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Sample records for carcinoembryonic antigen expression

  1. Induction of carcinoembryonic antigen expression in a three-dimensional culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, J. M.; Brown, D.; Fitzgerald, W.; Ford, R. D.; Nachman, A.; Goodwin, T. J.; Spaulding, G.

    1994-01-01

    MIP-101 is a poorly differentiated human colon carcinoma cell line established from ascites that produces minimal amounts of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a 180 kDa glycoprotein tumor marker, and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), a related protein that has 50 and 90 kDa isoforms, in vitro in monolayer culture. MIP-101 produces CEA when implanted into the peritoneum of nude mice but not when implanted into subcutaneous tissue. We tested whether MIP-101 cells may be induced to express CEA when cultured on microcarrier beads in three-dimensional cultures, either in static cultures as non-adherent aggregates or under dynamic conditions in a NASA-designed low shear stress bioreactor. MIP- 101 cells proliferated well under all three conditions and increased CEA and NCA production 3 - 4 fold when grown in three-dimensional cultures compared to MIP-101 cells growing logarithmically in monolayers. These results suggest that three-dimensional growth in vitro simulates tumor function in vivo and that three-dimensional growth by itself may enhance production of molecules that are associated with the metastatic process.

  2. Carcinoembryonic antigen expression level as a predictive factor for response to 5-fluorouracil in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression has been shown to protect cancer cell lines from apoptosis and anoikis. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the role of CEA expression on resistance to anticancer drugs in human colorectal cancer (CRC). We transfected CEA negative CRC cell line SW742 as well as CHO cells to overexpress CEA and their chemoresistance were assessed by MTT assay. In comparison to the parental cell lines, transfected cells had significantly increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The results also showed a direct correlation between the amount of cellular CEA protein and 5-FU resistance in CEA expressing cells. We found no significant difference in sensitivity to cisplatin and methotrexate between CEA-transfected cells and their counter parental cells. We also compared the association between CEA expression and chemoresistance of 4 CRC cell lines which differed in the levels of CEA production. The CEA expression levels in monolayer cultures of these cell lines did not correlate with the 5-FU resistance. However, 5-FU treatment resulted in the selection of sub-populations of resistant cells that displayed increased CEA expression levels by increasing drug concentration. We analyzed the effect of 5-FU in a 3D multicellular culture generated from the two CRC cell lines, LS180 and HT29/219. Compared with monolayer culture, CEA production and 5-FU resistance in both cell lines were stimulated by 3D growth. In comparison to the 3D spheroids of parental CHO, we observed a significantly elevated 5-FU resistance in 3D culture of the CEA-expressing CHO transfectants. Our findings suggest that the CEA level may be a suitable biomarker for predicting tumor response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in CRC.

  3. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  4. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy.

  5. Expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and nonspecific crossreacting antigen (NCA) in gastrointestinal cancer; the correlation with degree of differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Kodera, Y.; Isobe, K.; Yamauchi, M.; Satta, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Oikawa, S.; Kondoh, K.; Akiyama, S.; Itoh, K.; Nakashima, I.

    1993-01-01

    In spite of its reputation as a tumour marker, little is known about the function of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We examined the mRNA expression of CEA and NCA in 26 gastric and 14 colorectal cancers together with adjacent morphologically normal mucosae. There was no significant difference between the CEA mRNA levels of colorectal cancer and adjacent mucosa, whereas the CEA mRNA levels were significantly elevated in gastric cancer compared with normal gastric mucosa. The expression of NCA, on the other hand, was more cancer-specific and was significantly up-regulated in both gastric and colorectal cancers compared with the corresponding normal mucosae. No correlation was found between the mRNA level and plasma CEA value. No significant up-regulation was recognised in the node positive cancer, cancer with distant metastasis, or the metastatic tissues themselves. Marked diversity in the degree of differentiation in gastric cancer tissues, however, resulted in varied expression of the CEA gene family, compared with the constantly high expression found in colorectal cancer. Further analysis revealed significant up-regulation of NCA in well and moderately differentiated gastric cancers over poorly differentiated cancers, suggesting that NCA might have roles in differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8318403

  6. Adjuvant chemotherapy, p53, carcinoembryonic antigen expression and prognosis after D2 gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Luo, Hui-Yan; Ren, Chao; Jin, Ying; Chen, Dong-Liang; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate adjuvant chemotherapy, p53 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression and prognosis after D2 gastrectomy for stage II/III gastric adenocarcinoma. METHODS: A total of 286 patients with stage II or III gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent D2 radical gastrectomy between May 2007 and December 2010 were enrolled into this study. One hundred and sixty-nine of these patients received surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy, and 117 patients received surgery alone. Tumor expression of p53 and CEA proteins in all patients was evaluated immunohistochemically and correlated with clinicopathological parameters. The Kaplan-Meier curves for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) with log-rank testing were used to compare the survival difference. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used for multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Patients with adjuvant chemotherapy had a significantly better median OS (50.87 mo vs 30.73 mo, P = 0.000) and median DFS (36.30 mo vs 25.60 mo, P = 0.001) than patients with surgery alone in the entire cohort. Consistent results with the entire cohort were found in stage II (P = 0.006 and P = 0.047), stage III (P = 0.005 and P = 0.030), and stage IIIB/IIIC patients (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). The median OS and DFS advantages were confirmed by multivariate analysis (P = 0.000 and P = 0.008) and maintained when the analyses were restricted to fluoropyrimidine monotherapy (P = 0.003 and P = 0.001) and fluoropyrimidine plus platinum regimen (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007), however, not the fluoropyrimidine plus taxane (P = 0.198 and P = 0.777) or platinum plus taxane (P = 0.666 and P = 0.687) regimens. Median OS and median DFS did not differ significantly between the patients with p53(+) and p53(-) tumors (P = 0.608 and P = 0.064), or between patients with CEA(+) and CEA(-) tumors (P = 0.052 and P = 0.989), which were maintained when the analyses were restricted to surgery alone (p53: P = 0.864 and P = 0.431; CEA: P = 0.142 and

  7. Mouse models expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a transgene: Evaluation of CEA-based cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hance, Kenneth W.; Zeytin, Hasan E.; Greiner, John W.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, investigators have carried out several studies designed to evaluate whether human tumor-associated antigens might be exploited as targets for active specific immunotherapy, specifically human cancer vaccines. Not too long ago such an approach would have been met with considerable skepticism because the immune system was believed to be a rigid discriminator between self and non-self which, in turn, protected the host from a variety of pathogens. That viewpoint has been challenged in recent years by a series of studies indicating that antigenic determinants of self have not induced absolute host immune tolerance. Moreover, under specific conditions that evoke danger signals, peptides from self-antigen can be processed by the antigen-presenting cellular machinery, loaded onto the major histocompatibility antigen groove to serve as targets for immune intervention. Those findings provide the rationale to investigate a wide range of tumor-associated antigens, including differentiation antigens, oncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes as possible immune-based targets. One of those tumor-associated antigens is the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Described almost 40 years ago, CEA is a Mr 180–200,000 oncofetal antigen that is one of the more widely studied human tumor-associated antigens. This review will provide: (i) a brief overview of the CEA gene family, (ii) a summary of early preclinical findings on overcoming immune tolerance to CEA, and (iii) the rationale to develop mouse models which spontaneously develop gastrointestinal tumors and express the CEA transgene. Those models have been used extensively in the study of overcoming host immune tolerance to CEA, a self, tumor-associated antigen, and the experimental findings have served as the rationale for the design of early clinical trials to evaluate CEA-based cancer vaccines. PMID:15888344

  8. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies versus somatostatin analogs in the detection of metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma: are carcinoembryonic antigen and somatostatin receptor expression prognostic factors?

    PubMed

    Behr, T M; Gratz, S; Markus, P M; Dunn, R M; Hüfner, M; Schauer, A; Fischer, M; Munz, D L; Becker, H; Becker, W

    1997-12-15

    Surgery is currently the only potentially curative approach in the treatment of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In many instances however, postsurgically elevated or rising plasma calcitonin and/or carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels indicate persistent metastatic disease, although conventional diagnostic procedures (computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and invasive venous catheterization) fail to localize the responsible lesions. Recently, anti-CEA antibodies and somatostatin analogs have shown promising results in the staging of MTC. The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of both methodologies, especially for the detection of occult MTC, and to assess whether there may be correlations between the scintigraphic behavior and the patients' prognosis. A total of 26 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma were examined at our institution between 1977 and 1996. Ten of them had known disease, 14 had occult metastatic MTC, and 2 were free of disease at the time of presentation. Fourteen patients were investigated with anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (receiving a total of 35 injections: clones BW431/26, BW431/31, IMACIS, or F023C5, labeled with 99mTc, (111)In or (131)I), and 8 patients were studied with (111)In-labeled octreotide. Two patients received potentially therapeutic doses of (131)I-labeled anti-CEA antibodies. All patients underwent conventional radiologic evaluation (ultrasonography, CT, and MRI) and/or biopsy within 4 weeks. Additional imaging was performed with 99mTc-(V)-DMSA, (131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine, 201thallium chloride, 99mTc-methylene diphosphate, and/or 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography. Clinical follow-up was obtained. All patients with established disease had elevated plasma CEA (range, 6.8-345 ng/mL; calcitonin levels between 92 and 11,497 pg/mL), whereas in 9 of 14 occult cases, levels were < or = 5 ng/mL (range, 0.6-829 ng/mL; calcitonin, 72-2920 pg/mL). In patients with

  9. Glycoproteins of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family are expressed in sweat and sebaceous glands of human fetal and adult skin.

    PubMed

    Metze, D; Bhardwaj, R; Amann, U; Eades-Perner, A M; Neumaier, M; Wagener, C; Jantscheff, P; Grunert, F; Luger, T A

    1996-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family comprises a group of glycoproteins including the classical CEA, nonspecific cross-reacting antigens (NCA), and biliary glycoprotein (BGP). CEA glycoproteins have been identified in many glandular and mucosal tissues. In view of their putative role in cell adhesion, protein sorting, and signal transduction, CEA glycoproteins are thought to be involved in embryogenesis, architectual integrity, and secretory mechanisms of glandular epithelia. Since there are few data available on the expression of CEA-like proteins in human skin, the aim of this study was to immunohistochemically specify and localize the CEA glycoproteins in cutaneous adult and fetal glands using a panel of well-characterized antibodies. The secretory parts of eccrine sweat glands expressed CEA, NCA-90, and BGP, whereas apocrine glands remained unreactive for CEA glycoproteins. The ductal epithelia of both eccrine and apocrine glands contained CEA and NCA-90. Sebaceous glands were stained for BGP only. Electron microscopy of sweat glands showed CEA glycoprotein expression in cytoplasmic organelles and on microvilli lining the ductal surface. In sebaceous glands, BGP were demonstrated in small vesicles and along the cell membranes of differentiating sebocytes. Fetal development of cutaneous glands was associated with early expression of CEA glycoproteins. Additionally, mice transgenic for human CEA were shown to express CEA in sweat glands. The overall distribution of CEA glycoproteins in cutaneous glands was consistent with that in epithelia of other glandular tissues.

  10. Immunomodulatory roles of the carcinoembryonic antigen family of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ling; Allez, Matthieu; Park, Mee-Sook; Mayer, Lloyd

    2006-08-01

    One of the most remarkable aspects of the immune system is its ability to fashion an immune response most appropriate to the activating stimulus. Although the immune system possesses a number of adaptations to accomplish this, an important theme is local immune regulation by site-specific expression of receptors and ligands. One family of molecules that is gaining attention as modulators of the immune system is the carcinoembryonic antigen cell-adhesion molecule family (CEACAM). Functionally, the carcinoembryonic antigen family can mediate cell-cell contact, host-pathogen interactions, and immune regulation. For example, biliary glycoprotein (CEACAM1) can have direct activity on T cells, leading to the inhibition of helper or cytotoxic T cell function. The expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEACAM5) on intestinal epithelial cells is involved in the activation of populations of regulatory CD8(+) T cells, while a distinct subset of regulatory CD8+ T cells is activated by nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (CEACAM6) on placental trophoblasts. Interestingly, the function and phenotype of these cells depend upon the specific member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family expressed, as well as the antigen-presenting molecule with which it associates. Thus, these glycoproteins comprise a family of molecules whose functions can depend on their nature and context.

  11. Expression of MCRS1 and MCRS2 and their correlation with serum carcinoembryonic antigen in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenguang; Chen, Mingxiao; Zhao, Pingwei; Ayana, Desalegn Admassu; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated genes serve a crucial role in carcinogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the mRNA expression levels of microspherule protein 1 (MCRS1) and MCRS2 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and their association with clinical variables. The mRNA expression levels of MCRS1 and MCRS2 were assessed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the tumor and corresponding non-tumor tissues of 54 newly-diagnosed CRC patients, as well as in the normal colonic mucosa tissue of 19 age/gender-matched healthy controls. Immunofluorescence was also employed to identify the expression of MCRS1 in CRC tissues, while the concentration of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was determined by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. The results identified a negative correlation between MCRS1 and MCRS2 expression levels (r=−0.3018, P=0.0266). MCRS1 mRNA expression was significantly increased and MCRS2 mRNA expression was decreased in CRC tissues compared with the levels in the corresponding normal tissues (both P<0.001). An increase in MCRS1 expression and a decrease in MCRS2 expression was detected in advanced stage when compared with early stage CRC patients. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed increased expression of MCRS1 in CRC patients. Furthermore, the expression levels of MCRS1 displayed positive correlation, whilst those of MCRS2 displayed negative correlation, with the serum CEA level in patients with CRC. The results suggest that increased MCRS1 and decreased MCRS2 expression appeared to be involved in the pathogenesis of CRC. The present study provides evidence suggesting that MCRS1 and MCRS2 may identify CRC patients at a risk of disease relapse, and thus, may be potential tools for monitoring disease activity and act as novel diagnostic markers in the treatment of CRC. PMID:27446248

  12. In vivo selection for Neisseria gonorrhoeae opacity protein expression in the absence of human carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Simms, Amy N; Jerse, Ann E

    2006-05-01

    The neisserial opacity (Opa) proteins are phase-variable, antigenically distinct outer membrane proteins that mediate adherence to and invasion of human cells. We previously reported that Neisseria gonorrhoeae Opa protein expression appeared to be selected for or induced during experimental murine genital tract infection. Here we further defined the kinetics of recovery of Opa variants from the lower genital tracts of female mice and investigated the basis for this initial observation. We found that the recovery of different Opa phenotypes from mice appears cyclical. Three phases of infection were defined. Following intravaginal inoculation with primarily Opa- gonococci, the majority of isolates recovered were Opa+ (early phase). A subsequent decline in the percentage of Opa+ isolates occurred in a majority of mice (middle phase) and was followed by a reemergence of Opa+ variants in mice that were infected for longer than 8 days (late phase). We showed the early phase was due to selection for preexisting Opa+ variants in the inoculum by constructing a chloramphenicol-resistant (Cm(r)) strain and following Cm(r) Opa+ populations mixed with a higher percentage of Opa- variants of the wild-type (Cm(s)) strain. Reciprocal experiments (Opa- Cm(r) gonococci spiked with Opa+ Cm(s) bacteria) were consistent with selection of Opa+ variants. Based on the absence in mice of human carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules, the major class of Opa protein adherence receptors, we conclude the observed selection for Opa+ variants early in infection is not likely due to a specific adherence advantage and may be due to Opa-mediated evasion of innate defenses.

  13. Four carcinoembryonic antigen subfamily members, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2, selectively expressed in the normal human colonic epithelium, are integral components of the fuzzy coat.

    PubMed

    Frängsmyr, L; Baranov, V; Hammarström, S

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate which of the seven transcriptionally active genes of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) subfamily are expressed in human colon, we first examined mRNA expression using reverse transcriptase PCR. The result showed the CEA, nonspecific crossreacting antigen 50/90 (NCA), biliary glycoprotein (BGP), and carcinoembryonic antigen gene family member 2 (CGM2) mRNAs were expressed in the colon. To determine the cellular sources of these members within normal colonic mucosa, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry were then performed. CEA and NCA mRNAs were clearly detectable in the cytoplasm of columnar and goblet cells at the free luminal surface and the upper crypts with low hybridization in the mid crypt and the crypt base. In contrast, BGP and CGM2 mRNAs were restricted only to columnar cells at the upper third of the crypts and the luminal surface. Colon epithelium expression of CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 coincided with that of corresponding mRNAs. Ultrastructurally, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 were localized mainly to the apical surface glycocalyx, the fuzzy coat, of columnar cells. Interestingly, these molecules were localized in different microdomains within the fuzzy coat. Furthermore, BGP was highly expressed in the fuzzy coat of cryptal caveolated cells. As integral components of the fuzzy coat, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 can hardly function as intercellular adhesion molecules; they possibly play an important role in epithelial-microbial interactions.

  14. [Diagnostic capability of carcinoembryonic antigen elevation].

    PubMed

    Cerezo Ruiz, Antonio; Rosa Jiménez, Francisco; Lobón Hernández, José Antonio; Gómez Jiménez, Francisco Javier

    2014-12-01

    There is little information on the oncologic diagnostic accuracy of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels more than 3-fold above normal. To determine the prevalence of underlying cancer in patients with mild CEA elevation and the mean cost per patient of CEA determination. A retrospective study was carried out in all patients with CEA elevation (3-10 ng/ml) and suspicion of cancer referred to the gastroenterology or internal medicine outpatient units from 2001 to 2007. We studied 100 patients (60 men and 40 women), with a mean age of 67.4 ± 14.2 years and baseline CEA of 5.8 ± 1.7 ng/ml. The most important symptoms and signs were laboratory abnormalities (19 patients [19%]). Cancer was diagnosed in 4 patients (one gastric, 2 lung and one colon). Among patients without malignancies, 49 patients (49%) had no related processes, and 47 (47%) had benign diseases. During follow-up, one laryngeal cancer, one acute myeloid leukemia, and one colon cancer were detected (54.3 ± 24.6 months). We found no differences between baseline CEA levels in patients with and without cancer (6.6 ± 2.4 vs. 5.8 ± 1.7 ng/ml, p = 0.2). The mean cost per patient was 503.6 ± 257.6 €. Cancer was detected in a small proportion (7%) of patients with mild CEA elevation. The study of these patients is directly and indirectly associated with a not inconsiderable cost. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  15. [The carcinoembryonic antigen: apropos of an old friend].

    PubMed

    Téllez-Avila, Félix Ignacio; García-Osogobio, Sandra Minerva

    2005-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is glycoprotein localized in the apical surface of mature enterocytes. The members of the CEA gene family are clustered on chromosome 19q13.2. It is formed by 29 genes, of which 18 are expressed. Many functions of CEA have been known in healthy indiuiduals, however its role as cell adhesion molecule is the most studied. Besides the colon, CEA is expressed in the stomach, tongue, oesophagus, cervix, and prostate. The most important clinical function is in colorectal, gastric and ovary cancer. It is used as prognosis marker, staging system, recurrence, treatment response and liver metastases. There are many non-neoplasic diseases that enhance CEA value. Actually, CEA is being studying as target of immunotherapy.

  16. Differential expression of CD66a (BGP), a cell adhesion molecule of the carcinoembryonic antigen family, in benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions of the human mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Riethdorf, L; Lisboa, B W; Henkel, U; Naumann, M; Wagener, C; Löning, T

    1997-07-01

    CD66a, also known as biliary glycoprotein (BGP), is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family and the human homologue of the rat cell-CAM. There is evidence that aberrant expression or loss of CD66a in tumor tissue is of biological significance. No data about its expression in breast carcinoma cells and only sparse information about the expression of CD66a in normal breast are available thus far. In this study we used monoclonal antibodies to analyze the expression of CD66a and CEA in normal tissue, benign lesions, and in noninvasive and invasive carcinomas of the mammary gland. In normal tissue and benign lesions, CD66a was consistently expressed at the apical sites of epithelial cells and in myoepithelia, whereas CEA was absent or was restricted only to some apical membranes within the ductal tree. The specific staining of myoepithelia was most evident in pseudoinfiltrative radial scars and sclerosing adenosis. However, the apical expression of CD66a disappeared with the development of the malignant phenotype in noninvasive and invasive carcinomas, and changed gradually from low- to high-grade noninvasive carcinomas into a predominant uniform membrane staining all around the atypical cells. CEA expression was irregular in intensity and distribution. The native apical CD66a staining was partially preserved in some highly differentiated invasive carcinomas with a better prognosis, such as tubular and papillary carcinomas. These findings indicate that loss of CD66a expression rather than a change in staining patterns coincides with the development of the malignant phenotype.

  17. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen messenger RNA-expressing cells in peripheral blood 7 days after curative surgery is a novel prognostic factor in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadahiro, Sotaro; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Maeda, Yuji; Yurimoto, Satoshi; Yasuda, Seiei; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu; Kamijo, Akemi; Murayama, Chieko

    2007-03-01

    The significance of detection of circulating cancer cells in blood during surgery in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains controversial. Experimental study revealed that the cancer cells injected from the vein disappeared completely until 7 days. The aim of this study was to clarify that the detection of circulating cancer cells in blood taken later than 7 days after curative surgery may be a prognostic factor. Two hundred consecutive patients with CRC who underwent potentially curative surgery were the subjects. Peripheral blood was collected between 7 and 10 days after resection. Cancer cells were detected using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction targeting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) messenger RNA (mRNA). The median follow-up period was 52 months (range: 34-69 months). The overall positive incidence of CEA mRNA was 22%. Detection of CEA mRNA was not significantly related to conventional clinicopathological findings. Recurrence has been confirmed in 55 patients (28%). The recurrence rate was significantly higher in patients with rectal cancer, deep penetration, lymph node metastasis, preoperative chemoradiotherapy and positive CEA mRNA. The CEA mRNA positive patients showed significantly poorer disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) than the negative patients (DFS, P = 0.007; OS, P = 0.04). Multivariate analysis revealed that the positive expression of CEA mRNA (P < 0.01) as well as the tumor location and TNM stage classification was identified as the significant risk factors for recurrence. Detection of CEA mRNA expressing cells in peripheral blood 7 days after curative surgery is a novel independent factor predicting recurrence in patients with CRC.

  18. Antitumor activity of chimeric immunoreceptor gene-modified Tc1 and Th1 cells against autologous carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takeshi; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Sato, Masayoshi; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Masahide; Onodera, Masafumi; Miyamoto, Masaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Nishimura, Takashi

    2006-09-01

    To generate tumor-specific and interferon (IFN)-gamma-producing Tc1 and Th1 cells applicable for many cancer patients, we previously developed a protocol for generating carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific Tc1 and Th1 cells from healthy human T cells by transduction with a lentivirus containing a chimeric immunoglobulin T-cell receptor (cIgTCR) gene composed of single-chain variable fragments from an anti-CEA-specific monoclonal antibody fused to an intracellular signaling domain of CD28 and CD3zeta. These cells, designated Tc1-T and Th1-T bodies, respectively, showed strong antitumor activity against CEA-expressing tumor cells in RAG2-/- mice when both of them were transferred. However, it remains unclear whether it is possible to generate Tc1-T and Th1-T bodies from cancer patients with defective T-cell function because of significant immunosuppression. Here, we prepared Tc1-T and Th1-T bodies from T cells of a colon cancer patient, and asked whether these T bodies can exert effective T-cell function against autologous tumor cells. These T bodies showed high cytotoxicity and produced IFN-gamma in response to CEA-expressing autologous tumor cells, even in the presence of soluble CEA. It was also demonstrated that Th1-T bodies supported the survival of Tc1-T bodies through cell-to-cell interactions. Furthermore, our protocol utilized retrovirus for cIgTCR transduction to achieve better induction efficiency compared to lentivirus-mediated transduction. Taken together, our findings here indicate that retrovirally transduced Tc1-T and Th1-T bodies will become a promising strategy for adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  19. Carcinoembryonic antigen in the urine of patients with urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hall, R R; Laurence, D J; Darcy, D; Stevens, U; James, R; Roberts, S; Munro Neville, A

    1972-09-09

    Increased amounts of carcinoembryonic antigen (C.E.A.) or C.E.A.-like material are found in the urine of many patients with transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder, including those presumed to be at an early stage of development. It is suggested that measurement of urinary C.E.A. is of clinical diagnostic value in the detection and follow-up of urothelial carcinomas.

  20. Recombinant Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Reporter Gene for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenanova, Vania; Barat, Bhaswati; Olafsen, Tove; Chatziioannou, Arion; Herschman, Harvey R.; Braun, Jonathan; Wu, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Reporter genes can provide a way of non-invasively assessing gene activity in vivo. However, current reporter gene strategies may be limited by the immunogenicity of foreign reporter proteins, endogenous expression or unwanted biological activity. We have developed a reporter gene based on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a human protein with limited normal tissue expression. Methods To construct a CEA reporter gene for PET, a CEA minigene (N-A3) was fused to the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human FcγRIIb receptor. The NA3-FcγRIIb recombinant gene, driven by a CMV promoter, was transfected in Jurkat (human T cell leukemia) cells. Expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and microPET imaging. Results Flow cytometry identified Jurkat clones stably expressing NA3-FcγRIIb at low, medium, and high levels. High and medium NA3-FcγRIIb expression could also be detected by Western blot. Reporter gene positive and negative Jurkat cells were used to establish xenografts in athymic mice. IHC showed staining of the tumor with high reporter gene expression; medium and low N-A3 expression was not detected. MicroPET imaging, using an anti-CEA 124I-labeled scFv-Fc antibody fragment, demonstrated that only high N-A3 expression could be detected. Specific accumulation of activity was visualized at the N-A3 positive tumor as early as 4h. MicroPET image quantitation showed tumor activity of 1.8(±0.2), 15.2(±1.3) and 4.6(±1.2) %ID/g at 4h, 20h and 48h, respectively. Biodistribution at 48h, demonstrated tumor uptake of 4.8(±0.8) %ID/g. Conclusion The CEA N-A3 minigene has the potential to be used as a reporter gene for imaging cells in vivo. PMID:18719907

  1. Serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen and a tumor-extracted carcinoembryonic antigen-related antigen in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shively, J E; Spayth, V; Chang, F F; Metter, G E; Klein, L; Presant, C A; Todd, C W

    1982-06-01

    Levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and a tumor-extracted CEA-related antigen (TEX) were determined in sera from patients with carcinomas of the breast, colon, lung, head and neck, and a number of miscellaneous categories. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of each antigen at various stages of malignant disease. Competitive radioimmunoassays developed in our laboratory were shown to be sufficiently specific to detect either of these two antigens independent of each other. The results indicate that: (a) with our specific assays, CEA was not significantly elevated in smoker controls, but TEX was elevated in 29% of smoker controls; (b) TEX was equivalent to CEA as a tumor marker for colonic cancer. TEX was better than CEA as a marker for lung cancer and, based on limited data, there is a possibility that TEX is a significantly better tumor marker than is CEA in early lung cancer; (c) TEX was superior to CEA as a tumor marker for breast and head and neck cancers; (d) there is a strong indication that serial determinations of TEX can be used as effectively as CEA in the monitoring of disease progress. These preliminary results must be confirmed by increasing the number of cancer patients and including nonmalignant disease controls.

  2. Differences in carcinoembryonic antigen levels between colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunlong; Xuan, Weibo; Chen, Chunlin; Chen, Zhe; Yang, Ziyi; Zuo, Yunfei; Ren, Shuangyi

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the levels of the serum tumor biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in patients with carcinoma of the colon and rectum in different clinical stages. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed types of cancer worldwide and previous studies have reported rapidly updated therapeutic regimes. While the majority of studies focus on CRC as a single entity, certain studies distinguish colon cancer (CC) from rectal cancer (RC), as there is a hypothesis stating that CC and RC are two naturally different entities. CEA is reported to be an important tumor-associated antigen overexpressed in CRC, which is routinely detected as a significant indicator of CRC. Our study aimed to identify potential differences in the expression of CEA between CC and RC, which may, to some degree, reflect the natural differences between the two. We investigated 240 CRC cases between July, 2010 and December, 2012 from The First and Second Affiliated Hospitals of Dalian Medical University, including 117 CC and 123 RC patients with tumors classified by Duke's staging as A-D. The serum CEA level was measured preoperatively by radioimmunoassays as a routinely used auxiliary indicator. The expression of CEA differed between CC and RC, with the former exhibiting variation among the four stages, whereas no variation was observed in RC. In addition, there were differences between CC and RC regarding the CEA level in stage C and D. Furthermore, the CEA level in stage C of CC was significantly lower compared to that in any other stage. In conclusion, the intrinsic distribution of the CEA level between CC and RC suggests that CC and RC may be two naturally different entities; the significantly low CEA level in stage C of CC indicates that stage C may be crucial in the evolution of CC.

  3. Alcohol, carcinoembryonic antigen processing and colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Benita; Tuma, Dean J; Lazure, Kathryn E; Thomas, Peter; Casey, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that alcohol consumption is related to the development of alcoholic liver disease. Additionally, it is appreciated that other major health issues are associated with alcohol abuse, including colorectal cancer (CRC) and its metastatic growth to the liver. Although a correlation exists between alcohol use and the development of diseases, the search continues for a better understanding of specific mechanisms. Concerning the role of alcohol in CRC liver metastases, recent research is aimed at characterizing the processing of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycoprotein that is associated with and secreted by CRC cells. A positive correlation exists between serum CEA levels, liver metastasis, and alcohol consumption in CRC patients, although the mechanism is not understood. It is known that circulating CEA is processed primarily by the liver, first by nonparenchymal Kupffer cells (KCs) and secondarily, by hepatocytes via the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Since both KCs and hepatocytes are known to be significantly impacted by alcohol, it is hypothesized that alcohol-related effects to these liver cells will lead to altered CEA processing, including impaired asialo-CEA degradation, resulting in changes to the liver microenvironment and the metastatic potential of CRC cells. Also, it is predicted that CEA processing will affect cytokine production in the alcohol-injured liver, resulting in pro-metastatic changes such as enhanced adhesion molecule expression on the hepatic sinusoidal endothelium. This chapter examines the potential role that alcohol-induced liver cell impairments can have in the processing of CEA and associated mechanisms involved in CEA-related colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

  4. Radionuclide-Based Cancer Imaging Targeting the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao; Cai, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), highly expressed in many cancer types, is an important target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide-based imaging techniques (gamma camera, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET]) have been extensively explored for CEA-targeted cancer imaging both preclinically and clinically. Briefly, these studies can be divided into three major categories: antibody-based, antibody fragment-based and pretargeted imaging. Radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies, reported the earliest among the three categories, typically gave suboptimal tumor contrast due to the prolonged circulation life time of intact antibodies. Subsequently, a number of engineered anti-CEA antibody fragments (e.g. Fab’, scFv, minibody, diabody and scFv-Fc) have been labeled with a variety of radioisotopes for CEA imaging, many of which have entered clinical investigation. CEA-Scan (a 99mTc-labeled anti-CEA Fab’ fragment) has already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for cancer imaging. Meanwhile, pretargeting strategies have also been developed for CEA imaging which can give much better tumor contrast than the other two methods, if the system is designed properly. In this review article, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of radionuclide-based cancer imaging targeting CEA. Generally, isotopes with short half-lives (e.g. 18F and 99mTc) are more suitable for labeling small engineered antibody fragments while the isotopes with longer half-lives (e.g. 123I and 111In) are needed for antibody labeling to match its relatively long circulation half-life. With further improvement in tumor targeting efficacy and radiolabeling strategies, novel CEA-targeted agents may play an important role in cancer patient management, paving the way to “personalized medicine”. PMID:19578524

  5. Distribution of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules in human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Torlakovic, Hong; Bjerkan, Louise; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2012-10-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) are glycoproteins produced in epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules mediate cell-cell contact and host-pathogen interactions. The aims of this study were to map the distribution and examine the regulation of CEACAMs in human gingival sites. Quantitative real-time PCR performed on human gingival biopsies from periodontitis sites revealed mRNA coding for CEACAM1, -5, -6, and -7. Immunohistochemistry showed that CEACAMs were not found in oral gingival epithelium, except for CEACAM5 in periodontitis. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules 1, 5, and 6 were present in the oral sulcular epithelium of periodontitis but not in that of healthy gingiva. In junctional epithelium, all three molecules were present in healthy gingiva, but in periodontitis only CEACAM1 and -6 were detected. Staining for CEACAM1 and -6 was also seen in the inflammatory cell infiltrate in periodontitis. No staining for CEACAM7 was found. Proinflammatory mediators, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), increased the expression of CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs in cultured human oral keratinocytes. CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs were also strongly up-regulated upon stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid. In conclusion, the distribution of different CEACAMs was related to specific sites in the gingiva. This might reflect different functional roles in this tissue.

  6. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-01-01

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism. PMID:6896821

  7. A new Kupffer cell receptor mediating plasma clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen by the rat.

    PubMed

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1982-05-15

    Native human carcinoembryonic antigen is rapidly removed from the circulation by the rat liver Kupffer cell after intravenous injection. The molecule is subsequently transferred to the hepatocyte in an immunologically identifiable form. Carcinoembryonic antigen has a circulatory half-life of 3.7 (+/- 0.8) min, and cellular entry is by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Non-specific fluid pinocytosis and phagocytosis can be excluded as possible mechanisms by the kinetics of clearance and failure of colloidal carbon to inhibit uptake. Substances with known affinity for the hepatic receptors for mannose, N-acetylglucosamine, fucose and galactose all fail to inhibit carcinoembryonic antigen clearance. After two cycles of the Smith degradation, carcinoembryonic antigen is still able to inhibit clearance of the native molecule. Receptor specificity is apparently not dependent on those non-reducing terminal sugars of the native molecule. Performic acid-oxidized carcinoembryonic antigen also inhibits clearance of carcinoembryonic antigen in vivo. Receptor binding is not dependent on tertiary protein conformation. Non-specific cross-reacting antigen, a glycoprotein structurally similar to carcinoembryonic antigen, is cleared by the same mechanism.

  8. Carcinoembryonic antigen in renal allograft recipients and immunosuppressed renal patients.

    PubMed

    Myers, J B; Frost, M; Coates, A S; Mathews, J D; Kincaid-Smith, P

    1977-02-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was estimated in plasma from 70 patients with a renal transplant, 105 patients with glomerulonephritis who had received immunosuppressive therapy, and 124 healthy controls. There were raised levels in 30% of those with a renal transplant, 10% of those with glomerulonephritis and 2% of controls, and levels were higher in current smokers. CEA levels did not correlate with pre-transplant dialysis time nor with serum creatinine levels, but tended to fall with increasing time after transplantation, especially in non-smokers. CEA levels did not correlate with prednisolone dosage nor with number of rejection episodes, after allowing for time after transplantation and smoking habit. Nine of 70 patients with a renal transplant and three of 105 with glomerulonephritis had cancer, of skin in seven, cervix uteri in four, and colon in one. CEA was raised in all four transplant recipients with a visceral cancer (cervix three and colon one), but in none of the five with cutaneous cancer. Raised CEA levels occurring late after a renal allograft should prompt a careful search for visceral cancer.

  9. Immunosensing procedures for carcinoembryonic antigen using graphene and nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Luong, John H T; Vashist, Sandeep Kumar

    2017-03-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) graphene, sp(2)-hybridized carbon, and its two major derivatives, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have played an important role in immunoassays (IAs) and immunosensing (IMS) platforms for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), an implicated tumor biomarker found in several types of cancer. The graphene family with high surface area is functionalized to form stable nanocomposites with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and electron mediators. The capture anti-CEA antibody (Ab) with high density can be anchored on AuNPs of such composites to provide remarkable detection sensitivity, significantly below the level found in normal subjects and cancer patients. Electrochemical and fluorescence/chemiluminescence-quenching properties of graphene-based nanocomposites are exploited in various detection schemes. Future endeavors are envisioned for the development of an array platform with high-throughput for CEA together with other tumor biomarkers and C-reactive protein, a universal biomarker for infection and inflammation. The ongoing efforts dedicated to the replacement of a lab-based detector by a cellphone with smart applications will further enable cost-effective and frequent monitoring of CEA in order to establish its clinical relevance and provide tools for real-time monitoring of patients during chemotherapy.

  10. An epitope on carcinoembryonic antigen defined by the clinically relevant antibody PR1A3.

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, H; Young, S; Stewart, L M; Wrba, F; Rowan, A J; Snary, D; Bodmer, W F

    1994-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody PR1A3 has been used successfully for in vivo imaging of colorectal cancers, and several properties associated with this antibody, including minimal reactions of the antibody with circulating antigen in patients' sera, differentiate it from anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies used in similar studies. However, the antigen bound by PR1A3 was identified as CEA by analysis of somatic cell hybrids and by antigen expression from yeast artificial chromosomes, cosmids, and cDNA clones. The molecular weight, presence of a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor, elevation of surface expression by gamma-interferon, and N-terminal amino acid sequence all confirmed the antigen identification as CEA. A series of biliary glycoprotein-CEA hybrid proteins was produced which demonstrated that the epitope bound by the antibody was at the site of membrane attachment and involved parts of the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor and the B3 domain of CEA to form a conformational epitope. Access to this epitope, although possible when the antigen was on the cell surface, appeared to be blocked when CEA was released from the cell. The nature and location of the epitope on CEA are proposed to be responsible for the unique properties of the antibody. Images PMID:7514303

  11. Carcinoma of the ureter with extensive squamous differentiation and positive immunoperoxidase staining for carcinoembryonic antigen: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fulks, R M; Falace, P B

    1985-01-01

    A case of ureteral carcinoma with extensive squamous differentiation and positive staining for carcinoembryonic antigen by the immunoperoxidase method is presented. Ureteral carcinoma should be added to the list of tumors that may produce carcinoembryonic antigen or antigen-like material.

  12. Increased mortality associated with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen in insurance applicants.

    PubMed

    Stout, Robert L; Fulks, Michael; Dolan, Vera F; Magee, Mark E; Suarez, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Determine the relationship between the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) value and all-cause mortality in life insurance applicants aged 50 years and over. By use of the Social Security Master Death Index, mortality was examined in 115,590 insurance applicants aged 50 and up for whom blood samples for CEA were submitted to the Clinical Reference Laboratory. Results were stratified by CEA value (<5 ng/mL, 5 to 9.9 ng/mL, 10+ ng/mL), smoking status, and age groups (50-59 years, 60-69 years, and 70 years and up). Relative mortality is increased at CEA values between 5 and 9.9 ng/mL and further increased at 10+ ng/mL for all age groups, with the most dramatic increase at the youngest ages. Excess mortality appears to last at least 3 to 4 years after the elevated result. Five-year all-cause mortality in applicants with CEA values of 10+ ng/mL is 25.2% with a mortality ratio relative to those with a CEA <5 ng/mL of 1156%. This study shows that CEA can detect the risk of early excess mortality in life insurance applicants; CEA levels of 5 ng/mL and over may be of concern. CEA testing beginning at age 50 years for life insurance applicants could capture 4.6% of early mortality if the threshold for further evaluation was set at 10 ng/mL. Only 0.4% of all applicants aged 50 and over have CEA values at or above this threshold.

  13. Balancing between antitumor efficacy and autoimmune pathology in T-cell-mediated targeting of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Bos, Rinke; van Duikeren, Suzanne; Morreau, Hans; Franken, Kees; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Melief, Cornelis J M; Offringa, Rienk

    2008-10-15

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is intensively studied as a potential target for immunotherapy of colorectal cancers. Although overexpressed by tumors, CEA is also expressed in normal tissues, raising questions about the feasibility and safety of CEA-targeted immunotherapy. We investigated these issues in transgenic mice in which the expression of human CEA in normal tissues closely resembles that in man. Our data show that the T-cell response against CEA in these mice is blunted by both thymic and peripheral tolerance. Consequently, effective tumor targeting is only achieved by adoptive transfer of T cells from nontolerant donors in combination with interventions that eliminate peripheral immune regulatory mechanisms. However, such treatments can result in severe intestinal autoimmune pathology associated with weight loss and mortality. Interestingly, preconditioning of recipient mice by depletion of T-regulatory cells results in immune-mediated tumor control in the absence of toxicity. In this setting, CEA-specific T-cell responses are lower than those induced by toxic regimens and accompanied by additional T-cell responses against non-self antigen. These findings illustrate the importance of testing adoptive immunotherapies targeting self antigens such as CEA in preclinical in vivo models and show that the choice of immune intervention regimen critically determines the balance between therapeutic efficacy and toxicity.

  14. Elevated carcinoembryonic antigen tumour marker caused by head and neck cancer: a case report and literature study.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoedt, S I; Hauben, E; Hermans, R; Vander Poorten, V L; Nuyts, S

    2015-04-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen is a tumour marker commonly increased in gastrointestinal and pulmonary cancers. We report a case of a 46-year-old man with a mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the base of tongue with an elevated and traceable serum carcinoembryonic antigen level. This antigen proved to be a valuable marker in the treatment follow-up. When a raised carcinoembryonic antigen level is found, salivary gland malignancies should be taken into the differential diagnosis and clinical examination of the head and neck region should not be overlooked.

  15. Coproduction of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen by a continuous cell line from a human pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1982-08-01

    A simultaneous production of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by the same individual cells of an established human pancreatic cell line (QGP-1) was demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase method. Kinetics of cell proliferation and production of CEA and NCA were analyzed, and active synthesis of both antigens was found to be accompanied with the active proliferation of cultured cells. Both antigens in culture medium were purified by immunoadsorption and gel filtration. Immunochemical studies confirmed that CEA and NCA produced by the QGP-1 cells had properties identical to those of authentic CEA derived from metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to those of NCA from normal lungs, respectively.

  16. Anti-colorectal cancer effect of interleukin-2 and interferon-β fusion gene driven by carcinoembryonic antigen promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Mengchun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects of combined interleukin-2/interferon-β-based gene therapy in colorectal cancer. Transfection of the fusion gene expression plasmid induced significant apoptosis of Lovo cells. Additionally, the fusion gene exhibited strong inhibitory activity against tumor growth and apoptosis when being injected into the nude mice implanted with human colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the tail-vein injection showed a more notable effect than direct injection into tumor. These results suggest that the combined interleukin-2/interferon-β-based gene therapy with the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter might be an effective antitumor strategy. PMID:27313471

  17. The Prognostic Impact of the Carcinoembryonic Antigen in Ampullary Cancer - A Retrospective Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Fuellgraf, Hannah; Schilling, Oliver; Lai, Zon Weng; Kulemann, Birte; Timme, Sylvia; Makowiec, Frank; Shahinian, Jasmin H.; Hoeppner, Jens; Werner, Martin; Hopt, Ulrich T.; Wellner, Ulrich F.; Bronsert, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule (CEA) is a commonly immunohistochemically used antibody in pathological routine diagnostics with an overexpression in different cancers. We aimed to examine the immunohistochemically detectable CEA level in ampullary cancer and to correlate it with clinico-pathological data. Methods: Shot-gun proteomics revealed CEA in undifferentiated ampullary cancer cell lines. Next, tumor tissue of 40 ampullary cancers of a retrospective single center cohort of 40 patients was stained immunohistochemically for CEA; CEA expression was determined and correlated with clinico-pathological data. Results: Thirty-six patient specimens were included in statistical analysis. CEA expression and lymph node ratio (LNR) were the only independent predictors of overall survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: To our knowledge, cell line and patient cohorts are the largest and characterized cohorts examined for CEA so far. Hereby, CEA expression in ampullary cancer cells permits an estimation of outcome and suggests an opportunity for individualized CEA-directed therapy. Further trials with larger cohorts are needed to verify our results and to integrate CEA immunohistochemistry into clinical routine. PMID:28367245

  18. Targeted sonodynamic therapy of cancer using a photosensitizer conjugated with antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hironori; Kuroki, Motomu; Tachibana, Katsuro; Li, Tieli; Awasthi, Aradhana; Ueno, Aruto; Matsumoto, Hisanobu; Imakiire, Takayuki; Yamauchi, Yasushi; Yamada, Hiromi; Ariyoshi, Asami; Kuroki, Masahide

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a strategy for the selective destruction of cancer cells by ultrasonic irradiation in the presence of an antibody-conjugated photosensitizer. To this end, a photoimmunoconjugate (PIC) was prepared between ATX-70, a photosensitizer of a gallium-porphyrin analogue, and F11-39, a high affinity monoclonal antibody (MAb) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which is often overexpressed in various carcinoma cells. This conjugate, designated F39/ATX-70, retained immunoreactivity against purified CEA and CEA-expressing cells as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of F39/ATX-70 against CEA-expressing human gastric carcinoma cells in vitro was found to be greater than that of ATX-70 when applied in combination with ultrasound irradiation. When in vivo anti-tumor effects in a mouse xenograft model were assessed, intravenous administration of F39/ATX-70 followed by ultrasonic irradiation produced a marked growth inhibition of tumor compared with irradiation alone or irradiation after administration of ATX-70. These results suggest that the PIC between anti-CEA MAb and ATX-70 may have applications in sonodynamic therapy where destruction of CEA-expressing tumor is required.

  19. Plasma lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dnistrian, A M; Schwartz, M K

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated lipid-bound sialic acid as a "marker" in cancer patients and assessed the individual and combined value of lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen determinations in these patients. Plasma was sampled from 62 normal subjects and 125 cancer patients. Lipid-bound sialic acid was determined by the resorcinol method after total lipid extraction and isolation of the sialolipid fraction from plasma. Neither marker was increased in many breast cancer patients. Carcinoembryonic antigen was increased more commonly and to a greater degree in colon cancer patients and seems to be the preferred marker. Both markers were increased in lung cancer patients and their combined evaluation improved the rate of detection. Lipid-bound sialic acid was increased in more patients with leukemias, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and melanomas, suggesting that it may be a useful biochemical marker in these types of cancer.

  20. Demonstration and immunochemical characterization of carcinoembryonic antigen in human pancreatic juice.

    PubMed

    McCabe, R P; Kupchik, H Z; Saravis, C A; Broitman, S A; Gregg, J A; Zamcheck, N

    1976-05-01

    Pancreatic juice collected from 10 patients without evidence of malignant disease of the pancreas or other organs was pooled, extracted, and fractionated by Sepharose 6-B and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) activity in the material was demonstrated and studied by: a) radioimmunoassay, b) competitive binding to antibodies against CEA, c) precipitin inhibition, and d) Ouchterlony analysis. The immunochemical identity of the active material to CEA purified from liver metastases of colon cancer was demonstrated.

  1. MITF is a critical regulator of the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) in malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Nico; Löffek, Stefanie; Horn, Susanne; Ennen, Marie; Sánchez-Del-Campo, Luis; Zhao, Fang; Breitenbuecher, Frank; Davidson, Irwin; Singer, Bernhard B; Schadendorf, Dirk; Goding, Colin R; Helfrich, Iris

    2015-11-01

    The multifunctional Ig-like carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is neo-expressed in the majority of malignant melanoma lesions. CEACAM1 acts as a driver of tumor cell invasion, and its expression correlates with poor patient prognosis. Despite its importance in melanoma progression, how CEACAM1 expression is regulated is largely unknown. Here, we show that CEACAM1 expression in melanoma cell lines and melanoma tissue strongly correlates with that of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a key regulator of melanoma proliferation and invasiveness. MITF is revealed as a direct and positive regulator for CEACAM1 expression via binding to an M-box motif located in the CEACAM1 promoter. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of CEACAM1 expression and suggests an MITF-CEACAM1 axis as a potential determinant of melanoma progression.

  2. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen as a tumour marker in patients with endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hashiguchi, Y.; Kasai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Ichimura, T.; Yasui, T.; Sumi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background No potential tumour markers have been validated for prognosis in endometrial cancer. However, carcinoembryonic antigen (cea) is one of the most widely used tumour markers in various types of cancer. Although cea expression in endometrial cancer has been investigated, its prognostic value remains controversial, and no studies have investigated serum cea levels in large case series. In the present study, we investigated diagnostic and prognostic applications of serum cea for endometrial cancer. Methods This prospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. Between January 2006 and December 2012, serum cea was measured prospectively in 215 patients with endometrial cancer and was subsequently measured during treatment and at scheduled follow-up examinations in patients with elevated baseline serum cea. Results During the study period, 215 patients (142 stage i, 19 stage ii, 32 stage iii, 22 stage iv) were treated for endometrial cancer. By the time of last follow-up, 52 had relapsed (24.2%), and the median follow-up duration was 45 months (range: 1–95 months). Elevated serum cea was identified in 25 patients (11.6%) and was associated with histologic type (p = 0.04), histologic grade (p = 0.03), and myometrial invasion depth (p = 0.01). Elevated serum cea was not related to clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, age, menopausal status, or body mass index. Relapse of disease was related to elevated serum cea (p = 0.006). Conclusions Serum cea is a potential prognostic indicator for endometrial cancer. PMID:27803603

  3. Carcinoembryonic antigen admittance biosensor based on Au and ZnO nanoparticles using FFT admittance voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Norouzi, Parviz; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Faridbod, Farnoush; Pirali-Hamedani, Morteza; Larijani, Bagher; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2011-03-01

    In this work, a highly sensitive carcinoembryonic antigen fast Fourier transform admittance biosensor is introduced. The proposed biosensor is based on bilayer films of ZnO/Au nanoparticles as an immobilization matrix. These layers are prepared by self-assembly and deposition method on a gold electrode surface, respectively. Carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA) was immobilized on gold nanoparticles and positively charged horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was used to block sites against nonspecific binding. The admittance biosensor was developed based on fast Fourier transform continuous square wave voltammetry, which produces a sensitive, fast (less than 20 s) and reliable response for determination of carcinoembryonic antigen. The technique was applied as a detector in a flow injection system. The admittances reduction current of the biosensor decreases linearly in two concentrations ranges of CEA from 0.1 to 70 ng/mL and from 70 to 200 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.01 ng/mL in presence of 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) as an eluent solution.

  4. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  5. Establishment of a carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cell line from human pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaku, M; Nishiyama, T; Yagawa, K; Abe, M

    1980-10-01

    A human pancreatic carcinoma cell line of islet cell origin (QGP-1) has been established and maintained for over two years. The parent tumor and the cultured cell line produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and there is no evidence of hormone secretion from the tumor cells. The epithelioid cells, which had migrated from rounded, irregular cell aggregates, grow as a confluent monolayer with piling up of cells in some areas, and have a population doubling time of 3.5 days. The modal chromosome number was 50. Exponentially growing cultures produce 76.3 ng of CEA/10(6) cells after 7 days. CEA production was confirmed by immuno-peroxidase staining.

  6. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  7. Antitumor activity and immune responses induced by a recombinant carcinoembryonic antigen-vaccinia virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kantor, J; Irvine, K; Abrams, S; Kaufman, H; DiPietro, J; Schlom, J

    1992-07-15

    Human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a 180-kd glycoprotein expressed in human colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, breast, and non-small-cell lung carcinomas. Previous studies have demonstrated enhanced immune responses to other antigens presented with vaccinia virus proteins via a recombinant vaccinia virus construct. In addition, we have developed a recombinant CEA-vaccinia virus construct, designated rV(WR)-CEA, and have demonstrated humoral anti-CEA responses in mice after immunization with that virus. The goals of this study were (a) to construct a recombinant CEA-vaccinia vaccine in a less virulent vaccinia strain that is potentially safe and effective for treatment of patients whose tumors express CEA and (b) to evaluate the ability of the recombinant CEA-vaccinia vaccine to prevent and reverse tumor growth in mice and to elicit cell-mediated and humoral anti-CEA immune responses. Using the New York City strain of vaccinia virus, which is used in smallpox vaccination and is more attenuated for humans than rV(WR), we derived a recombinant CEA-vaccinia construct, designated rV(NYC)-CEA. The ability of this construct to induce antitumor immunity was evaluated in mice receiving subcutaneous injections of murine colon adenocarcinoma cells expressing the human CEA gene. Administration of rV(NYC)-CEA in mice induced strong anti-CEA antibody responses, as well as CEA-specific cell-mediated responses, including delayed-type hypersensitivity, lymphoproliferative, and cytotoxic responses. Vaccination of mice with the rV(NYC)-CEA rendered them resistant to the growth of subsequently transplanted CEA-expressing tumors. Moreover, when mice were vaccinated 7 days after tumor cell injection, tumor growth was either greatly reduced or eliminated. No toxic effects were observed in any of the mice. These studies demonstrate that antitumor activity can be induced with the use of a recombinant CEA-vaccinia virus construct derived from an attenuated vaccinia strain, and they

  8. Proper exercise decreases plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels with the improvement of body condition in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Ko, Il-Gyu; Park, Eung-Mi; Choi, Hye-Jung; Yoo, Jaehyun; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2014-05-01

    Aging increases the risk of chronic diseases including cancers. Physical exercise has the beneficial effects for the elderly susceptible to the development of cancers, through maintaining a healthy body condition and improving the immune system. However, excessive or insufficient exercise might increase the risk for cancer. In the present study, we investigated what exercise frequency improves cancer-related biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), red blood cell (RBC), and white blood cell (WBC), and the body composition of elderly women. Fifty-four females, aged 70 to 77 years, were divided into 4 groups: control, 1-day exercise (1E), 2-3-day exercise (2-3E), and 5-day exercise (5E) groups. The control group did not participate in any physical activity, while the subjects in the exercise groups underwent the exercise program for 12 weeks. As results, CEA was significantly decreased in the exercise groups, with the lowest values in 2-3E group. In contrast, AFP, RBC and WBC were not significantly changed. CEA is an oncofetal glycoprotein that is overexpressed in adenocarcinomas. Although the function of CEA has not been fully understood, CEA has been suggested to be involved in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines via stimulating monocytes and macrophages. Moreover, body weight and body mass index were improved in the exercise groups, with the lowest levels in 5E group. Thus, we suggest that exercise for 2-3 days per week decreases the expression of CEA and improves body condition, without loading fatigue or stress, which may contribute to preventing cancer in the elderly women.

  9. Use of antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen and human milk fat globule to distinguish carcinoma, mesothelioma, and reactive mesothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R J; Herbert, A; Braye, S G; Jones, D B

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies raised against human milk fat globule (HMFG 1 and 2) and carcinoembryonic antigen were used in an immunoperoxidase technique to differentiate mesothelioma, carcinoma, and benign, reactive mesothelium. Sixteen mesotheliomas, 27 lung carcinomas, and 13 specimens of reactive mesothelium were examined. Staining for carcinoembryonic antigen was not seen in reactive mesothelium or mesothelioma but was present in 22 of 27 carcinomas. Mesothelioma and carcinoma usually stained with HMFG 1 and 2; reactive mesothelium did not. These three antibodies may help to distinguish carcinoma, mesothelioma, and reactive mesothelium. Images PMID:6094617

  10. A Comprehensive Phylogenetic and Structural Analysis of the Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Scorilas, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and codes for a vast number of glycoproteins that differ greatly both in amino acid composition and function. The CEA family is divided into two groups, the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) and the pregnancy-specific glycoproteins. The CEA family members are implicated in pleiotropic (patho)physiological functions including cell–cell adhesion, pregnancy, immunity, neovascularization, regulation of insulin homeostasis, and carcinogenesis. In general, the CEA-encoded proteins are composed of an extracellular region with Ig variable and constant-like domains and a cytoplasmic region containing signaling motifs. Of particular interest, the well-studied human and mouse CEA genes are arranged in clusters in a single chromosome. Taking into account this characteristic, we made an effort to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the CEA gene family. Toward this end, the publicly available genomes were searched extensively for CEA homologs. The domain organization of the retrieved protein sequences was analyzed, and, subsequently, comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of the entire length CEA homologous proteins were performed. A series of evolutionarily conserved amino acid residues, functionally important, were identified. The relative positioning of these residues on the modeled tertiary structure of novel CEA protein domains revealed that they are, also, spatially conserved. Furthermore, the chromosomal arrangement of CEA genes was examined, and it was found that the CEA genes are preserved in terms of position, transcriptional orientation, and number in all species under investigation. PMID:24858421

  11. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  12. Detection of targeted carcinoembryonic antigens using a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jian; Lei, Chong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Zhen; Zhou, Yong

    2013-11-01

    In this work, a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor was designed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) labeled by Dynabeads. The sensor with Fe-based amorphous core and three dimension solenoid coils was fabricated by Micro Electro-Mechanical system technology. Sandwich assays are performed using antibody-antigen pair combination of biotin-streptavidin assay on a separated Au film substrate surface with a self-assembled layer. With dc magnetic fields in the range of 560 μT to 875 μT, detection of CEAs with different concentrations was performed and a minimum detectable concentration of 1 pg/ml was achieved. Furthermore, CEA samples with different concentrations can be distinguished.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering study of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum from patients with colorectal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Yanping; Zheng, Xiongwei; He, Cheng; Lu, Jianping; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haisan

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we developed a SERS platform for quantitative detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum of patients with colorectal cancers. Anti-CEA-functionalized 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-labeled Au/Ag core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared first and then used to analyze CEA antigen solutions of different concentrations. A calibration curve was established in the range from 5 × 10-3 to 5 × 105 ng/mL. Finally, this new SERS probe was applied for quantitative detection of CEA in serum obtained from 26 colorectal cancer patients according to the calibration curve. The results were in good agreement with that obtained by electrochemical luminescence method, suggesting that SERS immunoassay has high sensitivity and specificity for CEA detection in serum. A detection limit of 5 pg/ml was achieved. This study demonstrated the feasibility and great potential for developing this new technology into a clinical tool for analysis of tumor markers in the blood.

  14. An electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen enhanced by self-assembled nanogold coatings on magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Gao, Huiling; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wei, Xiaoping; Yang, Catherine F

    2010-04-14

    A quick and reproducible electrochemical-based immunosensor technique, using magnetic core/shell particles that are coated with self-assembled multilayer of nanogold, has been developed. Magnetic particles that are structured from Au/Fe(3)O(4) core-shells were prepared and aminated after a reaction between gold and thiourea, and additional multilayered coatings of gold nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of the core/shell particles. The carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA) was immobilized on the modified magnetic particles, which were then attached on the surface of solid paraffin carbon paste electrode (SPCE) by an external magnetic field. This is an assembly of a novel immuno biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The sensitivity and response features of this immunoassay are significantly affected by the surface area and the biological compatibility of the multilayered nanogold. The linear range for the detection of CEA was from 0.005 to 50 ng mL(-1) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.001 ng mL(-1). The LOD is approximately 500 times more sensitive than that of the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for CEA detection.

  15. Development of a PMMA Electrochemical Microfluidic Device for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Trung, Hoang; Tien, Bui Quang; Binh, Nguyen Hai; Ha, Cao Hong; Le Huy, Nguyen; Loc, Nguyen Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Lam, Tran Dai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic device fabricated by an inexpensive CO2 laser etching system was developed for detection of carcino-embryonic antigens (CEA). The device was capable of working in continuous mode and was designed with the aid of numerical simulation. The detection of target CEA was based on immuno-assay via magnetic particles and electrochemical sensing. The as-prepared microfluidic can be used to detect CEA at the relatively low concentration of 150 pg mL-1. The device could be reused many times, since the capture and removal of magnetic particles in the assay could be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The proposed approach appears to be suitable for high-throughput and automated analysis of large biomolecules such as tumor markers and pathogens.

  16. Proficiency testing for the radioimmunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen. A one-year report.

    PubMed

    Reynoso, G; Keane, M; Konopka, S

    1977-07-01

    Forty-three laboratories participated in an interlaboratory testing program offered by the College of American Pathologists for the radioimmunoassay (RIA) of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Thirty correctly reported a sample with 1.9 ng of endogenous CEA per ml as less than 2.5 ng. For samples with added exogenous CEA at the 5.4 ng/ml level, 24 laboratories reported too low and six too high (more than 2 SD beyond the targe value). At the 8.9 ng/ml concentration, three laboratories underestimated the CEA, while 18 overestimated the sample's concentration. A similar proportion of the laboratories performed in the same manner when estimating CEA at a target concentration of 15.9 ng/ml (five underestimating and 27 overestimating the concentration). Although individual variations were large, the majority of participating laboratories can reliably distinguish normal concentrations of CEA from moderate, intermediate and large elevations.

  17. Cathepsin D and carcino-embryonic antigen in serum, urine and tissues of colon adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Slawomir Dariusz; Snarska, Jadwiga; Jankowska, Anna; Roszkowska-Jakimiec, Wieslawa; Puchalski, Zbigniew; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Application of neoplastic markers in early diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma has brought fresh hope to millions of sufferers. However such a marker, distinctive for this particular carcinoma and allowing its detection at a sufficiently early stage of development has not yet been found. Cathepsin D (CD) is lysosomal aspartyl proteinase. It is a component of a proteolytic cascade participating actively in neoplastic invasion as well as in metastasis formation. Carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) is a useful marker in oncological diagnostics of colorectal cancer. CEA undergoes expression in all kinds of adenocarcinoma and is found both intercellularly and extracellularly. High concentrations of CEA in the blood serum confirm neoplastic changes in the digestive tract with high probability. The objective of this study has been to evaluate CD activity in the blood serum, urine and tumor tissues as well as in the colon biopsies which were not changed macroscopically and CEA concentration in the serum of colon adenocarcinoma, considering the extent of spread of cancer (TNM), the grade of the differentiation of cancer cell (G) as well as the tumor size. The possibility of application of CD along with CEA as markers of colon adenocarcinoma has also been examined. The examination included the serum and urine of 21 patients as well as 12 tissues biopsies with histopathologically confirmed colon adenocarcinoma. The reference group for the blood and urine comprised of 17 healthy controls, and for the colon adenocarcinoma tissues- samples collected from 14 people from the sites most distant from the resected tumor on the boundaries which were free of cancer cells. Activity of CD in the blood serum, urine as well as tissues was determined with a modified Greczaniuk et al. method and expressed by the amount of released tyrosine as the concentration of the activity in nmolTyr/mL/6h, whereas the specific activity was expressed in nmol Tyr/mg of protein /6h. The specific activity of CD in

  18. Sequence analysis of carcinoembryonic antigen: identification of glycosylation sites and homology with the immunoglobulin supergene family.

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, R J; Mooser, G; Pande, H; Lee, T D; Shively, J E

    1987-01-01

    A direct method for the determination of N-linked glycosylation sites in highly glycosylated proteins is described. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and a nonspecific crossreacting antigen (NCA) were chemically deglycosylated, and peptide maps were prepared by reverse-phase HPLC. The peptides were sequenced on a gas-phase microsequencer, and glycosylation sites were identified as the phenylthiohydantoin derivative of N-acetylglucosaminylasparagine. The sequences were confirmed by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Highly homologous, extended amino-terminal sequences were determined for CEA and two NCAs, NCA-95 and NCA-55. Cysteine-containing sequences for CEA and NCA-95 show up to 95% sequence homology, and the CEA sequences also show internal sequence homologies. A comparison of the CEA sequences with known protein sequences suggests that CEA may be a member of the immunoglobulin supergene family. The protein sequence data have been used to identify a genomic DNA clone for one of the NCA antigens [Thompson, J., Pande, H., Paxton, R. J., Shively, L., Padma, A., Simmer, R. L., Todd, C. W., Riggs, A. D. & Shively, J. E. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, in press] and a cDNA clone for CEA [Zimmermann, W., Ortlieb, B., Friedrich, R. & von Kleist, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, in press]. Images PMID:3469650

  19. [Prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen, alpha fetoprotein, carbohydrate antigen 125 and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Chen, Luohai; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Minhu; Chen, Jie

    2017-09-25

    To study the rate of elevated common biomarkers of digestive tumors, including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (GEP-NEN) and their prognostic values in GEP-NEN. Clinicopathological data of patients with GEP-NEN treated in The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University from January 2011 to December 2016 were retrospectively studied. The inclusion criteria were as follows: patients with complete clinicopathological data including AFP, CEA, CA125 and CA19-9 level before treatment; patients without previous or other concomitant cancer; patients diagnosed as sporadic but not familial NEN. Serum AFP level >30 μg/L, CEA level >7.5 μg/L, CA125 level >52.5 μg/L and CA19-9 level >52.5 kU/L were defined as elevation respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Log-rank test were applied to investigate the prognostic role of these biomarkers. A total of 170 patients with GEP-NEN were enrolled, and 105 (61.8%) patients were male with median age of 52.5 years. Thirty-six (21.2%), 77 (45.3%) and 57 (33.5%) cases were gastric, intestinal and pancreatic NEN respectively. Elevated AFP, CEA, CA125 and CA19-9 were found in 3(1.8%), 19(11.2%), 22(12.9%) and 21(12.4%) patients. Elevated CEA was related with G3 disease (OR=4.78, 95%CI:1.28-17.85, P=0.020) and elevated CA125 was related with distant metastasis (OR=51.60, 95%CI:5.76-462.44, P=0.000) while elevated CA19-9 was related with both G3 disease (OR=3.81; 95%CI:1.21-11.99, P=0.022) and distant metastasis(OR=4.87; 95%CI:1.41-16.75, P=0.012). The median follow-up was 22.5 months. Forty-six patients (27.1%) died during the follow-up. Patients with elevated CEA, CA125 or CA19-9 had worse overall survival compared with their counterparts with the median survivals of 14 months (95%CI:5.4 to 22.6 months, χ(2)=15.582, P=0.000), 6 months (95%CI:3.2 to 8.8 months, χ(2)=37.627, P=0.001) and

  20. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of carcinoembryonic antigen by rat liver Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Toth, C A; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1985-01-01

    In vivo, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is removed from the circulation by the liver Kupffer cells. Immunologically identifiable CEA is transferred from these macrophages to the hepatocytes, where degradation is completed. Circulatory clearance of CEA is specific, rapid [t1/2 = 3.7 +/- 0.9 (S.D.) min], and saturable. In vitro, Kupffer cells take up CEA by a saturable process which is time/temperature dependent and colchicine sensitive. Isolated Kupffer cells endocytose CEA with an apparent Km of 6 X 10(-8) M. There are approximately 16,000 CEA binding sites per cell. Nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), a glycoprotein structurally similar to CEA, is recognized with lower affinity by the same receptor. Endocytosis is independent of the nonreducing terminal sugars on the molecule: CEA modified by Smith degradation inhibits Kupffer cell recognition of native CEA. Since performic acid oxidized CEA also inhibits endocytosis, receptor binding is similarly independent of intact protein conformation. Isolated Kupffer cells have mannose and/or N-acetyl glucosamine receptor activity but do not internalize CEA by that mechanism. Galactose-terminated glycoproteins impede CEA and NCA clearance in vivo but not Kupffer cell endocytosis in vitro. Radiolabeled CEA released from isolated Kupffer cells following endocytosis shows no apparent molecular weight change. However, the released CEA contains species with higher isoelectric points, suggesting that perhaps the removal of sialic acid and the resulting exposure of galactose residues mediate the subsequent transfer to the hepatocyte.

