Science.gov

Sample records for carcinoembryonic antigen expression

  1. A recombinant vaccinia virus expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA).

    PubMed

    Kaufman, H; Schlom, J; Kantor, J

    1991-07-30

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a 180-kDa glycoprotein expressed on most gastrointestinal carcinomas. A 2.4-kb cDNA clone, containing the complete coding sequence, was isolated from a human colon tumor cell library and inserted into a vaccinia virus genome. This newly developed construct was characterized by Southern blotting, DNA hybridization studies, and polymerase chain reaction analysis. The CEA gene was stably integrated into the vaccinia virus thymidine kinase gene. The recombinant was efficiently replicated upon serial passages in cell cultures and in animals. The recombinant virus expresses on the surface of infected cells a protein product recognized by a monoclonal antibody (COL-I) directed against CEA. Immunization of mice with the vaccinia construct elicited a humoral immune response against CEA. Pilot studies also showed that administration of the recombinant CEA vaccinia construct was able to greatly reduce the growth in mice of a syngeneic murine colon adenocarcinoma which had been transduced with the human CEA gene. The use of this new recombinant CEA vaccinia construct may thus provide an approach in the specific active immunotherapy of human GI cancer and other CEA expressing carcinoma types.

  2. Expression of S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen and alpha fetoprotein in normal salivary glands and primary salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Günhan, O; Evren, G; Demiriz, M; Can, C; Celasun, B; Finci, R

    1992-12-01

    The distribution of S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen and alpha fetoprotein was studied in 38 primary salivary gland tumors. S-100 protein, a useful marker of myoepithelial cells, was demonstrated in some benign tumors. Carcinoembryonic antigen expression was consistently positive in adenoid cystic carcinoma. Demonstration of epithelial membrane antigen helped to confirm the epithelial nature of some neoplastic cells. Alpha fetoprotein was not expressed in any of the cases examined. No correlation was found between immunopositivity and tumor behavior in the present series.

  3. Induction of carcinoembryonic antigen expression in a three-dimensional culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, J. M.; Brown, D.; Fitzgerald, W.; Ford, R. D.; Nachman, A.; Goodwin, T. J.; Spaulding, G.

    1994-01-01

    MIP-101 is a poorly differentiated human colon carcinoma cell line established from ascites that produces minimal amounts of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a 180 kDa glycoprotein tumor marker, and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), a related protein that has 50 and 90 kDa isoforms, in vitro in monolayer culture. MIP-101 produces CEA when implanted into the peritoneum of nude mice but not when implanted into subcutaneous tissue. We tested whether MIP-101 cells may be induced to express CEA when cultured on microcarrier beads in three-dimensional cultures, either in static cultures as non-adherent aggregates or under dynamic conditions in a NASA-designed low shear stress bioreactor. MIP- 101 cells proliferated well under all three conditions and increased CEA and NCA production 3 - 4 fold when grown in three-dimensional cultures compared to MIP-101 cells growing logarithmically in monolayers. These results suggest that three-dimensional growth in vitro simulates tumor function in vivo and that three-dimensional growth by itself may enhance production of molecules that are associated with the metastatic process.

  4. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  5. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  6. Expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and nonspecific crossreacting antigen (NCA) in gastrointestinal cancer; the correlation with degree of differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Kodera, Y.; Isobe, K.; Yamauchi, M.; Satta, T.; Hasegawa, T.; Oikawa, S.; Kondoh, K.; Akiyama, S.; Itoh, K.; Nakashima, I.

