus and 2-23% in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, whereas in 1984 this resistance mechanism was detected only in 2% of the latter species from Anaradhapura. The AChE inhibition coefficient (ki) with propoxur was 1.86+/-0.24 x 10(5) M(-)1 min(-1) for Cx. tritaeniorhynchus from Anaradhapura in 1998. Both species were tested for activity levels of detoxifying glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and malathion-specific as well as general carboxylesterases. High activities of GSTs and carboxylesterases were detected in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus but not Cx. gelidus. Malathion-specific carboxylesterase was absent from both species. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved two elevated general carboxylesterases, CtrEstbeta1 and CtrEstalpha1, from Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and none from Cx

  9. A comparative study on esterases from three species of Raillietina.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, M P; Dhandayuthapani, S; Nellaiappan, K; Ramalingam, K

    1984-06-01

    The multiplicity of soluble esterases in Raillietina tetragona, R. echinobothrida and R. cesticillus was studied by use of slab polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Five fractions of esterase activity were observed in R. tetragona, seven in R. echinobothrida and three in R. cesticillus. The various fractions of esterase activity of closely related species of Raillietina showed differential behaviour towards various chemicals. Based on the inhibitory effect of inhibitors p-CMB, EDTA, malathion, silver nitrate and eserine sulphate, the various esterases have been classified into arylesterase, carboxylesterase, acetylesterase and cholinesterase.

  10. The effects of phenobarbital, bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and disulfiram on the hydrolysis of propanidid in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, U

    1984-01-01

    The short-acting anesthetic propanidid was used in vivo as a model substrate in studies of phenobarbital-inducible carboxylesterases in Wistar rats. Phenobarbital shortened the duration of anesthesia produced by intravenous (25 mg/kg) or intraperitoneal (750 mg/kg) administration of propanidid which was in good agreement with the lowered plasma concentration and the shortened half-life of propanidid in phenobarbital-pretreated rats. The treatment of rats with bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate or disulfiram with or without phenobarbital-pretreatment prolonged the sleeping time and the half-life of propanidid in plasma.

  11. Combined neonicotinoid pesticide and parasite stress alter honeybee queens’ physiology and survival

    PubMed Central

    Dussaubat, Claudia; Maisonnasse, Alban; Crauser, Didier; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Bonnet, Marc; Cousin, Marianne; Kretzschmar, André; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Le Conte, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Honeybee colony survival strongly relies on the queen to overcome worker losses exposed to combined stressors like pesticides and parasites. Queen’s capacity to withstand these stressors is however very little known. The effects of the common neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid in a chronic and sublethal exposure together with the wide distributed parasite Nosema ceranae have therefore been investigated on queen’s physiology and survivorship in laboratory and field conditions. Early physiological changes were observed on queens, particularly the increase of enzyme activities (catalase [CAT] and glutathione-S-transferase [GST] in the heads) related to protective responses to xenobiotics and oxidative stress against pesticide and parasite alone or combined. Stressors also alter the activity of two other enzymes (carboxylesterase alpha [CaE α] and carboxylesterase para [CaE p] in the midguts) involved in metabolic and detoxification functions. Furthermore, single and combined effects of pesticide and parasite decrease survivorship of queens introduced into mating hives for three months. Because colony demographic regulation relies on queen’s fertility, the compromise of its physiology and life can seriously menace colony survival under pressure of combined stressors. PMID:27578396

  12. A novel ibuprofen derivative with anti-lung cancer properties: synthesis, formulation, pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ka-Wing; Nie, Ting; Ouyang, Nengtai; Alston, Ninche; Wong, Chi C; Mattheolabakis, George; Papayannis, Ioannis; Huang, Liqun; Rigas, Basil

    2014-12-30

    Phospho-non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (phospho-NSAIDs) are a novel class of NSAID derivatives with potent antitumor activity. However, phospho-NSAIDs have limited stability in vivo due to their rapid hydrolysis by carboxylesterases at their carboxylic ester link. Here, we synthesized phospho-ibuprofen amide (PIA), a metabolically stable analog of phospho-ibuprofen, formulated it in nanocarriers, and evaluated its pharmacokinetics and anticancer efficacy in pre-clinical models of human lung cancer. PIA was 10-fold more potent than ibuprofen in suppressing the growth of human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, an effect mediated by favorably altering cytokinetics and inducing oxidative stress. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats revealed that liposome-encapsulated PIA exhibited remarkable resistance to hydrolysis by carboxylesterases, remaining largely intact in the systemic circulation, and demonstrated selective distribution to the lungs. The antitumor activity of liposomal PIA was evaluated in a metastatic model of human NSCLC in mice. Liposomal PIA strongly inhibited lung tumorigenesis (>95%) and was significantly (p<0.05) more efficacious than ibuprofen. We observed a significant induction of urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2αin vivo, which indicates that ROS stress probably plays an important role in mediating the antitumor efficacy of PIA. Our findings suggest that liposomal PIA is a potent agent in the treatment of lung cancer and merits further evaluation.

  13. Metabolism of aspirin and procaine in mice pretreated with O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate or O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, J.M.; Brown, T.M.

    1986-07-01

    Concentrations of (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)procaine in blood of mice were increased threefold for 27 min by exposure to O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate 2 hr prior to (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)procaine injection ip, while there was no effect of O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate pretreatment. There was no effect of either organophosphinate on the primary hydrolysis of (acetyl-l-/sup 14/C)aspirin when assessed by the expiration of (/sup 14/C)carbon dioxide; however, O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate pretreatment produced transient increases in blood concentrations of both (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)aspirin and (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)salicylic acid following administration of (carboxyl-/sup 14/C)aspirin. Liver carboxylesterase activity in O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate pretreated mice was 11% of control activity. These results indicate the potential for drug interaction with O-4-nitrophenyl diphenylphosphinate but not with O-4-nitrophenyl methyl(phenyl)phosphinate. It appears that liver carboxylesterase activity has a minor role in hydrolysis of aspirin in vivo, but may be more important in procaine metabolism.

  14. In vitro stability and metabolism of salvinorin A in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, K; Kuwayama, K; Miyaguchi, H; Kanamori, T; Iwata, Y T; Inoue, H

    2009-05-01

    Salvinorin A is the main active psychoactive ingredient in Salvia divinorum, a Mexican plant that has been widely available as a hallucinogen in recent years. The aims of this study were to investigate the stability of salvinorin A in rat plasma, esterases responsible for its degradation, and estimation of the degradation products. The apparent first-order rate constants of salvinorin A at 37 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 4 degrees C were 3.8 x 10(-1), 1.1 x 10(-1), and < 6.0 x 10(-3) h(-1), respectively. Salvinorin A degradation was markedly inhibited by the addition of sodium fluoride, an esterase inhibitor. Moreover, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (serine esterase inhibitor) and bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate (carboxylesterase inhibitor) also inhibited salvinorin A degradation. In contrast, little or no suppression of the degradation was seen with 5,5'-dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid (arylesterase inhibitor),ethopropazine (butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor), and BW284c51 (acetylcholineseterase inhibitor). These findings indicated that carboxylesterase was mainly involved in the salvinorin A hydrolysis in rat plasma.4. The degradation products of salvinorin A estimated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry included the deacetylated form (salvinorin B) and the lactone-ring-open forms of salvinorin A and salvinorin B. This lactone-ring-opening reactions were involved in calcium-dependent lactonase.

  15. Comparative study on transcriptional activity of 17 parabens mediated by estrogen receptor α and β and androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoko; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Uramaru, Naoto; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2013-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships of parabens which are widely used as preservatives for transcriptional activities mediated by human estrogen receptor α (hERα), hERβ and androgen receptor (hAR) were investigated. Fourteen of 17 parabens exhibited hERα and/or hERβ agonistic activity at concentrations of ≤ 1 × 10(-5)M, whereas none of the 17 parabens showed AR agonistic or antagonistic activity. Among 12 parabens with linear alkyl chains ranging in length from C₁ to C₁₂, heptylparaben (C₇) and pentylparaben (C₅) showed the most potent ERα and ERβ agonistic activity in the order of 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M, respectively, and the activities decreased in a stepwise manner as the alkyl chain was shortened to C₁ or lengthened to C₁₂. Most parabens showing estrogenic activity exhibited ERβ-agonistic activity at lower concentrations than those inducing ERα-agonistic activity. The estrogenic activity of butylparaben was markedly decreased by incubation with rat liver microsomes, and the decrease of activity was blocked by a carboxylesterase inhibitor. These results indicate that parabens are selective agonists for ERβ over ERα; their interactions with ERα/β are dependent on the size and bulkiness of the alkyl groups; and they are metabolized by carboxylesterases, leading to attenuation of their estrogenic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reactivity versus steric effects in fluorinated ketones as esterase inhibitors: a quantum mechanical and molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Rayo, Josep; Muñoz, Lourdes; Rosell, Gloria; Hammock, Bruce D.; Guerrero, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are a family of ubiquitous enzymes with broad substrate specificity, and their inhibition may have important implications in pharmaceutical and agrochemical fields. One of the most potent inhibitors both for mammalian and insect CEs are trifluoromethyl ketones (TFMKs), but the mechanism of action of these chemicals is not completely understood. This study examines the balance between reactivity versus steric effects in modulating the activity against human carboxylesterase 1. The intrinsic reactivity of the ketone moiety is determined from quantum mechanical computations, which combine gas phase B3LYP calculations with hydration free energies estimated with the IEF/MST model. In addition, docking and molecular dynamics simulations are used to explore the binding mode of the inhibitors along the deep gorge that delineates the binding site. The results point out that the activity largely depends on the nature of the fluorinated ketone, since the activity is modulated by the balance between the intrinsic electrophilicity of the carbonyl carbon atom and the ratio between keto and hydrate forms. However, the results also suggest that the correct alignment of the alkyl chain in the binding site can exert a large influence on the inhibitory activity, as this effect seems to override the intrinsic reactivity features of the fluorinated ketone. Overall, the results sustain a subtle balance between reactivity and steric effects in modulating the inhibitory activity of TFMK inhibitors. PMID:20676708

  17. The Activity of Cholinesterases in Diapausing and Flying Red Mason Bees Osmia bicornis (Megachilidae).

    PubMed

    Dmochowska-Slezak, Kamila; Zaobidna, Ewa; Domeracka, Joanna; Swiatkowska, Marta; Rusznica, Małgorzata; Zółtowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    The red mason bee (Osmia bicornis) is a highly effective pollinator that is exposed to various xenobiotics. The organism's potential resistance to the toxic effects of xenobiotics can be determined based on cholinesterase activity. The activity of cholinesterases (ChEs) towards acetylcholine (ACh) and butyrylcholine (BCh) was determined in extracts of diapausing (between October and late March) and flying bees (May). In both males and females, enzyme activity was higher towards ACh than towards BCh. The ratio of ACh/BCh activity was determined in the range of 1.43 to 4.15 in diapausing females and 3.00 to 7.18 in diapausing males. No significant changes in ChE activity towards ACh were observed in females before December and in males before February. Enzyme activity towards ACh increased dynamically in the second half of March. Enzyme activity towards BCh remained stable in both sexes until mid-March, after which it increased significantly. Excluding mid-March, enzyme BCh activity was significantly higher in females than in males. The activity of carboxylesterase towards 4-p-nitrophenyl butyrate was determined in females to assess the involvement of non-specific esterases in the hydrolysis of choline esters. Carboxylesterase activity was low in comparison with cholinesterase activity, and it remained practically unchanged throughout diapause, suggesting that choline esters in female O. bicornis extracts were hydrolyzed mainly by acetylcholinesterases.

  18. Expression and modulation of neuroligin and neurexin in the olfactory organ of the cotton leaf worm Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Durand, Nicolas; Chertemps, Thomas; Bozzolan, Françoise; Maïbèche, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Carboxylesterases are enzymes widely distributed within living organisms. In insects, they have been mainly involved in dietary metabolism and detoxification function. Interestingly, several members of this family called carboxylesterase-like adhesion molecules (CLAMs) have lost their catalytic properties and are mainly involved in neuro/developmental functions. CLAMs include gliotactins, neurotactins, glutactins, and neuroligins. The latter have for binding partner the neurexin. In insects, the function of these proteins has been mainly studied in Drosophila central nervous system or neuromuscular junction. Some studies suggested a role of neuroligins and neurexin in sensory processing but CLAM expression within sensory systems has not been investigated. Here, we reported the identification of 5 putative CLAMs expressed in the olfactory system of the model pest insect Spodoptera littoralis. One neuroligin, Slnlg4-yll and its putative binding partner neurexin SlnrxI were the most expressed in the antennae and were surprisingly associated with olfactory sensilla. In addition, both transcripts were upregulated in male antennae after mating, known to modulate the sensitivity of the peripheral olfactory system in S. littoralis, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in sensory plasticity.

  19. Antioxidant and neuroprotective potential of chitooligomers in Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to Monocrotophos.

    PubMed

    Nidheesh, T; Salim, Chinnu; Rajini, P S; Suresh, P V

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to establish the propensity of the chitooligomers (COS) to ameliorate neurodegeneration and oxidative stress in Caenorhabditis elegans induced by an organophosphorus insecticide, Monocrotophos (MCP). COS was prepared from α-chitosan by the enzymatic method using chitosanase and characterized by HPLC and electron spray ionization-TOF-(ESI-TOF)-MS. We exposed age synchronized L4 C. elegans worms (both wild type N2 and transgenic strain BZ555 (Pdat-1:GFP) to sublethal concentration of MCP (0.75mM) for 24h in the presence or absence of COS (0.2mM). The neuroprotective effect of COS was examined in N2 worms in terms of brood size, lifespan, egg laying, dopamine content, acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterase activity and by direct visualization and quantification of degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in BZ555. Exposure to COS extended lifespan, normalized egg laying, increased brood size, decreased the dopaminergic neurodegeneration, increased the dopamine content and increased AChE and carboxylesterase activity in C. elegans treated with MCP. COS induced a significant decrease in reactive oxygen species and increased the reduced glutathione level as well as increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activity. Our findings demonstrate that COS significantly inhibits the dopaminergic neurodegeneration and associated physiological alterations induced by MCP in C. elegans by attenuating the oxidative stress as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Using Drosophila melanogaster to validate metabolism-based insecticide resistance from insect pests.

    PubMed

    Daborn, Phillip J; Lumb, Christopher; Harrop, Thomas W R; Blasetti, Alex; Pasricha, Shivani; Morin, Shai; Mitchell, Sara N; Donnelly, Martin J; Müller, Pie; Batterham, Philip

    2012-12-01

    Identifying molecular mechanisms of insecticide resistance is important for preserving insecticide efficacy, developing new insecticides and implementing insect control. The metabolic detoxification of insecticides is a widespread resistance mechanism. Enzymes with the potential to detoxify insecticides are commonly encoded by members of the large cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase gene families, all rapidly evolving in insects. Here, we demonstrate that the model insect Drosophila melanogaster is useful for functionally validating the role of metabolic enzymes in conferring metabolism-based insecticide resistance. Alleles of three well-characterized genes from different pest insects were expressed in transgenic D. melanogaster : a carboxylesterase gene (αE7) from the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina, a glutathione S-transferase gene (GstE2) from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae and a cytochrome P450 gene (Cyp6cm1) from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. For all genes, expression in D. melanogaster resulted in insecticide resistance phenotypes mirroring those observed in resistant populations of the pest species. Using D. melanogaster to assess the potential for novel metabolic resistance mechanisms to evolve in pest species is discussed. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Effects of alcohol extracts from three kinds of biomass energy plant tissues on biological activity of Bemisia tabaci].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fu-cai; Zhou, Gui-sheng; Li, Chuan-ming; Yang, Yi-zhong; Qin, Pei

    2009-03-01

    To test the feasibility of using raw extracts from the tissues of biomass energy plants Ricinus communi and Kosteletzkya virginica as plant protection agents, the alcohol extracts from R. communi seed and leaf and from K. virginica leaf were used to treat adult Bemisia tabaci by spraying. The glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase activities in B. tabaci body were measured after treated for 4 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h, and the olfaction responses of B. tabaci to the alcohol extracts were detected with a Y-tube olfactomet. All the three alcohol extracts obviously inhibited the glutathione S-transferase and carboxylesterase activities in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of the 250-times diluted alcohol extracts on the two enzyme activities was equivalent to that of 3000 times-diluted 1.8% avermectins. In addition, the 250-times diluted alcohol extracts had obvious repellent effect on B. tabaci, with the repellent coefficient of the alcohol extracts from R. communi seed and leaf and from K, virginica leaf being 100.0%, 96.7%, and 79.4%, respectively. All of these suggested that the test three alcohol extracts had repellent and other biological effects on B. tabaci.

  2. 3-d structure-based amino acid sequence alignment of esterases, lipases and related proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.K.; Doctor, B.P.; Cygler, M.; Schrag, J.D.; Sussman, J.L.

    1993-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase, enzymes with potential as pretreatment drugs for organophosphate toxicity, are members of a larger family of homologous proteins that includes carboxylesterases, cholesterol esterases, lipases, and several nonhydrolytic proteins. A computer-generated alignment of 18 of the proteins, the acetylcholinesases, butyrylcholinesterases, carboxylesterases, some esterases, and the nonenzymatic proteins has been previously presented. More recently, the three-dimensional structures of two enzymes enzymes in this group, acetylcholinesterase from Torpedo californica and lipase from Geotrichum candidum, have been determined. Based on the x-ray structures and the superposition of these two enzymes, it was possible to obtain an improved amino acid sequence alignment of 32 members of this family of proteins. Examination of this alignment reveals that 24 amino acids are invariant in all of the hydrolytic proteins, and an additional 49 are well conserved. Conserved amino acids include those of the active site, the disulfide bridges, the salt bridges, in the core of the proteins, and at the edges of secondary structural elements. Comparison of the three-dimensional structures makes it possible to find a well-defined structural basis for the conservation of many of these amino acids.

  3. Water quality evaluation of two interconnected dam lakes with field-captured and laboratory-acclimated fish, Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Güngördü, Abbas; Ozmen, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Karakaya and Sultansuyu Dam Lakes, located in the eastern part of Turkey, are important water sources, both for irrigation and fishery. The main goal of the study was to investigate water qualities of dam lakes using a set of biomarkers in the fish Cyprinus carpio. For this aim, field sample and laboratory-acclimated fish were compared to identify changes in selected biomarkers. The activities of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase, and carboxylesterase were determined in liver samples. Also, plasma and liver lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase activities were assayed. Brain acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities were also determined. The hepatosomatic index and condition factors were calculated. Plasma vitellogenin assays were evaluated for the presence of xenoestrogen. Physicochemical values of water samples showed the existence of eutrophication risk, and also, some chemicals in both lakes were determined to be over tolerable limits. The comparisons of samples from both dam lake and laboratory-acclimated fish showed that the lakes may be at risk of pollution by some xenobiotics, namely xenoestrogens and acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting agents.

  4. Arbaclofen placarbil, a novel R-baclofen prodrug: improved absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination properties compared with R-baclofen.

    PubMed

    Lal, Ritu; Sukbuntherng, Juthamas; Tai, Ezra H L; Upadhyay, Shubhra; Yao, Fenmei; Warren, Mark S; Luo, Wendy; Bu, Lin; Nguyen, Son; Zamora, Jeanelle; Peng, Ge; Dias, Tracy; Bao, Ying; Ludwikow, Maria; Phan, Thu; Scheuerman, Randall A; Yan, Hui; Gao, Mark; Wu, Quincey Q; Annamalai, Thamil; Raillard, Stephen P; Koller, Kerry; Gallop, Mark A; Cundy, Kenneth C

    2009-09-01

    Baclofen is a racemic GABA(B) receptor agonist that has a number of significant pharmacokinetic limitations, including a narrow window of absorption in the upper small intestine and rapid clearance from the blood. Arbaclofen placarbil is a novel transported prodrug of the pharmacologically active R-isomer of baclofen designed to be absorbed throughout the intestine by both passive and active mechanisms via the monocarboxylate type 1 transporter. Arbaclofen placarbil is rapidly converted to R-baclofen in human and animal tissues in vitro. This conversion seems to be primarily catalyzed in human tissues by human carboxylesterase-2, a major carboxylesterase expressed at high levels in various tissues including human intestinal cells. Arbaclofen placarbil was efficiently absorbed and rapidly converted to R-baclofen after oral dosing in rats, dogs, and monkeys. Exposure to R-baclofen was proportional to arbaclofen placarbil dose, whereas exposure to intact prodrug was low. Arbaclofen placarbil demonstrated enhanced colonic absorption, i.e., 5-fold higher R-baclofen exposure in rats and 12-fold higher in monkeys compared with intracolonic administration of R-baclofen. Sustained release formulations of arbaclofen placarbil demonstrated sustained R-baclofen exposure in dogs with bioavailability up to 68%. In clinical use, arbaclofen placarbil may improve the treatment of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, spasticity, and numerous other conditions by prolonging exposure and decreasing the fluctuations in plasma levels of R-baclofen.

  5. In Vitro Metabolism of the Brominated Flame Retardants 2-Ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-Tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and Bis(2-Ethylhexyl) 2,3,4,5-Tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) in Human and Rat Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Simon C.; Macaulay, Laura J.; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the phaseout of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, new chemicals, such as 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (TBB) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) 2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (TBPH), have been used as replacements in some commercial flame retardant mixtures. Both chemicals have been detected in indoor dust at concentrations approaching the concentrations of PBDEs; however, little is known about their fate, metabolism, or toxicity. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential metabolism of these two brominated flame retardants in human and rat tissues by conducting in vitro experiments with liver and intestinal subcellular fractions. In all the experiments, TBB was consistently metabolized to 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) via cleavage of the 2-ethylhexyl chain without requiring any added cofactors. TBBA was also formed in purified porcine carboxylesterase, but at a much faster rate of 6.29 ± 0.58 nmol min-1 mg protein-1. The estimated Km and Vmax values for TBB metabolism in human microsomes were 11.1 ± 3.9 μM and 0.644 ± 0.144 nmol min-1 mg protein-1, respectively. A similar Km of 9.3 ± 2.2 μM was calculated for porcine carboxylesterase, indicating similar enzyme specificity. While the rapid formation of TBBA may reduce the bioaccumulation potential of TBB in mammals and may be useful as a biomarker of TBB exposure, the toxicity of this brominated benzoic acid is unknown and may be a concern based on its structural similarity to other toxic pollutants. In contrast to TBB, no metabolites of TBPH were detected in human or rat subcellular fractions. However, a metabolic product of TBPH, mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBMEHP), was formed in purified porcine carboxylesterase at an approximate rate of 1.08 pmol min-1 mg protein-1. No Phase II metabolites of TBBA or TBMEHP were observed. More research is needed to understand the in vivo toxicokinetics and health effects of these compounds given their current

  6. Coccolithophores: Functional Biodiversity, Enzymes and Bioprospecting

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Emma L.; Worthy, Charlotte A.; Probert, Ian; Ali, Sohail T.; Love, John; Napier, Johnathan; Littlechild, Jenny A.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Allen, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi is a single celled, marine phytoplankton with global distribution. As a key species for global biogeochemical cycling, a variety of strains have been amassed in various culture collections. Using a library consisting of 52 strains of E. huxleyi and an ‘in house’ enzyme screening program, we have assessed the functional biodiversity within this species of fundamental importance to global biogeochemical cycling, whilst at the same time determining their potential for exploitation in biocatalytic applications. Here, we describe the screening of E. huxleyi strains, as well as a coccolithovirus infected strain, for commercially relevant biocatalytic enzymes such as acid/alkali phosphodiesterase, acid/alkali phosphomonoesterase, EC1.1.1-type dehydrogenase, EC1.3.1-type dehydrogenase and carboxylesterase. PMID:21731551

  7. Extracellular and intracellular esterase processing of SCFA-hexosamine analogs: implications for metabolic glycoengineering and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mohit P; Tan, Elaine; Shah, Shivam; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Adam Meledeo, M; Huang, Jun; Espinoza, Freddy A; Yarema, Kevin J

    2012-11-15

    This report provides a synopsis of the esterase processing of short chain fatty acid (SCFA)-derivatized hexosamine analogs used in metabolic glycoengineering by demonstrating that the extracellular hydrolysis of these compounds is comparatively slow (e.g., with a t(1/2) of ∼4 h to several days) in normal cell culture as well as in high serum concentrations intended to mimic in vivo conditions. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of common sugar analogs revealed that O-acetylated and N-azido ManNAc derivatives were more refractory against extracellular inactivation by FBS than their butanoylated counterparts consistent with in silico docking simulations of Ac(4)ManNAc and Bu(4)ManNAc to human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). By contrast, all analogs tested supported increased intracellular sialic acid production within 2h establishing that esterase processing once the analogs are taken up by cells is not rate limiting.

  8. Cell-bound lipase and esterase of Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Sorhaug, T; Ordal, Z J

    1974-03-01

    The activities of glycerol ester hydrolase, lipase (EC 3.1.1.3) and carboxylesterase, and esterase (EC 3.1.1.1) were determined for whole cell preparations of Brevibacterium linens by using the pH-stat assay. The culture growth liquors were inactive against the three substrates, tributyrin emulsion, triacetin, and methyl butyrate. Cells washed in water had less activity than cells washed in 5% NaCl; the ratio of activities was close to 1:2 for all strains using tributyrin emulsion as the substrate. For the esterase substrates, this relationship varied widely and was strain dependent. The ability to hydrolyze the two esterase substrates varied independently of the level of lipase activity.

  9. A Comparison of Multiple Esterases as Biomarkers of Organophosphate Exposure and Effect in Two Earthworm Species

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ashley; Stoskopf, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Two different earthworm species, Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris, were exposed to 5 μg/cm2 of malathion to evaluate their usefulness as sentinels of organophosphate exposure and to assess three different esterases, as biomarkers of malathion exposure and effect. Tissue xenobiotic burdens and esterase activity were determined for each species and each esterase in order to assess variability. E. fetida exhibited 4-fold less variability in tissue burdens than did L. terrestris and had less variable basal esterase activities. An attempt was made to correlate malathion and malaoxon tissue burdens with esterase activity post-exposure. There was no malaoxon present in the earthworm tissues. No significant correlations were determined by comparing acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, nor carboxylesterase activities with malathion burdens. PMID:21404045

  10. Remarkably selective inhibitors of monoacylglycerol lipase bearing a reactive group that is bioisosteric with endocannabinoid substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Won; Niphakis, Micah J.; Lum, Kenneth M.; Cognetta, Armand B.; Wang, Chu; Matthews, Megan L.; Niessen, Sherry; Buczynski, Matthew W.; Parsons, Loren H.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide) are principally degraded by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), respectively. The recent discovery of O-aryl carbamates such as JZL184 as selective MAGL inhibitors has enabled the functional investigation of 2-AG signaling pathways in vivo. Nonetheless, JZL184 and other reported MAGL inhibitors still display low-level cross-reactivity with FAAH and peripheral carboxylesterases, which can complicate their use in certain biological studies. Here, we report a distinct class of O-hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP) carbamates that inhibit MAGL in vitro and in vivo with excellent potency and greatly improved selectivity, including showing no detectable cross-reactivity with FAAH. These findings designate HFIP-carbamates as a versatile chemotype for inhibiting MAGL and should encourage the pursuit of other serine hydrolase inhibitors that bear reactive groups resembling the structures of natural substrates. PMID:22542104

  11. Purified recombinant organophosphorus acid anhydrase protects mice against soman. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Broomfield, C.A.

    1992-12-31

    Since pharmacologic treatments of organophosphorus anticholinesterases (OPs) are nearing their practical limit other types of treatment are being sought. One approach is the prophylactic administration of scavengers that will detoxify OPs before they reach their critical target site. Using mice that were sensitized to OPs by depletion of their serum carboxylesterase with cresylbenzodioxaphosphorin oxide (CBDP), we have shown that animals pretreated intravenously with a purified organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (parathionase) (0.10 mg per g body wt.) are not measurably affected by up to 34.4 microgram soman per kg, a dose more than double that which is lethal to untreated animals. This result indicates that this approach is worthy of exploration and development for protecting military personnel and agricultural workers against OP intoxication. Scavengers, pretreatment, soman, OP intoxication, mice.

  12. Coccolithophores: functional biodiversity, enzymes and bioprospecting.

    PubMed

    Reid, Emma L; Worthy, Charlotte A; Probert, Ian; Ali, Sohail T; Love, John; Napier, Johnathan; Littlechild, Jenny A; Somerfield, Paul J; Allen, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi is a single celled, marine phytoplankton with global distribution. As a key species for global biogeochemical cycling, a variety of strains have been amassed in various culture collections. Using a library consisting of 52 strains of E. huxleyi and an 'in house' enzyme screening program, we have assessed the functional biodiversity within this species of fundamental importance to global biogeochemical cycling, whilst at the same time determining their potential for exploitation in biocatalytic applications. Here, we describe the screening of E. huxleyi strains, as well as a coccolithovirus infected strain, for commercially relevant biocatalytic enzymes such as acid/alkali phosphodiesterase, acid/alkali phosphomonoesterase, EC1.1.1-type dehydrogenase, EC1.3.1-type dehydrogenase and carboxylesterase.

  13. Synthetic polyester-hydrolyzing enzymes from thermophilic actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ren; Oeser, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Thermophilic actinomycetes produce enzymes capable of hydrolyzing synthetic polyesters such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET). In addition to carboxylesterases, which have hydrolytic activity predominantly against PET oligomers, esterases related to cutinases also hydrolyze synthetic polymers. The production of these enzymes by actinomycetes as well as their recombinant expression in heterologous hosts is described and their catalytic activity against polyester substrates is compared. Assays to analyze the enzymatic hydrolysis of synthetic polyesters are evaluated, and a kinetic model describing the enzymatic heterogeneous hydrolysis process is discussed. Structure-function and structure-stability relationships of actinomycete polyester hydrolases are compared based on molecular dynamics simulations and recently solved protein structures. In addition, recent progress in enhancing their activity and thermal stability by random or site-directed mutagenesis is presented.

  14. Structural basis of heroin and cocaine metabolism by a promiscuous human drug-processing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Bencharit, Sompop; Morton, Christopher L; Xue, Yu; Potter, Philip M; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2003-05-01

    We present the first crystal structures of a human protein bound to analogs of cocaine and heroin. Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a broad-spectrum bioscavenger that catalyzes the hydrolysis of heroin and cocaine, and the detoxification of organophosphate chemical weapons, such as sarin, soman and tabun. Crystal structures of the hCE1 glycoprotein in complex with the cocaine analog homatropine and the heroin analog naloxone provide explicit details about narcotic metabolism in humans. The hCE1 active site contains both specific and promiscuous compartments, which enable the enzyme to act on structurally distinct chemicals. A selective surface ligand-binding site regulates the trimer-hexamer equilibrium of hCE1 and allows each hCE1 monomer to bind two narcotic molecules simultaneously. The bioscavenger properties of hCE1 can likely be used to treat both narcotic overdose and chemical weapon exposure.

  15. Juvenile hormone esterase: biochemistry and structure

    PubMed Central

    Kamita, Shizuo G.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Normal insect development requires a precisely timed, precipitous drop in hemolymph juvenile hormone (JH) titer. This drop occurs through a coordinated halt in JH biosynthesis and increase in JH metabolism. In many species, JH esterase (JHE) is critical for metabolism of the resonance-stabilized methyl ester of JH. JHE metabolizes JH with a high kcat/KM ratio that results primarily from an exceptionally low KM. Here we review the biochemistry and structure of authentic and recombinant JHEs from six insect orders, and present updated diagnostic criteria that help to distinguish JHEs from other carboxylesterases. The use of a JHE-encoding gene to improve the insecticidal efficacy of biopesticides is also discussed. PMID:23543805

  16. Preparation of cobalt nanoparticles from polymorphic bacterial templates: A novel platform for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunjin; Shim, Hyun-Woo; Ryu, Bum Han; An, Deu Rae; Yoo, Wan Ki; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, T Doohun

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles have gathered significant research attention as materials for enzyme immobilization due to their advantageous properties such as low diffusion rates, ease of manipulation, and large surface areas. Here, polymorphic cobalt nanoparticles of varied sizes and shapes were prepared using Micrococcus lylae, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Paracoccus sp., and Haloarcula vallismortis as bacterial templates. Furthermore, nine lipases/carboxylesterases were successfully immobilized on these cobalt nanoparticles. Especially, immobilized forms of Est-Y29, LmH, and Sm23 were characterized in more detail for potential industrial applications. Immobilization of enzymes onto cobalt oxide nanoparticles prepared from polymorphic bacterial templates may have potential for efficient hydrolysis on an industrial-scale, with several advantages such as high retention of enzymatic activity, increased stability, and strong reusability.

  17. Acaricidal activity of Ocimum basilicum and Spilanthes acmella against the ectoparasitic tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Arachinida: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Veeramani, V; Sakthivelkumar, S; Tamilarasan, K; Aisha, S O; Janarthanan, S

    2014-09-01

    The ectoparasitic tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected at various cattle farms in and around Chennai was subjected to treatment of different crude solvent extracts of leaves of Ocimum basilicum and Spilanthes acmella for acaricidal activity. Among various solvent extracts of leaves of O. basilicum and S. acmella used, chloroform extract of O. basilicum at concentrations between 6% and 10% exhibited 70% and 100% mortality of ticks when compared to control. The LC50 and LC90 values of the chloroform extract of leaves of O. basilicum treatment on the ticks after 24 h were observed as 5.46% and 7.69%. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of α- and β- carboxylesterase enzymes in the whole gut homogenate of cattle tick, R. microplus treated with chloroform extract of leaves of O. basilicum revealed higher level of activities for the enzymes. This indicated that there was an induced response in the tick, R. microplus against the toxic effects of the extract of O. basilicum.

  18. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin-lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C).

  19. Design of a 15N Molecular Unit to Achieve Long Retention of Hyperpolarized Spin State

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Hiroshi; Hirano, Masashi; Imakura, Yuki; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Sando, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear hyperpolarization is a phenomenon that can be used to improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance molecular sensors. However, such sensors typically suffer from short hyperpolarization lifetime. Herein we report that [15N, D14]trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA) has a remarkably long spin–lattice relaxation time (1128 s, 14.1 T, 30 °C, D2O) on its 15N nuclei and achieves a long retention of the hyperpolarized state. [15N, D14]TMPA-based hyperpolarized sensor for carboxylesterase allowed the highly sensitive analysis of enzymatic reaction by 15N NMR for over 40 min in phophate-buffered saline (H2O, pH 7.4, 37 °C). PMID:28067292

  20. Characterization and affinity purification of juvenile hormone esterase from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Shiotsuki, T; Bonning, B C; Hirai, M; Kikuchi, K; Hammock, B D

    2000-08-01

    Juvenile hormone esterase (JHE) from hemolymph of the silkworm moth Bombyx mori was characterized for substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity. B. mori JHE hydrolyzed the juvenile hormone surrogate substrate methyl n-heptylthioacetothioate (HEPTAT) more efficiently than p-nitrophenyl acetate and 1-naphthyl acetate substrates widely used to assay total carboxylesterase activity. B. mori JHE was sensitive to 3-octylthio-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-propanone (OTFP), which was developed as a selective inhibitor for lepidopteran JHE, and relatively insensitive to diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), an inhibitor of serine esterases but not of all JHEs. Affinity purification with a trifluoromethyl ketone ligand was more efficient for purification of B. mori JHE than DEAE ion exchange chromatography.

  1. Tissue distribution, characterization and in vitro inhibition of B-esterases in the earwig Forficula auricularia.

    PubMed

    Malagnoux, Laure; Capowiez, Yvan; Rault, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Earwigs are important natural enemies of numerous pests in pome fruit orchards worldwide. Studying the effects of agricultural practices on these biological control agents is important for understanding its vulnerability in the field. The aim of this study was to characterize the B-esterase activities in the European earwig Forficula auricularia and to evaluate in vitro its sensitivity to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was mainly measured with 1.5 mM acetylthiocholine as the substrate in the microsomal fraction of earwig heads (70% of total AChE activity). Carboxylesterase (CbE) activities were measured with three substrates [5 mM 4-nitrophenyl acetate (4-NPA), 1mM 4-nitrophenyl valerate (4-NPV), and 2 mM α-naphtyl acetate (α-NA)] to examine different isoenzymes, which were present mainly in the cytosolic fraction (about 70-88% of total activities) of all earwig tissues. CbE activity was higher than AChE activity, especially with α-NA, then 4-NPA and lastly 4-NPV. Chlorpyrifos-oxon an organophosphate, and carbaryl a carbamate pesticide, inhibited AChE and CbE activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Earwig CbE activities showed a stronger sensitivity to organophosphate than AChE, with the strongest effect for chlorpyrifos-oxon on male carboxylesterase activities. CbE and AChE showed about the same sensitivity to carbamate pesticides regardless of sex. These results suggest that B-type esterases in the European earwig F.auricularia are suitable biomarkers of pesticide exposure.