  1. Electrochemical immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen based on a lead sulfide nanoparticle label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengfu; Zhang, Xing; Mao, Xun; Zeng, Qingxiang; Xu, Hui; Lin, Yuehe; Chen, Wei; Liu, Guodong

    2008-10-01

    We describe a lead sulfide nanoparticle (PbS NP)-based electrochemical immunoassay to detect a tumor biomarker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Cubic PbS NPs were prepared and functionalized with thioglycolic acid (TGA), which stabilized the formed NPs and offered carboxyl groups to conjugate with CEA antibodies. PbS NP conjugated with monoclonal CEA antibody was used as a label in an immunorecognition event. After a complete sandwich immunoreaction among the primary CEA antibody (immobilized on the carboxyl-modified magnetic beads), CEA and the PbS-labeled secondary antibody (PbS-anti-CEA), PbS labels were captured to the magnetic-bead (MB) surface through the antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Electrochemical stripping analysis of the captured PbS was used to quantify the concentration of CEA after an acid-dissolution step. The MBs and the magnetic separation platform were used to integrate a facile antibody immobilization with immunoreactions and the isolation of immunocomplexes from reaction solutions in the immunoassay. The voltammetric response is highly linear over the range of 1-50 ng ml-1 CEA, and the limit of detection is estimated to be 0.5 ng ml-1. The performance of this nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassay was successfully evaluated with human serum spiked with CEA, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for rapid, simple and cost-effective analysis of tumor biomarkers in biological fluids.

  2. Variations of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, alpha-fetoprotein and immunoglobulin levels in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vântu, A; Bălănescu, I; Stafidov, N; Voiculeţ, N

    1982-01-01

    To find the marker value of the carcinoembryonic antigen, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and immunoglobulin levels in patients with breast cancer, stages I or II, these parameters were determined in 94 patients devided into two groups: group A of 57 patients operated on for extirpation of the tumor without preoperative treatment and group B of 37 patients subjected to cobalto-therapy prior to operation then having the tumor extirpated. In the first group the determinations were performed before operation, at 14 days, and 2 months, respectively after the operation. In the second group 5 determinations were performed: before cobalto-therapy, after therapy, before the operation, at 15 days and 2 months, respectively after the operation. CEA and AFP were determined by the RIA tests and the immunoglobulins by immunodiffusion. The results showed that in 7 out of 37 cases the levels of CEA were significantly raised before and after therapy sometimes reaching values as high as 1000-3000 ng/nl while AFP was not influenced at all by breast tumors. The immunoglobulin values were also uninfluenced by the disease, but in certain cases of breast cancer IgA reached values of 300-500 IU/ml. It is assumed that since the patients who presented high CEA values had also an unfavourable evolution of the disease, determination of this antigen might also have a predictive value.

  3. Electrochemical Immunoassay of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on A Lead Sulfide Nanoparticle Label

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shengfu; Zhang, Xing; Mao, Xun; Zeng, Qingxiang; Xu, Hui; Lin, Yuehe; Chen, Wei; Liu, Guodong

    2008-10-01

    We describe a Lead sulfide nanoparticle (PbS NP) based electrochemical immunoassay to detect a tumor biomarker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Cubic PbS NPs were prepared and functionalized with thioglycolic acid (TGA), which stabilized the formed NPs and offered carboxyl groups to conjugate with CEA antibodies. PbS NP conjugated with monoclonal CEA antibody was used as a label in an immnorecognition event. After a complete sandwich immunoreaction among the primary CEA antibody (immobilized on the carboxyl-modified magnetic beads), CEA, and the PbS-labeled secondary antibody (PbS-anti-CEA), PbS labels were captured to the magnetic-bead (MB) surface through the antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Electrochemical stripping analysis of the captured PbS was used to quantify the concentration of CEA after an acid-dissolution step. The MBs and the magnetic separation platform were used to integrate a facile antibody immobilization with immunoreactions and the isolation of immunocomplexes from reaction solutions in the immunoassay. The performance of this nanoparticle based electrochemical immunoassay was successfully evaluated with human serum spiked with CEA, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for rapid, simple, and cost-effective analysis of tumor biomarkers in biological fluids.

  4. The diagnostic accuracy of carcinoembryonic antigen to detect colorectal cancer recurrence - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Caspar G; Karlsson, William K; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) has been used as a tumor marker in the follow-up of colorectal cancer for more than 40 years. Controversy exists regarding its diagnostic applicability due to a relatively low sensitivity and a questionable effect on mortality. The aim of this review was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of CEA in detecting recurrence after intended curative surgery for primary colorectal cancer. Systematic literature searches were performed in PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases, and articles were chosen based on predefined inclusion criteria. Reference lists from included articles were manually searched for additional publications of relevance. Forty-two original studies with generally representative populations and long follow-up were included. Data were reported on outcomes from 9,834 CEA tests during follow-up. Reporting on the reference standards used was not optimal. Sensitivity of CEA ranged from 17.4 % to 100 %, specificity ranged from 66.1 % to 98.4 %, positive predictive value ranged from 45.8 % to 95.2% and negative predictive value ranged from 74.5 % to 100 %. Results point toward a sensitivity of CEA ranging between 50 % and 80 %, and a specificity and negative predictive value above 80 %. Results on positive predictive value showed low reliability. Overall, CEA did not effectively detect treatable recurrences at an early stage, and a clinically relevant effect on patient mortality remains to be proven. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reduced Hepatic Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Level in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Garrett; Muturi, Harrison T.; Rezaei, Khadijeh; Al-Share, Qusai Y.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Bowman, Thomas A.; Ghadieh, Hilda E.; Ghanem, Simona S.; Zhang, Deqiang; Garofalo, Robert S.; Yin, Lei; Najjar, Sonia M.

    2017-01-01

    Impairment of insulin clearance is being increasingly recognized as a critical step in the development of insulin resistance and metabolic disease. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes insulin clearance. Null deletion or liver-specific inactivation of Ceacam1 in mice causes a defect in insulin clearance, insulin resistance, steatohepatitis, and visceral obesity. Immunohistological analysis revealed reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obese subjects with fatty liver disease. Thus, we aimed to determine whether this occurs at the hepatocyte level in response to systemic extrahepatic factors and whether this holds across species. Northern and Western blot analyses demonstrate that CEACAM1 mRNA and protein levels are reduced in liver tissues of obese individuals compared to their lean age-matched counterparts. Furthermore, Western analysis reveals a comparable reduction of CEACAM1 protein in primary hepatocytes derived from the same obese subjects. Similar to humans, Ceacam1 mRNA level, assessed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis, is significantly reduced in the livers of obese Zucker (fa/fa, ZDF) and Koletsky (f/f) rats relative to their age-matched lean counterparts. These studies demonstrate that the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obesity occurs at the level of hepatocytes and identify the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 as a common denominator of obesity across multiple species. PMID:28396653

  6. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using functional magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles in magnetic separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, H. Y.; Chang, C. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Chu, W. C.; Viswanathan, K.; Bor Fuh, C.

    2011-06-01

    We combined a sandwich immunoassay, anti-CEA/CEA/anti-CEA, with functional magnetic ( 80 nm) and fluorescent ( 180 nm) nanoparticles in magnetic separators to demonstrate a detection method for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Determination of CEA in serum can be used in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of tumor-related diseases. The CEA concentrations in samples were deduced and determined based on the reference plot using the measured fluorescent intensity of sandwich nanoparticles from the sample. The linear range of CEA detection was from 18 ng/mL to 1.8 pg/mL. The detection limit of CEA was 1.8 pg/mL. In comparison with most other detection methods, this method had advantages of lower detection limit and wider linear range. The recovery was higher than 94%. The CEA concentrations of two serum samples were determined to be 9.0 and 55 ng/mL, which differed by 6.7% (9.6 ng/mL) and 9.1% (50 ng/mL) from the measurements of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The analysis time can be reduced to one third of ELISA. This method has good potential for other biomarker detections and biochemical applications.

  7. Gold nanoparticle-based low limit of detection Love wave biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigens.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangming; Wan, Ying; Su, Yan; Fan, Chunhai; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2017-09-15

    In this work, a Love wave biosensing platform is described for detecting cancer-related biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). An ST 90°-X quartz Love wave device with a layer of SiO2 waveguide was combined with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to amplify the mass loading effect of the acoustic wave sensor to achieve a limit of detection of 37pg/mL. The strategy involves modifying the Au NPs with anti-CEA antibody conjugates to form nanoprobes in a sandwich immunoassay. The unamplified detection limit of the Love wave biosensor is 9.4ng/mL. This 2-3 order of magnitude reduction in the limit of detection brings the SAW platform into the range useful for clinical diagnosis. Measurement electronics and microfluidics are easily constructed for acoustic wave biosensors, such as the Love wave device described here, allowing for robust platforms for point of care applications for cancer biomarkers in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. New insights into the role of age and carcinoembryonic antigen in the prognosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, P G; Valentino, F; Berardi, E; Tronconi, C; Brugnatelli, S; Luinetti, O; Moratti, R; Corazza, G R

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify through relative survival (an estimate of cancer-specific survival) the true prognostic factors of colorectal cancer. The study involved 506 patients who underwent locally radical resection. All the clinical, histological and laboratory parameters were prognostically analysed for both overall and relative survival. This latter was calculated from the expected survival of the general population with identical age, sex and calendar years of observation. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to the proportional hazards model. Liver metastases, age, lymph node involvement and depth of bowel wall involvement were independent prognosticators of both overall and relative survival, whereas carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was predictive only of relative survival. Increasing age was unfavourably related to overall survival, but mildly protective with regard to relative survival. Three out of the five prognostic factors identified are the cornerstones of the current staging systems, and were confirmed as adequate by the analysis of relative survival. The results regarding age explain the conflicting findings so far obtained from studies considering overall survival only and advise against the adoption of absolute age limits in therapeutic protocols. Moreover, the prechemotherapy CEA level showed a high clinical value. PMID:18026187

  9. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. A.; Buckley, D.; Henson, D. B.; Armitage, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value. PMID:9823977

  10. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M A; Buckley, D; Henson, D B; Armitage, N C

    1998-11-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value.

  11. Reduced Hepatic Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Level in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Garrett; Muturi, Harrison T; Rezaei, Khadijeh; Al-Share, Qusai Y; DeAngelis, Anthony M; Bowman, Thomas A; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Zhang, Deqiang; Garofalo, Robert S; Yin, Lei; Najjar, Sonia M

    2017-01-01

    Impairment of insulin clearance is being increasingly recognized as a critical step in the development of insulin resistance and metabolic disease. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes insulin clearance. Null deletion or liver-specific inactivation of Ceacam1 in mice causes a defect in insulin clearance, insulin resistance, steatohepatitis, and visceral obesity. Immunohistological analysis revealed reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obese subjects with fatty liver disease. Thus, we aimed to determine whether this occurs at the hepatocyte level in response to systemic extrahepatic factors and whether this holds across species. Northern and Western blot analyses demonstrate that CEACAM1 mRNA and protein levels are reduced in liver tissues of obese individuals compared to their lean age-matched counterparts. Furthermore, Western analysis reveals a comparable reduction of CEACAM1 protein in primary hepatocytes derived from the same obese subjects. Similar to humans, Ceacam1 mRNA level, assessed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis, is significantly reduced in the livers of obese Zucker (fa/fa, ZDF) and Koletsky (f/f) rats relative to their age-matched lean counterparts. These studies demonstrate that the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 in obesity occurs at the level of hepatocytes and identify the reduction of hepatic CEACAM1 as a common denominator of obesity across multiple species.

  12. Superior Immunologic and Therapeutic Efficacy of a Xenogeneic Genetic Cancer Vaccine Targeting Carcinoembryonic Human Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Luberto, Laura; Mancini, Rita; La Monica, Nicola; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We have generated a xenogeneic vaccine against human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEACAM-5 or commonly hCEA) using as immunogen rhesus CEA (rhCEA). RhCEA cDNA was codon-usage optimized (rhCEAopt) and delivered by sequential DNA electro-gene-transfer (DNA-EGT) and adenoviral (Ad) vector. RhCEAopt was capable to break tolerance to CEA in hCEA transgenic mice and immune responses were detected against epitopes distributed over the entire length of the protein. Xenovaccination with rhCEA resulted in the activation of CD4+ T-cell responses in addition to self-reactive CD8+ T-cells, the development of high-titer antibodies against hCEA, and significant antitumor effects upon challenge with hCEA+ tumor cells. The superior activity of rhCEAopt compared with hCEAopt was confirmed in hCEA/HHD double-transgenic mice, where potent CD8+ T-cell responses against specific human HLA A*0201 hCEA epitopes were detected. Our data show that xenogeneic gene-based vaccination with rhCEA is a viable approach to break tolerance against CEA, thus suggesting further development in the clinical setting. PMID:25869226

  13. Superior Immunologic and Therapeutic Efficacy of a Xenogeneic Genetic Cancer Vaccine Targeting Carcinoembryonic Human Antigen.

    PubMed

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Luberto, Laura; Mancini, Rita; La Monica, Nicola; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2015-06-01

    We have generated a xenogeneic vaccine against human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEACAM-5 or commonly hCEA) using as immunogen rhesus CEA (rhCEA). RhCEA cDNA was codon-usage optimized (rhCEAopt) and delivered by sequential DNA electro-gene-transfer (DNA-EGT) and adenoviral (Ad) vector. RhCEAopt was capable to break tolerance to CEA in hCEA transgenic mice and immune responses were detected against epitopes distributed over the entire length of the protein. Xenovaccination with rhCEA resulted in the activation of CD4+ T-cell responses in addition to self-reactive CD8+ T-cells, the development of high-titer antibodies against hCEA, and significant antitumor effects upon challenge with hCEA+ tumor cells. The superior activity of rhCEAopt compared with hCEAopt was confirmed in hCEA/HHD double-transgenic mice, where potent CD8+ T-cell responses against specific human HLA A*0201 hCEA epitopes were detected. Our data show that xenogeneic gene-based vaccination with rhCEA is a viable approach to break tolerance against CEA, thus suggesting further development in the clinical setting.

  14. The role of bile carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing bile duct cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kwang Ro; Kim, Do Ha; Park, Jong Ho; Bang, Sung-Jo; Shin, Jung Woo; Park, Neung Hwa; Park, Jae Hoo

    2003-01-01

    It is known that the fluids bathing tumors might contain a higher level of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) than those found in the blood. Therefore, we evaluated the role of bile CEA in diagnosing bile duct cancer. One hundred and thirty two patients were prospectively studied. The patients were divided into 3 groups: the bile duct cancer (n=32), pancreatic cancer (n=16), and benign biliary diseases (n=84) groups. Bile samples were obtained on the next day of the biliary drainage procedures. The mean bile CEA level in those with bile duct cancer (120.6 +/- 156.9 ng/mL) was significantly higher than those with pancreatic cancer and benign biliary diseases (32.0 +/- 28.5 ng/mL, 29.3 +/- 56.3 ng/mL). Using the level of 20 ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity of bile CEA in the diagnosis of bile duct cancer from benign biliary diseases were 65.6% and 66.7%, respectively. Both the bile CEA and total bilirubin level were found to be an independent factor linked to bile duct cancer. This study result suggests that bile CEA level is a useful supplementary test for diagnosing bile duct cancer. PMID:14676443

  15. Malignant neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad; Qureshi, Asim; Saparamadu, Anna; Kumar, Shiyam

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman presented to a tertiary care centre with signs and symptoms of acute cholecystitis, cholelithiasis and diagnoses of a high-grade neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder primarily with peritoneal and liver metastases. She had a liver abscess secondary to Salmonella and Enterococcus fecalis that was drained and treated with appropriate antibiotics. Interestingly, the serum chromogranin A levels were within normal limits, but carcinoembryonic antigen was elevated, which helped evaluate responses and pick progression. She was treated with 10 cycles of palliative chemotherapy when malignancy associated complications started to recur, that is, cholangitis, worsening pain, cachexia, intestinal obstruction, etc leading to chemotherapy delays. Her disease progressed during these times with rapid deterioration of performance status. She died of septic complications postlaparotomy for intestinal obstruction. Her progression-free survival remained for 8 months with subjective and objective improvements, and her overall survival remained at 13 months. We describe the course of her illness and give a brief review of the literature. PMID:23661652

  16. Carcinoembryonic antigen-producing adrenal adenoma resected using combined lateral and anterior transperitoneal laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Taniguchi, Kentaro; Kurata, Masashi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kato, Kenji; Ogura, Yoshifumi; Iwasaki, Makoto; Okamoto, Shinya; Yamakado, Koichiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Iida, Taku; Kato, Takuma; Saito, Kanako; Wang, Linan; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman presented with symptoms consistent with hyperadrenocorticism and hyperca-techolaminism. She had a cushingoid appearance and her cortisol level was elevated. Her serum dopamine and noradrenalin levels were also elevated. Computed tomography detected a left adrenal mass measuring 3.5 cm × 3.0 cm in diameter. Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy was negative. Unexpectedly, the serum Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level was elevated. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed increased uptake in the adrenal tumor only, with a maximum standardized uptake value of 2.8. Selective venography and blood sampling revealed that the concentrations of cortisol, catecholamines and CEA were significantly elevated in the vein draining the tumor. A diagnosis of CEA-producing benign adenoma was made. After preoperative management, we performed a combined lateral and anterior transperitoneal laparoscopic adrenectomy. Her vital signs remained stable during surgery. Histopathological examination revealed a benign adenoma. Her cortisol, catecholamine and CEA levels normalized immediately after surgery. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of CEA-producing adrenal adenoma, along with a review of the relevant literature, and discuss our laparoscopic surgery techniques. PMID:18023107

  17. Highly conducting gold nanoparticles-graphene nanohybrid films for ultrasensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Mao, Li; Yuan, Ya-Li; Yuan, Ruo

    2011-07-15

    A new label-free amperometric immunosensor was developed for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on chitosan-ferrocene (CS-Fc) and nano-TiO(2) (CS-Fc+TiO(2)) complex film and gold nanoparticles-graphene (Au-Gra) nanohybrid. CS-Fc+TiO(2) composite membrane was first modified on a bare glass carbon electrode. Then Au-Gra nanohybrid was formed on the CS-Fc+TiO(2) membrane by self-assembly strategy. Next, further immobilization of anti-CEA was constructed according to the strong interaction between Au-Gra and the amido groups of anti-CEA. Since Au-Gra nanohybrid films provided a congenial microenvironment for the immobilization of biomolecules, the surface coverage of antibody protein could be enhanced and the sensitivity of the immunosensor has been improved. The good electronic conductive characteristic might be attributed to the synergistic effect of graphene nanosheets and Au NPs. The modified process was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Under optimized conditions, the resulting biosensor displayed good amperometric response to CEA with linear range from 0.01 to 80 ng/mL and a detection limit of 3.4 pg/mL (signal/noise=3). The results demonstrated that the immunosensor has advantages of high conduction, sensitivity, and long life time. This assay approach showed a great potential in clinical applications and detection of low level proteins.

  18. Immunohistology of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-expressing tumors grafted in nude mice after radioimmunotherapy with 131I-labeled bivalent hapten and anti-CEA x antihapten bispecific antibody.

    PubMed

    Gautherot, E; Kraeber-Bodéré, F; Daniel, L; Fiche, M; Rouvier, E; Saï-Maurel, C; Thedrez, P; Chatal, J F; Barbet, J

    1999-10-01

    We have developed a pretargeting strategy, called the Affinity Enhancement System (AES), which uses bispecific antibodies (BsF(ab')2) to target radiolabeled bivalent haptens to tumor cells. We performed several radioimmunotherapy (RIT) experiments in nude mice grafted with LS174T colon carcinoma or TT medullary thyroid cancer. Mice were treated with 131I-labeled di-DTPA-indium-tyrosyl-lysine bivalent hapten (75-112 MBq) administered 15-48 h after anti-CEA x anti-DTPA-indium BsF(ab')2. Immunohistological studies were performed on tumors at their minimal relative volume (TT), on stabilized tumor nodules (LS174T), and on regrowing tumors (TT and LS174T). Untreated tumors were used as controls. On microscopic examination, regrowing tumors (2 months posttherapy) were similar to untreated tumors with cells showing their respective typical morphology (large cells with a high nucleocytoplasmic ratio for TT, small and very undifferentiated cells for LS174T). However, regrowing tumors showed larger necrotic areas and a higher mitotic index correlated with Ki-67 antigen staining. Immunostaining for CEA was as strong as for controls. By contrast, the immunohistology of TT tumors at their minimal relative volume (1 month posttherapy) or of LS174T residual nodules (8 months posttherapy) showed decreased mitotic indices correlated with poor Ki-67 antigen staining. Some clusters of LS174T presented with features of glandular lumen, which suggested a more differentiated and less aggressive status. In TT tumors, CEA expression remained unchanged (80-100% membrane and cytoplasmic staining), whereas only 70% of the LS174T tumors were stained, with 58% loss of the membrane expression. Repeated treatment early after the tumor has reached its minimal relative volume should thus be efficient and improve the overall efficacy of AES RIT.

  19. Simultaneous Detection of α-Fetoprotein and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Si Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kuiyu; Zhang, Ye; Li, Zengyao; Zhou, Fan; Feng, Kang; Dou, Huiqiang; Wang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, resulting in death within six to 20 months. The survival rate can be improved by effective treatments when diagnosed at an early stage. The α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have been identified as markers that are expressed at higher levels in PHC patients. In this study, we employed silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (SiNW-FETs) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels to simultaneously detect AFP and CEA in desalted human serum. Dual-channel PDMS was first utilized for the selective modification of AFP and CEA antibodies on SiNWs, while single-channel PDMS offers faster and more sensitive detection of AFP and CEA in serum. During the SiNW modification process, 0.1% BSA was utilized to minimize nonspecific protein binding from serum. The linear dynamic ranges for the AFP and CEA detection were measured to be 500 fg/mL to 50 ng/mL and 50 fg/mL to 10 ng/mL, respectively. Our work demonstrates the promising potential of fabricated SiNW-FETs as a direct detection kit for multiple tumor markers in serum; therefore, it provides a chance for early stage diagnose and, hence, more effective treatments for PHC patients. PMID:26251912

  20. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen specifically increases among various serum markers of adenocarcinoma in hypohidrosis or conditions related to hypohidrosis.

    PubMed

    Honma, Masaru; Nozaki, Hiroyoshi; Nagahata, Hiroko; Fujii, Mizue; Shibuya, Takashi; Kanno, Kyoko; Minami-Hori, Masako; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2017-03-11

    Anhidrosis/hypohidrosis are conditions presenting various level of sweating dysfunction. Among them, acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis (AIGA) presents inadequate decrease or loss of sweating without apparent neurological and dermatological symptoms except cholinergic urticaria. Recently, serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), one of the most well-known tumor markers, has been proposed as a clinical marker reflecting activity of AIGA. This study was performed to verify the specificity and independence of serum CEA level from the other serum tumor markers especially related to adenocarcinoma. The expression of various tumor markers in the serum collected from three healthy control subjects, four AIGA cases, and a cholinergic urticaria (CU) case with elevation of serum CEA level and history of hyperthermia was analyzed using a membrane-based antibody array. In all AIGA and CU cases, the intensity of CEA was significantly increased (7.60-15.9 times compared with that of control), relatively well-reflecting the serum CEA level, and the mean intensity of CEA was 11.8 times higher than the control subjects (P = 0.0011). On the other hand, the ratio of carbohydrate antigen (CA)125 and CA19-9 was 1.93 and 0.23 times compared with the mean intensity of the control subjects, respectively, and there was no statistical significance. Immunohistochemistry on 10 AIGA cases showed increased expression of CEA but not CA19-9 and CA125 in the eccrine sweat glands. In conclusion, the elevation of serum CEA level was independent from the other tumor markers in hypohidrotic condition represented by AIGA.

  1. Emerging Role and Targeting of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 6 (CEACAM6) in Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Benny; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is a member of the CEA family of cell adhesion proteins that belong to the immunoglobulin superfamily. CEACAM6 is normally expressed on the surface of myeloid (CD66c) and epithelial surfaces. Stiochiomertic expression of members of the CEA family (CEACAM1, 5, 6, 7) on epithelia maintains normal tissue architecture through homo-and hetero-philic interactions. Dysregulated over-expression of CEACAM6 is oncogenic, is associated with anoikis resistance and an invasive phenotype mediated by excessive TGFβ, AKT, FAK and SRC signaling in human malignancies. Methods: Extensive literature review through PubMed was conducted to identify relevant preclinical and clinical research publications regarding CEACAM6 over the last decade and was summarized in this manuscript. Results: CEACAM5 and 6 are over-expressed in nearly 70% of epithelial malignancies including colorectal cancer (CRC), pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), hepatobiliary, gastric, breast, non-small cell lung and head/neck cancers. Importantly, CEACAM6 is a poor prognostic marker in CRC, while its expression correlates with tumor stage, metastasis and post-operative survival in PDA. CEACAM6 appears to be an immune checkpoint suppressor in hematologic malignancies including acute lymphoblastic leukemia and multiple myeloma. Several therapeutic monoclonal antibodies or antibody fragments targeting CEACAM6 have been designed and developed as a targeted therapy for human malignancies. A Llama antibody targeting CEACAM6 is being evaluated in early phase clinical trials. Conclusion: This review focuses on the role of CEACAM6 in the pathogenesis and signaling of the malignant phenotype in solid and hematologic malignancies and highlights its potential as a therapeutic target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27595061

  2. Evidence for carboxyl-terminal processing and glycolipid-anchoring of human carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Takami, N; Misumi, Y; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y; Ikehara, Y

    1988-09-05

    We have investigated the post-translational modification of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) for membrane-anchoring in QGP-1 cells derived from a human pancreatic carcinoma. Pulse-chase experiments with [3H]leucine demonstrated that CEA was initially synthesized as a precursor form with Mr 150,000 having N-linked high-mannose-type oligosaccharides, which was then converted to a mature form with Mr 200,000 containing the complex type sugar chains. The mature protein thus labeled was found to be released from the cell surface by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, suggesting that CEA is a phosphatidylinositol-linked membrane protein. This was confirmed by metabolic incorporation into CEA of 3H-labeled compounds such as ethanolamine, myo-inositol, palmitic acid, and stearic acid. The 3H-labeled fatty acids incorporated were specifically removed from the protein by nitrous acid deamination as well as by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C treatment. Since the available cDNA sequence predicts that CEA contains a single methionine residue only in its carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic domain, processing of the carboxyl terminus was examined by pulse-chase experiments with [35S]methionine. It was found that CEA with Mr 150,000 was initially labeled with [35S]methionine but its radioactivity was immediately lost with chase. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA is anchored to the membrane by simultaneously occurring proteolysis of the carboxyl terminus and replacement by the glycophospholipid immediately after the synthesis.

  3. Electrochemical sensor for immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen based on thionine monolayer modified gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zong; Chen, Jin; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2005-01-01

    A sensor based on thionine monolayer modified gold electrode for determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum is proposed. The sensor is prepared by covalently binding thionine to a cysteamine self-assembled monolayer with p-phthaloyl chloride as a linkage, which gives a surface coverage of 8.97+/-3.28 x 10(-12)mol/cm(2) for thionine. The electrochemistry of the immobilized thionine displays a surface-controlled electrode process with an average electron transfer rate constant of 1.47+/-0.84 s(-1). Based on an electrochemical enzyme-linked immunoassay by using the immobilized thionine as an electron transfer mediator between the electrode and the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled anti-CEA antibody, a calibration curve with two linear ranges from 0.6 to 17 and 17 to 200 ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.2 ng/mL for CEA determination is obtained in pH 4.2 PBS containing 2.0 mmol/L H(2)O(2) and 0.5 mol/L NaCl. The sensor shows a good accuracy. The precision and reproducibility are acceptable with the intra-assay CV of 4.9% and 5.9% at 10 and 100 ng/mL CEA concentrations, respectively, and the inter-assays CV of 7.8% at 100 ng/mL CEA. The response of thionine modified electrode shows only 1.6% decrease after 100 replicate measurements and the storage stability is acceptable in a pH 7.0 PBS at 4 degrees C for 1 week. The method avoids the addition of electron transfer mediator to the solution, thus is much simpler. The proposed method would be valuable for the diagnosis and monitoring of carcinoma and its metastasis.

  4. Elevated Level of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Search for a Malignancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to be associated with tumor burden in patients with colorectal cancer. However, it is also elevated to a significant degree in a number of other malignant and non-malignant conditions. We report a case of reversible CEA elevation in a patient using lithium for bipolar disorder. A 58-year-old female with a longstanding smoking history and a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bipolar illness, hypothyroidism, and obesity was found to have an elevated CEA level of 11.2 ng/ml (normal level <5 ng/ml) in the workup for postmenopausal bleeding. Her history was not positive for malignancy of colorectum, ovaries, thyroid, or breast.  She underwent a large number of imaging and endoscopic studies to evaluate for colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer; however, it did not reveal any evidence of malignancy. Upon review of her medications, she reported that she had recently started lithium for her bipolar illness. We followed up her CEA level while her dose of lithium was reduced from 450 to 300 mg per day. Her CEA level decreased from 25 mg/dl to 6.1 mg/dl and remained stable over the course of the next eight months. Our case is the first case report that identifies lithium as a potential cause of reversible CEA elevation. The underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated, but it underscores the importance of investigating the medications as part of the workup. PMID:27446768

  5. Aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assays for amplification detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li; Zhao, Jingjin; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2015-10-23

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as one of the most widely used tumor markers is used in the clinical diagnosis of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric, and cervical carcinomas. We developed an aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assay technique for assaying CEA in human serum for cancer diagnosis. The magnetic beads (MBs) are employed as carriers of double strand DNA that is formed by an aptamer of the target and a complementary DNA of the aptamer. After the aptamer in the MB-dsDNA conjugate binds with the target, the complementary DNA was released from the MB-dsDNA conjugate. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with a fluorescein amidite (FAM) labeled DNA, and forms a DNA duplex, which triggers the selective cleavage of FAM labeled DNA by nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvCI, and generating a FAM labeled DNA segment. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with another FAM labeled DNA, resulting in a continuous cleavage of FAM labeled DNA, and the generation of large numbers of FAM labeled DNA segments. In MCE laser induced fluorescence detection (LIF), the FAM labeled DNA segment is separated and detected. The linear range for CEA was 130 pg/ml-8.0 ng/ml with a correlation coefficient of 0.9916 and a detection limit of 68 pg/ml. The CEA concentration in the serum samples from healthy subjects was found to be in the range 1.3 ng/ml to 3.2 ng/ml. The CEA concentration in the samples from cancer patients was found to be >15 ng/ml. This method may become a useful tool for rapid analysis of CEA and other tumor markers in biomedical analysis and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of serum carcinoembryonic antigen in the detection of colorectal cancer before and after surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bin-Bin; Shi, Hui; Wan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) correlate with the presence of primary colorectal cancer (CRC), and/or recurrent CRC following radical resection. METHODS: A total of 413 patients with CRC underwent radical surgery between January 1998 and December 2002 in our department and were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up period was 69 mo (range, 3-118 mo), and CRC recurrence was experienced by 90/413 (21.8%) patients. Serum levels of CEA were assayed preoperatively, and using a cutoff value of 5 ng/mL, patients were divided into two groups, those with normal serum CEA levels (e.g., ≤ 5 ng/mL) and those with elevated CEA levels (> 5 ng/mL). RESULTS: The overall sensitivity of CEA for the detection of primary CRC was 37.0%. The sensitivity of CEA according to stage, was 21.4%, 38.9%, and 41.7% for stages I-III, respectively. Moreover, for stage II and stage III cases, the 5-year disease-free survival rates were reduced for patients with elevated preoperative serum CEA levels (P < 0.05). The overall sensitivity of CEA for detecting recurrent CRC was 54.4%, and sensitivity rates of 36.6%, 66.7%, and 75.0% were associated with cases of local recurrence, single metastasis, and multiple metastases, respectively. In patients with normal serum levels of CEA preoperatively, the sensitivity of CEA for detecting recurrence was reduced compared with patients having a history of elevated CEA prior to radical resection (32.6% vs 77.3%, respectively, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: CRC patients with normal serum CEA levels prior to resection maintained these levels during CRC recurrence, especially in cases of local recurrence vs cases of metastasis. PMID:22563201

  7. Preoperative Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Prognosis of Colorectal Cancer. An Independent Prognostic Factor Still Reliable

    PubMed Central

    Li Destri, Giovanni; Rubino, Antonio Salvatore; Latino, Rosalia; Giannone, Fabio; Lanteri, Raffaele; Scilletta, Beniamino; Di Cataldo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether, in a sample of patients radically treated for colorectal carcinoma, the preoperative determination of the carcinoembryonic antigen (p-CEA) may have a prognostic value and constitute an independent risk factor in relation to disease-free survival. The preoperative CEA seems to be related both to the staging of colorectal neoplasia and to the patient's prognosis, although this—to date—has not been conclusively demonstrated and is still a matter of intense debate in the scientific community. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. A total of 395 patients were radically treated for colorectal carcinoma. The preoperative CEA was statistically compared with the 2010 American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging, the T and N parameters, and grading. All parameters recorded in our database were tested for an association with disease-free survival (DFS). Only factors significantly associated (P < 0.05) with the DFS were used to build multivariate stepwise forward logistic regression models to establish their independent predictors. A statistically significant relationship was found between p-CEA and tumor staging (P < 0.001), T (P < 0.001) and N parameters (P = 0.006). In a multivariate analysis, the independent prognostic factors found were: p-CEA, stages N1 and N2 according to AJCC, and G3 grading (grade). A statistically significant difference (P < 0.001) was evident between the DFS of patients with normal and high p-CEA levels. Preoperative CEA makes a pre-operative selection possible of those patients for whom it is likely to be able to predict a more advanced staging. PMID:25875542

  8. All-in-one dual-aptasensor capable of rapidly quantifying carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Khang, Harriet; Cho, Kelly; Chong, Stephanie; Lee, Ji Hoon

    2017-04-15

    Using a dual DNA aptamer (CEA aptamer linked to hemin aptamer), capable of rapidly capturing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and hemin, an all-in-one dual-aptasensor with 1,1'-oxalyldiimidazole (ODI) chemiluminescence detection was developed for the early diagnosis of human cancer. CEA and hemin competitively bound with the dual DNA aptamer while the mixture in a detection cell was incubated for 30min at room temperature. When Amplex Red and H2O2 were added in the detection cell after the incubation, the yield of resorufin formed from the reaction Amplex Red and H2O2 depended on the concentration of HRP-mimicking G-quardruplex DNAzyme formed from the binding interaction between hemin and the dual DNA aptamer. Bright red light was observed with the addition of ODI and H2O2 in the detection cell containing resorufin. Relative CL intensity of all-in-one dual-aptasensor, operated with the competitive reaction of CEA and hemin in the presence of the dual aptamer, was exponentially decreased with the increase of CEA concentration in human serum. The limit of detection (LOD=3σ) of the all-in-one dual-aptasensor which operated with excellent accuracy, precision, and reproducibility was as low as 0.58ng/ml. The good correlation between the easy to use all-in-one dual-aptasensor and conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), operated with time consuming procedures (e.g., long incubations and multiple washings), indicates that the rapid all-in-one dual-aptasensor can be applied as a novel clinical tool for the early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  9. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using a flow-injection electrochemical device.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jin; Yang, Qingwei

    2007-05-01

    A magnetocontrolled immunosensing strategy based on flow-injection electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was developed for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum. The immunosensor was fabricated by immobilizing anti-CEA on epoxysilane-modified core-shell magnetic Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles. The detection principle is based on the difference between the resistances measured before and after the antigen-antibody interaction. The performance of the immunosensor and factors influencing this performance were also proposed. The resistance response depended linearly on the CEA concentration over the range 1.5-60 ng/ml, and the immunosensor gave a detection limit of 0.5 ng/ml (S/N=3). Coefficients of variance (CVs) of <9.8% were obtained for the intra- and interassay precisions. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of CEA in human serum. The recoveries obtained by spiking CEA standards into normal serum were 87-113%. The performance of the immunosensor was compared with a commercially available CEA ELISA. Satisfactory results were obtained according to a paired t-test method (t valueantigens or biocompounds. Figure This study introduced a magnetocontrolled electrochemical immunosensing strategy based on antibody-functionalized magnetic core-shell Fe3O4/SiO2 nanoparticles for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum.

  10. Targeted disruption of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 promotes diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Elaine; Dubois, Marie-Julie; Leung, Nelly; Charbonneau, Alexandre; Turbide, Claire; Avramoglu, Rita Kohen; DeMarte, Luisa; Elchebly, Mounib; Streichert, Thomas; Lévy, Emile; Beauchemin, Nicole; Marette, André

    2009-08-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CC1) is a cell adhesion molecule within the Ig superfamily. The Tyr-phosphorylated isoform of CC1 (CC1-L) plays an important metabolic role in the regulation of hepatic insulin clearance. In this report, we show that CC1-deficient (Cc1(-/-)) mice are prone to hepatic steatosis, as revealed by significantly elevated hepatic triglyceride and both total and esterified cholesterol levels compared with age-matched wild-type controls. Cc1(-/-) mice were also predisposed to lipid-induced hepatic steatosis and dysfunction as indicated by their greater susceptibility to store lipids and express elevated levels of enzymatic markers of liver damage after chronic feeding of a high-fat diet. Hepatic steatosis in the Cc1(-/-) mice was linked to a significant increase in the expression of key lipogenic (fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase) and cholesterol synthetic (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase) enzymes under the control of sterol regulatory element binding proteins-1c and -2 transcription factors. Cc1(-/-) mice also exhibited impaired insulin clearance, glucose intolerance, liver insulin resistance, and elevated hepatic expression of the key gluconeogenic transcriptional activators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 and Forkhead box O1. Lack of CC1 also exacerbated both glucose intolerance and hepatic insulin resistance induced by high-fat feeding, but insulin clearance was not further deteriorated in the high-fat-fed Cc1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, our data indicate that CC1 is a key regulator of hepatic lipogenesis and that Cc1(-/-) mice are predisposed to liver steatosis, leading to hepatic insulin resistance and liver damage, particularly when chronically exposed to dietary fat.

  11. Drug-resistant colon cancer cells produce high carcinoembryonic antigen and might not be cancer-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsin-chung; Ling, Qing-Dong; Yu, Wan-Chun; Hung, Chunh-Ming; Kao, Ta-Chun; Huang, Yi-Wei; Higuchi, Akon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the higher levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) secreted by the LoVo human colon carcinoma cells in a medium containing anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells were analyzed by subcutaneously xenotransplanting them into mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the drug-resistant cells isolated in this study were cancer-initiating cells, known also as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Methods The production of CEA was investigated in LoVo cells that were cultured with 0–10 mM of anticancer drugs, and we evaluated the increase in CEA production by the LoVo cells that were stimulated by anticancer drug treatment. The expression of several CSC markers in LoVo cells treated with anticancer drugs was also evaluated. Following anticancer drug treatment, LoVo cells were injected subcutaneously into the flanks of severe combined immunodeficiency mice in order to evaluate the CSC fraction. Results Production of CEA by LoVo cells was stimulated by the addition of anticancer drugs. Drug-resistant LoVo cells expressed lower levels of CSC markers, and LoVo cells treated with any of the anticancer drugs tested did not generate tumors within 8 weeks from when the cells were injected subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These results suggest that the drug-resistant LoVo cells have a smaller population of CSCs than the untreated LoVo cells. Conclusion Production of CEA by LoVo cells can be stimulated by the addition of anticancer drugs. The drug-resistant subpopulation of LoVo colon cancer cells could stimulate the production of CEA, but these cells did not act as CSCs in in vivo tumor generation experiments. PMID:23818760

  12. Demonstration of elevated anti-Lewis antibodies in sera of cancer patients using a carcinoembryonic antigen-polyethylene glycol immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Pompecki, R; Shively, J E; Todd, C W

    1981-05-01

    The serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and CEA-binding proteins of 68 controls and 170 cancer patients were determined. The CEA levels were determined by a double-antibody radioimmunoassay using radiolabeled CEA, and the CEA-binding proteins were determined by an immunoassay utilizing radiolabeled CEA and polyethylene glycol. The major CEA-binding proteins in serum were anti-blood group antibodies as demonstrated by differential binding of serum proteins from A, B, or O positive individuals to radiolabeled CEA's which were previously shown to carry specific blood group determinants. No statistically significant differences were observed for the binding of control versus cancer patient sera to CEA-A (carrying blood group A1), except, as expected, A negative (O or B positive) individuals gave high binding to CEA-A, while A positive individuals gave low binding to CEA-A. Statistically significant differences were observed for controls versus cancer patients for binding to CEA-Lewisab (CEA-Leab). CEA-Leab-binding activity was higher in females and smokers in the control group, but this distinction was not found in the cancer patients. The high levels of anti-Leab antibodies may be explained in females by exposure to fetal antigens during pregnancies and in smokers or cancer patients by exposure to precursors to blood group substances. The sera of 7% of the patients with colonic carcinoma, 18% of the patients with breast carcinoma, and 23% of the patients with bronchogenic carcinoma bound more CEA-Leab than did the serum of the highest male control. A correlation between CEA-Leab-binding activity and the levels of serum CEA was found for patients with colonic carcinoma but was not significant for the groups with other cancers or the control group. Serial determinations of CEA-Leab-binding activity for 21 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma changed congruently with the serum levels of CEA in 12 cases. The significance of these results in terms of expression

  13. Targeting Carcinoembryonic Antigen with DNA Vaccination: On-Target Adverse Events Link with Immunological and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chudley, Lindsey; Stasakova, Jana; Thirdborough, Stephen; King, Andrew; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Buxton, Emily; Edwards, Ceri; Halford, Sarah; Bateman, Andrew; O’Callaghan, Ann; Clive, Sally; Anthoney, Alan; Jodrell, Duncan I.; Weinschenk, Toni; Simon, Petra; Sahin, Ugur; Thomas, Gareth J.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Ottensmeier, Christian H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We have clinically evaluated a DNA fusion vaccine to target the HLA-A*0201 binding peptide CAP-1 from carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA605–613) linked to an immunostimulatory domain (DOM) from fragment C of tetanus toxin. Experimental Design Twenty-seven patients with CEA-expressing carcinomas were recruited: 15 patients with measurable disease (Arm-I) and 12 patients without radiological evidence of disease (Arm-II). Six intramuscular vaccinations of naked DNA (1mg/dose) were administered up to week 12. Clinical and immunological follow-up was to week 64 or clinical/radiological disease. Results DOM-specific immune responses demonstrated successful vaccine delivery. All patients without measurable disease compared to 60% with advanced disease responded immunologically, while 58% and 20% expanded anti-CAP-1 CD8+ T-cells, respectively. CAP-1-specific T-cells were only detectable in the blood post-vaccination, but could also be identified in previously resected cancer tissue. The gastrointestinal adverse event diarrhea was reported by 48% of patients and linked to more frequent decreases in CEA (p<0.001) and improved global immunological responses (anti-DOM responses of greater magnitude (p<0.001), frequency (p=0.004) and duration) compared to patients without diarrhea. In advanced disease patients, decreases in CEA were associated with better overall survival (HR=0.14, p=0.017). CAP-1 peptide was detectable on MHC class I of normal bowel mucosa and primary colorectal cancer tissue by mass-spectrometry, offering a mechanistic explanation for diarrhea through CD8+ T-cell attack. Conclusions Our data suggest that DNA vaccination is able to overcome peripheral tolerance in normal and tumor tissue and warrants testing in combination studies, for example, by vaccinating in parallel to treatment with an anti-PD1 antibody. PMID:27091407

  14. Coevolution of activating and inhibitory receptors within mammalian carcinoembryonic antigen families

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most rapidly evolving gene families are involved in immune responses and reproduction, two biological functions which have been assigned to the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family. To gain insights into evolutionary forces shaping the CEA gene family we have analysed this gene family in 27 mammalian species including monotreme and marsupial lineages. Results Phylogenetic analysis provided convincing evidence that the primordial CEA gene family in mammals consisted of five genes, including the immune inhibitory receptor-encoding CEACAM1 (CEA-related cell adhesion molecule) ancestor. Our analysis of the substitution rates within the nucleotide sequence which codes for the ligand binding domain of CEACAM1 indicates that the selection for diversification is, perhaps, a consequence of the exploitation of CEACAM1 by a variety of viral and bacterial pathogens as their cellular receptor. Depending on the extent of the amplification of an ancestral CEACAM1, the number of CEACAM1-related genes varies considerably between mammalian species from less than five in lagomorphs to more than 100 in bats. In most analysed species, ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs) or ITAM-like motif-containing proteins exist which contain Ig-V-like, ligand binding domains closely related to that of CEACAM1. Human CEACAM3 is one such protein which can function as a CEACAM1 decoy receptor in granulocytes by mediating the uptake and destruction of specific bacterial pathogens via its ITAM-like motif. The close relationship between CEACAM1 and its ITAM-encoding relatives appears to be maintained by gene conversion and reciprocal recombination. Surprisingly, secreted CEACAMs resembling immunomodulatory CEACAM1-related trophoblast-specific pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) found in humans and rodents evolved only in a limited set of mammals. The appearance of PSG-like genes correlates with invasive trophoblast growth in these species. Conclusions These

  15. Incorporation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels into the prognostic grouping system of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Heita; Kotake, Kenjiro; Hosaka, Miki; Hirata, Akira; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Fujita, Shin; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the significance of preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on disease-free survival (DFS) in colon cancer and propose a new prognostic grouping system. A multiinstitutional retrospective cohort of 7296 colon cancer patients who underwent R0 surgery between 1997 and 2006 was analyzed. We stratified preoperative serum CEA values into three categories (C-stages): C0 (normal CEA), C1A (up to double the cutoff value), and C1B (more than double the cutoff value) and stratified each TNM stage by C-stage. Multivariate analyses using Cox regression models were used to analyze the significance of C-stage on 5-year DFS. CEA level was an independent factor affecting DFS; the 5-year DFS of patients with C0 and C1, as well as those with C1A and C1B, differed significantly (C0 84.6%, C1 69.8%, C1A 72.7%, and C1B 66.4%, P < 0.0001). Additionally, the DFS of pStages IIC and C1B was significantly lower than of pStages IIIA and C0 (65.8 vs. 87.7%, respectively; hazard ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval 1.97-5.88, P < 0.0001). Moreover, the 5-year DFS of pStages IIIA and C0 or C1A did not differ significantly from pStages I and C1A (87.7 vs. 87.7%, P = 0.90 and 86.4 vs. 87.7%, P = 0.78, respectively). pStage IIC and C1B disease should be considered candidates for intensive adjuvant chemotherapy. Conversely, pStages IIIA and C0 or C1A could be exempted from adjuvant chemotherapy. Incorporating C-stage into the current TNM staging system may facilitate decision making regarding the use of adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer patients.

  16. C-stage in colon cancer: implications of carcinoembryonic antigen biomarker in staging, prognosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Sukumar, Shyamsunder; Sathaiah, Magesh; Mahan, Meredith; Pragatheeshwar, Kothai Divya; Pingpank, James F; Zeh, Herbert; Bartels, Christopher J; Lee, Kenneth K W; Bartlett, David L

    2011-04-20

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has proposed the inclusion of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (C-stage) into the conventional TNM staging system of colon cancer. We assessed the prognosis of various stages of colon cancer after such an inclusion. Data for all patients (N = 17 910) diagnosed with colonic adenocarcinoma (AJCC stages I, IIA, IIB, IIC, IIIA, IIIB, IIIC, and IV, based on TNM staging system) between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2004, with a median follow-up of 27 months (range 0-35 months), were collected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. C-stage (C0-stage = normal CEA level; C1-stage = elevated CEA level) was assigned to all patients with available CEA information (n = 9083). Multivariable analyses using Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify independent factors associated with prognosis. Prognosis of overall stages (AJCC stages I-IV and C0 or C1) was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. All statistical tests were two-sided. C1-stage was independently associated with a 60% increased risk of overall mortality (hazard ratio of death = 1.60, 95% confidence interval = 1.46 to 1.76, P < .001). Overall survival was decreased in patients with C1-stage cancer compared with C0-stage cancer of the respective overall stages (P < .05). Similarly, decreased overall survival was noted in patients with stage I C1 cancer compared with stage IIA C0 or stage IIIA C0 cancer (P < .001), in patients with stage IIA C1 cancer compared with stage IIIA C0 (P < .001), and in patients with stage IIB C1 or stage IIC C1 cancer compared with stage IIIB C0 cancer (P < .001). C-stage was an independent prognostic factor for colon cancer. The results support routine preoperative CEA testing and C-staging upon diagnosis of colon cancer and the inclusion of C-stage in the conventional TNM staging of colon cancer.

  17. Selective killing of lung cancer cells using carcinoembryonic antigen promoter and double suicide genes, thymidine kinase and cytosine deaminase (pCEA-TK/CD).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuan; Peng, Gui-Lin; Liu, Qi-Cai; Li, Fu-Li; Zou, Xu-Sen; He, Jian-Xing

    2012-03-01

    The application of gene therapy in cancer treatment is limited by non-specific targeting. In the present study, we constructed a recombinant plasmid, containing a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) promoter and double suicide genes thymidine kinase (TK) and cytosine deaminase (CD), henceforth referred to as pCEA-TK/CD. Our results showed that the CEA promoter can specifically drive target gene expression in CEA-positive lung cancer cells. In the presence of prodrugs 5-flucytosine and ganciclovir, pCEA-TK/CD transfection decreased inhibitory concentration 50 and increased apoptosis and cyclomorphosis. Our result suggests that gene therapy using pCEA-TK/CD may be a promising new approach for treating lung cancer.

  18. MicroRNA-29a suppresses the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6.

    PubMed

    Han, Hye Sook; Son, Seung-Myoung; Yun, Jieun; Jo, Yeong Nang; Lee, Ok-Jun

    2014-10-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is an important regulator of cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional roles of CEACAM6 in lung adenocarcinoma and to identify miRNAs that inhibit the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. CEACAM6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, and CEACAM6 has important functional roles in controlling the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, miR-29a can suppress the growth, migration, and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells by targeting CEACAM6. Therefore, miR-29a/CEACAM6 axis represents a potential therapeutic target for treatment of lung adenocarcinoma.

  19. Circulating calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen m-RNA detected by RT-PCR as tumour markers in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bojunga, J; Dragan, C; Schumm-Draeger, P M; Usadel, K H; Kusterer, K

    2001-01-01

    Detection of local relapse or metastasis in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) continue to pose a major diagnostic challenge. Besides established diagnostic studies such as serum calcitonin (CT) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), molecular detection of circulating tumour cells may be an additional diagnostic tool for the early detection of disease recurrence. We performed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on blood samples from patients diagnosed with MTC disease using primers specific for CT and CEA, respectively. CT mRNA was not detectable in peripheral blood of all patients with MTC (n = 11) and all controls (n = 32). CEA mRNA was significantly more often detected patients with MTC (72.7%) than in controls (34.4%; p = 0.038; Fisher exact test). With an example of a patient with MTC and massive tumour mass in the neck we demonstrate the failure of detection of CT mRNA over a period of 6 months, whereas CEA mRNA could be detected in peripheral blood of this patient. As a consequence, CT mRNA detected by RT-PCR in the peripheral blood can not be recommended as a tumour marker in MTC. However, the use of carcinoembryonic mRNA may provide a significant improvement in diagnosis of recurrent disease in MTC. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign   http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11720443

  20. Electrochemical immunoassay for carcinoembryonic antigen based on signal amplification strategy of nanotubular mesoporous PdCu alloy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanyan; Li, He; Li, Yuyang; Zhao, Yanfang; Ma, Hongmin; Zhu, Baocun; Xu, Caixia; Wei, Qin; Wu, Dan; Du, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Interests in using nanoporous metals for biosensing applications have been increasing. Herein, nanotubular mesoporous PdCu (NM-PdCu) alloy is used to fabricate a novel label-free electrochemical immunosensor for cancer biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). It operates through physisorption of anti-CEA on NM-PdCu and the mixture of sulfonated graphene sheets (HSO(3)-GS) and thionine (TH) functionalized glassy carbon electrode interface as the detection platform. In this study, chitosan (CS)-PdCu is bound very strongly to carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA), because of the good electron conductivity, high surface area, and good biocompatibility. CS-PdCu is immobilized on electrodes by electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged sulfo group of HSO(3)-GS and the abundant positively charged amino groups of chitosan. TH acts as the redox probe. Under the optimized conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor exhibits a wide working range from 0.01 to 12 ng/mL with a low detection limit of 4.86 pg/mL. The accuracy, reproducibility, and stability of the immunosensor are acceptable. The assay is evaluated for real serum samples, receiving satisfactory results. The nanoporous metal materials-based immunoassay provides a promising approach in clinical application and thus represents a versatile detection method.

  1. Radiocurability by Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} Using a Bispecific Antibody in Carcinoembryonic Antigen Transgenic Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Larbouret, Christel; Robert, Bruno; Linard, Christine; Teulon, Isabelle; Gourgou, Sophie M.Sc.; Bibeau, Frederic; Martineau, Pierre; Santoro, Lore; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Pelegrin, Andre; Azria, David

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) enhances radiotherapy (RT) killing of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. To overcome systemic side effects, we used a bispecific antibody (BsAb) directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and TNF-{alpha} to target this cytokine in a CEA-expressing colon carcinoma. We report the evaluation of this strategy in immunocompetent CEA-transgenic mice. Methods and Materials: The murine CEA-transfected colon carcinoma MC-38 was used for all experiments. In vitro, clonogenic assays were performed after RT alone, TNF-{alpha} alone, and RT plus TNF-{alpha}. In vivo, the mice were randomly assigned to treatment groups: control, TNF-{alpha}, BsAb, BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}, RT, RT plus TNF-{alpha}, and RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}. Measurements of endogenous TNF-{alpha} mRNA levels and evaluation of necrosis (histologic evaluation) were assessed per treatment group. Results: In vitro, combined RT plus TNF-{alpha} resulted in a significant decrease in the survival fraction at 2 Gy compared with RT alone (p < 0.00001). In vivo, we observed a complete response in 5 (50%) of 10, 2 (20%) of 10, 2 (18.2%) of 11, and 0 (0%) of 12 treated mice in the RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}, RT plus TNF-{alpha}, RT alone, and control groups, respectively. This difference was statistically significant when TNF-{alpha} was targeted with the BsAb (p = 0.03). The addition of exogenous TNF-{alpha} to RT significantly increased the endogenous TNF-{alpha} mRNA level, particularly when TNF-{alpha} was targeted with BsAb (p < 0.01). The percentages of necrotic area were significantly augmented in the RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha} group. Conclusion: These results suggest that targeting TNF-{alpha} with the BsAb provokes RT curability in a CEA-expressing digestive tumor syngenic model and could be considered as a solid rationale for clinical trials.

  2. Effect of prolactin on carcinoembryonic antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response induced by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matera, L; Beltramo, E; Martinuzzi, E; Buttiglieri, S

    2004-08-01

    The cytokine hormone prolactin (PRL) has been shown previously to modulate native cellular responses and maturation of antigen-presenting cells. Here we have addressed its effect on the antigen-specific response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CTL were generated from HLA-A2 lymphocytes after three rounds of stimulation with autologous dendritic cells loaded with HLA-A2-restricted carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) Cap-1 (YLSGANLNL) peptide. Selected cultures were expanded on cytokine-supplemented feeder-layers, enriched for CD8+ lymphocytes and analysed for PRL-receptor (PRL-R) expression and PRL responsiveness. Resting CD8+ lymphocytes were negative for PRL-R, whereas antigen-activated CD8+ lymphocytes derived from long-term cultures were highly positive. Results of a 51Cr release assay showed CTL killing of CEA-loaded, but not unloaded, T2 cell line and the CEA-positive gastric carcinoma cell line KATO, but not of the CEA-negative T leukaemia cell line Jurkat. Interferon (IFN)-gamma release, evaluated in an ELISPOT assay against CEA-loaded T2, was enhanced (P < 0.05) by concentrations of PRL (12-25 ng/ml) very close to the physiological levels (6-20 ng/ml), but was decreased (P < 0.05) by high concentrations (200 ng/ml). Pre-incubation of the stimulators with the anti-MHC class I MoAb W6.32 induced a 40-60% decrease of the PRL-boosted IFN-gamma release, thus proving the MHC restriction of the lymphocyte response. Cytotoxicity against CEA-loaded T2 and KATO cell lines was also increased by 12-25 ng (P < 0.05) and decreased (P < 0.05) by 200 ng PRL. Pre-incubation of CTL with an antibody specific for the PRL-R almost completely abrogated this effect.

  3. Effect of prolactin on carcinoembryonic antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response induced by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Matera, L; Beltramo, E; Martinuzzi, E; Buttiglieri, S

    2004-01-01

    The cytokine hormone prolactin (PRL) has been shown previously to modulate native cellular responses and maturation of antigen-presenting cells. Here we have addressed its effect on the antigen-specific response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). CTL were generated from HLA-A2 lymphocytes after three rounds of stimulation with autologous dendritic cells loaded with HLA-A2-restricted carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) Cap-1 (YLSGANLNL) peptide. Selected cultures were expanded on cytokine-supplemented feeder-layers, enriched for CD8+ lymphocytes and analysed for PRL-receptor (PRL-R) expression and PRL responsiveness. Resting CD8+ lymphocytes were negative for PRL-R, whereas antigen-activated CD8+ lymphocytes derived from long-term cultures were highly positive. Results of a 51Cr release assay showed CTL killing of CEA-loaded, but not unloaded, T2 cell line and the CEA-positive gastric carcinoma cell line KATO, but not of the CEA-negative T leukaemia cell line Jurkat. Interferon (IFN)-γ release, evaluated in an ELISPOT assay against CEA-loaded T2, was enhanced (P < 0·05) by concentrations of PRL (12–25 ng/ml) very close to the physiological levels (6–20 ng/ml), but was decreased (P < 0·05) by high concentrations (200 ng/ml). Pre-incubation of the stimulators with the anti-MHC class I MoAb W6·32 induced a 40–60% decrease of the PRL-boosted IFN-γ release, thus proving the MHC restriction of the lymphocyte response. Cytotoxicity against CEA-loaded T2 and KATO cell lines was also increased by 12–25 ng (P < 0·05) and decreased (P < 0·05) by 200 ng PRL. Pre-incubation of CTL with an antibody specific for the PRL-R almost completely abrogated this effect. PMID:15270849

  4. A Prospective Study of Comparing Multi-Gene Biomarker Chip and Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in the Postoperative Surveillance for Patients with Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Tang; Huang, Ming-Yii; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Circulating biomarkers can predict clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of our multigene biomarker chip for detecting circulating tumor cells for postoperative surveillance of stage I-III colorectal cancer patients. In total, 298 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients were analyzed after curative resection between June 2010 and October 2014. During each follow-up, a postoperative surveillance strategy, including ESMO Guidelines Working Group recommendations and the biochip, was used. After a 28.4-month median follow-up, 48 (16.1%) patients had postoperative relapse. Univariate analysis revealed that the postoperative relapse risk factors were rectal tumor, perineural invasion, elevated preoperative and postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, and positive biochip results (all P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that postoperative relapse correlated significantly with elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (odds ratio = 4.136, P = 0.008) and positive biochip results (odds ratio = 66.878, P < 0.001). However, the sensitivity (P = 0.003), specificity (P = 0.003), positive (P = 0.002) and negative (P = 0.006) predictive values, and accuracy (P < 0.001) of the biochip for predicting postoperative relapse were significantly higher than those of elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Moreover, the median lead time between positive biochip result and postoperative relapse detection was significantly earlier than that between elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and postoperative relapse detection (10.7 vs. 2.8 months, P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive biochip results correlated strongly with lower disease-free survival and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients (both P < 0.001). Compared with conventional serum carcinoembryonic antigen detection, our multigene chip aided more accurate and earlier prediction of

  5. A Prospective Study of Comparing Multi-Gene Biomarker Chip and Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in the Postoperative Surveillance for Patients with Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Tang; Huang, Ming-Yii; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating biomarkers can predict clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of our multigene biomarker chip for detecting circulating tumor cells for postoperative surveillance of stage I–III colorectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods In total, 298 stage I–III colorectal cancer patients were analyzed after curative resection between June 2010 and October 2014. During each follow-up, a postoperative surveillance strategy, including ESMO Guidelines Working Group recommendations and the biochip, was used. Results After a 28.4-month median follow-up, 48 (16.1%) patients had postoperative relapse. Univariate analysis revealed that the postoperative relapse risk factors were rectal tumor, perineural invasion, elevated preoperative and postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, and positive biochip results (all P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that postoperative relapse correlated significantly with elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (odds ratio = 4.136, P = 0.008) and positive biochip results (odds ratio = 66.878, P < 0.001). However, the sensitivity (P = 0.003), specificity (P = 0.003), positive (P = 0.002) and negative (P = 0.006) predictive values, and accuracy (P < 0.001) of the biochip for predicting postoperative relapse were significantly higher than those of elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Moreover, the median lead time between positive biochip result and postoperative relapse detection was significantly earlier than that between elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and postoperative relapse detection (10.7 vs. 2.8 months, P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive biochip results correlated strongly with lower disease-free survival and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Compared with conventional serum carcinoembryonic antigen detection, our multigene

  6. Correlation of disease activity and serum level of carcinoembryonic antigen in acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Honma, Masaru; Iinuma, Shin; Kanno, Kyoko; Komatsu, Shigetsuna; Minami-Hori, Masako; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2015-09-01

    Hypohidrosis and anhidrosis are congenital or acquired conditions which are characterized by inadequate sweating. Acquired idiopathic generalized hypohidrosis/anhidrosis (AIGA) includes idiopathic pure sudomotor failure (IPSF), which has the following distinct features: sudden onset in youth, increased serum immunoglobulin E and responds favorably to systemic corticosteroid. No clinical markers reflecting the disease severity or activity have been established. Here, we report a case of AIGA in a Japanese patient successfully treated with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy. In this case, serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels increased up to 19.8 ng/mL along with aberrant CEA immunoreactivity of eccrine sweat glands. Interestingly, the serum CEA level normalized as sweating improved with repeated methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Therefore, serum CEA level may serve as a useful clinical marker of hypohidrosis or anhidrosis.