    1993-01-01

    In spite of its reputation as a tumour marker, little is known about the function of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We examined the mRNA expression of CEA and NCA in 26 gastric and 14 colorectal cancers together with adjacent morphologically normal mucosae. There was no significant difference between the CEA mRNA levels of colorectal cancer and adjacent mucosa, whereas the CEA mRNA levels were significantly elevated in gastric cancer compared with normal gastric mucosa. The expression of NCA, on the other hand, was more cancer-specific and was significantly up-regulated in both gastric and colorectal cancers compared with the corresponding normal mucosae. No correlation was found between the mRNA level and plasma CEA value. No significant up-regulation was recognised in the node positive cancer, cancer with distant metastasis, or the metastatic tissues themselves. Marked diversity in the degree of differentiation in gastric cancer tissues, however, resulted in varied expression of the CEA gene family, compared with the constantly high expression found in colorectal cancer. Further analysis revealed significant up-regulation of NCA in well and moderately differentiated gastric cancers over poorly differentiated cancers, suggesting that NCA might have roles in differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8318403

  7. [Cancer Immunotherapy Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Dendritic Cells(iPSDCs)Expressing Carcinoembryonic Antigen].

    PubMed

    Kitadani, Junya; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Iwamoto, Hiromitsu; Tabata, Hiroaki; Nakamori, Mikihito; Nakamura, Masaki; Katsuda, Masahiro; Miyazawa, Motoki; Hayata, Keiji; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2016-09-01

    The difficulty in obtaining a sufficient number of functional dendritic cells(DCs)is a well-known serious problem in DCbased immunotherapy. Therefore, we used induced pluripotent stem cell-derived DCs(iPSDCs). We have reported that mouse iPSDCs are equivalent to BMDCs, in terms of maturation and antigen presentation. In this study, the antitumor immune response of human iPSDCs expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen was examined, to determine its clinical application in gastrointestinal cancer. Human iPS cells were established from healthy human fibroblasts using a Sendai virus vector, and human iPSDCs were differentiated under a feeder-free culture. Additionally, the surface marker expression, cytokine production, and migratory capacity of human iPSDCs were equivalent to those of monocyte-derived DCs(MoDCs). After 3 cycles of stimulation of autologous PBMCs by genetically modified DCs, the 51Cr-release assay was performed. The lymphocytes stimulated by iPSDCs-CEA showed cytotoxic activity against LCL-CEA and CEA652-pulsed LCL, but showed no cytotoxicity against LCL-LacZ. In addition, they showed cytotoxic activity against CEA-positive human cancer cell lines, MKN45 and HT29, but showed no cytotoxicity against CEA-negative human cancer cell line MKN1. In conclusion, CEA-specific CTLs responses could be induced by iPSDCs-CEA. This vaccination strategy may be useful in future clinical applications of cancer vaccines. PMID:27628546

  8. Expression of MCRS1 and MCRS2 and their correlation with serum carcinoembryonic antigen in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenguang; Chen, Mingxiao; Zhao, Pingwei; Ayana, Desalegn Admassu; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated genes serve a crucial role in carcinogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the mRNA expression levels of microspherule protein 1 (MCRS1) and MCRS2 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and their association with clinical variables. The mRNA expression levels of MCRS1 and MCRS2 were assessed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the tumor and corresponding non-tumor tissues of 54 newly-diagnosed CRC patients, as well as in the normal colonic mucosa tissue of 19 age/gender-matched healthy controls. Immunofluorescence was also employed to identify the expression of MCRS1 in CRC tissues, while the concentration of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was determined by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. The results identified a negative correlation between MCRS1 and MCRS2 expression levels (r=−0.3018, P=0.0266). MCRS1 mRNA expression was significantly increased and MCRS2 mRNA expression was decreased in CRC tissues compared with the levels in the corresponding normal tissues (both P<0.001). An increase in MCRS1 expression and a decrease in MCRS2 expression was detected in advanced stage when compared with early stage CRC patients. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed increased expression of MCRS1 in CRC patients. Furthermore, the expression levels of MCRS1 displayed positive correlation, whilst those of MCRS2 displayed negative correlation, with the serum CEA level in patients with CRC. The results suggest that increased MCRS1 and decreased MCRS2 expression appeared to be involved in the pathogenesis of CRC. The present study provides evidence suggesting that MCRS1 and MCRS2 may identify CRC patients at a risk of disease relapse, and thus, may be potential tools for monitoring disease activity and act as novel diagnostic markers in the treatment of CRC. PMID:27446248

  9. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter.