  2. Association between statin use and ischemic stroke or major hemorrhage in patients taking dabigatran for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Tony; Macdonald, Erin M.; Yao, Zhan; Hollands, Simon; Gomes, Tara; Tadrous, Mina; Mamdani, Muhammad M.; Juurlink, David N.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dabigatran etexilate is a prodrug whose absorption is opposed by intestinal P-glycoprotein and which is converted by carboxylesterase to its active form, dabigatran. Unlike other statins, simvastatin and lovastatin are potent inhibitors of P-glycoprotein and carboxylesterase, and might either increase the risk of hemorrhage with dabigatran etexilate or decrease its effectiveness. METHODS: We conducted 2 population-based, nested case–control studies involving Ontario residents 66 years of age and older who started dabigatran etexilate between May 1, 2012, and Mar. 31, 2014. In the first study, cases were patients with ischemic stroke; in the second, cases were patients with major hemorrhage. Each case was matched with up to 4 controls by age and sex. All cases and controls received a single statin in the 60 days preceding the index date. We determined the association between each outcome and the use of simvastatin or lovastatin, relative to other statins. RESULTS: Among 45 991 patients taking dabigatran etexilate, we identified 397 cases with ischemic stroke and 1117 cases with major hemorrhage. After multivariable adjustment, use of simvastatin or lovastatin was not associated with an increased risk of stroke (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88 to 2.01). In contrast, use of simvastatin and lovastatin were associated with a higher risk of major hemorrhage (adjusted OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.82). INTERPRETATION: In patients receiving dabigatran etexilate, simvastatin and lovastatin were associated with a higher risk of major hemorrhage relative to other statins. Preferential use of the other statins should be considered in these patients. PMID:28246253

  3. Simvastatin requires activation in accessory cells to modulate T-cell responses in asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Yakin, Yakup; Körber, Sandra; Grensemann, Barbara; Bendella, Zeynep; Boyaci, Niyazi; Gallert, Willem-Jakob; Yanik, Sarah Derya; Jungck, David; Koch, Andrea

    2016-10-05

    T-cell-dependent airway and systemic inflammation triggers the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Retrospective studies suggest that simvastatin has anti-inflammatory effects in both diseases but it is unclear, which cell types are targeted. We hypothesized that simvastatin modulates T-cell activity. Circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, either pure, co-cultured with monocytes or alveolar macrophages (AM) or in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), were ex vivo activated towards Th1/Tc1 or Th2/Tc2 and incubated with simvastatin. Markers for Th1/Tc1 (IFNγ) and Th2/Tc2 (IL-5, IL-13) were measured by ELISA; with PBMCs this was done comparative between 11 healthy never-smokers, 11 current smokers without airflow limitation, 14 smokers with COPD and 11 never-smokers with atopic asthma. T-cell activation induced IFNγ, IL-5 and IL-13 in the presence and absence of accessory cells. Simvastatin did not modulate cytokine expression in pure T-cell fractions. β-hydroxy-simvastatin acid (activated simvastatin) suppressed IL-5 and IL-13 in pure Th2- and Tc2-cells. Simvastatin suppressed IL-5 and IL-13 in Th2-cells co-cultivated with monocytes or AM, which was partially reversed by the carboxylesterase inhibitor benzil. Simvastatin suppressed IL-5 production of Th2/Tc2-cells in PBMCs without differences between cohorts and IL-13 stronger in never-smokers and asthma compared to COPD. Simvastatin induced IFNγ in Th1/Tc1-cells in PBMCs of all cohorts except asthmatics. Simvastatin requires activation in accessory cells likely by carboxylesterase to suppress IL-5 and IL-13 in Th2/Tc2-cells. The effects on Il-13 are partially reduced in COPD. Asthma pathogenesis prevents simvastatin-induced IFNγ up-regulation. Simvastatin has anti-inflammatory effects that could be of interest for asthma therapy.

  4. Cross-resistance study and biochemical mechanisms of thiamethoxam resistance in B-biotype Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuntao; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Chang, Xiaoli; Xie, Wen; Xu, Baoyun; Zhang, Youjun

    2010-03-01

    B-biotype Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) has invaded China over the past two decades. To understand the risks and to determine possible mechanisms of resistance to thiamethoxam in B. tabaci, a resistant strain was selected in the laboratory. Cross-resistance and the biochemical mechanisms of thiamethoxam resistance were investigated in the present study. A 66.3-fold thiamethoxam-resistant B. tabaci strain (TH-R) was established after selection for 36 generations. Compared with the susceptible strain (TH-S), the selected TH-R strain showed obvious cross-resistance to imidacloprid (47.3-fold), acetamiprid (35.8-fold), nitenpyram (9.99-fold), abamectin (5.33-fold) and carbosulfan (4.43-fold). No cross-resistance to fipronil, chlorpyrifos or deltamethrin was seen. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) exhibited significant synergism on thiamethoxam effects in the TH-R strain (3.14- and 2.37-fold respectively). However, diethyl maleate (DEM) did not act synergistically with thiamethoxam. Biochemical assays showed that cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activities increased 1.21- and 1.68-fold respectively, and carboxylesterase activity increased 2.96-fold in the TH-R strain. However, no difference was observed for glutathione S-transferase between the two strains. B-biotype B. tabaci develops resistance to thiamethoxam. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and carboxylesterase appear to be responsible for the resistance. Reasonable resistance management that avoids the use of cross-resistance insecticides may delay the development of resistance to thiamethoxam in this species.

  5. In vitro hydrolysis and transesterification of CDP323, an α4β1/α4β7 integrin antagonist ester prodrug.

    PubMed

    Chanteux, Hugues; Rosa, Maria; Delatour, Claude; Prakash, Chandra; Smith, Steven; Nicolas, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    We identified the enzyme(s) involved in the hydrolysis of the ethyl ester prodrug CDP323 (C28H29BrN403) and characterized its transesterification in the presence of ethanol with special emphasis on the risks of drug-drug interaction. The hydrolysis of CDP323 was evaluated in vitro using human liver and intestinal microsomes and recombinant human carboxylesterases (hCES1 and 2) and was shown to be approximately 20-fold higher in human liver microsomes when compared with human intestinal microsomes and in hCES1 when compared with hCES2. Nonspecific inhibitors of carboxylesterases significantly inhibited the hydrolysis of CDP323 (>80% inhibition) while specific inhibitors of CES2, acetylcholine esterase, arylesterase, and butyrylcholinesterase did not impair the hydrolysis reaction. The effect of ethanol on the kinetic parameters for hydrolysis was investigated, demonstrating that at high concentration (2%), Michaelis-Menten constant (Km), maximum velocity (Vmax), and intrinsic clearance (CLint) for the formation of the hydrolyzed product were decreased (∼40%). The use of deuterated ethanol allowed more mechanistic investigations of the transesterification mechanism and showed that the intrinsic clearance based on parent loss was not impaired in the presence of alcohol. Overall, our data demonstrate that CDP323 is mainly hydrolyzed by hCES1 and is prone to transesterification in the presence of ethanol. Transesterification mechanisms compete with hydrolysis without impairing the overall clearance of the ester prodrug. Based on in vitro results, the risk of a clinically significant drug-drug interaction with ethanol is anticipated to be low.

  6. Direct Imaging of ER Calcium with Targeted-Esterase Induced Dye Loading (TED)

    PubMed Central

    Samtleben, Samira; Jaepel, Juliane; Fecher, Caroline; Andreska, Thomas; Rehberg, Markus; Blum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of calcium dynamics is important to understand the role of calcium in cell physiology. To examine calcium dynamics, synthetic fluorescent Ca2+ indictors have become popular. Here we demonstrate TED (= targeted-esterase induced dye loading), a method to improve the release of Ca2+ indicator dyes in the ER lumen of different cell types. To date, TED was used in cell lines, glial cells, and neurons in vitro. TED bases on efficient, recombinant targeting of a high carboxylesterase activity to the ER lumen using vector-constructs that express Carboxylesterases (CES). The latest TED vectors contain a core element of CES2 fused to a red fluorescent protein, thus enabling simultaneous two-color imaging. The dynamics of free calcium in the ER are imaged in one color, while the corresponding ER structure appears in red. At the beginning of the procedure, cells are transduced with a lentivirus. Subsequently, the infected cells are seeded on coverslips to finally enable live cell imaging. Then, living cells are incubated with the acetoxymethyl ester (AM-ester) form of low-affinity Ca2+ indicators, for instance Fluo5N-AM, Mag-Fluo4-AM, or Mag-Fura2-AM. The esterase activity in the ER cleaves off hydrophobic side chains from the AM form of the Ca2+ indicator and a hydrophilic fluorescent dye/Ca2+ complex is formed and trapped in the ER lumen. After dye loading, the cells are analyzed at an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Cells are continuously perfused with Ringer-like solutions and the ER calcium dynamics are directly visualized by time-lapse imaging. Calcium release from the ER is identified by a decrease in fluorescence intensity in regions of interest, whereas the refilling of the ER calcium store produces an increase in fluorescence intensity. Finally, the change in fluorescent intensity over time is determined by calculation of ΔF/F0. PMID:23685703

  7. Possible mechanism for inhibition of morphine formation from 6-acetylmorphine after intake of street heroin.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Beck, Olof

    2015-07-01

    Heroin is de-acetylated in the body to morphine in two steps. The intermediate 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) is formed rapidly and is considered important for the pharmacological effect of heroin. In urine drug testing, an atypical pattern of morphine and 6-AM is known to occur in low frequency. The aim of this study was to investigate this atypical pattern in more detail and to identify responsible substances for a possible inhibition of the conversion from 6-AM to morphine. Urine samples were selected from a routine flow of samples sent for drug testing. Out of 695 samples containing morphine and 6-acetylmorphine, 11.5% had the atypical pattern of a 6-AM to morphine ratio above 0.26 as derived from a bimodal frequency distribution. An in vitro study of the conversion of 6-acetylmorphine to morphine in human liver homogenates demonstrated that a number of known carboxylesterase inhibitors were able to inhibit the reaction mimicking the situation in vivo. Compound 3 (3,6-Dimethoxy-4-acetoxy-5-[2-(N-methylacetamido)ethyl]phenanthrene) a substance formed from thebaine during the production of heroin was found to be a strong inhibitor. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify possible inhibitors present in vivo. This part of the investigation demonstrated that several components may contribute to the effect. It is concluded that inhibition of liver carboxylesterase activity is a possible mechanism causing the atypical pattern and that one candidate compound is the result of the heroin production process. An inhibition of 6-AM metabolism is likely to increase the pharmacological effect of heroin and may be related to a higher risk of lethal toxicity.

  8. Insecticide susceptibility status and major detoxifying enzymes' activity in Aedes albopictus (Skuse), vector of dengue and chikungunya in Northern part of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Bharati, Minu; Saha, Dhiraj

    2017-02-27

    Mosquitoes belonging to Aedes genus, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus transmit many globally important arboviruses including Dengue (DENV) and Chikungunya (CHIKV). Vector control with the use of insecticide remains the suitable method of choice to stop the transmission of these diseases. However, vector control throughout the world is failing to achieve its target results because of the worldwide development of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. To assess the insecticide susceptibility status of Aedes albopictus from northern part of West Bengal, the susceptibility of eight different Aedes albopictus populations were tested against a commonly used larvicide (temephos) and some adulticides (malathion, deltamethrin and lambda cyhalothrin) along with the major insecticide detoxifying enzymes' activity in them. Through this study, it was revealed that most of the populations were found susceptible to temephos except Nagrakata (NGK) and Siliguri (SLG), which showed both a higher resistance ratio (RR99) and a lower susceptibility, thereby reflecting the development of resistance against temephos in them. However, all tested adulticides caused 100% mortality in all the population implying their potency in control of this mosquito in this region of India. Through the study of carboxylesterase activity, it was revealed that the NGK population showed a 9.6 fold higher level of activity than susceptible population. The same population also showed a lower level of susceptibility and a higher resistance ratio (RR99), indicating a clear correlation between susceptibility to temephos and carboxylesterase enzymes' activity in this population. This preliminary data reflects that the NGK population is showing a trend towards resistance development and with time, there is possibility that this resistance phenomenon will spread to other populations. With the recurrence of dengue and chikungunya, this data on insecticide susceptibility status of Aedes albopictus could help the

  9. Status of Resistance of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to Neonicotinoids in Iran and Detoxification by Cytochrome P450-Dependent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Basij, M; Talebi, K; Ghadamyari, M; Hosseininaveh, V; Salami, S A

    2017-02-01

    Nine Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) populations were collected from different regions of Iran. In all nine populations, only one biotype (B biotype) was detected. Susceptibilities of these populations to imidacloprid and acetamiprid were assayed. The lethal concentration 50 values (LC50) for different populations showed a significant discrepancy in the susceptibility of B. tabaci to imidacloprid (3.76 to 772.06 mg l(-1)) and acetamiprid (4.96 to 865 mg l(-1)). The resistance ratio of the populations ranged from 9.72 to 205.20 for imidacloprid and 6.38 to 174.57 for acetamiprid. The synergistic effects of piperonylbutoxide (PBO) and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF) were evaluated for the susceptible (RF) and resistant (JR) populations for the determination of the involvement of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase and carboxylesterase, respectively, in their resistance mechanisms. The results showed that PBO overcame the resistance of the JR population to both imidacloprid and acetamiprid, with synergistic ratios of 72.7 and 106.9, respectively. Carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase were studied biochemically, for the purpose of measuring the activity of the metabolizing enzymes in order to determine which enzymes are directly involved in neonicotinoid resistance. There was an increase in the activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase up to 17-fold in the resistant JR population (RR = 205.20). The most plausible activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase correlated with the resistances of imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and this suggests that cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase is the only enzyme system responsible for neonicotinoid resistance in the nine populations of B. tabaci.

  10. Human Intestinal Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein (RKIP) Catalyzes Prasugrel as a Bioactivation Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kazui, Miho; Ogura, Yuji; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Prasugrel is a thienopyridine antiplatelet prodrug that undergoes rapid hydrolysis in vivo to a thiolactone metabolite by human carboxylesterase-2 (hCE2) during gastrointestinal absorption. The thiolactone metabolite is further converted to a pharmacologically active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoforms. The aim of the current study was to elucidate hydrolases other than hCE2 involved in the bioactivation step of prasugrel in human intestine. Using size-exclusion column chromatography of a human small intestinal S9 fraction, another peak besides the hCE2 peak was observed to have prasugrel hydrolyzing activity, and this protein was found to have a molecular weight of about 20 kDa. This prasugrel hydrolyzing protein was successfully purified from a monkey small intestinal cytosolic fraction by successive four-step column chromatography and identified as Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Second, we evaluated the enzymatic kinetic parameters for prasugrel hydrolysis using recombinant human RKIP and hCE2 and estimated the contributions of these two hydrolyzing enzymes to the prasugrel hydrolysis reaction in human intestine, which were approximately 40% for hRKIP and 60% for hCE2. Moreover, prasugrel hydrolysis was inhibited by anti-hRKIP antibody and carboxylesterase-specific chemical inhibitor (bis p-nitrophenyl phosphate) by 30% and 60%, respectively. In conclusion, another protein capable of hydrolyzing prasugrel to its thiolactone metabolite was identified as RKIP, and this protein may play a significant role with hCE2 in prasugrel bioactivation in human intestine. RKIP is known to have diverse functions in many intracellular signaling cascades, but this is the first report describing RKIP as a hydrolase involved in drug metabolism.

  11. Direct imaging of ER calcium with targeted-esterase induced dye loading (TED).

    PubMed

    Samtleben, Samira; Jaepel, Juliane; Fecher, Caroline; Andreska, Thomas; Rehberg, Markus; Blum, Robert

    2013-05-07

    Visualization of calcium dynamics is important to understand the role of calcium in cell physiology. To examine calcium dynamics, synthetic fluorescent Ca(2+) indictors have become popular. Here we demonstrate TED (= targeted-esterase induced dye loading), a method to improve the release of Ca(2+) indicator dyes in the ER lumen of different cell types. To date, TED was used in cell lines, glial cells, and neurons in vitro. TED bases on efficient, recombinant targeting of a high carboxylesterase activity to the ER lumen using vector-constructs that express Carboxylesterases (CES). The latest TED vectors contain a core element of CES2 fused to a red fluorescent protein, thus enabling simultaneous two-color imaging. The dynamics of free calcium in the ER are imaged in one color, while the corresponding ER structure appears in red. At the beginning of the procedure, cells are transduced with a lentivirus. Subsequently, the infected cells are seeded on coverslips to finally enable live cell imaging. Then, living cells are incubated with the acetoxymethyl ester (AM-ester) form of low-affinity Ca(2+) indicators, for instance Fluo5N-AM, Mag-Fluo4-AM, or Mag-Fura2-AM. The esterase activity in the ER cleaves off hydrophobic side chains from the AM form of the Ca(2+) indicator and a hydrophilic fluorescent dye/Ca(2+) complex is formed and trapped in the ER lumen. After dye loading, the cells are analyzed at an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Cells are continuously perfused with Ringer-like solutions and the ER calcium dynamics are directly visualized by time-lapse imaging. Calcium release from the ER is identified by a decrease in fluorescence intensity in regions of interest, whereas the refilling of the ER calcium store produces an increase in fluorescence intensity. Finally, the change in fluorescent intensity over time is determined by calculation of ΔF/F0.

  12. Highly selective biomarkers for pesticides developed in Eisenia fetida using SELDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Park, Doo-San; Jeon, Hwang-Ju; Park, Eun-Sil; Bae, In Kyung; Kim, Yong-Eun; Lee, Sung-Eun

    2015-03-01

    The repeated use of pesticides, and their subsequent residues, has contributed to severe adverse effects on the environment, including risks to human health. Therefore, it is important to assess the quality of the environment to ensure it remains free from pesticide residues. The six pesticides tested in this study showed high mortality on Eisenia fetida with LC50 values ranging from 7.7 to 37.9 g L(-1). The strongest lethal effect resulted from the organochlorine insecticide endosulfan (LC50=7.7 g L(-1)). Following exposure to the carbamate pesticides, acetylcholinesterase activity in E. fetida decreased dramatically in comparison to the control. Carboxylesterase activity was only lowered in E. fetida exposed to propoxur, when compared to the control. The remaining five pesticides had no significant effect on carboxylesterase activity in E. fetida. In order to discover pesticide-specific biomarkers with differentially expressed proteins after exposure to pesticides, protein patterns of pesticide-treated E. fetida were analyzed using SELDI-TOF MS with Q10 ProteinChips. Protein patterns were compared with their intensities at the same mass-to-charge ratios (m/z). All 42 peaks had intensities with associated p-values less than 0.089, and 40 of these peaks had associated p-values of 0.05. Using SELDI-TOF MS technology, selective biomarkers for the six pesticides tested were found in E. fetida; four proteins with 5425, 5697, 9523, and 9868 m/z were consistently observed in the earthworms following exposure to the carbamates.

  13. Hydrolytic metabolism of phenyl and benzyl salicylates, fragrances and flavoring agents in foods, by microsomes of rat and human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hitomi; Sugihara, Kazumi; Tamura, Yuki; Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Sone, Tomomichi; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2015-12-01

    Salicylates are used as fragrance and flavor ingredients for foods, as UV absorbers and as medicines. Here, we examined the hydrolytic metabolism of phenyl and benzyl salicylates by various tissue microsomes and plasma of rats, and by human liver and small-intestinal microsomes. Both salicylates were readily hydrolyzed by tissue microsomes, predominantly in small intestine, followed by liver, although phenyl salicylate was much more rapidly hydrolyzed than benzyl salicylate. The liver and small-intestinal microsomal hydrolase activities were completely inhibited by bis(4-nitrophenyl)phosphate, and could be extracted with Triton X-100. Phenyl salicylate-hydrolyzing activity was co-eluted with carboxylesterase activity by anion exchange column chromatography of the Triton X-100 extracts of liver and small-intestinal microsomes. Expression of rat liver and small-intestinal isoforms of carboxylesterase, Ces1e and Ces2c (AB010632), in COS cells resulted in significant phenyl salicylate-hydrolyzing activities with the same specific activities as those of liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited higher hydrolyzing activity than liver microsomes towards these salicylates. Human CES1 and CES2 isozymes expressed in COS cells both readily hydrolyzed phenyl salicylate, but the activity of CES2 was higher than that of CES1. These results indicate that significant amounts of salicylic acid might be formed by microsomal hydrolysis of phenyl and benzyl salicylates in vivo. The possible pharmacological and toxicological effects of salicylic acid released from salicylates present in commercial products should be considered.

  14. Minor compensatory changes in SAGE Mdr1a (P-gp), Bcrp, and Mrp2 knockout rats do not detract from their utility in the study of transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Zamek-Gliszczynski, Maciej J; Goldstein, Keith M; Paulman, April; Baker, Thomas K; Ryan, Timothy P

    2013-06-01

    Mdr1a-, Bcrp-, and Mrp2-knockout rats are a more practical species for absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies than murine models and previously demonstrated expected alterations in the pharmacokinetics of various probe substrates. At present, gene expression and pathology changes were systematically studied in the small intestine, liver, kidney, and brain tissue from male SAGE Mdr1a, Bcrp, and Mrp2 knockout rats versus wild-type Sprague-Dawley controls. Gene expression data supported the relevant knockout genotype. As expected, Mrp2 knockout rats were hyperbilirubinemic and exhibited upregulation of hepatic Mrp3. Overall, few alterations were observed within 112 ADME-relevant genes. The two potentially most consequential changes were upregulation of intestinal carboxylesterase in Mdr1a knockouts and catechol-O-methyltransferase in all tissues of Bcrp knockout rats. Previously reported upregulation of hepatic Mdr1b P-glycoprotein in proprietary Wistar Mdr1a knockout rats was not observed in the SAGE counterpart investigated herein. Relative liver and kidney weights were 22-53% higher in all three knockouts, with microscopic increases in hepatocyte size in Mdr1a and Mrp2 knockout rats and glomerular size in Bcrp and Mrp2 knockouts. Increased relative weight of clearing organs is quantitatively consistent with reported increases in the clearance of drugs that are not substrates of the knocked-out transporter. Overall, SAGE knockout rats demonstrated modest compensatory changes, which do not preclude their general application to study transporter-mediated pharmacokinetics. However, until future studies elucidate the magnitude of functional change, caution is warranted in rare instances of extensive metabolism by catechol-O-methyltransferase in Bcrp knockouts and intestinal carboxylesterase in Mdr1a knockout rats, specifically for molecules with free catechol groups and esters subject to gut-wall hydrolysis.

  15. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legler, Patricia; Boisvert, Susanne; Compton, Jaimee; Millard, Charles

    2014-07-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine O?. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. pNBE was tested as a surrogate scaffold for mammalian esterases. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1. We discuss the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases.

  16. Changes in the activity and the expression of detoxification enzymes in silkworms (Bombyx mori) after phoxim feeding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y H; Gu, Z Y; Wang, J M; Sun, S S; Wang, B B; Jin, Y Q; Shen, W D; Li, B

    2013-01-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an economically important insect. However, non-cocoon caused by chemical insecticide poisoning has largely hindered the development of sericulture. To explore the roles of detoxification enzymes in B. mori after insecticide poisoning, we monitored the activity changes of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, glutathione-S-transferase, and carboxylesterase in B. mori midgut and fatbody after phoxim feeding. At the same time, the expression levels of detoxification enzyme-related genes were also determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Compare to the control levels, the activity of P450 in the midgut and fatbody was increased to 1.72 and 6.72 folds; the activity of GST was no change in midgut, and in fatbody increased to 1.11 folds; the activity of carboxylesterase in the midgut was decreased to 0.69 folds, and in fatbody increased to 1.13 folds. Correspondingly, the expression levels of detoxifying enzyme genes CYP6ae22, CYP9a21, GSTo1 and Bmcce were increased to 15.99, 3.32, 1.86 and 2.30 folds in the midgut and to 3.58, 1.84, 2.14 and 4.21 folds in the fatbody after phoxim treatment. These results demonstrated the important roles of detoxification enzymes in phoxim metabolism. In addition, the detected activities of such enzymes were generally lower than those in cotton bollworms (Helicoverpa armigera), which may contribute to the high susceptibility of B. mori to insecticides. Our findings laid the foundation for further investigations of the molecular mechanisms of organophosphorus pesticide metabolism in B. mori. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Malathion bioactivation in the human liver: the contribution of different cytochrome p450 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Buratti, Franca M; D'Aniello, Alessandra; Volpe, Maria Teresa; Meneguz, Annarita; Testai, Emanuela

    2005-03-01

    Among organophosphorothioate (OPT) pesticides, malathion is considered relatively safe for use in mammals. Its rapid degradation by carboxylesterases competes with the cytochrome P450 (P450)-catalyzed formation of malaoxon, the toxic metabolite. However, impurities in commercial formulations are potent inhibitors of carboxylesterase, allowing a dramatic increase in malaoxon formation. Malathion desulfuration has been characterized in human liver microsomes (HLMs) with a method based on acetylcholinesterase inhibition that is able to detect nanomolar levels of oxon. The active P450 isoforms have been identified by means of a multifaceted strategy, including the use of cDNA-expressed human P450s and correlation, immunoinhibition, and chemical inhibition studies in a panel of phenotyped HLMs. HLMs catalyzed malaoxon formation with a high level of variability (>200-fold). One or two components (K(mapp1) = 53-67 microM; K(mapp2) = 427-1721 microM) were evidenced, depending on the relative specific P450 content. Results from different approaches indicated that, at low malathion concentration, malaoxon formation is catalyzed by CYP1A2 and, to a lesser extent, 2B6, whereas the role of 3A4 is relevant only at high malathion levels. These results are in line with those found with chlorpyrifos, diazinon, azynphos-methyl, and parathion, characterized by the presence of an aromatic ring in the molecule. Since malathion has linear chains as substituents at the thioether sulfur, it can be hypothesized that, independently from the chemical structure, OPTs are bioactivated by the same P450s. These results also suggest that CYP1A2 and 2B6 can be considered as possible metabolic biomarkers of susceptibility to OPT-induced toxic effects at actual human exposure levels.

  18. Differential Mechanisms of Tenofovir and Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Cellular Transport and Implications for Topical Preexposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Crooker, Kerry; Park, Sung Hyun; Su, Jonathan T.; Ott, Adina; Cheshenko, Natalia; Szleifer, Igal; Kiser, Patrick F.; Frank, Bruce; Mesquita, Pedro M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravaginal rings releasing tenofovir (TFV) or its prodrug, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), are being evaluated for HIV and herpes simplex virus (HSV) prevention. The current studies were designed to determine the mechanisms of drug accumulation in human vaginal and immune cells. The exposure of vaginal epithelial or T cells to equimolar concentrations of radiolabeled TDF resulted in over 10-fold higher intracellular drug levels than exposure to TFV. Permeability studies demonstrated that TDF, but not TFV, entered cells by passive diffusion. TDF uptake was energy independent but its accumulation followed nonlinear kinetics, and excess unlabeled TDF inhibited radiolabeled TDF uptake in competition studies. The carboxylesterase inhibitor bis-nitrophenyl phosphate reduced TDF uptake, suggesting saturability of intracellular carboxylesterases. In contrast, although TFV uptake was energy dependent, no competition between unlabeled and radiolabeled TFV was observed, and the previously identified transporters, organic anion transporters (OATs) 1 and 3, were not expressed in human vaginal or T cells. The intracellular accumulation of TFV was reduced by the addition of endocytosis inhibitors, and this resulted in the loss of TFV antiviral activity. Kinetics of drug transport and metabolism were monitored by quantifying the parent drugs and their metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Results were consistent with the identified mechanisms of transport, and the exposure of vaginal epithelial cells to equimolar concentrations of TDF compared to TFV resulted in ∼40-fold higher levels of the active metabolite, tenofovir diphosphate. Together, these findings indicate that substantially lower concentrations of TDF than TFV are needed to protect cells from HIV and HSV-2. PMID:26711762

  19. Mouse serum paraoxonase-1 lactonase activity is specific for medium-chain length fatty acid lactones.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Philip W; Picardo, Clive M; Potter, Philip M; Teiber, John F; Maguire, Graham F; Ng, Dominic S

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that paraoxonase-1 (PON1), complexed with high-density lipoproteins, is the major lactonase in the circulation. Using 5-hydroxy eicosatetraenoate δ-lactone (5-HETEL) as the substrate, we observed lactonase activity in serum from Pon1-/- mice. However, 6-12 carbon fatty acid γ- and δ-lactones were not hydrolyzed in serum from Pon1-/- mice. Serum from both wild-type and Pon1-/- mice contained a lactonase activity towards 5-HETEL and 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone that was resistant to inactivation by EDTA. This lactonase activity was sensitive to the serine esterase inhibitor phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride and co-eluted with carboxylesterase activity by size-exclusion chromatography. Analysis of serum from the Es1e mouse strain, which has a deficiency in the carboxylesterase, ES-1, proved that this activity was due to ES-1. PON1 activity predominated at early time points (30 s), whereas both PON1 and ES-1 contributed equally at later time points (15 min). When both PON1 and ES-1 were inhibited, 5-HETEL was stable in mouse serum. Thus, while long-chain fatty acid lactones are substrates for PON1, they can be hydrolyzed by ES-1 at neutral pH. In contrast, medium-chain length fatty acid lactones are stable in mouse serum in the absence of PON1, suggesting that PON1 plays a specific role in the metabolism of these compounds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of liver and brain esterases in the spotted gar fish (Lepisosteus oculatus) as biomarkers of effect in the lower Mississippi River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.L.; Obih, P.O.; Jaiswal, R.

    1997-05-01

    The responses of various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in fish models are rapidly evolving as important biomarkers for monitoring unacceptable levels of environmental contaminants. Ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, a specific cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase, is often used as an indicator of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pollution. Another class of enzymes which are potential biomarkers are the B-type esterases. These enzymes are sensitive to inhibition by organophosphates, and include the cholinesterases (ChE) and carboxylesterases. ChEs are further subdivided into acetylcholinesterase and butyryl cholinesterase. Among fish, AChE is predominantly localized in the brain and muscle, whereas, BuChE activity is found mainly in liver and plasma. The precise physiological role of BuChE is unknown, although it has been regarded as a marker enzyme for glial or supportive cells or other non-neuronal elements. Inhibition of ChE activity has often been associated with exposure to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides and other neurotoxic xenobiotics. Chemicals other than carbarnates and organophosphates that are environmental contaminants can also affect the activity of ChEs. Carboxylesterases represent a heterogenous group of isozymes that can catalyze the hydrolysis of a wide range of xenobiotic esters, amides and thioesters. For most CaE, their natural substrates are unknown, therefore, their physiological functions remain to be elucidated. These enzymes (CaE) occur widely in most tissues and are generally found in high levels in the liver. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the liver and brain esterases in the spotted gar fish as biomarkers of effect to multiple contaminants in the lower Mississippi River basin. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Association between statin use and ischemic stroke or major hemorrhage in patients taking dabigatran for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Tony; Macdonald, Erin M; Yao, Zhan; Hollands, Simon; Gomes, Tara; Tadrous, Mina; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Juurlink, David N

    2017-01-09

    Dabigatran etexilate is a prodrug whose absorption is opposed by intestinal P-glycoprotein and which is converted by carboxylesterase to its active form, dabigatran. Unlike other statins, simvastatin and lovastatin are potent inhibitors of P-glycoprotein and carboxylesterase, and might either increase the risk of hemorrhage with dabigatran etexilate or decrease its effectiveness. We conducted 2 population-based, nested case-control studies involving Ontario residents 66 years of age and older who started dabigatran etexilate between May 1, 2012, and Mar. 31, 2014. In the first study, cases were patients with ischemic stroke; in the second, cases were patients with major hemorrhage. Each case was matched with up to 4 controls by age and sex. All cases and controls received a single statin in the 60 days preceding the index date. We determined the association between each outcome and the use of simvastatin or lovastatin, relative to other statins. Among 45 991 patients taking dabigatran etexilate, we identified 397 cases with ischemic stroke and 1117 cases with major hemorrhage. After multivariable adjustment, use of simvastatin or lovastatin was not associated with an increased risk of stroke (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88 to 2.01). In contrast, use of simvastatin and lovastatin were associated with a higher risk of major hemorrhage (adjusted OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.82). In patients receiving dabigatran etexilate, simvastatin and lovastatin were associated with a higher risk of major hemorrhage relative to other statins. Preferential use of the other statins should be considered in these patients. © 2017 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  2. Incongruent Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genetic Structure of New World Screwworm Fly Populations Due to Positive Selection of Mutations Associated with Dimethyl- and Diethyl-Organophosphates Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bergamo, Luana Walravens; Fresia, Pablo; Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria L.

    2015-01-01

    Livestock production is an important economic activity in Brazil, which has been suffering significant losses due to the impact of parasites. The New World screwworm (NWS) fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, is an ectoparasite and one of the most important myiasis-causing flies endemic to the Americas. The geographic distribution of NWS has been reduced after the implementation of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), being eradicated in North America and part of Central America. In South America, C. hominivorax is controlled by chemical insecticides, although indiscriminate use can cause selection of resistant individuals. Previous studies have associated the Gly137Asp and Trp251Leu mutations in the active site of carboxylesterase E3 to resistance of diethyl and dimethyl-organophosphates insecticides, respectively. Here, we have sequenced a fragment of the carboxylesterase E3 gene (ChαE7), comprising part of intron iII, exon eIII, intron iIII and part of exon eIV, and three mitochondrial gene sequences (CR, COI and COII), of NWS flies from 21 locations in South America. These markers were used for population structure analyses and the ChαE7 gene was also investigated to gain insight into the selective pressures that have shaped its evolution. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and pairwise FST analysis indicated an increased genetic structure between locations in the ChαE7 compared to the concatenated mitochondrial genes. Discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC) and spatial analysis of molecular variance (SAMOVA) indicated different degrees of genetic structure for all markers, in agreement with the AMOVA results, but with low correlation to geographic data. The NWS fly is considered a panmitic species based on mitochondrial data, while it is structured into three groups considering the ChαE7 gene. A negative association between the two mutations related to organophosphate resistance and Fay & Wu’s H significant negative values for the exons, suggest

  3. Pyrethroid Resistance in Malaysian Populations of Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti Is Mediated by CYP9 Family of Cytochrome P450 Genes.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Intan H; Kamgang, Basile; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S; Riveron, Jacob M; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S

    2017-01-01

    Dengue control and prevention rely heavily on insecticide-based interventions. However, insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti, threatens the continued effectiveness of these tools. The molecular basis of the resistance remains uncharacterised in many endemic countries including Malaysia, preventing the design of evidence-based resistance management. Here, we investigated the underlying molecular basis of multiple insecticide resistance in Ae. aegypti populations across Malaysia detecting the major genes driving the metabolic resistance. Genome-wide microarray-based transcription analysis was carried out to detect the genes associated with metabolic resistance in these populations. Comparisons of the susceptible New Orleans strain to three non-exposed multiple insecticide resistant field strains; Penang, Kuala Lumpur and Kota Bharu detected 2605, 1480 and 425 differentially expressed transcripts respectively (fold-change>2 and p-value ≤ 0.05). 204 genes were commonly over-expressed with monooxygenase P450 genes (CYP9J27, CYP6CB1, CYP9J26 and CYP9M4) consistently the most up-regulated detoxification genes in all populations, indicating that they possibly play an important role in the resistance. In addition, glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and other gene families commonly associated with insecticide resistance were also over-expressed. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated an over-representation of GO terms linked to resistance such as monooxygenases, carboxylesterases, glutathione S-transferases and heme-binding. Polymorphism analysis of CYP9J27 sequences revealed a high level of polymorphism (except in Joho Bharu), suggesting a limited directional selection on this gene. In silico analysis of CYP9J27 activity through modelling and docking simulations suggested that this gene is involved in the multiple resistance in Malaysian populations as it is predicted to metabolise pyrethroids, DDT and bendiocarb. The predominant

  4. Current status of insecticide resistance among malaria vectors in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ondeto, Benyl M; Nyundo, Christopher; Kamau, Luna; Muriu, Simon M; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Njagi, Kiambo; Mathenge, Evan M; Ochanda, Horace; Mbogo, Charles M

    2017-09-19

    Insecticide resistance has emerged as one of the major challenges facing National Malaria Control Programmes in Africa. A well-coordinated national database on insecticide resistance (IRBase) can facilitate the development of effective strategies for managing insecticide resistance and sustaining the effectiveness of chemical-based vector control measures. The aim of this study was to assemble a database on the current status of insecticide resistance among malaria vectors in Kenya. Data was obtained from published literature through PubMed, HINARI and Google Scholar searches and unpublished literature from government reports, research institutions reports and malaria control programme reports. Each data source was assigned a unique identification code and entered into Microsoft Excel 2010 datasheets. Base maps on the distribution of insecticide resistance and resistance mechanisms among malaria vectors in Kenya were generated using ArcGIS Desktop 10.1 (ESRI, Redlands, CA, USA). Insecticide resistance status among the major malaria vectors in Kenya was reported in all the four classes of insecticides including pyrethroids, carbamates, organochlorines and organophosphates. Resistance to pyrethroids has been detected in Anopheles gambiae (s.s.), An. arabiensis and An. funestus (s.s.) while resistance to carbamates was limited to An. gambiae (s.s.) and An. arabiensis. Resistance to the organochlorine was reported in An. gambiae (s.s.) and An. funestus (s.s.) while resistance to organophosphates was reported in An. gambiae (s.l.) only. The mechanisms of insecticide resistance among malaria vectors reported include the kdr mutations (L 1014S and L 1014F) and elevated activity in carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferases (GST) and monooxygenases. The kdr mutations L 1014S and L 1014F were detected in An. gambiae (s.s.) and An. arabiensis populations. Elevated activity of monooxygenases has been detected in both An. arabiensis and An. gambiae (s.s.) populations while

  5. High-throughput proteomics integrated with gene microarray for discovery of colorectal cancer potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chenhan; Li, Dan; Zhai, Xiaohui; Hu, Wangxiong; Guo, Cheng; Yuan, Ying; Zheng, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Proteins, as executives of genes' instructions, are responsible for cellular phenotypes. Integrating proteomics with gene microarray, we conducted this study to identify potential protein biomarkers of colorectal cancer (CRC). Isobaric tags with related and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to screen and identify differentially expressed proteins between paired CRC and adjacent normal mucosa. Meanwhile, Affymetrix U133plus2.0 microarrays were used to perform gene microarray analysis. Verification experiments included immunohistochemistry (IHC), western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of selected proteins. Overall, 5469 differentially expressed proteins were detected with iTRAQ-MS from 24 matched CRC and adjacent normal tissues. And gene microarray identified 39859 differential genes from 52 patients. Of these, 3083 differential proteins had corresponding differentially expressed genes, with 245 proteins and their genes showed >1.5-fold change in expression level. Gene ontology enrichment analysis revealed that up-regulated proteins were more involved in cell adhesion and motion than down-regulated proteins. In addition, up-regulated proteins were more likely to be located in nucleus and vesicles. Further verification experiments with IHC confirmed differential expression levels of 5 proteins (S100 calcium-binding protein A9, annexin A3, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, carboxylesterase 2 and calcium activated chloride channel A1) between CRC and normal tissues. Besides, western blot showed a stepwise increase of annexin A3 abundance in normal colorectal mucosa, adenoma and CRC tissues. ELISA results revealed significantly higher serum levels of S100 calcium-binding protein A9 and annexin A3 in CRC patients than healthy controls, validating diagnostic value of these proteins. Cell experiments showed that inhibition of annexin A3 could suppress CRC cell proliferation and aggressiveness. S100 calcium