  7. The Genome-Wide Analysis of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Signaling by Colorectal Cancer Cells Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Anna; Evsyukov, Igor; Rayko, Michael; Gapon, Svetlana; Bozhokina, Ekaterina; Shishkin, Alexander; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Сarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5, CD66) is a promoter of metastasis in epithelial cancers that is widely used as a prognostic clinical marker of metastasis. The aim of this study is to identify the network of genes that are associated with CEA-induced colorectal cancer liver metastasis. We compared the genome-wide transcriptomic profiles of CEA positive (MIP101 clone 8) and CEA negative (MIP 101) colorectal cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential in vivo. The CEA-producing cells displayed quantitative changes in the level of expression for 100 genes (over-expressed or down-regulated). They were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. The KEGG pathway analysis identified 4 significantly enriched pathways: cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, MAPK signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and pyrimidine metabolism. Our results suggest that CEA production by colorectal cancer cells triggers colorectal cancer progression by inducing the epithelial- mesenchymal transition, increasing tumor cell invasiveness into the surrounding tissues and suppressing stress and apoptotic signaling. The novel gene expression distinctions establish the relationships between the existing cancer markers and implicate new potential biomarkers for colorectal cancer hepatic metastasis. PMID:27583792

  8. Label-free electrochemical immunosensor based on Nile blue A-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Sha; Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Xu, Jing-Kun; Lu, Li-Min; Wang, Wen-Min; Yang, Tao-Tao; Xing, Hua-Kun; Yu, Yong-Fang

    2016-05-01

    In this article, a novel, label-free, and inherent electroactive redox immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and Nile blue A (NB) hybridized electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (NB-ERGO) is proposed. The composite of NB-graphene oxide (NB-GO) was prepared by π-π stacking interaction. Then, chronoamperometry was adopted to simultaneously reduce HAuCl4 and nanocomposites of NB-GO for synthesizing AuNPs/NB-ERGO. The immunosensor was fabricated by capturing CEA antibody (anti-CEA) at this nanocomposite modified electrode. The immunosensor determination was based on the fact that, due to the formation of antigen-antibody immunocomplex, the decreased response currents of NB were directly proportional to the concentrations of CEA. Under optimal conditions, the linear range of the proposed immunosensor was estimated to be from 0.001 to 40 ng ml(-1) and the detection limit was estimated to be 0.00045 ng ml(-1). The proposed immunosensor was used to determine CEA in clinical serum samples with satisfactory results. The proposed method may provide promising potential application in clinical immunoassays with the properties of facile procedure, stability, high sensitivity, and selectivity.

  9. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based cancer vaccines: recent patents and antitumor effects from experimental models to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Mario; Fantini, Massimo; Benvenuto, Monica; Izzi, Valerio; Masuelli, Laura; Sacchetti, Pamela; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycosylated protein of MW 180 kDa, is overexpressed in a wide range of human carcinomas, including colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, non-small cell lung and breast carcinomas. Accordingly, CEA is one of several oncofetal antigens that may serve as a target for active anti-cancer specific immunotherapy. Experimental results obtained by employing animal models have supported the design of clinical trials using a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of different types of human cancers. This review reports findings from experimental models and clinical evidence on the use of a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of cancer patients. Among the diverse CEA-based cancer vaccines, DCs- and recombinant viruses-based vaccines seem the most valid. However, although vaccination was shown to induce a strong immune response to CEA, resulting in a delay in tumor progression and prolonged survival in some cancer patients, it failed to eradicate the tumor in most cases, owing partly to the negative effect exerted by the tumor microenvironment on immune response. Thus, in order to develop more efficient and effective cancer vaccines, it is necessary to design new clinical trials combining cancer vaccines with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and drugs which target those factors responsible for immunosuppression of immune cells. This review also discusses relevant patents relating to the use of CEA as a cancer vaccine.

  10. Sensitive electrochemical immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen with signal dual-amplification using glucose oxidase and an artificial catalase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Tang, Dianping; Li, Qunfang; Su, Biling; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2011-07-04

    A new dual-amplification strategy of electrochemical signal based on the catalytic recycling of the product was developed for the antigen-antibody interaction by glucose oxidase (GOD)- conjugated gold-silver hollow microspheres (AuAgHSs) coupled with an artificial catalase, Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB), on a graphene-based immunosensing platform. The first signal amplification introduced in this study was based on the labeled GOD on the AuAgHSs toward the catalytic oxidation of glucose. The generated H(2)O(2) was catalytically reduced by the immobilized PB on the graphene nanosheets with the second amplification. With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was monitored as a model analyte by using the synthesized AuAgHSs as labels in pH 6.0 phosphate buffer containing 10mM glucose. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range of 0.005-50 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit (LOD) of 1.0 pg mL(-1) CEA (at 3σ). Both the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CVs) were lower than 10%. The specificity and stability of the immunosensor were acceptable. In addition, the assay was evaluated for clinical serum specimens, and received a good correlation with those obtained by the referenced electrochemiluminescent (ECL). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A network signal amplification strategy of ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical immunosensing carcinoembryonic antigen based on CdSe/melamine network as label.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Yong; Kuang, Xuan; Wang, Zhiling; Wei, Qin

    2016-11-15

    Taking advantage of CdSe/melamine network as label and Au-TiO2 as substrate, this work developed a novel kind of signal amplification strategy for fabricating photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay. The melamine, a star-shaped triamino molecule, was firstly used for readily capturing CdSe QDs and forming a CdSe/melamine network, which was formed through strong interactions between the carboxyl groups of TGA-stabilized CdSe QDs and the three amino groups of each melamine molecule. In this strategy, the primary antibody (Ab1) was immobilized onto Au-TiO2 substrate, which made the photoelectric conversion efficiency increase significantly. After the formed Ab2-CdSe/melamine network labels were captured onto the electrode surface via the specific antibody-antigen interaction, the photoelectric activity could be further enhanced via the interaction between the Au-TiO2 substrate and CdSe/melamine network. Due to this amplification of PEC signals and the special structure of the label, the fabricated PEC immunosensor was applied for sensitive and specific detection of cancer biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and displayed a wide linear range (0.005-1000ngmL(-1)) and low detection limit (5pgmL(-1)). In addition, the immunosensor was performed with good stability and reproducibility, and the results to analyze human serum samples were satisfactory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen synthesized by various human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Kuroki, M; Koga, Y; Matsuoka, Y

    1986-05-01

    The production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in various human tumor cell lines were studied. By radioimmunoassay (RIA), five CEA-producing tumor cell lines tested--2 derived from colonic (M7609 and CCK-81), one from pancreatic (QGP-1) and 2 from lung (HLC-1 and KNS-62) carcinomas--were found to produce NCA simultaneously. The cellular contents of CEA and NCA and the amounts of both antigens released into the culture medium were highly variable among the cell lines. It was a distinct contrast that one cell line (CCK-81) released very large amounts of CEA and NCA into the medium while having the smallest amounts of both antigens in the cells, whereas the others contained much larger amounts of the antigens in the cells as compared with the amounts released into the medium. For most of the cell lines, the production of both CEA and NCA increased in the stationary phase of growth as compared with the exponential phase. The production kinetics of both CEA and NCA appeared to be parallel with each other in all the cell lines, though the amount ratio of CEA to NCA produced was variable. By means of a double immunodiffusion test with polyclonal antibodies, antigenic uniformity with no unique organ-specificity was confirmed for all the CEA preparations from spent media of the cell lines, though some differences in the sugar moiety of CEA were detected by RIA using monoclonal antibodies. No antigenic differences among NCA preparations were observed. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), molecular heterogeneity was observed among CEA or NCA preparations isolated from cell lysates.

  13. Identification of carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cells circulating in the blood of patients with colorectal carcinoma by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, S; Windeatt, S; O-Boateng, A; Fordy, C; Allen-Mersh, T G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Application of the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identification of circulating tumour cells in colorectal cancer. AIMS: To assess whether circulating malignant cells in patients with colorectal liver metastasis could be identified by RT-PCR recognition of mRNA coding for the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). PATIENTS: A total of 31 with colorectal liver metastases and 22 no-cancer controls. METHODS: Specific cDNA primers for CEA transcripts were used to apply RT-PCR to tissue biopsy specimens, colon carcinoma cell lines, and peripheral blood samples from patients with colorectal liver metastases. A strongly CEA-expressive HT115 colorectal carcinoma cell line was used to spike blood samples from no-cancer control subjects. RESULTS: The limit for detection of CEA cDNA by Southern blotting using HT115 cells was 50 cells per 14 ml of spiked blood. There was a significant difference (p = 0.007) in RT-PCR positive expression between patients with liver metastasis (26/31) compared with controls (5/22). There was no significant relation between the prevalence of CEA cDNA amplification and serum CEA level or metastasis volume in patients with liver metastasis. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to suggest that identification of circulating colorectal cancer cells using RT-PCR for detection of CEA cDNA is feasible. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9014772

  14. Increased Glucose-induced Secretion of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Mice Lacking the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 2 (CEACAM2)*

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Simona S.; Heinrich, Garrett; Lester, Sumona G.; Pfeiffer, Verena; Bhattacharya, Sumit; Patel, Payal R.; DeAngelis, Anthony M.; Dai, Tong; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K.; Smiley, Zachary N.; Jung, Dae Y.; Lee, Yongjin; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ergun, Suleyman; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Kim, Jason K.; Giovannucci, David R.; Najjar, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 2 (CEACAM2) regulates food intake as demonstrated by hyperphagia in mice with the Ceacam2 null mutation (Cc2−/−). This study investigated whether CEACAM2 also regulates insulin secretion. Ceacam2 deletion caused an increase in β-cell secretory function, as assessed by hyperglycemic clamp analysis, without affecting insulin response. Although CEACAM2 is expressed in pancreatic islets predominantly in non-β-cells, basal plasma levels of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin, islet areas, and glucose-induced insulin secretion in pooled Cc2−/− islets were all normal. Consistent with immunofluorescence analysis showing CEACAM2 expression in distal intestinal villi, Cc2−/− mice exhibited a higher release of oral glucose-mediated GLP-1, an incretin that potentiates insulin secretion in response to glucose. Compared with wild type, Cc2−/− mice also showed a higher insulin excursion during the oral glucose tolerance test. Pretreating with exendin(9–39), a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, suppressed the effect of Ceacam2 deletion on glucose-induced insulin secretion. Moreover, GLP-1 release into the medium of GLUTag enteroendocrine cells was increased with siRNA-mediated Ceacam2 down-regulation in parallel to an increase in Ca2+ entry through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Thus, CEACAM2 regulates insulin secretion, at least in part, by a GLP-1-mediated mechanism, independent of confounding metabolic factors. PMID:26586918

  15. In vivo subcellular imaging of tumors in mouse models using a fluorophore-conjugated anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in two-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Shigehiro; Oshima, Yusuke; Honkura, Naoki; Iimura, Tadahiro; Kameda, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Yoshida, Motohira; Yamamoto, Yuji; Watanabe, Yuji; Hikita, Atsuhiko; Imamura, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in applying fluorescence imaging techniques to the study of various disease processes and complex biological phenomena in vivo. To apply these methods to clinical settings, several groups have developed protocols for fluorescence imaging using antibodies against tumor markers conjugated to fluorescent substances. Although these probes have been useful in macroscopic imaging, the specificity and sensitivity of these methods must be improved to enable them to detect micro-lesions in the early phases of cancer, resulting in better treatment outcomes. To establish a sensitive and highly specific imaging method, we used a fluorophore-conjugated anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody to perform macroscopic and microscopic in vivo imaging of inoculated cancer cells expressing GFP with or without CEA. Macroscopic imaging by fluorescence zoom microscopy revealed that bio-conjugation of Alexa Fluor 594 to the anti-CEA antibody allowed visualization of tumor mass consisting of CEA-expressing human cancer cells, but the background levels were unacceptably high. In contrast, microscopic imaging using a two-photon excitation microscope and the same fluorescent antibody resulted in subcellular-resolution imaging that was more specific and sensitive than conventional imaging using a fluorescence zoom microscope. These results suggest that two-photon excitation microscopy in conjunction with fluorophore-conjugated antibodies could be widely adapted to detection of cancer-specific cell-surface molecules, both in cancer research and in clinical applications. PMID:25117702

  16. Horseradish peroxidase-labeled silver/reduced graphene oxide thin film-modified screen-printed electrode for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Lee, S X; Lim, H N; Ibrahim, I; Jamil, A; Pandikumar, A; Huang, N M

    2017-03-15

    In this study, a disposable and simple electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen. In this method, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were mixed with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) to modify the surface of screen-printed carbon electrode (SPE). Initially, AgNPs-rGO modified-SPEs were fabricated by using simple electrochemical deposition method. Then the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was immobilized between the primary antibody and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated secondary antibody onto AgNPs-rGO modified-SPEs to fabricate a sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor. The proposed method could detect the CEA with a linear range of 0.05-0.50µgmL(-1) and a detection limit down to 0.035µgmL(-1) as compared to its non-sandwich counterpart, which yielded a linear range of 0.05-0.40µgmL(-1), with a detection limit of 0.042µgmL(-1). The immunosensor showed good performance in the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen, exhibiting a simple, rapid and low-cost. The immunosensor showed a higher sensitivity than an enzymeless sensor.

  17. Carcinoembryonic Antigen-Related Cell Adhesion Molecule 5 Is an Important Surface Attachment Factor That Facilitates Entry of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Che-Man; Chu, Hin; Wang, Yixin; Wong, Bosco Ho-Yin; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Jie; Yang, Dong; Leung, Sze Pui; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Yeung, Man-Lung; Yan, Jinghua; Lu, Guangwen; Gao, George Fu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The spike proteins of coronaviruses are capable of binding to a wide range of cellular targets, which contributes to the broad species tropism of coronaviruses. Previous reports have demonstrated that Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) predominantly utilizes dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) for cell entry. However, additional cellular binding targets of the MERS-CoV spike protein that may augment MERS-CoV infection have not been further explored. In the current study, using the virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA), we identified carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5) as a novel cell surface binding target of MERS-CoV. CEACAM5 coimmunoprecipitated with the spike protein of MERS-CoV in both overexpressed and endogenous settings. Disrupting the interaction between CEACAM5 and MERS-CoV spike with anti-CEACAM5 antibody, recombinant CEACAM5 protein, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of CEACAM5 significantly inhibited the entry of MERS-CoV. Recombinant expression of CEACAM5 did not render nonpermissive baby hamster kidney (BHK21) cells susceptible to MERS-CoV infection. Instead, CEACAM5 overexpression significantly enhanced the attachment of MERS-CoV to the BHK21 cells. More importantly, the entry of MERS-CoV was increased when CEACAM5 was overexpressed in permissive cells, which suggested that CEACAM5 could facilitate MERS-CoV entry in conjunction with DPP4 despite not being able to support MERS-CoV entry independently. Taken together, the results of our study identified CEACAM5 as a novel cell surface binding target of MERS-CoV that facilitates MERS-CoV infection by augmenting the attachment of the virus to the host cell surface. IMPORTANCE Infection with the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is associated with the highest mortality rate among all known human-pathogenic coronaviruses. Currently, there are no approved vaccines or therapeutics against MERS-CoV infection. The

  18. Highly sensitive and selective lateral flow immunoassay based on magnetic nanoparticles for quantitative detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangming; Zhang, Honglian; Wu, Zhenhua; Dong, Haidao; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Dawei; Ge, Yuqing; Jia, Chunping; Liu, Huiying; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhang, Qiqing; Mao, Hongju

    2016-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is an important biomarker in cancer diagnosis. Here, we present an efficient, selective lateral-flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for in situ sensitive and accurate point-of-care detection of CEA. Signal amplification mechanism involved linking of detection MNPs with signal MNPs through biotin-modified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and streptavidin. To verify the effectiveness of this modified LFIA system, the sensitivity and specificity were evaluated. Sensitivity evaluation showed a broad detection range of 0.25-1000ng/ml for CEA protein by the modified LFIA, and the limit of detection (LOD) of the modified LFIA was 0.25ng/ml, thus producing significant increase in detection threshold compared with the traditional LFIA. The modified LFIA could selectively recognize CEA in presence of several interfering proteins. In addition, this newly developed assay was applied for quantitative detection of CEA in human serum specimens collected from 10 randomly selected patients. The modified LFIA system detected minimum 0.27ng/ml of CEA concentration in serum samples. The results were consistent with the clinical data obtained using commercial electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA) (p<0.01). In conclusion, the MNPs based LFIA system not only demonstrated enhanced signal to noise ratio, it also detected CEA with higher sensitivity and selectivity, and thus has great potential to be commercially applied as a sensitive tumor marker filtration system.

  19. The Combination of Cyst Fluid Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Cytology and Viscosity Increases the Diagnostic Accuracy of Mucinous Pancreatic Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se Hun; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lee, Kwang Hyuck; Woo, Young Sik; Noh, Dong Hyo

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The objective of this study was to investigate the value of cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in combination with cytology and viscosity for the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cysts. Methods We retrospectively reviewed our data for patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and cyst fluid analysis. We investigated the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the combination of cyst fluid CEA, cytology and viscosity testing. Results A total of 177 patients underwent EUS-FNA and cyst fluid analysis. Of these, 48 subjects were histologically and clinically confirmed to have pancreatic cysts and were therefore included in the analysis. Receiver operator curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff value of cyst fluid CEA for differentiating mucinous versus nonmucinous cystic lesions was 48.6 ng/mL. The accuracy of cyst fluid CEA (39/48, 81.3%) was greater than the accuracy of cytology (23/45, 51.1%) or the string sign (33/47, 70.2%). Cyst fluid CEA in combination with cytology and string sign assessment exhibited the highest accuracy (45/48, 93.8%). Conclusions Cyst fluid CEA was the most useful single test for identifying mucinous pancreatic cysts. The addition of cytology and string sign assessment to cyst fluid CEA increased the overall accuracy for the diagnosis of mucinous pancreatic cysts. PMID:27609484

  20. Smart DNA Machine for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection by Exonuclease III-Assisted Target Recycling and DNA Walker Cascade Amplification.

    PubMed

    He, Meng-Qi; Wang, Kun; Wang, Wen-Jing; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2017-09-05

    A synthetic DNA machine performs quasi-mechanical movements in response to external intervention, suggesting the promise of constructing sensitive and specific biosensors. Herein, a smart DNA walker biosensor for label-free detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is developed for the first time by a novel cascade amplification strategy of exonuclease (Exo) III-assisted target recycling amplification (ERA) and DNA walker. ERA as the first stage of amplification generates the walker DNA, while the autonomous traveling of the walker DNA on the substrate-modified silica microspheres as the second stage of amplification produces an ultrasensitive fluorescent signal with the help of N-methylmesoporphyrin IX (NMM). The DNA machine as a biosensor could be applied for transducing and quantifying signals from isothermal molecular amplifications, avoiding the complicated reporter elements and thermal cycling. The present biosensor achieves a detection limit of 1.2 pg·mL(-1) within a linear range of 10 pg·mL(-1) to 100 ng·mL(-1) for CEA, along with a favorable specificity. The practical applicability of the biosensor is demonstrated by the detection of CEA in human serum with satisfactory results; thus, it shows great potential in clinical diagnosis.

  1. Dual Immunomagnetic Nanobeads-Based Lateral Flow Test Strip for Simultaneous Quantitative Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Neuron Specific Enolase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenting; Wang, Kan; Xiao, Kun; Qin, Weijian; Hou, Yafei; Xu, Hao; Yan, Xinyu; Chen, Yanrong; Cui, Daxiang; He, Jinghua

    2017-01-01

    A novel immunomagnetic nanobeads -based lateral flow test strip was developed for the simultaneous quantitative detection of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which are sensitive and specific in the clinical diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Using this nanoscale method, high saturation magnetization, carboxyl-modified magnetic nanobeads were successfully synthesized. To obtain the immunomagnetic probes, a covalent bioconjugation of the magnetic nanobeads with the antibody of NSE and CEA was carried out. The detection area contained test line 1 and test line 2 which captured the immune complexes sensitively and formed sandwich complexes. In this assay, cross-reactivity results were negative and both NSE and CEA were detected simultaneously with no obvious influence on each other. The magnetic signal intensity of the nitrocellulose membrane was measured by a magnetic assay reader. For quantitative analysis, the calculated limit of detection was 0.094 ng/mL for NSE and 0.045 ng/mL for CEA. One hundred thirty clinical samples were used to validate the test strip which exhibited high sensitivity and specificity. This dual lateral flow test strip not only provided an easy, rapid, simultaneous quantitative detection strategy for NSE and CEA, but may also be valuable in automated and portable diagnostic applications. PMID:28186176

  2. Detection of survivin, carcinoembryonic antigen and ErbB2 level in oral squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Xia; Yang, Yan-Qi; Jin, Li-Jian; Cai, Zhi-Gang; Sun, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the survivin, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and ErbB2 in the saliva, serum and local tumor-exfoliated cells of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients, for providing reliable tumor markers for the early detection of oral malignant cancer. The saliva, serum, and local tumor-exfoliated cell samples of 26 OSCC patients without chemotherapy and 10 non-cancer patients were collected in Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Peking University. The contents of survivin, CEA and ErbB2 using were detected usingenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The survivin and CEA levels in saliva and local tumor-exfoliated cells of OSCC patients were significantly higher than those in the non-cancer patients (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference in the content of the above factors in the serum sample between two groups. There was no significant difference in the ErbB2 content in the saliva, serum or local tumor-exfoliated cells between two groups. Survivin and CEA levels are significantly increased in the saliva and local tumor-exfoliated cells in OSCC patients, and they can be used as reliable markers for the early detection of oral malignant cancer.

  3. A novel label-free electrochemical immunosensor based on functionalized nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuying; Liu, Qing; Liu, Yan; Cui, Jianjian; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ping; Li, Yueyun; Chen, Lei; Zhao, Zengdian; Dong, Yunhui

    2017-04-15

    A novel and ultrasensitive label-free electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated for quantitative detection of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). The nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (N-GQDs) supported PtPd bimetallic nanoparticles (PtPd/N-GQDs) were synthesized by a simple and green hydrothermal procedure. Subsequently, PtPd/N-GQDs functionalized Au nanoparticles (PtPd/N-GQDs@Au) were prepared successfully via a self-assembly approach. Because of the synergetic effect present in PtPd/N-GQDs@Au, this novel nanocomposites has shown excellent electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduction. Featuring good biocompatibility, excellent conductivity and large surface area, PtPd/N-GQDs@Au was applied as transducing materials to efficiently conjugate capture antibodies and amplify electrochemical signal. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed immunosensor was used for the detection of CEA with wide dynamic range in the range from 5 fg/mL to 50ng/mL with a low detection limit of 2fg/mL (S/N=3). Furthermore, this label-free immunosensor possesses high sensitivity, special selectivity and long-term stability, which shows promising application in bioassay analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen mRNA in peritoneal washes from gastric cancer patients and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan-Song; Xu, Jun; Luo, Guang-Hua; Wang, Rong-Chao; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Nilsson-Ehle, Peter; Xu, Ning

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more sensitive method for detection of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes from gastric cancer patients during surgery and to evaluate its clinical significance. METHODS: The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA levels in peritoneal washes from 65 cases of gastric cancer were detected by real-time RT-PCR. Peritoneal lavage cytology (PLC) was applied simultaneously to detection of free cancer cells. Negative controls included peritoneal washes from 5 cases of benign gastric disease and blood samples from 5 adult healthy volunteers. RESULTS: There was no CEA mRNA in peritoneal washes from benign gastric disease patients and in blood of adult healthy volunteers. The positive percentage of free cancer cells detected by real-time RT-PCR was 47.7% and only 12.3% by PLC. The positive rate of CEA mRNA was significantly related with serosa invasion between peritoneal metastasis and stage of gastric cancer. CONCLUSION: Real-time RT-PCR is a sensitive and rapid method for the detection of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes. The presence of free cancer cells in peritoneal washes is related to the pathologic stage of gastric cancer. PMID:16552810

  5. Combined measurement and significance of lipid-bound sialic acid and carcinoembryonic antigen in detection of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Munjal, D D; Picken, J; Pritchard, J

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness of lipid-bound sialic acid (LSA) as a "tumor marker" and assessed individual and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in cancer patients. Serum LSA and CEA concentrations were measured by the resorcinol method after total lipid extraction and isolation of the sialolipid fraction, and by Abbott enzyme immunoassay procedures, respectively. Results indicate that the frequency of elevation and mean LSA values were highest in patients with lung cancer (318 mg/liter), intermediate in miscellaneous (210 mg/liter) and colorectal cancers (200 mg/liter), and lowest in breast cancer (175 mg/liter); while mean CEA values were highest in colorectal cancer (162.5 micrograms/liter), followed by lung (33.8 micrograms/liter), miscellaneous (30.3 micrograms/liter), and breast cancers (11.6 micrograms/liter). Statistically, LSA and CEA values for cancer patients were significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than for normal subjects. The combined measurement of LSA and CEA in serum provides better detection potential for cancer patients than either of the two markers alone.

  6. Electrochemical Immunosensor Based on Fe3O4/PANI/AuNP Detecting Interface for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasiri, Chamali; Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Nguyen, Loc Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Thuy, Nguyen Thi My; Dai Lam, Tran

    2017-10-01

    A low-cost screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modified with Fe3O4, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and polyaniline (PANI) has been developed for rapid measurement of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) biomarker. The electrode surface was covered with Fe3O4 nanoparticles by drop coating then with PANI via electropolymerization. The resulting surface was further modified by AuNPs via electrodeposition. Key factors affecting the electrochemical behavior and sensing performance of the electrode were investigated. The results demonstrated that Fe3O4 mass loading of 2 mg/cm2 and 15 cycles of PANI polymerization were optimal for electrochemical measurement of CEA biomarker. In addition, compared with bare SPCE, coating the electrode surface with PANI, Fe3O4/PANI, and Fe3O4/PANI/AuNP significantly enhanced the peak oxidation current by approximately 16%, 52%, and 93%, respectively. The sensors exhibited linear trends with CEA concentration from 0 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL. The limit of detection and sensitivity of the electrode were estimated to be 0.25 ng/mL and 0.3827 μA/ng mL-1, respectively. Such sensors could be easily integrated into microfluidic platforms and could serve as a low-cost, rapid, point-of-care measurement method for CEA cancer biomarker.

  7. Electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen based on nanosilver-coated magnetic beads and gold-graphene nanolabels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huafeng; Tang, Dianping; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Bingqian; Cui, Yuling; Chen, Guonan

    2012-03-15

    A novel redox-active magnetic nanostructure was synthesized by using a wet chemical method for high-efficiency electrochemical immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, as a model analyte). The nanostructures based on the combination of a magnetic nanocore, a layer of electroactive poly(o-phenylenediamine) (PPD), and a silver metallic shell displayed good adsorption properties for the attachment of anti-CEA antibody selective to CEA. The magnetic nanostructure presented good redox behaviors to facilitate and modulate the way it was integrated into a magnetic carbon paste electrode. The assay was based on a sandwich-type immunoassay protocol by using nanogold-patterned graphene oxide nanoscales (AuNP-GO), conjugated with horseradish peroxidase-labeled anti-CEA, as secondary antibodies and biofunctionalized magnetic nanostructures as immunosensing probes. Under optimal conditions, the nanoparticle-based immunocomposites exhibited good electrochemical responses for the determination of CEA, and allowed the detection of CEA at a concentration as low as 1.0 pg mL(-1) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. In addition, the magnetic immunosensing had good reproducibility, and acceptable accuracy, and could be successfully applied for the detection of CEA in the clinical serum specimens. Significantly, by controlling the target biomolecules, this assay can be easily extended for use with other immunosensings, and thus represents a versatile design routine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Carcinoma-specific Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binding glycoproteins of human colorectal carcinoma and its relation to carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Y; Yonezawa, S; Nakamura, T; Shimizu, S; Ozawa, M; Muramatsu, T; Sato, E

    1985-08-01

    Glycoproteins binding to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) lectin, which recognizes the terminal alpha-L-fucose residue, were analyzed in 18 cases of human colorectal carcinoma by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by the Western blotting method. In the distal large bowel (descending and sigmoid colon and rectum), high-molecular-weight glycoproteins binding to UEA-I existed in carcinoma tissue but not in normal mucosa. In the proximal large bowel (ascending and transverse colon), high-molecular-weight glycoproteins binding to UEA-I were found both in normal mucosa and in carcinoma tissue, whereas those from the carcinoma tissue had an apparently lower molecular weight as compared to the weight of those from the normal mucosa. Thus there is a biochemical difference in UEA-I binding glycoproteins between the normal mucosa and the carcinoma tissue, although in our previous histochemical study no difference was observed in UEA-I binding glycoproteins of the proximal large bowel between the carcinoma tissue and the normal mucosa. Furthermore, carcinoembryonic antigen from the carcinoma tissue was found to have the same electrophoretical mobility as the UEA-I binding glycoproteins.

  9. Ultrasensitive non-enzymatic immunosensor for carcino-embryonic antigen based on palladium hybrid vanadium pentoxide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian; Jiang, Liping; Li, Faying; Wang, Ping; Liu, Qing; Dong, Yunhui; Li, Yueyun; Wei, Qin

    2016-03-15

    A novel and sensitive sandwich-type non-enzymatic electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated for quantitative monitoring of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). Nanocomposite of stannic oxide/reduced graphene oxide was used as substrate material to increase the specific surface area and enhance the conductivity of the glassy carbon electrode. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were introduced to link substrate materials and primary antibodies (Ab1) and accelerate the electron transfer in this system. At the same time, the palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs)-vanadium pentoxide (V2O5)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the label of secondary antibodies (Ab2). This composite label has shown excellent catalytic activity towards the reduction of H2O2. The nanomaterial-based signal amplification can improve the sensitivity and lower the limit of detection. The proposed immunosensor showed wide linear range from 0.5 pgmL(-1) to 25 ngmL(-1) with limit of detection of 0.17 pgmL(-1). This novel immunosensor was used to analyze serum sample. The results indicated that this immunosensor may find huge potential application for quantitative detection of CEA in the clinical diagnosis.

  10. A novel sandwiched electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen based on carbon quantum dots and signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Nian-Lu; Jia, Li-Ping; Ma, Rong-Na; Jia, Wen-Li; Lu, Yi-Yang; Shi, Sha-Shan; Wang, Huai-Sheng

    2017-03-15

    In this study, a novel sandwiched electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed. The nanocomposite of polydopamine and Ag nanoparticles (PDA-AgNPs) was prepared by the redox reaction between Ag(+) and dopamine. This nanocomposite not only provided an effective matrix for the immobilization of primary antibody (Ab1) but also enhanced the conductivity of the electrode. Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) were immobilized on the poly(ethylenimine) functionalized graphene oxide (PEI-GO) through amido-bond. Then Au nanoparticles were decorated on the CQDs modified PEI-GO matrix, and the resulted complex AuNPs/CQDs-PEI-GO was introduced to link secondary antibody (Ab2). The CQDs can be connected to the electrode surface through the combination of CEA with Ab1 and Ab2, and then the amplified electrochemiluminescence signal of CQDs was obtained with the synergistic effect of AgNPs, polydopamine, AuNPs and PEI-GO. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL intensity was proportional to the logarithm value of CEA concentration in the linear range from 5pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.67pgmL(-1) for CEA detection. The immunosensor was applied for the CEA detection in real samples with satisfactory results. The proposed ECL immunosensor showed good performance with high sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, stability and will be potential in clinical detection.

  11. An immune sandwich assay of carcinoembryonic antigen based on the joint use of upconversion phosphors and magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaohua; Wu, Zhengjun; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-06-21

    We herein report a sensitive and selective immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on the joint use of upconversion phosphors (UCPs) and magnetic beads (MBs). UCPs as the signal probe were designed with a core-shell structure which provided a 40-fold enhancement of the luminescence intensity. Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-modified UCPs were covalently conjugated with the anti-CEA antibody (coating), and streptavidin functionalized magnetic beads were combined with another biotin-tagged anti-CEA antibody. With the assistance of a magnet, the as-formed immune sandwich in the presence of CEA can be readily separated from the assay matrix. The immunosensor showed a linear dynamic range for CEA within 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) in a buffered aqueous solution, and 0.1-20 ng mL(-1) in a human serum sample. The sensor was highly specific to CEA. Our results have suggested the potential application of the UCP-MB based immunoassay for CEA in clinical analysis.

  12. Inside-out Signaling Promotes Dynamic Changes in the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (CEACAM1) Oligomeric State to Control Its Cell Adhesion Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prerna C.; Lee, Hannah S. W.; Ming, Aaron Y. K.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.; Yip, Christopher M.; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Gray-Owen, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts are fundamental to multicellular organisms and are subject to exquisite levels of control. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) can engage in both cis-homophilic (parallel) oligomerization and trans-homophilic (anti-parallel) binding. In this study, we establish that the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain has a propensity to form cis-dimers via the transmembrane-embedded 432GXXXG436 motif and that this basal state is overcome when activated calmodulin binds to the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Although mutation of the 432GXXXG436 motif reduced CEACAM1 oligomerization, it did not affect surface localization of the receptor or influence CEACAM1-dependent cellular invasion by the pathogenic Neisseria. The mutation did, however, have a striking effect on CEACAM1-dependent cellular aggregation, increasing both the kinetics of cell-cell association and the size of cellular aggregates formed. CEACAM1 association with tyrosine kinase c-Src and tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 was not affected by the 432GXXXG436 mutation, consistent with their association with the monomeric form of wild type CEACAM1. Collectively, our results establish that a dynamic oligomer-to-monomer shift in surface-expressed CEACAM1 facilitates trans-homophilic binding and downstream effector signaling. PMID:24005674

  13. Neisserial outer membrane vesicles bind the coinhibitory receptor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 and suppress CD4+ T lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hannah S W; Boulton, Ian C; Reddin, Karen; Wong, Henry; Halliwell, Denise; Mandelboim, Ofer; Gorringe, Andrew R; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic Neisseria bacteria naturally liberate outer membrane "blebs," which are presumed to contribute to pathology, and the detergent-extracted outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Neisseria meningitidis are currently employed as meningococcal vaccines in humans. While the composition of these vesicles reflects the bacteria from which they are derived, the functions of many of their constituent proteins remain unexplored. The neisserial colony opacity-associated Opa proteins function as adhesins, the majority of which mediate bacterial attachment to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs). Herein, we demonstrate that the Opa proteins within OMV preparations retain the capacity to bind the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-containing coinhibitory receptor CEACAM1. When CD4(+) T lymphocytes were exposed to OMVs from Opa-expressing bacteria, their activation and proliferation in response to a variety of stimuli were effectively halted. This potent immunosuppressive effect suggests that localized infection will generate a "zone of inhibition" resulting from the diffusion of membrane blebs into the surrounding tissues. Moreover, it demonstrates that OMV-based vaccines must be developed from strains that lack CEACAM1-binding Opa variants.

  14. Leptin Resistance Contributes to Obesity in Mice with Null Mutation of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule 1.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Garrett; Russo, Lucia; Castaneda, Tamara R; Pfeiffer, Verena; Ghadieh, Hilda E; Ghanem, Simona S; Wu, Jieshen; Faulkner, Latrice D; Ergün, Süleyman; McInerney, Marcia F; Hill, Jennifer W; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-05-20

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) promotes hepatic insulin clearance. Consistently, mice with null mutation of Ceacam1 (Cc1(-/-)) exhibit impaired insulin clearance with increased lipid production in liver and redistribution to white adipose tissue, leading to visceral obesity at 2 months of age. When the mutation is propagated on the C57/BL6J genetic background, total fat mass rises significantly with age, and glucose intolerance and systemic insulin resistance develop at 6 months of age. This study was carried out to determine the mechanisms underlying the marked increase in total fat mass in 6-month-old mutants. Indirect calorimetry analysis showed that Cc1(-/-) mice develop hyperphagia and a significant reduction in physical activity, in particular in the early hours of the dark cycle, during which energy expenditure is only slightly lower than in wild-type mice. They also exhibit increased triglyceride accumulation in skeletal muscle, due in part to incomplete fatty acid β-oxidation. Mechanistically, hypothalamic leptin signaling is reduced, as demonstrated by blunted STAT3 phosphorylation in coronal sections in response to an intracerebral ventricular injection of leptin. Hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity is also elevated in the mutants. Together, the data show that the increase in total fat mass in Cc1(-/-) mice is mainly attributed to hyperphagia and reduced spontaneous physical activity. Although the contribution of the loss of CEACAM1 from anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus is unclear, leptin resistance and elevated hypothalamic fatty-acid synthase activity could underlie altered energy balance in these mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Association of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels with chemoradiation-induced downstaging and downsizing of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify pretreatment clinical parameters associated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT)-induced downstaging and downsizing of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC T3-4 or N+). Data from 51 LARC patients, who received preoperative CRT and radical surgery between 2010 and 2013, were retrospectively analyzed. Rectal adenocarcinoma was histologically confirmed in all patients, who ranged in age between 41 and 81 years (median, 64 years). CRT consisted of 50.4 Gy pelvic radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. After a median interval of 7 weeks post-CRT, the patients underwent total mesorectal excision. Downstaging was defined as the transition from cStage II-III to ypStage 0-I. The longest tumor diameter was measured pre- and post-CRT using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, and based on the surgical specimen, respectively. Downstaging was observed in 16 (31.4%) patients, including 5 (9.8%) with a pathological complete response. The median downsizing rate was 60%. The serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels were 0.8-153.9 ng/ml (median, 4.4 ng/ml). The maximum standardized uptake value was 4.7-33.9 (median, 10.8). On univariate analysis, cT stage, tumor size and CEA level were associated with downstaging. On multivariate analysis, only CEA level (≤5 ng/ml) was a significant predictor of downstaging (odds ratio = 16.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.8-146.7; P=0.014). CEA level was the only factor significantly associated with downsizing (>60%) in the univariate analysis. These results demonstrated that pretreatment serum CEA levels are significantly associated with downstaging as well as downsizing of LARC following preoperative CRT. Therefore, this parameter may be useful in personalizing the management of LARC patients.

  16. Simultaneous quantitation of cytokeratin-19 fragment and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum via quantum dot-doped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Liang, Rongliang; Guo, Xinxin; Liang, Junyu; Deng, Qiaoting; Li, Min; An, Taixue; Liu, Tiancai; Wu, Yingsong

    2017-05-15

    A novel quantum dot-doped polystyrene nanoparticles-based lateral flow test strips (QPs-LFTS) system was developed to simultaneously detect a cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum to aid the diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer. Quantum dot-doped carboxylate-functionalized polystyrene nanoparticles (QPs) were prepared and introduced as fluorescent reporters in QPs-LFTS. The detection was based on a sandwich immunoassay and performed on lateral flow test strips, with an assay time of 15min. The strips were read by a fluorescence strip reader to obtain the fluorescence peak heights of the test lines (HT) and the control line (HC). The ratio of HT/HC was used for quantitation. The QPs showed excellent photoproperties and good performance. Under optimal conditions, the QPs-LFTS system exhibited a wide linear range for CYFRA 21-1 (1.3-480ng/mL) and CEA (2.8-680ng/mL). The detection limits for CYFRA 21-1 and CEA were 0.16 and 0.35ng/mL, respectively. The recovery and reproducibility of the method were satisfactory. Furthermore, excellent correlations (n =120, R(2) =0.9862, P<0.0001 for CYFRA 21-1; n =70, R(2) =0.9509, P<0.0001 for CEA) were obtained between the QPs-LFTS and commercially available chemiluminescence immunoassay kits in clinical serum testing. The results indicate that this developed test system is highly efficient and is expected to be useful for early screening and prognosis evaluation for lung cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical significance of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level in patients with clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suda, Takashi; Hachimaru, Ayumi; Tochii, Daisuke; Tochii, Sachiko; Takagi, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to assess the preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level in patients with clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate its clinical significance. Methods Between January 2005 and December 2014, a total of 378 patients with clinical stage IA NSCLC underwent complete resection with systematic node dissection. The survival rate was estimated starting from the date of surgery to the date of either death or the last follow-up by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses by log-rank tests were used to determine prognostic factors. Cox proportional hazards ratios were used to identify independent predictors of poor prognosis. Clinicopathological predictors of lymph node metastases were evaluated by logistic regression analyses. Results The 5-year survival rate of patients with an elevated preoperative serum CEA level was significantly lower than that of patients with a normal CEA level (75.5% vs. 87.7%; P=0.02). However, multivariate analysis did not show the preoperative serum CEA level to be an independent predictor of poor prognosis. Postoperative pathological factors, including lymphatic permeation, visceral pleural invasion, and lymph node metastases, tended to be positive in patients with an elevated preoperative serum CEA level. In addition, the CEA level was a statistically significant independent clinical predictor of lymph node metastases. Conclusions The preoperative serum CEA level was not an independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with pathological stage IA NSCLC but was an important clinical predictor of tumor invasiveness and lymph node metastases in patients with clinical stage IA NSCLC. Therefore, measurement of the preoperative serum CEA level should be considered even for patients with early-stage NSCLC. PMID:28203421

  18. Computed tomography of pulmonary changes in rheumatoid arthritis: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a marker of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Koch, Milene Caroline; Pereira, Ivânio Alves; Nobre, Luiz Felipe Souza; Neves, Fabricio Souza

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) classically affects the joints, but can present extra-articular manifestations, including pulmonary disease. The present study aimed to identify possible risk factors or laboratory markers for lung involvement in RA, particularly the presence of rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA), and tumor markers, by correlating them with changes observed on chest high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT). This cross-sectional study involved RA patients who were examined and questioned by a specialist physician and later subjected to chest HRCT and blood collection for measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), rheumatoid factor (RF), ACPA (anti-vimentin and/or anti-CCP3), and the tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA 125, CA 15-3, and CA 19-9. A total of 96 patients underwent chest HRCT. The most frequent findings were bronchial thickening (27/28.1 %) and bronchiectasis (25/26 %). RF was present in 63.2 % of patients (55/87), and ACPA (anti-vimentin or anti-CCP3) was present in 72.7 % of patients (64/88). CEA levels were high in 14 non-smokers (37.8 %) and 23 smokers (62.2 %). CA-19-9 levels were high in 6 of 86 patients (7.0 %), CA 15-3 levels were high in 3 of 85 patients (3.5 %), and CA 125 levels were high in 4 of 75 patients (5.3 %). Multivariate analysis indicated a statistically significant association between high CEA levels and the presence of airway changes in patients with RA (p = 0.048). CEA can serve as a predictor of lung disease in RA and can help identify individuals who require more detailed examination for the presence of respiratory disorders.

  19. Development of an FPW Biosensor with Low Insertion Loss and High Fabrication Yield for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Je-Wei; Huang, I-Yu; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Chang-Yu; Chen, Jian-Lin; Hsieh, Chia-Hsu

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, various flexural plate-wave (FPW)-based biosensors with low phase velocity, low operation frequency, high sensitivity, and short response time, have been developed. However, conventional FPW transducers have low fabrication yield because controlling the thickness of silicon/isolation/metal/piezoelectric multilayer floating thin-plate is difficult. Additionally, conventional FPW devices usually have high insertion loss because of wave energy dissipation to the silicon substrate or outside area of the output interdigital transducers (IDTs). These two disadvantages hinder the application of FPW devices. To reduce the high insertion loss of FPW devices, we designed two focus-type IDTs (fan-shaped and circular, respectively) that can effectively confine the launched wave energy, and adopted a focus-type silicon-grooved reflective grating structure (RGS) that can reduce the wave propagation loss. To accurately control the thickness of the silicon thin-plate and substantially improve the fabrication yield of FPW transducers, a 60 °C/27 °C two-step anisotropic wet etching process was developed. Compared with conventional FPW devices (with parallel-type IDTs and without RGS), the proposed FPW devices have lower insertion loss (36.04 dB) and higher fabrication yield (63.88%). Furthermore, by using cystamine-based self-assembled monolayer (SAM) nanotechnology, we used the improved FPW device to develop a novel FPW-based carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) biosensor for detection of colorectal cancer, and this FPW-CEA biosensor has a low detection limit (5 ng/mL), short response time (<10 min), high sensitivity (60.16–70.06 cm2/g), and high sensing linearity (R-square = 0.859–0.980). PMID:27834798

  20. Top-down nanofabrication of silicon nanoribbon field effect transistor (Si-NR FET) for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zengtao; Sun, Jialin; Zhao, Xiaoqian; Li, Zengyao; Cui, Songkui; Meng, Qingyang; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Tong; Jiang, Yanfeng

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of tumor markers is highly required in the clinic for cancer diagnosis and consequent treatment. A field-effect transistor-based (FET-based) nanobiosensor emerges with characteristics of being label-free, real-time, having high sensitivity, and providing direct electrical readout for detection of biomarkers. In this paper, a top-down approach is proposed and implemented to fulfill a novel silicon nano-ribbon FET, which acts as biomarker sensor for future clinical application. Compared with the bottom-up approach, a top-down fabrication approach can confine width and length of the silicon FET precisely to control its electrical properties. The silicon nanoribbon (Si-NR) transistor is fabricated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) substrate by a top-down approach with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible technology. After the preparation, the surface of Si-NR is functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Glutaraldehyde is utilized to bind the amino terminals of APTES and antibody on the surface. Finally, a microfluidic channel is integrated on the top of the device, acting as a flowing channel for the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) solution. The Si-NR FET is 120 nm in width and 25 nm in height, with ambipolar electrical characteristics. A logarithmic relationship between the changing ratio of the current and the CEA concentration is measured in the range of 0.1-100 ng/mL. The sensitivity of detection is measured as 10 pg/mL. The top-down fabricated biochip shows feasibility in direct detecting of CEA with the benefits of real-time, low cost, and high sensitivity as a promising biosensor for tumor early diagnosis.

  1. Top-down nanofabrication of silicon nanoribbon field effect transistor (Si-NR FET) for carcinoembryonic antigen detection

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zengtao; Sun, Jialin; Zhao, Xiaoqian; Li, Zengyao; Cui, Songkui; Meng, Qingyang; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Tong; Jiang, Yanfeng

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of tumor markers is highly required in the clinic for cancer diagnosis and consequent treatment. A field-effect transistor-based (FET-based) nanobiosensor emerges with characteristics of being label-free, real-time, having high sensitivity, and providing direct electrical readout for detection of biomarkers. In this paper, a top–down approach is proposed and implemented to fulfill a novel silicon nano-ribbon FET, which acts as biomarker sensor for future clinical application. Compared with the bottom–up approach, a top–down fabrication approach can confine width and length of the silicon FET precisely to control its electrical properties. The silicon nanoribbon (Si-NR) transistor is fabricated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) substrate by a top–down approach with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible technology. After the preparation, the surface of Si-NR is functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Glutaraldehyde is utilized to bind the amino terminals of APTES and antibody on the surface. Finally, a microfluidic channel is integrated on the top of the device, acting as a flowing channel for the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) solution. The Si-NR FET is 120 nm in width and 25 nm in height, with ambipolar electrical characteristics. A logarithmic relationship between the changing ratio of the current and the CEA concentration is measured in the range of 0.1–100 ng/mL. The sensitivity of detection is measured as 10 pg/mL. The top–down fabricated biochip shows feasibility in direct detecting of CEA with the benefits of real-time, low cost, and high sensitivity as a promising biosensor for tumor early diagnosis. PMID:28721039

  2. Predictive Value of Carcinoembryonic and Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Related to Some Clinical, Endoscopic and Histological Colorectal Cancer Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljević, Tomica; Stojanović, Dragoš; Gluvić, Zoran; Dugalić, Predrag; Ilić, Ivan; Vidaković, Radosav

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important oncological and public health problem worldwide, including Serbia. Unfortunately, half of the patients are recognized in an advanced stage of the disease, therefore, early detection through specific tumor biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), is the only way to cope with CRC expansion. Methods Our cross-sectional study evaluated the influence of some clinical, endoscopic and histological characteristics of CRC on CEA and CA 19-9 serum levels, to determine whether these biomarkers could be related to CRC detection. The study included 372 participants: 181 suffered from CRC and 191 participants were controls. Endoscopic and histological examinations were used for CRC diagnosis, while additional ultrasound and abdominal computerised tomography imaging were used for staging the disease. Measurement of CEA and CA 19-9 was performed after CRC confirmation. Results Age, gender, tumor localization, macro-morphological and histological characteristics did not influence biomarkers serum levels. Both were significantly higher (p<0.01) in patients with Dukes D stage of CRC compared with controls. Sensitivity (76.8%) and specificity (76.6%) of CEA alone were higher than for CA 19-9, but with no statistical significance. Furthermore, sensitivity of CEA alone in the Dukes A/B group was similar to the entire CRC patient group. Conclusions Although not recommended as a screening method for the general population, elevated values of each biomarker indicate further diagnostic procedures and their simultaneous testing can improve the diagnostic sensitivity in early detection of CRC, as shown by the united analysis (AUC 0.842). PMID:28356884

  3. Carcinoembryonic antigen detection with "Handing"-controlled fluorescence spectroscopy using a color matrix for point-of-care applications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weijian; Wang, Kan; Xiao, Kun; Hou, Yafei; Lu, Wenting; Xu, Hao; Wo, Yan; Feng, Shaoqing; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-04-15

    In this study, we developed a power-free, accurate, and portable diagnostic platform called Handing based on embedded technology, which can rapidly detect fluorescent signals from quantum dots (QDs) on lateral flow test strips (LFTSs). The Handing system has three components: a hand-held test terminal, LFTS cartridge, and data server. The hand-held test terminal is the primary system component and it is integrated with tiny components using printed circuit board packaging for image acquisition, processing, and data handling by a specific program. A black smooth shell and three-dimensional printed test cartridge are used to facilitate the portability of the detection terminal, which provides a closed detection process as well as enhancing the anti-interference capacity. The functions of the data server comprise pre-editing, storage, range querying, and sharing with an international network. Multiple hand-held terminal devices can be linked simultaneously to the same data server. In this study, we detected the tumor marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) using the QD-LFTS system, which allowed quantitative analysis in the range of 1-100ng/mL with an ideal detection limit of 0.049ng/mL. Thus, the system is suitable for detecting CEA in the clinically accepted range. We also detected 70 positive and 30 negative serum samples using the Handing system, which exhibited good specificity and sensitivity. Thus, Handing has the capacity for rapid quantitative detection with high stability and repeatability, so it could be used for in vitro diagnostics in the laboratory and in other conditions for various applications, e.g., food evaluation, disease screening, environmental monitoring, and drug testing.

  4. Suboptimal accuracy of carcinoembryonic antigen in differentiation of mucinous and nonmucinous pancreatic cysts: results of a large multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Srinivas; Ge, Phillip S; Keach, Joseph W; Mullady, Daniel; Fukami, Norio; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Azar, Riad R; Shah, Raj J; Murad, Faris M; Kushnir, Vladimir M; Watson, Rabindra R; Ghassemi, Kourosh F; Sedarat, Alireza; Komanduri, Srinadh; Jaiyeola, Diana-Marie; Brauer, Brian C; Yen, Roy D; Amateau, Stuart K; Hosford, Lindsay; Hollander, Thomas; Donahue, Timothy R; Schulick, Richard D; Edil, Barish H; McCarter, Martin; Gajdos, Csaba; Attwell, Augustin; Muthusamy, V Raman; Early, Dayna S; Wani, Sachin

    2015-12-01

    The exact cutoff value at which pancreatic cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level distinguishes pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) from pancreatic nonmucinous cystic neoplasms (NMCNs) is unclear. The aim of this multicenter retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cyst fluid CEA levels in differentiating between MCNs and NMCNs. Consecutive patients who underwent EUS with FNA at 3 tertiary care centers were identified. Patients with histologic confirmation of cyst type based on surgical specimens served as the criterion standard for this analysis. Demographic characteristics, EUS morphology, FNA fluid, and cytology results were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of MCNs was performed. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated for CEA levels. A total of 226 patients underwent surgery (mean age, 61 years, 96% white patients, 39% female patients) of whom 88% underwent Whipple's procedure or distal pancreatectomy. Based on surgical histopathology, there were 150 MCNs and 76 NMCNs cases. The median CEA level was 165 ng/mL. The area under the ROC curve for CEA levels in differentiating between MCNs and NMCNs was 0.77 (95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.84, P < .01) with a cutoff of 105 ng/mL, demonstrating a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 63%, respectively. The cutoff value of 192 ng/mL yielded a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 77% and would misdiagnose 39% of MCN cases. Cyst fluid CEA levels have a clinically suboptimal accuracy level in differentiating MCNs from NMCNs. Future studies should focus on novel cyst fluid markers to improve risk stratification of pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential recognition of members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family by Afa/Dr adhesins of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC).

    PubMed

    Berger, Cedric N; Billker, Oliver; Meyer, Thomas F; Servin, Alain L; Kansau, Imad

    2004-05-01

    Little is known about the molecular bases underlying the virulence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) harbouring the Afa/Dr family of adhesins. These adhesins recognize as receptors the GPI-anchored proteins CD55 (decay-accelerating factor, DAF) and CD66e (carcinoembryonic antigen, CEA). CD66e is a member of the CEA-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) family, comprising seven members. We analysed the interactions of Afa/Dr DAEC with the CEACAMs using CEACAM-expressing CHO and HeLa cells. The results demonstrate that only E. coli expressing a subfamily of Afa/Dr adhesins, named here Afa/Dr-I, including Dr, F1845 and AfaE-III adhesins, bound onto CHO cells expressing CEACAM1, CEA or CEACAM6. Whereas all the Afa/Dr adhesins elicit recruitment of CD55 around adhering bacteria, only the Afa/Dr-I subfamily elicits the recruitment of CEACAM1, CEA and CEACAM6. In addition, although CEACAM3 is not recognized as a receptor by the subfamily of Afa/Dr adhesins, it is recruited around bacteria in HeLa cells. The recruited CEACAM1, CEA and CEACAM6 around adhering bacteria resist totally or in part a detergent extraction, whereas the recruited CEACAM3 does not. Finally, the results show that recognition of CEA and CEACAM6, but not CEACAM1, is accompanied by tight attachment to bacteria of cell surface microvilli-like extensions, which are elongated. Moreover, recognition of CEA is accompanied by an activation of the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and by a phosphorylation of ERM, which in turn elicit the observed cell surface microvilli-like extensions.

  6. Major Protein of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Gene Family - CD66c, A Novel Marker in Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Suma M; Prema, Chaitra Linganna; Vimalambike, Manjunath Gubbanna; Shivalingaiah, Sheeladevi Chandakavadi; Sundaram, Shivakumar; Kumar, Anjali Pradeep; Math, Ananda Kuruvatti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In view of rising trend of the incidence of colorectal carcinoma in the Indian population due to adoption of western lifestyles and behaviours, we investigated the expression of the new emerging stem cell biomarker, CD66c in colorectal carcinoma of Indian origin. Aim To study the expression of CD66c in human colorectal carcinoma and to correlate level of marker expression with tumour staging. Materials and Methods This hospital based prospective study was conducted on 26 colorectal carcinoma patients in the age group of 20 years to 70 years. Surgically resected tumour specimens along with adjacent normal tissue were collected taking necessary precautions, paraffin embedded sections were prepared and used for histological and immunohistochemical analysis of CD66c. Statistical analysis Descriptive statistical measures like mean, standard deviation, percentage was applied. Other inferential statistical tests like Chi-square, Fisher’s-exact test and one-way ANOVA was applied to find out the association of CD66c with different stages. The difference were interpreted as statistically significant when p <0.05. Results CD66c showed differential expression with membrane positivity in normal colorectal epithelial cells and cytoplasmic expression in tumour cells. There was significant correlation between CD66c expression and tumour site (p=0.02) with colon carcinoma showing positive expression compared to the rectal carcinoma. There was no significant correlation between CD66c staining and tumour stage (p=0.947). No significant relationship was observed between CD66c expression and other clinicopathologic variables studied such as sex (p=0.552), age (p=0.713) and tumour grade (p=0.263). Conclusion CD66c can be specifically used for colon carcinoma and may be a novel marker in colon carcinoma stem cell isolation. The quantification of CD66c can be further verified by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Further studies can be carried out using CD66c alone or in

  7. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen messenger RNA in blood using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to predict recurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The existence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood as an indicator of tumor recurrence has not been clearly established, particularly for gastric cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the relationship between CTCs in peripheral blood at initial diagnosis and clinicopathologic findings in patients with gastric carcinoma. Methods Blood samples were obtained from 123 gastric carcinoma patients at initial diagnosis. mRNA was extracted and amplified for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA detection using real-time RT-PCR. Periodic 3-month follow-up examinations included serum CEA measurements and imaging. Results The minimum threshold for corrected CEA mRNA score [(CEA mRNA/GAPDH mRNA) × 106] was set at 100. Forty-five of 123 patients (36.6%) were positive for CEA mRNA expression. CEA mRNA expression significantly correlated with T stage and postoperative recurrence status (P = 0.001). Recurrent disease was found in 44 of 123 cases (35.8%), and 25 of these (56.8%) were positive for CEA mRNA. Of these patients, CEA mRNA was more sensitive than serum CEA in indicating recurrence. Three-year disease-free survival of patients positive for CEA mRNA was significantly poorer than of patients negative for CEA mRNA (P < 0.001). Only histological grade and CEA mRNA positivity were independent factors for disease-free survival using multivariate analysis. Conclusions CEA mRNA copy number in peripheral blood at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with disease recurrence in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. Real-time RT-PCR detection of CEA mRNA levels at initial diagnosis appears to be a promising predictor for disease recurrence in gastric adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:21040522

  8. A common genetic variant of fucosyltransferase 2 correlates with serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels and affects cancer screening in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Wannhoff, Andreas; Folseraas, Trine; Brune, Maik; Rupp, Christian; Friedrich, Kilian; Knierim, Johannes; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Sauer, Peter; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Schirmacher, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Hov, Johannes R

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients are at increased risk of biliary tract cancer, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) serum levels might be used for screening. Objective To examine cancer screening with CEA in PSC patients and analyse how serum CEA levels are affected by genetic variants of fucosyltransferase (FUT) 2 and 3. Methods In a retrospective cohort analysis we evaluated CEA levels in 226 PSC patients, including 19 with biliary malignancy, and investigated how FUT2 and FUT3 SNPs affected CEA levels. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and cut-off values were determined based on Youden’s index. A control cohort contained 240 patients, including 28 with biliary malignancy. Results Median CEA concentration was lower in cancer-free patients (1.4 ng/mL) than in cancer patients (2.0 ng/mL, P = 0.014). ROC analysis revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.671, the optimal cut-off was 3.2 ng/mL. The FUT2 variant rs601338 (G428A) correlated with CEA levels, and the effect was most prominent in a subgroup of patients genetically incapable of expressing CA19-9. The AUC improved if ROC analysis was performed separately for wild-type (AUC: 0.731) and homozygous mutant (AUC: 0.816) G428A. The influence of FUT2 on CEA was confirmed in the control cohort. Conclusions CEA is interesting for biliary-malignancy screening in PSC patients, especially in patients who do not express CA19-9. This is the first study to show that the combined use of CEA measurement and FUT genotyping is clinically beneficial and that it might enhance the early detection of biliary malignancy in clinical practice. This approach could also be effective when screening for other common gastrointestinal malignancies. PMID:26966527

  9. Single domain antibody against carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) inhibits proliferation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis of pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsai-Mu; Murad, Yanal M; Chang, Chia-Ching; Yang, Ming-Chi; Baral, Toya Nath; Cowan, Aaron; Tseng, Shin-Hua; Wong, Andrew; Mackenzie, Roger; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Zhang, Jianbing

    2014-03-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer cells, and it is associated with the progression of pancreatic cancer. We tested a single domain antibody (sdAb) targeting CEACAM6, 2A3, which was isolated previously from a llama immune library, and an Fc conjugated version of this sdAb, to determine how they affect the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3. We also compared the effects of the antibodies to gemcitabine. Gemcitabine and 2A3 slowed down cancer cell proliferation. However, only 2A3 retarded cancer cell invasion, angiogenesis within the cancer mass and BxPC3 cell MMP-9 activity, three features important for tumour growth and metastasis. The IC50s for 2A3, 2A3-Fc and gemcitabine were determined as 6.5μM, 8μM and 12nM, respectively. While the 2A3 antibody inhibited MMP-9 activity by 33% compared to non-treated control cells, gemcitabine failed to inhibit MMP-9 activity. Moreover, 2A3 and 2A3-Fc inhibited invasion of BxPC3 by 73% compared to non-treated cells. When conditioned media that were produced using 2A3- or 2A3-Fc-treated BxPC3 cells were used in a capillary formation assay, the capillary length was reduced by 21% and 49%, respectively. Therefore 2A3 is an ideal candidate for treating tumours that over-express CEACAM6. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Co-ordinate action of bacterial adhesins and human carcinoembryonic antigen receptors in enhanced cellular invasion by capsulate serum resistant Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Helen A; Griffiths, Natalie J; Hill, Darryl J; Virji, Mumtaz

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is a human specific opportunistic pathogen that occasionally penetrates mucosal barriers via the action of adhesins and invasins and evades host immune mechanisms during further dissemination via capsule expression. From in vitro studies, the primary adhesion of capsulate bacteria is believed to be mediated by polymeric pili, followed by invasion via outer membrane adhesins such as Opa proteins. As the latter requires the surface capsule to be down-modulated, invading bacteria would be serum sensitive and thus avirulent. However, there is recent evidence that capsulate bacteria may interact via Opa proteins when host cells express high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs), their target receptors. Such a situation may arise following increased circulation of inflammatory cytokines that upregulate certain adhesion molecules on host cells. In this study, using a tetracycline controlled expression system, we have developed cell lines with inducible CEACAM expression to mimic post-inflammation state of target tissues and analysed the interplay between the three surface components capsule, pili and Opa proteins in cellular interactions. With two distinct cell lines, not only the level but also the rate of adhesion of capsulate Opa-expressing Nm increased concurrently with CEACAM density. Moreover, when threshold levels of receptor were reached, cellular invasion ensued in an Opa-dependent manner. In studies with cell lines intrinsically expressing pilus receptors, notable synergism in cellular interactions between pili and Opa of several meningococcal strains was observed and was independent of capsule type. A number of internalized bacteria were shown to express capsule and when directly isolated from host cells, these bacteria were as serum resistant as the inoculated phenotype. Furthermore, we observed that agents that block Opa-CEACAM binding substantially reduced cellular invasion, while maintaining

  11. Development of a streptavidin-anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody, radiolabeled biotin pretargeting method for radioimmunotherapy of colorectal cancer. Reagent development.

    PubMed

    Karacay, H; Sharkey, R M; Govindan, S V; McBride, W J; Goldenberg, D M; Hansen, H J; Griffiths, G L

    1997-01-01

    With pretargeting, radioisotope delivery to tumor is decoupled from the long antibody localization process, and this can increase tumor:blood ratios dramatically. Several reagents were prepared for each step of a "two-step" pretargeting method, and their properties were investigated. For pretargeting tumor, streptavidin-monoclonal antibody (StAv-mab) conjugates were prepared by cross-linking sulfo-SMCC-derivatized streptavidin to a free thiol (SH) group on MN-14 [a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mab]. Thiolated mabs were generated either by reaction of 2-iminothiolane (2-IT) with mab lysine residues or by reduction of mab disulfide bonds with (2-mercaptoethyl)amine (MEA). Both procedures gave protein-protein conjugates isolated in relatively low yields (20-25%) after preparative size-exclusion (SE) chromatography purification with conservative peak collection. Both StAv-MN-14 conjugates retained their ability to bind to CEA, to an anti-idiotypic antibody to MN-14 (WI2), and to biotin, as demonstrated by SE-HPLC. Two clearing agents, WI2 mab and a biotin-human serum albumin (biotin-HSA) conjugate, were developed to remove excess circulating StAv-MN-14 conjugates in animals. Both clearing proteins were also modified with galactose residues, introduced using an activated thioimidate derivative, to produce clearing agents which would clear rapidly and clear primary mab rapidly. At least 14 galactose residues on WI2 were required to reduce blood levels to 5.9 +/- 0.7% ID/g in 1 h. Faster blood clearance (0.7 +/- 0.2% ID/g) was observed in 1 h using 44 galactose units per WI2. For the delivery of radioisotope to tumor, several biotinylated conjugates consisting of biotin, a linker, and a chelate were prepared. Conjugates showed good in vitro and in vivo stability when D-amino acid peptides were used as linkers, biotin-peptide-DOTA-indium-111 had a slightly longer blood circulation time (0.09 +/- 0.02% ID/g in 1 h) than biotin-peptide-DTPA-indium-111 (0

  12. Effect of Incorporation of Pretreatment Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels Into AJCC Staging for Colon Cancer on 5-Year Survival.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Pragatheeshwar; Talati, Chetasi; Munjal, Sumeet; Attwood, Kris; Edge, Stephen B; Francescutti, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has proposed the inclusion of pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels (C stage) into the conventional TNM staging system of colon cancer. The latter proposal has yet to be widely adopted because of the lack of long-term survival estimates of after C-stage incorporation into AJCC staging. To evaluate whether long-term overall and cancer-specific survival is affected by inclusion of C stage into the standard AJCC TNM staging and to study the implications on survival estimates. We performed a retrospective study of all patients diagnosed as having histologically proven colonic adenocarcinoma from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2005, from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. We stratified each AJCC stage as C0 (normal) or C1 (elevated) based on the pretreatment serum CEA level. Median follow-up was 71 months. Five-year estimates of overall and disease-specific survival and hazard ratios (HRs) for estimates of risk of overall and disease-specific mortality. A total of 16 619 patients were evaluated, and of these, 8878 patients had C0 disease and 7741 had C1 disease. C1 stage was independently associated with a 51% and 59% increased risk of overall (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.44-1.59; P < .001) and disease-specific mortality (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.49-1.69; P < . 001) at a median follow-up of 71 months. Analysis of survival of the AJCC stages subdivided as C0 or C1 revealed a significant worse prognosis of C1 AJCC stages compared with the respective C0 AJCC stages. The magnitude of change in survival was large enough to cause clustering of survival estimates of C1 vs C0 cancers across various AJCC stages. Analysis of patients with stage I, II, and III cancer revealed that node-negative C1 disease was associated with prognosis similar or worse than node-positive C0 disease. Inclusion of C stage into the AJCC TNM staging of colon cancer revealed significant

  13. Aptamers directly radiolabeled with technetium-99m as a potential agent capable of identifying carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in tumor cells T84.