    PubMed

    Rama, Ana R; Hernandez, Rosa; Perazzoli, Gloria; Burgos, Miguel; Melguizo, Consolación; Vélez, Celia; Prados, Jose

    2015-06-04

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA) to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E) towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  10. Murine carcinoma expressing carcinoembryonic antigen-like protein is restricted by antibody against neem leaf glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Das, Arnab; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Roy, Soumyabrata; Biswas, Jaydip; Baral, Rathindranath; Pal, Smarajit

    2014-11-01

    We have generated a polyclonal antibody against a novel immunomodulator, neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP) that can react to a specific 47 kDa subunit of NLGP. Generated anti-NLGP antibody (primarily IgG2a) was tested for its anti-tumor activity in murine carcinoma (EC, CT-26), sarcoma (S180) and melanoma (B16Mel) tumor models. Surprisingly, tumor growth restriction was only observed in CT-26 carcinoma models, without any alteration in other tumor systems. Comparative examination of antigenicity between four different tumor models revealed high expression of CEA-like protein on the surface of CT-26 tumors. Subsequent examination of the cross-reactivity of anti-NLGP antibody with purified or cell bound CEA revealed prominent recognition of CEA by anti-NLGP antibody, as detected by ELISA, Western Blotting and immunohistochemistry. This recognition seems to be responsible for anti-tumor function of anti-NLGP antibody only on CEA-like protein expressing CT-26 tumor models, as confirmed by ADCC reaction in CEA(+) tumor systems where dependency to anti-NLGP antibody is equivalent to anti-CEA antibody. Obtained result with enormous therapeutic potential for CEA(+) tumors may be explained in view of the epitope spreading concept, however, further investigation is crucial.

  11. Four carcinoembryonic antigen subfamily members, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2, selectively expressed in the normal human colonic epithelium, are integral components of the fuzzy coat.

    PubMed

    Frängsmyr, L; Baranov, V; Hammarström, S

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate which of the seven transcriptionally active genes of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) subfamily are expressed in human colon, we first examined mRNA expression using reverse transcriptase PCR. The result showed the CEA, nonspecific crossreacting antigen 50/90 (NCA), biliary glycoprotein (BGP), and carcinoembryonic antigen gene family member 2 (CGM2) mRNAs were expressed in the colon. To determine the cellular sources of these members within normal colonic mucosa, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry were then performed. CEA and NCA mRNAs were clearly detectable in the cytoplasm of columnar and goblet cells at the free luminal surface and the upper crypts with low hybridization in the mid crypt and the crypt base. In contrast, BGP and CGM2 mRNAs were restricted only to columnar cells at the upper third of the crypts and the luminal surface. Colon epithelium expression of CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 coincided with that of corresponding mRNAs. Ultrastructurally, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 were localized mainly to the apical surface glycocalyx, the fuzzy coat, of columnar cells. Interestingly, these molecules were localized in different microdomains within the fuzzy coat. Furthermore, BGP was highly expressed in the fuzzy coat of cryptal caveolated cells. As integral components of the fuzzy coat, CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2 can hardly function as intercellular adhesion molecules; they possibly play an important role in epithelial-microbial interactions.

  12. Highly stable electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaobin; Ma, Zhanfang

    2012-05-15

    The long-term stability of sensing interfaces is an important issue in biosensor fabrication. A novel stable gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode interface (GC-Ph-AuNP)-based biosensor for detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed. GC electrodes were modified with 1,4-phenylenediamine to form a stable layer, and then AuNPs were bound onto the GC electrodes through CAu bonds. Anti-CEA was directly adsorbed on AuNPs fixed on the GC electrode. The linear range of the immunosensor was from 10 fg to 100 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 3 fg mL(-1) (S/N=3). The current of the immunosensor was increased by 4% after one month. The GC-Ph-AuNP immunosensor showed high sensitivity, a wide linear range, low detection limit, and good selectivity and stability. The immobilization method of the immunosensor could be widely applied to construct other immunosensors.