  6. Development of organophosphate hydrolase activity in a bacterial homolog of human cholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Legler, Patricia M.; Boisvert, Susanne M.; Compton, Jaimee R.; Millard, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    We applied a combination of rational design and directed evolution (DE) to Bacillus subtilis p-nitrobenzyl esterase (pNBE) with the goal of enhancing organophosphorus acid anhydride hydrolase (OPAAH) activity. DE started with a designed variant, pNBE A107H, carrying a histidine homologous with human butyrylcholinesterase G117H to find complementary mutations that further enhance its OPAAH activity. Five sites were selected (G105, G106, A107, A190, and A400) within a 6.7 Å radius of the nucleophilic serine Oγ. All 95 variants were screened for esterase activity with a set of five substrates: pNP-acetate, pNP-butyrate, acetylthiocholine, butyrylthiocholine, or benzoylthiocholine. A microscale assay for OPAAH activity was developed for screening DE libraries. Reductions in esterase activity were generally concomitant with enhancements in OPAAH activity. One variant, A107K, showed an unexpected 7-fold increase in its kcat/Km for benzoylthiocholine, demonstrating that it is also possible to enhance the cholinesterase activity of pNBE. Moreover, DE resulted in at least three variants with modestly enhanced OPAAH activity compared to wild type pNBE. A107H/A190C showed a 50-fold increase in paraoxonase activity and underwent a slow time- and temperature-dependent change affecting the hydrolysis of OPAA and ester substrates. Structural analysis suggests that pNBE may represent a precursor leading to human cholinesterase and carboxylesterase 1 through extension of two vestigial specificity loops; a preliminary attempt to transfer the Ω-loop of BChE into pNBE is described. Unlike butyrylcholinesterase and pNBE, introducing a G143H mutation (equivalent to G117H) did not confer detectable OP hydrolase activity on human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1). We discuss the use of pNBE as a surrogate scaffold for the mammalian esterases, and the importance of the oxyanion-hole residues for enhancing the OPAAH activity of selected serine hydrolases. PMID:25077141

  7. In vitro metabolism and drug-drug interaction potential of UTL-5g, a novel chemo- and radioprotective agent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianmei; Shaw, Jiajiu; Dubaisi, Sarah; Valeriote, Frederick; Li, Jing

    2014-12-01

    N-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-1,2-oxazole-3-carboxamide (UTL-5g), a potential chemo- and radioprotective agent, acts as a prodrug requiring bioactivation to the active metabolite 5-methylisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX). UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) has been identified in porcine and rabbit liver esterases. The purpose of this study was to provide insights on the metabolism and drug interaction potential of UTL-5g in humans. The kinetics of UTL-5g hydrolysis was determined in human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human carboxylesterases (hCE1b and hCE2). The potential of UTL-5g and its metabolites for competitive inhibition and time-dependent inhibition of microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) was examined in HLM. UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and DCA in HLM were NADPH-independent, with a maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) of 11.1 nmol/min per mg and substrate affinity (Km) of 41.6 µM. Both hCE1b and hCE2 effectively catalyzed UTL-5g hydrolysis, but hCE2 exhibited ∼30-fold higher catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) than hCE1b. UTL-5g and DCA competitively inhibited microsomal CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19 (IC50 values <50 µM), and exhibited time-dependent inhibition of microsomal CYP1A2 with the inactivation efficiency (kinact/KI) of 0.68 and 0.51 minute(-1)·mM(-1), respectively. ISOX did not inhibit or inactivate any tested microsomal P450. In conclusion, hCE1b and hCE2 play a key role in the bioactivation of UTL-5g. Factors influencing carboxylesterase activities may have a significant impact on the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of UTL-5g. UTL-5g has the potential to inhibit P450-mediated metabolism through competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition. Caution is particularly needed for potential drug interactions involving competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2 in the future clinical development of UTL-5g. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  8. In Vitro Metabolism and Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of UTL-5g, a Novel Chemo- and Radioprotective Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianmei; Shaw, Jiajiu; Dubaisi, Sarah; Valeriote, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    N-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-1,2-oxazole-3-carboxamide (UTL-5g), a potential chemo- and radioprotective agent, acts as a prodrug requiring bioactivation to the active metabolite 5-methylisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (ISOX). UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and 2,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) has been identified in porcine and rabbit liver esterases. The purpose of this study was to provide insights on the metabolism and drug interaction potential of UTL-5g in humans. The kinetics of UTL-5g hydrolysis was determined in human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human carboxylesterases (hCE1b and hCE2). The potential of UTL-5g and its metabolites for competitive inhibition and time-dependent inhibition of microsomal cytochrome P450 (P450) was examined in HLM. UTL-5g hydrolysis to ISOX and DCA in HLM were NADPH-independent, with a maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) of 11.1 nmol/min per mg and substrate affinity (Km) of 41.6 µM. Both hCE1b and hCE2 effectively catalyzed UTL-5g hydrolysis, but hCE2 exhibited ∼30-fold higher catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) than hCE1b. UTL-5g and DCA competitively inhibited microsomal CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP2C19 (IC50 values <50 µM), and exhibited time-dependent inhibition of microsomal CYP1A2 with the inactivation efficiency (kinact/KI) of 0.68 and 0.51 minute−1·mM−1, respectively. ISOX did not inhibit or inactivate any tested microsomal P450. In conclusion, hCE1b and hCE2 play a key role in the bioactivation of UTL-5g. Factors influencing carboxylesterase activities may have a significant impact on the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of UTL-5g. UTL-5g has the potential to inhibit P450-mediated metabolism through competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition. Caution is particularly needed for potential drug interactions involving competitive inhibition or time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2 in the future clinical development of UTL-5g. PMID:25249693

  9. Pyrethroid Resistance in Malaysian Populations of Dengue Vector Aedes aegypti Is Mediated by CYP9 Family of Cytochrome P450 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ishak, Intan H.; Kamgang, Basile; Ibrahim, Sulaiman S.; Riveron, Jacob M.; Irving, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Background Dengue control and prevention rely heavily on insecticide-based interventions. However, insecticide resistance in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti, threatens the continued effectiveness of these tools. The molecular basis of the resistance remains uncharacterised in many endemic countries including Malaysia, preventing the design of evidence-based resistance management. Here, we investigated the underlying molecular basis of multiple insecticide resistance in Ae. aegypti populations across Malaysia detecting the major genes driving the metabolic resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings Genome-wide microarray-based transcription analysis was carried out to detect the genes associated with metabolic resistance in these populations. Comparisons of the susceptible New Orleans strain to three non-exposed multiple insecticide resistant field strains; Penang, Kuala Lumpur and Kota Bharu detected 2605, 1480 and 425 differentially expressed transcripts respectively (fold-change>2 and p-value ≤ 0.05). 204 genes were commonly over-expressed with monooxygenase P450 genes (CYP9J27, CYP6CB1, CYP9J26 and CYP9M4) consistently the most up-regulated detoxification genes in all populations, indicating that they possibly play an important role in the resistance. In addition, glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and other gene families commonly associated with insecticide resistance were also over-expressed. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis indicated an over-representation of GO terms linked to resistance such as monooxygenases, carboxylesterases, glutathione S-transferases and heme-binding. Polymorphism analysis of CYP9J27 sequences revealed a high level of polymorphism (except in Joho Bharu), suggesting a limited directional selection on this gene. In silico analysis of CYP9J27 activity through modelling and docking simulations suggested that this gene is involved in the multiple resistance in Malaysian populations as it is predicted to metabolise

  10. Effects of alpha-mangostin from mangosteen pericarp extract and imidacloprid on Nilaparvata lugens (Stal.) and non-target organisms: toxicity and detoxification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bullangpoti, Vasakorn; Visetson, Suraphon; Milne, John; Milne, Manthana; Sudthongkong, Chaiwud; Pronbanlualap, Somchai

    2007-01-01

    The brown planthopper, Nilaparvato lugens Stat. (BPH) is the most devastating insect pest in rice fields. Outbreaks of BPH, which are resistant to many synthetic insecticides, can cause total rice crop loss. This research was done to evaluate the efficiency of extracts of mangosteen pericarp (Garcina mangostana L.) as an alternative control of BPH Thailand strain. Topical spraying was applied to various stages of nymphal and adult BPH to determine toxicity. An ethanol extract of mangosteen pericarp extract gave the best control of BPH, with LC50 of 4.5% w/v (r2 = 0.95) with 3rd instar BPH nymphs when compared with the other solvents, hexane, acetone and dichloromethane. The active compound, alpha-mangostin showed an LC50 of 5.44%w/v (r2 = 0.88). The toxicity of this extract was less than that of Imidacloprid which showed an LC50 of 0.0042% w/v (r2 = 0.99). The toxicity to non-target organisms was determined. This extract showed toxicity to guppies ((LC50 = 2.53 and 4.27 ppm for females and males, respectively; r2 = 0.97 and 0.97, respectively), bees (LC50 = 4.38% w/v, r2 = 0.95) and mice (no oral acute toxicity and no dermal inflammation but showed eye irritation in 1 day which became normal within 3 days). In vitro detoxification enzyme activities of carboxylesterase, acetylcholinesterase and glutathione-s-transferase from BPH after 24 hours exposure were also observed. Carboxylesterase showed stronger activity than other enzymes. Toxicity in terms of LC50 values of both the extract and imidacloprid treatments increased in each generation. The LC50 values for each generation were 4.22-6.67 after sequential spraying. After the ethanol extract was kept at 4 degrees C, room temperature and 55 degrees C for 3 months, the quantity of alpha-mangostin and the BPH control efficiency was lower at 55 degrees C than those for other temperatures. The results from this research indicate that mangosteen pericarp extract can be an alternative insecticide for the control of BPH

  11. Pollution biomarkers in the spiny lizard (Sceloporus spp.) from two suburban populations of Monterrey, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Carlos; del Pliego, Pamela González; Alfaro, Roberto Mendoza; Lazcano, David; Cruz, Julio

    2012-11-01

    Environmental pollution may severely impact reptile species in urbanized areas. The magnitude of the impact is analyzed in the present study using lizard tail tips for the quantitative evaluation of enzymatic biomarkers of pollution. Spiny lizards (Sceloporus serrifer and S. torquatus) were collected from two suburban localities in the Monterrey metropolitan area, Mexico: Chipinque Ecological Park, a natural protected area, and El Carmen Industrial Park (IP), a highly polluted site. Different enzymes were used as biomarkers including: acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), carboxylesterase (CaE), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), acid phosphatase (ACP), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The levels of AChE, BChE and ACP activity were not significantly different between localities. AChE and BChE, commonly used as biomarkers of neurotoxic polluting agents (e.g. organophosphate pesticides) do not appear to be affecting the populations from the study locations. In contrast, the levels of CaE, GST, ALP and SOD were significantly different between the localities. These biomarkers are regularly associated with oxidative stress and processes of detoxification, and generally indicate pollution caused by heavy metals or hydrocarbons, which are common in industrial sites. The data resulting from the analysis of these biomarkers indicate that these polluting agents are affecting the populations of Sceloporus in IP. The present work validates the possibility of conducting additional ecotoxicological studies using biomarkers in combination with a nondestructive sampling technique in species of spiny lizards that are abundant in many North America areas.

  12. Xenobiotic metabolism of plant secondary compounds in the English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F.) (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maoxin; Fang, Tingting; Pu, Guilin; Sun, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Xuguo; Cai, Qingnian

    2013-09-01

    Plant secondary compounds have been documented to be deleterious to insects and other herbivores in diverse ways. In this study, the effect of catechol (phenolics), gramine (alkaloid) and L-ornithine-HCI (non-protein amino acid) on the activities of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, was evaluated. Phase I enzymes investigated in this study included carboxylesterase (CarE), and oxidoreductase, whereas Phase II enzymes were represented by glutathione S-transferase (GST). In general, CarE and GST activities in S. avenae were positively correlated with the concentration of plant secondary compounds in artificial diets. Oxidoreductase activity, however, displayed a different profile. Specifically, peroxidase (POD) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities in S. avenae were positively correlated with concentrations of dietary catechol and gramine, respectively, whereas catalase (CAT) activity was significantly suppressed by the higher concentration of catechol, gramine and L-ornithine-HCl. These combined results suggest that CarE and GST in S. avenae are key enzymes to breakdown a broad spectrum of plant secondary compounds, whereas oxidoreductase, including PPO and POD, degrades specific groups of plant secondary compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Biology, physiology and gene expression of grasshopper Oedaleus asiaticus exposed to diet stress from plant secondary compounds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xunbing; Ma, Jingchuan; Qin, Xinghu; Tu, Xiongbing; Cao, Guangchun; Wang, Guangjun; Nong, Xiangqun; Zhang, Zehua

    2017-08-17

    We studied the role of plant primary and secondary metabolites in mediating plant-insect interactions by conducting a no-choice single-plant species field experiment to compare the suitability, enzyme activities, and gene expression of Oedaleus asiaticus grasshoppers feeding on four host and non-host plants with different chemical traits. O. asiaticus growth showed a positive relationship to food nutrition content and a negative relationship to secondary compounds content. Grasshopper amylase, chymotrypsin, and lipase activities were positively related to food starch, crude protein, and lipid content, respectively. Activity of cytochrome P450s, glutathione-S-transferase, and carboxylesterase were positively related to levels of secondary plant compounds. Gene expression of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2C1, cytochrome P450 6K1 were also positively related to secondary compounds content in the diet. Grasshoppers feeding on Artemisia frigida, a species with low nutrient content and a high level of secondary compounds, had reduced growth and digestive enzyme activity. They also had higher detoxification enzyme activity and gene expression compared to grasshoppers feeding on the grasses Cleistogenes squarrosa, Leymus chinensis, or Stipa krylovii. These results illustrated Oedaleus asiaticus adaptive responses to diet stress resulting from toxic chemicals, and support the hypothesis that nutritious food benefits insect growth, but plant secondary compounds are detrimental for insect growth.

  14. Metabolomics identifies an inflammatory cascade involved in dioxin- and diet-induced steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Naoki; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Manna, Soumen K.; Kang, Dong Wook; Anderson, Erik R.; Luecke, Hans; Patterson, Andrew D.; Shah, Yatrik M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is among the most potent environmentally toxic compounds. Serum metabolomics identified azelaic acid-mono esters as significantly increased metabolites after TCDD treatment, due to down-regulation of hepatic carboxylesterase 3 (CES3, also known as triglyceride hydrolase) expression in an arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent manner in mice. The decreased CES3 expression was accomplished by TCDD-stimulated TGFβ-SMAD3 and IL6-STAT3 signaling, but not by direct AhR signaling. Methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet-treated mice also showed enhanced serum azelaic acid-mono ester levels following attenuation of hepatic CES3 expression, while db/db mice did not, thus suggesting an association with steatohepatitis. Forced expression of CES3 reversed serum azelaic acid-mono ester/azelaic acid ratios and hepatic TGFβ mRNA levels in TCDD- and MCD diet-treated mice and ameliorated steatohepatitis induced by MCD diet. These results support the view that azelaic acid-mono esters are possible indicators of TCDD exposure and steatohepatitis, and suggest a link between CES3, TGFβ, and steatohepatitis. PMID:23140643

  15. Conclusive identification of the oxybutynin-hydrolyzing enzyme in human liver.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Miyashita, Aiji; Iwatsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to conclusively determine the enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxybutynin in human liver. Hydrolysis in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and human liver cytosol (HLC) followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with similar K(m) values. In recombinant human carboxylesterase (CES)-expressing microsomes, CES1 was much more efficient than CES2 and yielded a K(m) value more comparable with that found in HLMs or HLC than did CES2. A correlation analysis using a set of individual HLMs, in which both CESs acted independently showed that the hydrolysis rate of oxybutynin, correlated significantly with a CES1 marker reaction, clopidogrel hydrolysis, but not with a CES2 marker reaction, irinotecan (CPT-11) hydrolysis. Chemical inhibition studies using bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate, clopidogrel, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, procainamide, physostigmine, and loperamide revealed that the effects of these compounds in HLMs, HLC, and recombinant CES1-expressing microsomes were similar, whereas those in CES2-expressing microsomes were clearly different. These results strongly suggest that CES1, rather than CES2, is the principal enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of oxybutynin in human liver.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of the salivary glands of potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae.

    PubMed

    DeLay, Bridget; Mamidala, Praveen; Wijeratne, Asela; Wijeratne, Saranga; Mittapalli, Omprakash; Wang, Jian; Lamp, William

    2012-12-01

    The potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae, is a pest of economic crops in the United States and Canada, where it causes damage known as hopperburn. Saliva, along with mechanical injury, leads to decreases in gas exchange rates, stunting and chlorosis. Although E. fabae saliva is known to induce plant responses, little knowledge exists of saliva composition at the molecular level. We subjected the salivary glands of E. fabae to Roche 454-pyrosequencing which resulted significant number (30,893) of expressed sequence tags including 2805 contigs and 28,088 singletons. A high number of sequences (78%) showed similarity to other insect species in GenBank, including Triboliumcastaneum, Drosophilamelanogaster and Acrythosiphonpisum. KEGG analysis predicted the presence of pathways for purine and thiamine metabolic, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, drug metabolism, and lysine degradation. Pfam analysis showed a high number of cellulase and carboxylesterase protein domains. Expression analysis of candidate genes (alpha amylase, lipase, pectin lyase, etc.) among different tissues revealed tissue-specific expression of digestive enzymes in E. fabae. This is the first study to characterize the sialotranscriptome of E. fabae and the first for any species in the family of Cicadellidae. Due to the status of these insects as economic pests, knowledge of which genes are active in the salivary glands is important for understanding their impact on host plants.

  17. GLYCOENGINEERING OF ESTERASE ACTIVITY THROUGH METABOLIC FLUX-BASED MODULATION OF SIALIC ACID.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mohit; Tan, Elaine; Labonte, Jason W; Shah, Shivam; Saeui, Christopher T; Liu, Lingshu; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Bovonratwet, Patawut; Gray, Jeffrey J; Yarema, Kevin

    2017-02-20

    This report describes the metabolic glycoengineering (MGE) of intracellular esterase activity in human colon cancer (LS174T) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In silico analysis of the carboxylesterases CES1 and CES2 suggested that these enzymes are modified with sialylated N-glycans, which are proposed to stabilize the active multimeric forms of these enzymes. This premise was supported by treating cells with butanolylated ManNAc to increase sialylation, which in turn increased esterase activity. By contrast, hexosamine analogs not targeted to sialic acid biosynthesis (e.g., butanoylated GlcNAc or GalNAc) had minimal impact. Measurement of mRNA and protein confirmed that esterase activity was controlled through glycosylation and not through transcription or translation. Azide-modified ManNAc analogs widely used in MGE also enhanced esterase activity and provided a way to enrich targeted "glycoengineered" proteins (such as CES2), thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the compounds were converted to sialosides and installed into the glycan structures of esterases as intended. Overall, this study provides a pioneering example of the modulation of intracellular enzyme activity through MGE, which expands the value of this technology from its current status as a labeling strategy and modulator of cell surface biological events.

  18. Candidate chemosensory genes in the Stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Nicolas; Gallot, Aurore; Legeai, Fabrice; Montagné, Nicolas; Poivet, Erwan; Harry, Myriam; Calatayud, Paul-André; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides is an important pest of maize in the Mediterranean Basin. Like other moths, this noctuid uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, very little is known on the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemosensation in this species. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (454 and Illumina) on different tissues from adult and larvae, including chemosensory organs and female ovipositors, to describe the chemosensory transcriptome of S. nonagrioides and identify key molecular components of the pheromone production and detection systems. We identified a total of 68 candidate chemosensory genes in this species, including 31 candidate binding-proteins and 23 chemosensory receptors. In particular, we retrieved the three co-receptors Orco, IR25a and IR8a necessary for chemosensory receptor functioning. Focusing on the pheromonal communication system, we identified a new pheromone-binding protein in this species, four candidate pheromone receptors and 12 carboxylesterases as candidate acetate degrading enzymes. In addition, we identified enzymes putatively involved in S. nonagrioides pheromone biosynthesis, including a ∆11-desaturase and different acetyltransferases and reductases. RNAseq analyses and RT-PCR were combined to profile gene expression in different tissues. This study constitutes the first large scale description of chemosensory genes in S. nonagrioides.

  19. Therapeutic Targeting of CPT-11 Induced Diarrhea: A Case for Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Umang; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    CPT-11 (irinotecan), a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor is one of the main treatments for colorectal cancer. The main dose limiting toxicities are neutropenia and late onset diarrhea. Though neutropenia is manageable, CPT-11 induced diarrhea is frequently severe, resulting in hospitalizations, dose reductions or omissions leading to ineffective treatment administration. Many potential agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies to prevent or ameliorate CPT-11 induced late onset diarrhea. It is predicted that prophylaxis of CPT-11 induced diarrhea will reduce sub-therapeutic dosing as well as hospitalizations and will eventually lead to dose escalations resulting in better response rates. This article reviews various experimental agents and strategies employed to prevent this debilitating toxicity. Covered topics include schedule/dose modification, intestinal alkalization, structural/chemical modification, genetic testing, anti-diarrheal therapies, transporter (ABCB1, ABCC2, BCRP2) inhibitors, enzyme (β-glucuronidase, UGT1A1, CYP3A4, carboxylesterase, COX-2) inducers and inhibitors, probiotics, antibiotics, adsorbing agents, cytokine and growth factor activators and inhibitors and other miscellaneous agents. PMID:23597015

  20. Evolution of Protein Quaternary Structure in Response to Selective Pressure for Increased Thermostability.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Nicholas J; Liu, Jian-Wei; Mabbitt, Peter D; Correy, Galen J; Coppin, Chris W; Lethier, Mathilde; Perugini, Matthew A; Murphy, James M; Oakeshott, John G; Weik, Martin; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-06-05

    Oligomerization has been suggested to be an important mechanism for increasing or maintaining the thermostability of proteins. Although it is evident that protein-protein contacts can result in substantial stabilization in many extant proteins, evidence for evolutionary selection for oligomerization is largely indirect and little is understood of the early steps in the evolution of oligomers. A laboratory-directed evolution experiment that selected for increased thermostability in the αE7 carboxylesterase from the Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina, resulted in a thermostable variant, LcαE7-4a, that displayed increased levels of dimeric and tetrameric quaternary structure. A trade-off between activity and thermostability was made during the evolution of thermostability, with the higher-order oligomeric species displaying the greatest thermostability and lowest catalytic activity. Analysis of monomeric and dimeric LcαE7-4a crystal structures revealed that only one of the oligomerization-inducing mutations was located at a potential protein-protein interface. This work demonstrates that by imposing a selective pressure demanding greater thermostability, mutations can lead to increased oligomerization and stabilization, providing support for the hypothesis that oligomerization is a viable evolutionary strategy for protein stabilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insecticide resistance status of Myzus persicae in Greece: long-term surveys and new diagnostics for resistance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Voudouris, Costas Ch; Kati, Amalia N; Sadikoglou, Eldem; Williamson, Martin; Skouras, Panagiotis J; Dimotsiou, Ourania; Georgiou, Stella; Fenton, Brian; Skavdis, George; Margaritopoulos, John T

    2016-04-01

    Myzus persicae nicotianae is an important pest in Greece, controlled mainly by neonicotinoids. Monitoring of the aphid populations for resistance mechanisms is essential for effective control. Two new RFLP-based diagnostics for the detection of the M918T (super-kdr pyrethroid resistance) and nAChR R81T (neonicotinoid resistance) mutations were applied, along with other established assays, on 131 nicotianae multilocus genotypes (MLGs) collected from tobacco and peach in Greece in 2012-2013. Furthermore, we present resistance data from aphid clones (>500, mainly nicotianae) collected in 2006-2007. About half of the clones tested with a diagnostic dose of imidacloprid were tolerant. The R81T mutation was not found in the 131 MLGs and 152 clones examined. Over half (58.6%) of a subset of 29 clones showed a 9-36-fold overexpression of CYP6CY3. M918T was found at low to moderate frequencies. The kdr and MACE mechanisms and carboxylesterase-based resistance were found at high frequency in all years. The aphid retains costly resistance mechanisms even in the absence of pressure from certain insecticides, which could be attributed to factors related to climate and genetic properties of the populations. The indication of build-up of resistance/tolerance to neonicotinoids, related to CYP6CY3 overexpression, is a matter of concern. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Bioefficacy of Alpinia galanga (Zingiberaceae) rhizome extracts, (E)-p-acetoxycinnamyl alcohol, and (E)-p-coumaryl alcohol ethyl ether against Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) and the impact on detoxification enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Sukhirun, N; Pluempanupat, W; Bullangpoti, V; Koul, O

    2011-10-01

    The application of insecticides to control oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a principal component of the current management of these fruit flies. However, we evaluated four extracts of Alpinia galanga Wild Linn (Zingiberaceae) rhizomes against adult flies and found hexane and ethanol extracts to be most effective (LC50 = 4,866 and 6,337 ppm, respectively, after 24 h). This suggested that both nonpolar and polar compounds could be active in the candidate plant. Accordingly, the hexane extract was further processed to isolate nonpolar active compounds from this plant source. Two compounds, (E)-p-acetoxycinnamyl alcohol and (E)-p-coumaryl alcohol ethyl ether, were identified as active ingredients and found to be more active than total hexane extract (LC50 = 3,654 and 4,044 ppm, respectively, after 24 h). The data suggested that the compounds were not synergistic but may have some additive effect in a mixture. The activity of the hexane extract against detoxification enzymes, carboxylesterase (CE) and glutathione transferase (GST) also was determined in vitro. CE was inhibited by 70%, whereas GST was not significantly inhibited. Insect CEs mediate insecticide resistance via their induction; therefore, inhibition of these enzymes by plant allelochemicals could be a useful alternative approach for the management of the pest in the field.

  3. Impact of insecticide exposure on the predation activity of the European earwig Forficula auricularia.

    PubMed

    Malagnoux, Laure; Capowiez, Yvan; Rault, Magali

    2015-09-01

    The European earwig Forficula auricularia is an effective predator in apple orchards. It is therefore crucial to study whether insecticides affect this natural pest control agent. Predation activity, i.e., the number of aphids eaten in 24 h, was determined under laboratory conditions after exposure of fourth-instar nymphs and adult earwigs to widely used insecticides (acetamiprid, chlorpyrifos-ethyl, deltamethrin, and spinosad), which were applied at the normal application rates. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and carboxylesterase activities were also measured as indicators of pesticide exposure. Predation activity decreased significantly in nymphs exposed to spinosad (62%) and chlorpyrifos-ethyl (98%) compared with controls. A similar response was found for both esterase activities. Spinosad had a stronger effect on AChE (-33%) whereas chlorpyrifos-ethyl affected CbE activity preferentially (-59%). Spinosad (20% of controls), acetamiprid (28%), and chlorpyrifos-ethyl (66%) also significantly decreased the predation behavior of adult male but not female (5 to 40%) earwigs. Adult AChE and CbE activities were also significantly reduced (28 to 67% of controls) in pesticide-exposed earwigs. Our results suggest that earwigs should be included in the environmental risk assessment framework for authorization of newly marketed plant protection products. Their predation behavior appears to be a sensitive and complementary biomarker.

  4. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  5. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF UBIQUITINATED PROTEINS FROM DELTAMETHRIN-RESISTANT AND SUSCEPTIBLE STRAINS OF THE DIAMONDBACK MOTH, Plutella Xylostella L.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Luogen; Du, Yaqiong; Hu, Junli; Jiao, Dongxu; Li, Jin; Zhou, Zhou; Xu, Qin; Li, Fengliang

    2015-10-01

    Ubiquitin, a small protein consisting of 76 amino acids, acts in protein degradation, DNA repair, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, and receptor control through endocytosis. Using proteomics, we compared the differentially ubiquitinated proteins between a deltamethrin-resistant (DR) strain and a deltamethrin-sensitive (DS) strain in third-instar larvae of the diamondback moth. We used polyubiquitin affinity beads to enrich ubiquitinated proteins and then performed one-dimensional SDS-PAGE separation and mass spectrometric identification. In the DR strain, We found 17 proteins that were upregulated (relative to the DS strain), including carbonic anhydrase family members, ADP ribosylation factor 102F CG11027-PA, protein kinase 61C, phospholipase A2 , dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and heat shock proteins, and five proteins that were downregulated in the DS strain, including carboxylesterase and DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferase. These results were also verified by qPCR. The differentially ubiquitinated proteins/enzymes were mainly responsible for protein binding, catalytic activity, and molecular transducer activity. These results improve our understanding of the relationship between protein ubiquitination and the deltamethrin stress response. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Linkage Map and QTL Analysis for Pyrethroid Resistance in the Bed Bug Cimex lectularius

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Toby; Ravinet, Mark; Naylor, Richard; Reinhardt, Klaus; Butlin, Roger K.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of insecticide resistance remains one of the biggest challenges in the control of medically and economically important pests. Insects have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms to reduce the efficacy of the commonly used classes of insecticides, and finding the genetic basis of resistance is a major aid to management. In a previously unstudied population, we performed an F2 resistance mapping cross for the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, for which insecticide resistance is increasingly widespread. Using 334 SNP markers obtained through RAD-sequencing, we constructed the first linkage map for the species, consisting of 14 putative linkage groups (LG), with a length of 407 cM and an average marker spacing of 1.3 cM. The linkage map was used to reassemble the recently published reference genome, facilitating refinement and validation of the current genome assembly. We detected a major QTL on LG12 associated with insecticide resistance, occurring in close proximity (1.2 Mb) to a carboxylesterase encoding candidate gene for pyrethroid resistance. This provides another example of this candidate gene playing a major role in determining survival in a bed bug population following pesticide resistance evolution. The recent availability of the bed bug genome, complete with a full list of potential candidate genes related to insecticide resistance, in addition to the linkage map generated here, provides an excellent resource for future research on the development and spread of insecticide resistance in this resurging pest species. PMID:27733453

  7. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

    DOE PAGES

    Vega, Fernando E.; Brown, Stuart M.; Chen, Hao; ...

    2015-07-31

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complexmore » polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. We find the draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies.« less

  8. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Fernando E.; Brown, Stuart M.; Chen, Hao; Shen, Eric; Nair, Mridul B.; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Infante, Francisco; Dowd, Patrick F.; Pain, Arnab

    2015-07-31

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complex polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. We find the draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies.

  9. Determination of cypermethrin degradation potential of soil bacteria along with plant growth-promoting characteristics.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Shamsa; Sultan, Sikander; Kertesz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The pyrethroid insecticide cypermethrin is in extensive use since 1980s for insect control. However, its toxicity toward aquatic animals and humans requires its complete removal from contaminated areas that can be done using indigenous microbes through bioremediation. In this study, three bacterial strains isolated from agricultural soil and identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus MCm5, Brevibacillus parabrevis FCm9, and Sphingomonas sp. RCm6 were found highly efficient in degrading cypermethrin and other pyrethroids. These bacterial strains were able to degrade more than 85 % of cypermethrin (100 mg L(-1)) within 10 days. Degradation kinetics of cypermethrin (200 mg kg(-1)) in soils inoculated with isolates MCm5, FCm9, and RCm6 suggested time-dependent disappearance of cypermethrin with rate constants of 0.0406, 0.0722, and 0.0483 d(-1) following first-order rate kinetics. Enzyme assays for Carboxylesterase, 3-PBA dioxygenase, Phenol hydroxylase, and Catechol-1,2 dioxygenase showed higher activities with cypermethrin treated cell-free extracts compared to non-treated cell-free extracts. Meanwhile, SDS-PAGE analysis showed upregulation of some bands in cypermethrin-treated cells. This might suggest that cypermethrin degradation in these strains involves inducible enzymes. Besides, the isolates displayed substantial plant growth-promoting traits such as phosphate solubilization, Indole acetic acid production, and ammonia production. Implying the efficient biodegradation potential along with multiple biological properties, these isolates can be valuable candidates for the development of bioremediation strategies.

  10. Separating esterase targets of organophosphorus compounds in the brain by preparative chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mangas, I; Vilanova, E; Benabent, M; Estévez, J

    2014-02-10

    Low level exposure to organophosphorus esters (OPs) may cause long-term neurological effects and affect specific cognition domains in experimental animals and humans. Action on known targets cannot explain most of these effects by. Soluble carboxylesterases (EC 3.1.1.1) of chicken brain have been kinetically discriminated using paraoxon, mipafox and phenylmethyl sulfonylfluoride as inhibitors and phenyl valerate as a substrate. Three different enzymatic components were discriminated and called Eα, Eβ and Eγ. In this work, a fractionation procedure with various steps was developed using protein native separation methods by preparative HPLC. Gel permeation chromatography followed by ion exchange chromatography allowed enriched fractions with different kinetic behaviors. The soluble chicken brain fraction was fractionated, while total esterase activity, proteins and enzymatic components Eα, Eβ and Eγ were monitored in each subfraction. After the analysis, 13 fractions were pooled and conserved. Preincubation of the soluble chicken brain fraction of with the organophosphorus mipafox gave rise to a major change in the ion exchange chromatography profile, but not in the molecular exchanged chromatography profile, which suggest that mipafox permanently modifies the ionic properties of numerous proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biochemical response of the Africanized honeybee exposed to fipronil.

    PubMed

    Roat, Thaisa C; Carvalho, Stephan M; Palma, Mário S; Malaspina, Osmar

    2017-06-01

    Bees are recognized worldwide for their social, economic, and environmental value. In recent decades they have been seriously threatened by diseases and high levels of pesticide use. The susceptibility of bees to insecticides makes them an important terrestrial model for assessing environmental quality, and various biomarkers have been developed for such assessments. The present study aimed to evaluate the activity of the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CaE), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in Africanized honeybees exposed to fipronil. The results showed that fipronil at a sublethal dose (0.01 ng/bee) modulates the activity of CaE in all isoforms analyzed (CaE-1, CaE-2, and CaE-3) in both newly emerged and aged bees, and does not affect the activity of AChE or GST. The recovery of the bees after fipronil exposure was also investigated, and these results demonstrated that even the cessation of fipronil ingestion might not lead to complete recovery of individual bees. Even at low doses, fipronil was shown to cause changes in the activity of key enzymes in bees. The possible consequences of these changes are discussed. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1652-1660. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. Genomic Analysis of Detoxification Supergene Families in the Mosquito Anopheles sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dan; Liu, Xianmiao; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2015-01-01

    Anopheles sinensis is an important malaria vector in China and other Southeast Asian countries, and the emergence of insecticide resistance in this mosquito poses a serious threat to the efficacy of malaria control programs. The recently published An. sinensis genome and transcriptome provide an opportunity to understand the molecular mechanisms of insecticide resistance. Analysis of the An. sinensis genome revealed 174 detoxification genes, including 93 cytochrome P450s (P450s), 31 glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs), and 50 choline/carboxylesterases (CCEs). The gene number was similar to that in An. gambiae, but represented a decrease of 29% and 42% compared with Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, respectively. The considerable contraction in gene number in Anopheles mosquitoes mainly occurred in two detoxification supergene families, P450s and CCEs. The available An. sinensis transcriptome was also re-analyzed to further identify key resistance-associated detoxification genes. Among 174 detoxification genes, 124 (71%) were detected. Several candidate genes overexpressed in a deltamethrin-resistant strain (DR-strain) were identified as belonging to the CYP4 or CYP6 family of P450s and the Delta GST class. These generated data provide a basis for identifying the resistance-associated genes of An. sinensis at the molecular level. PMID:26588704

  13. Role of white adipose lipolysis in the development of NASH induced by methionine- and choline-deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoki; Takahashi, Shogo; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Krausz, Kristopher W; Qu, Aijuan; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-11-01

    Methionine- and choline-deficient diet (MCD) is a model for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in rodents. However, the mechanism of NASH development by dietary methionine/choline deficiency remains undetermined. To elucidate the early metabolic changes associated with MCD-NASH, serum metabolomic analysis was performed using mice treated with MCD and control diet for 3 days and 1 week, revealing significant increases in oleic and linoleic acids after MCD treatment. These increases were correlated with reduced body weight and white adipose tissue (WAT) mass, increased phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase, and up-regulation of genes encoding carboxylesterase 3 and β2-adrenergic receptor in WAT, indicating accelerated lipolysis in adipocytes. The changes in serum fatty acids and WAT by MCD treatment were reversed by methionine supplementation, and similar alterations were detected in mice fed a methionine-deficient diet (MD), thus demonstrating that dietary methionine deficiency enhances lipolysis in WAT. MD treatment decreased glucose and increased fibroblast growth factor 21 in serum, thus exhibiting a similar metabolic phenotype as the fasting response. Comparison between MCD and choline-deficient diet (CD) treatments suggested that the addition of MD-induced metabolic alterations, such as WAT lipolysis, to CD-induced hepatic steatosis promotes liver injury. Collectively, these results demonstrate an important role for dietary methionine deficiency and WAT lipolysis in the development of MCD-NASH. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Simplified assays of lipolysis enzymes for drug discovery and specificity assessment of known inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Jose; Lamontagne, Julien; Erb, Heidi; Gezzar, Sari; Zhao, Shangang; Joly, Erik; Truong, Vouy Linh; Skorey, Kathryn; Crane, Sheldon; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are used as cellular building blocks and condensed energy stores and also act as signaling molecules. The glycerolipid/ fatty acid cycle, encompassing lipolysis and lipogenesis, generates many lipid signals. Reliable procedures are not available for measuring activities of several lipolytic enzymes for the purposes of drug screening, and this resulted in questionable selectivity of various known lipase inhibitors. We now describe simple assays for lipolytic enzymes, including adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), sn-1-diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL), monoacylglycerol lipase, α/β-hydrolase domain 6, and carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) using recombinant human and mouse enzymes either in cell extracts or using purified enzymes. We observed that many of the reported inhibitors lack specificity. Thus, Cay10499 (HSL inhibitor) and RHC20867 (DAGL inhibitor) also inhibit other lipases. Marked differences in the inhibitor sensitivities of human ATGL and HSL compared with the corresponding mouse enzymes was noticed. Thus, ATGListatin inhibited mouse ATGL but not human ATGL, and the HSL inhibitors WWL11 and Compound 13f were effective against mouse enzyme but much less potent against human enzyme. Many of these lipase inhibitors also inhibited human CES1. Results describe reliable assays for measuring lipase activities that are amenable for drug screening and also caution about the specificity of the many earlier described lipase inhibitors.

  15. Effects of zinc on CarE activities and its gene transcript level in the English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huan-Huan; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Li; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Hu, Zu-Qing; Hu, Xiang-Shun

    2014-05-15

    As a selective stress, heavy metals play an important role in inducing the adaptive adjustments of insects to changing environments. Carboxylesterase (CarE) is one kind of biomarker that could help us to explore the adaptation mechanism of aphids to heavy metal stress. In this study, CarE activity and gene expression level were investigated in English grain aphids, Sitobion avenae (F.) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), exposed to Zn2+ at concentrations of 0, 400, and 1600 mg/kg for 5, 15, 25, and 30 generations. The results showed that the CarE activity was significantly different between different Zn2+ concentrations and different generations. The CarE activity significantly decreased with increasing generations. In the higher generations, the CarE activity was strongly inhibited by the 1600 mg/kg of Zn2+. Realtime quantitative PCR revealed that the CarE gene expression pattern in S. avenae was up-regulated under the condition of 400 mg/kg and 1600 mg/kg of Zn2+, but a significant difference was not found after long-term exposure to high concentrations of Zn2+. It was concluded that CarE could be the sensitive biomarker for S. avenae response to the presence of Zn2+. In order to adapt to heavy metal Zn2+ stress, S. avenae had particular patterns of gene expression under long-term stress.