    PubMed

    Correa, Cristiane Rodrigues; de Barros, André Luís Branco; Ferreira, Carolina de Aguiar; de Goes, Alfredo Miranda; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; de Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro

    2014-04-15

    Aptamers are small oligonucleotides that are selected to bind with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. Aptamers are emerging as a new class of molecules for radiopharmaceutical development. In this study a new method to radiolabel aptamers with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) was developed. Two aptamers (Apt3 and Apt3-amine) selected against the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used. Labeling was done by the direct method and the developed complex was subjected to quality control tests. Radiochemical purity and stability were monitored by Thin Layer Chromatography. Binding and specificity assays were carried out in the T84 cell line (CEA+) to evaluate tumor affinity and specificity after radiolabeling. Aptamers were successfully labeled with (99m)Tc in high radiochemical yields, showing in vitro stability in presence of plasma and cystein. In binding assays the radiolabeled aptamer Apt3-amine showed the highest affinity to T84 cells. When evaluated with HeLa cells (CEA-), lower uptake was observed, suggesting high specificity for this aptamer. These results suggest that the Apt3-amine aptamer directly labeled with (99m)Tc could be considered a promising agent capable of identifying the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) present in tumor cells.

  14. CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... tend to have higher CEA levels than non-smokers. Increased CEA levels can indicate some non-cancer-related conditions, such as inflammation , cirrhosis , peptic ulcer , ulcerative colitis , rectal polyps , emphysema , and benign breast disease. ^ Back to top Proudly ...

  15. Combined assays for serum carcinoembryonic antigen and microRNA-17-3p offer improved diagnostic potential for stage I/II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, JINHAI; DONG, HUIMING; ZHANG, QIONG; ZHANG, SHANGWU

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer-related mortality, one of the main reasons for which is the lack of an effective screening method for early-stage disease. The levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and microRNA (miR)-17-3p in the serum of 70 patients with stage I/II colon cancer and 70 healthy volunteers were determined, and the diagnostic value of CEA plus miR-17-3p detection for colon cancer was assessed. The levels of CEA were measured by a radioimmunoassay method, and those of miR-17-3p using the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. miR-16 was used as the endogenous control, as it displayed high stability, high abundance and low variability in the analyzed serum samples. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated the potential diagnostic value of the two markers and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for CEA and miR-17-3p was 0.719 (95% CI: 0.658–0.843) and 0.807 (95% CI: 0.748–0.906), respectively. At a threshold of 9.6 ng/ml for CEA, the optimal sensitivity and specificity were 74.6 and 84.3%, respectively, in discriminating colon cancer patients from healthy controls. At a threshold of 2.98 for miR-17-3p, the sensitivity and the specificity were 83.6 and 72.9%, respectively. A combined ROC analysis using CEA and miR-17-3p revealed an AUC of 0.929 (95% CI: 0.834–0.978) with a sensitivity of 96.4% and a specificity of 95.7% in discriminating colon cancer patients from healthy controls. In conclusion, both CEA and miR-17-3p were highly expressed in the serum of our series of colon cancer patients. CEA plus miR-17-3p detection significantly increased the sensitivity and specificity in discriminating stage I/II colon cancer patients from healthy controls. Therefore, combined detection of serum CEA and miR-17-3p levels may have the potential to become a new laboratory method for the early clinical diagnosis of colon cancer. PMID:26807240

  16. Comparison of CA-50, a new tumour marker, with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in patients with gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Kuusela, P.; Haglund, C.; Roberts, P. J.; Jalanko, H.

    1987-01-01

    Serum levels were determined in 434 patients with benign and malignant gastrointestinal diseases and compared with the serum concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). The highest proportion of elevated CA-50 levels (greater than 17 U ml-1) was found in patients with pancreatic cancer (73%). High levels were mainly associated with advanced cancer, but also half of the patients with a resectable pancreatic tumour had an increased CA-50 concentration. The CA-50 level was elevated in 37-58% of patients with colorectal, gastric, hepatocellular and biliary tract cancers. In all gastrointestinal cancers, CA-50 gave additional information compared with CEA and AFP, except in hepatocellular carcinoma where AFP was the best marker. PMID:2441731

  17. Expression of Carcinoembryonic Cell Adhesion Molecule 6 and Alveolar Epithelial Cell Markers in Lungs of Human Infants with Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Linda W; Gonzalez, Robert; Barrette, Anne Marie; Wang, Ping; Dobbs, Leland; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-12-01

    The membrane protein carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM6) is expressed in the epithelium of various tissues, participating in innate immune defense, cell proliferation and differentiation, with overexpression in gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic and lung tumors. It is developmentally and hormonally regulated in fetal human lung, with an apparent increased production in preterm infants with respiratory failure. To further examine the expression and cell localization of CEACAM6, we performed immunohistochemical and biochemical studies in lung specimens from infants with and without chronic lung disease. CEACAM6 protein and mRNA were increased ~4-fold in lungs from infants with chronic lung disease as compared with controls. By immunostaining, CEACAM6 expression was markedly increased in the lung parenchyma of infants and children with a variety of chronic lung disorders, localizing to hyperplastic epithelial cells with a ~7-fold elevated proliferative rate by PCNA staining. Some of these cells also co-expressed membrane markers of both type I and type II cells, which is not observed in normal postnatal lung, suggesting they are transitional epithelial cells. We suggest that CEACAM6 is both a marker of lung epithelial progenitor cells and a contributor to the proliferative response after injury due to its anti-apoptotic and cell adhesive properties. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles film stabilizing gold nanoparticles as a versatile platform for ultrasensitive detection of carcino-embryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng; Zhang, Rongli; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Ye; Wei, Wei; Liu, Xiaoya; Luo, Jing

    2017-06-15

    In this work, a novel impedimetric immunosensor was developed based on electrophoretic deposition of polymeric self-assembled nanoparticles for the sensitive determination of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles γ-PGA-DA@CS were prepared by self-assembly of chitosan (CS) and dopamine modified poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA-DA) under mild conditions. A dense and nanostructured nanoparticles film was obtained on the electrode surface by electrophoretic deposition of γ-PGA-DA@CS nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were then tightly anchored on γ-PGA-DA@CS film with homogeneous dispersion due to numerous exposed dopamine adhesive dots present on the surface of γ-PGA-DA@CS. The obtained Au/γ-PGA-DA@CS nanocomposite film not only increases the electrode surface area in nanoscale dimension, but also provides a highly stable and biocompatible matrix for the convenient conjugation of antibody, thus providing a high-efficiency immunoassay platform. Monoclonal antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA-Ab) were effectively immobilized on the Au/γ-PGA-DA@CS film and a label-free impedimetric immunosensor was fabricated successfully as the ultimate goal. Under optimal conditions, the resultant immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range from 2.0×10(-14)gmL(-1) to 2.0×10(-8)gmL(-1) for the detection of CEA with a low detection limit of 10fgmL(-1). To the best of our knowledge, this was the lowest detection limit compared with other counterparts of label-free impedimetric immunosensors. Moreover, the immunosensor showed high specificity, good stability and satisfactory reproducibility. As a proof of concept, the proposed strategy provided a promising and versatile platform for clinical immunoassay of other tumor markers and biomolecules.

  19. Reference limits for chromogranin A, CYFRA 21-1, CA 125, CA 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Gustav; Åsberg, Arne; Hultström, Maria E; Aasarød, Knut; Hov, Gunhild G

    2017-05-27

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may have increased plasma concentrations of some tumor markers even when no cancer is present. Previous studies have indicated that plasma concentrations of chromogranin A (CGA), cytokeratin 19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1), cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) are higher in patients with CKD but without cancer, than in healthy individuals, and this can make interpretation of results more complicated. The aim of this study was to establish reference limits for these markers in patients with CKD not receiving dialysis and with no clinical evidence of cancer. We measured plasma concentrations in samples from 131 patients with CKD due to various etiologies and studied the association of tumor marker concentrations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and other patient characteristics. Estimated reference limits for plasma CA 125, CA 19-9 and CEA were approximately the same as for healthy populations. Serum concentrations of CGA and CYFRA 21-1 correlated strongly with estimated GFR, and GFR-dependent reference limits were estimated. GFR-dependent reference limits for CGA and CYFRA 21-1 are reported in order to support interpretation of these markers in patients with CKD.

  20. Identification and partial characterization of the unglycosylated peptide of carcinoembryonic antigen synthesized by human tumor cell lines in the presence of tunicamycin.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Matsuoka, Y

    1984-08-01

    Unglycosylated peptide backbones of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) synthesized by human tumor cell lines in the presence of tunicamycin were identified and analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three tumor cell lines, QGP-1 (pancreas), FCC-1 (colon) and KNS-62 (lung) were found to produce CEA molecules of 180,000-190,000 mol. wts labeled with both [3H]leucine and [14C]glucosamine under conventional culture conditions. In contrast, in the presence of tunicamycin, the native CEA molecules disappeared, and a new component that was precipitated with anti-CEA antibodies and labeled only with [3H]leucine but not with [14C]glucosamine was identified in each cell line. Monoclonal antibodies each directed to different major antigenic determinants on the native CEA molecules also reacted with this unglycosylated peptide. The apparent mol. wts of the naked CEA peptides from QGP-1 and FCC-1 were equally about 78,000, whereas that from KNS-62 was somewhat larger than the other two, suggesting some differences in the peptide structure of the CEA molecules.

  1. A novel lable-free electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen based on gold nanoparticles-thionine-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fen-Ying; Xu, Mao-Tian; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, gold nanoparticle-thionine-reduced graphene oxide (GNP-THi-GR) nanocomposites were prepared to design a label-free immunosensor for the sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The nanocomposites with good biocompatibility, excellent redox electrochemical activity and large surface area were coated onto the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface and then CEA antibody (anti-CEA) was immobilized on the electrode to construct the immunosensor. The morphologies and electrochemistry of the formed nanocomposites were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrometry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies demonstrated that the formation of antibody-antigen complexes decreased the peak current of THi in the GNP-THi-GR nanocomposites. The decreased currents were proportional to the CEA concentration in the range of 10-500 pg/mL with a detection limit of 4 pg/mL. The proposed method was simple, fast and inexpensive for the determination of CEA at very low levels.

  2. [Clinical evaluation of the tumor marker CA 19-9 in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in surgical pre- and postoperative diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M; Happ, J; Hottenrott, C; Maul, F D; Baum, R P; Hör, G; Encke, A

    1986-02-01

    A new tumor marker (CA 19-9) was investigated. CA 19-9 is a tumor-associated antigen which is detected by a monoclonal antibody. CA 19-9 (CIS-Centocor) was compared simultaneously with CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) in 347 patients. 123 patients with gastrointestinal tumors showed a sensitivity of 31% for CA 19-9 (CEA 49%), combination increased sensitivity to 58%. The highest sensitivity was found in pancreas carcinoma (CA 19-9 75%, CEA 66%, combination 92%); it was lower in gastric, colon, and oesophagus carcinomas. In relapsed colorectal carcinomas sensitivity was 53% (CEA 78%, combination 85%). In cases of relapse, tumor markers may become positive even if they were not detectable before resection of the primary tumor. Specificity for CA 19-9 was 100% (CEA 84%) compared to a group of non-malignant diseases including patients with inflammations and patients with nicotin abuse (n = 102). Because of its high specificity and superior sensitivity to CEA in pancreas carcinomas CA 19-9 should be determined in primary and relapse diagnosis in combination with CEA.

  3. Molecular cloning of a cDNA coding biliary glycoprotein I: Primary structure of a glycoprotein immunologically crossreactive with carcinoembryonic antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hinoda, Y.; Neumaier, M.; Hefta, S.A.; Drzeniek, Z.; Wagener, C.; Shively, L.; Hefta, L.J.F.; Shively, J.E.; Paxton, R.J.

    1988-09-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced four overlapping cDNA clones from a normal adult human colon library, which together gave the entire nucleotide sequence for biliary glycoprotein I (BGPI). BGPI is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family, which is a subfamily in the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. The deduced amino acid sequence of the combined clones for BGP I revealed a 34-residue leader sequence followed by a 108-residue N-terminal domain, a 178-residue immunoglobulin-like domain, a 108-residue region specific to BGP I, a 24-residue transmembrane domain, and a 35-residue cytoplasmic domain. The nucleotide sequence of BGP I exhibited greater than 80% identity with CEA and nonspecific crossreacting antigen (NCA) in the leader peptide, N-terminal domain, and immunoglobulin-like domain. They propose that BGP I diverged from NCA by acquiring an immunoglobulin-like domain substantially different from the domains found in NCA or CEA and also a new cytoplasmic domain. The latter feature should result in a substantially different membrane anchorage mechanism of BGP I compared to CEA, which lacks the cytoplasmic domain and is anchored via a phosphatidylinositol-glycan structure. Protein structural analysis of BGP I isolated from human bile revealed a blocked N terminus, 129 amino acids of internal sequence that are in agreement with the translated cDNA sequence, and five glycosylation sites in the peptides sequenced.

  4. Plasma-enhanced antibody immobilization for the development of a capillary-based carcinoembryonic antigen immunosensor using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiaoling; Zhan, Xuefang; Liu, Kunping; Lv, Hao; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-05-07

    In this study, antibody immobilization using a microwave-induced H2O/Ar plasma pretreatment was achieved for the first time. Plasma was used to activate the surface of a capillary-based immunosensor by increasing the density of silicon hydroxyls and dangling bonds to ensure better silanization. The capture antibodies were covalently immobilized after the silanized surface reacted with glutaraldehyde and antibodies. A Cy3-labeled detection antibody was used in combination with the antigen captured by the immunosensor to complete the sandwich-type immunoassay, and the signals were measured using a laser-induced fluorescence system. Microwave-induced H2O/Ar plasma pretreatment of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) immunosensor improved the antibody immobilization, and there was an obvious improvement in the linear detection range, i.e., 1 order of magnitude compared with a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This novel immobilization method dramatically improved the detection limit (0.5 pmol/L CEA) and sensitivity. Assay validation studies indicated that the correlation coefficient reached 0.9978, and the relative standard deviations were <7% for all samples, with recoveries of 99.7-107.1%. Furthermore, the immunosensor was applied successfully to CEA determination in actual saliva specimens with high sensitivity, acceptable precision, and reasonable accuracy. This enhanced CEA immunosensor based on microwave-induced H2O/Ar plasma was demonstrated to be a sensitive tool for CEA diagnostics.

  5. The relevance of serum carcinoembryonic antigen as an indicator of brain metastasis detection in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Sil; Jung, So-Lyoung; Lee, Kyo-Young; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Park, Sarah; Kim, Young-Kyoon; Yoo, Ie-Ryung; Choi, Byung-Ock; Jang, Hong-Seok; Yoon, Sei-Chul

    2012-08-01

    Although many biomarkers have emerged in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the predictive value of site-specific spread is not fully defined. We designed this study to determine if there is an association between serum biomarkers and brain metastasis in advanced NSCLC. We evaluated 227 eligible advanced NSCLC patients between May 2005 and March 2010. Patients who had been newly diagnosed with stage IV NSCLC but had not received treatment previously, and had available information on at least one of the following pretreatment serum biomarkers were enrolled: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1), cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9, and squamous cancer cell antigen. Whole body imaging studies and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were reviewed, and the total number of metastatic regions was scored. Brain metastasis was detected in 66 (29.1%) patients. Although serum CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA 125 levels were significantly different between low total metastatic score group (score 1-3) and high total metastatic score group (score 4-7), only CEA level was significantly different between patients with brain metastasis and those without brain metastasis (p < 0.0001). The area under the receiver operating curve of serum CEA for the prediction of brain metastasis was 0.724 (p = 0.0001). The present study demonstrated that the pretreatment serum CEA level was significantly correlated with brain metastasis in advanced NSCLC. These findings suggested the possible role of CEA in the pathogenesis of brain invasion. More vigilant surveillance would be warranted in the high-risk group of patients with high serum CEA level and multiple synchronous metastasis.

  6. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  7. Preparation of Au-polydopamine functionalized carbon encapsulated Fe₃O₄ magnetic nanocomposites and their application for ultrasensitive detection of carcino-embryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lei; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Gao, Jian; Wang, Qi; Hu, Lihua; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2016-02-12

    A novel carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in two-dimensional (2D) porous graphitic carbon nanocomposites (Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites) were synthesized by situ synthesis strategy, which provided a sensor platform owing to a large aspect ratio and porous structure. Polydopamine (PDA) were modified on the surface of Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites through self-polymerization of dopamine, acting as both the reductant and template for one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The prepared Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites show ferromagnetic features, extremely excellent electron transfer, large specific surface area and excellent dispersing property. These are conducive to the electrochemical signal output and the immobilization of antibody. In this work, a highly label-free sensitive magnetic immunosensor was developed based on Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites for the detection of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). The magnetic glassy carbon electrode was used to fix the Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites with the help of magnetic force. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range (0.001 ng/mL-20.0 ng/mL), a low detection limit (0.33 pg/mL), good reproducibility, selectivity and acceptable stability. The proposed sensing strategy may provide a potential application in the detection of other cancer biomarkers.

  8. [Carcinoembryonic antigen as a marker of proliferative diseases of the lymphatic system in patients with chronic renal failure--case report].

    PubMed

    Janas, Marzena; Niemczyk, Stanisław; Mazur, Stanisław

    2014-10-01

    In patients with CKD, anaemia mainly develops due to a decreased renal synthesis of erythropoietin. The anaemia, both normochromic and normocytic, becomes more severe as the glomerular filtration rate progressively decreases. Tumor markers are used to detect or monitor proliferative diseases. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is usually produced in the gastrointestinal tract, but its production is terminated before birth. The main application of this indicator is to monitor the treatment and the presence of metastases of colorectal cancer. We present a case of 86-year-old woman who was diagnosed with renal anaemia in stage 4 of chronic kidney disease (CKD), treated by periodic blood transfusions. This paper presents the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of anemia with complex and different than renal origin anemia in patients with CKD. Patients require the detailed haematological diagnosis. Pointed out the usefulness of CEA in the diagnosis of lymphoma with co-existing renal failure. The use of erythropoietin in doses of nephrology allowed to avoid further blood transfusion.

  9. Neutron-capture therapy of human cancer: in vitro results on the preparation of boron-labeled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Mizusawa, E; Dahlman, H L; Bennett, S J; Goldenberg, D M; Hawthorne, M F

    1982-01-01

    Two samples of 2-phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-[1-3H]dodecaborane(12) were prepared by treating 1-lithio-2-phenyl-1,2-dicarba-closo-dodecaborane(12) with 3H2O (0.1 and 5.0 Ci/ml, respectively). These tritiated phenylcarborane samples were subsequently converted to corresponding samples of p-[1,2-dicarba-closo-[1-3H]dodecaboran(12)-2-yl]benzenediazonium ion ([3H]DBD) suitable for azo-coupling reactions. Reaction of the two tritiated diazonium ion samples with 2-napthol resulted in the formation of an azo dye (epsilon = 1.98 X 10(4) M-1 cm-1 at 485 nm). Experiments relating absorbance to 3H activity proved the two [3H]DBD sources to have 3.81 X 10(11) and 2.45 X 10(13) cpm of 3H per mol of tritiated carborane substituent. Purified antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen were coupled to the [3H]DBD and, after extensive dialysis, the average number of carborane moieties per antibody molecule was determined by measuring the 3H activity associated with a known protein concentration. Further examination of these tritiated carborane-labeled antibodies by affinity chromatography proved that boron labeling did not destroy their immunoreactivity. Correlations of azo-coupling conditions (reactant ratios, pH) with immunoreactivity and antibody protein recovery are presented. Images PMID:6953444

  10. Carcinoembryonic antigen: assay following heat compared with perchloric acid extraction in patients with colon cancer, non-neoplastic gastrointestinal diseases, or chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, L R; Shuler, S E; Alyea, K; Husserl, F E

    1983-10-01

    Heat inactivation has been proposed as an alternative to perchloric acid (PCA) precipitation for the extraction of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) from human plasma. We examined a commercial RIA kit using heat inactivation, and compared results with those obtained with PCA precipitation. Adequate sensitivity (1.5 micrograms CEA/l plasma), satisfactory analytical recovery of CEA added to plasma, and dilutional linearity of samples found to have elevated CEA concentrations, were demonstrated for the heat-inactivation assay. Between-assay precision was better with the heat inactivation than with the PCA assay. Although the absolute concentration of CEA estimated after heat inactivation was consistently lower than that estimated after PCA extraction of plasma specimens, there was excellent correlation between results obtained with the two methods in colon cancer patients free of disease, colon cancer patients with residual or recurrent disease, patients with benign gastrointestinal disease, and in patients with chronic renal failure. We conclude that the heat-inactivation assay is an excellent alternative to the PCA assay.

  11. Preparation of Au-polydopamine functionalized carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposites and their application for ultrasensitive detection of carcino-embryonic antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lei; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Gao, Jian; Wang, Qi; Hu, Lihua; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A novel carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in two-dimensional (2D) porous graphitic carbon nanocomposites (Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites) were synthesized by situ synthesis strategy, which provided a sensor platform owing to a large aspect ratio and porous structure. Polydopamine (PDA) were modified on the surface of Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites through self-polymerization of dopamine, acting as both the reductant and template for one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The prepared Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites show ferromagnetic features, extremely excellent electron transfer, large specific surface area and excellent dispersing property. These are conducive to the electrochemical signal output and the immobilization of antibody. In this work, a highly label-free sensitive magnetic immunosensor was developed based on Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites for the detection of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). The magnetic glassy carbon electrode was used to fix the Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites with the help of magnetic force. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range (0.001 ng/mL–20.0 ng/mL), a low detection limit (0.33 pg/mL), good reproducibility, selectivity and acceptable stability. The proposed sensing strategy may provide a potential application in the detection of other cancer biomarkers. PMID:26868035

  12. Laparoscopic resection of a benign true cyst of the spleen with the harmonic scalpel producing high levels of CA 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Sardi, A; Ojeda, H F; King, D

    1998-12-01

    Primary true cysts of the spleen constitute 10 per cent of all nonparasitic cysts of the spleen. These cysts have been managed with total or partial splenectomy or marsupialization. Previous series reported elevated serum levels of CA 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A 16-year-old male presented with left upper quadrant pain and was found to have a mass on palpation. An ultrasound and a CT scan of the abdomen showed a 20-cm cystic lesion in the spleen. The CA 19-9 and CEA serum levels were 1264 units/ml (nl <33 units/ml) and 7.5 ng/ml (nl <3.1 ng/ml), respectively. Laparoscopic resection of the cyst using the harmonic scalpel was performed. The pathology showed a benign true epithelial cyst of the spleen, with strongly immunoperoxidase stains for keratin, CA 19-9, and CEA. Levels of CA 19-9 and CEA in the cystic fluid were 48,275 units/ml and 96.6 ng/ml, respectively. This is the first case reported in the literature of a true benign splenic cyst producing high levels of CEA and CA 19-9 in serum and cystic fluid. The patient was discharged home on the 1st postoperative day without problems and returned to his normal daily activities with the 1st week after surgery. The CA 19-9 and CEA serum levels returned to normal levels.

  13. Single-step cycle pulse operation of the label-free electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on branched polypyrrole for carcinoembryonic antigen detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Wang, Qi; Ma, Hongmin; Lv, Xiaohui; Wu, Dan; Sun, Xu; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A novel label-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor based on luminol functional-Au NPs@polypyrrole has been developed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In this work, polypyrrole prepared by chemical polymerization provided a large surface area to load amounts of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Au NPs could not only attach abundant luminol for the enhancement of ECL signal, but also provide a friendly microenvironment for the immobilization of antibodies. Moreover, 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluroborate ([BPy]BF4) were used to disperse luminol functional-Au NPs@polypyrrole nanocomposites, resulting in the film-formation of composites on the electrode, which could improve the stability of immunosensor. In particular, employment of single-step cycle pulse could limit the consecutive reaction between luminol and H2O2 efficiently, thus leading to stable and strong signals. The proposed method presents good ECL response for the detection of CEA allowing a wide linear range from 0.01 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL and a limit of detection as low as 3 fg/mL. The immunosensor would be a promising tool in the early diagnosis of CEA due to its high sensitivity, simplicity and cost-effective. PMID:27091590

  14. Pre-clinical validation study of a miniaturized electrochemical immunoassay based on square wave voltammetry for early detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mancera, Flavio Dolores; García-López, Patricia; Hernández-López, José Luis

    2015-04-15

    The ELISA format for measuring carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) serves as a reference standard against which other assays are compared. Because the World Health Organization (WHO) increasingly recommends the use of serum CEA as a diagnostic tool for cancer, it is relevant to explore the reliability of the new decentralized CEA point-of-care-testing (POCT) technologies that are available to physicians and patients, in compliance with mandates of the clinical laboratories' regulatory agencies. Electrochemical immunoassay (ECIA) based on trace lead (Pb) analysis by anodic stripping techniques using sandwich-type immunocomplex conjugates: (MB)Ab/AgCEA/Ab(PbS), and a commercial ELISA test system with optical transmission. The ECIA provides better analytical performance than does the ELISA. The within assay precision coefficient of variance (%CVw) of the ECIA is lower than the value recommended by the Hong Kong Association of Medical Laboratories (HKAML), and the recoveries of CEA at 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 25.0 and 50.0 ng/ml are in the range of 99-110% for control serum samples. The ECIA showed a minimal positive bias of 0.0267 ± 0.3270 ng/ml (P=0.9389). The proposed CEA screening technology can be practically employed for decentralized clinical analysis of CEA in human serum. Therefore, it can be viewed as a control method for personalized therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)- and /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody fragments in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, A.M.; Kazikiewicz, J.M.; Rosen, S.T.; Spies, S.M.

    1987-03-15

    The biodistribution, radioimmunoimaging, and high pressure liquid chromatography activity profiles of /sup 99m/Tc(Sn) and /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody fragments were compared. Nude mice, bearing specific (colon carcinoma, LS174T) and nonspecific (pancreatic carcinoma, MIA) xenografts were given injections of the respective radiolabeled antibody fragments and also of irrelevant /sup 125/I-labeled antibody fragments (MOPC-21). The animals were imaged at 24 h after being given injections, they were sacrificed, and biodistribution studies were performed. Results of the study showed high kidney uptake (48.6% injected dose (ID)/g +/- 8.1% (SD)) and low tumor uptake (1.5% ID/g +/- 0.6%) for /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)-labeled fragments and higher uptake (4.4% ID/g +/- 0.6%) for /sup 131/I-labeled fragments, resulting in a higher localization index for the radioiodinated monoclonal antibody fragments. Imaging results showed good tumor visualization at 24 h after injection for the /sup 131/I-labeled fragments and poor tumor visualization with predominant kidney uptake for /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)-labeled fragments. After radiolabeling, high pressure liquid chromatography analysis indicated that 131I was primarily associated with F(ab')2 fragments, whereas 99mTc was mostly associated with Fab' fragments.

  16. Single-step cycle pulse operation of the label-free electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on branched polypyrrole for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Wang, Qi; Ma, Hongmin; Lv, Xiaohui; Wu, Dan; Sun, Xu; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-04-19

    A novel label-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor based on luminol functional-Au NPs@polypyrrole has been developed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In this work, polypyrrole prepared by chemical polymerization provided a large surface area to load amounts of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Au NPs could not only attach abundant luminol for the enhancement of ECL signal, but also provide a friendly microenvironment for the immobilization of antibodies. Moreover, 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluroborate ([BPy]BF4) were used to disperse luminol functional-Au NPs@polypyrrole nanocomposites, resulting in the film-formation of composites on the electrode, which could improve the stability of immunosensor. In particular, employment of single-step cycle pulse could limit the consecutive reaction between luminol and H2O2 efficiently, thus leading to stable and strong signals. The proposed method presents good ECL response for the detection of CEA allowing a wide linear range from 0.01 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL and a limit of detection as low as 3 fg/mL. The immunosensor would be a promising tool in the early diagnosis of CEA due to its high sensitivity, simplicity and cost-effective.

  17. Use of quantum dot beads-labeled monoclonal antibody to improve the sensitivity of a quantitative and simultaneous immunochromatographic assay for neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kun; Wang, Kan; Qin, Weijian; Hou, Yafei; Lu, Wenting; Xu, Hao; Wo, Yan; Cui, Daxiang

    2017-03-01

    Detection of multiplex tumor markers was of great importance for cancer diagnosis. Immunochromatographic test strip (ICTS) was the most frequently-used point-of-care detection means. Herein, a convenient and fast method for simultaneous quantitative detection of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed based on ICTS using quantum dot beads (QBs) as marking material. Good monodispersity, high colloidal stability and carboxyl-modified (COOH-) QBs were used. For this method, two test lines were applied to the NC membrane for simultaneous analysis of CEA and NSE respectively. The ideal limit of CEA and NSE detection was 0.0378ng/mL and 0.0426ng/mL with scarcely any cross-reactivity. Moreover, the fluorescent signal intensity of the nitrocellulose membrane could be easily read out in the cooperation of the "Handing" system without professional operators. The possible clinical utilization of this platform was demonstrated by detecting 100 clinic human serums. The result showed that the platform had sensitivity of 99% and 97% for CEA and NSE, while the specificity was 97% and 100% respectively. Our results indicated that the QBs based ICTS not only owning the ability of sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of CEA and NSE, but also showing the potential in developing this ICTS into a routine part of early lung cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. One-step separation-free detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in whole serum: Combination of two-photon excitation fluorescence and optical trapping.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Cao, Di; Qi, Chu-Bo; Chen, Hong-Lei; Wan, Ya-Tao; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2017-04-15

    Direct analysis of biomolecules in complex biological samples remains a major challenge for fluorescence-based approaches due to the interference of background signals. Herein, we report an analytical methodology by exploiting a single low-cost near-infrared sub-nanosecond pulse laser to synchronously actualize optical trapping and two-photon excitation fluorescence for senstive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in buffer solution and human whole serum with no separation steps. The assay is performed by simultaneously trapping and exciting the same immune-conjugated microsphere fabricated with a sandwich immunization strategy. Since the signal is strictly limited in the region of a three-dimensional focal volume where the microsphere is trapped, no obvious background signal is found to contribute the detected signals and thus high signal-to-background data are obtained. As a proof-of-concept study, the constructed platform exhibits good specificity for CEA and the detection limit reaches as low as 8pg/mL (45 fM) with a wide linear range from 0.01 to 60ng/mL in the both cases. To investigate the potential application of this platform in clinical diagnosis, 15 cases of serum samples were analyzed with satisfactory results, which further confirm the applicability of this method.

  19. Urine carcinoembryonic antigen levels are more useful than serum levels for early detection of Bilharzial and non-Bilharzial urinary bladder carcinoma: Observations of 43 Egyptian cases

    PubMed Central

    Saied, Gamal M; El-Metenawy, Wafaa H; Elwan, Mohamed S; Dessouki, Nazar R

    2007-01-01

    Background Both urinary bilharziasis and urothelial neoplasia are associated with increased production of tissue carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Patients and methods Urine and serum CEA were determined in 43 patients with urinary bladder carcinoma including 22 post bilharzial and 21 nonbiharzial cases, in addition to 10 normal control cases. Results A significant increase was detected in both urine and serum CEA levels with bladder carcinoma compared to control cases. Urinary CEA was significantly elevated in 86% of bilharzial, versus 62% in nonbilharzial bladder carcinoma. Only 10.5% of control cases had urinary CEA elevation. The mean urinary CEA in bilharzial, was higher than that of nonbilharzial carcinoma, but the difference was not statistically significant. There was a definite relationship between urine CEA and the stage of malignancy; the higher the stage, the higher the level of urine CEA. No relationship could be detected between the stage of malignancy and serum CEA, or between the grades of malignancy and urine or serum CEA levels. Conclusion Urinary CEA is more useful than serum CEA in the early detection of urotherlial carcinoma particularly if provoked by bilharziasis. Its level is also correlated with the tumor stage. PMID:17224047

  20. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yiwen; Xiao, Guangyang; Hu, Bin

    2015-04-01

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L- 1 and 0.054 μg L- 1 with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L- 1) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2-50 μg L- 1. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications.

  1. Comprehensive immunological analyses of colorectal cancer patients in the phase I/II study of quickly matured dendritic cell vaccine pulsed with carcinoembryonic antigen peptide.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Mitsuru; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Michiyo; Kuroda, Shoko; Miyatake, Hideki; Itose, Ichiyo; Miyazaki, Masanori; Kakita, Naruyasu; Higashitani, Koyo; Matsubara, Tokuhiro; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Kasahara, Akinori; Takehara, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Norio

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccine has been used to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). The results of vaccine-induced clinical responses have not always been satisfactory partially because of DC incompetence. In order to evaluate the feasibility of novel mature DCs for therapeutic adjuvants against CRC, we conducted clinical trials with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) peptide-loaded DC quickly generated with a combination of OK432 (Streptococcuspyogenes preparation), prostanoid, and interferon-α (OPA-DC). In the ten patients enrolled in this study, the OPA-DC vaccine was well tolerated and administered four times every 2 weeks except for two patients, who were switched to other treatments due to disease progression. Among the eight evaluable patients, one displayed stable disease (SD), while the remaining seven showed progressive disease (PD). In the SD patient, natural killer (NK) cell frequency and cytolytic activity were increased. In the same patient, the frequency of CEA-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) increased stepwise with repetitive vaccinations; however, most of the CTLs exhibited central memory phenotype. In those with PD, NK cells proliferated well regardless of failure of response, whereas CTLs failed to do so. We concluded that the OPA-DC vaccine is well tolerated and has immune-stimulatory capacity in patients with CRC. Additional modulation is needed to attain significant clinical impact.

  2. A disposable electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen based on nano-Au/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-chitosans nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Niu, De-Jun; Xie, Wan-Zhen; Wang, Wei

    2010-02-05

    In this paper, a disposable electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on Au nanoparticles (AuNPs)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-chitosans (Chits) composite film was developed. MWCNTs-Chits homogeneous composite was first dispersed in acetic acid solution and then the AuNPs was in situ synthesized at the composite. The mixture was dripped on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and then CEA antibody (anti-CEA) was immobilized on the resulted modified electrode to construct the immunosensor. The stepwise assembly process of the immunosensor was characterized by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) studies demonstrated that the formation of antibody-antigen complexes decreased peak current of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) redox pair at the AuNPs/MWCNTs-Chits/GCE. The optimization of the pH of supporting electrolyte, the incubation temperature and time were studied in detail. Under optimal conditions, the peak current of DPV of the immunosensor decreased linearly with increasing CEA concentration in two ranges of 0.3-2.5 and 2.5-20 ng mL(-1), with a detection limit of 0.01 ng mL(-1) (S/N=3). This electrochemical immunoassay combines the specificity of the immunological reaction with the sensitivity of the AuNPs and MWCNTs amplified electrochemical detection. It would be valuable for diagnosis and monitoring of carcinoma. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Label-Free Microelectrode Array Based on One-Step Synthesis of Chitosan–Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Thionine for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huiren; Wang, Yang; Wang, Li; Song, Yilin; Luo, Jinping; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been an extensively used tumor marker responsible for clinical early diagnosis of cervical carcinomas, and pancreatic, colorectal, gastric and lung cancer. Combined with micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) technology, it is important to develop a novel immune microelectrode array (MEA) not only for rapid analysis of serum samples, but also for cell detection in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we depict a simple approach to modify chitosan–multi-walled carbon nanotubes–thionine (CS–MWCNTs–THI) hybrid film through one-step electrochemical deposition and the CS-MWCNTs-THI hybrid films are successfully employed to immobilize anti-CEA for fabricating simple, label-free, and highly sensitive electro-chemical immune MEAs. The detection principle of immune MEA was based on the fact that the increasing formation of the antigen-antibody immunocomplex resulted in the decreased response currents and the relationship between the current reductions with the corresponding CEA concentrations was directly proportional. Experimental results indicated that the label-free MEA had good selectivity and the limit of detection for CEA is 0.5 pg/mL signal to noise ratio (SNR) = 3. A linear calibration plot for the detection of CEA was obtained in a wide concentration range from 1 pg/mL to 100 ng/mL (r = 0.996). This novel MEA has potential applications for detecting CEA for the research on cancer cells and cancer tissue slices as well as for effective early diagnosis. PMID:28335260

  4. Comparing prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) with the oncofetal proteins glypican-3, Alpha feto protein and carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma among Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Abd El Gawad, Iman A; Mossallam, Ghada I; Radwan, Noha H; Elzawahry, Heba M; Elhifnawy, Niveen M

    2014-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is usually asymptomatic in the early stage and does not show elevated alpha-feto protein (AFP). AFP shows 60-80% sensitivity in diagnosing HCC. Glypican3 (GPC-3) is an oncofetal protein that is only detected in HCC cells but not in benign liver tissues, while Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed in various neoplasms including HCC. Although, it is not specific for HCC. Prothrombin induced by vitamin K absence-II (PIVKA-II) is an abnormal prothrombin protein that is increased in the serum of HCC patients. It has higher sensitivity and specificity compared to AFP. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical utility of PIVKA-II with GPC-3, AFP and CEA in diagnosing HCC. This study included 40 patients with HCC, 10 patients with cirrhosis as a benign control group, and 10 apparently healthy volunteers as normal controls. Serum samples were subjected to routine laboratory investigations, measurement of CEA, AFP using MEIA technique (Axsym), glypican3, and PIVKA-II using ELISA technique in the sera of all patients and controls. All markers showed the highest results in the HCC group. Higher concentrations of PIVKA-II were detected in patients with splenomegaly, and in tumors with size (>3cm). Combination of Glypican-3 and PIVKA-II showed the highest sensitivity, while GPC-3 alone and combination of GPC-3 and AFP showed the highest specificity to differentiate HCC from liver cirrhosis and normal controls. GPC-3, PIVKAII, and combination of both showed the highest sensitivity, while GPC-3 alone showed the highest specificity to differentiate HCC from liver cirrhosis. Glypican-3 is the only oncofetal antigen that showed comparable high diagnostic accuracy as PIVKA-II in diagnosing HCC among Egyptian patients. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Bioresponsive Release System for Visual Fluorescence Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen from Mesoporous Silica Nanocontainers Mediated Optical Color on Quantum Dot-Enzyme-Impregnated Paper.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhenli; Shu, Jian; Tang, Dianping

    2017-05-02

    An all-in-one paper-based analytical device (PAD) was successfully developed for visual fluorescence detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on CdTe/CdSe quantum dot (QD)-enzyme-impregnated paper by coupling with a bioresponsive controlled-release system from DNA-gated mesoporous silica nanocontainers (MSNs). The assay was carried out in a centrifuge tube by using glucose-loaded MSNs with a CEA aptamer and a QD-enzyme-paper attached on the lid. Initially, single-strand complementary DNA to a CEA aptamer was covalently conjugated to the aminated MSN, and then glucose (enzyme substrate) molecules were gated into the pore with the help of the aptamer. Glucose oxidase (GOD) and CdTe/CdSe QDs were coimmobilized on paper for the visual fluorescence signal output. Upon target CEA introduction in the detection cell, the analyte specifically reacted with the immobilized aptamer on the MSN to open the pore, thereby resulting in the glucose release. The released glucose was oxidized by the immobilized GOD on paper to produce gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the latter quenched the fluorescence of CdTe/CdSe QDs, which could be determined by the naked eye on a portable smartphone and a commercial fluorospectrometer. Under optimal conditions, the PAD-based sensing system enabled sensitive discrimination of target CEA against other biomarkers or proteins in a linear range of 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 6.7 pg mL(-1) (ppt). In addition, our strategy displayed high specificity, good reproducibility, and acceptable accuracy for analyzing human serum specimens with a commercial human CEA ELISA kit. Importantly, this methodology offers promise for simple analysis of biological samples and is suitable for use in the mass production of miniaturized devices, thus opening new opportunities for protein diagnostics and biosecurity.

  6. The prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen levels in blood and intraoperative pleural lavage fluid in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cagirici, Ufuk; Ergonul, Ayse Gul; Ozdil, Ali; Kavurmaci, Onder; Turhan, Kutsal; Cakan, Alpaslan; Barutcuoglu, Burcu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There is no specific marker for lung cancer, but, in some lung cancer types, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can reach high levels in the blood and pleural fluid. Aim This study investigated the relationship of CEA levels in blood (CEAB) and intraoperative pleural lavage fluid (CEAP) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with the type, stage, and extent of lung cancer. Material and methods A total of 50 patients, who underwent surgery at our clinic due to NSCLC (group I) or benign lung pathology (group II), were assessed. For this prospectively designed study, 25 consecutive patients were included in each group, and their CEAB and CEAP levels were investigated. Results When the levels of CEAP were compared, the average value of group I (1.35 ng/ml) was significantly higher than the average value of group II (0.04 ng/ml) (p = 0.027). When CEA levels were examined separately, and average values were taken according to surgical pathology results, both CEAB and CEAP levels of adenocarcinoma patients were found to be higher than those of the other groups. This difference was only significant for the level of CEAP (p = 0.026). Conclusions Although the average CEAB levels of patients with adenocarcinoma were higher than those of patients with other histopathological types, this difference was not statistically significant. However, we found that CEAP levels were significantly higher in patients with adenocarcinoma. These results have led us to consider that CEAP elevation is a more sensitive marker than the elevation of CEAB. PMID:28747941

  7. Macroporous graphene capped Fe3O4 for amplified electrochemiluminescence immunosensing of carcinoembryonic antigen detection based on CeO2@TiO2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenjuan; Ren, Xiang; Khan, Malik Saddam; Zhang, Yong; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2017-05-15

    A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal-amplified immunosensing strategy was proposed by using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) capped Fe3O4 (Au-FrGO). In this work, CeO2@TiO2 was prepared by a sol-gel method to wrap CeO2 with TiO2. In the presence of CeO2, CeO2@TiO2 exhibited better ECL activity than TiO2 with peroxydisulfate as coreactant. In addition, FrGO with macroporous structure was synthesized by self-assembly of rGO sheets capped cationic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, exhibiting larger specific surface area than rGO. Due to the low toxicity and magnetism of Fe3O4, FrGO owned more favorable biocompatibility and the application of magnetic-separation simplified the preparation procedure. After hybridizing with Au NPs, FrGO exhibited more excellent electrical conductivity and could immobilize more CeO2@TiO2 and antibodies. Therefore, a novel label-free ECL immunosensor based on Au-FrGO-CeO2@TiO2 was constructed which generated higher ECL response. To investigate the performance of the immunosensor, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was chosen as a model target analyte. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor had sensitive response to CEA in a wide linear range of 0.01pgmL(-1) to 10ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 3.28 fg mL(-1). The proposed ECL immunosensor exhibited excellent stability, repeatability and selectivity, which opened another promising avenue for CEA determination in real serum samples.

  8. Value of ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT in surveillance of postoperative colorectal cancer patients with various carcinoembryonic antigen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Feng, Bin; Zhang, Guo-Li; Hu, Man; Fu, Zheng; Zhao, Fen; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Kong, Li; Yu, Jin-Ming

    2014-06-07

    To evaluate the value of positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography (CT) in surveillance of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with different carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) concentrations. One hundred and six postoperative CRC patients who had suspected recurrence or metastasis and received fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT within one week were included in this study. The final diagnosis was confirmed by histological examination or clinical follow-up over at least six months. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FDG PET/CT were 95.2%, 82.6%, and 92.5%, and 94.8%, 81.4% and 92.8%, respectively, in the case- and lesion-based analyses. The sensitivity and accuracy of FDG PET/CT significantly differed from CT in both analyses (χ(2) = 8.186, P = 0.004; χ(2) =6.201, P = 0.013; χ(2) =13.445, P = 0.000; χ(2) =11.194, P = 0.001). In the lesion-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FDG PET/CT in the abnormal CEA group were 97.8%, 82.6%, and 95.6%, compared with 81.3%, 80%, and 80.6% for patients with normal CEA levels. In case-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FDG PET/CT were 97.2%, 77.8%, and 95% in abnormal CEA group. Only in lesion-based analysis, the sensitivity and accuracy of FDG PET/CT in the abnormal CEA group were significantly superior to those in the normal CEA group (χ(2) =6.432, P = 0.011; χ(2) =7.837, P = 0.005). FDG PET/CT changed the management in 45.8% of patients with positive scans. FDG PET/CT showed superior diagnostic value and is an advisable option in surveillance of postoperative CRC patients with a vague diagnosis.

  9. Photoelectrochemical Immunosensor for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on 2D TiO2 Nanosheets and Carboxylated Graphitic Carbon Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Qi; Ren, Xiang; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was used as the model, an ultrasensitive label-free photoelectrochemical immunosensor was developed using 2D TiO2 nanosheets and carboxylated graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as photoactive materials and ascorbic acid as an efficient electron donor. 2D TiO2 nanosheets was sythsized by surfactant self-assembly method and proved to have higher photoelectrochemical signals than TiO2 nanoparticles. Firstly, carboxylated g-C3N4 could be attached to 2D TiO2 nanosheets through the bond formed between carboxyl group of carboxylated g-C3N4 and TiO2. And the photocurrent of g-C3N4/TiO2 drastically enhances compared to carboxylated g-C3N4 and TiO2. Then, antibody of CEA was bonded to TiO2 through the dentate bond formed between carboxyl group of anti-CEA and TiO2, leading to the decrease of the photocurrents. As proven by PEC experiments and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, the fabrication process of the immunosensor is successful. Under the optimal conditions, the intensity decreased linearly with CEA concentration in the range of 0.01~10 ng/mL. The detection limit is 2.1 pg/mL. The work provides an effective method for the detection of tumor markers and can be extended for the application in food safety and environmental monitoring analysis. PMID:27263659

  10. Impact of cytokeratin-20 and carcinoembryonic antigen mRNA detection by RT-PCR in regional lymph nodes of patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, R; Hoos, A; Mueller, J; Nekarda, H

    2000-01-01

    The reported rates for tumour cell involvement in the locoregional lymph nodes of colorectal cancer vary greatly, depending on the method used and case selection. In order to further evaluate the clinical value of molecular biologic detection of tumour cells we investigated 102 histologically tumour-free (pN0) regional lymph nodes from 51 consecutive, completely resected (UICC R0) colorectal carcinoma specimens for the presence of tumour cell mRNA by RT-PCR specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cytokeratin 20 (CK-20). Two lymph nodes located nearest to the primary tumour were investigated in each case. CK-20 mRNA was found in 31 of 51 patients (60.8%) and CEA mRNA in 30 of 51 patients (58.8%), respectively. Identical transcription patterns of CK-20 and CEA mRNA (both positive or both negative) were found in 38 of 51 patients (74.5%). There was a significantly higher proportion of cases with CEA positivity in the lymph nodes of tubulopapillary than of mucinous adenocarcinomas (P< 0.03). Detection of CK-20 and CEA mRNA correlated in nine of 12 cases (75.0%) with the risk of tumour recurrence (not significant) and showed a tendency towards shorter disease-free survival by univariate analysis (not significant). Our data indicate that CK-20 and CEA mRNA detection by RT-PCR may prove useful for the prediction of tumour recurrence of patients with pN0 colorectal carcinoma, although neither reach statistical significance in this series of patients. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11044357

  11. Ablation of human colon carcinoma in nude mice by sup 131 I-labeled monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody F(ab')2 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Buchegger, F.; Pfister, C.; Fournier, K.; Prevel, F.; Schreyer, M.; Carrel, S.; Mach, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    Pooled F(ab')2 fragments of three MAbs against distinct epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used for radioimmunotherapy of nude mice bearing a subcutaneous human colon carcinoma xenograft. 9-10 d after transplantation when tumor nodules were in exponential growth, 36 mice were treated by intravenous injection of different amounts of {sup 131}I-labeled MAb F(ab')2. All 14 mice injected with a single dose of 2,200 (n = 10) or 2,800 microCi (n = 4) showed complete tumor remission. 8 of the 10 mice treated with 2,200 microCi survived in good health for 1 yr when they were killed and shown to be tumor free. Four of nine other mice treated with four fractionated doses of 400 microCi showed no tumor relapse for more than 9 mo. In contrast, all 15 mice injected with 1,600-3,000 microCi {sup 131}I-control IgG F(ab')2 showed tumor growth retardation of only 1-4 wk, and 15 of 16 mice injected with unlabeled anti-CEA MAb F(ab')2 showed unmodified tumor progression as compared with untreated mice. From tissue radioactivity distributions it was calculated that by an injection of 2,200 microCi {sup 131}I-MAb F(ab')2 a mean dose of 8,335 rad was selectively delivered to the tumor, while the tissue-absorbed radiation doses for the normal organs were: peripheral blood, 2,093; stomach, 1,668; kidney, 1,289; lung, 1,185; liver, 617; spleen, 501; small intestine, 427; large intestine, 367; bone, 337; and muscle, 198. These treatments were well tolerated since out of 19 mice with complete tumor remission only 4 required bone marrow transplantation and 17 were in good health for 6-12 mo of observation.

  12. Increased electrocatalyzed performance through hairpin oligonucleotide aptamer-functionalized gold nanorods labels and graphene-streptavidin nanomatrix: Highly selective and sensitive electrochemical biosensor of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Huang, Jing-Yi; Bao, Ting; Zhou, Jun; Xia, Hong-Xing; Zhang, Xiu-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Fu; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2016-09-15

    We report a triplex signal amplification strategy for sensitive biosensing of cancer biomarker by taking advantage of hairpin-shaped oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanorods (HO-GNRs), graphene and the avidin-biotin reation. The strategy expands electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by using an aptamer as biosensor's recognition element and HO-GNRs as signal enhancer. To construct this biosensor, the GNR was used as a carrier of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and HO aptamer with a biotin at the 3'-end and a thiol at the 5'-end, which amplified the electrochemical response because of a large molar ratio of HRP to HO. In the presence of target CEA, the binding reactions of CEA with the loop portions of the HOs caused HOs' loop-stem structure opened and exposed the biotins, and then HRP-GNRs-HO conjugates were captured on graphene and streptavidin modified electrodes via the reaction between the exposed biotins and preimmobilized streptavidins. The accumulation of HRP effectively catalyzed the hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidation of o-phenylenediamine to generate an electrochemical reduction current for CEA detection. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical biosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range of 5pgmL(-1) and 50ngmL(-1) toward CEA standards with a low detection limit of 1.5pgmL(-1) (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The proposed biosensor accurately detected CEA concentration in 8 human serum samples from patients with lung diseases, showing excellent correlations with standard chemiluminescence immunoassay. Furthermore, these results of target DNA detection made it abundantly clear that the proposed strategy can also be extended for detection of other relative biomarkers using different functional DNA structures, which shows great prospects in single-nucleotide polymorphisms analysis, biomedical sensing and application for accurate clinical diseases diagnostic.

  13. Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Predictor of Pathologic Response and a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a predictor of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and prognostic factor for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 352 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery. Serum CEA levels were determined before CRT administration (pre-CRT CEA) and before surgery (post-CRT CEA). Correlations between pre-CRT CEA levels and rates of good response (Tumor regression grade 3/4) were explored. Patients were categorized into three CEA groups according to their pre-/post-CRT CEA levels (ng/mL) (Group A: pre-CRT CEA {<=} 3; B: pre-CRT CEA >3, post-CRT CEA {<=}3; C: pre- and post-CRT CEA >3 ng/mL), and their oncologic outcomes were compared. Results: Of 352 patients, good responses were achieved in 94 patients (26.7%). The rates of good response decreased significantly as the pre-CRT CEA levels became more elevated (CEA [ng/mL]: {<=}3, 36.4%; 3-6, 23.6%; 6-9, 15.6%; >9, 7.8%; p < 0.001). The rates of good response were significantly higher in Group A than in Groups B and C (36.4% vs. 17.3% and 14.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The 3-year disease-free survival rate was significantly better in Groups A and B than in Group C (82% and 79% vs. 57%, respectively; p = 0.005); the CEA grouping was identified as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.025). Conclusions: In locally advanced rectal cancer patients, CEA levels could be of clinical value as a predictor of response to preoperative CRT and as an independent prognostic factor after preoperative CRT and curative surgery.

  14. Nanoparticle labelling-based magnetic immunoassay on chip combined with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Ping; He, Man; Peng, Hanyong; Zhang, Xing

    2011-10-07

    A sensitive and selective on chip magnetic immunoassay method, based on a sandwich-type immunoreaction with PbS nanoparticle (NPs) labels in combination with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS), was proposed for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We designed and fabricated a microfluidic chip for magnetic immunoassay, and the prepared iminodiacetic acid modified silica coated magnetic nanoparticles (IDA-SCMNPs) were packed into the central microchannel to form a solid phase column by self-assembly under the magnetic field. After completion of the immunoreaction involving a primary antibody, CEA and a secondary antibody labeled with PbS NPs on a magnetic solid phase packed-column, ETV-ICP-MS was used to determine the concentration of Pb that was released from the captured PbS NPs using an acid-dissolution step. The concentrations of CEA can be correlated with that of Pb. The established method demonstrated a limit of detection of 0.058 μg L(-1) for CEA, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.7% (c = 10 μg L(-1), n = 7). A linearity ranging from 0.2 μg L(-1) to 50 μg L(-1) and a 2-fold enrichment factor (from 60 μL sample solution to 30 μL eluent) were achieved. The proposed method was further validated by analyzing CEA in human serum. The results were in good agreement with those obtained by chemiluminescent immunoassay, which is currently used as a clinical method. Overall, this method offers the advantages of high speed, high sensitivity, high selectivity, low sample/reagents consumption, high integrity and versatility. Moreover, it can be easily applied to other biological and medical assays.

  15. Up-regulation of tumor suppressor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 in human colon cancer Caco-2 cells following repetitive exposure to dietary levels of a polyphenol-rich chokeberry juice.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Soto, María J; Larrosa, Mar; Garcia-Cantalejo, Jesús M; Espín, Juan C; Tomás-Barberan, Francisco A; García-Conesa, María T

    2007-04-01

    Consumption of berries and red fruits rich in polyphenols may contribute to the reduction of colon cancer through mechanisms not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the response of subconfluent Caco-2 cells (a human colon carcinoma model) to repetitive exposure (2 h a day for a 4-day period) of a subtoxic dose of a chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) juice containing mixed polyphenols. To mimic physiological conditions, we subjected the chokeberry juice to in vitro gastric and pancreatic digestion. The effects on viability, proliferation and cell cycle were determined, and changes in the expression of genes in response to the chokeberry treatment were screened using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. Exposure to the chokeberry juice inhibited Caco-2 cell proliferation by causing G(2)/M cell cycle arrest. We detected changes in the expression of a group of genes involved in cell growth and proliferation and cell cycle regulation, as well as those associated to colorectal cancer. A selection of these genes was further confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Among these, the tumor suppressor carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), whose expression is known to be reduced in the majority of early adenomas and carcinomas, was up-regulated by the treatment both at the mRNA and protein levels (as shown by flow cytometry analysis). CEACAM1, with a significant regulatory role on cell proliferation of particular interest at early stages of cancer development, may be a potential target for chemoprevention by food components such as those present in polyphenol-rich fruits.

  16. The critical role of residues 43R and 44Q of carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecules-1 in the protection from killing by human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Markel, Gal; Gruda, Raizy; Achdout, Hagit; Katz, Gil; Nechama, Morris; Blumberg, Richard S; Kammerer, Robert; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2004-09-15

    The multifunctional carcinoembryonic Ag cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)1 protein has recently become the focus of intense immunological research. We have previously shown that the CEACAM1 homophilic interactions inhibit the killing activity of NK cells. This novel inhibitory mechanism plays a key role in melanoma immune evasion, inhibition of decidual immune response, and controlling NK autoreactivity in TAP2-deficient patients. These roles are mediated mainly by homophilic interactions, which are mediated through the N-domain of the CEACAM1. The N-domain of the various members of the CEACAM family shares a high degree of similarity. However, it is still unclear which of the CEACAM family members is able to interact with CEACAM1 and what are the amino acid residues that control this interaction. In this study we demonstrate that CEACAM1 interacts with CEACAM5, but not with CEACAM6. Importantly, we provide the molecular basis for CEACAM1 recognition of various CEACAM family members. Sequence alignment reveals a dichotomy among the CEACAM family members: both CEACAM1 and CEACAM5 contain the R and Q residues in positions 43 and 44, respectively, whereas CEACAM3 and CEACAM6 contain the S and L residues, respectively. Mutational analysis revealed that both 43R and 44Q residues are necessary for CEACAM1 interactions. Implications for differential expression of CEACAM family members in tumors are discussed. Copyright 2004 The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Prognostic Value of Pretreatment Carcinoembryonic Antigen After Definitive Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Hsu, Hsuan-Chih; Sun, Li-Min; Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Lin, Hao; Chen, Hui-Chun; Tseng, Chih-Wen; Ou, Yu-Che; Chang, Hung-Yao; Fang, Fu-Min; Huang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Chang-Yu; Lu, Hsien-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Chou; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels have a prognostic role in patients after definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 550 patients was performed. The SCC antigen (SCC-Ag) and CEA levels were regarded as elevated when they were {>=}2 and {>=}5 ng/mL, respectively. A total of 208 patients underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the distant metastasis (DM), local failure (LF), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. The hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was evaluated for the risk of a poor prognosis. Results: Compared with the patients with normal CEA/SCC-Ag levels, CEA levels {>=}10 ng/mL but without elevated SCC-Ag levels was an independent factor for LF (HR, 51.81; 95% CI, 11.51-233.23; p < .001), DM (HR, 6.04; 95% CI, 1.58-23.01; p = .008), DFS (HR, 10.17; 95% CI, 3.18-32.56; p < .001), and OS (HR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.82-18.18; p = .003) after RT alone. However, no significant role for CEA was noted in patients with SCC-Ag levels {>=}2 ng/mL. In patients undergoing CCRT, a CEA level {>=}10 ng/mL was an independent factor for LF (HR, 2.50; 95% CI, 1.01-6.21; p = .047), DM (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.56-7.46; p = .002), DFS (HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.39-5.36; p = .003), and OS (HR, 3.93; 95% CI 1.99-7.75; p < .001). A SCC-Ag level of {>=}40 ng/mL was another prognostic factor for DM, DFS, and OS in patients undergoing not only CCRT, but also RT alone. The 5-year OS rate for CCRT patients with CEA <10 ng/mL and {>=}10 ng/mL was 75.3% and 35.8%, respectively (p < .001). CCRT was an independent factor for better OS (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50-0.97; p = .034). Conclusion: Pretreatment CEA levels in patients with SCC of the uterine cervix provide complementary information for predicting LF, DM

  18. A Novel Carcinoembryonic Antigen T-Cell Bispecific Antibody (CEA TCB) for the Treatment of Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bacac, Marina; Fauti, Tanja; Sam, Johannes; Colombetti, Sara; Weinzierl, Tina; Ouaret, Djamila; Bodmer, Walter; Lehmann, Steffi; Hofer, Thomas; Hosse, Ralf J; Moessner, Ekkehard; Ast, Oliver; Bruenker, Peter; Grau-Richards, Sandra; Schaller, Teilo; Seidl, Annette; Gerdes, Christian; Perro, Mario; Nicolini, Valeria; Steinhoff, Nathalie; Dudal, Sherri; Neumann, Sebastian; von Hirschheydt, Thomas; Jaeger, Christiane; Saro, Jose; Karanikas, Vaios; Klein, Christian; Umaña, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    CEA TCB is a novel IgG-based T-cell bispecific (TCB) antibody for the treatment of CEA-expressing solid tumors currently in phase I clinical trials (NCT02324257). Its format incorporates bivalent binding to CEA, a head-to-tail fusion of CEA- and CD3e-binding Fab domains and an engineered Fc region with completely abolished binding to FcγRs and C1q. The study provides novel mechanistic insights into the activity and mode of action of CEA TCB. CEA TCB activity was characterized on 110 cell lines in vitro and in xenograft tumor models in vivo using NOG mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Simultaneous binding of CEA TCB to tumor and T cells leads to formation of immunologic synapses, T-cell activation, secretion of cytotoxic granules, and tumor cell lysis. CEA TCB activity strongly correlates with CEA expression, with higher potency observed in highly CEA-expressing tumor cells and a threshold of approximately 10,000 CEA-binding sites/cell, which allows distinguishing between high- and low-CEA-expressing tumor and primary epithelial cells, respectively. Genetic factors do not affect CEA TCB activity confirming that CEA expression level is the strongest predictor of CEA TCB activity. In vivo, CEA TCB induces regression of CEA-expressing xenograft tumors with variable amounts of immune cell infiltrate, leads to increased frequency of activated T cells, and converts PD-L1 negative into PD-L1-positive tumors. CEA TCB is a novel generation TCB displaying potent antitumor activity; it is efficacious in poorly infiltrated tumors where it increases T-cell infiltration and generates a highly inflamed tumor microenvironment. Clin Cancer Res; 22(13); 3286-97. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Mechanistic Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CEACAM1) Splice Isoforms by the Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonuclear Proteins hnRNP L, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP M*

    PubMed Central

    Dery, Kenneth J.; Gaur, Shikha; Gencheva, Marieta; Yen, Yun; Shively, John E.; Gaur, Rajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is expressed in a variety of cell types and is implicated in carcinogenesis. Alternative splicing of CEACAM1 pre-mRNA generates two cytoplasmic domain splice variants characterized by the inclusion (L-isoform) or exclusion (S-isoform) of exon 7. Here we show that the alternative splicing of CEACAM1 pre-mRNA is regulated by novel cis elements residing in exon 7. We report the presence of three exon regulatory elements that lead to the inclusion or exclusion of exon 7 CEACAM1 mRNA in ZR75 breast cancer cells. Heterologous splicing reporter assays demonstrated that the maintenance of authentic alternative splicing mechanisms were independent of the CEACAM1 intron sequence context. We show that forced expression of these exon regulatory elements could alter CEACAM1 splicing in HEK-293 cells. Using RNA affinity chromatography, three members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family (hnRNP L, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP M) were identified. RNA immunoprecipitation of hnRNP L and hnRNP A1 revealed a binding motif located central and 3′ to exon 7, respectively. Depletion of hnRNP A1 or L by RNAi in HEK-293 cells promoted exon 7 inclusion, whereas overexpression led to exclusion of the variable exon. By contrast, overexpression of hnRNP M showed exon 7 inclusion and production of CEACAM1-L mRNA. Finally, stress-induced cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in MDA-MB-468 cells dynamically alters the CEACAM1-S:CEACAM1:L ratio in favor of the l-isoform. Thus, we have elucidated the molecular factors that control the mechanism of splice-site recognition in the alternative splicing regulation of CEACAM1. PMID:21398516

  20. Diagnostic value of selected biochemical markers in the detection of recurrence of medullary thyroid cancer - comparison of calcitonin, procalcitonin, chromogranin A, and carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Woliński, Kosma; Kaznowski, Jarosław; Klimowicz, Aleksandra; Maciejewski, Adam; Łapińska-Cwojdzińska, Dagny; Gurgul, Edyta; Car, Adrian D; Fichna, Marta; Gut, Paweł; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the thyroid gland, which derives from parafollicular C cells. Periodic measurement of biochemical markers of MTC remains a crucial part of patient follow-up and disease monitoring. The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic value of four selected markers - calcitonin (Ct), procalcitonin (PCT), chromogranin A (CgA), and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Patients with histopathologically confirmed MTC hospitalised in a single department between January 2015 and December 2015 were included in the study. Patients were subdivided into two groups: a remission group and an active disease group, based upon serum markers of MTC and imaging. Levels of Ct, PCT, CgA, and CEA were compared between the groups. Forty-four patients were included; 20 patients presented active disease and 24 were in remission. All patients with active disease had Ct exceeding the upper limit of normal range (10 pg/mL) - for that threshold the sensitivity was 100.0% and the specificity was 73.9%; for the best-fit threshold of 121.0 pg/mL the specificity was 95.8% with sensitivity 100.0%. There was significant correlation between Ct and PCT - p < 0.000001, r = 0.93. All patients with active disease exceeded the upper limit of the normal range (0.5 ng/mL) - for that threshold the sensitivity was 100.0% and the specificity was 83.3%; for the best-fit threshold of 0.95 ng/mL the specificity was 95.8% with sensitivity 100.0%. In case of CEA for the best-fit threshold of 12.66 ng/mL the specificity was 100.0% with sensitivity 57.9%; for CgA the best-fit threshold was 75.66 ng/mL with specificity 83.3% and sensitivity 75.0%. Our study confirms that PCT can be considered as an equivalent alternative for measurement of calcitonin. On the other hand, it is also worth noting that MTC can be a rare cause of very high levels of PTC not resulting from infectious diseases. The diagnostic value of CEA and chromogranin A is much lower and can be within the

  1. A phase I clinical study of immunotherapy for advanced colorectal cancers using carcinoembryonic antigen-pulsed dendritic cells mixed with tetanus toxoid and subsequent IL-2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Chao, Tsu-Yi; Chang, Jang-Yang; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Ch'ang, Hui-Ju; Kao, Woei-Yau; Wu, Yu-Chen; Yu, Wei-Lan; Chung, Tsai-Rong; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline

    2016-08-24

    To better evaluate and improve the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy, we conducted a clinical study of patients with advanced colorectal cancer using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-pulsed DCs mixed with tetanus toxoid and subsequent interleukin-2 treatment. The tetanus toxoid in the vaccine preparation serves as an adjuvant and provides a non-tumor specific immune response to enhance vaccine efficacy. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the toxicity of this treatment, (2) observe the clinical responses of vaccinated patients, and (3) investigate the immune responses of patients against CEA before and after treatment. Twelve patients were recruited and treated in this phase I clinical study. These patients all had metastatic colorectal cancer and failed standard chemotherapy. We first subcutaneously immunized patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with 1 × 10(6) CEA-pulsed DCs mixed with tetanus toxoid as an adjuvant. Patients received 3 successive injections with 1 × 10(6) CEA-pulsed DCs alone. Low-dose interleukin-2 was administered subcutaneously following the final DC vaccination to boost the growth of T cells. Patients were evaluated for adverse event and clinical status. Blood samples collected before, during, and after treatment were analyzed for T cell proliferation responses against CEA. No severe treatment-related side effects or toxicity was observed in patients who received the regular 4 DC vaccine injections. Two patients had stable disease and 10 patients showed disease progression. A statistically significant increase in proliferation against CEA by T cells collected after vaccination was observed in 2 of 9 patients. The results of this study indicate that it is feasible and safe to treat colorectal cancer patients using this protocol. An increase in the anti-CEA immune response and a clinical benefit was observed in a small fraction of patients. This treatment protocol should be further evaluated in

  2. Usefulness of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) in evaluating response to chemotherapy in patients with advanced non small-cell lung cancer: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels are an independent prognostic factor for recurrence and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Its role as a predictive marker of treatment response has not been widely characterized. Methods 180 patients with advanced NSCLC (stage IIIB or Stage IV), who had an elevated CEA serum level (>10 ng/ml) at baseline and who had no more than one previous chemotherapy regimen, were included. CEA levels were measured after two treatment cycles of platinum based chemotherapy (93%) or a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (7%). We assessed the change in serum CEA levels and the association with response measured by RECIST criteria. Results After two chemotherapy cycles, the patients who achieved an objective response (OR, 28.3%) had a reduction of CEA levels of 55.6% (95% CI 64.3-46.8) compared to its basal level, with an area under the ROC curve (AURC) of 0.945 (95% CI 0.91-0.99), and a sensitivity and specificity of 90.2 and 89.9%, respectively, for a CEA reduction of ≥14%. Patients that achieved a decrease in CEA levels ≥14% presented an overall response in 78% of cases, stable disease in 20.3% and progression in 1.7%, while patients that did not attain a reduction ≥14% had an overall response of 4.1%, stable disease of 63.6% and progression of 32.2% (p < 0.001). Patients with stable (49.4%) and progressive disease (22.2%) had an increase of CEA levels of 9.4% (95% CI 1.5-17.3) and 87.5% (95% CI 60.9-114) from baseline, respectively (p < 0.001). The AURC for progressive disease was 0.911 (95% CI 0.86-0.961), with sensitivity and specificity of 85 and 15%, respectively, for a CEA increase of ≥18%. PFS was longer in patients with a ≥14% reduction in CEA (8.7 vs. 5.1 months, p < 0.001). Reduction of CEA was not predictive of OS. Conclusions A CEA level reduction is a sensitive and specific marker of OR, as well as a sensitive indicator for progression to chemotherapy in patients

  3. Ablation of human colon carcinoma in nude mice by 131I-labeled monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody F(ab')2 fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Buchegger, F; Pfister, C; Fournier, K; Prevel, F; Schreyer, M; Carrel, S; Mach, J P

    1989-01-01

    Pooled F(ab')2 fragments of three MAbs against distinct epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used for radioimmunotherapy of nude mice bearing a subcutaneous human colon carcinoma xenograft. 9-10 d after transplantation when tumor nodules were in exponential growth, 36 mice were treated by intravenous injection of different amounts of 131I-labeled MAb F(ab')2. All 14 mice injected with a single dose of 2,200 (n = 10) or 2,800 microCi (n = 4) showed complete tumor remission. 8 of the 10 mice treated with 2,200 microCi survived in good health for 1 yr when they were killed and shown to be tumor free. Four of nine other mice treated with four fractionated doses of 400 microCi showed no tumor relapse for more than 9 mo. In contrast, all 15 mice injected with 1,600-3,000 microCi 131I-control IgG F(ab')2 showed tumor growth retardation of only 1-4 wk, and 15 of 16 mice injected with unlabeled anti-CEA MAb F(ab')2 showed unmodified tumor progression as compared with untreated mice. From tissue radioactivity distributions it was calculated that by an injection of 2,200 microCi 131I-MAb F(ab')2 a mean dose of 8,335 rad was selectively delivered to the tumor, while the tissue-absorbed radiation doses for the normal organs were: peripheral blood, 2,093; stomach, 1,668; kidney, 1,289; lung, 1,185; liver, 617; spleen, 501; small intestine, 427; large intestine, 367; bone, 337; and muscle, 198. These treatments were well tolerated since out of 19 mice with complete tumor remission only 4 required bone marrow transplantation and 17 were in good health for 6-12 mo of observation. The results demonstrate the selective destruction of established human colon carcinoma transplants by intravenous injection of either single or fractionated doses of 131I-MAb F(ab')2. Images PMID:2708519

  4. Effect of antigen turnover rate and expression level on antibody penetration into tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Margaret E; Pawlowski, David; Wittrup, K Dane

    2008-07-01

    Poor tissue penetration is a significant obstacle to the development of successful antibody drugs for immunotherapy of solid tumors, and diverse alterations to the properties of antibody drugs have been made to improve penetration and homogeneity of exposure. However, in addition to properties of the antibody drug, mathematical models of antibody transport predict that the antigen expression level and turnover rate significantly influence penetration. As intrinsic antigen properties are likely to be difficult to modify, they may set inherent limits to penetration. Accordingly, in this study, we assess their contribution by evaluating the distance to which antibodies penetrate spheroids when these antigen properties are systematically varied. Additionally, the penetration profiles of antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen and A33, two targets of clinical interest, are compared. The results agree well with the quantitative predictions of the model and show that localizing antibody to distal regions of tumors is best achieved by selecting slowly internalized targets that are not expressed above the level necessary for recruiting a toxic dose of therapeutic. Each antibody-bound antigen molecule that is turned over or present in excess incurs a real cost in terms of penetration depth-a limiting factor in the development of effective therapies for treating solid tumors.