  13. Specific adhesion of carcinoembryonic antigen-bearing colorectal cancer cells to immobilized carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Levin, L V; Griffin, T W

    1991-11-01

    Recent characterization of the genomic structure of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is consistent with that of a cellular adhesion molecule. To examine this function in colorectal cancer, the adherence of cell lines to microtiter wells coated with CEA and well-described adhesive molecules was determined. The CEA-positive cell line LoVo and the CEA-devoid cell line H-Meso-1 did not differ in adherence to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin, collagen and fibronectin, whereas LoVo cells adhered to CEA (10 micrograms/well) in a specific manner (43% bound cells vs. 1.5% bound cells with BSA or alpha-acidglycoprotein controls, P less than 0.01) while H-MESO-1 showed no adhesion to CEA (less than 0.6% bound cells). This adhesion of LoVo cells to CEA was not affected by co-incubation of cells with EDTA, sodium azide, or at 23 degrees C. However, the CEA to CEA adhesive interaction was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the N-terminal domain of the CEA molecule, and decreased by enzymatic removal of CEA from the LoVo cell membrane. The extent of adhesion to immobilized CEA by four CEA-producing cell lines (LoVo, HT29, LS174T and LS174-S), correlated with membrane CEA expression as determined by FACS analysis. The results of these experiments add support to the concept that CEA may function as a specific homotypic cellular adhesion molecule for colorectal cancer cells.

  14. Cloning of the complete gene for carcinoembryonic antigen: analysis of its promoter indicates a region conveying cell type-specific expression.

    PubMed Central

    Schrewe, H; Thompson, J; Bona, M; Hefta, L J; Maruya, A; Hassauer, M; Shively, J E; von Kleist, S; Zimmermann, W

    1990-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a widely used tumor marker, especially in the surveillance of colonic cancer patients. Although CEA is also present in some normal tissues, it is apparently expressed at higher levels in tumorous tissues than in corresponding normal tissues. As a first step toward analyzing the regulation of expression of CEA at the transcriptional level, we have isolated and characterized a cosmid clone (cosCEA1), which contains the entire coding region of the CEA gene. A close correlation exists between the exon and deduced immunoglobulin-like domain borders. We have determined a cluster of transcriptional starts for CEA and the closely related nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) gene and have sequenced their putative promoters. Regions of sequence homology are found as far as approximately 500 nucleotides upstream from the translational starts of these genes, but farther upstream they diverge completely. In both cases we were unable to find classic TATA or CAAT boxes at their expected positions. To characterize the CEA and NCA promoters, we carried out transient transfection assays with promoter-indicator gene constructs in the CEA-producing adenocarcinoma cell line SW403, as well as in nonproducing HeLa cells. A CEA gene promoter construct, containing approximately 400 nucleotides upstream from the translational start, showed nine times higher activity in the SW403 than in the HeLa cell line. This indicates that cis-acting sequences which convey cell type-specific expression of the CEA gene are contained within this region. Images PMID:2342461

  15. Nuclear factor-kappa B directs carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 receptor expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-infected epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Petra; Billker, Oliver; Meyer, Thomas F; Naumann, Michael

    2002-03-01

    The human-specific pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae expresses opacity-associated (Opa) protein adhesins that bind to various members of the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family. In this study, we have analyzed the mechanism underlying N. gonorrhoeae-induced CEACAM up-regulation in epithelial cells. Epithelial cells represent the first barrier for the microbial pathogen. We therefore characterized CEACAM expression in primary human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells and found that CEACAM1-3 (L, S) and CEACAM1-4 (L, S) splice variants mediate an increased Opa(52)-dependent gonoccocal binding to HOSE cells. Up-regulation of these CEACAM molecules in HOSE cells is a direct process that takes place within 2 h postinfection and depends on close contact between microbial pathogen and HOSE cells. N. gonorrhoeae-triggered CEACAM1 up-regulation involves activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), which translocates as a p50/p65 heterodimer into the nucleus, and an NF-kappaB-specific inhibitory peptide inhibited CEACAM1-receptor up-regulation in N. gonorrhoeae-infected HOSE cells. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides did not induce NF-kappaB and CEACAM up-regulation, which corresponds to our findings that HOSE cells do not express toll-like receptor 4. The ability of N. gonorrhoeae to up-regulate its epithelial receptor CEACAM1 through NF-kappaB suggests an important mechanism allowing efficient bacterial colonization during the initial infection process. PMID:11751883