  16. Identification of a major Quantitative Trait Locus determining resistance to the organophosphate temephos in the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Marcelo H S; Lovin, Diane D; Mori, Akio; Melo-Santos, Maria A V; Severson, David W; Ayres, Constância F J

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate insecticides (OP) have extensively been used to control mosquitoes, such as the vector Aedes aegypti. Unfortunately, OP resistance has hampered control programs worldwide. We used Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping to evaluate temephos resistance in two F1 intercross populations derived from crosses between a resistant Ae. aegypti strain (RecR) and two susceptible strains (MoyoD and Red). A single major effect QTL was identified on chromosome 2 of both segregating populations, named rtt1 (resistance to temephos 1). Bioinformatics analyses identified a cluster of carboxylesterase genes (CCE) within the rtt1 interval. qRT-PCR demonstrated that different CCEs were up-regulated in F2 resistant individuals from both crosses. However, none exceeded the 2-fold expression. Primary mechanisms for temephos resistance may vary between Ae. aegypti populations, yet also appear to support previous findings suggesting that multiple linked esterase genes may contribute to temephos resistance in the RecR strain as well as other populations.

  17. Biowaiver Monographs for Immediate-Release Solid Oral Dosage Forms: Enalapril.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Roger K; Kanfer, Isadore; Löbenberg, Raimar; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Groot, D W; Langguth, Peter; Polli, James E; Parr, Alan; Shah, Vinod P; Mehta, Mehul; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2017-08-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence testing for the marketing authorization of immediate-release, solid oral dosage forms containing enalapril maleate are reviewed. Enalapril, a prodrug, is hydrolyzed by carboxylesterases to the active angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor enalaprilat. Enalapril as the maleate salt is shown to be highly soluble, but only 60%-70% of an orally administered dose of enalapril is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract into the enterocytes. Consequently, enalapril maleate is a Biopharmaceutics Classification System class III substance. Because in situ conversion of the maleate salt to the sodium salt is sometimes used in production of the finished drug product, not every enalapril maleate-labeled finished product actually contains the maleate salt. Enalapril is not considered to have a narrow therapeutic index. With this background, a biowaiver-based approval procedure for new generic products or after major revisions to existing products is deemed acceptable, provided the in vitro dissolution of both test and reference preparation is very rapid (at least 85% within 15 min at pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8). Additionally, the test and reference product must contain the identical active drug ingredient. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. All rights reserved.

  18. Human and soil exposure during mechanical chlorpyrifos, myclobutanil and copper oxychloride application in a peach orchard in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, Giselle; Nasello, Soledad; Beiguel, Érica; Flores, Pedro; Di Schiena, Johanna; Basack, Silvana; Hughes, Enrique A; Zalts, Anita; Montserrat, Javier M

    2017-05-15

    The objective of this study was to measure the impact of the mechanized chlorpyrifos, copper oxychloride and myclobutanil application in a small peach orchard, on humans (operators, bystanders and residents) and on the productive soil. The mean Potential Dermal Exposure (PDE) of the workers (tractor drivers) was 30.8mL·h(-1)±16.4mL·h(-1), with no specific pesticide distribution on the laborers body. Although the Margin of Safety (MOS) factor for the application stage were above 1 (safe condition) for myclobutanil and cooper oxycloride it was below 1 for chlorpyrifos. The mix and load stage remained as the riskier operation. Pesticide found on the orchard soil ranged from 5.5% to 14.8% of the total chlorpyrifos, copper oxychloride and myclobutanil applied. Pesticide drift was experimentally measured, finding values in the range of 2.4% to 11.2% of the total pesticide applied. Using experimental drift values, bystander (for one application), resident (for 20 applications) and earthworm (for one application) risk indicators (RIs) were calculated for the chlorpyrifos plus copper oxychloride and for myclobutanil treatments for different distances to the orchard border. Earthworm RI was correlated with experimental Eisenia andrei ecotoxicological assays (enzymatic activities: cholinesterases, carboxylesterases and glutathione S-transferases; behavioral: avoidance and bait-lamina tests) with good correlation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Production and purification of a solvent-resistant esterase from Bacillus licheniformis S-86.

    PubMed

    Torres, Sebastián; Baigorí, Mario D; Pandey, Ashok; Castro, Guillermo R

    2008-12-01

    New thermophilic and organic-solvent-tolerant Bacillus licheniformis S-86 strain is able to produce two active and solvent-stable esterases. Production of type I and II esterases was substantially enhanced when oils and surfactants were supplied as carbon sources. Grape oil (0.1% v/v) and Tween 20 to 60 (0.1% v/v) had enhanced enzyme production between 1.6- and 2.2-folds. Type II esterase was purified to homogeneity in a five-step procedure. This esterase was purified 76.7-fold with a specific activity of 135 U mg(-1). Molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 38.4 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Type II esterase was active mostly on esters with short acyl chains, which allowed to classify the enzyme as a carboxylesterase with a K (m) of 80.2 mmol l(-1) and a V (max) of 256.4 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) for p-nitrophenyl acetate. Also, B. licheniformis S-86 type II esterase displayed activity in presence of water-miscible organic solvents at 50% concentration and stability after 1-h incubation.

  20. Role of kdr and esterase-mediated metabolism in pyrethroid-resistant populations of Haematobia irritans irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Felix D; Barros, A Thadeu M

    2006-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), has become a problem for Brazilian cattle producers even though its introduction into Brazil is relatively recent. Failure to control this cattle pest is becoming a concern, and horn fly populations from several ranches from the state of Mato Grosso do Sul were surveyed for pyrethroid resistance. Susceptibility bioassays revealed that cypermethrin resistance was widespread and reached high levels in horn fly populations throughout the state, with resistance factors (RFs) ranging from 50.4 to 704.8. Synergist bioassays failed to detect a major role for esterases as a pyrethroid resistance mechanism in these populations, except for the highly pyrethroid-resistant Estrela do Oeste population (RF = 704.8). The kdr sodium channel gene mutation was not detected in eight of the 13 populations, but < 7% of individuals from four populations and 50% of the flies from Estrela do Oeste exhibited this mutation. Neither the superkdr sodium channel gene mutation nor a resistance-associated gene mutation in the HialphaE7 carboxylesterase were found in any of the fly populations. Although target site insensitivity (kdr) and esterase-mediated metabolism occur in horn fly populations from Mato Grosso do Sul state, it seems that they are not the major mechanism causing pyrethroid resistance in most of these populations.

  1. Prediction and experimental validation of enzyme substrate specificity in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shivas R.; Erdin, Serkan; Ward, R. Matthew; Lua, Rhonald C.; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Structural Genomics aims to elucidate protein structures to identify their functions. Unfortunately, the variation of just a few residues can be enough to alter activity or binding specificity and limit the functional resolution of annotations based on sequence and structure; in enzymes, substrates are especially difficult to predict. Here, large-scale controls and direct experiments show that the local similarity of five or six residues selected because they are evolutionarily important and on the protein surface can suffice to identify an enzyme activity and substrate. A motif of five residues predicted that a previously uncharacterized Silicibacter sp. protein was a carboxylesterase for short fatty acyl chains, similar to hormone-sensitive-lipase–like proteins that share less than 20% sequence identity. Assays and directed mutations confirmed this activity and showed that the motif was essential for catalysis and substrate specificity. We conclude that evolutionary and structural information may be combined on a Structural Genomics scale to create motifs of mixed catalytic and noncatalytic residues that identify enzyme activity and substrate specificity. PMID:24145433

  2. Endophytic fungi producing of esterases: evaluation in vitro of the enzymatic activity using pH indicator.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Helen Cristina Fávero; Biasetto, Carolina Rabal; de Medeiros, João Batista; Âraújo, Angela Regina; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Teles, Helder Lopes; Trevisan, Henrique Celso

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive and efficient colorimetric method was optimized for detection of esterase enzymes produced by endophytic fungi for development of High-Throughput Screening (HTS). The fungi were isolated and obtained previously from plant species of Cerrado and Atlantic Forest located in areas of environmental preservation in the State of Sao Paulo / Brazil, as part of the project "Chemical and biological prospecting endophytic fungi associated to plant species of Cerrado and Atlantic Forest". The compounds ethyl butyrate, ethyl acetate and methyl propionate were used as standards esters which were hydrolyzed by extracellular enzyme from endophytic fungi (EC. 3.1.1.1--carboxyl-esterases) for production of carboxylic acids. Thus, the reduction of the pH increases the protonated indicator concentration (bromothymol blue), changing the color of the reaction medium (from blue to yellow), that can be observed and measured by spectrophotometry at 616 nm. The methodology with acid-base indicator was performed on 13 microorganisms, aiming Periconia atropurpurea as a potential source of esterase for biotransformation of short chain esters. The results also evidenced that this methodology showed to be efficient, fast, cheap, having low consumption of reagents and easy development, and can be applied to screen carboxylic-ester hydrolases in a large number of microorganisms.

  3. A Francisella virulence factor catalyses an essential reaction of biotin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Youjun; Napier, Brooke A; Manandhar, Miglena; Henke, Sarah K; Weiss, David S; Cronan, John E

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a gene (FTN_0818) required for Francisella virulence that seemed likely involved in biotin metabolism. However, the molecular function of this virulence determinant was unclear. Here we show that this protein named BioJ is the enzyme of the biotin biosynthesis pathway that determines the chain length of the biotin valeryl side-chain. Expression of bioJ allows growth of an Escherichia coli bioH strain on biotin-free medium, indicating functional equivalence of BioJ to the paradigm pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester carboxyl-esterase, BioH. BioJ was purified to homogeneity, shown to be monomeric and capable of hydrolysis of its physiological substrate methyl pimeloyl-ACP to pimeloyl-ACP, the precursor required to begin formation of the fused heterocyclic rings of biotin. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that distinct from BioH, BioJ represents a novel subclade of the α/β-hydrolase family. Structure-guided mapping combined with site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the BioJ catalytic triad consists of Ser151, Asp248 and His278, all of which are essential for activity and virulence. The biotin synthesis pathway was reconstituted reaction in vitro and the physiological role of BioJ directly assayed. To the best of our knowledge, these data represent further evidence linking biotin synthesis to bacterial virulence.

  4. Evaluation of enzymes inhibition activities of medicinal plant from Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Bangou, Mindiédiba Jean; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Meda, Nâg-Tiero Roland; Coulibaly, Ahmed Yacouba; Compaoré, Moussa; Zeba, Boukaré; Millogo-Rasolodimby, Jeanne; Nacoulma, Odile Germaine

    2011-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate some enzymes inhibitory effects of 11 plant species belonging to 9 families from Burkina Faso. Methanolic extracts were used for their Glutathione-s-transferase (GST), Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), Carboxylesterase (CES) and Xanthine Oxidase (XO) inhibitory activities at final concentration of 100 microg mL(-1). The total phenolics, flavonoids and tannins were also determined spectrophotometrically using Folin-Ciocalteu, AlCl3 and ammonium citrate iron reagents, respectively. Among the 11 species tested, the best inhibitory percentages were found with Euphorbia hirta, Sclerocarya birrea and Scoparia dulcis (inhibition > 40%) followed by Annona senegalensis, Annona squamosa, Polygala arenaria and Ceratotheca sesamoides (inhibition > 25%). The best total phenolic and tannin contents were found with S. birrea with 56.10 mg GAE/100 mg extract and 47.75 mg TAE/100 mg extract, respectively. E hirta presented the higher total flavonoids (9.96 mg QE/100 mg extract). It's was found that Sclerocarya birrea has inhibited all enzymes at more than 30% and this activity is correlated to total tannins contents. Contrary to S. birrea, the enzymatic activities of E. hirta and S. dulcis are correlated to total flavonoids contents. Present findings suggest that the methanolic extracts of those plant species are potential inhibitors of GST, AChE, CES and XO and confirm their traditional uses in the treatment of mental disorders, gout, painful inflammations and cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Prediction and experimental validation of enzyme substrate specificity in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shivas R; Erdin, Serkan; Ward, R Matthew; Lua, Rhonald C; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2013-11-05

    Structural Genomics aims to elucidate protein structures to identify their functions. Unfortunately, the variation of just a few residues can be enough to alter activity or binding specificity and limit the functional resolution of annotations based on sequence and structure; in enzymes, substrates are especially difficult to predict. Here, large-scale controls and direct experiments show that the local similarity of five or six residues selected because they are evolutionarily important and on the protein surface can suffice to identify an enzyme activity and substrate. A motif of five residues predicted that a previously uncharacterized Silicibacter sp. protein was a carboxylesterase for short fatty acyl chains, similar to hormone-sensitive-lipase-like proteins that share less than 20% sequence identity. Assays and directed mutations confirmed this activity and showed that the motif was essential for catalysis and substrate specificity. We conclude that evolutionary and structural information may be combined on a Structural Genomics scale to create motifs of mixed catalytic and noncatalytic residues that identify enzyme activity and substrate specificity.

  6. RNA interference: Applications and advances in insect toxicology and insect pest management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ho; Soumaila Issa, Moustapha; Cooper, Anastasia M W; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2015-05-01

    Since its discovery, RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized functional genomic studies due to its sequence-specific nature of post-transcriptional gene silencing. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent literature and summarize the current knowledge and advances in the applications of RNAi technologies in the field of insect toxicology and insect pest management. Many recent studies have focused on identification and validation of the genes encoding insecticide target proteins, such as acetylcholinesterases, ion channels, Bacillus thuringiensis receptors, and other receptors in the nervous system. RNAi technologies have also been widely applied to reveal the role of genes encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, carboxylesterases, and glutathione S-transferases in insecticide detoxification and resistance. More recently, studies have focused on understanding the mechanism of insecticide-mediated up-regulation of detoxification genes in insects. As RNAi has already shown great potentials for insect pest management, many recent studies have also focused on host-induced gene silencing, in which several RNAi-based transgenic plants have been developed and tested as proof of concept for insect pest management. These studies indicate that RNAi is a valuable tool to address various fundamental questions in insect toxicology and may soon become an effective strategy for insect pest management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacokinetic and Metabolic Studies of ADTM: A Novel Danshensu Derivative Confers Cardioprotection by HPLC-UV and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai; Shan, Luchen; Zhang, Zaijun; Li, Wei; Liao, Kaiyi; Li, Sha; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Yu, Pei; Wang, Yuqiang

    2015-07-01

    (R)-(3,5,6-Trimethylpyrazinyl) methyl-2-acetoxy-3-(3,4-diacetoxyphenyl) propanoate (ADTM) is a novel Danshensu (DSS) derivative regarded as a potential new agent for the treatment of myocardial ischemia. A validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) approach with a detection limit of 5 ng/mL was used for pharmacokinetic evaluation of ADTM in rat plasma. The intra- and interday precision in terms of relative standard deviation were <4.98 and 4.84%, respectively, at concentration levels of 0.02, 0.20 and 0.80 µg/mL. ADTM's absolute oral bioavailability value was 30.4% and t1/2 was 34.33 ± 11.51 and 29.94 ± 8.19 min after oral and intravenous administration of 20 mg/kg. In addition, the major metabolites both in vitro and in vivo were 2-hydroxymethy-3,5,6-trimethylpyrazin and DSS. The results indicated that the hydrolysis was the main metabolic pathway of ADTM, and carboxylesterase may play an important role in ADTM's metabolism. The present work provides basic information for ADTM's further preclinical research and DSS's chemical structure modification. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Comparative Structures and Evolution of Vertebrate Carboxyl Ester Lipase (CEL) Genes and Proteins with a Major Role in Reverse Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Roger S; Cox, Laura A

    2011-01-01

    Bile-salt activated carboxylic ester lipase (CEL) is a major triglyceride, cholesterol ester and vitamin ester hydrolytic enzyme contained within pancreatic and lactating mammary gland secretions. Bioinformatic methods were used to predict the amino acid sequences, secondary and tertiary structures and gene locations for CEL genes, and encoded proteins using data from several vertebrate genome projects. A proline-rich and O-glycosylated 11-amino acid C-terminal repeat sequence (VNTR) previously reported for human and other higher primate CEL proteins was also observed for other eutherian mammalian CEL sequences examined. In contrast, opossum CEL contained a single C-terminal copy of this sequence whereas CEL proteins from platypus, chicken, lizard, frog and several fish species lacked the VNTR sequence. Vertebrate CEL genes contained 11 coding exons. Evidence is presented for tandem duplicated CEL genes for the zebrafish genome. Vertebrate CEL protein subunits shared 53-97% sequence identities; demonstrated sequence alignments and identities for key CEL amino acid residues; and conservation of predicted secondary and tertiary structures with those previously reported for human CEL. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of the vertebrate CEL family of genes which were related to a nematode carboxylesterase (CES) gene and five mammalian CES gene families.

  9. Anti-dengue efficacy of bioactive andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata (Lamiales: Acanthaceae) against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Edwin, Edward-Sam; Vasantha-Srinivasan, Prabhakaran; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Thanigaivel, Annamalai; Ponsankar, Athirstam; Pradeepa, Venkatraman; Selin-Rani, Selvaraj; Kalaivani, Kandaswamy; Hunter, Wayne B; Abdel-Megeed, Ahmed; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2016-11-01

    The current study investigated the toxic effect of the leaf extract compound andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f) against the dengue vector Ae. aegypti. GC-MS analysis revealed that andrographolide was recognized as the major chemical constituent with the prominent peak area compared with other compounds. All isolated toxic compounds were purified and confirmed through RP-HPLC against chemical standards. The larvicidal assays established at 25ppm of bioactive compound against the treated instars of Ae. Aegypti showed prominent mortality compared to other treated concentrations. The percent mortality of larvae was directly proportional to concentration. The lethal concentration (LC50) was observed at 12ppm treatment concentration. The bioactive andrographolide considerably reduced the detoxifying enzyme regulations of α- and β- carboxylesterases. In contrast, the levels of GST and CYP450 significantly increase in a dose dependent manner. The andrographolide also showed strong oviposition deterrence effects at the sub-lethal dose of 12ppm. Similarly, the mean number of eggs were also significantly reduced in a dose dependent manner. At the concentration of 12ppm the effective percentage of repellency was greater than 90% with a protection time of 15-210min, compared with control. The histopathology study displayed that larvae treated with bioactive andrographolide had cytopathic effects in the midgut epithelium compared with the control. The present study established that bioactive andrographolide served as a potential useful for dengue vector management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of enzyme inhibitors to evaluate the conversion pathways of ester and amide prodrugs: a case study example with the prodrug ceftobiprole medocaril.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Gary; Skibbe, Jennifer; Parkinson, Andrew; Johnson, Mark D; Baumgardner, Dawn; Ogilvie, Brian; Usuki, Etsuko; Tonelli, Fred; Holsapple, Jeff; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne

    2012-03-01

    An approach was developed that uses enzyme inhibitors to support the assessment of the pathways that are responsible for the conversion of intravenously administered ester and amide prodrugs in different biological matrices. The methodology was applied to ceftobiprole medocaril (BAL5788), the prodrug of the cephalosporin antibiotic, ceftobiprole. The prodrug was incubated in plasma, postmitochondrial supernatant fractions from human liver (impaired and nonimpaired), kidney, and intestine as well as erythrocytes, in the presence and absence of different enzyme inhibitors (acetylcholinesterase, pseudocholinesterase, retinyl palmitoyl hydrolase, serine esterases, amidases, and cholinesterase). Hydrolysis was rapid, extensive, and not dependent on the presence of β-nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form) in all matrices tested, suggesting the involvement of carboxylesterases but not P450 enzymes. Hydrolysis in healthy human plasma was rapid and complete and only partially inhibited in the presence of paraoxonase inhibitors or in liver from hepatic impaired patients, suggesting involvement of nonparaoxonase pathways. The results demonstrate the utility of this approach in confirming the presence of multiple conversion pathways of intravenously administered prodrugs and in the case of BAL5788 demonstrated that this prodrug is unlikely to be affected by genetic polymorphisms, drug interactions, or other environmental factors that might inhibit or induce the enzymes involved in its conversion.

  11. Enzymic studies on the animal and intestinal bacterial metabolism of geniposide.

    PubMed

    Akao, T; Kobashi, K; Aburada, M

    1994-12-01

    Geniposide, a main iridoid glucoside of Gardenia fruit, is transformed to genipin, a genuine choleretic, in vivo in rats (Aburada et al., J. Pharmacobio-Dyn., 1, 81 (1978)). As geniposide was not hydrolyzed to any metabolite by rat liver homogenate, which has beta-D-glucosidase and esterase activities, beta-D-glucosidases in intestinal bacteria seem to be required for an exhibition of its choleretic action. The crude extract of Eubacterium sp. A-44, a human intestinal anaerobe, hydrolyzed geniposide, but that of Ruminococcus sp. PO1-3, another human anaerobe, did not, though both extracts had beta-D-glucosidase activities for p-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside. Only one of three beta-D-glucosidases from E. sp. A-44 and none of two from R. sp. PO1-3 hydrolyzed geniposide to genipin. However, carboxylesterases from E. sp. A-44 and pig liver were unable to hydrolyze geniposide to geniposidic acid, but hydrolyzed genipin to an aglycone of geniposidic acid, indicating that geniposide is first hydrolyzed to genipin by beta-D-glucosidases and subsequently to the aglycone of geniposidic acid by esterases. Thus, when geniposide is orally administered, genipin seems to be effectively produced in the intestine and then absorbed to act as a genuine choleretic.

  12. Deep Sequencing of Pyrethroid-Resistant Bed Bugs Reveals Multiple Mechanisms of Resistance within a Single Population

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, Zach N.; Kilcullen, Kathleen A.; Koganemaru, Reina; Anderson, Michelle A. E.; Anderson, Troy D.; Miller, Dini M.

    2011-01-01

    A frightening resurgence of bed bug infestations has occurred over the last 10 years in the U.S. and current chemical methods have been inadequate for controlling this pest due to widespread insecticide resistance. Little is known about the mechanisms of resistance present in U.S. bed bug populations, making it extremely difficult to develop intelligent strategies for their control. We have identified bed bugs collected in Richmond, VA which exhibit both kdr-type (L925I) and metabolic resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. Using LD50 bioassays, we determined that resistance ratios for Richmond strain bed bugs were ∼5200-fold to the insecticide deltamethrin. To identify metabolic genes potentially involved in the detoxification of pyrethroids, we performed deep-sequencing of the adult bed bug transcriptome, obtaining more than 2.5 million reads on the 454 titanium platform. Following assembly, analysis of newly identified gene transcripts in both Harlan (susceptible) and Richmond (resistant) bed bugs revealed several candidate cytochrome P450 and carboxylesterase genes which were significantly over-expressed in the resistant strain, consistent with the idea of increased metabolic resistance. These data will accelerate efforts to understand the biochemical basis for insecticide resistance in bed bugs, and provide molecular markers to assist in the surveillance of metabolic resistance. PMID:22039447

  13. Vinyl acetate induces intracellular acidification in mouse oral buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Wagner, Mark; Melvin, James E; Bogdanffy, Matthew S

    2005-08-14

    Vinyl acetate exposure in drinking water has been associated with tumor formation in the upper gastrointestinal tract of rats and mice. One potential mechanism for inducing carcinogenesis involves acidification of the intracellular environment due to the metabolism of vinyl acetate to acetic acid. Prolonged intracellular acidification is thought to produce cytotoxic and/or mitogenic responses that are the sentinel pharmacodynamic steps toward cancer. To determine whether exposure to vinyl acetate affects the intracellular pH of intact oral cavity tissue, isolated mouse oral buccal epithelium was loaded with the pH-sensitive dye BCECF, and then exposed to vinyl acetate concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000 microM for up to 4 min. Extracellular vinyl acetate exposure induced a progressive intracellular acidification that was reversible upon removal of the vinyl acetate. The rate of the acidification was concentration-dependent and increased exponentially within the concentration range tested. The magnitude of the vinyl acetate-induced acidification was inhibited by pretreatment with the carboxylesterase inhibitor bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that vinyl acetate contributes to the generation and progression of oral cavity tumors via a process of intracellular acidification. Such a process has been proposed to have practical dose-response thresholds below which the intracellular environment can be maintained within homeostatic bounds and the contribution of exposure to carcinogenic risk is negligible.

  14. Computational design of a Diels-Alderase from a thermophilic esterase: the importance of dynamics.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Liebeschuetz, John; Brinck, Tore

    2012-09-01

    A novel computational Diels-Alderase design, based on a relatively rare form of carboxylesterase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus, is presented and theoretically evaluated. The structure was found by mining the PDB for a suitable oxyanion hole-containing structure, followed by a combinatorial approach to find suitable substrates and rational mutations. Four lead designs were selected and thoroughly modeled to obtain realistic estimates of substrate binding and prearrangement. Molecular dynamics simulations and DFT calculations were used to optimize and estimate binding affinity and activation energies. A large quantum chemical model was used to capture the salient interactions in the crucial transition state (TS). Our quantitative estimation of kinetic parameters was validated against four experimentally characterized Diels-Alderases with good results. The final designs in this work are predicted to have rate enhancements of ≈ 10(3)-10(6) and high predicted proficiencies. This work emphasizes the importance of considering protein dynamics in the design approach, and provides a quantitative estimate of the how the TS stabilization observed in most de novo and redesigned enzymes is decreased compared to a minimal, 'ideal' model. The presented design is highly interesting for further optimization and applications since it is based on a thermophilic enzyme (T (opt) = 70 °C).

  15. Esterase profiles of organophosphorus compounds in vitro predict their behavior in vivo.

    PubMed

    Makhaeva, Galina F; Rudakova, Elena V; Serebryakova, Olga G; Aksinenko, Alexey Yu; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Bachurin, Sergey O; Richardson, Rudy J

    2016-11-25

    We studied 4 serine esterases (EOHs) that are associated with the following consequences from their inhibition by organophosphorus compounds (OPCs): acetylcholinesterase (AChE: acute neurotoxicity; cognition enhancement), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE: inhibition of drug metabolism and/or stoichiometric scavenging of EOH inhibitors; cognition enhancement), carboxylesterase (CaE; inhibition of drug metabolism and/or stoichiometric scavenging of EOH inhibitors), and neuropathy target esterase (NTE: delayed neurotoxicity, OPIDN). The relative degree of inhibition of these EOHs constitutes the "esterase profile" of an OPC, which we hypothesize can serve as a predictor of its overall physiological effects. To test this hypothesis, we selected 3 OPCs known from previous work on reference enzymes to span a wide range of esterase profiles, neuropathic potential, and acute cholinergic toxicity. For each compound, we determined in vitro IC50 and in vivo ED50 values for inhibition of AChE, BChE, CaE, and NTE in mouse brain and blood. The results showed good correlations between in vitro and in vivo measures of potency and selectivity except for brain CaE, a tissue-specific isoform of the enzyme that was less sensitive to the test compounds than expected. Thus, this synthesis of new and previously published results indicates that the concept of the esterase profile of OPCs is useful for the prediction of therapeutic and toxic effects in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Toxicology and Biochemical Characterization of Cantharidin on Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng-Wei; Yang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Cantharidin, a natural toxin produced by beetles in the families Meloidae and Oedemeridae, reported to be toxic to some pests, is being developed as a biopesticide in China. This study evaluates the toxicity and biochemical characterization of cantharidin on the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), an economically important fruit pest, under both laboratory and field conditions. Laboratory dose response bioassays showed that the LC50 value of cantharidin against neonate larvae was 0.057 mg ml(-1). Exposure of the larvae to 0.024 and 0.057 mg ml(-1) of cantharidin resulted in significant reduction in larval body weight. Neonate larvae exposed to LC10 of cantharidin showed increased glutathione S-transferase activity and significantly reduced the carboxylesterase and cytochrome P450-dependent mixed-function oxidase activities. Results also showed 16 and 25% ovicidal activity at concentrations of 0.057 and 0.14 mg ml(-1) of cantharidin, respectively. Field trials demonstrated cantharidin has a significant effect on both the first and second generations of C. pomonella larvae, but it exhibits a lower control efficiency than the chemical reference emamectin benzoate. Cantharidin may be considered a valuable tool for the control of codling moth.

  17. Influence of rice black streaked dwarf virus on the ecological fitness of non-vector planthopper Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Xing; He, Xiao-Chan; Zheng, Xu-Song; Yang, Ya-Jun; Lu, Zhong-Xian

    2014-08-01

    Rice black streak dwarf virus (RBSDV) is transmitted by the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallen). Non-vector rice brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), shares the same host rice plants with SBPH in paddy fields. The changes in nutritional composition of rice plants infected by RBSDV and the ecological fitness of BPH feeding on the infected plants were studied under both artificial climate chamber and field conditions. Contents of 16 detected amino acids and soluble sugar in RBSDV infected rice plants were higher than those in the healthy ones. On the diseased plants BPH had significantly higher nymphal survival rates, nymphal duration of the males, weight of the female adults, as well as egg hatchability compared to BPH being fed on healthy plants. However, there was no obvious difference in female nymph duration, longevity and fecundity. Defense enzymes (superoxidase dismutase, SOD and catalase, CAT) and detoxifying enzymes (carboxylesterase, CAE and glutathione S-transferase, GST) in BPH adults fed on diseased plants had markedly higher activities. The results indicate rice plants infected by RBSDV improved the ecological fitness of the brown planthopper, a serious pest but not a transmitter of the RBSDV virus.

  18. Prolonged Postdiapause: Influence on some Indicators of Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism of the Red Mason Bee, Osmia rufa

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowska, Kamila; Giejdasz, Karol; Fliszkiewicz, Monika; Żółtowska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Bees of the genus Osmia are being used in crop pollination at an increasing rate. However, a short life expectancy of adult individuals limits the feasibility of their use. Cocoons of the red mason bee, Osmia rufa L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), can be stored at 4° C in a postdiapause state, and adult bees can be used for pollination outside their natural flight period. The period of storage in this form has an unfavorable influence on the survival rate, life expectancy, and fertility of the bee. It was suggested that the negative results are connected with exhaustion of energy reserves. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined the contents of protein, carbohydrates, lipids, and the activities of some enzymes, and their degradation in red mason bees that emerged in spring according to their biological clock and in summer after elongated diapause. It was found that postdiapause artificially elongated by 3 months caused significant decreases in body weight, total sugar, glycogen, lipids, and protein content in O. rufa. Glucose level was highest in bees that emerged in the summer, which was coincident with increased activities of maltase and trehalase. The activities of sucrase and cellobiase were not changed, while amylase activity was considerably decreased. The activities of triacylglycerols lipase and C2, C4, C10 carboxylesterases were highest in bees that emerged in July. Low temperatures restrict O. rufa emergence, and during prolonged postdiapause, metabolic processes lead to significant reductions of structural and energetic compounds. PMID:24219557

  19. Hydrolytic Fate of 3/15-Acetyldeoxynivalenol in Humans: Specific Deacetylation by the Small Intestine and Liver Revealed Using in Vitro and ex Vivo Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ajandouz, El Hassan; Berdah, Stéphane; Moutardier, Vincent; Bege, Thierry; Birnbaum, David Jérémie; Perrier, Josette; Di Pasquale, Eric; Maresca, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In addition to deoxynivalenol (DON), acetylated derivatives, i.e., 3-acetyl and 15-acetyldexynivalenol (or 3/15ADON), are present in cereals leading to exposure to these mycotoxins. Animal and human studies suggest that 3/15ADON are converted into DON after their ingestion through hydrolysis of the acetyl moiety, the site(s) of such deacetylation being still uncharacterized. We used in vitro and ex vivo approaches to study the deacetylation of 3/15ADON by enzymes and cells/tissues present on their way from the food matrix to the blood in humans. We found that luminal deacetylation by digestive enzymes and bacteria is limited. Using human cells, tissues and S9 fractions, we were able to demonstrate that small intestine and liver possess strong deacetylation capacity compared to colon and kidneys. Interestingly, in most cases, deacetylation was more efficient for 3ADON than 15ADON. Although we initially thought that carboxylesterases (CES) could be responsible for the deacetylation of 3/15ADON, the use of pure human CES1/2 and of CES inhibitor demonstrated that CES are not involved. Taken together, our original model system allowed us to identify the small intestine and the liver as the main site of deacetylation of ingested 3/15ADON in humans. PMID:27483321

  20. Purification, biochemical characterization, and biological function of human esterase D.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W H; Wheatley, W; Benedict, W F; Huang, C M; Lee, E Y

    1986-01-01

    Human esterase D (carboxylesterase; carboxylic-ester hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.1), a genetic marker of retinoblastoma, was purified to biochemical homogeneity from erythrocytes. The purification scheme including carboxymethylcellulose, phenyl-Sepharose, chromatofocusing, and hydroxylapatite chromatographies resulted in a 10,000-fold purification of the enzyme with 15% recovery of total activity. The Km of esterase D was estimated to be 10 X 10(-6) M using 4-methylumbelliferyl acetate as substrate. The enzymatic activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate and HgCl2, suggesting an important role of SH group(s) in enzyme function. Specific rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies against esterase D were prepared and recognized either denatured or native human esterase D protein. Moreover, the polyclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated a polypeptide with a molecular mass of about 33-34 kDa from various cell lines of different mammalian species, indicating that the esterase D protein is highly conserved. The highest levels of this enzyme were found in liver and kidney. Furthermore, the expression of esterase D was enhanced 3-fold in a promonocytic cell line treated with phenobarbital but not with phorbol myristate acetate, suggesting that esterase D may have a role in detoxification. The availability of the homogeneous protein and its specific antibodies allows for cloning of the esterase D gene and facilitates studies of retinoblastomas. Images PMID:3462728

  1. Species differences in avian serum B esterases revealed by chromatofocusing and possible relationships of esterase activity to pesticide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H M; Mackness, M I; Walker, C H; Hardy, A R

    1991-04-15

    Serum cholinesterase (BChE) and carboxylesterase (CbE) activities were investigated in ten species of birds. Multiple forms of serum BChE and CbE were also separated by chromatofocusing. Higher CbE activity and a wider range of CbE and BChE forms were present in the sera of omnivorous/herbivorous birds than carnivores. Omnivores/herbivores studied were the starling, house sparrow, tree sparrow, pigeon, partridge and magpie. Serum CbE activities of these species ranged from 0.46 to 2.93 mumol/min/mL with 2-6 forms separated by chromatofocusing. 0-6 forms of BChE were separated by the same method. The serum CbE activities of the little owl, tawny owl, barn owl and razorbill ranged from 0.19 to 0.58 mumoles/min/mL with 0-2 forms separated by chromatofocusing. No ChE forms were present within the pH gradient. These results may be significant in contributing to the understanding of the selective toxicity of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides.

  2. A Transcriptome Survey Spanning Life Stages and Sexes of the Harlequin Bug, Murgantia histrionica.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Michael E; Rhoades, Joshua H; Nelson, David R; Kuhar, Daniel; Lancaster, Jason; Lehner, Bryan; Tholl, Dorothea; Weber, Donald C; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E

    2017-05-25

    The harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica (Hahn), is an agricultural pest in the continental United States, particularly in southern states. Reliable gene sequence data are especially useful to the development of species-specific, environmentally friendly molecular biopesticides and effective biolures for this insect. Here, mRNAs were sampled from whole insects at the 2nd and 4th nymphal instars, as well as sexed adults, and sequenced using Illumina RNA-Seq technology. A global assembly of these data identified 72,540 putative unique transcripts bearing high levels of similarity to transcripts identified in other taxa, with over 99% of conserved single-copy orthologs among insects being detected. Gene ontology and protein family analyses were conducted to explore the functional potential of the harlequin bug's gene repertoire, and phylogenetic analyses were conducted on gene families germane to xenobiotic detoxification, including glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and cytochrome P450s. Genic content in harlequin bug was compared with that of the closely related invasive pest, the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål). Quantitative analyses of harlequin bug gene expression levels, experimentally validated using quantitative real-time PCR, identified genes differentially expressed between life stages and/or sexes.

  3. Differential physiological effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on honey bees: A comparison between Apis mellifera and Apis cerana.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Li, Meng; He, Jingfang; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chaimanee, Veeranan; Huang, Wei-Fone; Nie, Hongyi; Zhao, Yazhou; Su, Songkun

    2017-08-01

    Acute toxicities (LD50s) of imidacloprid and clothianidin to Apis mellifera and A. cerana were investigated. Changing patterns of immune-related gene expressions and the activities of four enzymes between the two bee species were compared and analyzed after exposure to sublethal doses of insecticides. Results indicated that A. cerana was more sensitive to imidacloprid and clothianidin than A. mellifera. The acute oral LD50 values of imidacloprid and clothianidin for A. mellifera were 8.6 and 2.0ng/bee, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for A. cerana were 2.7 and 0.5ng/bee. The two bee species possessed distinct abilities to mount innate immune response against neonicotinoids. After 48h of imidacloprid treatment, carboxylesterase (CCE), prophenol oxidase (PPO), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were significantly downregulated in A. mellifera but were upregulated in A. cerana. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity was significantly elevated in A. mellifera at 48h after exposure to imidacloprid, but no significant change was observed in A. cerana. AChE was downregulated in both bee species at three different time points during clothianidin exposure, and GST activities were upregulated in both species exposed to clothianidin. Different patterns of immune-related gene expression and enzymatic activities implied distinct detoxification and immune responses of A. cerana and A. mellifera to imidacloprid and clothianidin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Toxicity and Detoxifying Mechanism of Cycloxaprid and Buprofezin in Controlling Sogatella furcifera (Homoptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaoli; Yuan, Yongda; Zhang, Tianshu; Wang, Dongsheng; Du, Xingbin; Wu, Xiangwen; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Yaozhong; Jiao, Yuetong; Teng, Haiyuan

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cycloxaprid (a modified neonicotinoid insecticide) and buprofezin (a thiadiazine insecticide) on mortality of the white-backed planthopper (WBPH), Sogatella furcifera, were determined in laboratory assays. Cycloxaprid killed WBPH nymphs and adults but buprofezin killed only nymphs, and cycloxaprid acted faster than buprofezin. One day after infestation, mortality of third-instar nymphs was >65% with cycloxaprid at 125 mg liter(-1) but was <38% with buprofezin at 148 mg liter(-1). By the 4th day after infestation, however, control of nymphs by the two insecticides was similar, and cycloxaprid at 125 mg liter(-1) caused ≥ 80% mortality of adults but buprofezin at 148 mg liter(-1) (the highest rate tested) caused almost no adult mortality. LC50 values for cycloxaprid were lowest with nymphs, intermediate with adult males, and highest with adult females. Although buprofezin was slower acting than cycloxaprid, its LC50 for nymphs 5 d after infestation was 3.79-fold lower than that of cycloxaprid. Mean carboxylesterase (CarE) specific activity of nymphal WBPH treated with cycloxaprid and buprofezin was higher than that of control, but there was no significant difference between cycloxaprid and control (no insecticide), and it was significantly higher for buprofezin than those of cycloxaprid and control. For glutathione S-transferase and mixed function oxygenase, the specific activity of nymphal WBPH treated with buprofezin was significantly higher than those of cycloxaprid and control, too.