  5. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  6. Prognostic Value of Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA), AFP, CA19-9 and CA125 for Patients with Colorectal Cancer with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Treated by Cytoreductive Surgery and Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ya Ruth; Huang, Yeqian; Liauw, Winston; Zhao, Jing; Morris, David L

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to clarify the prognostic significance of tumour markers on long-term survival in colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis (CRPC) following cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Preoperative serum tumour markers of 164 patients with CRPC were analyzed. Peritoneal cancer index (PCI) was measured and relationship to survival calculated. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) >6.5 mg/l and cancer antigen 125 (CA125) >16 U/ml remained independent predictors of survival after adjusting for PCI [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR)=2.46, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.3-4.5, p<0.01 and aHR=2.23, 95% CI=1.21-4.09, p<0.01, respectively]. Patients with high CEA and low CA125 or vice versa had an approximately triple risk of death (HR=3.34, 95% CI=1.21 9.25, p=0.02 and HR=2.76, 95% CI=1.01 7.77, p=0.04, respectively). High CEA with high CA125 produced an additive effect, reflecting a six-fold increase in death (HR=6.57, 95% CI=2.62 13.69, p<0.001, median survival: not reached vs. 22 months). Serum CEA and CA125 in patients with CRPC treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy convey a negative prognostic effect independently of PCI. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Cancer/Testis Antigens: Expression, Regulation, Tumor Invasion, and Use in Immunotherapy of Cancers.

    PubMed

    Salmaninejad, Arash; Zamani, Mohammad Reza; Pourvahedi, Mehrnaz; Golchehre, Zahra; Hosseini Bereshneh, Ali; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-10-01

    Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are named based on their expression pattern that is restricted in a number of normal and abnormal tissues. Tumor cells frequently express antigens whose expression is typically restricted to germ cells. Their unique expression pattern is guaranteed by precise epigenetic regulatory mechanisms. Because of their tumor-limited, high immunogenicity, and biased expression, discovery of these molecules provides unprecedented opportunities for further research and clinical development in the field of cancer diagnosis and immunotherapy. Evolving evidence reveals that a number of CTAs stimulate epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and generation of cancer stem-like cells, intensifying metastasis, invasion, and tumorigenesis. Based on these features, CTAs attract attention to be considered as ideal targets for developing several clinical trials, many of them concentrating on CTA vaccine therapy. According to recent practical clinical interest, more characterizations of CTA regulation are identified. CTA expression has been demonstrated in a variety of human cancer tissues, and some of them have been found to elicit humoral and/or cellular immune responses in cancer patients. CTAs are brilliant targets for anticancer drug discovery, targeted tumor therapy, and diagnostic biomarkers, furthermore, valued genes in the study of immunotherapy, promoting tumorigenesis, and malignant progression. This review outlines and categorizes our current understanding of the complex and biased process of CTAs mRNA and protein expression in cancer, and supplies the most recent information on their regulation and function. Besides, a concise synopsis of the major clinical trials involving CTAs, as therapeutic avenues, is discussed. AIRE: autoimmune regulator; cAMP: cyclic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate; CEA: carcinoembryonic antigen; CML: chronic myeloid leukemia; CREB: cyclicamp response element binding; CSCs: cancer stem cells; CTAs: cancer

  8. [Pax-2 antigen expression in kidney tumours].

    PubMed

    Vjestica, Jelena M; Marković-Lipkovski, Jasmina; Tulić, Cane D; Djokić, Milan R; Segar, Bojan S; Cirović, Sanja L; Stojanović, Martina M; Vuksanović, Aleksandar M

    2011-01-01

    Pax-2 transcriptional factor is expressed during kidney development and could re-express in renal tumors. The aim of this study was to examine Pax-2 expression in different types of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in order to see whether it is good immunohistochemical marker. We analyzed 48 different renal tumours stained with Pax-2 antibody. Pax-2 positive reaction was noticed in nucleus or cytoplasm. Expression of this antigen in tumours tissue was correlated with tumour stage and nuc-lear grade. Pax-2 expression between different histological RCC types was analyzed by chi2 test and Fishers test for two in-depended samples. Pax-2 is expressed by a high percentage of re-nal tumors regardless of histologic type. Significant diffe-rence of Pax-2 expression between oncocytomas and chromofobe RCC was found. Nuclear expression of Pax-2 is useful diagnostic kidney tumour marker. Pax-2 showed stronger expression in lower malignancy kidney tumours and in oncocytomas, than in high grade RCC like in those with sarcomatoid differentiation

  9. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and p<0.001 for the 750 dyes). Human pancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (p<0.001 for the 650 dyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  10. Pharmacological administration of granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor is of significant importance for the induction of a strong humoral and cellular response in patients immunized with recombinant carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Samanci, A; Yi, Q; Fagerberg, J; Strigård, K; Smith, G; Rudén, U; Wahren, B; Mellstedt, H

    1998-11-01

    Eighteen colorectal carcinoma patients without macroscopic disease after surgery were immunized using recombinant (r) human (h) carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with (n=9) or without (n=9) the addition of soluble granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The dose of rhCEA per immunization was 100 microg (n=6), 316 microg (n=6) or 1000 microg (n=6). rhCEA was given s.c. on day 1 and 80 microg/day of GM-CSF s.c. on days 1-4. The schedule was repeated six times during a period of 9 months. All patients in the GM-CSF group developed a strong rhCEA-dose-dependent IgG antibody response while only one-third of the non-GM-CSF patients mounted a weak antibody response. All patients (9/9) in the GM-CSF group developed a strong rhCEA-specific proliferative T cell response as well as type I T cells (interferon gamma secretion). In 45% of the patients also a weak type II T cell response (interleukin-4 secretion) was evoked. Both MHC-class-I- and -II restricted rhCEA-specific T cells were noted. A specific cellular response (proliferation and/or cytokine secretion) against native hCEA could be found in 8/9 patients in the GM-CSF group, although at a significantly lower level than against rhCEA. In the non-GM-CSF group a weak rhCEA-specific T cell response was induced. Three patients had a proliferative response, 4 patients type I T cells and 6 patients type II T cells. No signs of autoimmune reactions were noted. Local pharmacological administration of GM-CSF seemed to be a prerequisite for the induction of a strong immunity against baculovirus-produced hCEA protein. However, the cellular response against native CEA was of a significantly lower magnitude.

  11. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  12. Developmental expression of autoimmune target antigens during organogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, T; Eishi, Y

    1991-01-01

    A common factor existing among autoimmune target antigens was sought in association with their developmental expression during organogenesis. Autoimmunity against a certain organ was experimentally induced in rats by deliberate immunization with whole tissue extract of the respective organ. Histopathological changes in a target organ of the immunized rats were recorded, and tissue specificity of the raised autoantibodies was immunohistologically examined with tissue sections of normal adult rats. These immune sera were also reacted with tissue sections of a target organ in each stage of organogenesis, and the time of first expression of the target antigen was determined for each immune serum. As a result, induced autoantibodies were directed only to a limited number of tissue antigens, such as thyroid follicular antigens [gestation day 17 (17 GD)], salivary ductal antigens (18 GD), anterior pituitary antigens (21 GD), gastric parietal cell antigens (22 GD), neural myelin antigens (2 days after birth), retinal photo-receptor cell antigens (3 days after birth) and testicular germ cell antigens (4 weeks after birth). They were first expressed on the day indicated in parentheses. Comparing with the development of the immune system, which was monitored by demonstrating CD4- and/or CD8-positive cells in the developing thymus and spleen, a common feature of these potential autoimmune target antigens was found to be that they were expressed either in parallel with, or after, but never before, the development of the immune system. This observation might suggest why only a limited number of self antigens can be autoimmune target antigens among the enormously large number of antigen determinants existing in the whole extract of each organ. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1769700

  13. Brain metastasis development and poor survival associated with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: a prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Central nervous system is a common site of metastasis in NSCLC and confers worse prognosis and quality of life. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of clinical-pathological factors (CPF), serum CEA levels, and EGFR and HER2 tissue-expression in brain metastasis (BM) and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced NSCLC. Methods In a prospective manner, we studied 293 patients with NSCLC in IIIB-IV clinical stage. They received standard chemotherapy. CEA was measured prior to treatment; EGFR and HER2 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. BM development was confirmed by MRI in symptomatic patients. Results BM developed in 27, and 32% of patients at 1 and 2 years of diagnosis with adenocarcinoma (RR 5.2; 95% CI, 1.002–29; p = 0.05) and CEA ≥ 40 ng/mL (RR 11.4; 95% CI, 1.7–74; p < 0.01) as independent associated factors. EGFR and HER2 were not statistically significant. Masculine gender (RR 1.4; 95% CI, 1.002–1.9; p = 0.048), poor performance status (RR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5–2.3; p = 0.002), advanced clinical stage (RR 1.44; 95% CI, 1.02–2; p = 0.04), CEA ≥ 40 ng/mL (RR 1.5; 95% CI, 1.09–2.2; p = 0.014) and EGFR expression (RR 1.6; 95% CI, 1.4–1.9; p = 0.012) were independent associated factors to worse OS. Conclusion High CEA serum level is a risk factor for BM development and is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced NSCLC. Surface expression of CEA in tumor cells could be the physiopathological mechanism for invasion to CNS. PMID:19386089

  14. Vaccination with a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a tumor antigen breaks immune tolerance and elicits therapeutic antitumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Chakraborty, Mala; Hance, Kenneth W.; Bernstein, Michael B.; Boehm, Amanda L.; Guo, Zhimin; Quick, Deborah; Franzusoff, Alex; Greiner, John W.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a nonpathogenic yeast, has previously been used as a vehicle to elicit immune responses to foreign antigens, and tumor-associated antigens, and has been shown to reduce tumorburden in mice. Studies were designed to determine if vaccination of human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-transgenic mice (where CEA is a self-antigen) with a recombinant S. cerevisiae construct expressing human CEA (yeast-CEA) elicits CEA-specific T-cell responses and antitumor activity. Experimental Design CEA-transgenic mice were vaccinated with yeast-CEA, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were assessed after one and multiple administrations or vaccinations at multiple sites per administration. Antitumor activity was determined by tumor growth and overall survival in both pulmonary metastasis and subcutaneous pancreatic tumor models. Results These studies demonstrate that recombinant yeast can break tolerance and that a) yeast-CEA constructs elicit both CEA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses; b) repeated yeast-CEA administration causes increased antigen-specific T-cell responses after each vaccination; c) vaccination with yeast-CEA at multiple sites induces a greater T-cell response than the same dose given at a single site; d) tumor-bearing mice vaccinated with yeast-CEA show a reduction in tumor burden and increased overall survival compared to mock-treated or control yeast-vaccinated mice in both pulmonary metastasis and subcutaneous pancreatic tumor models. Conclusions Vaccination with a heat-killed recombinant yeast expressing the tumor-associated antigen CEA induces CEA-specific immune responses, reduces tumor burden, and extends overall survival in CEA-transgenic mice. These studies thus form the rationale for the incorporation of recombinant yeast-CEA and other recombinant yeast constructs in cancer immunotherapy protocols. PMID:18594015

  15. Application of negative ion MS/MS to the identification of N-glycans released from carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1).

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Baruah, Kavitha; Scanlan, Christopher N

    2009-01-01

    Structures of N-glycans released from rat CEACAM1 expressed in human embryonic kidney cells were determined by MALDI and negative ion nanospray MS/MS techniques. The major carbohydrates were bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary complex glycans with and without sialic acid, fucose and bisecting GlcNAc residues. High-mannose glycans, predominantly Man(5)GlcNAc(2), were also found. The negative ion fragmentation technique easily identified the branching pattern of the triantennary glycans (mainly branched on the 6-antenna) and the presence of 'bisecting' GlcNAc residues (attached to the 4-position of the core mannose), features that are difficult to determine by traditional techniques. Sialic acids were in both alpha2-3 and alpha2-6 linkage as determined by MALDI-TOF MS following linkage-specific derivatization. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A randomized pilot phase I study of modified carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) peptide (CAP1-6D)/montanide/GM-CSF-vaccine in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CEA is expressed in >90% of pancreatic cancers (PC) and may be an appropriate immunotherapy target. CEA is poorly immunogenic due to immune tolerance; CAP1-6D, an altered peptide ligand can help bypass tolerance. We conducted a pilot randomized phase I trial in PC patients to determine the peptide dose required to induce an optimal CD8+ T cell response. Methods Patients with a PS 0-1, HLA-A2+ and CEA-expressing, previously-treated PC were randomized to receive 10 μg (arm A), 100 μg (arm B) or 1000 μg (arm C) of CEA peptide emulsified in Montanide and GM-CSF, given every 2 weeks until disease progression. Results Sixty-six patients were screened and 19 enrolled of whom 14 received at least 3 doses of the vaccine and thus evaluated for the primary immunologic endpoint. A median of 4 cycles (range 1-81) was delivered. Median and mean peak IFN-γ T cell response by ELISPOT (spots per 104 CD8+ cells, Arm A/B/C) was 11/52/271 (A vs. C, p = 0.028) for medians and 37/148/248 (A vs. C, p = 0.032) for means. T cell responses developed or increased in 20%/60%/100% of pts in Arms A/B/C. Seven of the 19 patients remain alive at a minimum 32 months from trial initiation, including three with unresectable disease. Conclusions The T cell response in this randomized phase I trial was dose-dependent with the 1 mg CEA peptide dose eliciting the most robust T cell responses. A signal of clinical benefit was observed and no significant toxicity was noted. Further evaluation of 1 mg CEA peptide with stronger adjuvants, and/or combined with agents to overcome immune inhibitory pathways, may be warranted in PC pts. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00203892 PMID:24829746

  17. The clinical efficacy of first-generation carcinoembryonic antigen (CEACAM5)-specific CAR T cells is limited by poor persistence and transient pre-conditioning-dependent respiratory toxicity.

    PubMed

    Thistlethwaite, Fiona C; Gilham, David E; Guest, Ryan D; Rothwell, Dominic G; Pillai, Manon; Burt, Deborah J; Byatte, Andrea J; Kirillova, Natalia; Valle, Juan W; Sharma, Surinder K; Chester, Kerry A; Westwood, Nigel B; Halford, Sarah E R; Nabarro, Stephen; Wan, Susan; Austin, Eric; Hawkins, Robert E

    2017-06-28

    The primary aim of this clinical trial was to determine the feasibility of delivering first-generation CAR T cell therapy to patients with advanced, CEACAM5(+) malignancy. Secondary aims were to assess clinical efficacy, immune effector function and optimal dose of CAR T cells. Three cohorts of patients received increasing doses of CEACAM5(+)-specific CAR T cells after fludarabine pre-conditioning plus systemic IL2 support post T cell infusion. Patients in cohort 4 received increased intensity pre-conditioning (cyclophosphamide and fludarabine), systemic IL2 support and CAR T cells. No objective clinical responses were observed. CAR T cell engraftment in patients within cohort 4 was significantly higher. However, engraftment was short-lived with a rapid decline of systemic CAR T cells within 14 days. Patients in cohort 4 had transient, acute respiratory toxicity which, in combination with lack of prolonged CAR T cell persistence, resulted in the premature closure of the trial. Elevated levels of systemic IFNγ and IL-6 implied that the CEACAM5-specific T cells had undergone immune activation in vivo but only in patients receiving high-intensity pre-conditioning. Expression of CEACAM5 on lung epithelium may have resulted in this transient toxicity. Raised levels of serum cytokines including IL-6 in these patients implicate cytokine release as one of several potential factors exacerbating the observed respiratory toxicity. Whilst improved CAR designs and T cell production methods could improve the systemic persistence and activity, methods to control CAR T 'on-target, off-tissue' toxicity are required to enable a clinical impact of this approach in solid malignancies.

  18. Diagnostic utility of PET/CT with (18)F-DOPA and (18)F-FDG in persistent or recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma: the importance of calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen cutoff.

    PubMed

    Romero-Lluch, Ana Reyes; Cuenca-Cuenca, Juan Ignacio; Guerrero-Vázquez, Raquel; Martínez-Ortega, Antonio Jesús; Tirado-Hospital, Juan Luis; Borrego-Dorado, Isabel; Navarro-González, Elena

    2017-06-23

    This study sought to evaluate and compare the utility of 18-F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) and 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for identification of lesions in patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). In addition, we analyzed the correlation between the calcitonin (Ct), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels, each doubling time (DT), and PET positivity. We evaluated the reliability of the 150 pg/mL Ct cutoff set by the American Thyroid Association guidelines for further imaging (including (18)F-DOPA PET/CT). We prospectively recruited 18 patients with recurrent MTC, identified by elevation of Ct or CEA. Each patient underwent a (18)F-FDG PET/CT and a (18)F-DOPA PET/CT. Abnormal uptakes were detected with (18)F-DOPA (n=12) and (18)F-FDG (n=9), (sensitivity of 66.7% vs. 50%; p<0.01). Twenty-eight lesions were detected with (18)F-DOPA vs. 16 lesions with (18)F-FDG (1.56±1.5 vs. 0.89±1.18 lesions per patient; p=0.01). None of our patients showed additional lesions with (18)F-FDG in comparison to (18)F-DOPA. Patient-based detection rate increased significantly with Ct levels ≥150 pg/mL vs. Ct<150 pg/mL for both (18)F-DOPA (sensitivity 90.9% vs. 28.6%; p=0.013) and (18)F-FDG PET/CT (sensitivity 72.7% vs. 14.3%; p=0.025). Using a CEA cutoff of ≥5 ng/mL, detection rates of (18)F-DOPA and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were 81.1% and 72.7%, respectively. No correlation between Ct-DT or CEA-DT and PET positivity was found. Histological confirmation was obtained in eight patients. (18)F-DOPA PET/CT appears to be superior to (18)F-FDG PET/CT in detecting and locating lesions in patients with recurrent MTC. This technique tends to be especially useful in patients with negative results in other imaging modalities and Ct≥150 pg/mL or CEA≥5 ng/mL.

  19. Diagnostic utility of serum and pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratin 19 fragments in patients with effusion from nonsmall cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sushil Kumar; Bhat, Sanjay; Chandel, Vikas; Sharma, Mayank; Sharma, Pulkit; Gupta, Sakul; Sharma, Sashank; Bhat, Aijaz Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To assess the diagnostic value of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 (cytokeratin 19 fragments) in serum and pleural fluid in non small cell lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Settings and Design: Two subsets of patients were recruited with lymphocytic exudative effusion, one subset constituted diagnosed patients of NSCLC with malignant pleural effusion and the other subset of constituted with Tubercular pleural effusion. Materials and Methods: CYFRA 21-1 and CEA levels were measured using Electrochemilumiscence Immunoassay (ECLIA). The test principle used the Sandwich method. For both the tests, results are determined via a calibration curve which is instrument specifically generated by 2 - point calibration and a master curve provided via reagent barcode. Statistical Analysis Used: All data are expressed as means ± SD and percentage. All the parametric variables were analysed by student-t test where as non parametric variables were compared by Mann-Whitney U-test Statistical significance was accepted for P values < 0.05. Software used were SPSS 11.5, and MS excel 2007. In order to compare the performance of the tumor markers, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and compared with area under the curve (AUC). The threshold for each marker was selected based on the best diagnostic efficacy having achieved equilibrium between sensitivity and specificity. Results: In cases serum CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 34.1 ± 29.9 with a range of 1.6-128.3 where as in controls serum CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 1.9 ± 1.0 with a range of 0.5–4.7. In cases serum CEA levels had mean value of 24.9 ± 47.3 with a range of 1.0, 267.9 where as in controls serum CEA levels had mean value of 1.9 ± 1.4 with a range of 0.2-6.8. The difference in the means of serum CYFRA 21-l (P = 0.000) and CEA (P = 0.046) were statistically significant. In cases pleural fluid CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 160.1 ± 177.1 with a range of 5.4–517

  20. Immunochemical analysis of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, D D; Saint, R B; Rickard, M D; Mitchell, G F

    1986-12-01

    Previously we reported the isolation of several Escherichia coli clones expressing fragments of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens as beta-galactosidase fused proteins (Bowtell, Saint, Rickard & Mitchell, 1984). Here we describe the isolation of additional antigen-expressing clones from a larval cDNA library and the assignment of these clones to 7 antigen families. These were isolated with a polyspecific rabbit antiserum raised to the oncosphere. Since this serum was capable of reacting with a large number of antigens, it was important to develop techniques for rapidly determining the identity of the native T. taeniaeformis molecule corresponding to a cloned antigen gene. These included active immunization of rabbits with fused proteins and several techniques involving affinity purification on immobilized fused proteins. The reactivity of the antigen-positive clones with sera from humans infected with related parasites was also assessed. Finally, immunization of mice with several fused proteins failed to protect against subsequent infection, although antigens previously identified as candidate host-protective antigens (Bowtell, Mitchell, Anders, Lightowlers & Rickard, 1983) have yet to be identified in the expression library.

  1. Expression of Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Bacillus megaterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    protective antigen in Bacillus megaterium B.J. Berger, K.E. Schwandt and C.L. Radford Defence R&D Canada - Suffield Technical Memorandum DISTRIBUTION...antigen in Bacillus megaterium B. J. Berger, K. E. Schwandt, and C. L. Radford Defence R&D Canada - Suffield Defence R&D Canada - Suffield Technical...expressed using Bacillus megaterium and a xylose-inducible heterologous expression system. After only 3.5 hours growth post-induction in Luria

  2. Cancer testis antigen expression in testicular germ cell tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Peter K; Thielken, Andrea; Brandt, Simone; Barghorn, André; Lohe, Bernd; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger

    2014-06-01

    Cancer testis antigens are encoded by germ line-associated genes that are present in normal germ cells of testis and ovary but not in differentiated tissues. Their expression in various human cancer types has been interpreted as 're-expression' or as intratumoral progenitor cell signature. Cancer testis antigen expression patterns have not yet been studied in germ cell tumorigenesis with specific emphasis on intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified as a precursor lesion for testicular germ cell tumors. Immunohistochemistry was used to study MAGEA3, MAGEA4, MAGEC1, GAGE1 and CTAG1B expression in 325 primary testicular germ cell tumors, including 94 mixed germ cell tumors. Seminomatous and non-seminomatous components were separately arranged and evaluated on tissue microarrays. Spermatogonia in the normal testis were positive, whereas intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified was negative for all five CT antigens. Cancer testis antigen expression was only found in 3% (CTAG1B), 10% (GAGE1, MAGEA4), 33% (MAGEA3) and 40% (MAGEC1) of classic seminoma but not in non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumors. In contrast, all spermatocytic seminomas were positive for cancer testis antigens. These data are consistent with a different cell origin in spermatocytic seminoma compared with classic seminoma and support a progression model with loss of cancer testis antigens in early tumorigenesis of testicular germ cell tumors and later re-expression in a subset of seminomas.

  3. The diagnostic value of CA 27-29, CA 15-3, mucin-like carcinoma antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen and CA 19-9 in breast and gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Frenette, P S; Thirlwell, M P; Trudeau, M; Thomson, D M; Joseph, L; Shuster, J S

    1994-01-01

    In the past decade, considerable interest has arisen for defining the role of various tumor markers in the diagnosis of cancer. This cross-sectional study evaluates four breast cancer markers (CA 27-29, CA 15-3, MCA and CEA) and two gastrointestinal (GI) markers (CA 19-9 and CEA) in 213 patients. Receiver operating curves (ROC) revealed a sensitivity for the 90% specificity cutoff for breast cancers compared to breast benign diseases of 70% for CA 27-29, 67.5% for CA 15-3, 52.5% for MCA and 40% for CEA. When GI tumors were compared to benign GI disease, the sensitivity for 90% specificity was 40.3% for CEA and 32.3% for CA 19-9. Comparison of breast cancer and GI malignancies with other malignancies leads to a marked shift of the ROC curve to the right and loss of specificity. Late stage for all breast and GI tumor markers was found to be a predictor of high serum antigen level (p < 0.001). The presence of liver metastases in breast cancer was associated with abnormal levels of CA 27-29 (p = 0.028). Pancreas adenocarcinomas had a higher CA 19-9 antigen level (p < 0.001) than other GI malignancies. CA 27-29 appears to be at least as sensitive and specific as CA 15-3 in patients with breast cancer. None of the above markers retain their specificity when compared with a control group consisting of other malignancies.

  4. Antigenic evaluation of a recombinant baculovirus-expressed Sarcocystis neurona SAG1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G D; Lakritz, J; Saville, W J; Livingston, R S; Dubey, J P; Middleton, J R; Marsh, A E

    2004-10-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary parasite associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). This is a commonly diagnosed neurological disorder in the Americas that infects the central nervous system of horses. Current serologic assays utilize culture-derived parasites as antigen. This method requires large numbers of parasites to be grown in culture, which is labor intensive and time consuming. Also, a culture-derived whole-parasite preparation contains conserved antigens that could cross-react with antibodies against other Sarcocystis species and members of Sarcocystidae such as Neospora spp., Hammondia spp., and Toxoplasma gondii. Therefore, there is a need to develop an improved method for the detection of S. neurona-specific antibodies. The sera of infected horses react strongly to surface antigen 1 (SnSAG1), an approximately 29-kDa protein, in immunoblot analysis, suggesting that it is an immunodominant antigen. The SnSAG1 gene of S. neurona was cloned, and recombinant S. neurona SAG1 protein (rSnSAG1-Bac) was expressed with the use of a baculovirus system. By immunoblot analysis, the rSnSAG1-Bac antigen detected antibodies to S. neurona from naturally infected and experimentally inoculated equids, cats, rabbit, mice, and skunk. This is the first report of a baculovirus-expressed recombinant S. neurona antigen being used to detect anti-S. neurona antibodies in a variety of host species.

  5. A Novel Malaria Vaccine Candidate Antigen Expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Eleni-Muus, Janna; Aldag, Ingo; Samuel, Kay; Creasey, Alison M.; Hartmann, Marcus W. W.; Cavanagh, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective malaria vaccines is hampered by the problem of producing correctly folded Plasmodium proteins for use as vaccine components. We have investigated the use of a novel ciliate expression system, Tetrahymena thermophila, as a P. falciparum vaccine antigen platform. A synthetic vaccine antigen composed of N-terminal and C-terminal regions of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) was expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila. The recombinant antigen was secreted into the culture medium and purified by monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity chromatography. The vaccine was immunogenic in MF1 mice, eliciting high antibody titers against both N- and C-terminal components. Sera from immunized animals reacted strongly with P. falciparum parasites from three antigenically different strains by immunofluorescence assays, confirming that the antibodies produced are able to recognize parasite antigens in their native form. Epitope mapping of serum reactivity with a peptide library derived from all three MSP-1 Block 2 serotypes confirmed that the MSP-1 Block 2 hybrid component of the vaccine had effectively targeted all three serotypes of this polymorphic region of MSP-1. This study has successfully demonstrated the use of Tetrahymena thermophila as a recombinant protein expression platform for the production of malaria vaccine antigens. PMID:24489871

  6. Uterus human leucocyte antigen expression in the perspective of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Tristan; Filloux, Matthieu; Guillaudeau, Angelique; Essig, Marie; Bibes, Romain; Pacha, Adam Fodil; Piver, Pascal; Aubard, Yves; Marquet, Pierre; Drouet, Mireille

    2016-12-01

    To describe class I and II human leucocyte antigen (HLA) expression using different uterine tissues in the perspective of uterus transplantation. Human uterine tissues were obtained from 12 women who had undergone hysterectomy for the treatment of benign disease. HLA class I and HLA-antigen D related (DR) expression were assessed via immunochemistry. HLA class I expression in the uterus was compared with expression in other organs and tissues, including kidney and myocardium samples. HLA class I expression was strong in the endometrial glands and mild in the myometrium. Staining of endometrial glands was similar to glomerular staining in the kidney. The myometrium seems to express HLA class I similarly to hepatocytes and myocardial cells. HLA class I expression in the uterus did not differ in younger or post-menopausal women. HLA-DR was expressed in the endometrial glands, but not in the myometrium. A lack of HLA-DR expression seemed to be correlated with cell proliferation. HLA expression in the endometrium and myometrium is different. The endometrium should be the major target of alloreactive response. As for other transplanted organs, assessment of HLA unacceptable antigens and multiple immunosuppressive treatments is necessary in uterus transplantation. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Blood group ABO and Lewis antigens in bladder tumors: correlation between glycosyltransferase activity and antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Orntoft, T F; Wolf, H

    1988-01-01

    Pronounced changes in the expression of ABO and Lewis antigens have been observed in transitional cell carcinomas compared with normal urothelium. These changes are associated with changes in the activity of blood-group gene-encoded glycosyltransferases. This paper describes the correlation between blood-group antigen expression and the activity of glycosyltransferases in transitional cell carcinomas. Examined individuals were A1A2BO, Lewis, and secretor typed by the use of blood and saliva. The activity of alpha-2-, and alpha-4-L-fucosyltransferases as well as the alpha-3-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferase were determined as p-moles of labelled sugar incorporated by Lacto-N-biose I and 2'-fucosyllactose, respectively, per 100,000 carcinoma cells. In 3 non-secretors whose erythrocytes types as Le(a+b-), the alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase activity was similar to that in 3 secretors, and the Leb antigen could be demonstrated to be present by monoclonal antibodies, both by immunohistological and immunochemical means. In 11 tumors from A individuals, the A1-transferase was severely reduced in 9 individuals who showed a loss of A antigen expression, and present in 2 individuals with A antigen expression in cytoplasmic vesicles. In conclusion, we demonstrate a good correlation between individual glycosyltransferase activity and expression of blood group Leb and loss of expression of blood group A in transitional cell carcinomas. Immunostaining of neutral glycolipids separated by TLC showed the Leb-active glycolipids to be simple hexa-saccharides in both secretors and non-secretors.

  8. Minor Histocompatibility Antigens Are Expressed in Syncytiotrophoblast and Trophoblast Debris

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Olivia J.; Linscheid, Caitlin; Hodes, Herbert C.; Nauser, Traci L.; Gilliam, Melissa; Stone, Peter; Chamley, Larry W.; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2012-01-01

    The fetal semi-allograft can induce expansion and tolerance of antigen-specific maternal T and B cells through paternally inherited major histocompatibility complex and minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs). The effects of these antigens have important consequences on the maternal immune system both during and long after pregnancy. Herein, we investigate the possibility that the placental syncytiotrophoblast and deported trophoblastic debris serve as sources of fetal mHAgs. We mapped the expression of four mHAgs (human mHAg 1, pumilio domain-containing protein KIAA0020, B-cell lymphoma 2–related protein A1, and ribosomal protein S4, Y linked) in the placenta. Each of these proteins was expressed in several placental cell types, including the syncytiotrophoblast. These antigens and two additional Y chromosome–encoded antigens [DEAD box polypeptide 3, Y linked (DDX3Y), and lysine demethylase5D] were also identified by RT-PCR in the placenta, purified trophoblast cells, and cord blood cells. Finally, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the presence of mHAgs in the syncytiotrophoblast and trophoblast debris shed from first-trimester placenta. By this method, four antigens (DDX3Y; ribosomal protein S4, Y linked; solute carrier 1A5; and signal sequence receptor 1) were found in the syncytiotrophoblast, and one antigen (DDX3Y) was found in shed trophoblast debris. The finding of mHAgs in the placenta and in trophoblast debris provides the first direct evidence that fetal antigens are present in debris shed from the human placenta. The data, thus, suggest a mechanism by which the maternal immune system is exposed to fetal alloantigens, possibly explaining the relationship between parity and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:22079431

  9. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic banana plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G B Sunil; Ganapathi, T R; Revathi, C J; Srinivas, L; Bapat, V A

    2005-10-01

    Embryogenic cells of bananan cv. Rasthali (AAB) have been transformed with the 's' gene of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Four different expression cassettes (pHBS, pHER, pEFEHBS and pEFEHER) were utilized to optimize the expression of HBsAg in banana. The transgenic nature of the plants and expression of the antigen was confirmed by PCR, Southern hybridization and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The expression levels of the antigen in the plants grown under in vitro conditions as well as the green house hardened plants were estimated by ELISA for all the four constructs. Maximum expression level of 38 ng/g F.W. of leaves was noted in plants transformed with pEFEHBS grown under in vitro conditions, whereas pHER transformed plants grown in the green house showed the maximum expression level of 19.92 ng/g F.W. of leaves. Higher monoclonal antibody binding of 67.87% of the antigen was observed when it was expressed with a C-terminal ER retention signal. The buoyant density in CsCl of HBsAg derived from transgenic banana leaves was determined and found to be 1.146 g/ml. HBsAg obtained from transgenic banana plants is similar to human serum derived one in buoyant density properties. The transgenic plants were grown up to maturity in the green house and the expression of HBsAg in the fruits was confirmed by RT-PCR. These transgenic plants were multiplied under in vitro using floral apex cultures. Attempts were also made to enhance the expression of HBsAg in the leaves of transgenic banana plants by wounding and/or treatment with plant growth regulators. This is the first report on the expression of HBsAg in transgenic banana fruits.

  10. Kinetics of Antigen Expression and Epitope Presentation during Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Nathan P.; Smith, Stewart A.; Wong, Yik Chun; Tan, Chor Teck; Dudek, Nadine L.; Flesch, Inge E. A.; Lin, Leon C. W.; Tscharke, David C.; Purcell, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge about the dynamics of antigen presentation to T cells during viral infection is very poor despite being of fundamental importance to our understanding of anti-viral immunity. Here we use an advanced mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify the presentation of eight vaccinia virus peptide-MHC complexes (epitopes) on infected cells and the amounts of their source antigens at multiple times after infection. The results show a startling 1000-fold range in abundance as well as strikingly different kinetics across the epitopes monitored. The tight correlation between onset of protein expression and epitope display for most antigens provides the strongest support to date that antigen presentation is largely linked to translation and not later degradation of antigens. Finally, we show a complete disconnect between the epitope abundance and immunodominance hierarchy of these eight epitopes. This study highlights the complexity of viral antigen presentation by the host and demonstrates the weakness of simple models that assume total protein levels are directly linked to epitope presentation and immunogenicity. PMID:23382674

  11. Exosome targeting of tumor antigens expressed by cancer vaccines can improve antigen immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J; Nachtwey, James M; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Brinkmann, Kay; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2011-08-01

    MVA-BN-PRO (BN ImmunoTherapeutics) is a candidate immunotherapy product for the treatment of prostate cancer. It encodes 2 tumor-associated antigens, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and is derived from the highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus stock known as MVA-BN. Past work has shown that the immunogenicity of antigens can be improved by targeting their localization to exosomes, which are small, 50- to 100-nm diameter vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosome targeting is achieved by fusing the antigen to the C1C2 domain of the lactadherin protein. To test whether exosome targeting would improve the immunogenicity of PSA and PAP, 2 additional versions of MVA-BN-PRO were produced, targeting either PSA (MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2) or PAP (MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2) to exosomes, while leaving the second transgene untargeted. Treatment of mice with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 led to a striking increase in the immune response against PAP. Anti-PAP antibody titers developed more rapidly and reached levels that were 10- to 100-fold higher than those for mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. Furthermore, treatment with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 increased the frequency of PAP-specific T cells 5-fold compared with mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. These improvements translated into a greater frequency of tumor rejection in a PAP-expressing solid tumor model. Likewise, treatment with MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2 increased the antigenicity of PSA compared with treatment with MVA-BN-PRO and resulted in a trend of improved antitumor efficacy in a PSA-expressing tumor model. These experiments confirm that targeting antigen localization to exosomes is a viable approach for improving the therapeutic potential of MVA-BN-PRO in humans.

  12. Expression of antigen tf and galectin-3 in fibroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Itandehui Belem; Pérez-Campos, Eduardo; Martinez, Margarito; Mayoral, Miguel Ángel; Pérez, Laura; Aguilar, Sergio; Zenteno, Edgar; Pina, Maria del Socorro; Hernández, Pedro

    2012-12-24

    Fibroadenomas are benign human breast tumors, characterized by proliferation of epithelial and stromal components of the terminal ductal unit. They may grow, regress or remain unchanged, as the hormonal environment of the patient changes. Expression of antigen TF in mucin or mucin-type glycoproteins and of galectin-3 seems to contribute to proliferation and transformations events; their expression has been reported in ductal breast cancer and in aggressive tumors. Lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence were used to examine the expression and distribution of antigen TF and galectin-3. We used lectins from Arachis hypogaea, Artocarpus integrifolia, and Amaranthus lecuocarpus to evaluate TF expression and a monoclonal antibody to evaluate galectin-3 expression. We used paraffin-embedded blocks from 10 breast tissues diagnosed with fibroadenoma and as control 10 healthy tissue samples. Histochemical and immunofluorescence analysis showed positive expression of galectin-3 in fibroadenoma tissue, mainly in stroma, weak interaction in ducts was observed; whereas, in healthy tissue samples the staining was also weak in ducts. Lectins from A. leucocarpus and A. integrifolia specificaly recognized ducts in healthy breast samples, whereas the lectin from A. hypogaea recognized ducts and stroma. In fibroadenoma tissue, the lectins from A. integrifolia, A. Hypogaea, and A. leucocarpus recognized mainly ducts. Our results suggest that expression of antigen TF and galectin-3 seems to participate in fibroadenoma development.

  13. Expression of antigen tf and galectin-3 in fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibroadenomas are benign human breast tumors, characterized by proliferation of epithelial and stromal components of the terminal ductal unit. They may grow, regress or remain unchanged, as the hormonal environment of the patient changes. Expression of antigen TF in mucin or mucin-type glycoproteins and of galectin-3 seems to contribute to proliferation and transformations events; their expression has been reported in ductal breast cancer and in aggressive tumors. Findings Lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence were used to examine the expression and distribution of antigen TF and galectin-3. We used lectins from Arachis hypogaea, Artocarpus integrifolia, and Amaranthus lecuocarpus to evaluate TF expression and a monoclonal antibody to evaluate galectin-3 expression. We used paraffin-embedded blocks from 10 breast tissues diagnosed with fibroadenoma and as control 10 healthy tissue samples. Histochemical and immunofluorescence analysis showed positive expression of galectin-3 in fibroadenoma tissue, mainly in stroma, weak interaction in ducts was observed; whereas, in healthy tissue samples the staining was also weak in ducts. Lectins from A. leucocarpus and A. integrifolia specificaly recognized ducts in healthy breast samples, whereas the lectin from A. hypogaea recognized ducts and stroma. In fibroadenoma tissue, the lectins from A. integrifolia, A. Hypogaea, and A. leucocarpus recognized mainly ducts. Conclusions Our results suggest that expression of antigen TF and galectin-3 seems to participate in fibroadenoma development. PMID:23265237

  14. Cancer-testis antigen expression is shared between epithelial ovarian cancer tumors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Soto, Arlene E; Schreiber, Taylor; Strbo, Natasa; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Miao, Feng; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Simpkins, Fiona; Nieves-Neira, Wilberto; Lucci, Joseph; Podack, Eckhard R

    2017-06-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens have been proposed as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Our objective was to evaluate the expression of a panel of CT antigens in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tumor specimens, and to determine if antigen sharing occurs between tumors. RNA was isolated from EOC tumor specimens, EOC cell lines and benign ovarian tissue specimens. Real time-PCR analysis was performed to determine the expression level of 20 CT antigens. A total of 62 EOC specimens, 8 ovarian cancer cell lines and 3 benign ovarian tissues were evaluated for CT antigen expression. The majority of the specimens were: high grade (62%), serous (68%) and advanced stage (74%). 58 (95%) of the EOC tumors analyzed expressed at least one of the CT antigens evaluated. The mean number of CT antigen expressed was 4.5 (0-17). The most frequently expressed CT antigen was MAGE A4 (65%). Antigen sharing analysis showed the following: 9 tumors shared only one antigen with 62% of the evaluated specimens, while 37 tumors shared 4 or more antigens with 82%. 5 tumors expressed over 10 CT antigens, which were shared with 90% of the tumor panel. CT antigens are expressed in 95% of EOC tumor specimens. However, not a single antigen was universally expressed across all samples. The degree of antigen sharing between tumors increased with the total number of antigens expressed. These data suggest a multi-epitope approach for development of immunotherapy for ovarian cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi expresses diverse repetitive protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hoft, D F; Kim, K S; Otsu, K; Moser, D R; Yost, W J; Blumin, J H; Donelson, J E; Kirchhoff, L V

    1989-01-01

    We screened a Trypanosoma cruzi cDNA expression library with human and rabbit anti-T. cruzi sera and identified cDNA clones that encode polypeptides containing tandemly arranged repeats which are 6 to 34 amino acids in length. The peptide repeats encoded by these cDNAs varied markedly in sequence, copy number, and location relative to the polyadenylation site of the mRNAs from which they were derived. The repeats were specific for T. cruzi, but in each case the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs and the total number of repeat copies encoded varied considerably among different isolates of the parasite. Expression of the peptide repeats was not stage specific. One of the peptide repeats occurred in a protein with an Mr of greater than 200,000 and one was in a protein of Mr 75,000 to 105,000. The frequent occurrence and diversity of these peptide repeats suggested that they may play a role in the ability of the parasite to evade immune destruction in its invertebrate and mammalian hosts, but the primary roles of these macromolecules may be unrelated to the host-parasite relationship. Images PMID:2659529

  17. Allogeneic H-2 antigen expression is insufficient for tumor rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G A; Cole, G A; Clements, V K; Garcia, E P; Ostrand-Rosenberg, S

    1987-01-01

    Murine A strain (KkDdLd) sarcoma I (SaI) tumor cells have been transfected with a cloned H-2Kb gene. The resulting clones (SKB clones) stably express high levels of a molecule that is serologically and biochemically indistinguishable from the H-2Kb antigen. SKB clones are not susceptible to cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated lysis by H-2Kb-specific bulk, cloned, or H-2Kb-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-specific effectors. Survival times of A/J and B10.A mice challenged i.p. with the H-2Kb-expressing transfectants and the parental SaI cells are similar, suggesting that the presence of an allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class I antigen on the surface of this tumor line is insufficient for tumor rejection. Images PMID:3500477

  18. Thrombin Increases Expression of Fibronectin Antigen on the Platelet Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Mark H.; Painter, Richard G.; Forsyth, Jane; Birdwell, Charles; Plow, Edward F.

    1980-02-01

    Fibronectins (fn) are adhesive glycoproteins which bind to collagen and to fibrin and appear to be important in cellular adhesion to other cells or surfaces. Fn-related antigen is present in human platelets, suggesting a possible role for fn in the adhesive properties of platelets. We have studied the localization of fn in resting and thrombin-stimulated platelets by immunofluorescence and quantitative binding of radiolabeled antibody. In resting fixed platelets, variable light surface staining for fn was observed. When these cells were made permeable to antibody with detergent, staining for fn was markedly enhanced and was present in a punctate distribution, suggesting intracellular localization. Stimulation with thrombin, which is associated with increased platelet adhesiveness, resulted in increased staining for fn antigen on intact platelets. These stimulated cells did not leak 51Cr nor did they stain for F-actin, thus documenting that the increased fn staining was not due to loss of plasma membrane integrity. The thrombin-induced increase in accessible platelet fn antigen was confirmed by quantitative antibody binding studies in which thrombin-stimulated platelets specifically bound 15 times as much radiolabeled F(ab')2 anti-fn as did resting cells. Thus, thrombin stimulation results in increased expression of fn antigen on the platelet surface. Here it may participate in interactions with fibrin, connective tissue, or other cells.

  19. Paired Expression Analysis of Tumor Cell Surface Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Orentas, Rimas J.; Sindiri, Sivasish; Duris, Christine; Wen, Xinyu; He, Jianbin; Wei, Jun S.; Jarzembowski, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antibody-based therapy or with T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is useful to the extent that the cell surface membrane protein being targeted is not expressed on normal tissues. The most successful CAR-based (anti-CD19) or antibody-based therapy (anti-CD20) in hematologic malignancies has the side effect of eliminating the normal B cell compartment. Targeting solid tumors may not provide a similar expendable marker. Beyond antibody to Her2/NEU and EGFR, very few antibody-based and no CAR-based therapies have seen broad clinical application for solid tumors. To expand the way in which the surfaceome of solid tumors can be analyzed, we created an algorithm that defines the pairwise relative overexpression of surface antigens. This enables the development of specific immunotherapies that require the expression of two discrete antigens on the surface of the tumor target. This dyad analysis was facilitated by employing the Hotelling’s T-squared test (Hotelling–Lawley multivariate analysis of variance) for two independent variables in comparison to a third constant entity (i.e., gene expression levels in normal tissues). We also present a unique consensus scoring mechanism for identifying transcripts that encode cell surface proteins. The unique application of our bioinformatics processing pipeline and statistical tools allowed us to compare the expression of two membrane protein targets as a pair, and to propose a new strategy based on implementing immunotherapies that require both antigens to be expressed on the tumor cell surface to trigger therapeutic effector mechanisms. Specifically, we found that, for MYCN amplified neuroblastoma, pairwise expression of ACVR2B or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with GFRA3, GFRA2, Cadherin 24, or with one another provided the strongest hits. For MYCN, non-amplified stage 4 neuroblastoma, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase 1, or ALK paired with GFRA2, GFRA3, SSK1, GPR173, or

  20. Heterologous expression of antigenic peptides in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Cédric M; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Aguilar, Claudio; Eichwald, Catherine

    2016-08-11

    Numerous strategies have been developed for the display of heterologous proteins in the surface of live bacterial carriers, which can be used as vaccines, immune-modulators, cancer therapy or bioremediation. Bacterial biofilms have emerged as an interesting approach for the expression of proteins of interest. Bacillus subtilis is a well-described, endospore-forming organism that is able to form biofilms and also used as a probiotic, thus making it a suitable candidate for the display of heterologous proteins within the biofilm. Here, we describe the use of TasA, an important structural component of the biofilms formed by B. subtilis, as a genetic tool for the display of heterologous proteins. We first engineered the fusion protein TasA-mCherry and showed that was widely deployed within the B. subtilis biofilms. A significant enhancement of the expression of TasA-mCherry within the biofilm was obtained when depleting both tasA and sinR genes. We subsequently engineered fusion proteins of TasA to antigenic peptides of the E. granulosus parasite, paramyosin and tropomyosin. Our results show that the antigens were well expressed within the biofilm as denoted by macrostructure complementation and by the detection of the fusion protein in both immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In addition, we show that the recombinant endospores of B. subtilis preserve their biophysical and morphological properties. In this work we provide strong evidence pointing that TasA is a suitable candidate for the display of heterologous peptides, such as antigens, cytokines, enzymes or antibodies, in the B. subtilis biofilms. Finally, our data portray that the recombinant endospores preserve their morphological and biophysical properties and could be an excellent tool to facilitate the transport and the administration.

  1. Cloning, expression, and antigenicity of 14 proteins from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maojun; Meng, Fanliang; Cao, Fangfang; Qiao, Bo; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Hongying; Zhou, Yizhuang; Dong, Haiyan; Gu, Yixin; Xiao, Di; Zhang, Yongchan; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2012-08-01

    Fourteen Campylobacter jejuni genes--porA, cadF, omp18, dnaK, flaC, peb1, peb2, peb3, peb4, ahpC, groEL, tuF, hipO, and Cj0069--were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The recombinant proteins were purified on histidine (His) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) trap columns using the ÄKTA Explorer 100 System. Recombinant proteins were visualized using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The antigenicities of these recombinant proteins were assessed by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with anti-C. jejuni immune rabbit sera. Four recombinant proteins, including rGST-PorA, rHis-CadF, rGST-GroEL, and rGST-TuF, demonstrated reactions with both anti-serum and preimmune serum, while rHis-DnaK, rGST-FlaC, rGST-PEB2, rGST-PEB3, rGST-PEB4, and rGST-HipO showed variable antigenicity characteristics to the anti-sera derived from different C. jejuni strains. rHis-Omp18, rHis-PEB1, and rGST-AhpC demonstrated universal and specific antigenities with the entire anti-sera panel tested in this present study, while recombinant rGST-Cj0069 and rHis-DnaK did not react with any of the anti-C. jejuni sera tested. In conclusion, rGST-AhpC may be useful as a potential serodiagnostic antigen for C. jejuni infection.

  2. Expression of T cell antigen receptor during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.P.; Lanier, L.L.; Guyden, J.; Richie, E.R.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have used flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies, radioimmuneprecipitation with a rabbit antiserum to common epitopes of the TCR, and Northern and Southern blot analysis with cloned TCR genes to study antigen receptor (TCR) expression by normal murine and human thymocytes and by primary murine thymomas. L3T4-,Lyt2- murine thymomas corresponding to the earliest stage of thymic differentiation, were found to have rearranged TCR beta genes, and to express low levels of beta transcript, but lacked alpha gene transcript and failed to express TCR on the cell surface. L3T4+,Lyt2+ thymomas were variable, but the majority were found to contain significant levels of both alpha and beta transcripts and to express TCR at the cell surface. Similarly, alpha and beta transcripts and TCR protein were detected in sorted L3T4+,Lyt2+ murine thymocytes. Using three color fluorescence, the authors determined that app. 70% of human T4+T8+ thymocytes also expressed T3, a component of the TCR complex. These data indicate that in mouse and man expression of TCR occurs in the immature, or cortical, thymic population.

  3. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, YA; Seregin, SS; Kousa, YA; Rastall, DPW; Appledorn, DM; Godbehere, S; Schutte, BC; Amalfitano, A

    2014-01-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general. PMID:23949283

  4. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  5. Greenhouse and field cultivations of antigen-expressing potatoes focusing on the variability in plant constituents and antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Mikschofsky, Heike; Heilmann, Elena; Schmidtke, Jörg; Schmidt, Kerstin; Meyer, Udo; Leinweber, Peter; Broer, Inge

    2011-05-01

    The production of plant-derived pharmaceuticals essentially requires stable concentrations of plant constituents, especially recombinant proteins; nonetheless, soil and seasonal variations might drastically interfere with this stability. In addition, variability might depend on the plant organ used for production. Therefore, we investigated the variability in plant constituents and antigen expression in potato plants under greenhouse and field growth conditions and in leaves compared to tubers. Using potatoes expressing VP60, the only structural capsid protein of the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), CTB, the non-toxic B subunit (CTB) of the cholera toxin (CTA-CTB(5)) and the marker protein NPTII (neomycinphosphotransferase) as a model, we compare greenhouse and field production of potato-derived antigens. The influence of the production organ turned out to be transgene specific. In general, yield, plant quality and transgene expression levels in the field were higher than or similar to those observed in the greenhouse. The variation (CV) of major plant constituents and the amount of transgene-encoded protein was not influenced by the higher variation of soil properties observed in the field. Amazingly, for specific events, the variability in the model protein concentrations was often lower under field than under greenhouse conditions. The changes in gene expression under environmental stress conditions in the field observed in another event do not reduce the positive influence on variability since events like these should excluded from production. Hence, it can be concluded that for specific applications, field production of transgenic plants producing pharmaceuticals is superior to greenhouse production, even concerning the stability of transgene expression over different years. On the basis of our results, we expect equal or even higher expression levels with lower variability of recombinant pharmaceuticals in the field compared to greenhouse production

  6. Vaginal myofibroblastoma with glands expressing mammary and prostatic antigens.

    PubMed

    Wallenfels, I; Chlumská, A

    2012-01-01

    A case of unusual vaginal myofibroblastoma containing glands which expressed mammary and prostatic markers is described. The tumor occurred in 70-year-old woman in the proximal third of the vagina. It showed morphology and immunophenotype typical of so-called cervicovaginal myofibroblastoma. The peripheral zone of the lesion contained a few groups of glands suggesting vaginal adenosis or prostatic-type glands on initial examination. The glands showed a surprising simultaneous expression of mammary markers mammaglobin and GCDFP-15 and prostatic markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). Immunostains for alpha-smooth muscle actin, p63 and CD10 highlighted the myoepithelial cell layer of the glands. The finding indicates that simultaneous use of both mammary and prostatic markers for examination of unusual glandular lesions in the vulvovaginal location can be helpful for an exact diagnosis, and can contribute to better understanding of prostatic and mammary differentiations in the female lower genital tract.

  7. Definition and application of good manufacturing process-compliant production of CEA-specific chimeric antigen receptor expressing T-cells for phase I/II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Guest, Ryan D; Kirillova, Natalia; Mowbray, Sam; Gornall, Hannah; Rothwell, Dominic G; Cheadle, Eleanor J; Austin, Eric; Smith, Keith; Watt, Suzanne M; Kühlcke, Klaus; Westwood, Nigel; Thistlethwaite, Fiona; Hawkins, Robert E; Gilham, David E

    2014-02-01

    Adoptive cell therapy employing gene-modified T-cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising preclinical activity in a range of model systems and is now being tested in the clinical setting. The manufacture of CAR T-cells requires compliance with national and European regulations for the production of medicinal products. We established such a compliant process to produce T-cells armed with a first-generation CAR specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). CAR T-cells were successfully generated for 14 patients with advanced CEA(+) malignancy. Of note, in the majority of patients, the defined procedure generated predominantly CD4(+) CAR T-cells with the general T-cell population bearing an effector-memory phenotype and high in vitro effector function. Thus, improving the process to generate less-differentiated T-cells would be more desirable in the future for effective adoptive gene-modified T-cell therapy. However, these results confirm that CAR T-cells can be generated in a manner compliant with regulations governing medicinal products in the European Union.

  8. Human leukocyte antigen-E alleles and expression in patients with serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lu, Renquan; Xie, Suhong; Wen, Xuemei; Wang, Hongling; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) is one of the most extensively studied non-classical MHC class I molecules that is almost non-polymorphic. Only two alleles (HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*0103) are found in worldwide populations, and suggested to be functional differences between these variants. The HLA-E molecule can contribute to the escape of cancer cells from host immune surveillance. However, it is still unknown whether HLA-E gene polymorphisms might play a role in cancer immune escape. To explore the association between HLA-E alleles and the susceptibility to serous ovarian cancer (SOC), 85 primary SOC patients and 100 healthy women were enrolled. Here, we indicated that high frequency of HLA-E*0103 allele existed in SOC patients by the allele-specific quantitative real-time PCR method. The levels of HLA-E protein expression in SOC patients with the HLA-E*0103 allele were higher than those with the HLA-E*0101 allele using immunohistochemistry analysis. The cell surface expression and functional differences between the two alleles were verified by K562 cells transfected with HLA-E*0101 or HLA-E*0103 allelic heavy chains. The HLA-E*0103 allele made the transfer of the HLA-E molecule to the cell surface easier, and HLA-E/peptides complex more stable. These differences ultimately influenced the function of natural killer cells, showing that the cells transfected with HLA-E*0103 allele inhibited natural killer cells to lysis. This study reveals a novel mechanism regarding the susceptibility to SOC, which is correlated with the HLA-E*0103 allele. PMID:25711417

  9. Strategies for optimal expression of vaccine antigens from Taeniid cestode parasites in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gauci, Charles; Jenkins, David; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2011-07-01

    Investigations were undertaken into optimizing the expression of Cestode parasite vaccine antigens in the bacterium, Escherichia coli to levels sufficient for mass production. A strategy to genetically engineer the antigens and improve their expression in E. coli was investigated. Plasmid constructs encoding truncated parasite antigens were prepared, leading to removal of N and C-terminal hydrophobic domains of the antigens. This approach was found to be an effective strategy for improving expression of the TSOL18 recombinant antigen of Taenia solium in E. coli. Clear demonstration that plasmid construct modification can be used to significantly improve heterologous expression in E. coli was shown for the EG95 antigen of Echinococcus granulosus. Removal of hydrophobic stretches of amino acids from the N and C termini of EG95 by genetic manipulation led to a substantial change in expression of the protein from an insoluble to a soluble form. The data demonstrate that the occurrence of hydrophobic regions in the antigens are a major feature that hindered their expression in E. coli. It was also shown that retaining a minimal protein domain (a single fibronectin type III domain) led to high level expression of functional protein that is antigenic and host protective. Two truncated antigens were combined from two species of parasite (EG95NC⁻ from E. granulosus and Tm18N⁻ from Taenia multiceps) and expressed as a single hybrid antigen in E. coli. The hybrid antigens were expressed at a high level and retained antigenicity of their respective components, thereby simplifying production of a multi-antigen vaccine. The findings are expected to have an impact on the preparation of recombinant Cestode vaccine antigens using E. coli, by increasing their utility and making them more amenable to large-scale production.