  16. Immunohistochemical localization of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, M; Carrozza, M

    1990-04-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was first isolated from colonic carcinoma and has been used as a diagnostic marker. CEA has also been observed in a variety of epithelial tumors and normal tissues. In this study, CEA was localized by means of immunohistochemical procedures in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors, as well as in normal parotid gland, indicating that CEA is not a reliable marker for differentiation between benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms.

  17. Novel mouse model for carcinoembryonic antigen-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carlos H F; Stanners, Clifford P

    2004-06-01

    Many novel cancer therapies, including immunotherapy and gene therapy, are specifically targeted to tumor-associated molecules, among which carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) represents a popular example. Discrepancies between preclinical experimental data in animal models and clinical outcome in terms of therapeutic response and toxicity, however, often arise. Preclinical testing can be compromised by the lack of CEA and other closely related human CEA family members in rodents, which lack analogous genes for most human CEA family members. Here, we report the construction of a transgenic mouse with a 187-kb human bacterial artificial chromosome (CEABAC) that contains part of the human CEA family gene cluster including complete human CEA (CEACAM5), CEACAM3, CEACAM6, and CEACAM7 genes. The spatiotemporal expression pattern of these genes in the CEABAC mice was found to be remarkably similar to that of humans. This novel mouse will ensure better assessment than previously utilized models for the preclinical testing of CEA-targeted therapies and perhaps allow the testing of CEACAM6, which is overexpressed in many solid tumors and leukemias, as a therapeutic target. Moreover, expression of CEA family genes in gastrointestinal, breast, hematopoietic, urogenital, and respiratory systems could facilitate other clinical applications, such as the development of therapeutic agents against Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections, which use CEA family members as major receptors. PMID:15194045

  18. Human carcinoembryonic antigen and biliary glycoprotein can serve as mouse hepatitis virus receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D S; Asanaka, M; Chen, F S; Shively, J E; Lai, M M

    1997-01-01

    Receptors for murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) are members of the murine carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family. Since MHV can also infect primates and cause central nervous system lesions (G. F. Cabirac et al., Microb. Pathog. 16:349-357, 1994; R. S. Murray et al., Virology 188:274-284, 1992), we examined whether human CEA-related molecules can be used by MHV as potential receptors. Transfection of plasmids expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEA) and human biliary glycoprotein into COS-7 cells, which lack a functional MHV receptor, conferred susceptibility to two MHV strains, A59 and MHV-2. Domain exchange experiments between human and murine CEA-related molecules identified the immunoglobulin-like loop I of hCEA as the region conferring the virus-binding specificity. This finding expands the potential MHV receptors to primate species. PMID:8995701

  19. Recombinant anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibodies for targeting cancer.

    PubMed

    Chester, K A; Mayer, A; Bhatia, J; Robson, L; Spencer, D I; Cooke, S P; Flynn, A A; Sharma, S K; Boxer, G; Pedley, R B; Begent, R H