  5. The Toxicity and Detoxifying Mechanism of Cycloxaprid and Buprofezin in Controlling Sogatella furcifera (Homoptera: Delphacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoli; Yuan, Yongda; Zhang, Tianshu; Wang, Dongsheng; Du, Xingbin; Wu, Xiangwen; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Yaozhong; Jiao, Yuetong; Teng, Haiyuan

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cycloxaprid (a modified neonicotinoid insecticide) and buprofezin (a thiadiazine insecticide) on mortality of the white-backed planthopper (WBPH), Sogatella furcifera, were determined in laboratory assays. Cycloxaprid killed WBPH nymphs and adults but buprofezin killed only nymphs, and cycloxaprid acted faster than buprofezin. One day after infestation, mortality of third-instar nymphs was >65% with cycloxaprid at 125 mg liter−1 but was <38% with buprofezin at 148 mg liter−1. By the 4th day after infestation, however, control of nymphs by the two insecticides was similar, and cycloxaprid at 125 mg liter−1 caused ≥80% mortality of adults but buprofezin at 148 mg liter−1 (the highest rate tested) caused almost no adult mortality. LC50 values for cycloxaprid were lowest with nymphs, intermediate with adult males, and highest with adult females. Although buprofezin was slower acting than cycloxaprid, its LC50 for nymphs 5 d after infestation was 3.79-fold lower than that of cycloxaprid. Mean carboxylesterase (CarE) specific activity of nymphal WBPH treated with cycloxaprid and buprofezin was higher than that of control, but there was no significant difference between cycloxaprid and control (no insecticide), and it was significantly higher for buprofezin than those of cycloxaprid and control. For glutathione S-transferase and mixed function oxygenase, the specific activity of nymphal WBPH treated with buprofezin was significantly higher than those of cycloxaprid and control, too. PMID:26175461

  6. [Genetic and epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer and genetic testing for personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Yutaka; Hinoda, Yuji

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies have uncovered molecular pathways of colorectal cancer, including the chromosomal instability pathway and microsatellite pathway. In addition, according to genetic and epigenetic profiles, colorectal cancer can be subclassified into 3 distinct groups, named the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) 1, CIMP2, and CIMP negative. CIMP1 is characterized by MSI and BRAF mutations and rare KRAS and p53 mutations. CIMP2 is associated with KRAS mutations and rare MSI, BRAF, or p53 mutations. CIMP negative cases have a high rate of p53 mutations and lower rates of MSI or mutations of BRAF or KRAS. Regarding genetic testing for personalized medicine for colorectal cancer, uridine disphosphate glucuronosyl transferase 1(UGT1) and KRAS tests are available. Irinotecan is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The prodrug irinotecan is biotransformed by carboxylesterase into its active metabolite SN-38, which is inactivated by UGT1 into the inactive compound SN-38G. Here we discuss UGT1A1 gene polymorphism as a predictor of toxicity. The epidermal growth factor (EGFR) plays an important role in the development and progression of colorectal cancer. KRAS serves as a mediator between extracellular ligand binding and intracellular transduction of signals from EGFR to the nucleus. Activating KRAS mutations has been identified as a predictor of resistance to EGFR-directed antibodies such as cetuximab. Here we discuss the current understanding of KRAS mutations and the therapeutic effect of cetuximab.

  7. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei.

    PubMed

    Vega, Fernando E; Brown, Stuart M; Chen, Hao; Shen, Eric; Nair, Mridul B; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Brodie, Eoin L; Infante, Francisco; Dowd, Patrick F; Pain, Arnab

    2015-07-31

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complex polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. The draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies.

  8. Deep sequencing of pyrethroid-resistant bed bugs reveals multiple mechanisms of resistance within a single population.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Zach N; Kilcullen, Kathleen A; Koganemaru, Reina; Anderson, Michelle A E; Anderson, Troy D; Miller, Dini M

    2011-01-01

    A frightening resurgence of bed bug infestations has occurred over the last 10 years in the U.S. and current chemical methods have been inadequate for controlling this pest due to widespread insecticide resistance. Little is known about the mechanisms of resistance present in U.S. bed bug populations, making it extremely difficult to develop intelligent strategies for their control. We have identified bed bugs collected in Richmond, VA which exhibit both kdr-type (L925I) and metabolic resistance to pyrethroid insecticides. Using LD(50) bioassays, we determined that resistance ratios for Richmond strain bed bugs were ∼5200-fold to the insecticide deltamethrin. To identify metabolic genes potentially involved in the detoxification of pyrethroids, we performed deep-sequencing of the adult bed bug transcriptome, obtaining more than 2.5 million reads on the 454 titanium platform. Following assembly, analysis of newly identified gene transcripts in both Harlan (susceptible) and Richmond (resistant) bed bugs revealed several candidate cytochrome P450 and carboxylesterase genes which were significantly over-expressed in the resistant strain, consistent with the idea of increased metabolic resistance. These data will accelerate efforts to understand the biochemical basis for insecticide resistance in bed bugs, and provide molecular markers to assist in the surveillance of metabolic resistance.

  9. Total esterase activity in human saliva: Validation of an automated assay, characterization and behaviour after physical stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; De Torre, Carlos; Carrillo, José M; Rubio, Mónica; García, Montserrat; Cugat, Ramón; Cerón, José J

    2016-07-01

    Although saliva has esterase activity, this activity has not been characterized or studied in individuals subjected to physical stress. The aim of this report was to develop and validate an automated spectrophotometric assay for total esterase activity measurement in human saliva, as well as to study the contribution of different enzymes on this activity and its behaviour under physical stress in healthy subjects. The assay used 4-nitrophenyl acetate as substrate and was precise, accurate and provided low limits of detection and quantification. Inhibition with diisopropylfluorophosphate showed that cholinesterase, carboxylesterase and cholesterol esterase contributions not represented more than 20% of total esterase. Addition of standards of lipase and albumin to saliva samples showed that both proteins significantly contributed to esterase activity only when equal or higher than 11.6 IU/L and 250 μg/mL, respectively. Western blot analyses showed absence of paraoxonase-1 and high amount of carbonic anhydrase-VI. The high affinity of purified carbonic anhydrase-VI for the substrate supported a major contribution of this enzyme. Total esterase activity and alpha-amylase was measured in saliva samples from 12 healthy male students before and after participation in an indoor football match. The activity significantly increased after match and positively correlated with salivary alpha-amylase. This method could be used as a biomarker of physical stress in humans, with carbonic anhydrase-VI being the esterase that contributed more to the activity of the assay.

  10. A Novel Thermostable Arylesterase from the Archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P1: Purification, Characterization, and Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hee-Bong

    2008-01-01

    A novel thermostable arylesterase, a 35-kDa monomeric enzyme, was purified from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P1. The optimum temperature and pH were 94°C and 7.0, respectively. The enzyme displayed remarkable thermostability: it retained 52% of its activity after 50 h of incubation at 90°C. In addition, the purified enzyme showed high stability against denaturing agents, including various detergents, urea, and organic solvents. The enzyme has broad substrate specificity besides showing an arylesterase activity toward aromatic esters: it exhibits not only carboxylesterase activity toward tributyrin and p-nitrophenyl esters containing unsubstituted fatty acids from butyrate (C4) to palmitate (C16), but also paraoxonase activity toward organophosphates such as p-nitrophenylphosphate, paraoxon, and methylparaoxon. The kcat/Km ratios of the enzyme for phenyl acetate and paraoxon, the two most preferable substrates among all tested, were 30.6 and 119.4 s−1·μM−1, respectively. The arylesterase gene consists of 918 bp corresponding to 306 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shares 34% identity with that of arylesterase from Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1. Furthermore, we successfully expressed active recombinant S. solfataricus arylesterase in Escherichia coli. Together, our results show that the enzyme is a serine esterase belonging to the A-esterases and contains a catalytic triad composed of Ser156, Asp251, and His281 in the active site. PMID:18931117

  11. Engineering Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for simultaneous degradation of organophosphates and pyrethroids and its application in bioremediation of soil.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhenqiang; Gong, Ting; Che, You; Liu, Ruihua; Xu, Ping; Jiang, Hong; Qiao, Chuanling; Song, Cunjiang; Yang, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Agricultural soils are usually co-contaminated with organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid pesticides. To develop a stable and marker-free Pseudomonas putida for co-expression of two pesticide-degrading enzymes, we constructed a suicide plasmid with expression cassettes containing a constitutive promoter J23119, an OP-degrading gene (mpd), a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase gene (pytH) that utilizes the upp gene as a counter-selectable marker for upp-deficient P. putida. By introduction of suicide plasmid and two-step homologous recombination, both mpd and pytH genes were integrated into the chromosome of a robust soil bacterium P. putida KT2440 and no selection marker was left on chromosome. Functional expression of mpd and pytH in P. putida KT2440 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Degradation experiments with liquid cultures showed that the mixed pesticides including methyl parathion, fenitrothion, chlorpyrifos, permethrin, fenpropathrin, and cypermethrin (0.2 mM each) were degraded completely within 48 h. The inoculation of engineered strain (10(6) cells/g) to soils treated with the above mixed pesticides resulted in a higher degradation rate than in noninoculated soils. All six pesticides could be degraded completely within 15 days in fumigated and nonfumigated soils with inoculation. Theses results highlight the potential of the engineered strain to be used for in situ bioremediation of soils co-contaminated with OP and pyrethroid pesticides.

  12. Candidate Chemosensory Genes in the Stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Nicolas; Gallot, Aurore; Legeai, Fabrice; Montagné, Nicolas; Poivet, Erwan; Harry, Myriam; Calatayud, Paul-André; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The stemborer Sesamia nonagrioides is an important pest of maize in the Mediterranean Basin. Like other moths, this noctuid uses its chemosensory system to efficiently interact with its environment. However, very little is known on the molecular mechanisms that underlie chemosensation in this species. Here, we used next-generation sequencing (454 and Illumina) on different tissues from adult and larvae, including chemosensory organs and female ovipositors, to describe the chemosensory transcriptome of S. nonagrioides and identify key molecular components of the pheromone production and detection systems. We identified a total of 68 candidate chemosensory genes in this species, including 31 candidate binding-proteins and 23 chemosensory receptors. In particular, we retrieved the three co-receptors Orco, IR25a and IR8a necessary for chemosensory receptor functioning. Focusing on the pheromonal communication system, we identified a new pheromone-binding protein in this species, four candidate pheromone receptors and 12 carboxylesterases as candidate acetate degrading enzymes. In addition, we identified enzymes putatively involved in S. nonagrioides pheromone biosynthesis, including a ∆11-desaturase and different acetyltransferases and reductases. RNAseq analyses and RT-PCR were combined to profile gene expression in different tissues. This study constitutes the first large scale description of chemosensory genes in S. nonagrioides. PMID:23781142

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells as cellular vehicles for prodrug gene therapy against tumors.

    PubMed

    Amara, Ikrame; Touati, Walid; Beaune, Philippe; de Waziers, Isabelle

    2014-10-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) consists of targeted delivery to tumor cells of a suicide gene responsible for the in situ conversion of a prodrug into cytotoxic metabolites. One of the major impediments of GDEPT is to target specifically the tumor cells with the suicide gene. Among gene delivery methods, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged recently as potential cellular vehicles for gene delivery. MSCs are particularly suited for gene transduction. They exhibit remarkable migratory property towards tumors and their metastases and they are weakly immunogenic. This review will summarize the current knowledge about MSCs engineered to express different suicide genes (cytosine deaminase, thymidine kinase, carboxylesterase, cytochrome P450) to elicit a significant antitumor response against brain tumors, ovarian, hepatocellular, pancreatic, renal or medullary thyroid carcinomas, breast or prostate cancer and pulmonary metastases. The potential side effects of these MSC-based tumor therapies will also be considered to highlight certain aspects that need to be improved prior to clinical use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative intestinal esterases amongst passerine species: Assessing vulnerability to toxic chemicals in a phylogenetically explicit context.

    PubMed

    Narvaez, Cristobal; Ramirez-Otarola, Natalia; Bozinovic, Francisco; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Sabat, Pablo

    2015-09-01

    Inhibition of blood esterase activities by organophosphate (OP) pesticides has been used as a sensitive biomarker in birds. Furthermore, compared to mammalian vertebrates, less is known about the role of these enzyme activities in the digestive tracts of non-mammalian vertebrates, as well as the environmental and biological stressors that contribute to their natural variation. To fill this gap, we examined butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and carboxylesterases (CbE) in the digestive tracts of sixteen passerine species from central Chile. Whole intestine enzyme activities were positively and significantly correlated with body mass. After correcting for body mass and phylogenetic effect, we found only a marginal effect of dietary category on BChE activity, but a positive and significant association between the percentage of dietary nitrogen and the mass-corrected lipase activity. Our results suggest that observed differences may be due to the dietary composition in the case of lipases and BChE, and also we predict that all model species belonging to the same order will probably respond differently to pesticide exposure, in light of differences in the activity levels of esterase activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Host suitability and diet mixing influence activities of detoxification enzymes in adult Japanese beetles.

    PubMed

    Adesanya, Adekunle; Liu, Nannan; Held, David W

    2016-05-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450, glutathione S transferase (GST), and carboxylesterase (CoE) activity was measured in guts of the scarab Popillia japonica Newman, after consumption of single or mixed plant diets of previously ranked preferred (rose, Virginia creeper, crape myrtle and sassafras) or non-preferred hosts (boxelder, riverbirch and red oak). The goal of this study was to quantify activities of P450, GST and CoE enzymes in the midgut of adult P. japonica using multiple substrates in response to host plant suitability (preferred host vs non-preferred hosts), and single and mixed diets. Non-preferred hosts were only sparingly fed upon, and as a group induced higher activities of P450, GST and CoE than did preferred hosts. However, enzyme activities for some individual plant species were similar across categories of host suitability. Similarly, beetles tended to have greater enzyme activities after feeding on a mixture of plants compared to a single plant type, but mixing per se does not seem as important as the species represented in the mix. Induction of detoxification enzymes on non-preferred hosts, or when switching between hosts, may explain, in part, the perceived feeding preferences of this polyphagous insect. The potential consequences of induced enzyme activities on the ecology of adult Japanese beetles are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Substrate Engineering Enabling Fluorescence Droplet Entrapment for IVC-FACS-Based Ultrahigh-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fuqiang; Fischer, Michael; Han, Yunbin; Withers, Stephen G; Feng, Yan; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2016-09-06

    In vitro compartmentalization-based fluorescence-activated cell sorting (IVC-FACS) is a powerful screening tool for directed evolution of enzymes. However, the efficiency of IVC-FACS is limited by the tendency of the fluorescent reporter to diffuse out of the droplets, which decouples the genotype and phenotype of the target gene. Herein we present a new strategy called fluorescence droplet entrapment (FDE) to solve this problem. The substrate is designed with a polarity that enables it to pass through the oil phase, react with the enzyme and generate an oil-impermeable and fluorescent product that remains entrapped inside the droplet. Several FDE substrates were designed, using two distinct substrate engineering strategies, for the detection of phosphotriesterases, carboxylesterases, and glycosidases activities. Model screening assays in which rare phosphotriesterase-active cells were enriched from large excesses of inactive cells showed that the enrichment efficiency achievable using an FDE substrate was as high as 900-fold: the highest yet reported in such an IVC-FACS system. Thus, FDE provides a means to tightly control the onset of the enzymatic reaction, minimize droplet cross-talk, and lower the background fluorescence. It therefore may serve as a useful strategy for the IVC-FACS screening of enzymes, antibodies, and other proteins.

  17. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabens by rat liver microsomes and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human liver and small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited significant transesterification activities with different substrate specificities, like rat microsomes. Carboxylesterase isoforms, CES1b and CES1c, and CES2, exhibited significant transesterification activity toward parabens, and showed similar substrate specificity to human liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral toxicity of Photorhabdus culture media on gene expression of the adult sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Yam Kumar; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll

    2012-01-01

    The oral toxicity of culture media of the symbiotic bacteria, Photorhabdus temperata, mutually associated with entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis megidis and Photorhabdus luminescens ssp. laumondii (TT01) mutually associated with Heterorhabditis bacteriophora, were investigated in the adults of Bemisia tabaci. The oral ingestion of sucrose diet solutions (20%) containing bacteria-free supernatant of the culture media from symbiotic bacteria gradually increased mortalities and was completely lethal at 60 h after the treatments, whereas the mortalities of the controls, sucrose solutions with or without media that uncultured with bacteria, were less than 17% up to 84 h of incubation. The effects of oral ingestion of symbiont culture media were demonstrated on the expression rates of several genes of B. tabaci using quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis. Genes associated with immunity (knottin) and nervous system (acetylcholine receptor, acetylcholine esterase and sodium channel) were up-regulated while genes involved in metabolism (cytochromep450 and carboxylesterase) were down-regulated, but genes involved in development (ecdysone receptor), reproduction (vitellogenin) and stress (hsp70, hsp90 and shsp) did not change transcription rates. Our results provide information for the understanding of the mechanism of symbiont pathogenic factors for the manipulation of host physiology at the transcription level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ethylphenidate as a selective dopaminergic agonist and methylphenidate-ethanol transesterification biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Kennerly S.; Corbin, Timothy R.; Murphy, Cristina E.

    2014-01-01

    We review the pharmaceutical science of ethylphenidate (EPH) in the contexts of drug discovery; drug interactions; biomarker for dl-methylphenidate (MPH)-ethanol exposure; potentiation of dl-MPH abuse liability; contemporary “designer drug”; pertinence to the newer transdermal and chiral switch MPH formulations; as well as problematic internal standard. d-EPH selectively targets the dopamine transporter while d-MPH exhibits equipotent actions at dopamine and norepinephrine transporters. This selectivity carries implications for the advancement of tailored attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) pharmacotherapy in the era of genome-based diagnostics. Abuse of dl-MPH often involves ethanol co-abuse. Carboxylesterase 1 enantioselectively transesterifies l-MPH with ethanol to yield l-EPH accompanied by significantly increased early exposure to d-MPH and rapid potentiation of euphoria. The pharmacokinetic component of this drug interaction can largely be avoided using dexmethylphenidate (dexMPH). This notwithstanding, maximal potentiated euphoria occurs following dexMPH-ethanol. C57BL/6 mice model dl-MPH-ethanol interactions: An otherwise depressive dose of ethanol synergistically increases dl-MPH stimulation; A sub-stimulatory dose of dl-MPH potentiates a low, stimulatory dose of ethanol; Ethanol elevates blood, brain and urinary d-MPH concentrations while forming l-EPH. Integration of EPH preclinical neuropharmacology with clinical studies of MPH-ethanol interactions provides a translational approach toward advancement of ADHD personalized medicine and management of comorbid alcohol use disorder. PMID:25303048

  20. Ethylphenidate as a selective dopaminergic agonist and methylphenidate-ethanol transesterification biomarker.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Kennerly S; Corbin, Timothy R; Murphy, Cristina E

    2014-12-01

    We review the pharmaceutical science of ethylphenidate (EPH) in the contexts of drug discovery, drug interactions, biomarker for dl-methylphenidate (MPH)-ethanol exposure, potentiation of dl-MPH abuse liability, contemporary "designer drug," pertinence to the newer transdermal and chiral switch MPH formulations, as well as problematic internal standard. d-EPH selectively targets the dopamine transporter, whereas d-MPH exhibits equipotent actions at dopamine and norepinephrine transporters. This selectivity carries implications for the advancement of tailored attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) pharmacotherapy in the era of genome-based diagnostics. Abuse of dl-MPH often involves ethanol coabuse. Carboxylesterase 1 enantioselectively transesterifies l-MPH with ethanol to yield l-EPH accompanied by significantly increased early exposure to d-MPH and rapid potentiation of euphoria. The pharmacokinetic component of this drug interaction can largely be avoided using dexmethylphenidate (dexMPH). This notwithstanding, maximal potentiated euphoria occurs following dexMPH-ethanol. C57BL/6 mice model dl-MPH-ethanol interactions: an otherwise depressive dose of ethanol synergistically increases dl-MPH stimulation; a substimulatory dose of dl-MPH potentiates a low, stimulatory dose of ethanol; ethanol elevates blood, brain, and urinary d-MPH concentrations while forming l-EPH. Integration of EPH preclinical neuropharmacology with clinical studies of MPH-ethanol interactions provides a translational approach toward advancement of ADHD personalized medicine and management of comorbid alcohol use disorder.

  1. Exposure of larvae to thiamethoxam affects the survival and physiology of the honey bee at post-embryonic stages.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Daiana Antonia; Dussaubat, Claudia; Kretzschmar, André; Carvalho, Stephan Malfitano; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M; Malaspina, Osmar; Bérail, Géraldine; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Belzunces, Luc P

    2017-10-01

    Under laboratory conditions, the effects of thiamethoxam were investigated in larvae, pupae and emerging honey bees after exposure at larval stages with different concentrations in the food (0.00001 ng/μL, 0.001 ng/μL and 1.44 ng/μL). Thiamethoxam reduced the survival of larvae and pupae and consequently decreased the percentage of emerging honey bees. Thiamethoxam induced important physiological disturbances. It increased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity at all developmental stages and increased glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and carboxylesterase para (CaEp) activities at the pupal stages. For midgut alkaline phosphatase (ALP), no activity was detected in pupae stages, and no effect was observed in larvae and emerging bees. We assume that the effects of thiamethoxam on the survival, emergence and physiology of honey bees may affect the development of the colony. These results showed that attention should be paid to the exposure to pesticides during the developmental stages of the honey bee. This study represents the first investigation of the effects of thiamethoxam on the development of A. mellifera following larval exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of esterase activity and characterization of cholinesterases in the reef fish Haemulon plumieri.

    PubMed

    Leticia, Alpuche-Gual; Gerardo, Gold-Bouchot

    2008-11-01

    White grunt (Haemulon plumieri) has been proposed by the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS) Synoptic Monitoring Program as a bioindicator species. It is in this sense that the present study has a main goal to evaluate this organism's suitability as an indicator species. Individuals were captured during three seasons at the port of Sisal, Yucatan, Mexico which is located in an area that is considered to be weakly impacted by human activities such as agriculture or industry. Both cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxylesterase (CbE) activities were measured in brain, muscle, liver and eye of sampled individuals. Results indicated that ChE and CbE activities were greatest in the brain (256.3 ± 43) and in the liver (191 ± 21), respectively. Furthermore, ChEs detected in brain, liver and muscle were characterized, and results suggested that the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) type was more abundant relative to pseudocholinesterase (BChE) which was rare. In addition, K(m) and V(max) and IC(50) values were calculated from the Michaelis-Menten equation. Finally, an additional experiment in vitro showed a significant decrease in both ChE and CbE activities when different tissues were exposed to model xenobiotics, such as benzo[a]pyrene and Chlorpyrifos. In conclusion, findings from this study confirm the potential suitability of H. plumieri as an organic pollution bioindicator species, and thus of practical use for environmental biomonitoring purposes.

  3. Comparative insecticide susceptibility and detoxification enzyme activities among pestiferous blattodea.

    PubMed

    Valles, S M; Koehler, P G; Brenner, R J

    1999-11-01

    Topical bioassays using propoxur, chlorpyrifos, and lambda-cyhalothrin were conducted on eight cockroach species. Based on lethal dose values, the relative toxicities of the insecticide classes were generally pyrethroid > carbamate > organophosphorous. Lambda-Cyhalothrin and propoxur were more toxic toward the Blattidae as compared with the Blattellidae. The order of lambda-cyhalothrin toxicity was Periplaneta americana > Periplaneta brunnea = Periplaneta australasiae = Periplaneta fuliginosa = Blatta orientalis > Blattella asahinai = Blattella germanica > Blattella vaga. The order of propoxur toxicity was B. orientalis > P. americana > P. brunnea = P. australasiae > B. asahinai > P. fuliginosa = B. germanica > B. vaga. The order of chlorpyrifos toxicity was P. americana > B. asahinai = B. vaga > B. orientalis = P. australasiae = P. brunnea > B. germanica = P. fuliginosa. Detoxification enzyme activities for each species also were measured and compared with insecticide toxicity. Propoxur LD50 was significantly (P = 0.01; r = 0.81) correlated with glutathione S-transferase activity. Lambda-Cyhalothrin LD50 correlated with methoxyresorufin O-demethylase activity (P = 0.01; r = 0.81), carboxylesterase activity (P = 0.03; r = - 0.75), general esterase activity (P = 0.02; r = - 0.79), and cockroach weight (P = 0.01; r = -0.95).

  4. A Linkage Map and QTL Analysis for Pyrethroid Resistance in the Bed Bug Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Toby; Ravinet, Mark; Naylor, Richard; Reinhardt, Klaus; Butlin, Roger K

    2016-12-07

    The rapid evolution of insecticide resistance remains one of the biggest challenges in the control of medically and economically important pests. Insects have evolved a diverse range of mechanisms to reduce the efficacy of the commonly used classes of insecticides, and finding the genetic basis of resistance is a major aid to management. In a previously unstudied population, we performed an F2 resistance mapping cross for the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, for which insecticide resistance is increasingly widespread. Using 334 SNP markers obtained through RAD-sequencing, we constructed the first linkage map for the species, consisting of 14 putative linkage groups (LG), with a length of 407 cM and an average marker spacing of 1.3 cM. The linkage map was used to reassemble the recently published reference genome, facilitating refinement and validation of the current genome assembly. We detected a major QTL on LG12 associated with insecticide resistance, occurring in close proximity (1.2 Mb) to a carboxylesterase encoding candidate gene for pyrethroid resistance. This provides another example of this candidate gene playing a major role in determining survival in a bed bug population following pesticide resistance evolution. The recent availability of the bed bug genome, complete with a full list of potential candidate genes related to insecticide resistance, in addition to the linkage map generated here, provides an excellent resource for future research on the development and spread of insecticide resistance in this resurging pest species.

  5. Salvia miltiorrhiza Roots against Cardiovascular Disease: Consideration of Herb-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza root (Danshen) is widely used in Asia for its cardiovascular benefits and contains both hydrophilic phenolic acids and lipophilic tanshinones, which are believed to be responsible for its therapeutic efficacy. This review summarized the effects of these bioactive components from S. miltiorrhiza roots on pharmacokinetics of comedicated drugs with mechanic insights regarding alterations of protein binding, enzyme activity, and transporter activity based on the published data stemming from both in vitro and in vivo human studies. In vitro studies indicated that cytochrome P450 (CYP450), carboxylesterase enzyme, catechol-O-methyltransferase, organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1) and OAT3, and P-glycoprotein were the major targets involved in S. miltiorrhiza-drug interactions. Lipophilic tanshinones had much more potent inhibitory effects towards CYPs activities compared to hydrophilic phenolic acids, evidenced by much lower Ki values of the former. Clinical S. miltiorrhiza-drug interaction studies were mainly conducted using CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 probe substrates. In addition, the effects of coexisting components on the pharmacokinetic behaviors of those noted bioactive compounds were also included herein. PMID:28473993

  6. Substrate specificity and pH dependence of homogeneous wheat germ acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, R L; Waymack, P P

    1991-08-01

    The broad substrate specificity of a homogeneous isoenzyme of wheat germ acid phosphatase (WGAP) was extensively investigated by chromatographic, electrophoretic, NMR, and kinetic procedures. WGAP exhibited no divalent metal ion requirement and was unaffected upon incubation with EDTA or o-phenanthroline. A comparison of two catalytically homogeneous isoenzymes revealed little difference in substrate specificity. The specificity of WGAP was established by determining the Michaelis constants for a wide variety of substrates. p-Nitrophenyl phosphate, pyrophosphate, tripolyphosphate, and ATP were preferred substrates while lesser activities were seen toward sugar phosphates, trimetaphosphate, phosphoproteins, and (much less) phosphodiesters. An extensive table of Km and Vmax values is given. The pathway for the hydrolysis of trimetaphosphate was examined by colorimetric and 31P NMR methods and it was found that linear tripolyphosphate is not a free intermediate in the enzymatic reaction. In contrast to literature reports, homogeneous wheat germ acid phosphatase exhibits no measurable carboxylesterase activity, nor does it hydrolyze phenyl phosphonothioate esters or phytic acid at significant rates.

  7. Proteins with an alpha/beta hydrolase fold: Relationships between subfamilies in an ever-growing superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenfant, Nicolas; Hotelier, Thierry; Bourne, Yves; Marchot, Pascale; Chatonnet, Arnaud

    2013-03-25

    Alpha/beta hydrolases function as hydrolases, lyases, transferases, hormone precursors or transporters, chaperones or routers of other proteins. The amount of structural and functional available data related to this protein superfamily expands exponentially, as does the number of proteins classified as alpha/beta hydrolases despite poor sequence similarity and lack of experimental data. However the superfamily can be rationally divided according to sequence or structural homologies, leading to subfamilies of proteins with potentially similar functions. Since the discovery of proteins homologous to cholinesterases but devoid of enzymatic activity (e.g., the neuroligins), divergent functions have been ascribed to members of other subfamilies (e.g., lipases, dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV, etc.). To study the potentially moonlighting properties of alpha/beta hydrolases, the ESTHER database (for ESTerase and alpha/beta Hydrolase Enzymes and Relatives; http://bioweb.ensam.inra.fr/esther), which collects, organizes and disseminates structural and functional information related to alpha/beta hydrolases, has been updated with new tools and the web server interface has been upgraded. A new Overall Table along with a new Tree based on HMM models has been included to tentatively group subfamilies. These tools provide starting points for phylogenetic studies aimed at pinpointing the origin of duplications leading to paralogous genes (e.g., acetylcholinesterase versus butyrylcholinesterase, or neuroligin versus carboxylesterase). Another of our goals is to implement new tools to distinguish catalytically active enzymes from non-catalytic proteins in poorly studied or annotated subfamilies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary X-ray analysis of twinned crystals of the Q88Y25_Lacpl esterase from Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Yanaisis; Esteban-Torres, María; Acebrón, Iván; de las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario; Martínez-Ripoll, Martín; Mancheño, José M

    2011-11-01

    Q88Y25_Lacpl is an esterase produced by the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 that shows amino-acid sequence similarity to carboxylesterases from the hormone-sensitive lipase family, in particular the AFEST esterase from the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic esterase EstEI isolated from a metagenomic library. N-terminally His(6)-tagged Q88Y25_Lacpl has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells, purified and crystallized at 291 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Mass spectrometry was used to determine the purity and homogeneity of the enzyme. Crystals of His(6)-tagged Q88Y25_Lacpl were prepared in a solution containing 2.8 M sodium acetate trihydrate pH 7.0. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.24 Å resolution on beamline ID29 at the ESRF. The apparent crystal point group was 422; however, initial global analysis of the intensity statistics (data processed with high symmetry in space group I422) and subsequent tests on data processed with low symmetry (space group I4) showed that the crystals were almost perfectly merohedrally twinned. Most probably, the true space group is I4, with unit-cell parameters a = 169.05, b = 169.05, c = 183.62 Å.

  9. Alterations in the skin of Labeo rohita exposed to an azo dye, Eriochrome black T: a histopathological and enzyme biochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ayan; Verma, Neeraj; Mistri, Arup; Ranjan, Brijesh; Nigam, Ashwini Kumar; Kumari, Usha; Mittal, Swati; Mittal, Ajay Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Histopathological changes and alterations in the activity of certain metabolic and antioxidant enzymes were analyzed in the head skin of Labeo rohita, exposed to sublethal test concentrations of the azo dye, Eriochrome black T for 4 days, using 24 h renewal bioassay method. Hypertrophied epithelial cells, increased density of mucous goblet cells, and profuse mucous secretion at the surface were considered to protect the skin from toxic impact of the azo dye. Degenerative changes including vacuolization, shrinkage, decrease in dimension, and density of club cells with simultaneous release of their contents in the intercellular spaces were associated to plug them, preventing indiscriminate entry of foreign matter. On exposure of fish to the dye, significant decline in the activity of enzymes-alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, carboxylesterase, succinate dehydrogenase, catalase, and peroxidase-was associated with the binding of dye to the enzymes. Gradual increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase was considered to reflect a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. On transfer of azo dye exposed fish to freshwater, skin gradually recovers and, by 8 days, density and area of mucous goblet cells, club cells, and activity of the enzymes appear similar to that of controls. Alteration in histopathology and enzyme activity could be considered beneficial tool in monitoring environmental toxicity, valuable in the sustenance of fish populations.

  10. Human arylacetamide deacetylase is responsible for deacetylation of rifamycins: rifampicin, rifabutin, and rifapentine.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akinori; Fukami, Tatsuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Watanabe, Akinobu; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2011-12-01

    Rifamycins such as rifampicin, rifabutin, and rifapentine are used for the treatment of tuberculosis and induce various drug-metabolizing enzymes. Rifamycins have been reported to be mainly deacetylated by esterase(s) expressed in human liver microsomes (HLM) to 25-deacetylrifamycins, but the responsible enzyme remained to be determined. In this study, we found that recombinant human arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC) could efficiently deacetylate rifamycins, whereas human carboxylesterases, which are enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of many prodrugs, showed no activity. The involvement of AADAC in the deacetylation of rifamycins in HLM was verified by the similarities of the K(m) and K(i) values and the inhibitory characteristics between recombinant AADAC and HLM. Rifamycins exhibited potent cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells, but their 25-deacetylated metabolites did not. Luciferase assay using a reporter plasmid containing CYP3A4 direct repeat 3 and everted repeat 6 motifs revealed that 25-deacetylrifamycins have lesser potency to transactivate CYP3A4 compared with the parent drugs. Supporting these results, HepG2 cells infected with a recombinant adenovirus expressing human AADAC showed low cytotoxicity and induction potency of CYP3A4 by rifamycins. In addition, CYP3A4 induction in human hepatocytes by rifamycins was increased by transfecting siRNA for human AADAC. Thus, we found that human AADAC was the enzyme responsible for the deacetylation of rifamycins and would affect the induction rate of drug-metabolizing enzymes by rifamycins and their induced hepatotoxicity.

  11. The 'pH optimum anomaly' of intracellular enzymes of Ferroplasma acidiphilum.

    PubMed

    Golyshina, Olga V; Golyshin, Peter N; Timmis, Kenneth N; Ferrer, Manuel

    2006-03-01

    A wide range of microorganisms, the so-called acidophiles, inhabit acidic environments and grow optimally at pH values between 0 and 3. The intracellular pH of these organisms is, however, close to neutrality or slightly acidic. It is to be expected that enzymatic activities dedicated to extracellular functions would be adapted to the prevailing low pH of the environment (0-3), whereas intracellular enzymes would be optimally active at the near-neutral pH of the cytoplasm (4.6-7.0). The genes of several intracellular or cell-bound enzymes, a carboxylesterase and three alpha-glucosidases, from Ferroplasma acidiphilum, a cell wall-lacking acidophilic archaeon with a growth optimum at pH 1.7, were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and their products purified and characterized. The Ferroplasmaalpha-glucosidases exhibited no sequence similarity to known glycosyl hydrolases. All enzymes functioned and were stable in vitro in the pH range 1.7-4.0, and had pH optima much lower than the mean intracellular pH of 5.6. This 'pH optimum anomaly' suggests the existence of yet-undetected cellular compartmentalization providing cytoplasmic pH patchiness and low pH environments for the enzymes we have analysed.

  12. Homology modeling and active-site residues probing of the thermophilic Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius esterase 2.

    PubMed Central

    Manco, G.; Febbraio, F.; Adinolfi, E.; Rossi, M.

    1999-01-01

    The moderate thermophilic eubacterium Alicyclobacillus (formerly Bacillus) acidocaldarius expresses a thermostable carboxylesterase (esterase 2) belonging to the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)-like group of the esterase/lipase family. Based on secondary structures predictions and a secondary structure-driven multiple sequence alignment with remote homologous protein of known three-dimensional (3D) structure, we previously hypothesized for this enzyme the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold typical of several lipases and esterases and identified Ser155, Asp252, and His282 as the putative members of the catalytic triad. In this paper we report the construction of a 3D model for this enzyme based on the structure of mouse acetylcholinesterase complexed with fasciculin. The model reveals the topological organization of the fold corroborating our predictions. As regarding the active-site residues, Ser155, Asp252, and His282 are located close to each other at hydrogen bond distances. Their catalytic role was here probed by biochemical and mutagenic studies. Moreover, on the basis of the secondary structure-driven multiple sequence alignment and the 3D structural model, a residue supposed important for catalysis, Gly84, was mutated to Ser. The activity of the mutated enzyme was drastically reduced. We propose that Gly84 is part of a putative "oxyanion hole" involved in the stabilization of the transition state similar to the C group of the esterase/lipase family. PMID:10493580

  13. Role of farnesoid X receptor in establishment of ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing enzyme genes in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Piekos, Stephanie; Guo, Grace L; Zhong, Xiao-Bo

    2016-09-01

    The expression of phase-I drug metabolizing enzymes in liver changes dramatically during postnatal liver maturation. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is critical for bile acid and lipid homeostasis in liver. However, the role of FXR in regulating ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing genes is not clear. Hence, we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify the developmental expression of phase-I genes in both Fxr-null and control (C57BL/6) mouse livers during development. Liver samples of male C57BL/6 and Fxr-null mice at 6 different ages from prenatal to adult were used. The Fxr-null showed an overall effect to diminish the "day-1 surge" of phase-I gene expression, including cytochrome P450s at neonatal ages. Among the 185 phase-I genes from 12 different families, 136 were expressed, and differential expression during development occurred in genes from all 12 phase-I families, including hydrolysis: carboxylesterase (Ces), paraoxonase (Pon), and epoxide hydrolase (Ephx); reduction: aldoketo reductase (Akr), quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo), and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (Dpyd); and oxidation: alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh), flavin monooxygenases (Fmo), molybdenum hydroxylase (Aox and Xdh), cytochrome P450 (P450), and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por). The data also suggested new phase-I genes potentially targeted by FXR. These results revealed an important role of FXR in regulation of ontogeny of phase-I genes.