  10. Genetic regulation of variable Vi antigen expression in a strain of Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed Central

    Snellings, N J; Johnson, E M; Kopecko, D J; Collins, H H; Baron, L S

    1981-01-01

    Certain strains of the genus Citrobacter exhibit a variable expression of the Vi surface antigen that appears to involve a special mechanism for regulation of gene expression. Two nonlinked chromosomal loci, viaA and viaB, are known to determine nonvariable Vi antigen expression in strains of Salmonella. To confirm the presence of analogous loci in Citrobacter and to ascertain whether either of them is involved in variable Vi antigen expression in this organism, donor strains were constructed from Citrobacter freundii WR7004 and used to transfer their Vi antigen-determining genes to ViaA- and ViaB- Salmonella typhi recipient strains. Vi antigen expression in C. freundii was found to be controlled by loci analogous to the Salmonella via genes. S. typhi recipients of the C. freundii viaA+ genes were restored to the full, continuous expression of the Vi antigen normally seen in S. typhi. Thus, the C. freundii viaA genes appeared to play no role in the variable expression of the Vi antigen. In contrast, S. typhi recipients of the C. freundii viaB+ genes exhibited the rapid, reversible alternation between full Vi antigen expression and markedly reduced Vi antigen expression that was seen to occur in the C. freundii parent. The C. freundii viaB locus was thus identified as the one whose genes are regulated so as to produce variable Vi antigen expression. Genes determining another C. freundii surface antigen, the synthesis of which is not affected by the mechanism regulating Vi expression, were coinherited with the C. freundii viaB+ genes. An invertible, insertion sequence element located within the C. freundii viaB locus is proposed to account for the regulation of variable Vi antigen expression. Images PMID:6161917

  11. Mature IgM-expressing plasma cells sense antigen and develop competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Pascal; Moro-Sibilot, Ludovic; Barthly, Lucas; Jagot, Ferdinand; This, Sébastien; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Colisson, Renaud; Hobeika, Elias; Fest, Thierry; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Sicard, Antoine; Mondière, Paul; Genestier, Laurent; Nutt, Stephen L.; Defrance, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Dogma holds that plasma cells, as opposed to B cells, cannot bind antigen because they have switched from expression of membrane-bound immunoglobulins (Ig) that constitute the B-cell receptor (BCR) to production of the secreted form of immunoglobulins. Here we compare the phenotypical and functional attributes of plasma cells generated by the T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent forms of the hapten NP. We show that the nature of the secreted Ig isotype, rather than the chemical structure of the immunizing antigen, defines two functionally distinct populations of plasma cells. Fully mature IgM-expressing plasma cells resident in the bone marrow retain expression of a functional BCR, whereas their IgG+ counterparts do not. Antigen boost modifies the gene expression profile of IgM+ plasma cells and initiates a cytokine production program, characterized by upregulation of CCL5 and IL-10. Our results demonstrate that IgM-expressing plasma cells can sense antigen and acquire competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge. PMID:27924814

  12. Cell surface expression of hepatitis B surface and core antigens in transfected rat fibroblast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Siddiqui, A; Vierling, J M

    1990-04-01

    Hepatocellular necrosis during hepatitis B virus infection is hypothesized to result from host immune responses against either hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen expressed on the surface membrane of infected hepatocytes. To study the capacity of hepatitis B deoxyribonucleic acid to induce membrane expression of either hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B core antigen in vitro, we assessed transfected rat fibroblast cell lines by indirect immunofluorescence. Rat fibroblasts were transfected with plasmid vectors containing the natural promoters, native enhancer, and uninterrupted sequences of either the Pre S/S gene or core gene. Resulting cell lines produced hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen/hepatitis B e antigen, respectively. Immunofluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry showed that hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen were expressed in a granular pattern in the surface membrane of transfected cells. We conclude that surface membrane expression of both hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen is an intrinsic consequence of expression of either the Pre S/S or core gene.

  13. Regulation of cancer germline antigen gene expression: implications for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2010-05-01

    Cancer germline (CG; also known as cancer-testis) antigen genes are normally expressed in germ cells and trophoblast tissues and are aberrantly expressed in a variety of human malignancies. CG antigen genes have high clinical relevance as they encode a class of immunogenic and highly selective tumor antigens. CG antigen-directed immunotherapy is undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of a number of solid tumor malignancies and has been demonstrated to be safe, provoke immune responses and be of therapeutic benefit. Achieving an improved understanding of the mechanisms of CG antigen gene regulation will facilitate the continued development of targeted therapeutic approaches against tumors expressing these antigens. Substantial evidence suggests epigenetic mechanisms, particularly DNA methylation, as a primary regulator of CG antigen gene expression in normal and cancer cells as well as in stem cells. The roles of sequence-specific transcription factors and signal transduction pathways in controlling CG antigen gene expression are less clear but are emerging. A combinatorial therapeutic approach involving epigenetic modulatory drugs and CG antigen immunotherapy is suggested based on these data and is being actively pursued. In this article, we review the mechanisms of CG antigen gene regulation and discuss the implications of these mechanisms for the development of cancer immunotherapy approaches targeting CG antigens.

  14. Expression of basement membrane antigens in spindle cell melanoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, V G; Woodruff, J M

    1998-07-01

    Spindle cell melanoma (SCM) is an uncommon form of melanoma that may be confused histologically with other tumors, including malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Tumors with neural differentiation and melanocytic nevi may both show basement membrane immunohistochemically and at the ultrastructural level. However, most ultrastructural studies of melanoma have failed to demonstrate well formed basement membrane around tumor cells. The presence of basement membrane has been used by some authors as evidence favoring MPNST, as opposed to SCM. To evaluate this distinction immunohistochemically, 22 primary and metastatic cutaneous melanomas having a spindle cell component (SCM) were studied using monoclonal antibodies against laminin and Type IV collagen. S100 protein and HMB45 antigen expression were also studied. All but one of the SCM were reactive for S100 protein in at least 25% of the cells. Thirteen of 20 tumors (65%) were focally reactive with HMB45. Laminin was expressed in 42% of the tumors (only membranous pattern in 3; cytoplasmic and membranous in 5). Seventeen tumors (77%) expressed type IV collagen (only membranous pattern in 7; cytoplasmic and membranous pattern in 10). Laminin and type IV collagen, known components of basement membrane, are often found in SCM. Therefore, their detection cannot be used to distinguish SCM from MPNST.

  15. Analysis of CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and adjacent tissue.

    PubMed

    Borges, Marcus Nascimento; Facina, Gil; Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrin Guerreiro; Waitzberg, Angela Flávia Logullo; Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cell maturation is considered essential for starting an immune response. The CD83 antigen is an important marker of dendritic cell maturation. The objectives here were to analyze CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and breast tissue adjacent to the lesion and to identify clinical factors that might influence this expression. This was a retrospective study at a public university hospital, in which 29 histopathological samples of breast fibroadenoma and adjacent breast tissue, from 28 women of reproductive age, were analyzed. The immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the cell expression of the antigen. The antigen expression in the cells was evaluated by means of random manual counting using an optical microscope. Positive expression of the CD83 antigen in the epithelial cells of the fibroadenoma (365.52; standard deviation ± 133.13) in relation to the adjacent breast tissue cells (189.59; standard deviation ± 140.75) was statistically larger (P < 0.001). Several clinical features were analyzed, but only parity was shown to influence CD83 antigen expression in the adjacent breast tissue, such that positive expression was more evident in nulliparous women (P = 0.042). The expression of the CD83 antigen in the fibroadenoma was positive and greater than in the adjacent breast tissue. Positive expression of the antigen in the adjacent breast tissue was influenced by parity, and was significantly more evident in nulliparous women.

  16. Surface expression of Helicobacter pylori HpaA adhesion antigen on Vibrio cholerae, enhanced by co-expressed enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial antigens.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Joshua; Lebens, Michael; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2017-02-17

    Helicobacter pylori infection can cause peptic ulceration and is associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. This study aimed to construct and characterize a non-virulent Vibrio cholerae O1 strain, which grows more rapidly than H. pylori, as vector for H. pylori antigens for possible use as a vaccine strain against H. pylori. This was done by recombinant expression of the H. pylori adhesion antigen HpaA alone or, as a proof of principle, together with different colonization factor (CF) antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) which may enhance immune responses against HpaA. A recombinant V. cholerae strain co-expressing HpaA and a fimbrial CF antigens CFA/I or CS5, but not the non-fimbrial CF protein CS6, was shown to express larger amounts of HpaA on the surface when compared with the same V. cholerae strain expressing HpaA alone. Mutations in the CFA/I operon showed that the chaperon, possibly together with the usher, was involved in enhancing the surface expression of HpaA. Oral immunization of mice with formaldehyde-inactivated recombinant V. cholerae expressing HpaA alone or together with CFA/I induced significantly higher serum antibody responses against HpaA than mice similarly immunized with inactivated HpaA-expressing H. pylori bacteria. Our results demonstrate that a non-virulent V. cholerae strain can be engineered to allow strong surface expression of HpaA, and that the expression can be further increased by co-expressing it with ETEC fimbrial antigens. Such recombinant V. cholerae strains expressing HpaA, and possibly also other H. pylori antigens, may have the potential as oral inactivated vaccine candidates against H. pylori.

  17. Human erythrocyte antigens. Regulation of expression of a novel erythrocyte surface antigen by the inhibitor Lutheran In(Lu) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Telen, M J; Eisenbarth, G S; Haynes, B F

    1983-01-01

    Our study describes a novel human erythrocyte protein antigen, the expression of which is regulated by the rare Lutheran inhibitor In(Lu) gene. We have produced a monoclonal antibody (A3D8) that bound strongly to erythrocytes from subjects with Lutheran phenotypes Lu(a+b+), Lu(a+b-), and Lu(a-b+) but bound negligibly to erythrocytes from subjects with the dominant form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype, reflecting inheritance of the In(Lu) gene. Importantly, erythrocytes from an individual with the recessive form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype (i.e., absence of the In(Lu) gene and absence of genes encoding for Lutheran antigens) showed reactivity with A3D8 antibody comparable to that seen with Lu(a+) or Lu(b+) erythrocytes. A3D8 antigen activity was also found on all leukocytes and in serum and plasma; this activity also appeared to be regulated by the In(Lu) gene in serum, plasma, and on a subset of leukocytes. Thus, we have identified a human erythrocyte protein whose expression is modified by the In(Lu) gene. This knowledge that such an antigen exists on erythrocytes and in normal plasma should allow further studies into the molecular genetics of the In(Lu) gene and into the functional and structural significance of the A3D8 antigen. PMID:6863545

  18. T cells expressing CD19/CD20 bi-specific chimeric antigen receptors prevent antigen escape by malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zah, Eugenia; Lin, Meng-Yin; Silva-Benedict, Anne; Jensen, Michael C.; Chen, Yvonne Y.

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown remarkable curative potential against advanced B-cell malignancies, but multiple trials have also reported patient relapses due to the emergence of CD19-negative leukemic cells. Here, we report the design and optimization of single-chain, bi-specific CARs that trigger robust cytotoxicity against target cells expressing either CD19 or CD20, two clinically validated targets for B-cell malignancies. We determined the structural parameters required for efficient dual-antigen recognition, and we demonstrate that optimized bi-specific CARs can control both wild-type B-cell lymphoma and CD19− mutants with equal efficiency in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first bi-specific CAR capable of preventing antigen escape by performing true OR-gate signal computation on a clinically relevant pair of tumor-associated antigens. The CD19-OR-CD20 CAR is fully compatible with existing T-cell manufacturing procedures and implementable by current clinical protocols. These results present an effective solution to the challenge of antigen escape in CD19 CAR T-cell therapy, and they highlight the utility of structure-based rational design in the development of receptors with higher-level complexity. PMID:27059623

  19. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of four CEA family antigens (CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2) in normal and cancerous gastric epithelial cells: up-regulation of BGP and CGM2 in carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, T; Kuroki, M; Takeo, H; Matsuo, Y; Ohshima, K; Yamashita, Y; Shirakusa, T; Matsuoka, Y

    1998-03-30

    Four human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family members, CEA (CD66e), non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA, CD66c), biliary glycoprotein (BGP, CD66a) and CEA gene-family member 2 (CGM2), are expressed in normal mucosal epithelia of the colon. Expression of BGP and CGM2 has recently been demonstrated to be down-regulated in colorectal adenocarcinomas. We have now investigated the expression of the 4 CEA family antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma and carcinoma cell lines in comparison with adjacent normal gastric mucosa. The transcripts of the CEA, NCA and BGP genes evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were detectable at various levels in all the gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines tested, while CGM2 mRNA was detectable in the cell lines of poorly differentiated but not of well-differentiated carcinomas. The levels of CEA mRNA in normal gastric mucosa were variable but mostly increased in adenocarcinomas. The sparse expression of NCA observed in the normal tissues was markedly up-regulated in the carcinomas. In contrast to previous findings on normal and cancerous colonic tissues, the transcripts of CGM2 were totally undetectable and those of BGP were recognized only marginally, if at all, in normal gastric mucosa, while both messages were detected at significant levels in most of the gastric adenocarcinomas. This was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Our findings indicate that expression of the CEA family antigens, particularly that of BGP and CGM2, is differently regulated in epithelial cells of the colon and the stomach.

  1. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of membrane antigen expression.

    PubMed

    D'hautcourt, Jean-Luc

    2002-11-01

    Immunological analysis for cell antigens has been performed by flow cytometry in a qualitative fashion for over thirty years. During that time it has become increasingly apparent that quantitative measurements such as number of antigens per cell provide unique and useful information. This unit on quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM) describes the most commonly used protocols, both direct and indirect, and the major methods of analysis for the number of antibody binding sites on a cell or particle. Practical applications include detection of antigen under- or overexpression in hematological malignancies, distinguishing between B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, and precise diagnosis of certain rare diseases.

  2. Immunogenic measles antigens expressed in plants: role as an edible vaccine for adults.

    PubMed

    Muller, Claude P; Marquet-Blouin, Estelle; Fack, Fred; Damien, Benjamin; Steinmetz, Andŕe; Bouche, Fabienne B

    2003-01-30

    Vaccine-induced immunity against measles is less robust than natural immunity. Waning of immunity in vaccines may eventually require a revaccination of adults. Measles antigens expressed in plants have been shown to be antigenic and immunogenic both after invasive and oral vaccination. Strategies for the vaccination of adults, the potential of an oral measles vaccine produced in edible plants and the design of suitable antigens are discussed.

  3. Oral Vaccination Against Anthrax Using a Transgenic Plant Expressing Protective Antigen.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Plant Expressing Protective Antigen DAMDI7-95-C-5102 6 . AUTHOR(S) Dr. Karen Oishi 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING...Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA), the Yersiniapestis V antigen modified to contain a His 6 epitope to facilitate affinity purification (His-Tag V...these reasons it has been very difficult to 6 develop more effective vaccines which will stimulate mucosal immunity. With the majority of vaccines

  4. Comparative immunological evaluation of recombinant Salmonella Typhimurium strains expressing model antigens as live oral vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the development of various systems to generate live recombinant Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, little work has been performed to systematically evaluate and compare their relative immunogenicity. Such information would provide invaluable guidance for the future rational design of live recombinant Salmonella oral vaccines. Result To compare vaccine strains encoded with different antigen delivery and expression strategies, a series of recombinant Salmonella Typhimurium strains were constructed that expressed either the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or a fragment of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein from the H5N1 influenza virus, as model antigens. The antigens were expressed from the chromosome, from high or low-copy plasmids, or encoded on a eukaryotic expression plasmid. Antigens were targeted for expression in either the cytoplasm or the outer membrane. Combinations of strategies were employed to evaluate the efficacy of combined delivery/expression approaches. After investigating in vitro and in vivo antigen expression, growth and infection abilities; the immunogenicity of the constructed recombinant Salmonella strains was evaluated in mice. Using the soluble model antigen EGFP, our results indicated that vaccine strains with high and stable antigen expression exhibited high B cell responses, whilst eukaryotic expression or colonization with good construct stability was critical for T cell responses. For the insoluble model antigen HA, an outer membrane expression strategy induced better B cell and T cell responses than a cytoplasmic strategy. Most notably, the combination of two different expression strategies did not increase the immune response elicited. Conclusion Through systematically evaluating and comparing the immunogenicity of the constructed recombinant Salmonella strains in mice, we identified their respective advantages and deleterious or synergistic effects. Different construction strategies were optimally

  5. HLA Class II Antigen Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Tumors as a Favorable Prognostic Marker12

    PubMed Central

    Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Arriga, Roberto; Coppola, Andrea; Caratelli, Sara; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Lauro, Davide; Lugli, Alessandro; Han, Junyi; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Ferrone, Cristina; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul; Rossi, Piero; Attanasio, Antonio; Ferrone, Soldano; Terracciano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumors, its association with the clinical course of the disease, and the underlying mechanism(s). Two tissue microarrays constructed with 220 and 778 CRC tumors were stained with HLA-DR, DQ, and DP antigen-specific monoclonal antibody LGII-612.14, using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The immunohistochemical staining results were correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The functional role of HLA class II antigens expressed on CRC cells was analyzed by investigating their in vitro interactions with immune cells. HLA class II antigens were expressed in about 25% of the 220 and 21% of the 778 tumors analyzed with an overall frequency of 23%. HLA class II antigens were detected in 19% of colorectal adenomas. Importantly, the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity were significantly lower than those detected in CRC tumors. However, HLA class II antigen staining was weakly detected only in 5.4% of 37 normal mucosa tissues. HLA class II antigen expression was associated with a favorable clinical course of the disease. In vitro stimulation with interferon gamma (IFNγ) induced HLA class II antigen expression on two of the four CRC cell lines tested. HLA class II antigen expression on CRC cells triggered interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by resting monocytes. HLA class II antigen expression in CRC tumors is a favorable prognostic marker. This association may reflect stimulation of IL-1β production by monocytes. PMID:24563618

  6. Production of recombinant botulism antigens: a review of expression systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, G M S G; Cunha, C E P; Salvarani, F M; Gonçalves, L A; Pires, P S; Conceição, F R; Lobato, F C F

    2014-08-01

    Botulism is a paralytic disease caused by intoxication with neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. Despite their similar mechanism of action, the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are classified in eight serotypes (A to H). As to veterinary medicine, the impact of this disease is essentially economic, since different species of production animals can be affected, especially by BoNT/C and D. In human health, botulism is feared in a possible biological warfare, what would involve mainly the BoNT/A, B, E and F. In both cases, the most effective way to deal with botulism is through prevention, which involves vaccination. However, the current vaccines against this disease have several drawbacks on their process of production and, besides this, can be dangerous to producers since it requires certain level of biosafety. This way, recombinant vaccines have been shown to be a great alternative for the development of vaccines against both animal and human botulism. All BoNTs have a 50-kDa light chain (LC) and a 100-kDa heavy chain (HC). The latter one presents two domains of 50 kDa, called the N-terminal (HN) and C-terminal (HC) halves. Among these regions, the HC alone seem to confer the proper immune response against intoxication. Since innumerous studies describe the expression of these distinct regions using different systems, strategies, and protocols, it is difficult to define the best option for a viable vaccine production. Thereby, the present review describes the problematic of botulism and discusses the main advances for the viable production of vaccines for both human and veterinary medicine using recombinant antigens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation.

  8. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-04-20

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  9. A Human Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Resulting from Differential Expression due to a Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Makoto; Warren, Edus H.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2003-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (minor H antigens) are targets of graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia responses after allogeneic human leukocyte antigen identical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Only a few human minor H antigens have been molecularly characterized and in all cases, amino acid differences between homologous donor and recipient proteins due to nucleotide polymorphisms in the respective genes were responsible for immunogenicity. Here, we have used cDNA expression cloning to identify a novel human minor H antigen encoded by UGT2B17, an autosomal gene in the multigene UDP-glycosyltransferase 2 family that is selectively expressed in liver, intestine, and antigen-presenting cells. In contrast to previously defined human minor H antigens, UGT2B17 is immunogenic because of differential expression of the protein in donor and recipient cells as a consequence of a homozygous gene deletion in the donor. Deletion of individual members of large gene families is a common form of genetic variation in the population and our results provide the first evidence that differential protein expression as a consequence of gene deletion is a mechanism for generating minor H antigens in humans. PMID:12743171

  10. Isolation and characterization of NIH 3T3 cells expressing polyomavirus small T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, T.; Satake, M.; Robins, T.; Ito, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The polyomavirus small T-antigen gene, together with the polyomavirus promoter, was inserted into retrovirus vector pGV16 which contains the Moloney sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and neomycin resistance gene driven by the simian virus 40 promoter. This expression vector, pGVST, was packaged into retrovirus particles by transfection of PSI2 cells which harbor packaging-defective murine retrovirus genome. NIH 3T3 cells were infected by this replication-defective retrovirus containing pGVST. Of the 15 G418-resistant cell clones, 8 express small T antigen at various levels as revealed by immunoprecipitation. A cellular protein with an apparent molecular weight of about 32,000 coprecipitates with small T antigen. Immunofluorescent staining shows that small T antigen is mainly present in the nuclei. Morphologically, cells expressing small T antigen are indistinguishable from parental NIH 3T3 cells and have a microfilament pattern similar to that in parental NIH 3T3 cells. Cells expressing small T antigen form a flat monolayer but continue to grow beyond the saturation density observed for parental NIH 3T3 cells and eventually come off the culture plate as a result of overconfluency. There is some correlation between the level of expression of small T antigen and the growth rate of the cells. Small T-antigen-expressing cells form small colonies in soft agar. However, the proportion of cells which form these small colonies is rather small. A clone of these cells tested did not form tumors in nude mice within 3 months after inoculation of 10/sup 6/ cells per animal. Thus, present studies establish that the small T antigen of polyomavirus is a second nucleus-localized transforming gene product of the virus (the first one being large T antigen) and by itself has a function which is to stimulate the growth of NIH 3T3 cells beyond their saturation density in monolayer culture.

  11. Expression of blood group antigens on red cell microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, R T; Dumaswala, U J; Greenwalt, T J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether epitopes of the A, B, D, Fya, M, N, S, s, and K blood group antigens are present on microvesicle membranes shed by red cells during storage. Vesicles were isolated from outdated units of blood having and lacking the specified antigens. Diluted antisera were absorbed with fixed quantities of vesicles from red cells with the test antigen and red cells lacking that antigen (controls). The adsorbed and unadsorbed antisera were titrated and scored by using panel cells from persons known to be heterozygous for all the non-AB antigens. The mean titration scores following adsorption with the vesicles from A, B, D, M+N-, M-N+, S+s-, S-s+, and Fy(a+b-) units were appreciably lower than the control scores (0, 0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 4, and 4 vs. 19, 23, 34, 13, 12, 16, 18, and 29, respectively), which indicated the presence of these epitopes on the membrane of shed vesicles. The results following adsorption with K:1,2 vesicles were equivocal.

  12. Expression and the antigenicity of recombinant coat proteins of tungro viruses expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yee, Siew Fung; Chu, Chia Huay; Poili, Evenni; Sum, Magdline Sia Henry

    2017-02-01

    Rice tungro disease (RTD) is a recurring disease affecting rice farming especially in the South and Southeast Asia. The disease is commonly diagnosed by visual observation of the symptoms on diseased plants in paddy fields and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, visual observation is unreliable and PCR can be costly. High-throughput as well as relatively cheap detection methods are important for RTD management for screening large number of samples. Due to this, detection by serological assays such as immunoblotting assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay are preferred. However, these serological assays are limited by lack of continuous supply of antibodies as reagents due to the difficulty in preparing sufficient purified virions as antigens. This study aimed to generate and evaluate the reactivity of the recombinant coat proteins of Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) and Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV) as alternative antigens to generate antibodies. The genes encoding the coat proteins of both viruses, RTBV (CP), and RTSV (CP1, CP2 and CP3) were cloned and expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. All of the recombinant fusion proteins, with the exception of the recombinant fusion protein of the CP2 of RTSV, were reactive against our in-house anti-tungro rabbit serum. In conclusion, our study showed the potential use of the recombinant fusion coat proteins of the tungro viruses as alternative antigens for production of antibodies for diagnostic purposes.

  13. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei.

  14. Differential expression of HLA class II antigens on human fetal and adult lymphocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J A; Jones, D B; Evans, P R; Smith, J L

    1985-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to monomorphic determinants of the MHC class II subregion locus products: DP, DR and DQ, was used to investigate the expression of these antigens on early lymphocytes and macrophages from human fetal liver (13-20 weeks), placenta (16 weeks and term) and cord blood, in relation to the class II phenotype of cells from adult tonsil and peripheral blood. Fetal liver sections and cell suspensions showed differential expression of class II antigens. DP was expressed at a higher frequency (11.0% of nucleated cells) than DR on lymphoid cells and macrophages from fetal liver, and DQ was either absent or expressed on less than 0.3% of nucleated cells. Consistent with this finding, DP but not DR or DQ antigens were observed on vascular elements and macrophages in the villi of 16-week placenta. At term, all three subregion locus products were expressed. Adult tonsil and peripheral blood B lymphocytes expressed DP, DR and DQ antigens with similar frequency; however, DQ was expressed at a lower frequency than DP and DR on cord blood B lymphocytes. In contrast, 30-50% macrophages from cord blood and adult peripheral blood expressed DP and DR, but fewer (5% and 18%, respectively) expressed DQ. These data suggest that class II antigens are expressed in the sequence DP, DR, DQ on developing lymphocytes. A similar sequence is suggested for macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3894221

  15. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in canine masticatory muscle myositis.

    PubMed

    Paciello, Orlando; Shelton, G Diane; Papparella, Serenella

    2007-04-01

    Studies in human immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies have documented expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I) and class II (MHC class II) antigens on muscle fiber membranes in the presence or absence of cellular infiltration. Here we evaluate the presence and distribution of these antigens in canine masticatory muscle myositis, an immune-mediated inflammatory myopathy. Twelve samples of temporalis and masseter muscles from dogs with a clinical diagnosis of canine masticatory muscle myositis were examined by immunohistochemistry and double-immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. MHC class I and class II antigens were expressed in muscle fibers independent of inflammatory cell infiltration. Furthermore MHC class I and class II antigens were expressed on the sarcolemma and co-localized with dystrophin. Our results suggest that MHC class I and class II expression in canine masticatory muscle myositis may play a role in the initiation and maintenance of the pathological condition, rather than just a consequence of a preceding local inflammation.

  16. Bcl-2 in combination to myeloid antigen expression in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and prognostic outcome.

    PubMed

    Amirghofran, Zahra; Daneshbod, Yahya; Gholijani, Naser

    2009-01-01

    The present study was performed to find the importance of two myeloid (CD13 and CD33) antigens aberrantly expressed on the blasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and Bcl-2 expression in relation to clinical and biological features and treatment outcome. Bone marrow or peripheral blood samples of 50 patients were assessed for the expression of markers by immunostaining methods. Twenty-one patients (42%) showed more than 20% positivity for Bcl-2. Aberrant expression of myeloid antigens was found in 14% of cases. The expression of Bcl-2 was associated with shorter survival (p = 0.009). A significant correlation between expression of myeloid antigens (MY) and survival and complete remission duration was found. The mean survival was 656 + 301 days for MY+ cases and 1009 +/- 230 days for MY- patients (p < 0.0001). Expression of Bcl-2 in combination to myeloid antigens was associated with a poorer outcome. Survival of MY+ patients expressing Bcl-2 was shorter than MY- Bcl-2+ and MY+ Bcl-2- ALL cases (p = 0.038). In conclusion, results of this study indicated the prognostic value of Bcl-2 and myeloid antigen expression in ALL patients. Presence of these markers together on the leukemic cells was associated with a poorer response to therapy and may implicate modified therapeutic strategies in the patients.

  17. Major histocompatibility complex class II antigen expression in B and T cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M E; Holgate, C S; Williamson, J M; Grigor, I; Quirke, P; Bird, C C

    1987-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study of 46 B and T cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, using monoclonal antibodies to the products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen subregions, DP, DQ, and DR, showed that most B and T cell lymphomas express these antigens. Both coordinate and non-coordinate expression of MHC class II antigens was observed, but this did not correlate with immunological phenotype, morphological grade, or proliferation index as determined by flow cytometry. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3546388

  18. Mutations that impair a posttranscriptional step in expression of HLA-A and -B antigens.

    PubMed Central

    DeMars, R; Rudersdorf, R; Chang, C; Petersen, J; Strandtmann, J; Korn, N; Sidwell, B; Orr, H T

    1985-01-01

    Mutations can interfere with posttranscriptional expression of the HLA-A and -B genes. B-lymphoblastoid cells that contain one copy of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were subjected to mutagenesis and immunoselection for MHC antigen-loss mutants. Some mutations partially reduced surface expression of HLA-A and eliminated HLA-B expression concurrently, although the HLA-A and -B genes were present and transcribed. Antigen expression was fully restored in hybrids of these mutants with other B-lymphoblastoid cells. Therefore, normal cell surface expression of the HLA-A and -B antigens on B lymphoblasts requires (i) execution of at least one trans-active step in the production of the antigens after transcription of the HLA-A and -B genes or (ii) association of the class I antigens with other molecules. DNA analysis of one mutant suggests the possibility that a locus required for the normal expression of the HLA-A and -B antigens is located between the MHC complement genes and the HLA-DP alpha II locus. Images PMID:3906658

  19. Dendritic Cell Targeting of Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen Expressed by Lactobacillus acidophilus Protects Mice from Lethal Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-28

    Dendritic cell targeting of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen expressed by Lactobacillus acidophilus protects mice from lethal challenge M...lethal chal- lenge. A vaccine strategy was established by using Lactobacillus acidophilus to deliver Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) via...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cell targeting of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen expressed by Lactobacillus acidophilus protects mice

  20. Bioreactor aeration conditions modulate growth and antigen expression during Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae cultivation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adilson José; de Baptista-Neto, Alvaro; do Carmo Cilento, Maria; de Campos Giordano, Roberto; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina

    2008-05-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the causative agent of swine erysipelas, was cultivated in a 5-L stirred and aerated bioreactor under different dissolved oxygen tensions (0%, 5%, and 30% of saturation) for evaluation of the influence of oxygen on cell growth as well as on the production of the main antigenic component of the vaccine against erysipelas, a 64-69 kDa protein (SpaA). The microorganism presented different growth profiles for different aeration conditions. However, at the end of the batch cultivations, similar cell concentrations were obtained under the studied conditions. In order to maximize biomass titers and antigen production, the microorganism was cultivated in fed-batch operation mode under aerobic conditions. Under this condition, there was a fivefold increase in biomass production in comparison to the results attained in batch cultivations. To follow up antigen expression, samples collected during batch cultivations were concentrated and treated with choline for antigen extraction. Antigen expression was then assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by murine immunization tests. It was observed a direct influence of oxygen availability upon antigen expression, which is favored in the presence of oxygen. Analysis of the samples collected throughout the fed-batch process also revealed that antigen production is growth associated.

  1. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  2. Novel methods for expression of foreign antigens in live vector vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Harley, Regina H.; Galen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial live vector vaccines represent a vaccine development strategy that offers exceptional flexibility. In this approach, genes encoding protective antigens of unrelated bacterial, viral or parasitic pathogens are expressed in an attenuated bacterial vaccine strain that delivers these foreign antigens to the immune system, thereby eliciting relevant immune responses. Rather than expressing these antigens using low copy expression plasmids, here we pursue expression of foreign proteins from the live vector chromosome. Our strategy is designed to compensate for the inherent disadvantage of loss of gene dosage (vs. plasmid-based expression) by integrating antigen-encoding gene cassettes into multiple chromosomal sites already inactivated in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine candidate. We tested expression of a cassette encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) integrated separately into native guaBA, htrA or clyA chromosomal loci. Using single integrations, we show that expression levels of GFPuv are significantly affected by the site of integration, regardless of the inclusion of additional strong promoters within the incoming cassette. Using cassettes integrated into both guaBA and htrA, we observe cumulative synthesis levels from two integration sites superior to single integrations. Most importantly, we observe that GFPuv expression increases in a growth phase-dependent manner, suggesting that foreign antigen synthesis may be “tuned” to the physiology of the live vaccine. We expect this novel platform expression technology to prove invaluable in the development of a wide variety of multivalent live vector vaccines, capable of expressing multiple antigens from both chromosomal and plasmid-based expression systems within a single strain. PMID:23406777

  3. Enhanced antigen-presenting capacity of cultured Langerhans' cells is associated with markedly increased expression of Ia antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, S.; Caughman, S.W.; Sharrow, S.O.; Stephany, D.; Katz, S.I.

    1987-10-15

    Recent studies indicate that when epidermal Langerhans' cells (LC) are cultured for 2 to 3 days they, in comparison to freshly prepared LC, exhibit markedly enhanced ability to stimulate T cell proliferative responses in oxidative mitogenesis and in the mixed epidermal-leukocyte reaction. In this study, we determined whether cultured LC enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, and whether such enhanced stimulatory capacity correlates with the level of Ia antigen expressed on LC. We used C3H/He (Iak) epidermal cells as stimulators and, as responder cells, both the trinitrophenyl-specific clones D8 and SE4, which were assayed for (/sup 3/H)dThd incorporation, and the pigeon cytochrome c specific hybridoma 2C2, which was assayed for interleukin 2 production. Cultured LC induced 10 to 100 times greater proliferation or interleukin 2 production by responder cells than did freshly prepared LC. The intensity of I-Ak and I-Ek, expressed on cultured LC as assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, was found to be 10 to 36 times greater on a per cell basis than that on freshly prepared LC. Depletion of LC from fresh epidermal cell suspensions by anti-Iak and complement or treatment with 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ medium range ultraviolet light or cycloheximide before culture abrogated both the increase in Ia expression and antigen-specific clonal proliferation. The results suggest that when LC are removed from their usual epidermal milieu, they express increased amounts of Ia and become more potent stimulators of T cell responses.

  4. Update on baculovirus as an expression and/or delivery vehicle for vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yeh; Chung, Yao-Chi; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2014-12-01

    After three decades of development, the baculovirus/insect cell expression system is now recognized as a powerful platform for recombinant protein production. With a number of distinct advantages, the baculovirus/insect cell expression system has been extensively used for the production of various vaccine candidates, and several human and veterinary vaccine products have been commercially available. In addition to insect cells, baculovirus is capable of entering a broad range of mammalian cells, lending itself to a promising gene delivery vehicle for antigen expression and display in vivo. The use of baculovirus for antigen expression and delivery has been reviewed in 2008. Rather than a critical evaluation, this paper aims to provide an update of the applications of baculovirus as an in vitro or in vivo antigen expression/delivery vehicle, with special focuses on developments and advances after 2008.

  5. Interleukin 12 inhibits antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and Th2 cytokine expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia, and may be mediated by T helper (Th) lymphocytes expressing a Th2 cytokine pattern. Interleukin (IL) 12 suppresses the expression of Th2 cytokines and their associated responses, including eosinophilia, serum immunoglobulin E, and mucosal mastocytosis. We have previously shown in a murine model that antigen- induced increases in airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia are CD4+ T cell dependent. We used this model to determine the ability of IL-12 to prevent antigen-induced increases in airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophils, and lung Th2 cytokine expression. Sensitized A/J mice developed airway hyperresponsiveness and increased numbers of BAL eosinophils and other inflammatory cells after single or repeated intratracheal challenges with sheep red blood cell antigen. Pulmonary mRNA and protein levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 were increased after antigen challenge. Administration of IL-12 (1 microgram/d x 5 d) at the time of a single antigen challenge abolished the airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary eosinophilia and promoted an increase in interferon (IFN) gamma and decreases in IL-4 and IL-5 expression. The effects of IL-12 were partially dependent on IFN-gamma, because concurrent treatment with IL-12 and anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody partially reversed the inhibition of airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilia by IL-12. Treatment of mice with IL-12 at the time of a second antigen challenge also prevented airway hyperresponsiveness and significantly reduced numbers of BAL inflammatory cells, reflecting the ability of IL-12 to inhibit responses associated with ongoing antigen-induced pulmonary inflammation. These data show that antigen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation can be blocked by IL-12, which suppresses Th2 cytokine expression. Local administration of IL-12 may provide a novel

  6. C-myc oncogene expression in human melanoma and its relationship with tumour antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Grover, R; Ross, D A; Richman, P I; Robinson, B; Wilson, G D

    1996-08-01

    Melanoma produces specific tumour antigens which are capable of eliciting an immune response. However, this tumour evades the immune system, in part, by downregulation of class I HLA antigens on the cell surface, which are required for T cell recognition. It has been suggested that the oncogene c-myc may have a role in effecting this change in vitro, however, the relationship between oncoprotein level and tumour antigenicity has not been established in human tumours. This study measured c-myc oncoprotein in 94 melanoma specimens (46 primary tumours and 48 regional metastases) using flow cytometry and evaluated class I HLA expression with immunohistochemistry. C-myc expression was found in 91 tumours (96%) with higher expression in metastases than primary melanomas (P<0.005). Class I HLA expression was found to show great variation although metastases showed less antigenicity than primary tumours (P<0.01). Analysis of the relationship between these two parameters revealed a highly significant correlation in both primary (P<0.01) and metastatic disease (P<0.01), with high oncoprotein being associated with down regulation of cell surface antigens. Knowledge of the control of tumour antigenicity is likely to provide an objective platform for the development of new strategies for immunotherapy.

  7. Ectopic expression of cancer testis antigens in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma (CTCL) patients

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Ivan V.; Cordeiro, Brendan; Huang, Yuanshen; Zargham, Hanieh; Pehr, Kevin; Doré, Marc-André; Gilbert, Martin; Zhou, Youwen; Kupper, Thomas S.; Sasseville, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathogenesis of CTCL remains only partially understood. A number of recent studies attempted to identify novel diagnostic markers and future therapeutic targets. One group of antigens, cancer-testis (CT) antigens, normally present solely in testicular germ cells, can be ectopically expressed in a variety of cancers. Currently only a few studies attempted to investigate the expression of CT antigens in CTCL. Experimental Design In the present work we test the expression of CT genes in a cohort of CTCL patients, normal skin samples, skin from benign inflammatory dermatoses and in patient-derived CTCL cells. We correlate such expression with the p53 status and explore molecular mechanisms behind their ectopic expression in these cells. Results Our findings demonstrate that SYCP1, SYCP3, REC8, SPO11 and GTSF1 genes are heterogeneously expressed in CTCL patients and patient-derived cell lines, while cTAGE1 was found to be robustly expressed in both. Mutated p53 status did not appear to be a requirement for the ectopic expression of CT antigens. While T cell stimulation resulted in a significant upregulation of STAT3 and JUNB expression, it did not significantly alter the expression of CT antigens. Treatment of CTCL cells in-vitro with Vorinostat or Romidepsin Histone Deacetylase inhibitors resulted in a significant dose-dependent upregulation of mRNA, but not protein. Further expression analysis demonstrated that SYCP1, cTAGE1 and GTSF1 were expressed in CTCL, but not in normal skin or benign inflammatory dermatoses. Conclusions A number of CT genes are ectopically expressed in CTCL patients and can be used as biomarkers or novel targets for immunotherapy. PMID:24850846

  8. [MHC class I antigens, CD4 and CD8 expressions in polymyositis and dermatomyositis].

    PubMed

    Graça, Carla Renata; Kouyoumdjian, João Aris

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the frequencies of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigens, and CD4 and CD8 cells in skeletal muscle in polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). This was a retrospective study of 34 PM cases, 8 DM cases, and 29 control patients with non-inflammatory myopathies. MHC-I antigens were expressed in the sarcolemma and/or sarcoplasm in 79.4% of PM cases, 62.5% of DM cases, and 27.6% of controls (CD4 expression was observed in 76.5%, 75%, and 13.8%, respectively). There was a high suspicion of PM/DM (mainly PM) in patients in whom MHC-I antigens and CD4 were co-expressed. In 14.3% of PM/DM cases, we observed MHC-I antigens expression alone, without inflammatory cells. MCH-I antigens expression and CD4 positivity might add to strong diagnostic suspicion of PM/DM. No cellular infiltration was observed in 14.3% of such cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Varying expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens on human renal endothelium and epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P. R.; Trickett, L. P.; Smith, J. L.; MacIver, A. G.; Tate, D.; Slapak, M.

    1985-01-01

    Pre-anastomosis wedge biopsies from 14 cadaveric donor kidneys were examined for the expression of class I (HLA-ABC) and class II (HLA-DR) antigens in renal tissue. Two monoclonal antibodies to class I antigens and four to class II antigens were used in an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Consistent expression of both antigens was demonstrated on the surface of glomerular, peritubular capillary and venous endothelial cells. Renal arteries contained only class I antigens. Proximal tubules contained varying amounts of each antigen in their cytoplasm. Sixteen human lymphocytotoxic allo-antisera showed marked variation in their ability to detect HLA antigens on the kidney. The selection of donors for recipients of renal allografts involves the complement-dependent cytotoxicity test and the failure of some lymphocytotoxic antisera to bind to the kidney indicates that some suitable patients may be incorrectly excluded. The use of a binding assay using an immunoperoxidase technique should be included in cross-match techniques particularly for patients who have high levels of circulating cytotoxic antibodies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3855644

  10. Expression of PCV2 antigen in the ovarian tissues of gilts

    PubMed Central

    TUMMARUK, Padet; PEARODWONG, Pachara

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine the expression of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) antigen in the ovarian tissue of naturally infected gilts. Ovarian tissues were obtained from 11 culled gilts. The ovarian tissues sections were divided into two groups according to PCV2 DNA detection using PCR. PCV2 antigen was assessed in the paraffin embedded ovarian tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. A total of 2,131 ovarian follicles (i.e., 1,437 primordial, 133 primary, 353 secondary and 208 antral follicles), 66 atretic follicles and 131 corpora lutea were evaluated. It was found that PCV2 antigen was detected in 280 ovarian follicles (i.e., 239 primordial follicles, 12 primary follicles, 10 secondary follicles and 19 antral follicles), 1 atretic follicles and 3 corpora lutea (P<0.05). PCV2 antigen was detected in primordial follicles more often than in secondary follicles, atretic follicles and corpora lutea (P<0.05). The detection of PCV2 antigen was found mainly in oocytes. PCV2 antigen was found in both PCV2 DNA positive and negative ovarian tissues. It can be concluded that PCV2 antigen is expressed in all types of the ovarian follicles and corpora lutea. Further studies should be carried out to determine the influence of PCV2 on porcine ovarian function and oocyte quality. PMID:26522687

  11. Properties of B cells and Thy-1-antigen-expressing cells infiltrating rat renal allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, D.; Halttunen, J.; Tiisala, S.; Ustinov, J.; Renkonen, R.; Haeyry, P. )

    1990-10-01

    We have examined (1) the frequency of B cells secreting antibodies against donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens and (2) the properties of Thy-1-antigen-expressing leukocytes in rats rejecting renal allografts. Our results show that B cells secreting antibodies are present in the inflammatory cell population at the frequency of 1:850. Among them only 1 out of 2-150 is engaged in production of antibodies directed to the graft MHC antigens, depending on the method of assay. This suggests that despite the observed significant production of nonspecific immunoglobulin in situ, only a minority of the B-cell population is specifically committed to the graft MHC antigens. This finding is concordant with the described previously low frequencies of the T cells specifically directed toward the graft MHC antigen. The role of the immunologically noncommitted cells in graft rejection is unknown. We have found that a substantial part (up to 60%) of inflammatory cells invading a rat kidney allograft express the Thy-1 antigen. This suggests that they might be immature (progenitor ) cells and, therefore, unable to respond to the graft antigens. Progenitor-like properties of these cells have been confirmed by their ability to reconstitute lethally irradiated syngeneic rat. Finally, these immature cells are of lymphoid, not of myeloid, linkage, because they do not proliferate in the presence of GM-CSF.

  12. Induction of Human Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Mouse Cells, Using Lentiviral Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Lang, Haili; Zhou, Xianpei; Zhang, Li; Yin, Rong; Maciejko, Jessica; Giannitsos, Vasiliki; Motyka, Bruce; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ABO histo-blood group system is the most important antigen system in transplantation medicine, yet no small animal model of the ABO system exists. To determine the feasibility of developing a murine model, we previously subcloned the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (H-transferase, EC 2.4.1.69) cDNA and the human α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (A-transferase, EC 2.4.1.40) cDNA into lentiviral vectors to study their ability to induce human histo-blood group A antigen expression on mouse cells. Herein we investigated the optimal conditions for human A and H antigen expression in murine cells. We determined that transduction of a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LvEF1-AH-trs) resulted in the expression of A antigen in a mouse endothelial cell line. We also studied the in vivo utility of this vector to induce human A antigen expression in mouse liver. After intrahepatic injection of LvEF1-AH-trs, A antigen expression was observed on hepatocytes as detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. In human group A erythrocyte-sensitized mice, A antigen expression in the liver was associated with tissue damage, and deposition of antibody and complement. These results suggest that this gene transfer strategy can be used to simulate the human ABO blood group system in a murine model. This model will facilitate progress in the development of interventions for ABO-incompatible transplantation and transfusion scenarios, which are difficult to develop in clinical or large animal settings. PMID:20163247

  13. [Prokaryotic expression, purification and antigenicity identification of recombinant human survivin protein].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaotao; Wang, Wei; Tian, Renli; Xu, Yuanji; Yan, Jinqi; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Jiangping; Yu, Jiyun

    2013-08-01

    To construct a prokaryotic expression plasmid pET28a-survivin, optimize the recombinant protein expression conditions in E.coli, and purify the survivin recombinant protein and identify its antigenicity. Survivin cDNA segment was amplified by PCR and cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET28a(+) to construct the recombinant expression vector pET28a-survivin. The expression vector was transformed into BL21 (DE3) and the fusion protein survivin/His was induced by IPTG. The fusion protein was purified through Ni affinity chromatography. The antigenicity of the purified survivin protein was identified by Western blotting and ELISA. The recombinant expression vector was verified successfully by BamHI and HindIII. The fusion protein induced by IPTG was obtained with Mr; about 24 000. The purity of the purified protein reached 90% by SDS-PAGE analysis. And the antigenicity of the survivin protein was validated by Western blotting and ELISA. The prokaryotic expression plasmid pET28a-survivin was successfully constructed and the survivin protein was expressed and purified in E.coli. The antigenicity of the purified survivin protein was demonstrated desirable.

  14. Lewis Antigen Expression by Helicobacter pylori Strains Colonizing Different Regions of the Stomach of Individual Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    González-Valencia, Gerardo; Muñoz-Perez, Leopoldo; Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres, Javier

    2008-01-01

    The diversity in the expression of Lewis antigens (Le) of 226 single colonies of Helicobacter pylori isolated from four regions of the stomach of eight adults is shown. Ley was expressed more in strains colonizing antrum than in strains colonizing fundus, whereas Lex was more common in fundus strains. cagA+ strains were more associated with Le-negative strains. PMID:18550746

  15. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiming; Modiano, Jaime F; Ito, Daisuke

    2017-03-30

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1(-) and SSEA-1(+) cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines.

  16. Increased expression of nuclear envelope gp210 antigen in small bile ducts in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Minoru; Takii, Yasushi; Ito, Masahiro; Komori, Atsumasa; Yokoyama, Terufumi; Shimizu-Yoshida, Yuki; Koyabu, Makiko; Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Kamihira, Takashi; Daikoku, Manabu; Migita, Kiyoshi; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Nozaki, Naohito; Shimoda, Shinji; Ishibashi, Hiromi

    2006-03-01

    The sustained antibody response to nuclear envelope gp210 antigen indicates a group of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients at high risk for the progression to end-stage hepatic failure. To address this issue, we immunohistochemically studied the expression of gp210 antigen in needle liver biopsy specimens from PBC patients using a monoclonal antibody specific for gp210 antigen. The specimens from autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), chronic viral hepatitis B (CHB) and C (CHC) patients served as disease controls. The expression of gp210 antigen was apparently increased on the nuclear envelope of biliary epithelial cells (BECs) of small bile ducts in almost all specimens from PBC. In contrast, the expression of gp210 antigen was negative in BECs of small bile ducts in normal liver, while relatively weak anti-gp210 immunostaining was observed in AIH, CHC and CHB. In addition, the degree of gp210 expression in BECs of small bile ducts was positively correlated to that of portal inflammation, interface hepatitis and lobular inflammation in PBC. These results indicate that the increased expression of gp210 in small bile ducts, which is probably associated with damage to BECs by inflammation, is possibly involved in autoimmune response to gp210 leading to the progression to end-stage hepatic failure in PBC.

  17. Antigenic properties and diagnostic potential of puumala virus nucleocapsid protein expressed in insect cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vapalahti, O; Lundkvist, A; Kallio-Kokko, H; Paukku, K; Julkunen, I; Lankinen, H; Vaheri, A

    1996-01-01

    Puumala virus (PUU) is a member of the genus Hantavirus in the family Bunyaviridae and the causative agent of nephropathia epidemica, a European form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Sera of nephropathia epidemica patients react specifically with PUU nucleocapsid (N) protein. In order to safely provide large quantities of antigen for diagnostic purposes, PUU Sotkamo strain N protein was expressed by using the baculovirus system in Sf9 insect cells to up to 30 to 50% of the total cellular protein. The recombinant N protein (bac-PUU-N) was solubilized with 6 M urea, dialyzed, and purified by anion-exchange liquid chromatography. In an immunoglobulin M mu-capture assay purified and unpurified bac-PUU-N antigen showed identical results compared with the results of a similar assay based on native PUU antigen grown in Vero E6 cells. An immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibody-capture assay based on unpurified bac-PUU-N also showed results identical to those of an assay with native PUU-N antigen. Moreover, a panel of monoclonal antibodies reactive with eight different epitopes showed identical reactivity patterns with both natural and bac-PUU-N antigen, while two epitopes in PUU-N expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli were not recognized. Puumala hantavirus N protein expressed by the baculovirus system offers a safe and inexpensive source of specific antigen for large-scale diagnostic and seroepidemiological purposes. PMID:8748286

  18. Regulation of Sialyl Lewis Antigen Expression in Colon Cancer Cells by Sialidase NEU4*

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takahashi, Kohta; Moriya, Setsuko; Miyagi, Taeko

    2011-01-01

    Sialyl Lewis antigens, sialyl Lewis a and sialyl Lewis x, are utilized as tumor markers, and their increase in cancer is associated with tumor progression by enhancement of cancer cell adhesion to endothelial E-selectin. However, regulation mechanisms are not fully understood. We previously demonstrated that NEU4 is the only sialidase efficiently acting on mucins and it is down-regulated in colon cancer. To elucidate the significance of NEU4 down-regulation, we investigated sialyl Lewis antigens as endogenous substrates for the sialidase. NEU4 was found to hydrolyze the antigens in vitro and decrease cell surface levels much more effectively than other sialidases. Western blot, thin layer chromatography, and metabolic inhibition studies of desialylation products revealed NEU4 to preferentially catalyze sialyl Lewis antigens expressed on O-glycans. Cell adhesion to and motility and growth on E-selectin were significantly reduced by NEU4. E-selectin stimulation of colon cancer cells enhanced cell motility through activation of the p38/Hsp27/actin reorganization pathway, whereas NEU4 attenuated the signaling. On immunocytochemical analysis, some NEU4 molecules were localized at cell surfaces. Under hypoxia conditions whereby the antigens were increased concomitantly with several sialyl- and fucosyltransferases, NEU4 expression was markedly decreased. These results suggest that NEU4 plays an important role in control of sialyl Lewis antigen expression and its impairment in colon cancer. PMID:21521691

  19. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of the M Antigen of Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Reiss, Errol; Lott, Timothy J.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Deepe, George S.

    1999-01-01

    The major diagnostic antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum are the H and M antigens, pluripotent glycoproteins that elicit both humoral and T-cell-mediated immune responses. These antigens may play a role in the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. M antigen is considered immunodominant because antibodies against it are the first precipitins to arise in acute histoplasmosis and are commonly present during all phases of infection. The biological activity of monomolecular M antigen and its ability to elicit a protective immune response to H. capsulatum are largely unknown. A molecular approach was used to identify the biological nature of M antigen, including its purification from histoplasmin, partial digestion with proteinases, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to separate the released peptides. The amino acid sequences of the purified peptides were obtained by Edman degradation, and using degenerate oligonucleotide primers for PCR, a 321-bp fragment of the gene encoding the M antigen was amplified from genomic H. capsulatum DNA. This fragment was used to screen an H. capsulatum genomic DNA library, leading to the isolation, cloning, and sequencing of the full-length gene. The M gene consists of 2,187-bp DNA encoding a protein of 80,719 Da, which has significant homology to catalases from Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, and Eimericella nidulans. A cDNA was generated by reverse transcription-PCR and cloned into the expression vector pQE40. The identity of the cloned, expressed protein was confirmed by Western blotting. The recombinant fusion protein was immunoreactive with monoclonal antibodies raised against M antigen, with polyclonal mouse anti-M antiserum, and with a serum sample from a patient with histoplasmosis. The gene encoding the major immunodominant M antigen of H. capsulatum is a presumptive catalase, and the recombinant protein retains serodiagnostic activity. PMID:10085041

  20. Aberrant Cosmc genes result in Tn antigen expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell line HT-29

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Du, Zhenzhen; Sun, Xuhong; Shi, Chuanqin; Zhang, Huaixiang; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tn antigen, which arises from mutation in the Cosmc gene is one of the most common tumor associated carbohydrate antigens. Cosmc resides in X24 encoded by a single gene and functions as a specific molecular chaperone for T-synthase. While the Tn antigen cannot be detected in normal cells, Cosmc mutations inactivate T-synthase and consequently result in Tn antigen expression within certain cancers. In addition to this Cosmc mutation-induced expression, the Tn antigen is also expressed in such cell lines as Jurkat T, LSC and LS174T. Whether the Cosmc mutation is present in the colon cancer cell line HT-29 is still unclear. Here, we isolate HT-29-Tn+ cells from HT-29 cells derived from a female colon cancer patient. These HT-29-Tn+ cells show a loss of the Cosmc gene coding sequence (CDS) leading to an absence of T-synthase activity and Tn antigen expression. Additionally, almost no methylation of Cosmc CpG islands was detected in HT-29-Tn+ as well as in HT-29-Tn- and Tn- tumor cells from male patients. In contrast, the methylation frequency of CpG island of Cosmc in normal female cells was ~50%. Only one active allele of Cosmc existed in HT-29-Tn+ and HT-29-Tn- cells as based upon detection of SNP sites. These results indicate that Tn antigens expression and T-synthase inactivity in HT-29-Tn+ cells can be related to the absence of CDS in Cosmc active alleles, while an inactive allele deletion of Cosmc in HT-29 cells has no influence on Cosmc function. PMID:26045765

  1. Comparison of the reactivities of baculovirus-expressed recombinant Norwalk virus capsid antigen with those of the native Norwalk virus antigen in serologic assays and some epidemiologic observations.

    PubMed Central

    Green, K Y; Lew, J F; Jiang, X; Kapikian, A Z; Estes, M K

    1993-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Norwalk virus (NV) by immune electron microscopy (IEM) in 1972, serologic studies with this virus have relied on particle-positive fecal material from infected volunteers as the source of antigen because it has not been possible to propagate this virus in cell culture. However, the recent cloning of the NV (strain 8FIIa) genome and expression of the capsid protein in a baculovirus system to form "virus-like particles" has provided a consistent source of antigen (designated rNV). The purpose of the present study was to compare the antigenicities of these rNV particles with those of native NV antigen derived from human fecal material by using well-characterized sera obtained from earlier studies. In IEM studies, the rNV antigen reacted with NV-specific antibodies in a manner similar to that observed previously when particle-positive fecal material was used as antigen. In addition, a direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in which the rNV antigen was used as antigen, proved efficient and specific for the detection of serologic responses to NV compared with the previously established techniques of IEM and blocking antibody immunoassays in which particle-positive fecal material was used as the antigen. The availability of an unlimited source of antigen will enable serologic studies that will greatly increase our understanding of the epidemiology of NV and its role in human enteric illness. Images PMID:8396590

  2. Tumorigenic activity of Merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Megan E.; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lambert, Paul F.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contain wild type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiological role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  3. Expression of Ia like (HLA-DR) antigens on human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Clerici, N; Reboiras, S; Fierro, C; Leyva-Cobian, F

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of Ia like (HLA-DR) antigens on human alveolar macrophages (HAM phi) has been investigated by indirect immunofluorescence staining of viable macrophages with a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to common determinants of these antigens. HAM phi were characterized by non-specific esterase stain, plastic adherence, phagocytosis and IgG-Fc receptor expression. Ia like antigens were expressed in approximately 45-80% of HAM phi, being localized as patchy and lineal fluorescence along the membrane. Ia like expression was higher in macrophages from non-smoker subjects (P less than 0.025). No difference in Ia like antigen expression was found between adherent and non-adherent HAM phi subsets. Ia like positive HAM phi from both smoker and non-smoker subjects consisted of a large subpopulation of phagocytic cells (60-70%) and a smaller non-phagocytic subpopulation (20-25%). These subpopulations were also present in the Ia like negative HAM phi. The percentage of Ia like positive macrophages showed variable results depending on the MoAb used, suggesting that not all anti-Ia like antibodies recognize the same antigenic determinants. Moreover, lack of staining of one macrophage subset occurred with all MoAb tested, over a large range of concentrations. PMID:6209043

  4. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes: the importance of chromosomal and nuclear context in VSG expression control.

    PubMed

    Glover, Lucy; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Alsford, Sam; McCulloch, Richard; Field, Mark C; Horn, David

    2013-12-01

    African trypanosomes are lethal human and animal parasites that use antigenic variation for evasion of host adaptive immunity. To facilitate antigenic variation, trypanosomes dedicate approximately one third of their nuclear genome, including many minichromosomes, and possibly all sub-telomeres, to variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes and associated sequences. Antigenic variation requires transcription of a single VSG by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I), with silencing of other VSGs, and periodic switching of the expressed gene, typically via DNA recombination with duplicative translocation of a new VSG to the active site. Thus, telomeric location, epigenetic controls and monoallelic transcription by Pol-I at an extranucleolar site are prominent features of VSGs and their expression, with telomeres, chromatin structure and nuclear organization all making vitally important contributions to monoallelic VSG expression control and switching. We discuss VSG transcription, recombination and replication control within this chromosomal and sub-nuclear context.

  5. Expression of protective antigen in transgenic plants: a step towards edible vaccine against anthrax.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohd Azhar; Singh, Samer; Anand Kumar, P; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2002-12-06

    Protective antigen (PA) is the most potent molecule for vaccination against anthrax. In the present study, we have successfully integrated protective antigen gene in nuclear genome of tobacco plants by Agrobacterium mediated leaf-disc transformation method. Expression of protective antigen gene was detected by immunoblot analysis using antisera raised against purified PA. A distinct band of approximately 83kDa lighted up in the protein extracted from transformed plants while there was no such band in untransformed plants. The plant expressed PA showed biological activity just like native PA, which was demonstrated by cytolytic assay on macrophage like cell lines with lethal factor. This study establishes for the first time expression of PA gene in a plant system and thus marks the first milestone towards developing edible vaccine against anthrax.

  6. SMIM1 variants rs1175550 and rs143702418 independently modulate Vel blood group antigen expression

    PubMed Central

    Christophersen, Mikael K.; Jöud, Magnus; Ajore, Ram; Vege, Sunitha; Ljungdahl, Klara W.; Westhoff, Connie M.; Olsson, Martin L.; Storry, Jill R.; Nilsson, Björn

    2017-01-01

    The Vel blood group antigen is expressed on the red blood cells of most individuals. Recently, we described that homozygosity for inactivating mutations in SMIM1 defines the rare Vel-negative phenotype. Still, Vel-positive individuals show great variability in Vel antigen expression, creating a risk for Vel blood typing errors and transfusion reactions. We fine-mapped the regulatory region located in SMIM1 intron 2 in Swedish blood donors, and observed a strong correlation between expression and rs1175550 as well as with a previously unreported tri-nucleotide insertion (rs143702418; C > CGCA). While the two variants are tightly linked in Caucasians, we separated their effects in African Americans, and found that rs1175550G and to a lesser extent rs143702418C independently increase SMIM1 and Vel antigen expression. Gel shift and luciferase assays indicate that both variants are transcriptionally active, and we identified binding of the transcription factor TAL1 as a potential mediator of the increased expression associated with rs1175550G. Our results provide insight into the regulatory logic of Vel antigen expression, and extend the set of markers for genetic Vel blood group typing. PMID:28084402

  7. Co-expression and impact of prostate specific membrane antigen and prostate specific antigen in prostatic pathologies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken to relate the co-expression of prostate-associated antigens, PSMA and PSA, with the degree of vascularization in normal and pathologic (hyperplasia and cancer) prostate tissues to elucidate their possible role in tumor progression. Methods The study was carried out in 6 normal, 44 benign prostatic hyperplastic and 39 cancerous human prostates. Immunohistochemical analysis were performed using the monoclonal antibody CD34 to determine the angiogenic activity, and the monoclonal antibodies 3E6 and ER-PR8 to assess PSMA and PSA expression, respectively. Results In our study we found that in normal prostate tissue, PSMA and PSA were equally expressed (3.7 ± 0.18 and 3.07 ± 0.11). A significant difference in their expression was see in hyperplastic and neoplastic prostates tissues (16.14 ± 0.17 and 30.72 ± 0.85, respectively) for PSMA and (34.39 ± 0.53 and 17.85 ± 1.21, respectively) for PSA. Study of prostate tumor profiles showed that the profile (PSA+, PSMA-) expression levels decreased between normal prostate, benign prostatic tissue and primary prostate cancer. In the other hand, the profile (PSA-, PSMA+) expression levels increased from normal to prostate tumor tissues. PSMA overexpression was associated with high intratumoral angiogenesis activity. By contrast, high PSA expression was associated with low angiogenesis activity. Conclusion These data suggest that these markers are regulated differentially and the difference in their expression showed a correlation with malignant transformation. With regard to the duality PSMA-PSA, this implies the significance of their investigation together in normal and pathologic prostate tissues. PMID:21189143

  8. Identification, sequencing, and expression of Mycobacterium leprae superoxide dismutase, a major antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Thangaraj, H S; Lamb, F I; Davis, E O; Jenner, P J; Jeyakumar, L H; Colston, M J

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding a major 28-kilodalton antigen of Mycobacterium leprae has now been sequenced and identified as the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) on the basis of the high degree of homology with known SOD sequences. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 67% homology with a human manganese-utilizing SOD and 55% homology with the Escherichia coli manganese-utilizing enzyme. The gene is not expressed from its own promoter in E. coli but is expressed from its own promoter in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The amino acid sequences of epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies against the 28-kilodalton antigen have been determined. Images PMID:1692812

  9. Multivalent Chromosomal Expression of the Clostridium botulinum Serotype A Neurotoxin Heavy-Chain Antigen and the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent toxins that cause severe disease in humans. New and improved vaccines are needed for both of these pathogens. For mucosal vaccine delivery using lactic acid bacteria, chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid-based expression systems, as chromosomal expression circumvents plasmid instability and the need for antibiotic pressure. In this study, we constructed three strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM expressing from the chromosome (i) the nontoxic host receptor-binding domain of the heavy chain of Clostridium botulinum serotype A neurotoxin (BoNT/A-Hc), (ii) the anthrax protective antigen (PA), and (iii) both the BoNT/A-Hc and the PA. The BoNT/A-Hc vaccine cassette was engineered to contain the signal peptide from the S-layer protein A from L. acidophilus and a dendritic-cell-targeting peptide. A chromosomal region downstream of lba0889 carrying a highly expressed enolase gene was selected for insertion of the vaccine cassettes. Western blot analysis confirmed the heterologous expression of the two antigens from plasmid and chromosome locations. Stability assays demonstrated loss of the vaccine cassettes from expression plasmids without antibiotic maintenance. RNA sequencing showed high expression of each antigen and that insertion of the vaccine cassettes had little to no effect on the transcription of other genes in the chromosome. This study demonstrated that chromosomal integrative recombinant strains are promising vaccine delivery vehicles when targeted into high-expression chromosomal regions. Levels of expression match high-copy-number plasmids and eliminate the requirement for antibiotic selective maintenance of recombinant plasmids. IMPORTANCE Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent neurotoxins that pose a biochemical warfare concern; therefore, effective vaccines against these bacteria are required. Chromosomal expression of antigens is

  10. Multivalent Chromosomal Expression of the Clostridium botulinum Serotype A Neurotoxin Heavy-Chain Antigen and the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2016-10-15

    Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent toxins that cause severe disease in humans. New and improved vaccines are needed for both of these pathogens. For mucosal vaccine delivery using lactic acid bacteria, chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid-based expression systems, as chromosomal expression circumvents plasmid instability and the need for antibiotic pressure. In this study, we constructed three strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM expressing from the chromosome (i) the nontoxic host receptor-binding domain of the heavy chain of Clostridium botulinum serotype A neurotoxin (BoNT/A-Hc), (ii) the anthrax protective antigen (PA), and (iii) both the BoNT/A-Hc and the PA. The BoNT/A-Hc vaccine cassette was engineered to contain the signal peptide from the S-layer protein A from L. acidophilus and a dendritic-cell-targeting peptide. A chromosomal region downstream of lba0889 carrying a highly expressed enolase gene was selected for insertion of the vaccine cassettes. Western blot analysis confirmed the heterologous expression of the two antigens from plasmid and chromosome locations. Stability assays demonstrated loss of the vaccine cassettes from expression plasmids without antibiotic maintenance. RNA sequencing showed high expression of each antigen and that insertion of the vaccine cassettes had little to no effect on the transcription of other genes in the chromosome. This study demonstrated that chromosomal integrative recombinant strains are promising vaccine delivery vehicles when targeted into high-expression chromosomal regions. Levels of expression match high-copy-number plasmids and eliminate the requirement for antibiotic selective maintenance of recombinant plasmids. Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent neurotoxins that pose a biochemical warfare concern; therefore, effective vaccines against these bacteria are required. Chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid

  11. Polymorphic expression of a human superficial bladder tumor antigen defined by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Fradet, Y; Islam, N; Boucher, L; Parent-Vaugeois, C; Tardif, M

    1987-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up. Images PMID:3313389

  12. T cells expressing an anti–B-cell maturation antigen chimeric antigen receptor cause remissions of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed Abbas; Shi, Victoria; Maric, Irina; Wang, Michael; Stroncek, David F.; Rose, Jeremy J.; Brudno, Jennifer N.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Feldman, Steven A.; Hansen, Brenna G.; Fellowes, Vicki S.; Hakim, Frances T.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Therapies with novel mechanisms of action are needed for multiple myeloma (MM). B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is expressed in most cases of MM. We conducted the first-in-humans clinical trial of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting BCMA. T cells expressing the CAR used in this work (CAR-BCMA) specifically recognized BCMA-expressing cells. Twelve patients received CAR-BCMA T cells in this dose-escalation trial. Among the 6 patients treated on the lowest 2 dose levels, limited antimyeloma activity and mild toxicity occurred. On the third dose level, 1 patient obtained a very good partial remission. Two patients were treated on the fourth dose level of 9 × 106 CAR+ T cells/kg body weight. Before treatment, the first patient on the fourth dose level had chemotherapy-resistant MM, making up 90% of bone marrow cells. After treatment, bone marrow plasma cells became undetectable by flow cytometry, and the patient’s MM entered a stringent complete remission that lasted for 17 weeks before relapse. The second patient on the fourth dose level had chemotherapy-resistant MM making up 80% of bone marrow cells before treatment. Twenty-eight weeks after this patient received CAR-BCMA T cells, bone marrow plasma cells were undetectable by flow cytometry, and the serum monoclonal protein had decreased by >95%. This patient is in an ongoing very good partial remission. Both patients treated on the fourth dose level had toxicity consistent with cytokine-release syndrome including fever, hypotension, and dyspnea. Both patients had prolonged cytopenias. Our findings demonstrate antimyeloma activity of CAR-BCMA T cells. This trial was registered to www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02215967. PMID:27412889

  13. Protein expression in yeast as an approach to production of recombinant malaria antigens.

    PubMed

    Bathurst, I C

    1994-01-01

    The selection of a system suitable for expression of recombinant malaria antigens for vaccine development is, in the final analysis, empirical. However, experience gained with both malaria antigens and other recombinant proteins has provided helpful guidelines. Recombinant DNA technology has been successfully applied to the development of vaccines against a number of human diseases. For example, recombinant DNA-derived hepatitis B virus surface antigen has been produced from both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Yeast has been demonstrated to be an excellent host for the expression of recombinant proteins with uses in diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccine production. Both intracellular and secretory systems have been developed and optimized for the production of high levels of recombinant proteins. Recombinant DNA technology, and in particular yeast expression systems, have been successfully used to produce malaria antigens, several of which have been protective in various animal models. In contrast, attempts to produce sufficient quantities of antigens for a malaria vaccine from in vitro cultures of the malaria parasite have been unsuccessful. Recombinant proteins can be produced and purified from yeast in large quantities and at low cost, each being requirements for a vaccine to be used in a global vaccination program against malaria.