    2000-01-01

    Antibodies can be used to target cancer therapies to malignant tissue; the approach is attractive because conventional treatments such as chemo- and radiotherapy are dose limited due to toxicity in normal tissues. Effective targeting relies on appropriate pharmacokinetics of antibody-based therapeutics, ideally showing maximum uptake and retention in tumor and rapid clearance from normal tissue. We have studied the factors influencing these dynamics for antibodies against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Protein engineering of anti-CEA antibodies, in vivo biodistribution models, and mathematical models have been employed to improve understanding of targeting parameters, define optimal characteristics for the antibody-based molecules employed, and develop new therapies for the clinic. Engineering antibodies to obtain the desired therapeutic characteristics is most readily achieved using recombinant antibody technology, and we have taken the approach of immunizing mice to provide high-affinity anti-CEA single-chain Fv antibodies (sFvs) from filamentous bacteriophage libraries. MFE-23, the most characterized of these sFvs, has been expressed in bacteria and purified in our laboratory for two clinical trials: a gamma camera imaging trial using 123I-MFE-23 and a radioimmunoguided surgery trial using 125I-MFE-23, where tumor deposits are detected by a hand-held probe during surgery. Both these trials showed that MFE-23 is safe and effective in localizing tumor deposits in patients with cancer. We are now developing fusion proteins that use the MFE-23 antibody to deliver a therapeutic moiety; MFE-23:: carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2) targets the enzyme CPG2 for use in the antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy system and MFE::tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) aims to reduce sequestration and increase tumor concentrations of systemically administered TNFalpha.

  20. Axillary lymphoscintigraphy by radioimmunodetection of carcinoembryonic antigen in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, E E; Corgan, R L; Casper, S; Primus, F J; Spremulli, E; Estes, N; Goldenberg, D M

    1979-12-01

    In seven women with carcinoma of the breast I-131-labeled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were administered subcutaneously in the finger webs. Subsequent scintigraphic immages demonstrated localization of radioactivity in the ipsilateral axillary metastases of all patients and in the contralateral axillae of three. Fifteen patients with either gastrointestinal or genitourinary cancers were studied as controls; in 12 both the hands and feet were injected with antibodies to CEA and in the other three either the hands or feet. Radioactivity was observed in the inquinal nodes of four control patients with tumors below the diaphragm and in the axillary nodes of one patient with a tumor above the diaphragm. The concentration of antibody in lymph node metastases from breast carcinoma was 100% specific. In those lymph nodes that presumably contained no metastatic tumor but demonstrated localization of labeled antibody, retention of CEA in the nodes from tumor drainage is postulated as the receptor site for the antibody.

  1. Electrochemical immunosensor based on hyperbranched structure for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jingjing; Wang, Xiaobo; Lu, Liandi; Zhu, Peiyuan; Mao, Chun; Zhao, Haolin; Song, Youchao; Shen, Jian

    2014-08-15

    Sensitive determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is very important in clinical research and diagnosis. Herein we report the design and synthesis of a new kind of immunosensor based on the benefits of hyperbranched structure. The hyperbranched polyester was grafted to the surface of indium tin oxides glass (ITO) electrode, and the grafting processes were characterized by attentuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After CEA and horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled antibody-conjugated AuNPs (HRP-Ab2-AuNPs) bioconjugates were immobilized on the surface of the hyperbranched structure-modified electrode, the optimized conditions of the above electrode were investigated. Moreover, the analytical performance of the proposed immunosensor showed a high sensitivity, a linear range from 0.01 to 80ng/mL with a low detection limit of 2.36pg/mL, and good selectivity for CEA. The designed immunoassay system holds great potential for ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing of other analytes. PMID:24607616

  2. Carcinoma of the ureter with extensive squamous differentiation and positive immunoperoxidase staining for carcinoembryonic antigen: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fulks, R M; Falace, P B

    1985-01-01

    A case of ureteral carcinoma with extensive squamous differentiation and positive staining for carcinoembryonic antigen by the immunoperoxidase method is presented. Ureteral carcinoma should be added to the list of tumors that may produce carcinoembryonic antigen or antigen-like material.