  14. Acute toxicity and sublethal effects of fipronil on detoxification enzymes in juvenile zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Wu, Haihua; Gao, Cuie; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Yuping; Zhang, Jianzhen; Ma, Enbo

    2014-10-01

    The acute toxicity of fipronil and its sublethal effects on detoxification enzymes (carboxylesterases (CarEs), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD)) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) were investigated. The results indicated that the 24-h LC50 of fipronil for zebrafish was 220.4 μg/L (95% CI: 173.7-272.4 μg/L). Sublethal concentrations of fipronil did not cause significant changes in CarEs activities. In the liver and muscle tissues, GST activities at the tested concentrations did not significantly differ from those in the control. In the brain and gill tissues, GST activities at a concentration of 4 μg/L were significantly lower than those at a concentration of 2 μg/L. The results suggest that CarEs and GSTs were not suitable biomarkers for fipronil effects in D. rerio. A significant induction in the ECOD activities in the brain, gill, liver, and muscle tissues was observed compared with the control. Moreover, the dose-dependent responses of the ECOD activity were observed after treatment with sublethal concentrations of fipronil in the range of 2-20 μg/L. The results suggested that ECOD could be a suitable biomarker of fipronil effects in D. rerio. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Antifeedant Activity of Ginkgo biloba Secondary Metabolites against Hyphantria cunea Larvae: Mechanisms and Applications.

    PubMed

    Pan, Long; Ren, Lili; Chen, Fang; Feng, Yuqian; Luo, Youqing

    2016-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba is a typical relic plant that rarely suffers from pest hazards. This study analyzed the pattern of G. biloba pest hazards in Beijing; tested the antifeedant activity of G. biloba extracts, including ginkgo flavonoids, ginkgolide, and bilobalide, against Hyphantria cunea larvae; determined the activities of glutathione transferase (GSTs), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CarE) and mixed-functional oxidase (MFO), in larvae after feeding on these G. biloba secondary metabolites; and screened for effective botanical antifeedants in the field. In this study, no indicators of insect infestation were found for any of the examined leaves of G. biloba; all tested secondary metabolites showed significant antifeedant activity and affected the activity of the four larval detoxifying enzymes. Ginkgolide had the highest antifeedant activity and the most significant effect on the detoxifying enzymes (P<0.05). Spraying leaves with G. biloba extracts or ginkgolide both significantly repelled H. cunea larvae in the field (P<0.05), although the former is more economical and practical. This study investigated the antifeedant activity of G. biloba secondary metabolites against H. cunea larvae, and the results provide new insights into the mechanism of G. biloba pest resistance. This study also developed new applications of G. biloba secondary metabolites for effective pest control.

  16. Draft genome of the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide: the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Fernando E.; Brown, Stuart M.; Chen, Hao; Shen, Eric; Nair, Mridul B.; Ceja-Navarro, Javier A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Infante, Francisco; Dowd, Patrick F.; Pain, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most economically important insect pest of coffee worldwide. We present an analysis of the draft genome of the coffee berry borer, the third genome for a Coleopteran species. The genome size is ca. 163 Mb with 19,222 predicted protein-coding genes. Analysis was focused on genes involved in primary digestion as well as gene families involved in detoxification of plant defense molecules and insecticides, such as carboxylesterases, cytochrome P450, gluthathione S-transferases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and a gene that confers resistance to the insecticide dieldrin. A broad range of enzymes capable of degrading complex polysaccharides were identified. We also evaluated the pathogen defense system and found homologs to antimicrobial genes reported in the Drosophila genome. Ten cases of horizontal gene transfer were identified with evidence for expression, integration into the H. hampei genome, and phylogenetic evidence that the sequences are more closely related to bacterial rather than eukaryotic genes. The draft genome analysis broadly expands our knowledge on the biology of a devastating tropical insect pest and suggests new pest management strategies. PMID:26228545

  17. Biochemical response to exposure to six textile dyes in early developmental stages of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Güngördü, Abbas; Birhanli, Ayse; Ozmen, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the toxic effect of a lethal concentration of six different commercially used textile dyes on the 46th stage of Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The tadpoles were exposed to Astrazon Red FBL, Astrazon Blue FGRL, Remazol Red RR, Remazol Turquoise Blue G-A, Cibacron Red FN-3G, and Cibacron Blue FN-R for 168 h in static test conditions, and thus, 168-h median lethal concentrations (LC(50)s) of each dye were determined to be 0.35, 0.13, 112, 7, 359, and 15.8 mg/L, respectively. Also, to evaluate the sublethal effects of each dye, tadpoles were exposed to different concentrations of dyes (with respect to 168-h LC(50)s) for 24 h. The alteration of selected enzyme activities was tested. For this aim, glutathione S-transferase (GST), carboxylesterase, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assayed. After dye exposure, the GST induction or inhibition and LDH induction indicated some possible mechanisms of oxidative stress and deterioration in aerobic respiration processes induced by the tested dyes. Findings of the study suggest that selected biomarker enzymes are useful in understanding the toxic mechanisms of these dyes in X. laevis tadpoles as early warning indicators. Therefore, these selected biomarkers may evaluate the effect of environmental factors, such as textile dye effluents and other industrial pollutants, on amphibians in biomonitoring studies.

  18. Prolonged postdiapause: influence on some indicators of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism of the red mason bee, Osmia rufa.

    PubMed

    Dmochowska, Kamila; Giejdasz, Karol; Fliszkiewicz, Monika; Zółtowska, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    Bees of the genus Osmia are being used in crop pollination at an increasing rate. However, a short life expectancy of adult individuals limits the feasibility of their use. Cocoons of the red mason bee, Osmia rufa L. (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), can be stored at 4° C in a postdiapause state, and adult bees can be used for pollination outside their natural flight period. The period of storage in this form has an unfavorable influence on the survival rate, life expectancy, and fertility of the bee. It was suggested that the negative results are connected with exhaustion of energy reserves. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined the contents of protein, carbohydrates, lipids, and the activities of some enzymes, and their degradation in red mason bees that emerged in spring according to their biological clock and in summer after elongated diapause. It was found that postdiapause artificially elongated by 3 months caused significant decreases in body weight, total sugar, glycogen, lipids, and protein content in O. rufa. Glucose level was highest in bees that emerged in the summer, which was coincident with increased activities of maltase and trehalase. The activities of sucrase and cellobiase were not changed, while amylase activity was considerably decreased. The activities of triacylglycerols lipase and C2, C4, C10 carboxylesterases were highest in bees that emerged in July. Low temperatures restrict O. rufa emergence, and during prolonged postdiapause, metabolic processes lead to significant reductions of structural and energetic compounds.

  19. Alteration of syncytiotrophoblast mitochondria function and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in the placenta of rural residents.

    PubMed

    Rivero Osimani, Valeria L; Valdez, Susana R; Guiñazú, Natalia; Magnarelli, Gladis

    2016-06-01

    The impact of environmental organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure on respiratory complexes, enzymatic antioxidant defense activities, and oxidative damage markers in the syncytiotrophoblast and cytotrophoblast mitochondria was evaluated. Placental progesterone (PG) levels and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression were studied. Samples from women non-exposed (control group-CG) and women living in a rural area (rural group-RG) were collected during pesticide spraying season (RG-SS) and non-spraying season (RG-NSS). In RG-SS, the exposure biomarker placental carboxylesterase decreased and syncytiotrophoblast cytochrome c oxidase activity increased, while 4-hydroxynonenal levels decreased. PG levels decreased in RG-SS and in the RG. Nitric oxide synthase expression decreased in RG, RG-SS and RG-NSS. No significant changes in mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme activities were found. These results suggest that the alteration of syncytiotrophoblast mitochondrial complex IV activity and steroidogenic function may be associated to pesticide exposure. Reduction in placental PG and eNOS expression may account for low newborn weight in RG.

  20. Subchronic exposure to chlorpyrifos affects energy expenditure and detoxification capacity in juvenile Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Narváez, Cristóbal; Ríos, Juan Manuel; Píriz, Gabriela; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Sabat, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Effects of pesticides on non-target organisms have been studied in several taxa at different levels of biological organization, from enzymatic to behavioral responses. Although the physiological responses may be associated with higher energy costs, little is known about metabolic costs of pesticide detoxification in birds. To fill this gap, we exposed orally (diet) 15-d old Coturnix coturnix japonica individuals to sublethal doses of chlorpyrifos (10 and 20 mg active ingredient/kg dry food) for four weeks. Carboxylesterase (CbE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were periodically measured in multiple tissues along with measurements of resting (RMR) and maximum metabolic rates (M(sum)). Furthermore, glucuronic acid in bird excreta was also assessed at the end of the trial. While CbE and BChE activities were inhibited by chlorpyrifos in all tissues during the third and fourth weeks following pesticide treatment, AChE activity was unaffected. At this sampling times, both M(sum) and RMR expansibility decreased. These results suggest that the exposure to chlorpyrifos caused a negative effect on aerobic performance. Additionally, excretion rate of glucuronic acid was up to 2-fold higher in the 20-mg/kg group than in the control and 10-mg/kg chlorpyrifos groups. The inhibition of CbE and BChE activities corroborated that these enzymes are fulfilling their role as bioscavengers for organophosphate pesticides, decreasing its concentration and thus protecting AChE activity against inhibition by chlorpyrifos.

  1. A point mutation (L1015F) of the voltage-sensitive sodium channel gene associated with lambda-cyhalothrin resistance in Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) population from the transgenic Bt cotton field of China.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Congai; Gao, Xiwu

    2016-02-01

    In China, the green mirid bug, Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür), has caused severe economic damage to many kinds of crops, especially the cotton and jujubes. Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely used for controlling this pest in the transgenic Bt cotton field. Five populations of A. lucorum collected from cotton crops at different locations in China were evaluated for lambda-cyhalothrin resistance. The results showed that only the population collected from Shandong Province exhibited 30-fold of resistance to lambda-cyhalothrin. Neither PBO nor DEF had obvious synergism when compared the synergistic ratio between SS and RR strain which was originated from the Shandong population. Besides, there were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) in the carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase, or 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase activities between the Shandong population and the laboratory susceptible strain (SS). The full-length sodium channel gene named AlVSSC encoding 2028 amino acids was obtained by RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). One single point mutation L1015F in the AlVSSC was detected only in the Shandong population. Our results revealed that the L1015F mutation associated with pyrethroid resistance was identified in A. lucorum populations in China. These results will be useful for the rational chemical control of A. lucorum in the transgenic Bt cotton field.

  2. Carbamate and Pyrethroid Resistance in the Akron Strain of Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Mutunga, James M.; Anderson, Troy D.; Craft, Derek T.; Gross, Aaron D.; Swale, Daniel R.; Tong, Fan; Wong, Dawn M.; Carlier, Paul R.; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Insecticide resistance in the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae is a serious problem, epitomized by the multi-resistant Akron strain, originally isolated in the country of Benin. Here we report resistance in this strain to pyrethroids and DDT (13-fold to 35-fold compared to the susceptible G3 strain), but surprisingly little resistance to etofenprox, a compound sometimes described as a “pseudo-pyrethroid.” There was also strong resistance to topically-applied commercial carbamates (45-fold to 81-fold), except for the oximes aldicarb and methomyl. Biochemical assays showed enhanced cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and carboxylesterase activity, but not that of glutathione-S-transferase. A series of substituted α,α,α,-trifluoroacetophenone oxime methylcarbamates were evaluated for enzyme inhibition potency and toxicity against G3 and Akron mosquitoes. The compound bearing an unsubstituted phenyl ring showed the greatest toxicity to mosquitoes of both strains. Low cross resistance in Akron was retained by all analogs in the series. Kinetic analysis of acetylcholinesterase activity and its inhibition by insecticides in the G3 strain showed inactivation rate constants greater than that of propoxur, and against Akron enzyme inactivation rate constants similar to that of aldicarb. However, inactivation rate constants against recombinant human AChE were essentially identical to that of the G3 strain. Thus, the acetophenone oxime carbamates described here, though potent insecticides that control resistant Akron mosquitoes, require further structural modification to attain acceptable selectivity and human safety. PMID:26047119

  3. BmNPV resistance of silkworm larvae resulting from the ingestion of TiO₂ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Xie, Yi; Cheng, Zhe; Cheng, Jie; Hu, Rengping; Gui, Suxin; Sang, Xuezi; Sun, Qingqing; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Lei; Shen, Weide; Hong, Fashui

    2012-12-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) causes infection in the silkworm that is often lethal. The infection is hard to prevent, partly because of the nature of the virus particles and partly because of the different strains of B. mori. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂ NPs) have been demonstrated to have antimicrobial properties. The present study investigated whether TiO₂ NPs added to an artificial diet can increase the resistance of B. mori larvae to BmNPV and examined the molecular mechanism behind any resistance shown. The results indicated that ingested TiO₂ NPs decreased reactive oxygen species and NO accumulation in B. mori larvae under BmNPV infection, which in turn led to a decrease in their growth inhibition and mortality. In addition, the TiO₂ NPs significantly promoted the expression of resistance-related genes, including those encoding superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, acetylcholine esterase, carboxylesterase, heat shock protein 21, glutathione S transferase o1, P53, and transferring and of genes encoding cytochrome p302 and nitric oxide synthase. These findings are a useful addition to the understanding of the mechanism of BmNPV resistance of B. mori larvae in response to TiO₂ NPs addition. Such information also provides a theoretical basis for the use of TiO₂ NPs in sericulture.

  4. Tumor-Induced Hyperlipidemia Contributes to Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfeng; Li, Lena; Lian, Jihong; Schauer, Silvia; Vesely, Paul W.; Kratky, Dagmar; Hoefler, Gerald; Lehner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Summary The known link between obesity and cancer suggests an important interaction between the host lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis. Here, we used a syngeneic tumor graft model to demonstrate that tumor development influences the host lipid metabolism. BCR-Abl-transformed precursor B cell tumors induced hyperlipidemia by stimulating very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and blunting VLDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turnover. To assess whether tumor progression was dependent on tumor-induced hyperlipidemia, we utilized the VLDL production-deficient mouse model, carboxylesterase3/triacylglycerol hydrolase (Ces3/TGH) knockout mice. In Ces3/Tgh–/– tumor-bearing mice, plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels were attenuated. Importantly tumor weight was reduced in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice. Mechanistically, reduced tumor growth in Ces3/Tgh–/– mice was attributed to reversal of tumor-induced PCSK9-mediated degradation of hepatic LDLR and decrease of LDL turnover. Our data demonstrate that tumor-induced hyperlipidemia encompasses a feed-forward loop that reprograms hepatic lipoprotein homeostasis in part by providing LDL cholesterol to support tumor growth. PMID:27050512

  5. Design of Enzymatically Cleavable Prodrugs of a Potent Platinum-Containing Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Song; Pickard, Amanda J.; Kucera, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Using a versatile synthetic approach, a new class of potential ester prodrugs of highly potent, but systemically too toxic, platinum–acridine anticancer agents was generated. The new hybrids contain a hydroxyl group, which has been masked with a cleavable lipophilic acyl moiety. Both butanoic (butyric) and bulkier 2-propanepentanoic (valproic) esters were introduced. The goals of this design were to improve the drug-like properties (e.g., logD) and to reduce the systemic toxicity of the pharmacophore. Two distinct pathways by which the target compounds undergo effective ester hydrolysis, the proposed activating step, have been confirmed: platinum-assisted, self-immolative ester cleavage in a low-chloride environment (LC-ESMS, NMR spectroscopy) and enzymatic cleavage by human carboxylesterase-2 (hCES-2) (LC-ESMS). The valproic acid ester derivatives are the first example of a metal-containing agent cleavable by the pro-drug-converting enzyme. They show excellent chemical stability and reduced systemic toxicity. Preliminary results from screening in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (A549, NCI-H1435) suggest that the mechanism of the valproic esters may involve intracellular deesterification. PMID:25303639

  6. [Therapeutic drug monitoring of rufinamide].

    PubMed

    Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Tribut, Olivier; Verdier, Marie-Clémence

    2012-01-01

    Rufinamide is a third-generation antiepileptic drug, available since early 2010 in France. It is indicated in combination therapy in the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome from the age of 4. It has orphan drug status. The bioavailability of rufinamide is high, but decreases with the dose and increases with food intake. Rufinamide is not metabolized by cytochromes but hydrolyzed by a carboxylesterase in an inactive carboxylic derivative. Elimination is mainly renal. The half-life varies from 6 to 10h. Although established from relatively few studies, exposure efficacy and exposure toxicity relationships are argued. A plasma concentration of 15 mg/L, obtained with a standard regimen, reduces the number of seizures of 25%. Few factors of intrinsic variability are described. There are few clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions and they concern combinations with other antiepileptic drugs, especially valproate. Although there is no validated therapeutic range, the level of evidence for this therapeutic drug monitoring has been estimated at "possibly useful". © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  7. A Transcriptome Survey Spanning Life Stages and Sexes of the Harlequin Bug, Murgantia histrionica

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Michael E.; Rhoades, Joshua H.; Nelson, David R.; Kuhar, Daniel; Lancaster, Jason; Lehner, Bryan; Tholl, Dorothea; Weber, Donald C.; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E.

    2017-01-01

    The harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica (Hahn), is an agricultural pest in the continental United States, particularly in southern states. Reliable gene sequence data are especially useful to the development of species-specific, environmentally friendly molecular biopesticides and effective biolures for this insect. Here, mRNAs were sampled from whole insects at the 2nd and 4th nymphal instars, as well as sexed adults, and sequenced using Illumina RNA-Seq technology. A global assembly of these data identified 72,540 putative unique transcripts bearing high levels of similarity to transcripts identified in other taxa, with over 99% of conserved single-copy orthologs among insects being detected. Gene ontology and protein family analyses were conducted to explore the functional potential of the harlequin bug’s gene repertoire, and phylogenetic analyses were conducted on gene families germane to xenobiotic detoxification, including glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases and cytochrome P450s. Genic content in harlequin bug was compared with that of the closely related invasive pest, the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål). Quantitative analyses of harlequin bug gene expression levels, experimentally validated using quantitative real-time PCR, identified genes differentially expressed between life stages and/or sexes. PMID:28587099

  8. The Peripheral Olfactory Repertoire of the Lightbrown Apple Moth, Epiphyas postvittana

    PubMed Central

    Thrimawithana, Amali H.; Crowhurst, Ross N.; Newcomb, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The lightbrown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana is an increasingly global pest of horticultural crops. Like other moths, E. postvittana relies on olfactory cues to locate mates and oviposition sites. To detect these cues, moths have evolved families of genes encoding elements of the peripheral olfactory reception system, including odor carriers, receptors and degrading enzymes. Here we undertake a transcriptomic approach to identify members of these families expressed in the adult antennae of E. postvittana, describing open reading frames encoding 34 odorant binding proteins, 13 chemosensory proteins, 70 odorant receptors, 19 ionotropic receptors, nine gustatory receptors, two sensory neuron membrane proteins, 27 carboxylesterases, 20 glutathione-S-transferases, 49 cytochrome p450s and 18 takeout proteins. For the odorant receptors, quantitative RT-PCR corroborated RNAseq count data on steady state transcript levels. Of the eight odorant receptors that group phylogenetically with pheromone receptors from other moths, two displayed significant male-biased expression patterns, one displayed significant female-biased expression pattern and five were expressed equally in the antennae of both sexes. In addition, we found two male-biased odorant receptors that did not group with previously described pheromone receptors. This suite of olfaction-related genes provides a substantial resource for the functional characterization of this signal transduction system and the development of odor-mediated control strategies for horticultural pests. PMID:26017144

  9. Effects of Mitragynine and a Crude Alkaloid Extract Derived from Mitragyna speciosa Korth. on Permethrin Elimination in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Srichana, Kachamas; Janchawee, Benjamas; Prutipanlai, Sathaporn; Raungrut, Pritsana; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2015-01-01

    Detoxification and elimination of permethrin (PM) are mediated by hydrolysis via carboxylesterase (CES). Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) contains mitragynine (MG) and other bioactive alkaloids. Since PM and MG have the same catalytic site and M. speciosa is usually abused by adding other ingredients such as pyrethroid insecticides, the effects of MG and an alkaloid extract (AE) on the elimination of PM were investigated in rats. Rats were subjected to single and multiple pretreatment with MG and AE prior to receiving a single oral dose (460 mg/kg) of PM. Plasma concentrations of trans-PM and its metabolite phenoxybenzylalcohol (PBAlc) were measured. The elimination rate constant (kel) and the elimination half-life (t1/2 el) of PM were determined, as well as the metabolic ratio (PMR).A single and multiple oral pretreatment with MG and AE altered the plasma concentration-time courses of both trans-PM and PBAlc during 8–22 h, decreased the PMRs, delayed elimination of PM, but enhanced elimination of PBAlc. Results indicated that PM–MG or AE toxicokinetic interactions might have resulted from the MG and AE interfering with PM hydrolysis. The results obtained in rats suggest that in humans using kratom cocktails containing PM, there might be an increased risk of PM toxicity due to inhibition of PM metabolism and elimination. PMID:25825913

  10. Toxicological properties of trialkyl phosphorothioate and dialkyl alkyl- and arylphosphonothioate esters.

    PubMed

    Fukuto, T R

    1983-01-01

    Impurities such as O,S,S-trimethyl phosphorodithioate (TMPD) and the S-methyl isomer of malathion (isomalathion) strongly potentiated the mammalian toxicity of malathion. In contrast, impurities present in the phosphoramidothioate insecticide acephate had an antagonizing effect on its mammalian toxicity. The potentiation of the toxicity of malathion was attributed to inhibition of mammalian liver and serum carboxylesterase. O,O,S-Trimethyl phosphorothioate (TMP), another impurity present in technical malathion and in other organophosphorus insecticides, proved to be highly toxic. Rats given a single oral dose of TMP at a level as low as 20 mg/kg died over a period of three weeks, with death occurring with non-cholinergic signs of poisoning. TMPD also caused similar delayed death in rats. O,O,O-Trimethyl phosphorothioate (TMP=S), also another impurity in technical malathion and a structural isomer of TMP, was a potent antagonist to the delayed toxicity of TMP. Examination of a number of related trialkyl phosphorothioate and dialkyl alkylphosphonothioate esters revealed several of these compounds to be highly toxic to rats.

  11. Mechanisms of resistance to malathion in the medfly Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Magaña, Cristina; Hernández-Crespo, Pedro; Brun-Barale, Alexandra; Couso-Ferrer, Francisco; Bride, Jean-Marc; Castañera, Pedro; Feyereisen, René; Ortego, Félix

    2008-08-01

    Target site insensitivity and metabolic resistance mediated by esterases have been previously suggested to be involved in resistance to malathion in a field-derived strain (W) of Ceratitis capitata. In the present study, we have obtained the coding sequence for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene (Ccace) of C. capitata. An allele of Ccace carrying only a point mutation Gly328Ala (Torpedo numbering) adjacent to the glutamate of the catalytic triad was found in individuals of the W strain. Adult flies homozygotes for this mutant allele showed reduced AChE activity and less sensitivity to inhibition by malaoxon, showing that target site insensitivity is one of the factors of malathion resistance. In addition, all individuals from the resistant W strain showed reduced aliesterase activity, which has been associated with specific malathion resistance in higher Diptera. However, the alphaE7 gene (CcalphaE7), sequenced in susceptible and resistant individuals, did not carry any of the mutations associated with organophosphorus insecticide resistance in other Diptera. Another esterase mechanism, perhaps a carboxylesterase selective for malathion, in addition to mutant AChE, thus contributes to malathion resistance in C. capitata.

  12. Characterisation of integrated stress biomarkers in two deep-sea crustaceans, Aristeus antennatus and Nephrops norvegicus, from the NW fishing grounds of the Mediterranean sea.

    PubMed

    Antó, Mertixell; Arnau, Susana; Buti, Elisenda; Cortijo, Verónica; Gutiérrez, Elena; Solé, Montserrat

    2009-07-01

    Several biomarkers indicative of stress were characterised in the crustaceans Aristeus antennatus and Nephrops norvegicus sampled off the Barcelona coast (NW Mediterranean). The biomarkers selected were cholinesterase (ChE) activities in muscle; and catalase, glutathione reductase (GR), total glutathione peroxidase (t-GPX), DT-diaphorase (DT-D), glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and carboxylesterases (CbEs) in hepatopancreas tissue. Lipid peroxidation (LP) levels and total protein yield (PY) were also determined in muscle and hepatopancreas tissues. The activities and levels are discussed in relation to species and season, and differences in these two factors were observed for most biomarkers. AChEs and pseudocholinesterases were present in the muscles of both crustaceans. Catalase and GST activities were higher in N. norvegicus, whereas GR and t-GPX activities varied according to the season. Hepatic CbE activities were similar in the two crustaceans, whereas LP levels and PY were different between species. Seasonality and species particularities are factors to consider when these crustaceans are used as sentinels.

  13. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Olea europaea L. to Identify Genes Involved in the Development of the Pollen Tube.

    PubMed

    Iaria, Domenico; Chiappetta, Adriana; Muzzalupo, Innocenzo

    2016-01-01

    In olive (Olea europaea L.), the processes controlling self-incompatibility are still unclear and the molecular basis underlying this process are still not fully characterized. In order to determine compatibility relationships, using next-generation sequencing techniques and a de novo transcriptome assembly strategy, we show that pollen tubes from different olive plants, grown in vitro in a medium containing its own pistil and in combination pollen/pistil from self-sterile and self-fertile cultivars, have a distinct gene expression profile and many of the differentially expressed sequences between the samples fall within gene families involved in the development of the pollen tube, such as lipase, carboxylesterase, pectinesterase, pectin methylesterase, and callose synthase. Moreover, different genes involved in signal transduction, transcription, and growth are overrepresented. The analysis also allowed us to identify members in actin and actin depolymerization factor and fibrin gene family and member of the Ca(2+) binding gene family related to the development and polarization of pollen apical tip. The whole transcriptomic analysis, through the identification of the differentially expressed transcripts set and an extended functional annotation analysis, will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of pollen germination and pollen tube growth in the olive.

  14. The Peripheral Olfactory Repertoire of the Lightbrown Apple Moth, Epiphyas postvittana.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Jacob A; Jordan, Melissa D; Thrimawithana, Amali H; Crowhurst, Ross N; Newcomb, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    The lightbrown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana is an increasingly global pest of horticultural crops. Like other moths, E. postvittana relies on olfactory cues to locate mates and oviposition sites. To detect these cues, moths have evolved families of genes encoding elements of the peripheral olfactory reception system, including odor carriers, receptors and degrading enzymes. Here we undertake a transcriptomic approach to identify members of these families expressed in the adult antennae of E. postvittana, describing open reading frames encoding 34 odorant binding proteins, 13 chemosensory proteins, 70 odorant receptors, 19 ionotropic receptors, nine gustatory receptors, two sensory neuron membrane proteins, 27 carboxylesterases, 20 glutathione-S-transferases, 49 cytochrome p450s and 18 takeout proteins. For the odorant receptors, quantitative RT-PCR corroborated RNAseq count data on steady state transcript levels. Of the eight odorant receptors that group phylogenetically with pheromone receptors from other moths, two displayed significant male-biased expression patterns, one displayed significant female-biased expression pattern and five were expressed equally in the antennae of both sexes. In addition, we found two male-biased odorant receptors that did not group with previously described pheromone receptors. This suite of olfaction-related genes provides a substantial resource for the functional characterization of this signal transduction system and the development of odor-mediated control strategies for horticultural pests.

  15. Novel and environmental friendly approach; Impact of Neem (Azadirachta indica) gum nano formulation (NGNF) on Helicoverpa armigera (Hub.) and Spodoptera litura (Fab.).

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Gandhi, Pachiyappan Rajiv; Elango, Gandhi; Karthi, Sengodan; Chung, Ill-Min; Rajakumar, Govindasamy

    2017-08-30

    The future of this study was to prepare a natural pesticide which will not harm the environment and yet control pests. Neem gum nano formulation (NGNF), a novel biopesticide prepared from the Neem gum extract (Azadirachta indica) (NGE) was evaluated for its antifeedant, larvicidal and pupicidal activities against Helicoverpa armigera (Hub.) and Spodoptera litura (Fab.) at 100ppm. The NGNF showed significant (100%) antifeedant, larvicidal and pupicidal activities against H. armigera and S. litura. The LC50 values of 10.20, 12.49 and LC90 values of 32.68, 36.68ppm on H. armigera and S. litura, respectively at 100ppm. The NGNF treatments showed differences in the activities of detoxifying enzymes, carboxylesterases, glucosidases and glutathione S-transferases in the larval gut. Earthworm toxicity illustrated that 6.25ppm of chemical insecticides (cypermethrin) varied widely in their contact toxicities compared to 100ppm of NGNF and control in both contact filter paper and artificial soil test. The NGNF were characterized and confirmed by FTIR, XRD, SEM and EDX analysis. Ten compounds were identified from the Neem gum extract (NGE) by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The major compounds were fatty acids like Hexadecanoic acid, oleic acid, and ricinoleic acid. NGNF could be used as an agent to prepare novel bio-pesticides formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of biotransformation enzymes in the antennae of codling moth Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinglong; Liu, Lu; Su, Xiaoji; Feng, Jinian

    2016-04-10

    Biotransformation enzymes are found in insect antennae and play a critical role in degrading xenobiotics and odorants. In Cydia pomonella, we identified 26 biotransformation enzymes. Among these enzymes, twelve carboxylesterases (CXEs), two aldehyde oxidases (AOXs) and six alcohol dehydrogenases (ADs) were predominantly expressed in antennae. Each of the CpomCXEs presents a conserved catalytic triad "Ser-His-Glu", which is the structural characteristic of known insect CXEs. CpomAOXs present two redox centers, a FAD-binding domain and a molybdenum cofactor/substrate-binding domain. The antennal CpomADs are from two protein families, short-chain dehydrogenases/reducetases (SDRs) and medium-chain dehydrogenases/reducetases (MDRs). Putative catalytic active domain and cofactor binding domain were found in these CpomADs. Potential functions of these enzymes were determined by phylogenetic analysis. The results showed that these enzymes share close relationship with odorant degrading enzymes (ODEs) and resistance-associated enzymes of other insect species. Because of commonly observed roles of insect antennal biotransformation enzymes, we suggest antennal biotransformation enzymes presented here are candidate that involved in degradation of odorants and xenobiotics within antennae of C. pomonella. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Enantiospecific gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of urinary methylphenidate: implications for phenotyping.

    PubMed

    LeVasseur, Natalie L; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Markowitz, John S; DeVane, C Lindsay; Patrick, Kennerly S

    2008-02-01

    A chiral derivatization gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method for urine methylphenidate (MPH) analysis was developed and validated to investigate preliminary findings regarding a novel MPH poor metabolizer (PM). Detection was by electron impact (EI) ionization-selected ion monitoring of the N-trifluoroacetylprolylpiperidinium fragments from MPH and the piperidine-deuterated MPH internal standard. The PM eliminated approximately 70 times more l-MPH in urine (9% of the dose over 0-10h), and approximately 5 times more of the d-isomer (10% of the dose), than the mean values determined from 10 normal metabolizers of MPH. Only minor amounts of the metabolite p-hydroxy-MPH were found in the urine of both the PM and normal metabolizers, while the concentration of MPH lactam was not high enough to be detectable. The described method indirectly gauges the functional carboxylesterase-1 status of patients receiving MPH based on the evaluation of relative urine concentrations of d-MPH:l-MPH. Clinical implications concerning rational drug selection for an identified or suspected MPH PM are discussed.

  18. Purification and preliminary characterization of permethrinase from a pyrethroid-transforming strain of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Maloney, S E; Maule, A; Smith, A R

    1993-07-01

    Bacillus cereus SM3 was isolated on a mineral salts medium with Tween 80 as the primary carbon source. It was able to hydrolyze second- and third-generation pyrethroids, thereby generating noninsecticidal products. The enzyme responsible for this hydrolytic reaction was named permethrinase for this study. This is the first instance in which pyrethroid detoxification has been achieved with a cell-free microbial enzyme system. Permethrinase was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. The molecular mass of native permethrinase was 61 +/- 3 kDa, as estimated by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. This novel microbial esterase seems to be a carboxylesterase. Permethrinase activity had an optimum pH of 7.5 and a temperature optimum of 37 degrees C. No cofactors or coenzymes were required for permethrinase activity. The enzyme may be a serine esterase, as it seems to be sensitive to the organophosphorus compound tetraethylpyrophosphate at concentrations in the micromolar range. Addition of dithiothreitol afforded permethrinase protection against the inhibitory effects of the sulfydryl agents p-chloromercuribenzoate and N-ethylmaleimide. The enzyme was stable over a range of temperatures. Cell extracts of strain SM3 also contained another esterase, which was active towards beta-naphthylacetate, but this enzyme was distinct from permethrinase.

  19. Integrated phenotypic and activity-based profiling links Ces3 to obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Eduardo; Galmozzi, Andrea; Chang, Jae Won; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Pawlak, Joanna; Li, Weiwei; Godio, Cristina; Thomas, Jason; Partida, David; Niessen, Sherry; O'Brien, Paul E; Russell, Aaron P; Watt, Matthew J; Nomura, Daniel K; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saez, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    Phenotypic screening is making a comeback in drug discovery as the maturation of chemical proteomics methods has facilitated target identification for bioactive small molecules. A limitation of these approaches is that time-consuming genetic methods or other means are often required to determine the biologically relevant target (or targets) from among multiple protein-compound interactions that are typically detected. Here, we have combined phenotypic screening of a directed small-molecule library with competitive activity-based protein profiling to map and functionally characterize the targets of screening hits. Using this approach, we identify carboxylesterase 3 (Ces3, also known as Ces1d) as a primary molecular target of bioactive compounds that promote lipid storage in adipocytes. We further show that Ces3 activity is markedly elevated during adipocyte differentiation. Treatment of two mouse models of obesity-diabetes with a Ces3 inhibitor ameliorates multiple features of metabolic syndrome, illustrating the power of the described strategy to accelerate the identification and pharmacologic validation of new therapeutic targets.

  20. Effects of Fraxinellone on the Midgut Enzyme Activities of the 5th Instar Larvae of Oriental Armyworm, Mythimna separata Walker

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Min; Wu, Wenjun; Liu, Huixia

    2014-01-01

    Isolated from Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz., fraxinellone exhibited multiple bioactivities against insects. In the present paper, the changes of digestive enzymes and detoxification enzymes of Mythimna separata Walker (5th instar larvae), treated with fraxinellone, were investigated. Compared with those of the control, the α-amylase activity of the fraxinellone-treated 5th instar larvae was inhibited, whereas the level of their protease activity was increased. Based upon further studies on the specific proteases, the levels of the active alkaline trypsin-like enzyme (BApNA as the substrate) and the chymotrypsin-like enzyme (BTEE as the substrate) activities of the treated larvae were declined; however, the level of activity of the weak alkaline trypsin-like enzyme (TAME as the substrate) of the treated ones was increased. Meanwhile, the activities of two detoxification enzymes, such as carboxylesterase (CarE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), of the treated larvae were increased to some extent, but the activities of NADPH-P450 reductase and O-demethylase of the treated ones declined. Therefore, protease (especially the weak alkaline trypsin-like enzyme), CarE and GST played important roles in the metabolism of fraxinellone in the midgut of Mythimna separata (M. separata). PMID:25216084

  1. The central role of mosquito cytochrome P450 CYP6Zs in insecticide detoxification revealed by functional expression and structural modelling.

    PubMed

    Chandor-Proust, Alexia; Bibby, Jaclyn; Régent-Kloeckner, Myriam; Roux, Jessica; Guittard-Crilat, Emilie; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Riaz, Muhammad Asam; Paine, Mark; Dauphin-Villemant, Chantal; Reynaud, Stéphane; David, Jean-Philippe

    2013-10-01

    The resistance of mosquitoes to chemical insecticides is threatening vector control programmes worldwide. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) are known to play a major role in insecticide resistance, allowing resistant insects to metabolize insecticides at a higher rate. Among them, members of the mosquito CYP6Z subfamily, like Aedes aegypti CYP6Z8 and its Anopheles gambiae orthologue CYP6Z2, have been frequently associated with pyrethroid resistance. However, their role in the pyrethroid degradation pathway remains unclear. In the present study, we created a genetically modified yeast strain overexpressing Ae. aegypti cytochrome P450 reductase and CYP6Z8, thereby producing the first mosquito P450-CPR (NADPH-cytochrome P450-reductase) complex in a yeast recombinant system. The results of the present study show that: (i) CYP6Z8 metabolizes PBAlc (3-phenoxybenzoic alcohol) and PBAld (3-phenoxybenzaldehyde), common pyrethroid metabolites produced by carboxylesterases, producing PBA (3-phenoxybenzoic acid); (ii) CYP6Z8 transcription is induced by PBAlc, PBAld and PBA; (iii) An. gambiae CYP6Z2 metabolizes PBAlc and PBAld in the same way; (iv) PBA is the major metabolite produced in vivo and is excreted without further modification; and (v) in silico modelling of substrate-enzyme interactions supports a similar role of other mosquito CYP6Zs in pyrethroid degradation. By playing a pivotal role in the degradation of pyrethroid insecticides, mosquito CYP6Zs thus represent good targets for mosquito-resistance management strategies.

  2. Esterase LpEst1 from Lactobacillus plantarum: A Novel and Atypical Member of the αβ Hydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Cabrera, Álvaro; Gago, Federico; Acebrón, Iván; Benavente, Rocío; Mardo, Karin; de las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M.

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 reveals the presence of a rich repertoire of esterases and lipases highlighting their important role in cellular metabolism. Among them is the carboxylesterase LpEst1 a bacterial enzyme related to the mammalian hormone-sensitive lipase, which is known to play a central role in energy homeostasis. In this study, the crystal structure of LpEst1 has been determined at 2.05 Å resolution; it exhibits an αβ-hydrolase fold, consisting of a central β-sheet surrounded by α-helices, endowed with novel topological features. The structure reveals a dimeric assembly not comparable with any other enzyme from the bacterial hormone-sensitive lipase family, probably echoing the specific structural features of the participating subunits. Biophysical studies including analytical gel filtration and ultracentrifugation support the dimeric nature of LpEst1. Structural and mutational analyses of the substrate-binding pocket and active site together with biochemical studies provided insights for understanding the substrate profile of LpEst1 and suggested for the first time the conserved Asp173, which is adjacent to the nucleophile, as a key element in the stabilization of the loop where the oxyanion hole resides. PMID:24663330

  3. Enzymatic Alterations and Genotoxic Effects Produced by Sublethal Concentrations of Organophosphorous Temephos in Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Boscolli Barbosa; de Campos Júnior, Edimar Olegário

    2015-01-01

    The responses of biochemical and genetic parameters were evaluated in tissues of Poecilia reticulata exposed to sublethal and environmentally relevant concentrations of 0.005, 0.01, or 0.02 mg/L of the organophosphorous (OP) pesticide temephos (TE) for 168 h. Activities of enzymes brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and liver carboxylesterase (CbE) were determined. Nuclear abnormalities (NA) and micronucleus (MN) frequency in gill erythrocytes were also measured. No mortality was observed over the experimental period; however, brain AChE activities were decreased significantly in guppies in all TE treatment groups after 72 h of exposure. Hepatic CbE activities of fish were increased in all TE treatment groups at 96, 120, and 144 h of exposure. The frequencies of MN and NA in fish gill erythrocytes displayed a marked rise after 168 h of exposure to concentrations of 0.01 or 0.02 mg/L TE. Thus, determination of these parameters may be employed as potential indices of exposure to TE using this sentinel organism for monitorining.