  14. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jennifer; Sariyer, Ilker K.; De La Fuente-Granada, Marisol; Augelli, Brian J.; Otte, Jessica; Azizi, S. Ausim; Amini, Shohreh; Khalili, Kamel; Krynska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    JC virus (JCV), a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases and the

  15. Phase Variable O Antigen Biosynthetic Genes Control Expression of the Major Protective Antigen and Bacteriophage Receptor in Vibrio cholerae O1

    PubMed Central

    Seed, Kimberley D.; Faruque, Shah M.; Mekalanos, John J.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Camilli, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide O1 antigen is a major target of bacteriophages and the human immune system and is of critical importance for vaccine design. We used an O1-specific lytic bacteriophage as a tool to probe the capacity of V. cholerae to alter its O1 antigen and identified a novel mechanism by which this organism can modulate O antigen expression and exhibit intra-strain heterogeneity. We identified two phase variable genes required for O1 antigen biosynthesis, manA and wbeL. manA resides outside of the previously recognized O1 antigen biosynthetic locus, and encodes for a phosphomannose isomerase critical for the initial step in O1 antigen biosynthesis. We determined that manA and wbeL phase variants are attenuated for virulence, providing functional evidence to further support the critical role of the O1 antigen for infectivity. We provide the first report of phase variation modulating O1 antigen expression in V. cholerae, and show that the maintenance of these phase variable loci is an important means by which this facultative pathogen can generate the diverse subpopulations of cells needed for infecting the host intestinal tract and for escaping predation by an O1-specific phage. PMID:23028317

  16. Inducible expression of cancer-testis antigens in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heninger, Erika; Krueger, Timothy E.G.; Thiede, Stephanie M.; Sperger, Jamie M.; Byers, Brianna L.; Kircher, Madison R.; Kosoff, David; Yang, Bing; Jarrard, David F.; McNeel, Douglas G.; Lang, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance to self-antigens can limit robust anti-tumor immune responses in the use of tumor vaccines. Expression of novel tumor associated antigens can improve immune recognition and lysis of tumor cells. The cancer-testis antigen (CTA) family of proteins has been hypothesized to be an ideal class of antigens due to tumor-restricted expression, a subset of which have been found to induce antibody responses in patients with prostate disease. We demonstrate that CTA expression is highly inducible in five different Prostate Cancer (PC) cell lines using a hypomethylating agent 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5AZA) and/or a histone deacetylase inhibitor LBH589. These CTAs include NY-ESO1, multiple members of the MAGE and SSX families and NY-SAR35. A subset of CTAs is synergistically induced by the combination of 5AZA and LBH589. We developed an ex vivo organ culture using human PC biopsies for ex vivo drug treatments to evaluate these agents in clinical samples. These assays found significant induction of SSX2 in 9/9 distinct patient samples and NY-SAR35 in 7/9 samples. Further, we identify expression of SSX2 in circulating tumor cells (CTC) from patients with advanced PC. These results indicate that epigenetic modifying agents can induce expression of a broad range of neoantigens in human PC and may serve as a useful adjunctive therapy with novel tumor vaccines and checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27769045

  17. Primary virus-induced lymphomas evade T cell immunity by failure to express viral antigens

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    T lymphoma induction by the mink cell focus-inducing murine leukemia virus MCF 1233 in C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 mice is influenced by a strongly Th-dependent, H-2I-A-restricted antiviral immune response (25). We compared the MHC class I as well as viral env and gag antigenic cell surface profiles of frequent T lymphomas of H-2I-A nonresponder-type mice to that of rare T lymphomas of H-2I-A responder-type mice. Membrane immunofluorescence studies, with a panel of anti-env mAbs (reactive with the highly conserved gp70f epitope, the p15Ec epitope, and the gp70-p15E complex), a polyclonal anti-p30 serum, and anti-H-2 class I mAbs, showed that all 17 nonresponder tumors tested expressed high levels of both env and gag viral proteins, and 15 of these 17 nonresponder tumors expressed high levels of H-2 class I K and D antigens. In contrast, 10 of 11 responder lymphomas lacked env and/or gag determinants. The only responder lymphoma with both strong env and gag expression failed to express H-2K and -D antigens. Preferential loss of env or gag expression did not correlate with H-2 class I allelic specificities. Both responder and nonresponder T lymphoma DNA contained multiple, predominantly MCF-like, newly acquired proviral integrations. Differences in viral antigen cell surface expression were confirmed at cytoplasmic and RNA levels. The amounts of 8.2- and 3.2-kb viral RNA were greatly reduced in two responder lymphomas when compared with four nonresponder lymphomas. In both responder lymphomas, aberrantly sized viral RNA species were found. Upon in vivo passage of these responder lymphomas in either immunocompetent or T cell-deficient nu/nu mice, it was found that various molecular mechanisms may underlie the lack of viral antigen expression at the cell surface of these lymphomas. One lymphoma re-expressed viral antigens when transplanted with nu/nu mice, whereas the other remained stably gag negative. The combined findings indicate that an H-2I-A-regulated antiviral immune

  18. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  19. Expression of recombinant Araraquara Hantavirus nucleoprotein in insect cells and its use as an antigen for immunodetection compared to the same antigen expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antigens for Hantavirus serological tests have been produced using DNA recombinant technology for more than twenty years. Several different strategies have been used for that purpose. All of them avoid the risks and difficulties involved in multiplying Hantavirus in the laboratory. In Brazil, the Araraquara virus is one of the main causes of Hantavirus Cardio-Pulmonary Syndrome (HCPS). Methods In this investigation, we report the expression of the N protein of the Araraquara Hantavirus in a Baculovirus Expression System, the use of this protein in IgM and IgG ELISA and comparison with the same antigen generated in E. coli. Results The protein obtained, and purified in a nickel column, was effectively recognized by antibodies from confirmed HCPS patients. Comparison of the baculovirus generated antigen with the N protein produced in E. coli showed that both were equally effective in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions Our results therefore indicate that either of these proteins can be used in serological tests in Brazil. PMID:21569341

  20. Slime Production and Expression of the Slime-Associated Antigen by Staphylococcal Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ammendolia, M. G.; Di Rosa, R.; Montanaro, L.; Arciola, C. R.; Baldassarri, L.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to produce slime and to express a slime-associated antigen was examined in a collection of staphylococcal clinical isolates. Slime-producing strains were found among coagulase-negative staphylococci in percentages comparable to those reported in other studies; surprisingly, a high percentage of Staphylococcus aureus strains also were able to produce this extracellular material. In the latter case, this ability was strongly dependent on the presence of an additional carbohydrate source in the growth medium. Expression of the slime-associated antigen appeared to be species specific and confined to the Staphylococcus epidermidis sensu stricto isolates; its strong association with the ability of these strains to produce thicker biofilms indicated slime-associated antigen as a possible virulence marker for S. epidermidis. PMID:10488184

  1. Ia antigens are expressed on ATPase-positive dendritic cells in chicken epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Torres, A; Millan Aldaco, D A

    1994-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) are antigen-presenting dendritic cells located in mammalian epidermis and in other stratified epithelia. We recently demonstrated the presence of Langerhans-like cells in the epidermis of the chicken using ultrastructural histochemistry for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). The aim of the present study was to test whether ATPase-positive dendritic cells also express class II histocompatibility molecules (Ia antigens) encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), using a double staining technique, in separated chicken epidermal sheets. We concluded that the epidermal dendritic cells observed are the LC of the chicken, based on their morphology and spatial distribution, but mainly on the complete overlap for ATPase reaction and Ia antigen expression, these being reliable markers for the identification of mammalian LC. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Figs 7,8 Figs 9,10 Figs 11,12 PMID:7928646

  2. Inhibiting DNA methylation activates cancer testis antigens and expression of the antigen processing and presentation machinery in colon and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Siebenkäs, Cornelia; Chiappinelli, Katherine B; Guzzetta, Angela A; Sharma, Anup; Jeschke, Jana; Vatapalli, Rajita; Baylin, Stephen B; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-01-01

    Innovative therapies for solid tumors are urgently needed. Recently, therapies that harness the host immune system to fight cancer cells have successfully treated a subset of patients with solid tumors. These responses have been strong and durable but observed in subsets of patients. Work from our group and others has shown that epigenetic therapy, specifically inhibiting the silencing DNA methylation mark, activates immune signaling in tumor cells and can sensitize to immune therapy in murine models. Here we show that colon and ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit lower expression of transcripts involved in antigen processing and presentation to immune cells compared to normal tissues. In addition, treatment with clinically relevant low doses of DNMT inhibitors (that remove DNA methylation) increases expression of both antigen processing and presentation and Cancer Testis Antigens in these cell lines. We confirm that treatment with DNMT inhibitors upregulates expression of the antigen processing and presentation molecules B2M, CALR, CD58, PSMB8, PSMB9 at the RNA and protein level in a wider range of colon and ovarian cancer cell lines and treatment time points than had been described previously. In addition, we show that DNMTi treatment upregulates many Cancer Testis Antigens common to both colon and ovarian cancer. This increase of both antigens and antigen presentation by epigenetic therapy may be one mechanism to sensitize patients to immune therapies.

  3. Epigenetic silencing of the chaperone Cosmc in human leukocytes expressing tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Mi, Rongjuan; Song, Lina; Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Xiaokun; Zeng, Junwei; Lehoux, Sylvain; Aryal, Rajindra P; Wang, Jianmei; Crew, Vanja K; van Die, Irma; Chapman, Arlene B; Cummings, Richard D; Ju, Tongzhong

    2012-11-30

    Cosmc is the specific molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum for T-synthase, a Golgi β3-galactosyltransferase that generates the core 1 O-glycan, Galβ1-3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr, in glycoproteins. Dysfunctional Cosmc results in the formation of inactive T-synthase and consequent expression of the Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), which is associated with several human diseases. However, the molecular regulation of expression of Cosmc, which is encoded by a single gene on Xq24, is poorly understood. Here we show that epigenetic silencing of Cosmc through hypermethylation of its promoter leads to loss of Cosmc transcripts in Tn4 cells, an immortalized B cell line from a male patient with a Tn-syndrome-like phenotype. These cells lack T-synthase activity and express the Tn antigen. Treatment of cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine causes restoration of Cosmc transcripts, restores T-synthase activity, and reduces Tn antigen expression. Bisulfite sequencing shows that CG dinucleotides in the Cosmc core promoter are hypermethylated. Interestingly, several other X-linked genes associated with glycosylation are not silenced in Tn4 cells, and we observed no correlation of a particular DNA methyltransferase to aberrant methylation of Cosmc in these cells. Thus, hypermethylation of the Cosmc promoter in Tn4 cells is relatively specific. Epigenetic silencing of Cosmc provides another mechanism underlying the abnormal expression of the Tn antigen, which may be important in understanding aberrant Tn antigen expression in human diseases, including IgA nephropathy and cancer.

  4. Epigenetic Silencing of the Chaperone Cosmc in Human Leukocytes Expressing Tn Antigen*

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Rongjuan; Song, Lina; Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Xiaokun; Zeng, Junwei; Lehoux, Sylvain; Aryal, Rajindra P.; Wang, Jianmei; Crew, Vanja K.; van Die, Irma; Chapman, Arlene B.; Cummings, Richard D.; Ju, Tongzhong

    2012-01-01

    Cosmc is the specific molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum for T-synthase, a Golgi β3-galactosyltransferase that generates the core 1 O-glycan, Galβ1–3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr, in glycoproteins. Dysfunctional Cosmc results in the formation of inactive T-synthase and consequent expression of the Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), which is associated with several human diseases. However, the molecular regulation of expression of Cosmc, which is encoded by a single gene on Xq24, is poorly understood. Here we show that epigenetic silencing of Cosmc through hypermethylation of its promoter leads to loss of Cosmc transcripts in Tn4 cells, an immortalized B cell line from a male patient with a Tn-syndrome-like phenotype. These cells lack T-synthase activity and express the Tn antigen. Treatment of cells with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine causes restoration of Cosmc transcripts, restores T-synthase activity, and reduces Tn antigen expression. Bisulfite sequencing shows that CG dinucleotides in the Cosmc core promoter are hypermethylated. Interestingly, several other X-linked genes associated with glycosylation are not silenced in Tn4 cells, and we observed no correlation of a particular DNA methyltransferase to aberrant methylation of Cosmc in these cells. Thus, hypermethylation of the Cosmc promoter in Tn4 cells is relatively specific. Epigenetic silencing of Cosmc provides another mechanism underlying the abnormal expression of the Tn antigen, which may be important in understanding aberrant Tn antigen expression in human diseases, including IgA nephropathy and cancer. PMID:23035125

  5. Induction of cancer testis antigen expression in circulating acute myeloid leukemia blasts following hypomethylating agent monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pragya; Paluch, Benjamin E.; Matsuzaki, Junko; James, Smitha R.; Collamat-Lai, Golda; Blagitko-Dorfs, Nadja; Ford, Laurie Ann; Naqash, Rafeh; Lübbert, Michael; Karpf, Adam R.; Nemeth, Michael J.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTAs) are promising cancer associated antigens in solid tumors, but in acute myeloid leukemia, dense promoter methylation silences their expression. Leukemia cell lines exposed to HMAs induce expression of CTAs. We hypothesized that AML patients treated with standard of care decitabine (20mg/m2 per day for 10 days) would demonstrate induced expression of CTAs. Peripheral blood blasts serially isolated from AML patients treated with decitabine were evaluated for CTA gene expression and demethylation. Induction of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6, were observed following decitabine. Re-expression of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6 was associated with both promoter specific and global (LINE-1) hypomethylation. NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6 mRNA levels were increased irrespective of clinical response, suggesting that these antigens might be applicable even in patients who are not responsive to HMA therapy. Circulating blasts harvested after decitabine demonstrate induced NY-ESO-1 expression sufficient to activate NY-ESO-1 specific CD8+ T-cells. Induction of CTA expression sufficient for recognition by T-cells occurs in AML patients receiving decitabine. Vaccination against NY-ESO-1 in this patient population is feasible. PMID:26883197

  6. Upregulated Expression of B-Cell Antigen Family Tandem Repeat Proteins by Leishmania Amastigotes ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Carter, Darrick; Guderian, Jeffrey; Inoue, Noboru; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Reed, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins with tandem repeat (TR) domains have been found in various protozoan parasites, and they are often targets of B-cell responses. Through systematic analyses of whole proteomes, we recently demonstrated that two trypanosomatid parasites, Leishmania infantum and Trypanosoma cruzi, are rich in antigenic proteins with large TR domains. However, the reason that these proteins are antigenic was unclear. Here, by performing molecular, immunological, and bioinformatic characterizations of Leishmania TR proteins, we found two possible factors affecting the antigenicity of these proteins; one factor is their fundamental composition as TR proteins, and the other is regulation of their expression by parasites. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) using recombinant proteins revealed that the copy number of the repeat affects the affinity of binding between antigens and antibodies, as expected based on thermodynamic binding kinetics. Other than containing TR domains, the TR proteins do not share characteristics, such as sequence similarity or biased cellular location predicted by the presence of a signal sequence(s) and/or a transmembrane domain(s). However, the TR proteome contained a higher percentage of proteins upregulated in amastigotes than the whole proteome, and upregulated expression of a TR protein seemed to affect its antigenicity. These results indicate that Leishmania parasites actively utilize the TR protein family for parasitism in mammalian hosts. PMID:20160013

  7. Identification of Antigenic Components of Staphylococcus epidermidis Expressed during Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pourmand, Mohammad R.; Clarke, Simon R.; Schuman, Richard F.; Mond, James J.; Foster, Simon J.

    2006-01-01

    A spectrum of in vivo-expressed Staphylococcus epidermidis antigens was identified by probing a bacteriophage lambda library of S. epidermidis genomic DNA with human serum from infected and uninfected individuals. This analysis resulted in identification of 53 antigen-encoding loci. Six antigenic polypeptides were expressed from these loci and purified. These polypeptides were the propeptide, mature amidase, and repeat sequence domains of the major autolysin AtlE, GehD (lipase), and two members of a conserved family of surface proteins (ScaA [AaE] and ScaB). AtlE, ScaA, and ScaB all exhibit human ligand binding capacity. Screening a bank of human serum samples revealed that there were significant increases in the amounts of reactive immunoglobulin G in infected individuals compared to the amounts in healthy individuals for the repeat sequence and mature amidase domains of AtlE, ScaB, and GehD. Vaccination of mice with recombinant antigens stimulated an immune response which in vitro opsonized S. epidermidis. In this study we identified prospective candidate antigens for prophylaxis or immunotherapy to control disease. PMID:16861652

  8. Expression and functional properties of the Streptococcus intermedius surface protein antigen I/II.

    PubMed

    Petersen, F C; Pasco, S; Ogier, J; Klein, J P; Assev, S; Scheie, A A

    2001-07-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is associated with deep-seated purulent infections. In this study, we investigated expression and functional activities of antigen I/II in S. intermedius. The S. intermedius antigen I/II appeared to be cell surface associated, with a molecular mass of approximately 160 kDa. Northern blotting indicated that the S. intermedius NCTC 11324 antigen I/II gene was transcribed as a monocistronic message. Maximum expression was seen during the early exponential phase. Insertional inactivation of the antigen I/II gene resulted in reduced hydrophobicity during early exponential phase, whereas no effect was detected during mid- and late exponential phases. Binding to human fibronectin and laminin was reduced in the isogenic mutant, whereas binding to human collagen types I and IV and to rat collagen type I was not significant for either the wild type or the mutant. Compared to the wild type, the capacity of the isogenic mutant to induce interleukin 8 (IL-8) release by THP-1 monocytic cells was significantly reduced. The results indicate that the S. intermedius antigen I/II is involved in adhesion to human receptors and in IL-8 induction.

  9. Systematic Cloning of Treponema pallidum Open Reading Frames for Protein Expression and Antigen Discovery

    PubMed Central

    McKevitt, Matthew; Patel, Krupa; Smajs, David; Marsh, Michael; McLoughlin, Melanie; Norris, Steven J.; Weinstock, George M.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    A topoisomerase-based method was used to clone PCR products encoding 991 of the 1041 open reading frames identified in the genome sequence of the bacterium that causes syphilis, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Cloning the open reading frames into the univector plasmid system permitted the rapid conversion of the original clone set to other functional vectors containing a variety of promoters or tag sequences. A computational prediction of signal sequences identified 248 T. pallidum proteins that are potentially secreted from the cell. These clones were systematically converted into vectors designed to express the encoded proteins as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins. To test the potential of the clone set for novel antigen discovery, 85 of these fusion proteins were expressed from Escherichia coli, partially purified, and tested for antigenicity by using sera from rabbits infected with T. pallidum. Twelve of the 85 proteins bound significant levels of antibody. Of these 12 proteins, seven had previously been identified as T. pallidum antigens, and the remaining five represent novel antigens. These results demonstrate the potential of the T. pallidum clone set for antigen discovery and, more generally, for advancing the biology of this enigmatic spirochete. PMID:12805273

  10. Secretor status and ABH antigens expression in patients with oral lesions.

    PubMed

    Campi, Carlos; Escovich, Livia; Valdés, Vanina; García Borrás, Silvia; Racca, Liliana; Racca, Amelia; Cotorruelo, Carlos; Biondi, Claudia

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the secretor status of patients with oral pre-cancerous and cancerous lesions and ABH antigens expression in fixed tissue sections of these patients. To reveal A, B and H antigens in tissue sections of patients with precancerous and cancerous oral lesions (n= 54) we used a modified specific red cell adherence technique (SRCA-test). Normal endothelial cells expressed ABH antigens, the presence of indicator erythrocytes at the lumen of the blood vessels served as a built in positive control. The test results were graded from negative adherence to very strongly positive adherence. Negative adherence was defined as a complete absence of adhered indicator erythrocytes. A strongly positive reaction was defined as a sheet of indicator erythrocytes adhered to the epithelia cells. In 31 of the 54 samples analyzed the test showed slightly positive results on atypical areas, and there was a complete antigen deletion in areas histologically affected by neoplasia. Sixteen samples showed a total absence of ABH antigens in both histologically normal and pathological areas. As a working hypothesis, we propose that areas of SRCA-test negative epithelium are closely related to invasive carcinomas and may be their precursor lesions. Further it is suggested that areas of blood group isoantigen negative epithelium showing atypia, or in some instances near normal histology, may give rise to relatively low grade carcinomas. Considering these results we suggest the use of this method to monitor probable preneoplastic lesions in risk population, specially in those with no secretor status.

  11. Identification of Multiple Antigens Recognized by Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes From a Single Patient: Tumor Escape by Antigen Loss and Loss of MHC Expression

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Hung T.; Wang, Qiong J.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe a patient who experienced recurrence of metastatic melanoma after an initial dramatic response to immunotherapy using peptides derived from gp100, MART-1, and tyrosinase emulsified in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, and present data to support the hypothesis that the progression of disease in this patient was due to in vivo immunoselection for immunoresistant tumor variants. The authors previously demonstrated the existence of T-cell clones in this patient’s peripheral blood and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) reactive against multiple antigens, including gp100, the tyrosinase-related protein (TRP)-2, a novel TRP-2 isoform-TRP-2-6b, SOX10, and the melanoma antigen NY-ESO-1. In addition to the multiple HLA-A2 restricted T-cell clones, the authors have now identified additional HLA-B/C-restricted as well as class II (HLA-DP)-restricted anti-melanoma antigen T-cell clones from this patient’s TIL. One recurrent tumor showed loss of expression of multiple tumor antigens but retention of HLA class I expression. The other recurrent lesion showed total loss of HLA class I expression even though the tumor cells still expressed many melanoma antigens. This paper thus provides evidence for both the effectiveness of the immune destruction of cancer as well as problems associated with antigen-loss tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:15076135

  12. Cloning and Expressing Recombinant Protective Antigen Domains of B. anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Bacillus Anthracis in Escherichia Coli . Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2001, 283 (2), 308–15. 15. Ivins, B. E .; Welkos, S. L. Cloning and Expression of the...Buffer 4 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) at 37 ºC for at least 2 h. The enzymes were heat -inactivated for 20 min at 65 ºC. The pET-22b(+) vector was...to the previous reaction. The phosphatase was heat -inactivated for 20 min at 65 ºC prior to ligation. For each ligation, T4 DNA ligase and its

  13. Recombinant measles AIK-C vaccine strain expressing heterologous virus antigens.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Sawada, Akihito; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-04

    Further attenuated measles vaccines were developed more than 50 years ago and have been used throughout the world. Recombinant measles vaccine candidates have been developed and express several heterologous virus protective antigens. Immunogenicity and protective actions were confirmed using experimental animals: transgenic mice, cotton rats, and primates. The recent development of measles vaccine-based vectored vaccine candidates has been reviewed and some information on recombinant measles vaccines expressing respiratory syncytial virus proteins has been shown and discussed.

  14. Myeloid Antigen Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Relevance for Clinical Outcome in Indonesian ALL-2006 Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Supriyadi, Eddy; Veerman, Anjo J. P.; Sutaryo; Purwanto, Ignatius; vd Ven, Peter M.; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients expressing myeloid antigens on their ALL cells varies between 5 and 36% in several different studies. The clinical relevance of myeloid antigen expression in childhood ALL is controversial. In Indonesian patients, no data were present. Therefore, in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, we analyzed 239 ALL patients who were immunophenotyped including myeloid markers (CD13, CD33, CD117, and/or cMPO). Myeloid antigen expression was found in 25% of patients. Expression of myeloid antigen in B-lineage leukemia was 27%, and in T-lineage leukemia, it was 18% (P = 0.15). No association was found between myeloid antigen expression and clinical or biological features. In the whole cohort of patients we did not find a significant association between myeloid antigen expression and survival, although leukemia-free survival at 3 years was higher in the myeloid-negative patients (73% ± 6%) compared to myeloid-positive patients (67% ± 8%). Interestingly, in T-ALL patients, expression of myeloid antigens was an independent adverse prognostic factor (hazard ratio: 3.26, 95% CI: 1.06–9.98, P = 0.04). Kaplan-Meier analysis for event-free survival was also significant (log rank P = 0.03) in this subgroup. In conclusion, in the Indonesian ALL population, in particular, myeloid antigen-expressing T-ALL patients had a higher chance of having induction failure. PMID:23227046

  15. Expression of cancer-testis antigens in stem cells: is it a potential drawback or an advantage in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) are a group of tumor associated antigens with a restricted expression pattern in normal gametogenic tissues but expression in a broad range of malignancies. Their expression pattern has made them potential targets for immunotherapy. However, expression of some of these antigens has been demonstrated in normal stem cells as well as cancer stem cells (CSCs). As CSCs have been shown to be sources of metastasis and tumor recurrence, novel therapies are being focused on their eradication. On the other hand, CTA expression in normal stem cells raises the possibility that CTA based immunotherapies cause side effects in normal tissues.

  16. Escherichia coli strains expressing H12 antigens demonstrate an increased ability to attach to abiotic surfaces as compared with E. coli strains expressing H7 antigens.

    PubMed

    Goulter, Rebecca M; Taran, Elena; Gentle, Ian R; Gobius, Kari S; Dykes, Gary A

    2014-07-01

    The role of Escherichia coli H antigens in hydrophobicity and attachment to glass, Teflon and stainless steel (SS) surfaces was investigated through construction of fliC knockout mutants in E. coli O157:H7, O1:H7 and O157:H12. Loss of FliC(H12) in E. coli O157:H12 decreased attachment to glass, Teflon and stainless steel surfaces (p<0.05). Complementing E. coli O157:H12 ΔfliC(H12) with cloned wildtype (wt) fliC(H12) restored attachment to wt levels. The loss of FliCH7 in E. coli O157:H7 and O1:H7 did not always alter attachment (p>0.05), but complementation with cloned fliC(H12), as opposed to cloned fliCH7, significantly increased attachment for both strains compared with wt counterparts (p<0.05). Hydrophobicity determined using bacterial adherence to hydrocarbons and contact angle measurements differed with fliC expression but was not correlated to the attachment to materials included in this study. Purified FliC was used to functionalise silicone nitride atomic force microscopy probes, which were used to measure adhesion forces between FliC and substrates. Although no significant difference in adhesion force was observed between FliC(H12) and FliCH7 probes, differences in force curves suggest different mechanism of attachment for FliC(H12) compared with FliCH7. These results indicate that E. coli strains expressing flagellar H12 antigens have an increased ability to attach to certain abiotic surfaces compared with E. coli strains expressing H7 antigens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression and self-assembly of recombinant capsid protein from the antigenically distinct Hawaii human calicivirus.

    PubMed Central

    Green, K Y; Kapikian, A Z; Valdesuso, J; Sosnovtsev, S; Treanor, J J; Lew, J F

    1997-01-01

    The Norwalk and Hawaii viruses are antigenically distinct members of the family Caliciviridae and are considered to be important etiologic agents of epidemic gastroenteritis, with most studies focusing on the role of Norwalk virus. To further investigate the importance of Hawaii virus, Hawaii virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by expression of its capsid protein in the baculovirus system and these VLPs were used as the antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that was efficient in the detection of a serologic response to Hawaii virus. The ready availability of Hawaii VLPs should enable larger-scale epidemiological studies to further elucidate the importance of this agent. PMID:9196224

  18. Lewis antigen expression in gastric mucosa of children: relationship with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Ana Margarida; Marques, Terezinha; Soares, Paula Cristina M; David, Leonor; Reis, Celso A; Serpa, Jacinta; Queiroz, Dulciene M; Rocha, Gifone A; Rocha, Andréia C

    2004-01-01

    Lewis epithelial antigen expression has a role in Helicobacter pylori adherence, presumably mainly in cagA-positive strains. The authors investigated whether Lewis antigen expression in children's gastric mucosa was associated with H. pylori infection, cagA status, patient age, or presence of duodenal ulcer (DU). The expression of Lewis A (Le(a)), B (Le(b)), X (Le(x)), and Y (Le(y)) was detected by immunohistochemistry in the antral and oxyntic mucosae of 70 children. Children were divided in four age groups (<4 years; 4-8 years; 9-12 years; and 13-18 years). Forty-seven of the 70 children had H. pylori and 17 had DU. The cagA status was determined by polymerase chain reaction in 34 patients. Le(a) and Le(b) were expressed in 64% and 44% of the patients, respectively; Le(x) and Le(y) were expressed in the glands in all of the patients and in the superficial epithelium. Le(b) expression was more common among patients without H. pylori (15/23, 65%) than in those with H. pylori (16/47, 34%) (P = 0.03). In noninfected patients, Le(b) and superficial Le(y) expression were associated with increased age. Le(b) expression was more common in patients with chronic gastritis than in those with DU. Le(x) superficial expression was significantly associated with DU in patients with H. pylori. In children, the expression of Le(b) and Le(y) in the superficial gastric epithelium depends on age. Other receptors, such as Le(x), may have a role in H. pylori colonization, especially in patients with DU. Studies assessing the expression of Lewis antigens in children may contribute to an understanding of the mechanisms of acquisition of H. pylori infection.

  19. Prevalence, serologic and genetic studies of high expressers of the blood group A antigen on platelets*.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna Gomes, B M; Estalote, A C; Palatnik, M; Pimenta, G; Pereira, B de B; Do Nascimento, E M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the distribution of the platelet blood group A antigenicity in Euro-Brazilians (EUBs) and Afro-Brazilians (AFBs). A small but significant proportion of individuals express high levels of A or B antigen on their platelets corresponding to the erythrocyte ABO group. The mechanism of increased antigen expression has not been elucidated. A cohort of 241 blood group A donors was analysed by flow cytometry. Although mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) is a typical continuous variable, platelets were screened and divided into two categories: low expressers (LEs) and high expressers (HEs). A three-generation family was investigated looking for an inheritance mechanism. The prevalence of the HE platelet phenotype among group A(1) donors was 2%. The mean of MFI on platelets of A(1) subgroup of EUBs differs from that of AFBs (P = 0·0115), whereas the frequency of the HE phenotype was similar between them (P = 0·5251). A significant difference was found between sexes (P = 0·0039). Whereas the serum glycosyltransferase from HE family members converted significantly more H antigen on group O erythrocytes into A antigens compared with that in LE serum, their ABO, FUT1 and FUT2 genes were consensus. The theoretically favourable, transcriptionally four-repeat ABO enhancer was not observed. The occurrence of HE in several members suggests familial aggregation. Indeed, in repeated measures, stability of the MFI values is suggesting an inherited condition. Factors outside the ABO locus might be responsible for the HE phenotype. Whether the real mechanism of inheritance is either of a polygenic or of a discrete Mendelian nature remains to be elucidated. © 2010 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2010 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  20. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  1. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology.

  2. Mapping of B-Cell Epitopes in a Trypanosoma cruzi Immunodominant Antigen Expressed in Natural Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lesénéchal, Mylène; Becquart, Laurence; Lacoux, Xavier; Ladavière, Laurent; Baida, Renata C. P.; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; da Silveira, José Franco

    2005-01-01

    Tc40 is an immunodominant antigen present in natural Trypanosoma cruzi infections. This immunogen was thoroughly mapped by using overlapping amino acid sequences identified by gene cloning and chemical peptide synthesis. To map continuous epitopes of the Tc40 antigen, an epitope expression library was constructed and screened with sera from human chagasic patients. A major, linear B-cell epitope spanning residues 403 to 426 (PAKAAAPPAA) was identified in the central domain of Tc40. A synthetic peptide spanning this region reacted strongly with 89.8% of the serum samples from T. cruzi-infected individuals. This indicates that the main antigenic site is defined by the linear sequence of the peptide rather than a conformation-dependent structure. The major B-cell epitope of Tc40 shares a high degree of sequence identity with T. cruzi ribosomal and RNA binding proteins, suggesting the existence of cross-reactivity among these molecules. PMID:15699429

  3. Different serotypes of dengue viruses differently regulate the expression of the host cell antigen processing machinery.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chye Sheng; Yusof, Rohana; Othman, Shatrah

    2015-09-01

    Dengue virus (DV) infection demonstrates an intriguing virus-induced intracellular membrane alteration that results in the augmentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted antigen presentation. As oppose to its biological function in attracting CD8(+) T-cells, this phenomenon appears to facilitate the immune evasion. However, the molecular events that attribute to the dysregulation of the antigen presenting mechanism (APM) by DV remain obscure. In this study, we aimed to characterize the host cell APM upon infection with all serotypes of whole DV. Cellular RNA were isolated from infected cells and the gene expressions of LMP2, LMP7, TAP1, TAP2, TAPBP, CALR, CANX, PDIA3, HLA-A and HLA-B were analyzed via quantitative PCR. The profiles of the gene expression were further validated. We showed that all four DV serotypes modulate host APM at the proteasomal level with DV2 showing the most prominent expression profile.

  4. Regulatory mutations in CHO cells induce expression of the mouse embryonic antigen SSEA-1.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C; Stanley, P

    1983-11-01

    Two rare and dominant mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, LEC11 and LEC12, express the mouse embryonic antigen SSEA-1. Parental CHO cells and the revertants, LEC11.R9 and LEC12.R10, do not express this antigen as detected by a sensitive radioimmunoassay with a monoclonal antibody to SSEA-1. The presence of the SSEA-1 determinant correlates with the apparent de novo expression of specific N-acetylglucosaminide alpha(1,3)fucosyltransferase activities not detected in parental or revertant cell extracts. Several differences in the enzymes substrate specificities and their products have been identified. The combined data suggest that LEC11 and LEC12 mutants result from regulatory mutations affecting different fucosyltransferase genes.

  5. Extracellular Expression in Aspergillus niger of an Antibody Fused to Leishmania sp. Antigens.

    PubMed

    Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2017-08-31

    Nucleoside hydrolase and sterol 24-c-methyltransferase, two antigenic proteins of Leishmania sp., were expressed in Aspergillus niger. Genetic transformation of conidia was achieved using underwater shock waves. scFv antibody addressed to DEC205, a receptor of dendritic cells, was fused to two proteins of Leishmania sp. Receptor 205 has a relevant role in the immune system in mammals; it can modulate T cell response to different antigens. Extracellular expression strategy of recombinant antibody was achieved using a fragment of native glucoamylase A (514 aa) as a carrier. Fermentations in shake flasks showed that the recombinant protein (104 kDa) was expressed and secreted only when maltose was used as carbon source; on the contrary, the expression was highly repressed in presence of xylose. Noteworthy, recombinant protein was secreted without glucoamylase-carrier and accumulation at intracellular level was not observed. The results presented here demonstrate the high value of Aspergillus niger as biotechnological platform for recombinant antibodies against Leishmania sp. at low cost. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about the recombinant expression of antigenic proteins of Leishmania sp. in filamentous fungi. The protein obtained can be used to explore novel strategies to induce immunity against Leishmania sp. or it can be employed in diagnostic kits to detect this neglected disease.

  6. Melanoma antigen expression and metastatic ability of mutant B16 melanoma clones.

    PubMed

    Nozue, M; Sakiyama, H; Tsuchiya, K; Hirabayashi, Y; Taniguchi, M

    1988-11-15

    The biological functions of murine melanoma-associated antigens recognized by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (M562, M622 and M2590) were examined by using mutant clones which differed in their degree of expression of these antigens. Four clones of high expressors of 3 types of antigen (MEA group), 5 clones of low or non-expressors of M562- and M622-recognizing antigens (MEB group) and 4 clones of non-expressor of GM3 recognized by M2590 (MEC group) were used. Attachment of these clones to components of extracellular matrix was different between the groups. Two clones of the MEA group showed the highest ability to adhere to laminin and type-IV collagen, whereas the clones of the MEB and MEC groups significantly lost their ability to attach to laminin and type-IV collagen. In experimental lung metastasis, metastasizing ability of MEA-group cells was higher than that of MEB- and MEC-group cells. Our results suggest that these antigens play some functional role in metastasis mediated by increasing capacity for attachment to laminin and type-IV collagen.

  7. Stage-specific embryonic antigen: determining expression in canine glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    The expression of stage-specific embryonic antigens (SSEAs) was determined in several types of canine cancer cells. Flow cytometry showed SSEA-1 expression in glioblastoma, melanoma, and mammary cancer cells, although none expressed SSEA-3 or SSEA-4. Expression of SSEA-1 was not detected in lymphoma, osteosarcoma, or hemangiosarcoma cell lines. Relatively stable SSEA-1 expression was observed between 24 and 72 h of culture. After 8 days in culture, sorted SSEA-1− and SSEA-1+ cells re-established SSEA-1 expression to levels comparable to those observed in unsorted cells. Our results document, for the first time, the expression of SSEA-1 in several canine cancer cell lines. PMID:27456773

  8. Supernatants of human leukocytes contain mediator, different from interferon gamma, which induces expression of MHC class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    In this report, data are presented on the regulation of MHC class II antigen expression by a mediator present in supernatants of human mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC-SN), and which is different from IFN-gamma. The capacity of supernatants to induce antigen expression did not correspond to titers of IFN-gamma. Removal of IFN-gamma using either dialysis against pH 2 or neutralizing mAb against human IFN-gamma did not abrogate the MHC class II antigen expression-inducing capacity of MLC-SN when tested on adenocarcinoma cell lines, kidney epithelial cells, and fibroblasts in vitro in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Therefore, supernatants of human leukocytes contain a mediator, different from IFN-gamma, which induces expression of MHC class II antigens. Dose-response studies revealed that the mediator is produced after allogeneic and lectin stimulation of human leukocytes, and by unstimulated leukocytes. Activation of leukocytes resulted in increased titers of the mediator. The mediator markedly enhances expression of both HLA-DR and HLA-DQ antigens, whereas IFN-gamma had a similar effect on HLA-DR antigens, and only a minor effect on HLA-DQ antigens. Interaction of the mediator and IFN-gamma resulted in a potentiating effect of these two factors on MHC class II antigen expression. Biochemical analysis revealed a mediator, distinguishable by FPLC from IL-1, IL-2, and human IFN-gamma, and which has a molecular mass of 32 kD. PMID:2941512

  9. Induction of surface antigen CD69 expression in T-lymphocytes following exposure to actinomycin D.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C D; Greene, J F; Measel, J W

    1999-10-01

    The expression of surface antigen CD69 in immune response cells is typically associated with the early stage(s) of cell activation, with maximal expression levels within 4 h of appropriate antigenic or mitogenic stimulation, and maintenance of these high expression levels for 18-24 h. The expression profiles of CD69 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured with actinomycin D prior to mitogenic stimulation were evaluated by direct immunofluorescence using flow cytometry. Pretreatment of PBMC suspensions with low, non-toxic levels of actinomycin D stimulated CD3+ T-lymphocytes to express CD69 in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, CD4+ T-lymphocytes were the primary cells responding in this fashion. Secondary mitogenic stimulation following antibiotic treatment potentiated cellular CD69 expression in these assays. CD69 expression was profoundly suppressed with in vitro actinomycin D concentrations >/=1-2 microg/ml, presumably by interference with cellular transcription/translation mechanisms. Parallel thymidine incorporation assays indicated that actinomycin D effectively inhibited thymidine uptake in a concentration-dependent manner, with complete inhibition at >/=0.1 microg/ml. The evaluation of cell cycling dynamics following antibiotic treatment, with and without secondary mitogen stimulation, indicated no substantial changes in DNA synthesis over controls. The diversity of these responses suggests that expression of CD69 may not solely reflect mitogenic activation status but may, under some conditions, result from induced cellular stress.

  10. Expression Cloning of an Immunodominant Family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens Using Human Cd4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Mark R.; Bement, Teresa; Day, Craig H.; Zhu, Liqing; Molesh, David; Skeiky, Yasir A. W.; Coler, Rhea; Lewinsohn, David M.; Reed, Steven G.; Dillon, Davin C.

    2000-01-01

    Development of a subunit vaccine for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is likely to be dependent on the identification of T cell antigens that induce strong proliferation and interferon γ production from healthy purified protein derivative (PPD)+ donors. We have developed a sensitive and rapid technique for screening an Mtb genomic library expressed in Escherichia coli using Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells. Using this technique, we identified a family of highly related Mtb antigens. The gene of one family member encodes a 9.9-kD antigen, termed Mtb9.9A. Recombinant Mtb9.9A protein, expressed and purified from E. coli, elicited strong T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PPD+ but not PPD− individuals. Southern blot analysis and examination of the Mtb genome sequence revealed a family of highly related genes. A T cell line from a PPD+ donor that failed to react with recombinant Mtb9.9A recognized one of the other family members, Mtb9.9C. Synthetic peptides were used to map the T cell epitope recognized by this line, and revealed a single amino acid substitution in this region when compared with Mtb9.9A. The direct identification of antigens using T cells from immune donors will undoubtedly be critical for the development of vaccines to several intracellular pathogens. PMID:10662800

  11. Expression of CD3-associated antigen-binding receptors on suppressor T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Steele, J K; Billings, P R; Selvaraj, P; Dorf, M E

    1988-01-01

    Three suppressor T (Ts)-cell hybridomas specific for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (NP) hapten were selected for surface expression of cluster determinant 3 (CD3) by using antibody (anti-CD3) or antigen (NP-bovine serum albumin) panning procedures followed by cloning at limiting dilution. The CD3-selected Ts hybridomas showed a 1-2 logarithmic enrichment in suppressor activity when compared to the parent lines; they also specifically bound NP-coupled sheep red blood cells in rosette assays. This antigen-binding ability could be down-modulated by anti-CD3 antibody. Similarly, surface expression of CD3 was specifically down-modulated by preincubation of these hybridomas with antigen. Anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody under reducing conditions coprecipitated a broad band of 38-50 kDa associated with two CD3 (25 and 16 kDa) bands. T-cell receptor, anti-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody also immunoprecipitated a broad band in the 41 to 49-kDa region. The combined results suggest that, like helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Ts cells also bear antigen-specific receptors associated with CD3 molecules. Images PMID:2973609

  12. Identification of Tannerella forsythia antigens specifically expressed in patients with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hyeong Chan; Zhu, Weidong; Kim, Seon-Mi; Sabet, Mojgan; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2007-10-01

    Molecular pathogenesis of Tannerella forsythia, a putative periodontal pathogen, has not yet been adequately elucidated due to limited information on its virulence factors. Here, identification of in vivo expressed antigens of T. forsythia is reported using in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT). Among 13 000 recombinant clones screened, 16 positive clones were identified that reacted reproducibly with sera obtained from patients with periodontal disease. DNA sequences from 12 of these in vivo-induced genes were determined. IVIAT-identified protein antigens of T. forsythia include: BspA, a well-defined virulence factor of T. forsythia; enzymes involved in housekeeping functions (tRNA synthetases, glycine hydroxymethyltransferase, and glucoside glucohydrolase); enzymes implicated in tissue destruction (dipeptidyl peptidase IV); a DNA mismatch repair protein; and putative outer membrane proteins of unknown function. The in vivo gene expression of these IVIAT-identified antigens was confirmed by a quantitative real-time PCR analysis. This is, to the best of the authors' knowledge, the first report using IVIAT in T. forsythia. It is anticipated that detailed analysis of the in vivo-induced genes identified by IVIAT in this study will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating periodontal infection by T. forsythia.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic variation of Lewis antigen expression in geographically diverse Helicobacter pylori isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Mary Ann; Zhang, William; Shah, Sunny; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo L.; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori is a persistent colonizer of the human gastric mucosa, which can lead to the development peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinomas. However, H. pylori can asymptomatically colonize a host for years. One factor that has been hypothesized to contribute to such persistence is the production of Lewis (Le) antigens in the lipopolysaccharide layer of the bacterial outer membrane as a form of molecular mimicry, since humans also express these antigens on their gastric mucosa. Humans and H. pylori both are polymorphic for Le expression, which is driven in H. pylori by variation at the Le synthesis loci. In this report we sought to characterize Le genotypic and phenotypic variation in geographically diverse H. pylori isolates. Materials and Methods From patients undergoing endoscopy in 29 countries, we determined Le phenotypes of 78 H. pylori strains, and performed genotyping of the galT and β-(1,3)galT loci in 113 H. pylori strains. Results Le antigen phenotyping revealed a significant (p <0.0001) association between type 1 (Lea and Leb) expression and strains of East-Asian origin. Genotyping revealed a significant correlation between strain origin and the size of the promoter region upstream of the Le synthesis gene, galT (p <0.0001). Conclusion These results indicate that the heterogeneity of human Le phenotypes are reflected in their H. pylori colonizing strains, and suggest new loci that can be studied to assess variation of Le expression. PMID:22059399

  14. Variable expression of activation-linked surface antigens on human mast cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Valent, P; Schernthaner, G H; Sperr, W R; Fritsch, G; Agis, H; Willheim, M; Bühring, H J; Orfao, A; Escribano, L

    2001-02-01

    Mast cells (MC) are multipotent effector cells of the immune system. They contain an array of biologically active mediator substances in their granules. MC also express a number of functionally important cell surface antigens, including stem cell factor receptor (SCFR=kit=CD117), high affinity IgER (FcepsilonRI), or CSaR (CD88). Respective ligands can induce or promote degranulation, migration, or cytokine production. Other integral surface molecules can mediate adhesion or cell aggregation. Recent data suggest that a number of critical molecules are variably expressed on the surface of human MC. In fact, depending on the environment (organ), stage of cell maturation, type of disease, and other factors, MC express variable amounts of activation-linked antigens (CD25, CD63, CD69, CD88), cell recognition molecules (CD2, CD11, CD18, CD50, CD54), or cytokine receptors. At present, however, little is known about the mechanisms and regulation of expression of such antigens. The present article gives an overview of MC phenotypes in health and disease, and attempts to provide explanations for the phenotypic variability of MC.

  15. Simultaneous Quantification of Viral Antigen Expression Kinetics Using Data-Independent (DIA) Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Croft, Nathan P; de Verteuil, Danielle A; Smith, Stewart A; Wong, Yik Chun; Schittenhelm, Ralf B; Tscharke, David C; Purcell, Anthony W

    2015-05-01

    The generation of antigen-specific reagents is a significant bottleneck in the study of complex pathogens that express many hundreds to thousands of different proteins or to emerging or new strains of viruses that display potential pandemic qualities and therefore require rapid investigation. In these instances the development of antibodies for example can be prohibitively expensive to cover the full pathogen proteome, or the lead time may be unacceptably long in urgent cases where new highly pathogenic viral strains may emerge. Because genomic information on such pathogens can be rapidly acquired this opens up avenues using mass spectrometric approaches to study pathogen antigen expression, host responses and for screening the utility of therapeutics. In particular, data-independent acquisition (DIA) modalities on high-resolution mass spectrometers generate spectral information on all components of a complex sample providing depth of coverage hitherto only seen in genomic deep sequencing. The spectral information generated by DIA can be iteratively interrogated for potentially any protein of interest providing both evidence of protein expression and quantitation. Here we apply a solely DIA mass spectrometry based methodology to profile the viral antigen expression in cells infected with vaccinia virus up to 9 h post infection without the need for antigen specific antibodies or other reagents. We demonstrate deep coverage of the vaccinia virus proteome using a SWATH-MS acquisition approach, extracting quantitative kinetics of 100 virus proteins within a single experiment. The results highlight the complexity of vaccinia protein expression, complementing what is known at the transcriptomic level, and provide a valuable resource and technique for future studies of viral infection and replication kinetics. Furthermore, they highlight the utility of DIA and mass spectrometry in the dissection of host-pathogen interactions.

  16. Differential Glioma-Associated Tumor Antigen Expression Profiles of Human Glioma Cells Grown in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N.; Hoa, Neil T.; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens. PMID:22957023

  17. Differential glioma-associated tumor antigen expression profiles of human glioma cells grown in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N; Hoa, Neil T; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens.

  18. Immunoselection in vivo: independent loss of MHC class I and melanocyte differentiation antigen expression in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Jäger, E; Ringhoffer, M; Altmannsberger, M; Arand, M; Karbach, J; Jäger, D; Oesch, F; Knuth, A

    1997-04-10

    Peptides derived from melanocyte differentiation antigens have been identified as targets for MHC class I-restricted cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in human melanoma Regression of antigen-expressing tumors as well as selection of antigen-loss variants in the presence of antigen-specific CTLs have previously been reported. In the present study, we determined the expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan A/MART-1 and tyrosinase by mRNA analysis and by immunohistochemical staining with the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) A103 and T311. Co-expression of Melan A/MART-1 and tyrosinase was detected by both methods in 18/20 melanomas tested. However, immunohistochemistry provided additional information on intensity and microheterogeneity of antigen expression that cannot be detected by mRNA analysis as a molecular basis for the escape from CTL recognition of antigen-negative tumor cells. Comparative analysis of repeated biopsies of metastatic lesions in 5 HLA-A2+ patients showed a gradual loss of Melan A/MART-1 expression in 4/5 and of tyrosinase in 2/5 samples in association with tumor progression. However, 3 of these patients had growing antigen-positive tumors in the presence of antigen-specific CTLs. This led us to assess the expression of MHC class I, the essential restriction element for CTL recognition, and of HLA-A2. We found an unexpectedly high frequency of MHC class I-negative tumors (9/20). Loss of MHC class I expression was detected in 3/5 progressive tumors and isolated loss of HLA-A2 in 1/5 tumors. Our results suggest that strategies enhancing the expression of MHC class I and tumor-associated antigens need to be considered in attempts at making vaccination more effective.

  19. Relationship between expression of epidermal growth factor and simian virus 40 T antigen in a line of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lafond, R E; Giammalvo, J T; Norkin, L C

    1995-09-01

    The pattern of expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen gene and resultant dysplasia were re-examined in a line of transgenic mice in which the T antigen gene was under the control of the SV40 early promoter. We found that T antigen expression in the kidney, and resulting dysplastic lesions, occurred exclusively in the distal convoluted tubules and the ascending limbs of Henle. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in the kidney of normal mice was similarly immunolocalized. The correlation between high EGF immunoreactivity in normal mouse tissues and T antigen expression in the transgenic counterpart was also seen in the choroid plexus epithelium and in the submandibular glands of male mice. T antigen was not found in the submandibular gland of transgenic females. Similarly, EGF was only rarely detected in the normal female submandibular gland. In contrast to the correlation between T antigen expression in the transgenic mice and EGF expression in the corresponding tissues of the normal mice, within the dysplastic lesions of the transgenic mice EGF expression was severely diminished. Adenocarcinomas of the male submandibular gland from another line of transgenic mice that expresses the Int-1 transgene, showed similarly reduced levels of immunostaining for EGF. Thus, reduced expression of EGF might be a general feature of dysplasia and tumorigenesis in those tissues that normally express EGF.

  20. Prognostic relevance of melanoma antigen D1 expression in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Melanoma antigen D1 (MAGED1) is a member of the type II melanoma antigen (MAGE) family. The down-regulation of MAGED1 expression has been shown in breast carcinoma cell lines and in glioma stem cells and may play an important role in apoptosis and anti-tumorigenesis. However, there is no report on its clinical role in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods We examined the expression of MAGED1 by qPCR in colorectal cancer tissues and their adjacent non-tumorous tissues taken from 6 cases and performed Western blotting and IHC analyses. In addition, we analyzed MAGED1 expression in 285 clinicopathologically characterized colorectal cancer patients. Results MAGED1 expression was significantly down-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues compared with adjacent non-tumorous tissues and was associated with clinical stage (p < 0.001), T classification (p = 0.001), N classification (p < 0.001), M classification (p < 0.001) and pathologic differentiation (p = 0.002). Patients with lower MAGED1 expression had a shorter survival time than those with higher MAGED1 expression. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that MAGED1 expression was an independent prognostic factors (p < 0.001). Conclusions MAGED1 may serve as a novel prognostic biomarker of human colorectal cancer. PMID:22935435

  1. Expression of Heterologous Antigens in Commensal Neisseria spp.: Preservation of Conformational Epitopes with Vaccine Potential

    PubMed Central

    O'Dwyer, Clíona A.; Reddin, Karen; Martin, Denis; Taylor, Stephen C.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Hudson, Michael J.; Brodeur, Bernard R.; Langford, Paul R.; Kroll, J. Simon

    2004-01-01

    Commensal neisseriae share with Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) a tendency towards overproduction of the bacterial outer envelope, leading to the formation and release during growth of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs from both meningococci and commensal neisseriae have shown promise as vaccines to protect against meningococcal disease. We report here the successful expression at high levels of heterologous proteins in commensal neisseriae and the display, in its native conformation, of one meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine candidate, NspA, in OMVs prepared from such a recombinant Neisseria flavescens strain. These NspA-containing OMVs conferred protection against otherwise lethal intraperitoneal challenge of mice with N. meningitidis serogroup B, and sera raised against them mediated opsonophagocytosis of meningococcal strains expressing this antigen. This development promises to facilitate the design of novel vaccines containing membrane protein antigens that are otherwise difficult to present in native conformation that provide cross-protective efficacy in the prevention of meningococcal disease. PMID:15501782

  2. Expression of Ia antigens by murine kidney epithelium after exposure to streptozotocin.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, A. G.; Mannschreck, J. W.; Anderson, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    In the normal murine kidney, Ia antigens are expressed by dendritic cells located within the interstitial connective tissue and scattered cells within the glomerulus. After receiving multiple low doses of streptozotocin, a nitrosourea derivative of glucose, kidney epithelium labeled intensely with anti-Ia antibodies. Ultrastructural immunohistochemistry indicated that the epithelial cells of the proximal convoluted tubules expressed Ia antigens on their basolateral surfaces while remaining Ia- on their luminal surfaces. This response to streptozotocin does not appear to be related to the diabetogenic potential of the drug, because BALB/cJ mice, which remain normoglycemic after treatment with streptozotocin, also exhibited strongly Ia+ tubular epithelium after treatment with streptozotocin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2950766

  3. Expression of ABH blood group antigens, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I, and type IV collagen in the sinusoids of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Terada, T; Nakanuma, Y

    1991-01-01

    The expression of blood group antigens (A, B, H, Lewis(a) and Lewis(b)), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), factor VIII-related antigen, and type IV collagen on the sinusoids was examined immunohistochemically in 15 cases of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), 11 cases of cirrhosis, 12 cases of chronic active hepatitis, and in a control sample of 16 normal livers. Sinusoidal endothelial cells of HCC characteristically showed a diffuse and strong immunoreactivity to ABH blood group antigens in the specimen with a comparable ABO blood group. The sinusoidal endothelial cells were also diffusely and strongly positive for UEA-I receptors. In contrast, in cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis a few sinusoidal endothelial cells were positive for ABH blood group antigens and UEA-I receptors. In normal livers, only a few sinusoidal endothelial cells were positive for ABH blood group antigens and UEA-1 receptors. Tests for factor VIII-related antigen and Lewis blood group antigens were almost negative on sinusoidal endothelial cells. Although type IV collagen was distributed diffusely in the space of Disse in these four groups, its expression was strongest in HCC. Blood vessels of portal tracts and fibrous septa were positive for ABH blood group antigens, UEA-1 receptors, factor VIII-related antigen, and type IV collagen, but negative for Lewis blood group antigens. These findings suggest that some sinusoidal endothelial cells undergo "capillarization" in cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis, and that the majority of sinusoidal endothelial cells of HCC have phenotypic characteristics of capillaries.

  4. Lewis(y) antigen promotes the progression of epithelial ovarian cancer by stimulating MUC1 expression.

    PubMed

    Hou, Rui; Jiang, Luo; Liu, Dawo; Lin, Bei; Hu, Zhenhua; Gao, Jian; Zhang, Danye; Zhang, Shulan; Iwamori, Masao

    2017-08-01

    MUC1 is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and is overexpressed in various epithelial tumor tissues. Some researchers have demonstrated that the glycosylation status of MUC1 can affect MUC1-mediated tumor growth and cell differentiation. In our previous study, we proved that the abilities of cell proliferation, adhesion, invasion and metastasis, and drug resistance were enhanced in ovarian cancer cells stably expressing Lewis(y). Therefore, we hypothesized that Lewis(y) antigen may play a central role in regulating MUC1 expression, and MUC1-mediated cell growth and differentiation may be closely associated with Lewis(y) antigen. This study aimed to examine the correlation between MUC1 expression and Lewis(y) antigen levels in ovarian cancer cell lines and tissue samples. A series of techniques, including RT-qPCR, western blot anlaysis, immunoprecipitation, immunohistochemistry and double-labeling immunofluorescence were applied to detect the expression of Lewis(y) and MUC1. In malignant epithelial ovarian tumors, the positive expression rates of Lewis(y) antigen and MUC1 were 88.33 and 86.67%, respectively, which were markedly higher than those in borderline (60.00 and 53.33%, P<0.05), benign (33.33 and 30%, P<0.01) and normal (0 and 25%, P<0.01) ovarian samples. There was no correlation between the positive expression rates of Lewis(y) or MUC1 and clinicopathological parameters in ovarian cancers (P>0.05). The expression levels of Lewis(y) and MUC1 correlated with the clinical FIGO stage (P<0.05). Both MUC1 and Lewis(y) were highly expressed in ovarian cancer tissues, and their expression levels were positively correlated (P<0.01). In α1,2-fucosyltransferase (α1,2-FT)-transfected cells, the gene and protein expression levels of MUC1 were significantly upregulated compared with the cells that did not overexpress α1,2-FT (P<0.05). The ratio of Lewis(y) immunoprecipitated with MUC1 to total MUC1 increased 1.55-fold in α1,2-FT-overexpressing cells

  5. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population. PMID:9060668

  6. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-04-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population.

  7. Interferon treatment of mice: enhanced expression of histocompatibility antigens on lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, P; Gresser, I; Leary, P; Tovey, M

    1976-01-01

    Treatment of young and mature mice with potent mouse interferon preparations results in a marked enhancement of the expression of histocompatibility antigens on the surface of thymocytes and splenic lymphocytes as measured by an enhanced absorption of alloantiserum. We postulate that such modifications of the cell surface may reflect an effect of interferon on lymphocyte maturation and may be relevant to the effect of interferon on lymphocyte function. PMID:1063409

  8. Decreased neutralizing antigenicity in IBV S1 protein expressed from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Kiyohiko; Suenaga, Kiyotaka; Sakaguchi, Masashi; Yamazaki, Kenichi; Honda, Takashi

    2015-10-02

    We evaluated the antigenicity of recombinant infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) S1 protein expressed in mammalian cells. Recombinant S1 was expressed as a secreted protein fused with a trimerization motif peptide, then purified using Ni Sepharose. The purified protein was analyzed by Western blotting, mixed with oil adjuvant, and administered to 29-day-old specific-pathogen-free chickens. Six weeks after immunization, anti-IBV neutralizing titer and anti-S1 ELISA titer were determined; immunized chickens then were inoculated with IBV via the trachea and ciliary activity was observed. Results showed that the recombinant S1 protein was highly glycosylated, and the neutralizing antigenicity of recombinant S1 protein was lower than that of inactivated virus. However, anti-S1 ELISA indicated that the recombinant S1 protein induced antibodies against S1. These results suggest that the recombinant S1 may retain non-neutralizing epitopes but have unnatural glycosylation pattern and conformation, resulting in lacking neutralizing conformational epitopes. In conclusion, the neutralizing antigenicity of recombinant S1 protein expressed from mammalian cells was decreased, and was not sufficient to induce neutralizing antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Signal transduction-associated and cell activation-linked antigens expressed in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Ghannadan, Minoo; Hauswirth, Alexander W; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Arock, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are multifunctional hematopoietic effector cells that produce and release an array of biologically active mediator substances. Growth and functions of MCs are regulated by cytokines, other extracellular factors, surface and cytoplasmic receptors, oncogene products, and a complex network of signal transduction cascades. Key regulators of differentiation of MCs appear to be stem cell factor (SCF) and its tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (c-kit proto-oncogene product=CD117), downstream-acting elements, and the mi transcription factor (MITF). Signaling through KIT is negatively regulated by the signal regulatory protein (SIRP)-alpha (CD172a)-SHP-1-pathway that is disrupted in neoplastic MCs in MC proliferative disorders. Both KIT and FcepsilonRI are involved in MC activation and mediator release. Activation of MCs through FcepsilonRI is associated with increased expression of activation-linked membrane antigens as well as with signaling events involving Lyn and Syk kinases, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-pathway, Ras pathway, and the phospholipase C-protein kinase C pathway. A similar network of signaling is found in SCF-activated MCs. The current article gives an overview on signal transduction-associated and activation-linked antigens expressed in human MCs. Wherever possible the functional implication of signaling pathways and antigen expression are discussed.

  10. Modulation of ABH histo-blood group antigen expression in normal and myasthenic human thymus.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Victoria S; Marinova, Tsvetana T

    2006-10-01

    The role of ABH histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) in intercellular communication during normal and pathological processes is still uncertain. The present work investigates the expression of ABH HBGA in epithelial cells and lymphocytes in normal thymus, and characterizes the modulation of their immunoreactivity during myasthenic transformation. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were applied on normal young thymus and on myasthenia gravis-associated thymomas and thymic hyperplasias. The Hassall's corpuscules in the thymus of young individuals were homogeneously stained for HBGA, while in hyperplastic glands only their central part was positive. Stromal epithelial cells permanently expressed HBGA in all tissue samples. In thymomas, mainly the lymphocytes in close proximity to antigen expressing epithelial cells were positive, while in the hyperplastic gland the most intensely stained lymphocytes were those within Hassall's corpuscules. Novel evidence for modulation of ABH antigen reactivity in normal and myasthenic human thymus is presented. It suggests that HBGA might participate in the regulation of the cross-talk in the thymocyte microenvironment throughout the ontogeny, as well as during the myasthenic transformation.