  4. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Broad Reactivity of the Nerve Agent Sarin.

    PubMed

    Tuin, Adriaan W; Mol, Marijke A E; van den Berg, Roland M; Fidder, A; van der Marel, Gijs A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Noort, Daan

    2009-04-01

    Elucidation of noncholinesterase protein targets of organophosphates, and nerve agents in particular, may reveal additional mechanisms for their high toxicity as well as clues for novel therapeutic approaches toward intoxications with these agents. Within this framework, we here describe the synthesis of the activity-based probe 3, which contains a phosphonofluoridate moiety, a P-Me moiety, and a biotinylated O-alkyl group, and its use in activity-based protein profiling with two relevant biological samples, that is, rhesus monkey liver and cultured human A549 lung cells. In this way, we have unearthed eight serine hydrolases (fatty acid synthase, acylpeptide hydrolase, dipeptidyl peptidase 9, prolyl oligopeptidase, carboxylesterase, long-chain acyl coenzyme A thioesterase, PAF acetylhydrolase 1b, and esterase D/S-formyl glutathione hydrolase) as targets that are modified by the nerve agent sarin. It is also shown that the newly developed probe 3 might find its way into the development of alternative, less laborious purification protocols for human butyrylcholinesterase, a potent bioscavenger currently under clinical investigation as a prophylactic/therapeutic for nerve agent intoxications.

  5. The effects of 8-OH-DPAT on neuroinflammation after sarin exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Teresa L; Joshi, Kaushal; Rapp, Christine M; Chapleau, Molly; Cool, David R; Schlager, John J; Lucot, James B

    2013-08-09

    Poisoning by organophosphate nerve agents can induce seizures which rapidly become refractory to treatment and result in brain damage. Current therapies have only a narrow time frame for effective administration after poisoning. 5-HT1A agonists were tested for efficacy in mice against a seizure-producing combination of the carboxylesterase inhibitor 2-(o-cresyl)-4H-1:3:2-benzodioxaphosphorin-2-oxide (CBDP) and sarin, producing an LD20-40. Administration of the 5-HT1A agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) decreased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) staining in mice when administered 1min after CBDP and sarin while other 5-HT1A agonists buspirone and S-14506 were not effective. The reduction in GFAP staining by 8-OH-DPAT remained significant when a single dose was administered 2h after the toxic challenge. In addition, 8-OH-DPAT reversed the increase in the inflammatory factor IL-1β in the dentate gyrus and amygdala but did not reduce positive TUNEL staining in the dentate gyrus. Due to the failure of the two other agonists to provide protection, the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100635 was tested. WAY-100635 was found to neither reverse the neuroprotective effects of 8-OH-DPAT nor worsen the damage when given alone, making a role for this receptor unlikely. The neuroprotective effects of 8-OH-DPAT appear to lie within its secondary pharmacology.

  6. Sublethal effects of the organic antifoulant Mexel(R)432 on osmoregulation and xenobiotic detoxification in the flatfish Solea senegalensis.

    PubMed

    López-Galindo, Cristina; Vargas-Chacoff, Luis; Nebot, Enrique; Casanueva, José F; Rubio, Daniel; Solé, Montserrat; Mancera, Juan Miguel

    2010-03-01

    Mexel(R)432 is an anionic surfactant used as biocide in the cooling water system of power plants for biofouling reduction. Refrigeration waters from power plants do not usually follow, prior to their discharge to sea, any treatment aimed to eliminate biocides and this can have negative consequences on the aquatic fauna nearby. The effects of different concentrations of the antifoulant Mexel(R)432 (0.5, 1 and 2mgL(-1)) on osmoregulation (osmolality and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity) and stress parameters (cortisol, glucose, and lactate) were assessed in juveniles of the flatfish Solea senegalensis. Gill histopathology and alterations due to oxidative stress (increased lipid peroxidation, LPO, levels) at branchial and hepatic levels were also considered. Other parameters tested were the antioxidant enzymes (catalase, CAT; glutathione peroxidase, GPX; and glutathione reductase, GR), xenobiotic metabolism defenses involved in detoxification (carboxylesterase, CbE; 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, EROD; and glutathione S-transferase, GST) and the neurotransmitter acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Significant variations in osmoregulatory parameters, histological lesions and decreased branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity were observed in exposed fish. Other gill biomarkers presented little or no significant variations in relation to controls. In contrast, hepatic parameters, such as CAT activity, were inhibited while EROD activity was initially elevated but after longer exposures it recovered basal values. These results suggested that under our experimental protocol exists toxic associated to Mexel(R)432 exposures.

  7. Screening and its potential application of lipolytic activity from a marine environment: characterization of a novel esterase from Yarrowia lipolytica CL180.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Tae; Kang, Sung Gyun; Woo, Jung-Hee; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2007-03-01

    To develop an enantioselective lipase/esterase hydrolyzing racemic ofloxacin ester to levofloxacin, samples were collected from a variety of marine environments such as cold sea, hydrothermal vent area, sediment, tidal flat area, arctic sea, marine organisms, and so on. Microorganisms were isolated by plating on an enrichment medium with simultaneous detection of lipolytic activities and screened for the hydrolysis of ofloxacin ester. Three candidates among isolates were selected, and one of them, identified as Yarrowia lipolytica CL180, hydrolyzed preferentially S-enantiomer of racemic ofloxacin ester. The lipase/esterase gene (yli180) was cloned by screening a genomic library. The sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame consisting of 1,431 bp that encoded a protein of 476 amino acids with a molecular mass of 53 kDa. The yli180 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The optimum activity of the recombinant protein (rYli180) occurred at pH 7.5 and 35 degrees C, respectively. rYli180 preferentially hydrolyzed p-nitrophenyl esters of fatty acids with short chain lengths of < or =10 carbon atoms. This study represents a novel esterase of type B1 carboxylesterase/lipase family from a marine isolate, showing a potential usage as a biocatalyst because of enantioselectivity toward racemic ofloxacin ester.

  8. Characterisation of esterases as potential biomarkers of pesticide exposure in the lugworm Arenicola marina (Annelida: Polychaeta).

    PubMed

    Hannam, Marie L; Hagger, Josephine A; Jones, Malcolm B; Galloway, Tamara S

    2008-03-01

    Here, we identify and characterise cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxylesterase (CbE) activities in the body tissues of the sediment dwelling worm Arenicola marina. Exposure to the organophosphorus pesticide azamethiphos yielded an in vitro IC50 of 5 microg l(-1) for propionylcholinesterase (PChE). PChE was significantly inhibited in vivo after a 10 day exposure to 100 microg l(-1) azamethiphos, equivalent to the recommended aquatic application rate (ANOVA; F=2.75, P=0.033). To determine sensitivity to environmental conditions, A. marina were exposed for 10 days to field collected sediments. PChE activity was significantly lower in worms exposed to sediments from an estuary classified to be at high risk from point source pollution by the UK Environment Agency (ANOVA; F=15.33, P<0.001). Whilst causality cannot be directly attributed from these latter exposures, they provide an important illustration of the potential utility of esterase activity as a biomarker of environmental quality in this ecologically relevant sentinel species.

  9. Toxicity of the insecticide chlorpyrifos to the South American toad Rhinella arenarum at larval developmental stage.

    PubMed

    Liendro, Natacha; Ferrari, Ana; Mardirosian, Mariana; Lascano, Cecilia I; Venturino, Andrés

    2015-03-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an insecticide widely used for pest control in the fruit-productive region of North Patagonia, Argentina, where it is found in superficial waters. The aim of this study was to establish the toxic effects of CPF in Rhinella arenarum toad larvae as a potentially exposed species. We determined the 96 h-LC50 (1.46 ± 0.27 mg/L), the LOEC (0.81 mg/L, LC10) and NOEC (0.43 mg/L, LC1) for CPF lethality as endpoint. We also analyzed biochemical biomarkers in larvae exposed to sublethal CPF concentrations. The IC50 for cholinesterase was 0.113 ± 0.026 mg/L, one order of magnitude lower than the LC50. Carboxylesterase activity was inhibited, buffering OP toxicity on cholinesterase. Reduced glutathione increased after 24h as an antioxidant response, and decreased at 96 h together with catalase activity, due to oxidative stress. These biochemical effects suggest that environmentally relevant CPF concentrations pose a threat to R. arenarum larvae progression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipophilic prodrug conjugates allow facile and rapid synthesis of high loading capacity liposomes without the need for post-assembly purification

    PubMed Central

    Mikhalin, Alexander A.; Evdokimov, Nikolai M.; Frolova, Liliya V.; Magedov, Igor V.; Kornienko, Alexander; Johnston, Robert; Rogelj, Snezna; Tartis, Michaelann S.

    2014-01-01

    Dihydropyridopyrazoles are simplified synthetic analogues of podophyllotoxin that can effectively mimic its molecular scaffold and act as potent mitotic spindle poisons in dividing cancer cells. However, despite nanomolar potencies and ease of synthetic preparation, further clinical development of these promising anticancer agents is hampered due to their poor aqueous solubility. In this paper, we developed a prodrug strategy that enables incorporation of dihydropyridopyrazoles into liposome bilayers to overcome the solubility issues. The active drug was covalently connected to either myristic or palmitic acid anchor via carboxylesterase hydrolyzable linkage. The resulting prodrugs were self assembled into liposome bilayers from hydrated lipid films using ultrasound without the need for post-assembly purification. The average particle size of the prodrug-loaded liposomes was about 90 nm. The prodrug incorporation was verified by differential scanning calorimetry, spectrophotometry and gel filtration reaching maximum at 0.3 and 0.35 prodrug/lipid molar ratios for myristic and palmitic conjugates, respectively. However, the ratio of 0.2 was used in the particle size and biological activity experiments to maintain long-term stability of the prodrug-loaded liposomes against phase separation during storage. Antiproliferative activity was tested against HeLa and Jurkat cancer cell lines in vitro showing that the liposomal prodrug retained antitubulin activity of the parent drug and induced apoptosis mediated cancer cell death. Overall, the established data provide a powerful platform for further clinical development of dihydropyridopyrazoles using liposomes as the drug delivery system. PMID:25534989

  11. Conjugates of γ-Carbolines and Phenothiazine as new selective inhibitors of butyrylcholinesterase and blockers of NMDA receptors for Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Makhaeva, Galina F; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Boltneva, Natalia P; Sokolov, Vladimir B; Grigoriev, Vladimir V; Serebryakova, Olga G; Vikhareva, Ekaterina A; Aksinenko, Alexey Yu; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Bachurin, Sergey O

    2015-08-18

    Alzheimer disease is a multifactorial pathology and the development of new multitarget neuroprotective drugs is promising and attractive. We synthesized a group of original compounds, which combine in one molecule γ-carboline fragment of dimebon and phenothiazine core of methylene blue (MB) linked by 1-oxo- and 2-hydroxypropylene spacers. Inhibitory activity of the conjugates toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and structurally close to them carboxylesterase (CaE), as well their binding to NMDA-receptors were evaluated in vitro and in silico. These newly synthesized compounds showed significantly higher inhibitory activity toward BChE with IC50 values in submicromolar and micromolar range and exhibited selective inhibitory action against BChE over AChE and CaE. Kinetic studies for the 9 most active compounds indicated that majority of them were mixed-type BChE inhibitors. The main specific protein-ligand interaction is π-π stacking of phenothiazine ring with indole group of Trp82. These compounds emerge as promising safe multitarget ligands for the further development of a therapeutic approach against aging-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and/or other pathological conditions.

  12. Pharmacological profile of the novel anti-inflammatory corticosteroid NS-126, a therapeutic agent for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naoki; Hashino, Asami; Kageyama, Kiyoto; Zhang, Xin; Sasagawa, Takahiro; Kawakita, Naoko; Takahashi, Yosuke; Yoshida, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Mikiko; Mori, Kazuya; Kyoi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    NS-126 (9-fluoro-11beta,17,21-trihydroxy-16alpha-methylpregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione 21-cyclohexanecarboxylate 17-cyclopropanecarboxylate) is a novel, highly lipophilic anti-inflammatory corticosteroid. We compared NS-126 and the widely used intranasal corticosteroid fluticasone propionate (FP) in a guinea-pig model of allergic rhinitis and a rat model of airway eosinophilia. In the allergic rhinitis model, NS-126 and FP reduced sneezing and nasal obstruction to similar extents. In the airway eosinophilia model, both compounds inhibited the infiltration of eosinophils into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but the effect of NS-126 was longer-lasting than that of FP. In vitro, NS-126 showed lower affinity than FP for the glucocorticoid receptor and was a weaker inhibitor of Th(2) cytokine and chemokine production and mast-cell secretory responses. We also investigated DX-17-CPC, a metabolite of NS-126 generated in nasal tissue by carboxylesterase-catalyzed hydrolysis at the 17-position. DX-17-CPC showed greater affinity than NS-126 for the glucocorticoid receptor and was a stronger inhibitor of Th(2) cytokine and chemokine production and mast-cell secretory responses. The long duration of the anti-allergic effects of NS-126 may be explained by its high lipophilicity, while the strength of its anti-allergic effects may be explained by the generation of the active metabolite DX-17-CPC. NS-126 is a long-acting intranasal corticosteroid and a promising therapeutic agent for allergic rhinitis.

  13. Toxicology in the Fast Lane: Application of High-Throughput Bioassays to Detect Modulation of Key Enzymes and Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Morisseau, Christophe; Merzlikin, Oleg; Lin, Amy; He, Guochun; Feng, Wei; Padilla, Isela; Denison, Michael S.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Legislation at state, federal, and international levels is requiring rapid evaluation of the toxicity of numerous chemicals. Whole-animal toxicologic studies cannot yield the necessary throughput in a cost-effective fashion, leading to a critical need for a faster and more cost-effective toxicologic evaluation of xenobiotics. Objectives We tested whether mechanistically based screening assays can rapidly provide information on the potential for compounds to affect key enzymes and receptor targets, thus identifying those compounds requiring further in-depth analysis. Methods A library of 176 synthetic chemicals was prepared and examined in a high-throughput screening (HTS) manner using nine enzyme-based and five receptor-based bioassays. Results All the assays have high Z′ values, indicating good discrimination among compounds in a reliable fashion, and thus are suitable for HTS assays. On average, three positive hits were obtained per assay. Although we identified compounds that were previously shown to inhibit a particular enzyme class or receptor, we surprisingly discovered that triclosan, a microbiocide present in personal care products, inhibits carboxylesterases and that dichlone, a fungicide, strongly inhibits the ryanodine receptors. Conclusions Considering the need to rapidly screen tens of thousands of anthropogenic compounds, our study shows the feasibility of using combined HTS assays as a novel approach toward obtaining toxicologic data on numerous biological end points. The HTS assay approach is very useful to quickly identify potentially hazardous compounds and to prioritize them for further in-depth studies. PMID:20049205

  14. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors: pharmacology and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Colović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer's disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases.

  15. Species-related differences in the inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase by paraoxon and malaoxon.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A; Wallace, K B

    1987-04-01

    Interspecies comparisons indicate that fish are relatively more resistant to acute intoxication with parathion and paraoxon than are rodents. In contrast, fish are more sensitive to malathion and malaoxon. The following investigation was designed to determine if species-related differences in the sensitivity of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to inhibition by paraoxon and malaoxon could contribute to the interspecies differences in toxicity. Brain AChE activity was significantly greater in fathead minnows and rainbow trout than in rats and mice. The fathead minnow and rainbow trout IC50 values for paraoxon were 228- to 1879-fold greater than the corresponding values for rat and mouse. Similarly, the Ki (bimolecular inhibition constant) was 159- to 1663-fold greater in rodents than in fish, which reflected both a higher KA (association constant) and kp (phosphorylation constant) in rodents. The rodent IC50 values for malaoxon were 30-80% that of the fish IC50, and the Ki was 30-50% greater in rodents than in fish. These data suggest that the greater sensitivity of rodent brain AChE to inhibition by paraoxon may contribute to the greater toxicity of parathion and paraoxon in rodents than in fish. In contrast, the lack of correlation between the inhibition of brain AChE by malaoxon and species-related differences in acute I D50 suggests that other factors, such as the limited carboxylesterase activity in fish, may be responsible for this species selectivity.

  16. An upp-based markerless gene replacement method for genome reduction and metabolic pathway engineering in Pseudomonas mendocina NK-01 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chi; Gong, Ting; Zuo, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Fengjie; Fan, Xu; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-06-01

    A markerless gene replacement method was adapted by combining a suicide plasmid, pEX18Tc, with a counterselectable marker, the upp gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase), for the medium-chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA(MCL))-producing strain Pseudomonas mendocina NK-01. An NK-01 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant background strain was first constructed by deleting the chromosomal upp gene. The suicide plasmid pEX18Tc, carrying a functional allele of the upp gene of P. mendocina NK-01, was used to construct the vectors to delete the algA (encoding mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase) and phaZ (encoding PHA(MCL) depolymerase) genes, and a 30 kb chromosomal fragment in the 5-FU resistant background host. The genes were removed efficiently from the genome of P. mendocina NK-01 and left a markerless chromosomal mutant. In addition, two exogenous genes were inserted into the phaC1 (PHA(MCL) polymerase) loci of Pseudomonas putida KT-∆UPP simultaneously. Thus, we constructed a genetically stable and marker-free P. putida KT2440 mutant with integrated mpd (encoding methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH)) and pytH (encoding a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (PytH)) gene on the chromosome. The upp-based counterselection system could be further adapted for P. mendocina NK-01 and P. putida KT2440 and used for genome reduction and metabolic pathway engineering.

  17. Degradation of malathion, in aqueous extracts of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis).

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasuko; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2004-09-22

    Malathion was incubated in water extracts of vegetables at various temperatures and pH, and the amount of malathion present over time was analyzed by a gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector. Malathion was degraded to a nondetectable level in a 1% asparagus extract incubated at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C for 4 h. Carrot extract showed the second highest rate of malathion degradation (76%), followed by kale extract (23.7%), spinach extract (9.7%), and broccoli extract (1.5%) under the same conditions. The highest degradation rates of malathion were observed at 37 degrees C, when three different temperatures were tested (5, 25, and 37 degrees C) at pH 7.4. Rate constants were 0.134 min(-)(1) from a 1% asparagus solution and 0.095 min(-)(1) from a 0.5% asparagus solution. The highest degradation rate of malathion was achieved at pH 9 among the pHs tested (pH 4, 7.4, and 9) in a 0.5% asparagus solution. The 0.5% asparagus solution degraded dicarboxylic acid esters by almost 100% for dimethyl succinate and diethyl adipate, by 64% for diethyl acetyl succinate, and 30% for diethyl benzyl malonate when incubated at pH 9 for 20 min. The results support the hypothesis that the enzyme that degrades malathion in the asparagus solutions is a carboxylesterase.

  18. Use of esterase activities for the detection of chemical neurotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Manco, Giuseppe; Nucci, Roberto; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2009-01-01

    The quest for a quick and easy detection of the neurotoxin levels in the environment has fostered the search for systems alternative to currently employed analytical methods such as spectrophotometer, gas-liquid chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, and more recently mass spectrometry. These drawbacks lead to intense research efforts to develop biosensor devices for the determination of these compounds. In this review, we present an overview of the actual development of research in neurotoxin detection by using enzymatic biosensors based on esterase activity, in particular cholinesterases, and carboxylesterases. Detection by enzymatic activity could be carried out measuring the hydrolysis products or the residual enzymatic activity after inhibition, using a transducer system that makes possible the correlation between the determined activity and the analyte concentration. Several transducer systems were adopted for the neurotoxins identification using esterases, including electrochemical, optical, conductimetric and piezoelectric procedures. The differences in the used transducer determine the final sensitivity and specificity of the biosensor. Moreover, a brief description of immobilization procedure, that is an important step in the biosensor development and could affect the final characteristic of biosensor (sensibility, stability, response time and reproducibility), was accomplished. Final considerations on advantages and problems, related to actual development of these technologies, and its prospective were discussed.

  19. A Francisella Virulence Factor Catalyzes an Essential Reaction of Biotin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Napier, Brooke A.; Manandhar, Miglena; Henke, Sarah K; Weiss, David S.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We recently identified a gene (FTN_0818) required for Francisella virulence that seemed likely involved in biotin metabolism. However, the molecular function of this virulence determinant was unclear. Here we show that this protein named BioJ is the enzyme of the biotin biosynthesis pathway that determines the chain length of the biotin valeryl side chain. Expression of bioJ allows growth of an E. coli bioH strain on biotin-free medium, indicating functional equivalence of BioJ to the paradigm pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester carboxyl-esterase, BioH. BioJ was purified to homogeneity, shown to be monomeric and capable of hydrolysis of its physiological substrate methyl pimeloyl-ACP to pimeloyl-ACP, the precursor required to begin formation of the fused heterocyclic rings of biotin. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that distinct from BioH, BioJ represents a novel sub-clade of the α/β-hydrolase family. Structure-guided mapping combined with site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the BioJ catalytic triad consists of Ser151, Asp248 and His278, all of which are essential for activity and virulence. The biotin synthesis pathway was reconstituted in vitro and the physiological role of BioJ directly assayed. To the best of our knowledge, these data represent further evidence linking biotin synthesis to bacterial virulence. PMID:24313380

  20. B-esterase determination and organophosphate insecticide inhibitory effects in JEG-3 trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Marlon; Rivero Osimani, Valeria; Sánchez, Victoria; Rosenbaum, Enrique; Guiñazú, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    The placenta and trophoblasts express several B-esterases. This family includes acethylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CES) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), which are important targets of organophosphate insecticide (OP) toxicity. To better understand OP effects on trophoblasts, B-esterase basal activity and kinetic behavior were studied in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell cultures. Effects of the OP azinphos-methyl (Am) and chlorpyrifos (Cp) on cellular enzyme activity were also evaluated. JEG-3 cells showed measurable activity levels of AChE and CES, while BChE was undetected. Recorded Km for AChE and CES were 0.33 and 0.26 mM respectively. Native gel electrophoresis and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated CES1 and CES2 isoform expression. Cells exposed for 4 and 24 h to the OP Am or Cp, showed a differential CES and AChE inhibition profiles. Am inhibited CES and AChE at 4 h treatment while Cp showed the highest inhibition profile at 24 h. Interestingly, both insecticides differentially affected CES1 and CES2 activities. Results demonstrated that JEG-3 trophoblasts express AChE, CES1 and CES2. B-esterase enzymes were inhibited by in vitro OP exposure, indicating that JEG-3 cells metabolization capabilities include phase I enzymes, able to bioactivate OP. In addition, since CES enzymes are important for medicinal drug activation/deactivation, OP exposure may interfere with trophoblast CES metabolization, probably being relevant in a co-exposure scenario during pregnancy.

  1. Esterase detoxification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors by ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organophosphate (OP) and N-methylcarbamate pesticides inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but differences in metabolism and detoxification can influence potency of these pesticides across and within species. Carboxylesterase (CaE) and A-esterase (paraoxonase, PON) are considered factors underlying age-related sensitivity differences. We used an in vitro system to measure detoxification of AChE-inhibiting pesticides mediated via these esterases. Recombinant human AChE was used as a bioassay of inhibitor concentration following incubation with detoxifying tissue: liver plus Ca+2 (to stimulate PONs, measuring activity of both esterases) or EGTA (to inhibit PONs, thereby measuring CaE activity). Inhibitory concentrations of aldicarb, chlorpyrifos oxon, malaoxon, methamidophos, oxamyl, paraoxon, and methyl paraoxon were incubated with liver from adult male rat or one of 20 commercially provided human (11-83 years of age) liver samples. Detoxification was the difference in inhibition produced by the pesticide alone or in combination with liver plus Ca+2 or EGTA. Generally, rat liver produced more detoxification than did the human samples. There were large detoxification differences, which were not correlated with age or sex, across human samples for some pesticides (especially malaoxon, chlorpyrifos oxon) but not for others (e.g., aldicarb, methamidophos). Chlorpyrifos oxon was detoxified only in the presence of Ca+2 in both rat and human livers. Detoxification of pa

  2. Accurate protein structure annotation through competitive diffusion of enzymatic functions over a network of local evolutionary similarities.

    PubMed

    Venner, Eric; Lisewski, Andreas Martin; Erdin, Serkan; Ward, R Matthew; Amin, Shivas R; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2010-12-13

    High-throughput Structural Genomics yields many new protein structures without known molecular function. This study aims to uncover these missing annotations by globally comparing select functional residues across the structural proteome. First, Evolutionary Trace Annotation, or ETA, identifies which proteins have local evolutionary and structural features in common; next, these proteins are linked together into a proteomic network of ETA similarities; then, starting from proteins with known functions, competing functional labels diffuse link-by-link over the entire network. Every node is thus assigned a likelihood z-score for every function, and the most significant one at each node wins and defines its annotation. In high-throughput controls, this competitive diffusion process recovered enzyme activity annotations with 99% and 97% accuracy at half-coverage for the third and fourth Enzyme Commission (EC) levels, respectively. This corresponds to false positive rates 4-fold lower than nearest-neighbor and 5-fold lower than sequence-based annotations. In practice, experimental validation of the predicted carboxylesterase activity in a protein from Staphylococcus aureus illustrated the effectiveness of this approach in the context of an increasingly drug-resistant microbe. This study further links molecular function to a small number of evolutionarily important residues recognizable by Evolutionary Tracing and it points to the specificity and sensitivity of functional annotation by competitive global network diffusion. A web server is at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/networks.

  3. Purification and preliminary characterization of permethrinase from a pyrethroid-transforming strain of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, S E; Maule, A; Smith, A R

    1993-01-01

    Bacillus cereus SM3 was isolated on a mineral salts medium with Tween 80 as the primary carbon source. It was able to hydrolyze second- and third-generation pyrethroids, thereby generating noninsecticidal products. The enzyme responsible for this hydrolytic reaction was named permethrinase for this study. This is the first instance in which pyrethroid detoxification has been achieved with a cell-free microbial enzyme system. Permethrinase was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. The molecular mass of native permethrinase was 61 +/- 3 kDa, as estimated by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. This novel microbial esterase seems to be a carboxylesterase. Permethrinase activity had an optimum pH of 7.5 and a temperature optimum of 37 degrees C. No cofactors or coenzymes were required for permethrinase activity. The enzyme may be a serine esterase, as it seems to be sensitive to the organophosphorus compound tetraethylpyrophosphate at concentrations in the micromolar range. Addition of dithiothreitol afforded permethrinase protection against the inhibitory effects of the sulfydryl agents p-chloromercuribenzoate and N-ethylmaleimide. The enzyme was stable over a range of temperatures. Cell extracts of strain SM3 also contained another esterase, which was active towards beta-naphthylacetate, but this enzyme was distinct from permethrinase. Images PMID:8357241

  4. Muscular and hepatic pollution biomarkers in the fishes Phycis blennoides and Micromesistius poutassou and the crustacean Aristeus antennatus in the Blanes Submarine Canyon (NW Mediterranean).

    PubMed

    Solé, Montserrat; Hambach, Bastian; Cortijo, Verónica; Huertas, David; Fernández, Pilar; Company, Joan B

    2009-07-01

    Submarine canyons are regarded as a sink for pollutants. In order to determine if this theory applied to deep-sea species from an important fishing ground (the Blanes submarine canyon) located in the NW Mediterranean, we sampled the commercial fish Phycis blennoides and Micromesistius poutassou and the crustacean Aristeus antennatus. Specimens were sampled inside and outside (in the open continental slope) the submarine canyon; both are regarded as potentially affected by exposure to different anthropogenic chemicals. Several pollution biomarkers in muscle (activity of cholinesterases) and liver/hepatopancreas (catalase, glutathione S-transferases, carboxylesterases, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase in fish or mixed function oxygenase (MFO)-related reductases in crustacean, and lipid peroxidation levels) were measured. Chemical analysis of the persistent organic pollutants, namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) was also performed on the fish and crustacean muscle. Biomarker activities and levels were discussed in relation to pollutant exposure, habitat, and parameters including sex, size, and species. Biochemical responses and chemical analysis of PCBs evidenced interspecies differences as well as sex and size-related ones, mainly in A. antennatus. An indication of higher exposure to pollutants inside the canyon was observed, which was more clearly reflected in the fish than in the crustacean. However, further research is required to confirm this observation.

  5. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  6. B-esterase activities and blood cell morphology in the frog Leptodactylus chaquensis (Amphibia: Leptodactylidae) on rice agroecosystems from Santa Fe Province (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Attademo, Andrés M; Cabagna-Zenklusen, Mariana; Lajmanovich, Rafael C; Peltzer, Paola M; Junges, Celina; Bassó, Agustín

    2011-01-01

    Activity of B-esterases (BChE: butyrylcholinesterase and CbE: carboxylesterase using two model substrates: α-naphthyl acetate and 4-nitrophenyl valerate) in a native frog, Leptodactylus chaquensis from rice fields (RF1: methamidophos and RF2: cypermethrin and endosulfan sprayed by aircraft) and non-contaminated area (pristine forest) was measured. The ability of pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride (2-PAM) to reactivate BChE levels was also explored. In addition, changes in blood cell morphology and parasite infection were determined. Mean values of plasma BChE activities were lower in samples from the two rice fields than in those from the reference site. CbE (4-nitrophenyl valerate) levels varied in the three sites studied, being highest in RF1. Frog plasma from RF1 showed positive reactivation of BChE activity after incubation with 2-PAM. Blood parameters of frogs from RF2 revealed morphological alterations (anisochromasia and immature erythrocytes frequency). Moreover, a major infection of protozoan Trypanosoma sp. in individuals from the two rice fields was detected. We suggest that integrated use of several biomarkers (BChE and CBEs, chemical reactivation of plasma with 2-PAM, and blood cell parameters) may be a promising procedure for use in biomonitoring programmes to diagnose pesticide exposure of wild populations of this frog and other native anuran species in Argentina.

  7. Transcriptome mining: Multigene panel to test delousing drug response in the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Muñoz, V; Gallardo-Escárate, C

    2016-02-01

    Controlling infestations of copepodid ectoparasites in the salmon industry is increasingly problematic given higher instances of drug resistance or loss of sensitivity. Despite the importance of this issue, the molecular mechanisms and genes implicated in resistance/susceptibility are only scarcely understood. The objective of the present study was to identify and evaluate the expression levels of candidate genes associated with delousing drug response in the sea louse Caligus rogercresseyi. From RNA-seq data obtained for adult male and female sea lice, 62.48 M reads were assembled in 70,349 high-quality contigs. BLASTX analysis against UniprotKB/Swiss-Prot and the ESTs available for crustaceans in the NCBI database identified 870 transcripts previously related to genes associated with delousing drug response. Furthermore, 14 candidate genes were validated through RT-qPCR and were evaluated with deltamethrin and azamethiphos bioassays. The results evidenced an overregulation of genes involved in ion transport in salmon lice treated with deltamethrin, while those treated with azamethiphos evidenced an overregulation of genes such as cytochrome P450, Carboxylesterase, and acetylcholine receptors. The present study provides a multigene panel to test delousing drug response to pyrethroids and organophosphates in a highly prevalent pathogen of the Chilean salmon industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A polyclonal antibody preparation with Michaelian catalytic properties.

    PubMed Central

    Gallacher, G; Jackson, C S; Searcey, M; Badman, G T; Goel, R; Topham, C M; Mellor, G W; Brocklehurst, K

    1991-01-01

    1. 4-Nitrophenyl 4'-(3-aza-2-oxoheptyl)phenyl carbonate (I), an amide conjugate (XI) involving the carboxy group of 4-nitrophenyl 4'-carboxymethylphenyl phosphate and an amino group of keyhole-limpet haemocyanin, and a fluorescein derivative (XVII) were synthesized. 2. The conjugate (XI) was used as an immunogen with which to raise polyclonal antibodies in multigeneration cross-bred sheep; the fluorescent derivative (XVII) was used for the initial assessment of the antisera via binding assays monitored by fluorescence polarization; the carbonate ester (I) was used as a chromogenic substrate for the investigation of catalytic activity. 3. The IgG from the antiserum of sheep no. 270 was isolated by Na2SO4 precipitation and chromatography on Protein G-Sepharose. 4. This preparation of IgG catalysed the hydrolysis of the carbonate ester (I); the catalysis at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with at least 25 turnovers, Km = 3.34 microM, and lower limits for kcat. of 0.029 s-1 and for kcat./Km of 8.77 x 10(3) M-1.S-1, on the unlikely assumption that the concentration of catalytic antibody is provided by twice the total IgG concentration (two sites per molecule); probable estimates of the fraction of the total IgG that is anti-haptenic IgG and of the fraction of this that is catalytically active suggest that the values of kcat./Km are actually very much larger than these lower limits. 5. The failure of the antibody preparation to catalyse the hydrolysis of the isomeric 2-nitrophenyl carbonate (II), which differs from compound (I) only in the position of the nitro substituent in the leaving group, compels the view that catalytic activity is due to antibody rather than contaminant enzyme; this conclusion is supported by (a) the failure of the following to discriminate effectively between the isomeric substrates (I) and (II): pig liver carboxylesterase, rabbit liver carboxylesterase (collectively EC 3.1.1.1), whole serum from a non-immunized sheep and

  9. Insights into the novel hydrolytic mechanism of a diethyl 2-phenyl-2-(2-arylacetoxy)methyl malonate ester-based microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Tim; Walker, Gregory S; Goosen, Theunis C; Ruggeri, Roger B; Conn, Edward L; Rocke, Benjamin N; Lapham, Kimberly; Steppan, Claire M; Hepworth, David; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2012-10-15

    Inhibition of intestinal and hepatic microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a potential strategy for the treatment of dyslipidemia and related metabolic disorders. Inhibition of hepatic MTP, however, results in elevated liver transaminases and increased hepatic fat deposition consistent with hepatic steatosis. Diethyl 2-((2-(3-(dimethylcarbamoyl)-4-(4'-(trifluoromethyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-ylcarboxamido)phenyl)acetoxy)methyl)-2-phenylmalonate (JTT-130) is an intestine-specific inhibitor of MTP and does not cause increases in transaminases in short-term clinical trials in patients with dyslipidemia. Selective inhibition of intestinal MTP is achieved via rapid hydrolysis of its ester linkage by liver-specific carboxylesterase(s), resulting in the formation of an inactive carboxylic acid metabolite 1. In the course of discovery efforts around tissue-specific inhibitors of MTP, the mechanism of JTT-130 hydrolysis was examined in detail. Lack of ¹⁸O incorporation in 1 following the incubation of JTT-130 in human liver microsomes in the presence of H₂¹⁸O suggested that hydrolysis did not occur via a simple cleavage of the ester linkage. The characterization of atropic acid (2-phenylacrylic acid) as a metabolite was consistent with a hydrolytic pathway involving initial hydrolysis of one of the pendant malonate ethyl ester groups followed by decarboxylative fragmentation to 1 and the concomitant liberation of the potentially electrophilic acrylate species. Glutathione conjugates of atropic acid and its ethyl ester were also observed in microsomal incubations of JTT-130 that were supplemented with the thiol nucleophile. Additional support for the hydrolysis mechanism was obtained from analogous studies on diethyl 2-(2-(2-(3-(dimethylcarbamoyl)-4-(4'-trifluoromethyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-ylcarboxamido)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl)-2-phenylmalonate (3), which cannot participate in hydrolysis via the fragmentation pathway because of the additional methylene group

  10. Recovery study of cholinesterases and neurotoxic signs in the non-target freshwater invertebrate Chilina gibbosa after an acute exposure to an environmental concentration of azinphos-methyl.

    PubMed

    Cossi, Paula Fanny; Beverly, Boburg; Carlos, Luquet; Kristoff, Gisela

    2015-10-01

    Azinphos-methyl belongs to the class of organophosphate insecticides which are recognized for their anticholinesterase action. It is one of the most frequently used insecticides in the Upper Valley of Río Negro and Río Neuquén in Argentina, where agriculture represents the second most important economic activity. It has been detected in water from this North Patagonian region throughout the year and the maximum concentration found was 22.48 μg L(-1) during the application period. Chilina gibbosa is a freshwater gastropod widely distributed in South America, particularly in Patagonia, Argentina and in Southern Chile. Toxicological studies performed with C. gibbosa in our laboratory have reported neurotoxicity signs and cholinesterase inhibition after exposure to azinphos-methyl for 48 h. Recovery studies together with characterization of the enzyme and sensitivity of the enzyme to pesticides can improve the toxicological evaluation. However, little is known about recovery patterns in organisms exposed to organophosphates. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the recovery capacity (during 21 days in pesticide-free water) of cholinesterase activity and neurotoxicity in C. gibbosa after 48 h of exposure to azinphos-methyl. Also, lethality and carboxylesterase activity were registered during the recovery period. Regarding enzyme activities, after a 48-h exposure to 20 μg L(-1) of azinphos-methyl, cholinesterases showed an inhibition of 85% with respect to control, while carboxylesterases were not affected. After 21 days in pesticide-free water, cholinesterases continued to be inhibited (70%). Severe neurotoxicity signs were observed after exposure: 82% of the snails presented lack of adherence to vessels, 11% showed weak adherence, and 96% exhibited an abnormal protrusion of the head-foot region from shell. After 21 days in pesticide-free water, only 15% of the snails presented severe signs of neurotoxicity. However, during the recovery period significant

  11. Development of an eco-friendly mosquitocidal agent from Alangium salvifolium against the dengue vector Aedes aegypti and its biosafety on the aquatic predator.

    PubMed

    Thanigaivel, Annamalai; Vasantha-Srinivasan, Prabhakaran; Edwin, Edward-Sam; Ponsankar, Athirstam; Selin-Rani, Selvaraj; Chellappandian, Muthiah; Kalaivani, Kandaswamy; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-06-04

    Plant extracts with their enriched chemical constituents have established potential alternative mosquito control agents. In this research, we developed an eco-friendly mosquitocidal agent from Alangium salvifolium leaves against the dengue and Zika virus vector Aedes aegypti and we investigated its biosafety on the mosquito aquatic predator Toxorhynchites splendens. Results showed that the methanolic extract of A. salvifolium leaves was composed by eight main compounds, with major peak area for hexadecenoic acid (21.74%). LC50 and LC90 values calculated on Ae. aegypti fourth instar larvae were 104.80 and 269.15 ppm respectively. The methanolic extract tested at 100 ppm decreased the α-β carboxylesterase and SOD ratio significantly and upregulated the GST and CYP450 level. The A. salvifolium methanolic extract displayed significant repellent and adulticidal activity at 100 and 400 ppm respectively. The treatment with 100 ppm of the methanolic extract led to 210 min of protection from Ae. aegypti bites. Four hundred parts per million of the extract showed 98% adult mortality within 30 min from the treatment. Lastly, biosafety assays on the mosquito aquatic predator Tx. splendens showed that the toxicity of the A. salvifolium extract was significantly lower if compared to the cypermethrin-based treatments. The methanolic extract of A. salvifolium showed a maximum of 47.3% mortality rate at the concentration of 1000 ppm, while 0.7 ppm of cypermethrin achieved 91.3% mortality rate on Tx. splendens. Overall, our study enhances basic knowledge on how to improve natural larvicidal agents against dengue and Zika virus mosquito vector with harmless responses on non-target aquatic predators.

  12. Mechanisms on boron-induced alleviation of aluminum-toxicity in Citrus grandis seedlings at a transcriptional level revealed by cDNA-AFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin-Xing; Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Guo, Peng; Chen, Li-Song

    2015-01-01

    The physiological and biochemical mechanisms on boron (B)-induced alleviation of aluminum (B)-toxicity in plants have been examined in some details, but our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes is very limited. In this study, we first used the cDNA-AFLP to investigate the gene expression patterns in Citrus grandis roots responsive to B and Al interactions, and isolated 100 differentially expressed genes. Results showed that genes related to detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and aldehydes (i.e., glutathione S-transferase zeta class-like isoform X1, thioredoxin M-type 4, and 2-alkenal reductase (NADP+-dependent)-like), metabolism (i.e., carboxylesterases and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase-like 4-like, nicotianamine aminotransferase A-like isoform X3, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase 18-like isoform X1, and FNR, root isozyme 2), cell transport (i.e., non-specific lipid-transfer protein-like protein At2g13820-like and major facilitator superfamily protein), Ca signal and hormone (i.e., calcium-binding protein CML19-like and IAA-amino acid hydrolase ILR1-like 4-like), gene regulation (i.e., Gag-pol polyprotein) and cell wall modification (i.e., glycosyl hydrolase family 10 protein) might play a role in B-induced alleviation of Al-toxicity. Our results are useful not only for our understanding of molecular processes associated with B-induced alleviation of Al-toxicity, but also for obtaining key molecular genes to enhance Al-tolerance of plants in the future.

  13. The nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor contribute to the impact of fipronil on hepatic gene expression linked to thyroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roques, Béatrice B; Leghait, Julien; Lacroix, Marlène Z; Lasserre, Frédéric; Pineau, Thierry; Viguié, Catherine; Martin, Pascal G P

    2013-10-01

    Fipronil is described as a thyroid disruptor in rat. Based on the hypothesis that this results from a perturbation of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism, our goal was to investigate the pathways involved in fipronil-induced liver gene expression regulations. First, we performed a microarray screening in the liver of rats treated with fipronil or vehicle. Fipronil treatment led to the upregulation of several genes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics, including the cytochrome P450 Cyp2b1, Cyp2b2 and Cyp3a1, the carboxylesterases Ces2 and Ces6, the phase II enzymes Ugt1a1, Sult1b1 and Gsta2, and the membrane transporters Abcc2, Abcc3, Abcg5, Abcg8, Slco1a1 and Slco1a4. Based on a large overlap with the target genes of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR), we postulated that these two nuclear receptors are involved in mediating the effects of fipronil on liver gene expression in rodents. We controlled that liver gene expression changes induced by fipronil were generally reproduced in mice, and then studied the effects of fipronil in wild-type, CAR- and PXR-deficient mice. For most of the genes studied, the gene expression modulations were abolished in the liver of PXR-deficient mice and were reduced in the liver of CAR-deficient mice. However, CAR and PXR activation in mouse liver was not associated with a marked increase of thyroid hormone clearance, as observed in rat. Nevertheless, our data clearly indicate that PXR and CAR are key modulators of the hepatic gene expression profile following fipronil treatment which, in rats, may contribute to increase thyroid hormone clearance.

  14. A Novel Reaction Mediated by Human Aldehyde Oxidase: Amide Hydrolysis of GDC-0834

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Susan; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Liu, Lichuan; Khojasteh, S. Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.; Barr, John T.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Halladay, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    GDC-0834, a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor investigated as a potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was previously reported to be extensively metabolized by amide hydrolysis such that no measurable levels of this compound were detected in human circulation after oral administration. In vitro studies in human liver cytosol determined that GDC-0834 (R)-N-(3-(6-(4-(1,4-dimethyl-3-oxopiperazin-2-yl)phenylamino)-4-methyl-5-oxo- 4,5-dihydropyrazin-2-yl)-2-methylphenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b] thiophene-2-carboxamide) was rapidly hydrolyzed with a CLint of 0.511 ml/min per milligram of protein. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) and carboxylesterase (CES) were putatively identified as the enzymes responsible after cytosolic fractionation and mass spectrometry-proteomics analysis of the enzymatically active fractions. Results were confirmed by a series of kinetic experiments with inhibitors of AO, CES, and xanthine oxidase (XO), which implicated AO and CES, but not XO, as mediating GDC-0834 amide hydrolysis. Further supporting the interaction between GDC-0834 and AO, GDC-0834 was shown to be a potent reversible inhibitor of six known AO substrates with IC50 values ranging from 0.86 to 1.87 μM. Additionally, in silico modeling studies suggest that GDC-0834 is capable of binding in the active site of AO with the amide bond of GDC-0834 near the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo), orientated in such a way to enable potential nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl of the amide bond by the hydroxyl of MoCo. Together, the in vitro and in silico results suggest the involvement of AO in the amide hydrolysis of GDC-0834. PMID:25845827

  15. Biochemical analysis of a chlorfenapyr-selected resistant strain of Tetranychus urticae Koch.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Van Pottelberge, Steven; Tirry, Luc

    2006-05-01

    Tetranychus urticae Koch has recently developed resistance to chlorfenapyr in Australia and Japan, but no attempt has yet been made to describe the biochemical mechanisms involved in chlorfenapyr resistance. In this study a laboratory-selected chlorfenapyr-resistant strain was investigated. Resistance to chlorfenapyr was associated with a strong increase in esterase activity and P450 mono-oxygenase (MO) activity but a decrease in 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMBZ) peroxidation activity. Differences in esterase activities between susceptible and resistant strains increased with increasing carbon number of the aliphatic side-chain of the nitrophenol substrate. A 4.4-fold increase in the O-deethylation of 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin (7-EFC) mediated by P450 MOs was detected. Remarkably, the resistant strain showed only half of the total TMBZ peroxidation activity found in the susceptible strain. The activity of these enzymes was further determined on different crosses and back-crosses of both strains. Results indicated that activities correlated with chlorfenapyr susceptibility and could be considered as biochemical markers. Esterase isozymes of both strains and their crosses were separated with isoelectric focusing (IEF) and visualised after activity staining. It was clear that two distinct zones of enhanced esterase activity were present in the chlorfenapyr-resistant strain (EST 11, pI = 4.88 and EST 16, pI = 4.71). EST 11 was identified with inhibitors as a carboxylesterase. The relative presence and intensity of these esterase zones changed in the different crosses and could be seen as a marker for chlorfenapyr resistance. Glutathione-S-transferase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were not significantly different between strains. A twofold decrease in TMBZ peroxidase activity in the resistant strain could reflect decreased activation of chlorfenapyr. On the basis of these results the involvement of P450 MOs and esterases in the

  16. 3D-fibroblast tissues constructed by a cell-coat technology enhance tight-junction formation of human colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsusaki, Michiya; Hikimoto, Daichi; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Kadowaki, Koji; Ohura, Kayoko; Imai, Teruko; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2015-02-13

    Caco-2, human colon carcinoma cell line, has been widely used as a model system for intestinal epithelial permeability because Caco-2 cells express tight-junctions, microvilli, and a number of enzymes and transporters characteristic of enterocytes. However, the functional differentiation and polarization of Caco-2 cells to express sufficient tight-junctions (a barrier) usually takes over 21 days in culture. This may be due to the cell culture environment, for example inflammation induced by plastic petri dishes. Three-dimensional (3D) sufficient cell microenvironments similar to in vivo natural conditions (proteins and cells), will promote rapid differentiation and higher functional expression of tight junctions. Herein we report for the first time an enhancement in tight-junction formation by 3D-cultures of Caco-2 cells on monolayered (1L) and eight layered (8L) normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). Trans epithelial electric resistance (TEER) of Caco-2 cells was enhanced in the 3D-cultures, especially 8L-NHDF tissues, depending on culture times and only 10 days was enough to reach the same TEER value of Caco-2 monolayers after a 21 day incubation. Relative mRNA expression of tight-junction proteins of Caco-2 cells on 3D-cultures showed higher values than those in monolayer structures. Transporter gene expression patterns of Caco-2 cells on 3D-constructs were almost the same as those of Caco-2 monolayers, suggesting that there was no effect of 3D-cultures on transporter protein expression. The expression correlation between carboxylesterase 1 and 2 in 3D-cultures represented similar trends with human small intestines. The results of this study clearly represent a valuable application of 3D-Caco-2 tissues for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enzymatic biomarkers as tools to assess environmental quality: a case study of exposure of the honeybee Apis mellifera to insecticides.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Stephan M; Belzunces, Luc P; Carvalho, Geraldo A; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Badiou-Beneteau, Alexandra

    2013-09-01

    The present study was intended to evaluate the responses of enzymes in the honeybee Apis mellifera after exposure to deltamethrin, fipronil, and spinosad and their use as biomarkers. After determination of the median lethal doses (LD50), honeybees were exposed at doses of 5.07 ng/bee and 2.53 ng/bee for deltamethrin, 0.58 ng/bee and 0.29 ng/bee for fipronil, and 4.71 ng/bee and 2.36 ng/bee for spinosad (equivalent to 1/10th [LD50/10] and 1/20th [LD50/20] of the LD50, respectively). The responses of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterases (CaEs-1-3), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were assessed. The results showed that deltamethrin, fipronil, and spinosad modulated these biomarkers differentially. For the enzyme involved in the defense against oxidative stress, fipronil and spinosad induced CAT activity. For the remaining enzymes, 3 response profiles were identified. First, exposure to deltamethrin induced slight effects and modulated only CaE-1 and CaE-2, with opposite effects. Second, spinosad exhibited an induction profile for most of the biomarkers, except AChE. Third, fipronil did not modulate AChE, CaE-2, or GST, increased CAT and CaE-1, and decreased ALP. Thus, this set of honeybee biomarkers appears to be a promising tool to evaluate environmental and honeybee health, and it could generate fingerprints to characterize exposures to pesticides. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  18. Hormone-dependence of sarin lethality in rats: sex differences and stage of the estrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carl D.; Wright, Linnzi K.M.; Garcia, Gregory E.; Lee, Robyn B.; Lumley, Lucille A.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) are highly toxic compounds that cause a cascade of symptoms and death, if exposed casualties are left untreated. Numerous rodent models have investigated the toxicity and mechanisms of toxicity of CWNAs, but most are limited to male subjects. Given the profound physiological effects of circulating gonadal hormones in female rodents, it is possible that the daily cyclical fluctuations of these hormones affect females’ sensitivity to the lethal effects of CWNAs, and previous reports that included female subjects did not control for the stage of the hormonal cycle. The aim of the current study was to determine the 24-hour median lethal dose (LD50) of the CWNA sarin in male, ovariectomized (OVEX) female, and female rats during different stages of the estrous cycle (diestrus, proestrus, and estrus). Additionally, baseline activity levels of plasma acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase, and carboxylesterase were measured to determine differences among the groups. Results indicated that females in proestrus had a significantly higher LD50 of sarin compared to OVEX and estrous females. Although some sex differences were observed in the activity levels of plasma esterases, they were not consistent and likely not large enough to significantly affect the LD50s. These results suggest that hormonal cyclicity can influence the outcome of CWNA-related studies using female rodents, and that this variability can be minimized by controlling for the stage of the cycle. Additional research is necessary to determine the precise mechanism of the observed differences because it is unlikely to be solely explained by plasma esterase activity. PMID:26079828

  19. Effects of Sublethal Exposure to a Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Formulation on Metabolic Activities of Different Xenobiotic-Metabolizing Enzymes in Rats.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Karen; Najle, Roberto; Lifschitz, Adrián; Maté, María L; Lanusse, Carlos; Virkel, Guillermo L

    2014-07-01

    The activities of different xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in liver subcellular fractions from Wistar rats exposed to a glyphosate (GLP)-based herbicide (Roundup full II) were evaluated in this work. Exposure to the herbicide triggered protective mechanisms against oxidative stress (increased glutathione peroxidase activity and total glutathione levels). Liver microsomes from both male and female rats exposed to the herbicide had lower (45%-54%, P < 0.01) hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) levels compared to their respective control animals. In female rats, the hepatic 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (a general CYP-dependent enzyme activity) was 57% higher (P < 0.05) in herbicide-exposed compared to control animals. Conversely, this enzyme activity was 58% lower (P < 0.05) in male rats receiving the herbicide. Lower (P < 0.05) 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethlyase (EROD, CYP1A1/2 dependent) and oleandomycin triacetate (TAO) N-demethylase (CYP3A dependent) enzyme activities were observed in liver microsomes from exposed male rats. Conversely, in females receiving the herbicide, EROD increased (123%-168%, P < 0.05), whereas TAO N-demethylase did not change. A higher (158%-179%, P < 0.01) benzyloxyresorufin O-debenzylase (a CYP2B-dependent enzyme activity) activity was only observed in herbicide-exposed female rats. In herbicide-exposed rats, the hepatic S-oxidation of methimazole (flavin monooxygenase dependent) was 49% to 62% lower (P < 0.001), whereas the carbonyl reduction of menadione (a cytosolic carbonyl reductase-dependent activity) was higher (P < 0.05). Exposure to the herbicide had no effects on enzymatic activities dependent on carboxylesterases, glutathione transferases, and uridinediphospho-glucuronosyltransferases. This research demonstrated certain biochemical modifications after exposure to a GLP-based herbicide. Such modifications may affect the metabolic fate of different endobiotic and xenobiotic substances. The pharmacotoxicological significance of these

  20. Fumonisins: oxidative stress-mediated toxicity and metabolism in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Wu, Qinghua; Wan, Dan; Liu, Qianying; Chen, Dongmei; Liu, Zhenli; Martínez-Larrañaga, María Rosa; Martínez, María Aránzazu; Anadón, Arturo; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    Fumonisins (FBs) are widespread Fusarium toxins commonly found as corn contaminants. FBs could cause a variety of diseases in animals and humans, such as hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, hepatocarcinogenic and cytotoxic effects in mammals. To date, almost no review has addressed the toxicity of FBs in relation to oxidative stress and their metabolism. The focus of this article is primarily intended to summarize the progress in research associated with oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for FB-induced toxicity as well as the metabolism. The present review showed that studies have been carried out over the last three decades to elucidate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress as a result of FBs treatment and have correlated them with various types of FBs toxicity, indicating that oxidative stress plays critical roles in the toxicity of FBs. The major metabolic pathways of FBs are hydrolysis, acylation and transamination. Ceramide synthase, carboxylesterase FumD and aminotransferase FumI could degrade FB1 and FB2. The cecal microbiota of pigs and alkaline processing such as nixtamalization can also transform FB1 into metabolites. Most of the metabolites of FB1 were less toxic than FB1, except its partial (pHFB1) metabolites. Further understanding of the role of oxidative stress in FB-induced toxicity will throw new light on the use of antioxidants, scavengers of ROS, as well as on the blind spots of metabolism and the metabolizing enzymes of FBs. The present review might contribute to reveal the toxicity of FBs and help to protect against their oxidative damage.

  1. Genetic diversity, acaricide resistance status and evolutionary potential of a Rhipicephalus microplus population from a disease-controlled cattle farming area in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Robbertse, Luïse; Baron, Samantha; van der Merwe, Nicolaas A; Madder, Maxime; Stoltsz, Wilhelm H; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2016-06-01

    The Southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus is a hematophagous ectoparasite of great veterinary and economic importance. Along with its adaptability, reproductive success and vectoring capacity, R. microplus has been reported to develop resistance to the major chemical classes of acaricides currently in use. In South Africa, the Mnisi community in the Mpumalanga region offers a unique opportunity to study the adaptive potential of R. microplus. The aims of this study therefore included characterising acaricide resistance and determining the level and pattern of genetic diversity for R. microplus in this region from one primary population consisting of 12 communal dip-stations. The level of acaricide resistance was evaluated using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes that contribute to acaricide insensitivity. Additionally, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) gene fragments of collected individuals were sequenced and a haplotype network was constructed. A high prevalence of alleles attributed to resistance against formamidines (amitraz) in the octopamine/tyramine (OCT/Tyr) receptor (frequency of 0.55) and pyrethroids in the carboxylesterase (frequency of 0.81) genes were observed. Overall, the sampled tick population was homozygous resistant to pyrethroid-based acaricides in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGS) gene. A total of 11 haplotypes were identified in the Mnisi R. microplus population from ITS2 analysis with no clear population structure. From these allele frequencies it appears that formamidine resistance in the Mnisi community is on the rise, as the R. microplus populations is acquiring or generating these resistance alleles. Apart from rearing multi-resistant ticks to commonly used acaricides in this community these ticks may pose future problems to its surrounding areas.

  2. Standard versus continuous administration of capecitabine in metastatic breast cancer (GEICAM/2009-05): a randomized, noninferiority phase II trial with a pharmacogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Martín, Miguel; Martínez, Noelia; Ramos, Manuel; Calvo, Lourdes; Lluch, Ana; Zamora, Pilar; Muñoz, Montserrat; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalía; García-Sáenz, José Ángel; Guerra, Eva; Caronia, Daniela; Casado, Antonio; Ruíz-Borrego, Manuel; Hernando, Blanca; Chacón, José Ignacio; De la Torre-Montero, Julio César; Jimeno, María Ángeles; Heras, Lucía; Alonso, Rosario; De la Haba, Juan; Pita, Guillermo; Constenla, Manuel; González-Neira, Anna

    2015-02-01

    The approved capecitabine regimen as monotherapy in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is 1,250 mg/m(2) twice daily for 2 weeks on and 1 week off (Cint). Dose modifications are often required because of severe hand-foot syndrome (HFS). We tested a continuous regimen with a lower daily dose but a similar cumulative dose in an attempt to reduce the severity of adverse events (AEs) while maintaining efficacy. We randomized 195 patients with HER-2/neu-negative MBC to capecitabine 800 mg/m(2) twice daily throughout the 21-day cycle (Ccont) or to Cint to assess noninferiority in the percentage of patients free of progression at 1 year. Secondary endpoints included efficacy and safety. Associations between polymorphisms in capecitabine metabolism-related genes and drug response were assessed. The percentage of patients free of progression at 1 year was 27.3% with Cint versus 25.3% with Ccont (difference of -2.0%; 95% confidence interval: -15.5% to 11.5%, exceeding the 15% deemed noninferior). Differences regarding other efficacy variables were also not found. Grade 3-4 HFS was the most frequent AE (41.1% in Cint vs. 42.3% in Ccont). Grade 3-4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, diarrhea, and stomatitis were more frequent with Cint. A 5' untranslated region polymorphism in the carboxylesterase 2 gene was associated with HFS. One polymorphism in cytidine deaminase and two in thymidine phosphorylase were associated with survival. Our study was unable to show noninferiority with the continuous capecitabine regimen (Ccont) compared with the approved intermittent regimen (Cint). Further investigation is required to improve HFS. Polymorphisms in several genes might contribute to interindividual differences in response to capecitabine. ©AlphaMed Press; the data published online to support this summary is the property of the authors.

  3. Controlling Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens pallens using silver nanoparticles synthesized from aqueous extract of Cassia fistula fruit pulp and its mode of action.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Hatem; Hongjie, Li; Hosni, Dawood; Wei, Jiqian; Abbas, Ghulam; Ga'al, Hassan; Jianchu, Mo

    2017-05-25

    Mosquitoes act as key vector for transmission of devastating parasites and pathogens which affect millions of people globally. In this research, the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles of Cassia fistula fruit pulp as an innovative and operative tool against vector mosquitoes is presented. Silver nanoparticles were characterized by a series of techniques including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscope and confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscope, UV-Vis spectrophotometry and X-ray diffraction. Silver nanoparticles were highly effective against the larvae (I-IV instar) and pupae of Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens pallens after 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment. Ae. albopictus had LC50 values ranging from 8.3 mg/L (I instar) to 17.3 mg/L (pupae) and LC50 ranging from 1.1 mg/L (I instar) to 19.0 mg/L (pupae) against Cx. pipiens pallens. The systemic effect of AgNPs was further assessed in the fourth instar larvae of Ae. albopictus and Cx. pipiens pallens by measuring the levels of total proteins and activity of two important marker enzymes: Acetylcholinesterase and α- and β-carboxylesterase. Overall, the findings of the study suggest that the use of Cassia fistula-fruit pulp extract mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles can be used for controlling vector mosquitoes. This is the first report on the mosquito larvicidal and pupicidal activity of AgNPs synthesized by Cassia fistula fruit pulp and its possible mechanism of action.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of EstE1, a new and thermostable esterase cloned from a metagenomic library

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Jung-Sue; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Dong-Uk; Oh, Jong-Won; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Recombinant EstE1 protein with a histidine tag at the C-terminus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) and then purified by affinity chromatography. The protein was then crystallized at 290 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. EstE1, a new thermostable esterase, was isolated by functional screening of a metagenomic DNA library from thermal environment samples. This enzyme showed activity towards short-chain acyl derivatives of length C4–C6 at a temperature of 303–363 K and displayed a high thermostability above 353 K. EstE1 has 64 and 57% amino-acid sequence similarity to est{sub pc}-encoded carboxylesterase from Pyrobaculum calidifontis and AFEST from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, respectively. The recombinant protein with a histidine tag at the C-terminus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) and then purified by affinity chromatography. The protein was crystallized at 290 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution from an EstE1 crystal; the crystal belongs to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.71, c = 234.23 Å. Assuming the presence of four molecules in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient V{sub M} is calculated to be 2.2 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and the solvent content is 44.1%.

  5. RNA-seq of Rice Yellow Stem Borer Scirpophaga incertulas Reveals Molecular Insights During Four Larval Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Renuka, Pichili; Madhav, Maganti S; Padmakumari, Ayyagari Phani; Barbadikar, Kalyani M; Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Vijaya Sudhakara Rao, Kola; Marla, Soma S; Ravindra Babu, Vemuri

    2017-09-07

    The yellow stem borer (YSB), Scirpophaga incertulas, is a prominent pest in rice cultivation causing serious yield losses. The larval stage is an important stage in YSB, responsible for maximum infestation. However, limited knowledge exists on the biology and mechanisms underlying the growth and differentiation of YSB. To understand and identify the genes involved in YSB development and infestation, so as to design pest control strategies, we performed de novo transcriptome analysis at the first, third, fifth, and seventh larval developmental stages employing Illumina Hi-seq. High-quality reads (HQR) of ∼229 Mb were assembled into 24,775 transcripts with an average size of 1485 bp. Genes associated with various metabolic processes, i.e., detoxification mechanism [CYP450, GSTs, and carboxylesterases (CarEs)], RNA interference (RNAi) machinery (Dcr-1, Dcr-2, Ago-1, Ago-2, Sid-1, Sid-2, Sid-3, and Sid-1-related gene), chemoreception (CSPs, GRs, OBPs, and ORs), and regulators [transcription factors (TFs) and hormones] were differentially regulated during the developmental stages. Identification of stage-specific transcripts made it possible to determine the essential processes of larval development. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed that YSB has not evolved much with respect to the detoxification mechanism, but showed the presence of distinct RNAi machinery. The presence of strong specific visual recognition coupled with chemosensory mechanisms supports the monophagous nature of YSB. Designed expressed sequenced tags-simple-sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) will facilitate accurate estimation of the genetic diversity of YSB. This is the first report on characterization of the YSB transcriptome and the identification of genes involved in key processes, which will help researchers and industry to devise novel pest control strategies. This study also opens up a new avenue to develop next-generation resistant rice using RNAi or genome editing approaches. Copyright

  6. Cytochrome P450 Isoforms in the Metabolism of Decursin and Decursinol Angelate from Korean Angelica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Li, Li; Tang, Suni; Hale, Thomas W; Xing, Chengguo; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that the in vitro hepatic microsomal metabolism of pyranocoumarin compound decursinol angelate (DA) to decursinol (DOH) exclusively requires cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, whereas the conversion of its isomer decursin (D) to DOH can be mediated by CYP and esterase(s). To provide insight into specific isoforms involved, here we show with recombinant human CYP that 2C19 was the most active at metabolizing D and DA in vitro followed by 3A4. With carboxylesterases (CES), D was hydrolyzed by CES2 but not CES1, and DA was resistant to both CES1 and CES2. In human liver microsomal (HLM) preparation, the general CYP inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) and respective competitive inhibitors for 2C19 and 3A4, (+)-N-3-benzylnirvanol (NBN) and ketoconazole substantially retarded the metabolism of DA and, to a lesser extent, of D. In healthy human subjects from a single-dose pharmacokinetic (PK) study, 2C19 extensive metabolizer genotype (2C19*17 allele) tended to have less plasma DA AUC0-48h and poor metabolizer genotype (2C19*2 allele) tended to have greater DA AUC0-48h. In mice given a single dose of D/DA, pretreatment with ABT boosted the plasma and prostate levels of D and DA by more than an order of magnitude. Taken together, our findings suggest that CYP isoforms 2C19 and 3A4 may play a crucial role in the first pass liver metabolism of DA and, to a lesser extent, that of D in humans. Pharmacogenetics with respect to CYP genotypes and interactions among CYP inhibitor drugs and D/DA should therefore be considered in designing future translation studies of DA and/or D.

  7. Identification of activating enzymes of a novel FBPase inhibitor prodrug, CS-917.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kazuishi; Inaba, Shin-Ichi; Nakano, Rika; Watanabe, Mihoko; Sakurai, Hidetaka; Fukushima, Yumiko; Ichikawa, Kimihisa; Takahashi, Tohru; Izumi, Takashi; Shinagawa, Akira

    2015-06-01

    CS-917 (MB06322) is a selective small compound inhibitor of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), which is expected to be a novel drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes by inhibiting gluconeogenesis. CS-917 is a bisamidate prodrug and activation of CS-917 requires a two-step enzyme catalyzed reaction. The first-step enzyme, esterase, catalyzes the conversion of CS-917 into the intermediate form (R-134450) and the second-step enzyme, phosphoramidase, catalyzes the conversion of R-134450 into the active form (R-125338). In this study, we biochemically purified the CS-917 esterase activity in monkey small intestine and liver. We identified cathepsin A (CTSA) and elastase 3B (ELA3B) as CS-917 esterases in the small intestine by mass spectrometry, whereas we found CTSA and carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) in monkey liver. We also purified R-134450 phosphoramidase activity in monkey liver and identified sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase, acid-like 3A (SMPADL3A), as an R-134450 phosphoramidase, which has not been reported to have any enzyme activity. Recombinant human CTSA, ELA3B, and CES1 showed CS-917 esterase activity and recombinant human SMPDL3A showed R-134450 phosphoramidase activity, which confirmed the identification of those enzymes. Identification of metabolic enzymes responsible for the activation process is the requisite first step to understanding the activation process, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of CS-917 at the molecular level. This is the first identification of a phosphoramidase other than histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein (HINT) family enzymes and SMPDL3A might generally contribute to activation of the other bisamidate prodrugs.

  8. Identification of activating enzymes of a novel FBPase inhibitor prodrug, CS-917

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kazuishi; Inaba, Shin-ichi; Nakano, Rika; Watanabe, Mihoko; Sakurai, Hidetaka; Fukushima, Yumiko; Ichikawa, Kimihisa; Takahashi, Tohru; Izumi, Takashi; Shinagawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    CS-917 (MB06322) is a selective small compound inhibitor of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), which is expected to be a novel drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes by inhibiting gluconeogenesis. CS-917 is a bisamidate prodrug and activation of CS-917 requires a two-step enzyme catalyzed reaction. The first-step enzyme, esterase, catalyzes the conversion of CS-917 into the intermediate form (R-134450) and the second-step enzyme, phosphoramidase, catalyzes the conversion of R-134450 into the active form (R-125338). In this study, we biochemically purified the CS-917 esterase activity in monkey small intestine and liver. We identified cathepsin A (CTSA) and elastase 3B (ELA3B) as CS-917 esterases in the small intestine by mass spectrometry, whereas we found CTSA and carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) in monkey liver. We also purified R-134450 phosphoramidase activity in monkey liver and identified sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase, acid-like 3A (SMPADL3A), as an R-134450 phosphoramidase, which has not been reported to have any enzyme activity. Recombinant human CTSA, ELA3B, and CES1 showed CS-917 esterase activity and recombinant human SMPDL3A showed R-134450 phosphoramidase activity, which confirmed the identification of those enzymes. Identification of metabolic enzymes responsible for the activation process is the requisite first step to understanding the activation process, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of CS-917 at the molecular level. This is the first identification of a phosphoramidase other than histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein (HINT) family enzymes and SMPDL3A might generally contribute to activation of the other bisamidate prodrugs. PMID:26171222

  9. The targeted histone deacetylase inhibitor tefinostat (CHR-2845) shows selective in vitro efficacy in monocytoid-lineage leukaemias

    PubMed Central

    Zabkiewicz, Joanna; Gilmour, Marie; Hills, Robert; Vyas, Pares; Bone, Elizabeth; Davidson, Alan; Burnett, Alan; Knapper, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Tefinostat (CHR-2845) is a novel monocyte/macrophage-targeted histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor which is cleaved into its active acid by the intracellular esterase human carboxylesterase-1 (hCE-1). The in vitro efficacy of tefinostat was characterised in cell lines and in a cohort of 73 primary AML and CMML samples. Dose-dependent induction of apoptosis and significant growth inhibitory effects were seen in myelomonocytic (M4), monocytic/monoblastic (M5) and CMML samples in comparison to non-monocytoid AML sub-types (p = 0.007). Importantly, no growth inhibitory effects were seen in normal bone marrow CD34+ cells exposed to AML-toxic doses of tefinostat in clonogenic assays. Expression of hCE-1 was measured by intracellular flow cytometry and immunoblotting across the cohort, with highest levels seen in M5 AML patients. hCE-1 levels correlated with significantly increased tefinostat sensitivity (low EC50) as measured by growth inhibition assays (p = 0.001) and concomitant elevation of the mature monocytoid marker CD14+. Strong induction of intracellular histone protein acetylation was observed in tefinostat-responsive samples, as were high levels of the DNA damage sensor γ-H2A.X, highlighting potential biomarkers of patient responsiveness. Synergistic interaction between tefinostat and the current standard treatment cytarabine was demonstrated in dose response and clonogenic assays using simultaneous drug addition in primary samples (median Combination Index value = 0.51). These data provide a strong rationale for the further clinical evaluation of tefinostat in monocytoid-lineage haematological neoplasms including CMML and monocyte-lineage AMLs. PMID:26934551

  10. Effects of novel brominated flame retardant TBPH and its metabolite TBMEHP on human vascular endothelial cells: Implication for human health risks.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ping; Liu, Rong-Yan; Sun, Hong-Jie; Yang, Yun-Wen; Cui, Xin-Yi; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-07-01

    As a replacement for polybrominated diphenyl ethers, bis-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBPH) is widely used as a novel flame retardant and has been detected in many environmental matrix including human blood. TBPH can be metabolized into mono-(2-ethyhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (TBMEHP) by carboxylesterase. However, their adverse effects on human vascular endothelium and their potential impacts on human cardiovascular disease are unknown. In this study, their adverse effects and associated molecular mechanisms on human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated. A concentration-dependent inhibition on HUVECs' viability and growth was observed for TBMEHP but not for TBPH. TBMEHP induced a marked G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and robust cell apoptosis at 1μg/mL by inducing expression of p53, GADD45α and cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors (p21and p27) while suppressing the expression of cyclin D1, CDK2, CDK6, and Bcl-2. Unlike TBMEHP, TBPH caused early apoptosis after G2/M phase arrest only at 10μg/mL via up-regulation of p21 and down-regulation of CDK2 and CDK4. TBMEHP decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased caspase-3 activity at 1μg/mL, suggesting that activation of p53 and mitochondrial pathway were involved in the cell apoptosis. The data showed that TBPH and TBMEHP induced different cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through different molecular mechanisms with much higher toxicity for TBMEHP. Our study implies that the metabolites of TBPH, possibly other novel brominated flame retardants, may be of potential concern for human cardiovascular disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-08

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  12. Low concentrations of metal mixture exposures have adverse effects on selected biomarkers of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Yologlu, Ertan; Ozmen, Murat

    2015-11-01

    Polluted ecosystems may contain mixtures of metals, such that the combinations of metals, even in low concentrations, may cause adverse effects. In the present study, we focused on toxic effects of mixtures of selected metals, the LC50 values, and also their safety limit in aquatic systems imposed by the European legislation using a model organism. Xenopus laevis tadpoles were used as test organisms. They were exposed to metals or their combinations due to 96-h LC50 values. Glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CaE), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) levels were evaluated. Metallothionein concentrations were also determined. The LC50s for Cd, Pb, and Cu were calculated as 5.81mg AI/L, 123.05mg AI/L, and 0.85mg AI/L, respectively. Low lethality ratios were observed with unary exposure of each metal in lower concentrations. Double or triple combinations of LC50 and LC50/2 concentrations caused 100% lethality with Cd+Cu and Pb+Cd+Cu mixtures, while the Pb+Cu mixture also caused high lethal ratios. The selected enzyme activities were significantly affected by metals or mixtures, and dose-related effects were determined. The metallothionein levels generally increased as related to concentration in unary metals and mixtures. Acceptable limit values of unary metals and mixtures did not significantly change metallothionein levels. The results suggest that oxidative stress-related mechanisms are involved in the toxicity induced by selected metals with combinations of very low concentrations.

  13. Rabbit serum albumin hydrolyzes the carbamate carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Sogorb, Miguel A; Carrera, Victoria; Benabent, Mónica; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2002-04-01

    One of the main detoxification processes of the carbamate insecticides is the hydrolysis of the carbamic ester bond. Carboxylesterases seem to play important roles in the metabolization of carbamates. This study performs a biochemical characterization of the capabilities of rabbit serum albumin (RSA) to hydrolyze the carbamate carbaryl. Rabbit serum albumin was able to hydrolyze carbaryl with a K(cat) of 7.1 x 10(-5) s(-1). The K(m) for this hydrolysis reaction was 240 microM. Human, chicken, and bovine serum albumins were also able to hydrolyze carbaryl. The divalent cation Cu(2+) at 1 mM concentration inhibited around 50% of the hydrolysis of carbaryl by RSA. Other mono- and divalent cations at 1 mM concentration and 5 mM EDTA exerted no significant effects on the hydrolysis of carbaryl by RSA. The inhibition of the carbaryl hydrolysis by sulfydril blocking agents suggests that a cysteine residue plays an important role in the active center of the catalytic activity. Both caprylic and palmitic acids were noncompetitive inhibitors of the carbaryl hydrolysis by RSA. The carboxyl ester p-nitrophenyl butyrate is a substrate of RSA and competitively inhibited the hydrolysis of carbaryl by this protein, suggesting that the hydrolysis of carbaryl and the hydrolysis of carboxyl esters occur in the same catalytic site and through a similar mechanism. This mechanism might be based on the carbamylation of a tyrosine residue of the RSA. Serum albumin is a protein universally present in nontarget species of insecticides; therefore, the capability of this protein to hydrolyze other carbamates must be studied because it might have important toxicological and ecotoxicological implications.

  14. Detoxification of nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates in blood plasma and tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Brundrett, R B; Hartman, P E

    1984-01-01

    Nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates exhibit relatively high mutagenic activity in Salmonella when compared with nitrosoureas. This high activity can be accounted for by activation of nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates by cellular thiols, predominantly reduced glutathione, that are present intracellularly at concentrations in the millimolar range. In striking contrast to the in vitro mutagenicity tests, a number of studies have indicated that nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates are less potent than nitrosoureas when tested in vivo in model systems such as the mouse. We extend here previous studies [Aukerman et al, 1983] that demonstrate striking chemical decomposition and inactivation of mutagenic activity of nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates during exposure to murine blood plasma. Plasma glutathione concentrations are inadequate to account for the rapid inactivations noted. Furthermore, the predominant inactivating species is heat-sensitive, nondialyzable, and is greater than 25,000 daltons in size as judged by ultrafiltration experiments. Serum albumin has some inactivating capacity at the concentration found in undiluted plasma and could account for the very low but significant inactivating capacity of human plasma. On the other hand, serum albumin lacks the potency necessary to account for the extremely high levels of inactivating activity observed in rodent and rabbit plasma. Elsewhere we present evidence that carboxylesterase activity is the predominant inactivating species in mouse plasma [Aukerman et al, 1983; Aukerman, 1983; Brundrett and Aukerman, 1984]. Mouse liver, large intestine, kidney, and stomach have more activity per milligram protein under the assay conditions used than plasma itself. Rat liver S9 is also active at enhancing the decomposition of nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates; most of this inactivating capacity resides in the microsomal fraction. The relatively rapid detoxification of these N-nitroso compounds by plasma and other tissues of

  15. Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) genotoxicity profile: relevance for carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    Vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is a site-of-contact carcinogen in rodents. It is also DNA reactive and mutagenic, but only after its carboxylesterase mediated conversion to acetaldehyde (AA), a metabolic reaction that also produces acetic acid and protons. As VAM's mutagenic metabolite, AA is normally produced endogenously; detoxification by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is required to maintain intra-cellular AA homeostasis. This review examines VAM's overall genotoxicity, which is due to and limited by AA, and the processes leading to mutation induction. VAM and AA have both been universally negative in mutation studies in bacteria but both have tested positive in several in vitro studies in higher organisms that usually employed high concentrations of test agents. Recently however, in vitro studies evaluating submillimolar concentrations of VAM or AA have shown threshold dose-responses for mutagenicity in human cultured cells. Neither VAM nor AA induced systemic mutagenicity in in vivo studies in metabolically competent mice when tested at non-lethal doses while treatments of animals deficient in aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh in animals) did induce both gene and chromosome level mutations. The results of several studies have reinforced the critical role for aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2 in humans) in limiting AA's (and therefore VAM's) mutagenicity. The overall aim of this review of VAM's mutagenic potential through its AA metabolite is to propose a mode of action (MOA) for VAM's site-of-contact carcinogenesis that incorporates the overall process of mutation induction that includes both background mutations due to endogenous AA and those resulting from exogenous exposures.