  11. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jonathan CY; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15312.001 PMID:27205882

  12. Toxoplasma gondii: cloning, expression and immunoreactivity of recombinant ROP5 and ROP18 antigens.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Marcin M; Dziadek, Bożena; Dziadek, Jarosław; Gatkowska, Justyna; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Długońska, Henryka

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis and determining the infective stage are critical for effective therapy of toxoplasmosis. Owing to the progress in biotechnology, commonly used native, non-standardized diagnostic antigens should be replaced by genetically engineered antigens. The recombinant proteins are also promising components of subunit vaccines against Toxoplasma gondii infections. A strategic biological role of rhoptry proteins (ROP) in parasitophorous vacuole biogenesis and virulence of the parasite creates a necessity for an intensive study on the serological activity and immunogenicity of newly developed recombinant ROP antigens. Our findings indicate that all generated preparations of recombinant ROP5 and ROP18 antigens, expressed in Escherichia coli bacteria, are recognized by specific antibodies produced during acute and chronic infections in inbred laboratory mice. We noticed, for the first time, that ROP5 IgM antibodies are an early and sensitive marker of T. gondii infection. The proven immunoreactivity of the obtained preparations has become a premise for a further study on their utility in routine diagnosis of human and animal toxoplasmosis as well as in the immunoprevention of T. gondii infection (as the main or supplementary component of the vaccine).

  13. Expression in yeast of a Plasmodium vivax antigen of potential use in a human malaria vaccine

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    DNA coding for 234 amino acids of the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of Plasmodium vivax was incorporated into yeast expression vectors. The DNA encoded all the repeat domain and codons for a highly conserved sequence, KLKQP, found in CS proteins from all malaria parasites. Yeast cells transformed with these autonomously replicating plasmids expressed, upon induction, high levels of the CS polypeptide. The malaria antigen was purified in good yields from yeast extracts and was injected into mice using alum as adjuvant. The antibodies recognized the authentic CS protein, and at high dilutions, they inhibited the invasion of hepatocytes by sporozoites in vitro. PMID:3549959

  14. Mucin-associated sialosyl-Tn antigen expression in gastric cancer correlates with an adverse outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Werther, J. L.; Rivera-MacMurray, S.; Bruckner, H.; Tatematsu, M.; Itzkowitz, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    The expression of sialosyl-Tn (STn) antigen was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in primary gastric cancers. Twenty-one of 31 (68%) gastric cancers expressed STn, regardless of tumour location, stage or histological type. Eighty-one per cent of patients with STn-positive tumours died of their disease or had recurrent cancer, compared with 20% of patients with STn-negative tumours (P < 0.002). STn may be a useful prognostic marker in patients with gastric cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8123499

  15. Novel cancer-testis antigen expression on glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Komiyama, Masaru; Miyata, Haruo; Yagoto, Mika; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Iizuka, Akira; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Nogami, Masahiro; Ito, Ichiro; Watanabe, Reiko; Sugino, Takashi; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant and aggressive tumors, and has a very poor prognosis with a mean survival time of <2 years, despite intensive treatment using chemo-radiation. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches including immunotherapy have been developed against GBM. For the purpose of identifying novel target antigens contributing to GBM treatment, we developed 17 primary glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients, and analyzed the expression of various tumor antigens and glioma-associated markers using a quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). A quantitative PCR using 54 cancer-testis (CT) antigen-specific primers showed that 36 CT antigens were positive in at least 1 of 17 serum-derived cell lines, and 17 antigens were positive in >50% cell lines. Impressively, 6 genes (BAGE, MAGE-A12, CASC5, CTAGE1, DDX43 and IL-13RA2) were detected in all cell lines. The expression of other 13 glioma-associated antigens than CT genes were also investigated, and 10 genes were detected in >70% cell lines. The expression of CT antigen and glioma-associated antigen genes with a high frequency were also verified in IHC analysis. Moreover, a relationship of antigen gene expressions with a high frequency to overall survival was investigated using the Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) database of the National Cancer Institute, and expression of 6 genes including IL-13RA2 was inversely correlated to overall survival time. Furthermore, 4 genes including DDX43, TDRD1, HER2 and gp100 were identified as MGMT-relevant factors. In the present study, several CT antigen including novel genes were detected in high-grade glioma primary cell lines, which might contribute to developing novel immunotherapy and glioma-specific biomarkers in future.

  16. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax.

  17. Construction of random tumor transcriptome expression library for creating and selecting novel tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huizhun; Zhao, Xiuyun; Du, Peng; Qi, Gaofu

    2016-09-01

    Novel tumor antigens are necessary for the development of efficient tumor vaccines for overcoming the immunotolerance and immunosuppression induced by tumors. Here, we developed a novel strategy to create tumor antigens by construction of random tumor transcriptome expression library (RTTEL). The complementary DNA (cDNA) from S180 sarcoma was used as template for arbitrarily amplifying gene fragments with random primers by PCR, then ligated to the C-terminal of HSP65 in a plasmid pET28a-HSP for constructing RTTEL in Escherichia coli. A novel antigen of A5 was selected from RTTEL with the strongest immunotherapeutic effects on S180 sarcoma. Adoptive immunotherapy with anti-A5 sera also inhibited tumor growth, further confirming the key antitumor roles of A5-specific antibodies in mice. A5 contains a sequence similar to protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (PCMT1). The antisera of A5 were verified to cross-react with PCMT1 by Western blotting assay and vice versa. Both anti-A5 sera and anti-PCMT1 sera could induce antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity toward S180 cells by in vitro assay. Further assay with fluorescent staining showed that PCMT1 is detectable on the surface of S180 cells. Summary, the strategy to construct RTTEL is potential for creating and screening novel tumor antigens to develop efficient tumor vaccines. By RTTEL, we successfully created a protein antigen of A5 with significant immunotherapeutic effects on S180 sarcoma by induction of antibodies targeting for PCMT1.

  18. Detection of a low-molecular-weight antigen on melanoma cells by a human antiserum in leukocyte-dependent antibody assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, P; Murray, E; Werkmeister, J; McCarthy, W H

    1979-10-01

    Biochemical characterization of serologically detected human melanoma antigens was undertaken for the development of immunodiagnostic assays in melanoma. An antiserum from a human melanoma patient, which detected melanoma antigens expressed on a large proportion of different melanoma cells, was used in leucocyte-dependent cytotoxic antibody (LDA) 51Cr-release assays to monitor the purification of melanoma antigens in urea/acetate extracts of lactoperoxidase 125I-labelled melanoma cell membranes. The separation procedures included affinity chromatography on Concanavalin A, gel filtration on porous polyacrylamide beads and preparative isoelectric focusing. The fractions were also monitored by polyacrylamide electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate and by measurement of beta 2 microglobulin and carcinoembryonic antigen content. The antigens detected by this antiserum appeared to be acidic (pI 3.5) low-mol.-wt glycoproteins of approximately 15,000 daltons which were resistant to heating at 56 degrees C and digestion with neuraminidase, but susceptible to repeated freeze-thawing and trypsin digestion. They did not appear to be related to HLA antigens, beta 2 microglobulin or known foetal antigens. The nature of the antigens detected in these studies is as yet unknown, but they appear similar to those described in the sera and urine of melanoma patients in previous reports. Thes combined results and the frequent expression of these antigens on melanoma cells from different patients suggest that assays to detect this antigen may provide a valuable immunodiagnostic aid in the management of melanoma.

  19. Diversity of Helicobacter pylori isolates in expression of antigens and induction of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ren-Xian; Luo, Dong-Jiao; Sun, Ai-Hua; Yan, Jie

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To obtain evidence for selection of antigens used in genetically engineered vaccine against Helicobacter pylori (H pylori). METHODS: Enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) was established on the basis of recombinant protein antigens rUreB, rHpaA, rVacA, rCagA1, rNapA, rFlaA and rFlaB of H pylori to detect expression rates of the antigens in bacterial isolates as well as positive rates of the antibodies in sera from H pylori-infected patients. PCR was applied to the detection of carrying rates of the genes encoding antigens in the isolates. RESULTS: The outputs of rUreB, rHpaA, rVacA, rCagA1, rNapA, rFlaA and rFlaB were approximately 35%, 32%, 15%, 23%, 56%, 25% and 20% of the total bacterial proteins, respectively. One hundred and fifty-one strains of H pylori were isolated from 347 biopsy specimens of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer or gastric adenocarcinoma, with a positive rate of 43.5%. All of the isolates expressed UreB, HpaA, FlaA and FlaB while 52.3%, 92.1% and 93.4% of the isolates expressed VacA, CagA and NapA, respectively. In the sera of 151 H pylori-infected patients, the positive rates of IgG antibodies against UreB, HpaA, VacA, CagA, NapA, FlaA and FlaB were 100%, 87.4%, 43%, 71.5%, 89.4%, 84.8% and 79.5%, respectively. Furthermore, the expression frequencies of VacA and NapA were found to be relative to the severity of gastric diseases (P = 0.016 and P < 0.0001, respectively). CONCLUSION: UreB antigen is the top option of developing genetically engineered vaccine against H pylori followed by NapA or HpaA. PMID:18720546

  20. Cloning, auto-induction expression, and purification of rSpaA swine erysipelas antigen.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adilson José; da Costa Iemma, Mônica Rosas; Luperni Horta, Antônio Carlos; Sargo, Cíntia Regina; de Lima Camargo Giordano, Raquel; de Campos Giordano, Roberto; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina; Marques Novo, Maria Teresa

    2012-10-01

    This work reports the cloning, expression, and purification of a 42-kDa fragment of the SpaA protein from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the main antigenic candidate for a subunit vaccine against swine erysipelas. The use of an auto-induction protocol to improve heterologous protein expression in recombinant Escherichia coli cultures was also investigated. The cellular growth pattern and metabolite formation were evaluated under different induction conditions. The His-tagged protein was over-expressed as inclusion bodies, and was purified by a single chromatography step under denaturing conditions. Auto-induction conditions were shown to be an excellent process strategy, leading to a high level of rSpaA expression (about 25 % of total cellular protein content) in a short period of time.

  1. Secretory expression of a novel human spermatozoa antigen in E. coli and its application to a protein chip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Zhu; Qiu, Zhuo-Lin; Cai, Xiang-Sheng; Li, Jing-Jing; She, Miao-Qin; Xu, Yuan-Feng; Wu, Ying-Song

    2017-06-09

    To produce a recombinant spermatozoa antigen peptide using the E. coli: PhoA system on a protein chip for screening anti-sperm antibodies (ASA). The purity of the recombinant spermatozoa antigen exceeded 95% after two-step purification, as assessed using SDS-PAGE and HPLC. The diagnostic performance of a protein chip coated with the recombinant antigen peptide was evaluated by examining ASA in 51 infertile patients in comparison with a commercial ELISA kit. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.944, which indicated that the protein chip coated with recombinant spermatozoa antigen peptide was consistent with ELISA for ASA detection. A recombinant spermatozoa antigen was expressed in the E. coli PhoA secretory expression system and its potential application for clinical ASA detection was validated.

  2. Transgenic carrot expressing fusion protein comprising M. tuberculosis antigens induces immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Permyakova, Natalia V; Zagorskaya, Alla A; Belavin, Pavel A; Uvarova, Elena A; Nosareva, Olesya V; Nesterov, Andrey E; Novikovskaya, Anna A; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L; Moshkin, Mikhail P; Deineko, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  3. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  4. Cyclin-A1 represents a new immunogenic targetable antigen expressed in acute myeloid leukemia stem cells with characteristics of a cancer-testis antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Majeti, Ravindra; Schmitt, Thomas; Stirewalt, Derek; Keilholz, Ulrich; Loeb, Keith R.; Wood, Brent; Choi, Yongiae E.; Bleakley, Marie; Warren, Edus H.; Hudecek, Michael; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Weissman, Irving L.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted T-cell therapy is a potentially less toxic strategy than allogeneic stem cell transplantation for providing a cytotoxic antileukemic response to eliminate leukemic stem cells (LSCs) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, this strategy requires identification of leukemia-associated antigens that are immunogenic and exhibit selective high expression in AML LSCs. Using microarray expression analysis of LSCs, hematopoietic cell subpopulations, and peripheral tissues to screen for candidate antigens, cyclin-A1 was identified as a candidate gene. Cyclin-A1 promotes cell proliferation and survival, has been shown to be leukemogenic in mice, is detected in LSCs of more than 50% of AML patients, and is minimally expressed in normal tissues with exception of testis. Using dendritic cells pulsed with a cyclin-A1 peptide library, we generated T cells against several cyclin-A1 oligopeptides. Two HLA A*0201-restricted epitopes were further characterized, and specific CD8 T-cell clones recognized both peptide-pulsed target cells and the HLA A*0201-positive AML line THP-1, which expresses cyclin-A1. Furthermore, cyclin-A1–specific CD8 T cells lysed primary AML cells. Thus, cyclin-A1 is the first prototypic leukemia-testis-antigen to be expressed in AML LSCs. The pro-oncogenic activity, high expression levels, and multitude of immunogenic epitopes make it a viable target for pursuing T cell–based therapy approaches. PMID:22529286

  5. Stabilization of Transfected Cells Expressing Low-Incidence Blood Group Antigens: Novel Methods Facilitating Their Use as Reagent-Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Cecilia; Esteban, Rosa; Canals, Carme; Muñiz-Díaz, Eduardo; Nogués, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of erythrocyte antibodies in the serum of patients rely on panels of human red blood cells (RBCs), which coexpress many antigens and are not easily available for low-incidence blood group phenotypes. These problems have been addressed by generating cell lines expressing unique blood group antigens, which may be used as an alternative to human RBCs. However, the use of cell lines implies several drawbacks, like the requirement of cell culture facilities and the high cost of cryopreservation. The application of cell stabilization methods could facilitate their use as reagent cells in clinical laboratories. Methods We generated stably-transfected cells expressing low-incidence blood group antigens (Dia and Lua). High-expresser clones were used to assess the effect of TransFix® treatment and lyophilization as cell preservation methods. Cells were kept at 4°C and cell morphology, membrane permeability and antigenic properties were evaluated at several time-points after treatment. Results TransFix® addition to cell suspensions allows cell stabilization and proper antigen detection for at least 120 days, despite an increase in membrane permeability and a reduction in antigen expression levels. Lyophilized cells showed minor morphological changes and antigen expression levels were rather conserved at days 1, 15 and 120, indicating a high stability of the freeze-dried product. These stabilized cells have been proved to react specifically with human sera containing alloantibodies. Conclusions Both stabilization methods allow long-term preservation of the transfected cells antigenic properties and may facilitate their distribution and use as reagent-cells expressing low-incidence antigens, overcoming the limited availability of such rare RBCs. PMID:27603310

  6. Stabilization of Transfected Cells Expressing Low-Incidence Blood Group Antigens: Novel Methods Facilitating Their Use as Reagent-Cells.

    PubMed

    González, Cecilia; Esteban, Rosa; Canals, Carme; Muñiz-Díaz, Eduardo; Nogués, Núria

    2016-01-01

    The identification of erythrocyte antibodies in the serum of patients rely on panels of human red blood cells (RBCs), which coexpress many antigens and are not easily available for low-incidence blood group phenotypes. These problems have been addressed by generating cell lines expressing unique blood group antigens, which may be used as an alternative to human RBCs. However, the use of cell lines implies several drawbacks, like the requirement of cell culture facilities and the high cost of cryopreservation. The application of cell stabilization methods could facilitate their use as reagent cells in clinical laboratories. We generated stably-transfected cells expressing low-incidence blood group antigens (Dia and Lua). High-expresser clones were used to assess the effect of TransFix® treatment and lyophilization as cell preservation methods. Cells were kept at 4°C and cell morphology, membrane permeability and antigenic properties were evaluated at several time-points after treatment. TransFix® addition to cell suspensions allows cell stabilization and proper antigen detection for at least 120 days, despite an increase in membrane permeability and a reduction in antigen expression levels. Lyophilized cells showed minor morphological changes and antigen expression levels were rather conserved at days 1, 15 and 120, indicating a high stability of the freeze-dried product. These stabilized cells have been proved to react specifically with human sera containing alloantibodies. Both stabilization methods allow long-term preservation of the transfected cells antigenic properties and may facilitate their distribution and use as reagent-cells expressing low-incidence antigens, overcoming the limited availability of such rare RBCs.

  7. Analysis of the limitations of hepatitis B surface antigen expression in soybean cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, T R; Sunil Kumar, G B; Srinivas, L; Revathi, C J; Bapat, V A

    2007-09-01

    Soybean cell suspension cultures were transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens harboring pHBS/pHER constructs to express hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The transformed colonies were selected and analyzed for the expression of HBsAg by PCR, reverse transcription (RT) PCR, Western blot and ELISA analysis. The maximum expression of 700 ng/g F.W. was noted in pHER transformed cells. The highest expressing colonies were used to initiate the cell suspension cultures and the expression of HBsAg was estimated periodically. The expression levels were reduced drastically in cell suspension cultures compared to the colonies maintained on semi-solid medium. Various parameters were studied to maximize the cell growth and to retain the expression levels. The supplementation of culture medium with a protease inhibitor, leupeptin hemisulfate could restore up to 50% of HBsAg expression in cell suspension cultures. This is the first report to investigate the possible cause and solution to the loss of recombinant protein expression levels in plant cell suspension cultures.

  8. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher D.; Bannantine, John P.; Govender, Rodney; Endersen, Lorraine; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Coffey, Aidan; O'Mahony, Jim; Sleator, Roy D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of MAP2121c can enhance the heterologous expression of the major membrane protein (MMP), analogous to the form in which it is produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, we previously engineered MAP3733c (encoding MptD) and show herein that MptD displays the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adheres to the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne's disease. PMID:25237653

  9. Identification of Salmonella enterica Serovar Pullorum Antigenic Determinants Expressed In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuchun; Hu, Yachen; Chen, Jing; Liu, Zhicheng; Han, Jun; Sun, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Pullorum affecting poultry causes pullorum disease and results in severe economic loss in the poultry industry. Currently, it remains a major threat in countries with poor poultry surveillance and no efficient control measures. As S. Pullorum could induce strong humoral immune responses, we applied an immunoscreening technique, the in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT), to identify immunogenic bacterial proteins expressed or upregulated during S. Pullorum infection. Convalescent-phase sera from chickens infected with S. Pullorum were pooled, adsorbed against antigens expressed in vitro, and used to screen an S. Pullorum genomic expression library. Forty-five proteins were screened out, and their functions were implicated in molecular biosynthesis and degradation, transport, metabolism, regulation, cell wall synthesis and antibiotic resistance, environmental adaptation, or putative functions. In addition, 11 of these 45 genes were assessed for their differential expression by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), revealing that 9 of 11 genes were upregulated to different degrees under in vivo conditions, especially the regulator of virulence determinants, phoQ. Then, four in vivo-induced proteins (ShdA, PhoQ, Cse3, and PbpC) were tested for their immunoreactivity in 28 clinical serum samples from chickens infected with S. Pullorum. The rate of detection of antibodies against ShdA reached 82% and was the highest among these proteins. ShdA is a host colonization factor known to be upregulated in vivo and related to the persistence of S. Typhimurium in the intestine. Furthermore, these antigens identified by IVIAT warrant further evaluation for their contributions to pathogenesis, and more potential roles, such as diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive uses, need to be developed in future studies. PMID:23774596

  10. Effect of temperature on the expression of major histocompatibility complex class-I antigens.

    PubMed

    Aboud, M; Segal, S; Priel, E; Blair, D G; O'Hara, B

    1992-06-01

    In the present study we investigated the effect of temperature on MHC class-I gene expression in BALB/C 3T3 cells incubated for 5 days at 34 degrees C, 37 degrees C and 39 degrees C. FACS analysis revealed no significant difference in the cell surface expression of any of the 3 major class-I antigens at 34 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Strikingly, however, when the level of the respective mRNA was determined, only that of the H-2K was comparable at both temperatures, whereas the levels of the H-2D and H-2L mRNA were profoundly higher at 37 degrees C. These data appear to reflect a differential temperature-related transcriptional control of the different class-I genes or a different temperature effect on the stability of their mRNA. The absence of a parallel increase in surface expression of the corresponding H-2D and H-2L antigens may result from some translational or post-translational limiting factors. At 39 degrees C, however, these limiting factors seem to be overcome since the surface expression of all the 3 antigens was remarkably increased although the level of their encoding mRNA was rather lower than in 37 degrees C. This stimulatory effect might be ascribed to heat shock proteins which are known to arise in cells at heat or other stress conditions. They participate in assembly and disassembly of various protein complexes and in transport of certain proteins across intracellular membranes. Such proteins may have arisen in our cells at 39 degrees C and facilitated the intracellular assembly of the class-I molecules and their transport to the cell surface. The possible implication of such heat shock proteins in the anti-tumor effect of hyperthermia is discussed.

  11. Surface expression of Mo3e antigen by activated human monocytes and U-937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R.F. III; Bury, M.J.; Liu, D.Y.

    1986-03-05

    The surface expression of a protease-sensitive antigen, Mo3e, by activated human monocytes and U-937 cells is a plasma membrane feature of the activated state. Mo3e, which is an 80 kD protein on Western blot analysis, may represent the surface receptor for migration inhibitory factor (MIF), as evidenced by inhibition of MIF responsiveness produced by anti-Mo3e monoclonal antibody. Mo3e is barely detectable (by surface immunofluorescence) on freshly isolated monocytes but becomes expressed in high antigen density during 18-24 hrs culture in medium containing E. coli lipopolysaccharide (> 1 ng/ml), 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (5-10 nM), or muramyl dipeptide (0.1-1 ..mu..M). In U-937 cells, Mo3e surface expression is detectable after 24 hrs exposure to PMA and other pharmacological activators of protein kinase C: 4..beta..-phorbol 12, 13 dibutyrate, 4..beta..-phorbol 12, 13 didecanoate, mezerein, or Sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol. The biologically-inactivate phorbol compounds, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol 12, 13 didecanoate and 4/sub ..beta../-phorbol do not stimulate Mo3e expression. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, has a synergistic effect on Mo3e expression stimulated by PMA; conversely, calcium antagonists block PMA-induced Mo3e expression. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C activation and intracellular calcium mobilization in the stimulated expression of Mo3e by activated human mononuclear phagocytes.

  12. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  13. Specific mutation of a gammaherpesvirus-expressed antigen in response to CD8 T cell selection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Loh, Joy; Popkin, Daniel L; Droit, Lindsay; Braaten, Douglas C; Zhao, Guoyan; Zhang, Xin; Vachharajani, Punit; Myers, Nancy; Hansen, Ted H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2012-03-01

    Herpesviruses are thought to be highly genetically stable, and their use as vaccine vectors has been proposed. However, studies of the human gammaherpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, have found viral isolates containing mutations in HLA class I-restricted epitopes. Using murine gammaherpesvirus 68 expressing ovalbumin (OVA), we examined the stability of a gammaherpesvirus antigenic locus under strong CD8 T cell selection in vivo. OVA-specific CD8 T cells selected viral isolates containing mutations in the OVA locus but minimal alterations in other genomic regions. Thus, a CD8 T cell response to a gammaherpesvirus-expressed antigen that is not essential for replication or pathogenesis can result in selective mutation of that antigen in vivo. This finding may have relevance for the use of herpesvirus vectors for chronic antigen expression in vivo.

  14. Optimization of the expression of surface antigen SAG1/2 of Toxoplasma gondii in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, G; Init, I; Fong, M Y; Lau, Y L

    2011-12-01

    Surface antigens are the most abundant proteins found on the surface of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Surface antigen 1 (SAG1) and Surface antigen 2 (SAG2) remain the most important and extensively studied surface proteins. These antigens have been identified to play a role in host cell invasion, immune modulation, virulence attenuation. Recombinant SAG1/2 was cloned and expressed in yeast Pichia pastoris. We describe here optimization of critical parameters involved in high yield expression of the recombinant SAG1/2. Our results suggest that recombinant SAG1/2 were best expressed at 30ºC, pH 6 and 1% methanol as the carbon source by X33 Pichia cells. Additional optimizations included the downstream process such as ammonium sulphate precipitation and dialysis. The fusion protein was purified using Ni-NTA purification system with 80% recovery. The purified protein was 100% specific and sensitive in detection of toxoplasmosis.

  15. Expression of the Major Surface Antigen of Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoites in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shobhona; Godson, G. Nigel

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite protein, a surface antigen of the sporozoite stage of the monkey malarial parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using an expression vector containing the 5' regulatory region of the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I gene. It was necessary to eliminate the entire 5' upstream region of the parasite DNA to obtain the expression of this protein. Only the circumsporozoite precursor protein was produced by the yeast transformants, as detected by immunoblotting. About 55 and 20 percent of the circumsporozoite protein produced in yeast was associated with the 25,000g and 150,000g particulate fractions, respectively. The protein could be solubilized in Triton X-100 and was stable in solubilized extracts.

  16. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  17. Human dendritic cells adenovirally-engineered to express three defined tumor antigens promote broad adaptive and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Leeann T; Landsberg, Jennifer; Messmer, Michelle; Shi, Jian; Pardee, Angela D; Haskell, Ronald; Vujanovic, Lazar; Kirkwood, John M; Butterfield, Lisa H

    2012-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has shown a promising ability to promote anti-tumor immunity in vitro and in vivo. Many trials have tested single epitopes and single antigens to activate single T cell specificities, and often CD8(+) T cells only. We previously found that determinant spreading and breadth of antitumor immunity correlates with improved clinical response. Therefore, to promote activation and expansion of polyclonal, multiple antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as provide cognate help from antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, we have created an adenovirus encoding three full length melanoma tumor antigens (tyrosinase, MART-1 and MAGE-A6, "AdVTMM"). We previously showed that adenovirus (AdV)-mediated antigen engineering of human DC is superior to peptide pulsing for T cell activation, and has positive biological effects on the DC, allowing for efficient activation of not only antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, but also NK cells. Here we describe the cloning and testing of "AdVTMM2," an E1/E3-deleted AdV encoding the three melanoma antigens. This novel three-antigen virus expresses mRNA and protein for all antigens, and AdVTMM-transduced DC activate both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells which recognize melanoma tumor cells more efficiently than single antigen AdV. Addition of physiological levels of interferon-α (IFNα) further amplifies melanoma antigen-specific T cell activation. NK cells are also activated, and show cytotoxic activity. Vaccination with multi-antigen engineered DC may provide for superior adaptive and innate immunity and ultimately, improved antitumor responses.

  18. Human dendritic cells adenovirally-engineered to express three defined tumor antigens promote broad adaptive and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Landsberg, Jennifer; Messmer, Michelle; Shi, Jian; Pardee, Angela D.; Haskell, Ronald; Vujanovic, Lazar; Kirkwood, John M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has shown a promising ability to promote anti-tumor immunity in vitro and in vivo. Many trials have tested single epitopes and single antigens to activate single T cell specificities, and often CD8+ T cells only. We previously found that determinant spreading and breadth of antitumor immunity correlates with improved clinical response. Therefore, to promote activation and expansion of polyclonal, multiple antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, as well as provide cognate help from antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, we have created an adenovirus encoding three full length melanoma tumor antigens (tyrosinase, MART-1 and MAGE-A6, “AdVTMM”). We previously showed that adenovirus (AdV)-mediated antigen engineering of human DC is superior to peptide pulsing for T cell activation, and has positive biological effects on the DC, allowing for efficient activation of not only antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, but also NK cells. Here we describe the cloning and testing of “AdVTMM2,” an E1/E3-deleted AdV encoding the three melanoma antigens. This novel three-antigen virus expresses mRNA and protein for all antigens, and AdVTMM-transduced DC activate both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells which recognize melanoma tumor cells more efficiently than single antigen AdV. Addition of physiological levels of interferon-α (IFNα) further amplifies melanoma antigen-specific T cell activation. NK cells are also activated, and show cytotoxic activity. Vaccination with multi-antigen engineered DC may provide for superior adaptive and innate immunity and ultimately, improved antitumor responses. PMID:22737604

  19. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Nicole R.; Hecht, Karen A.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-01-08

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins incorporating a tetracysteine tag for site-directed labeling with biarsenical affinity probes and either EGFP or single chain antibody to test colocalization of probes with the EGFP-tagged recombinant protein or binding of biosilica-immobilized antibodies to large and small molecule antigens, respectively. Site-directed labeling with the biarsenical probes demonstrated colocalization with EGFP-encoded proteins in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting their use in studying biosilica maturation. Isolated biosilica transformed with a single chain antibody against either the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) effectively bound the respective antigens. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime of the TNT surrogate Alexa Fluor 555-trinitrobenzene reflected the high binding specificity of the transformed isolated biosilica. These results demonstrated the potential use of biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies as binders for large and small molecule antigens in sensing and therapeutics.

  1. SURFIN is a polymorphic antigen expressed on Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Gerhard; Kawai, Satoru; Haeggström, Malin; Kaneko, Osamu; von Euler, Anne; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Palm, Daniel; Fernandez, Victor; Wahlgren, Mats

    2005-01-01

    The surfaces of the infected erythrocyte (IE) and the merozoite, two developmental stages of malaria parasites, expose antigenic determinants to the host immune system. We report on surface-associated interspersed genes (surf genes), which encode a novel polymorphic protein family, SURFINs, present on both IEs and merozoites. A SURFIN expressed in 3D7 parasites, SURFIN4.2, was identified by mass spectrometric analysis of peptides cleaved off the surface of live IEs with trypsin. SURFINs are encoded by a family of 10 surf genes, including three predicted pseudogenes, located within or close to the subtelomeres of five of the chromosomes. SURFINs show structural and sequence similarities with exported surface-exposed proteins (PvSTP1, PkSICAvar, PvVIR, Pf332, and PfEMP1) of several Plasmodium species. SURFIN4.2 of a parasite other than 3D7 (FCR3S1.2) showed polymorphisms in the extracellular domain, suggesting sequence variability between genotypes. SURFIN4.2 not only was found cotransported with PfEMP1 and RIFIN to the IE surface, but also accumulated in the parasitophorous vacuole. In released merozoites, SURFIN4.2 was present in an amorphous cap at the parasite apex, where it may be involved in the invasion of erythrocytes. By exposing shared polymorphic antigens on IEs and merozoites, the parasite may coordinate the antigenic composition of these attachment surfaces during growth in the bloodstream. PMID:15939796

  2. Structure and expression of a mouse major histocompatibility antigen gene, H-2Ld.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, G A; Margulies, D H; Camerini-Otero, R D; Ozato, K; Seidman, J G

    1982-01-01

    A genomic clone encoding H-2Ld, a mouse major transplantation antigen, has been identified and the structure of the H-2Ld gene has been partially determined. We isolated 35 genomic clones from a BALB/c (H-2d) genomic library by hybridization to mouse or human probes. One of these clones encodes H-2Ld as determined by two criteria. First, the gene encodes a protein that is identical at the 76 known amino acid positions for H-2Ld. Second, when introduced into L cells by DNA-mediated gene transfer, a new H-2 antigen is expressed that is recognized by anti-H-2Ld monoclonal antibodies. The sequence of the H-2Ld protein predicted by the DNA sequences shows more than 80% homology to known H-2 antigens. H-2L-like sequences are found in mutant H-2Kb molecules, suggesting that gene conversion or reciprocal recombination may play a role in the development of H-2 polymorphism. PMID:6952248

  3. Design and Development of Therapies using Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Dotti, Gianpietro; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2013-01-01

    Summary Investigators developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for expression on T cells more than 25 years ago. When the CAR is derived from an antibody, the resultant cell should combine the desirable targeting features of an antibody (e.g. lack of requirement for major histocompatibility complex recognition, ability to recognize non-protein antigens) with the persistence, trafficking and effector functions of a T-cell. This article describes how the past two decades have seen a crescendo of research which has now begun to translate these potential benefits into effective treatments for patients with cancer. We describe the basic design of CARs, describe how antigenic targets are selected, and the initial clinical experience with CART cells. Our review then describes our own and other investigators’ work aimed at improving the function of CARs and reviews the clinical studies in hematological and solid malignancies that are beginning to exploit these approaches. Finally, we show the value of adding additional engineering features to CAR-T cells, irrespective of their target, to render them better suited to function in the tumor environment, and discuss how the safety of these heavily modified cells may be maintained. PMID:24329793

  4. Identification and preliminary characterization of Treponema pallidum protein antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Stamm, L V; Kerner, T C; Bankaitis, V A; Bassford, P J

    1983-01-01

    We have previously described the construction in Escherichia coli K-12 of a hybrid plasmid colony bank of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) genomic DNA. By screening a portion of this bank with an in situ immunoassay, we identified six E. coli clones that express T. pallidum antigens. In this study, the recombinant plasmids from each of these clones have been analyzed in E. coli maxicells and have been found to encode a number of proteins that are not of vector pBR322 origin and are, therefore, of treponemal origin. In each case, several of these proteins can be specifically precipitated from solubilized maxicell extracts by high-titer experimental rabbit syphilitic serum. Certain of these proteins are also precipitated by high-titer latent human syphilitic sera (HSS). The T. pallidum DNA inserts in these plasmids range in size from 6.2 to 14 kilobase pairs, and from the restriction patterns of the inserts and the protein profiles generated by each plasmid in maxicells, it is apparent that we have recovered a total of four unique clones from our colony bank. Recombinant plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 were of particular interest. Plasmid pLVS3 encodes three major protein antigens with molecular weights of 39,000, 35,000, and 25,000. These three proteins, which were not recognized by pooled normal human sera, were efficiently precipitated by most secondary HSS, latent HSS, and late HSS tested. These proteins were also precipitated, although somewhat inefficiently, by most primary HSS tested. Plasmid pLVS5 encodes a major protein antigen with a molecular weight of 32,000 and several minor protein antigens that, although efficiently precipitated by experimental rabbit syphilitic serum, were generally not recognized by the various HSS tested. Evidence is presented indicating that the protein antigens encoded by plasmids pLVS3 and pLVS5 are specific for pathogenic treponemal species. We have also demonstrated that immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against these protein

  5. Children with postsurgical capillary leak syndrome can be distinguished by antigen expression on neutrophils and monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Pipek, Michal; Valet, Guenter; Richter, Jacqueline; Hambsch, Joerg; Schneider, Peter

    1999-04-01

    Our initial studies indicate that children who develop post- operative capillary leak syndrome (CLS) following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can be distinguished based on their pre-operative level of circulating cytokines an adhesion molecules. We tested flow cytometric analysis of surface antigen expression as a potential assay for risk assessment of CLS. 24th preoperative blood samples were stained with monoclonal antibodies for the adhesion molecules ICAM-1, LFA1, MAC1, (beta) -integrin, activation markers CD25, CD54, CD69, HLA- DR, CD14 or CD4. Cells were measured on a dual-laser flow cytometer calibrated with microbeads. Antigen expression was detected as mean fluorescence intensity. The data indicate, that neutrophils of CLS patients express preoperatively higher levels of LFA1 and monocytes higher levels of HLA-DR and activation markers thus are in a state of activation. This could in combination with surgical trauma and CPB lead to their additional stimulation and migration into sites of inflammation and induce postoperative CLS. It is planned to set up a Flow-Classification program for individual risk assessment. By discriminate analysis over 80 percent of the patients were correctly classified. Our preliminary study indicates that flow cytometry with its low samples requirements and rapid access of the results could be a powerful tool to perform risk assessment prior to pediatric open heart surgery.

  6. B7 expression and antigen presentation by human brain endothelial cells: requirement for proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Prat, A; Biernacki, K; Becher, B; Antel, J P

    2000-02-01

    Interaction between systemic immune cells with cells of the blood-brain barrier is a central step in development of CNS-directed immune responses. Endothelial cells are the first cells of the blood-brain barrier encountered by migrating lymphocytes. To investigate the antigen-presenting capacity of human adult brain endothelial cells (HBECs), we used HBECs derived from surgically resected temporal lobe tissue, cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood derived CD4+ T lymphocytes. HBECs in response to IFN-gamma, but not under basal culture conditions, expressed HLA-DR, B7.1 and B7.2 antigens. Despite such up-regulation, these IFN-gamma-treated HBECs, in contrast to human microglia and PB monocytes, did not sustain allogeneic CD4+ cell proliferation, supported only low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, and did not stimulate IL-2 receptor expression. CD4+ T cell proliferation and increased IL-2 receptor expression could be obtained by addition of IL-2. Our data suggests that, although HBECs cannot alone support T cell proliferation and cytokine production, HBECs acting in concert with cytokines derived from a proinflammatory environment could support such a response.

  7. Overview of expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng-jun; Guo, Bin; Huo, Yan-lin; Guan, Zheng-ping; Wei, Ya-hui

    2010-10-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV), a pathogen for chronic liver infection, afflicts more than 350 million people world-wide. The effective way to control the virus is to take HBV vaccine. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is an effective protective antigen suitable for vaccine development. At present, "edible" vaccine based on transgenic plants is one of the most promising directions in novel types of vaccines. HBsAg production from transgenic plants has been carried out, and the transgenic plant expression systems have developed from model plants (such as tobacco, potato and tomato) to other various plant platforms. Crude or purified extracts of transformed plants have been found to conduct immunological responses and clinical trials for hepatitis B, which gave the researches of plant-based HBsAg production a big boost. The aim of this review was to summarize the recent data about plant-based HBsAg development including molecular biology of HBsAg gene, selection of expression vector, the expression of HBsAg gene in plants, as well as corresponding immunological responses in animal models or human.

  8. Aberrant expression of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen Globo H in thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Ping; Yang, Po-Sheng; Chien, Ming-Nan; Chen, Ming-Jen; Lee, Jie-Jen; Liu, Chien-Liang

    2016-12-01

    The induction of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen results from altered glycosylation in transformed cells. Globo H is a hexasaccharide glycosphingolipid overexpressed on malignancies of epithelial origin and has become an attractive vaccine target. We aimed to investigate the expression patterns and prognostic value of Globo H in thyroid neoplasms. Globo H expression was examined by immunohistochemical analysis using commercial and in-house tissue microarrays. The expression was correlated with clinicopathologic characteristics in papillary thyroid cancer. Normal or benign thyroid lesions were negative for Globo H expression. Globo H was positive in 33% medullary, 24% papillary, 11% undifferentiated, and 8% follicular thyroid cancer. Globo H expression in papillary thyroid cancer was associated with extrathyroidal invasion (P = 0.017), BRAF mutation (P = 0.010), AMES high risk (P = 0.045), and increased ATA risk of recurrence (P = 0.022). Globo H is specifically expressed in a subset of thyroid malignancies. In papillary thyroid cancer, Globo H expression is associated with invasiveness and BRAF mutation. Immunotherapy targeting Globo H may have potential applications in thyroid cancer. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:853-858. © 2016 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Enhancing Antitumor Efficacy of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Through Constitutive CD40L Expression

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kevin J; Seinstra, Beatrijs A; Nikhamin, Yan; Yeh, Raymond; Usachenko, Yelena; van Leeuwen, Dayenne G; Purdon, Terence; Pegram, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier J

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with genetically modified T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a promising therapy for patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, CAR-modified T cells (CAR T cells) have mostly failed in patients with solid tumors or low-grade B-cell malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bulky lymph node involvement. Herein, we enhance the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells through the constitutive expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154). T cells genetically modified to constitutively express CD40L (CD40L-modified T cells) demonstrated increased proliferation and secretion of proinflammatory TH1 cytokines. Further, CD40L-modified T cells augmented the immunogenicity of CD40+ tumor cells by the upregulated surface expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), adhesion molecules (CD54, CD58, and CD70), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules (Class I and HLA-DR), and the Fas-death receptor (CD95). Additionally, CD40L-modified T cells induced maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 by monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Finally, tumor-targeted CD19-specific CAR/CD40L T cells exhibited increased cytotoxicity against CD40+ tumors and extended the survival of tumor-bearing mice in a xenotransplant model of CD19+ systemic lymphoma. This preclinical data supports the clinical application of CAR T cells additionally modified to constitutively express CD40L with anticipated enhanced antitumor efficacy. PMID:25582824

  10. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide modification, Lewis antigen expression, and gastric colonization are cholesterol-dependent.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Ellen; McGee, David J

    2009-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori specifically takes up cholesterol and incorporates it into the bacterial membrane, yet little is currently known about cholesterol's physiological roles. We compared phenotypes and in vivo colonization ability of H. pylori grown in a defined, serum-free growth medium, F12 with 1 mg/ml albumin containing 0 to 50 mug/ml cholesterol. While doubling times were largely unaffected by cholesterol, other overt phenotypic changes were observed. H. pylori strain SS1 grown in defined medium with cholesterol successfully colonized the stomach of gerbils, whereas SS1 grown without cholesterol failed to colonize. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide often displays Lewis X and/or Y antigens. Expression of these antigens measured by whole-cell ELISA was markedly enhanced in response to growth of strain SS1, 26695, or G27 in cholesterol. In addition, electrophoretic analysis of lipopolysaccharide in wild type G27 and in mutants lacking the O-chain revealed structural changes within the oligosaccharide core/lipid A moieties. These responses in Lewis antigen levels and in lipopolysaccharide profiles to cholesterol availability were highly specific, because no changes took place when cholesterol was substituted by beta-sitosterol or bile salts. Disruption of the genes encoding cholesterol alpha-glucosyltransferase or lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase had no effect on Lewis expression, nor on lipopolysaccharide profiles, nor on the cholesterol responsiveness of these properties. Disruption of the lipid A 1-phosphatase gene eliminated the effect of cholesterol on lipopolysaccharide profiles but not its effect on Lewis expression. Together these results suggest that cholesterol depletion leads to aberrant forms of LPS that are dependent upon dephosphorylation of lipid A at the 1-position. A tentative model for the observed effects of cholesterol is discussed in which sequential steps of lipopolysaccharide biogenesis and, independently, presentation of Lewis antigen at

  11. Expression of Cancer Testis Antigens in Colorectal Cancer: New Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Czerewaty, Michał; Deskur, Anna; Safranow, Krzysztof; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background. While cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are restricted in postnatal tissues to testes and germ line-derived cells, their role in cancer development and the clinical significance of their expression still remain to be better defined. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of CTA expression in colon samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in relation to patient clinical status. Methods. Forty-five patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer were included in the study. We selected a panel of 18 CTAs that were previously detected in CRC as well as some new gene candidates, and their expression was detected at the mRNA level by employing RQ-PCR. Additionally, we evaluated CTA expression in three colon cancer cell lines (CL-188, HTB-39, and HTB-37) after exposure to the DNA methylation-modifying drug 5-azacytidine. Results. We report that 6 out of 18 (33%) CTAs tested (MAGEA3, OIP5, TTK, PLU1, DKKL1, and FBXO39) were significantly (p < 0.05) overexpressed in tumor tissue compared with healthy colon samples isolated from the same patients. Conclusions. Moreover, we found that MAGEA3, PLU-1, and DKKL expression positively correlated with disease progression, evaluated according to the Dukes staging system. Finally, 5-azacytidine exposure significantly upregulated expression of CTAs on CRC cells, which indicates that this demethylation agent could be employed therapeutically to enhance the immune response against tumor cells. PMID:27635108

  12. Antigen expression determines adenoviral vaccine potency independent of IFN and STING signaling

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kylie M.; Zak, Daniel E.; Costa, Andreia; Yamamoto, Ayako; Kastenmuller, Kathrin; Hill, Brenna J.; Lynn, Geoffrey M.; Darrah, Patricia A.; Lindsay, Ross W.B.; Wang, Lingshu; Cheng, Cheng; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Gall, Jason G.D.; Roederer, Mario; Aderem, Alan; Seder, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors (rAds) are lead vaccine candidates for protection against a variety of pathogens, including Ebola, HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, due to their ability to potently induce T cell immunity in humans. However, the ability to induce protective cellular immunity varies among rAds. Here, we assessed the mechanisms that control the potency of CD8 T cell responses in murine models following vaccination with human-, chimpanzee-, and simian-derived rAds encoding SIV-Gag antigen (Ag). After rAd vaccination, we quantified Ag expression and performed expression profiling of innate immune response genes in the draining lymph node. Human-derived rAd5 and chimpanzee-derived chAd3 were the most potent rAds and induced high and persistent Ag expression with low innate gene activation, while less potent rAds induced less Ag expression and robustly induced innate immunity genes that were primarily associated with IFN signaling. Abrogation of type I IFN or stimulator of IFN genes (STING) signaling increased Ag expression and accelerated CD8 T cell response kinetics but did not alter memory responses or protection. These findings reveal that the magnitude of rAd-induced memory CD8 T cell immune responses correlates with Ag expression but is independent of IFN and STING and provide criteria for optimizing protective CD8 T cell immunity with rAd vaccines. PMID:25642773

  13. Opisthorchis viverrini-antigen induces expression of MARCKS during inflammation-associated cholangiocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Techasen, Anchalee; Loilome, Watcharin; Namwat, Nisana; Duenngai, Kunyarat; Cha'on, Ubon; Thanan, Raynoo; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Miwa, Masanao; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2012-03-01

    Myristoylated alanine rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) has been implicated in PKC-mediated membrane-cytoskeleton alterations that underlie lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage responses. MARCKS is postulated to be involved in inflammation-associated CCA based on its overexpression in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and inflammatory cells. The aims of this study were to investigate localization patterns of MARCKS in hamster and human tissue during cholangiocarcinogenesis and to examine the involvement of MARCKS in inflammation. MARCKS protein expression was found prominently in inflammatory cells of Opisthorchis viverrini-treated as well as O. viverrini plus N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)-treated hamsters from week 2 to week 3 of treatment. The positive signal decreased during week 4 to week 12, then increased again at week 26 when CCA developed. At the last time point the expression of MARCKS was observed in both cancer and inflammatory cells. MARCKS protein expression was also found in inflammatory cells, including macrophages in human CCA tissues. O. viverrini excretory/secretory products or worm antigen induced MARCKS mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the human U937 macrophage cell line. The relative mRNA expression of MARCKS in white blood cells of O. viverrini-infected patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (P = 0.02). Thus, MARCKS is significantly expressed in macrophages and plays a role in inflammation-related CCA induced by O. viverrini.

  14. Expressed var gene repertoire and variant surface antigen diversity in a shrinking Plasmodium falciparum population.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Bianca C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Menezes, Maria J; Cabral, Fernanda J; Bastos, Marcele F; Costa, Fabio T M; Sousa-Neto, Jayme A; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2016-11-01

    The var gene-encoded erythrocyte membrane protein-1 of Plasmodium falciparum (PfEMP-1) is the main variant surface antigen (VSA) expressed on infected erythrocytes. The rate at which antibody responses to VSA expressed by circulating parasites are acquired depends on the size of the local VSA repertoire and the frequency of exposure to new VSA. Because parasites from areas with declining malaria endemicity, such as the Amazon, typically express a restricted PfEMP-1 repertoire, we hypothesized that Amazonians would rapidly acquire antibodies to most locally circulating VSA. Consistent with our expectations, the analysis of 5878 sequence tags expressed by 10 local P. falciparum samples revealed little PfEMP-1 DBL1α domain diversity. Among the most commonly expressed DBL1α types, 45% were shared by two or more independent parasite lines. Nevertheless, Amazonians displayed major gaps in their repertoire of anti-VSA antibodies, although the breadth of anti-VSA antibody responses correlated positively with their cumulative exposure to malaria. We found little antibody cross-reactivity even when testing VSA from related parasites expressing the same dominant DBL1α types. We conclude that variant-specific immunity to P. falciparum VSAs develops slowly despite the relatively restricted PfEMP-1 repertoire found in low-endemicity settings.

  15. Sarcoidosis Th17 Cells are ESAT-6 Antigen Specific but Demonstrate Reduced IFN-γ Expression

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Bradley W.; Ploetze, Kristen; Isom, Joan; Chambers-Harris, Isfahan; Braun, Nicole A.; Taylor, Thyneice; Abraham, Susamma; Mageto, Yolanda; Culver, Dan A.; Oswald-Richter, Kyra A.; Drake, Wonder P.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology. Many patients with sarcoidosis demonstrate antigen-specific immunity to mycobacterial virulence factors. Th-17 cells are crucial to the immune response in granulomatous inflammation, and have recently been shown to be present in greater numbers in the peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF) of sarcoidosis patients than healthy controls. It is unclear whether Th-17 cells in sarcoidosis are specific for mycobacterial antigens, or whether they have similar functionality to control Th-17 cells. Methods Flow cytometry was used to determine the numbers of Th-17 cells present in the peripheral blood and BALF of patients with sarcoidosis, the percentage of Th-17 cells that were specific to the mycobacterial virulence factor ESAT-6, and as well as to assess IFN-γ expression in Th-17 cells following polyclonal stimulation. Results Patients with sarcoidosis had greater numbers of Th-17 cells in the peripheral blood and BALF than controls and produced significantly more extracellular IL-17A (p=0.03 and p=0.02, respectively). ESAT-6 specific Th-17 cells were present in both peripheral blood and BALF of sarcoidosis patients (p<0.001 and p=0.03, respectively). After polyclonal stimulation, Th-17 cells from sarcoidosis patients produced less IFN-γ than healthy controls. Conclusions Patients with sarcoidosis have mycobacterial antigen-specific Th-17 cells peripherally and in sites of active sarcoidosis involvement. Despite the Th1 immunophenotype of sarcoidosis immunology, the Th-17 cells have reduced IFN-γ expression, compared to healthy controls. This reduction in immunity may contribute to sarcoidosis pathogenesis. PMID:23073617

  16. ABO antigen expression in graft tissue: is titration against donor erythrocytes relevant?

    PubMed

    Rydberg, Lennart; Skogsberg, Ulrika; Mölne, Johan

    2007-12-27

    ABO-incompatible living donor renal transplantation has become an accepted treatment for end-stage renal disease. Two main factors appear to be important when crossing the ABO barrier, the donor organ A/B antigen expression and the amount of recipient anti-A/B antibody. Antigen expression depends on the ABO blood group and subgroup and may vary in different tissues and cells. The amount of recipient anti-A/B antibody, determined by titration, is very variable. One major drawback with titration is the lack of conformity between different laboratories, making comparisons difficult. For clinical use, the anti-A/B antibody titration technique has to be simple, rapid, and cheap, in addition to being accurate. Although there is a need for more standardized procedures for determination of ABO antibodies, existing techniques are sufficient in the clinical care of patients. To illustrate the variation in susceptibility of different graft tissues to ABO antibodies, in this paper we describe a case of an ABO-incompatible combined liver and kidney transplantation.

  17. Functional expression of a cattle MHC class II DR-like antigen on mouse L cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, D.C.; Craigmile, S.; Campbell, J.D.M.

    1996-09-01

    Cattle DRA and DRB genes, cloned by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, were transfected into mouse L cells. The cattle DR-expressing L-cell transfectant generated was analyzed serologically, biochemically, and functionally. Sequence analysis of the transfected DRB gene clearly showed showed that it was DRB3 allele DRB3*0101, which corresponds to the 1D-IEF-determined allele DRBF3. 1D-IEF analysis of the tranfectant confirmed that the expressed DR product was DRBF3. Functional integrity of the transfected gene products was demonstrated by the ability of the transfectant cell line to present two antigens (the foot-and-mouth disease virus-derived peptide FMDV15, and ovalbumin) to antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cells from both the original animal used to obtain the genes, and also from an unrelated DRBF3{sup +} heterozygous animal. Such transfectants will be invaluable tools, allowing us to dissect the precise contributions each locus product makes to the overall immune response in heterozygous animals, information essential for rational vaccine design. 45 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Cross-protective efficacy of dendritic cells targeting conserved influenza virus antigen expressed by Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Tao; Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Gui-Lian; Jiang, Yan-Long; Zhao, Liang; Li, Yu; Wang, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) can infect birds and mammals, including humans, and are thus a serious threat to public health. Vaccination is vital for controlling AIV circulation. In this study, we generated a recombinant lactobacillus expressing the NP-M1-DCpep of H9N2 avian influenza virus and evaluated the activation effect of NC8-pSIP409-NP-M1-DCpep on dendritic cells (DCs) in a mouse model. The specific mucosal antibody responses and B and T cell responses in lymphoid tissues were also characterized. Importantly, we confirmed that specific CD8 T cells presented in vitro and antigen-specific cytotoxicity (activated the expression of CD107a) and in vivo antigen-specific cytotoxicity after vaccination. The adoptive transfer of NC8-pSIP409-NP-M1-DCpep-primed CD8+ T cells into NOD-SCID mice resulted in effective protection against mouse-adapted AIV infection. In addition, we observed protection in immunized mice challenged with mouse-adapted H9N2 AIV and H1N1 influenza virus, as evidenced by reductions in the lung virus titers, improvements in lung pathology, and weight loss and complete survival. Our data are promising for the generation of effective, non-traditional influenza vaccines against AIVs. PMID:28004787

  19. Identification, expression and antigenic analysis of recombinant hemagglutinin proteins of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kun-Wei; Hsieh, Hsien-Hua; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Lee, Ya-Jane; Sung, Ming-Hua; Wong, Min-Liang; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2009-01-01

    Canine distemper (CD) is a widely distributed disease of dogs, caused by the canine distemper virus (CDV). In the present study, the gene encoding the hemagglutinin (H) protein of a CDV isolate from central Taiwan was sequenced and compared with other strains. Sequence variations were noticed in the H gene from the field CDV strain that had previously been implicated in the increasing incidence of CD. To establish a serology-based diagnostic test, the full-length H protein, as well as five deletion mutants of a recombinant H protein of the local isolate, were produced using an E. coli expression system. Three truncated recombinant proteins with relatively high expression levels, designated HM3, HM4 and HM5, were used as antigens to examine their reactivity with canine sera. By using three negative sera and 17 CD-positive sera, the high specificity of recombinant H proteins was observed by ELISA. In addition, immunoblotting demonstrated that all three purified recombinant proteins exhibit an antigenic property recognized by the serum of a CD-suspected dog.

  20. Chloroplast-Derived Vaccine Antigens and Biopharmaceuticals: Expression, Folding, Assembly and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Chebolu, S.; Daniell, H.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgene expression, transgene containment via maternal inheritance, and multi-gene expression in a single transformation event. Oral delivery is facilitated by hyperexpression of vaccine antigens against cholera, tetanus, anthrax, plague, or canine parvovirus (4%–31% of total soluble protein, TSP) in transgenic chloroplasts (leaves) or non-green plastids (carrots, tomato) as well as the availability of antibiotic free selectable markers or the ability to excise selectable marker genes. Hyperexpression of several therapeutic proteins, including human serum albumin (11.1% TSP), somatotropin (7% TSP), interferon-alpha (19% TSP), interferon-gamma (6% TSP), and antimicrobial peptide (21.5% TSP), facilitates efficient and economic purification. Also, the presence of chaperones and enzymes in chloroplasts facilitates assembly of complex multisubunit proteins and correct folding of human blood proteins with proper disulfide bonds. Functionality of chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens and therapeutic proteins has been demonstrated by several assays, including the macrophage lysis assay, GM1-ganglioside binding assay, protection of HeLA cells or human lung carcinoma cells against encephalomyocarditis virus, systemic immune response, protection against pathogen challenge, and growth or inhibition of cell cultures. Purification of human proinsulin has been achieved using novel purification strategies (inverse temperature transition property) that do not require expensive column chromatography techniques. Thus, transgenic chloroplasts are ideal bioreactors for production of functional human and animal therapeutic proteins in an environmentally friendly manner. PMID:19401820

  1. Identification of a cell-surface antigen selectively expressed on the natural killer cell

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    We have studied the cell-surface phenotype of natural killer (NK) cells of NZB and B6 mice which react to an MuLV+ lymphoid tumor. (a) NK cells do not express Thy1, Ly2, or Ig surface markers. (b) NK cells express an antigen recognized by C3H anti-CE antiserum ('anti-Ly1.2 antiserum'). Inasmuch as NK activity of spleen cells from B6 and B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains were both equally sensitive to C3H anti-CE antiserum, the NK antigen is distinct from Ly1.2. This point was confirmed by the observation that alphaNK activity was removed by absorption of C3H anti-CE antiserum with spleen cells from either B6 or B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains. Absorption of C3H alphaCE serum with BALB/c thymocytes and spleen cells (which are Ly1.2+NK-) removed anti-Ly1.2 activity and left anti-NK activity intact. This absorption step could be circumvented by inserting the BALB/c genotype into the recipient immunized to CE cells (i.e., (C3H X BALB/c)F1 alphaCE spleen cells). This antiserum, provisionally termed 'anti-NK', defines a new subclass of lymphocytes which may play a central role in the immunosurveillance against tumors. PMID:187714

  2. [Expression characteristics of differentiation antigens on granulocytes in patients with megaloblastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Tao; Ke, Pei-Feng; Shen, Wen-Hong; Chen, Su-Ning; Wang, Guo-Zheng

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to explore the change characteristics of cell differentiation antigen (CD) on bone marrow (BM) granulocytes in patients,with megaloblastic anemia (MA). In combination with BM cell morphology, hemogram, level of blood serum folic acid, level of Vit B(12), cell genetics and biological examination data, the BM granulocytes differentiation antigens in 13 patients with MA were detected by flow cyto metry and analyzed retrospectively, in order to summarize the variation characteristics of CD13, CD33 and CD15 expressed on myeloid cells in patient with MA, including forward scatter light (FSC) and side scatter light (SSC) signal intensity, then these findings were compared with that in normal healthy persons. The results showed that the expression rates of CD13, CD15 and CD33 on granulocytic in patients with MA and normal healthy persons were (44.53 ± 16)%, (96.16 ± 2.67)%, (80.81 ± 14.71)% and (62.33 ± 11.02)%, (99.53 ± 0.46)%, (70.00 ± 7.81)% respectively, in which the expression rate of CD13 and CD15 in patients with MA decreased (P < 0.01), while the expression rate of CD33 increased (P < 0.01). The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CD13, CD15, CD33, SSC and FSC in MA patients and normal healthy persons were 3.39 ± 1.41, 14.29 ± 6.59, 1.95 ± 0.94, 478.78 ± 70.43, 633.46 ± 75.53 and 5.12 ± 1.15, 20.67 ± 5.13, 1.04 ± 0.17, 332.00 ± 38.16, 537.00 ± 16.70 respectively, in which the MFI of CD13 and CD15 on granulocytes in MA patients decreased (P < 0.01),while the MFI of FSC,SSC and CD33 increased (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). It is concluded that not only the morphology of BM granulocytes in patents with MA shows dysmaturity, but the expressing feature of differentiation antigens on BM granulocytes in MA patients also displays dysmaturity.These findings will contribute to the clinical diagnosis of MA patients.

  3. Capsular Polysaccharide Expression in Commensal Streptococcus Species: Genetic and Antigenic Similarities to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Skov Sørensen, Uffe B; Yao, Kaihu; Yang, Yonghong; Tettelin, Hervé; Kilian, Mogens

    2016-11-15

    Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is considered a hallmark of most invasive species of bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, in which the capsule is among the principal virulence factors and is the basis for successful vaccines. Consequently, it was previously assumed that capsule production distinguishes S. pneumoniae from closely related commensals of the mitis group streptococci. Based on antigenic and genetic analyses of 187 mitis group streptococci, including 90 recognized serotypes of S. pneumoniae, we demonstrated capsule production by the Wzy/Wzx pathway in 74% of 66 S. mitis strains and in virtually all tested strains of S. oralis (subspecies oralis, dentisani, and tigurinus) and S. infantis Additional analyses of genomes of S. cristatus, S. parasanguinis, S. australis, S. sanguinis, S. gordonii, S. anginosus, S. intermedius, and S. constellatus revealed complete capsular biosynthesis (cps) loci in all strains tested. Truncated cps loci were detected in three strains of S. pseudopneumoniae, in 26% of S. mitis strains, and in a single S. oralis strain. The level of sequence identities of cps locus genes confirmed that the structural polymorphism of capsular polysaccharides in S. pneumoniae evolved by import of cps fragments from commensal Streptococcus species, resulting in a mosaic of genes of different origins. The demonstrated antigenic identity of at least eight of the numerous capsular polysaccharide structures expressed by commensal streptococci with recognized serotypes of S. pneumoniae raises concerns about potential misidentifications in addition to important questions concerning the consequences for vaccination and host-parasite relationships both for the commensals and for the pathogen. Expression of a capsular polysaccharide is among the principal virulence factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae and is the basis for successful vaccines against infections caused by this important pathogen. Contrasting with previous

  4. RelB nuclear translocation regulates B cell MHC molecule, CD40 expression, and antigen-presenting cell function

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Brendan J.; MacDonald, Kelli P. A.; Pettit, Allison R.; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2000-01-01

    Mice with targeted RelB mutations demonstrated an essential role for RelB in immune responses and in myeloid dendritic cell differentiation. Human studies suggested a more global transcriptional role in antigen presentation. Burkitt lymphoma cell lines were used as a model to examine the role of RelB in antigen presentation. After transient transfection of BJAB with RelB, strong nuclear expression of RelB-p50 heterodimers was associated with increased APC function and expression of CD40 and MHC class I. Antisense RelB in DG75 reduced antigen-presenting capacity and CD40-mediated up-regulation of MHC molecules. The data indicate that RelB transcriptional activity directly affects antigen presentation and CD40 synthesis. Stimulation of RelB transcriptional activity may provide a positive feedback loop for facilitating productive APC/T cell interactions. PMID:11027342

  5. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) expression in plant cell culture: Kinetics of antigen accumulation in batch culture and its intracellular form.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark L; Mason, Hugh S; Shuler, Michael L

    2002-12-30

    The production of edible vaccines in transgenic plants and plant cell culture may be improved through a better understanding of antigen processing and assembly. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was chosen for study because it undergoes substantial and complex post-translational modifications, which are necessary for its immunogenicity. This antigen was expressed in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Williams 82) and tobacco NT1 (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cell suspension cultures, and HBsAg production in batch culture was characterized. The plant-derived antigen consisted predominantly of disulfide cross-linked HBsAg protein (p24(s)) dimers, which were all membrane associated. Similar to yeast, the plant-expressed HBsAg was retained intracellularly. The maximal HBsAg titers were obtained with soybean suspension cultures (20-22 mg/L) with titers in tobacco cultures being approximately 10-fold lower. For soybean cells, electron microscopy and immunolocalization demonstrated that all the HBsAg was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and provoked dilation and proliferation of the ER network. Sucrose gradient analysis of crude extracts showed that HBsAg had a complex size distribution uncharacteristic of the antigen's normal structure of uniform 22-nm virus-like particles. The extent of authentic epitope formation was assessed by comparing total p24(s) synthesized to that reactive by polyclonal and monoclonal immunoassays. Depending on culture age, between 40% and 100% of total p24(s) was polyclonal antibody reactive whereas between 6% and 37% was recognized by a commercial monoclonal antibody assay. Possible strategies to increase HBsAg production and improve post-translational processing are discussed.

  6. Cloning and Expression of Genes for Dengue Virus Type-2 Encoded-Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-26

    necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP cDNA cloning; sequence analysis; E . Coli expression; 06 13 epitope mapping; ELISA titers...antigens in E . coli 6 4.3 Mapping of the neutralization epitope of DEN-2" E protein 7 4.4 Detection of stable secondary structure at the 3-terminus of...based high ievel expression systems and characterize functions of flavivirus proteins. Three notable expression systems are: 1) the E . coli expression

  7. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates.

  8. A microarray method for identifying tumor antigens by screening a tumor cDNA expression library against cancer sera

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, Kurt; Sykes, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The immune system responds to tumor cells. The challenge has been how to effectively use these responses to treat or protect against cancer. Toward the goal of developing a cancer vaccine, we are pursuing methodologies for the discovery and testing of useful antigens. We present an array-based approach for discovering these B cell antigens by directly screening for specific host-sera reactivity to lysates from tumor-derived cDNA expression libraries. Several cancer-specific antigens were identified, and these are currently being validated as potential candidates. PMID:23851590

  9. A microarray method for identifying tumor antigens by screening a tumor cDNA expression library against cancer sera.

    PubMed

    Whittemore, Kurt; Sykes, Kathryn

    2013-10-01

    The immune system responds to tumor cells. The challenge has been how to effectively use these responses to treat or protect against cancer. Toward the goal of developing a cancer vaccine, we are pursuing methodologies for the discovery and testing of useful antigens. We present an array-based approach for discovering these B cell antigens by directly screening for specific host-sera reactivity to lysates from tumor-derived cDNA expression libraries. Several cancer-specific antigens were identified, and these are currently being validated as potential candidates.

  10. Nonselective expression of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen fragments in mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V B; Tevethia, S S; Tevethia, M J; Weissman, S M

    1982-01-01

    To understand the role of various functional domains of simian virus 40 early tumor antigens, we have cloned and introduced into mouse cells portions of early simia