  3. Streptococcal preparation OK-432 promotes the capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to prime carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses induced with genetically modified DCs that express CEA.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Toshiyasu; Iwahashi, Makoto; Nakamura, Masaki; Matsuda, Kenji; Nakamori, Mikihito; Ueda, Kentaro; Naka, Teiji; Katsuda, Masahiro; Miyazawa, Motoki; Iida, Takeshi; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2008-02-01

    Cancer immunotherapy using dendritic cells (DCs) adenovirally transduced with the whole tumor-associated antigen (TAA) gene is an effective approach. Streptococcal preparation OK-432 is useful for stimulating DCs in terms of maturation. In this study, we established carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) using in vitro stimulation with adenovirally modified human DCs that express CEA. We investigated whether OK-432 stimulation could be more effective in inducing CEA-specific CTLs compared with other typical stimuli. DCs adenovirally transduced with the CEA gene were cultured under various conditions with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or OK-432. A cytotoxicity assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived CTLs was performed in a 4 h-51Cr release assay. OK-432 stimulated immature DCs to acquire a mature phenotype and to produce significant amounts of T-helper 1 cytokines. In all groups (immature DCs, TNF-alpha/DCs, LPS/DCs, OK-432/DCs), CEA-specific CTLs were generated. OK-432-stimulated DCs (HLA-A24) induced the most potent cytotoxic activity against CEA-expressing targets (A24) but not against controls. OK-432/DCs were able to induce markedly potent CTLs specific to target cells pulsed with CEA652 peptide (HLA-A24-restricted peptide), although others failed to induce potent CTLs. In conclusion, the CTL induction protocol using adenovirally modified DCs that express CEA after maturation with OK-432 showed a potent antitumor activity against CEA-expressing target cells, and is therefore promising for clinical applications as a cancer vaccine therapy.

  4. Induction of cytotoxic T cells and their antitumor activity in mice transgenic for carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Mizobata, S; Tompkins, K; Simpson, J F; Shyr, Y; Primus, F J

    2000-08-01

    In order to develop immunotherapy strategies that are based on eliciting immune responsiveness to the self-antigen, human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), we examined whether cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against CEA could be elicited in CEA-transgenic and nontransgenic mice. CEA-transgenic [C57BL/ 6-TGN(CEAGe)18FJP] and nontransgenic mice were primed with CEA-transfected syngeneic fibroblasts in combination with Corynebacterium parvum. Spleen cells from immunized mice were cultured with irradiated syngeneic MC-38 colon carcinoma cells transfected with CEA (MC-38.CEA) as stimulators prior to the measurement of CTL activity. Primed nontransgenic spleen cells showed augmented CTL activity against MC-38.CEA cells as compared with control parental MC-38 cells, nontransfected or transfected with vector only. Moreover, primed CEA transgenic spleen cells showed augmented CTL activity against MC-38.CEA cells that was similar to that observed in nontransgenic mice. All CTL clones derived from either transgenic or nontransgenic mice showed cross-reactivity with MC-38 cells expressing the CEA-related antigen, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen, but not biliary glycoprotein. CEA-specific CTL clones were not identified. Adoptive transfer of cloned CTL resulted in inhibition of MC-38.CEA but not MC-38.BGP tumor growth. Tumor cures were elicited in mice treated with a combination of cloned CTL and cyclophosphamide. Histopathological examination of CEA-expressing colons from either immunized mice or recipients of cloned CTL did not reveal any autoimmune reactions. These studies demonstrate that CTL recognizing cross-reactive class I epitopes on the CEA molecule can be induced in transgenic mice. The expression of these epitopes on tumor cells creates effective targets for CTL in vivo without inducing adverse reactions in CEA-expressing normal tissues. Since anti-CEA CTL have been generated in humans, CEA-transgenic mice may be a useful model to study vaccines that are based

  5. Indium 111 ZCE-025 immunoscintigraphy in occult recurrent colorectal cancer with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.J.; Abdel-Nabi, H.; Merchant, B. )

    1990-02-01

    We investigated the utility of scanning with indium 111 labeled to monoclonal antibody in 13 patients after curative resection of colorectal cancer who had elevated carcinoembryonic antigen levels and negative results of clinical workup. Each patient received 1 mg of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody type ZCE 025 labeled with 5.5 mCi of {sup 111}In, plus 9 to 39 mg of the same antibody unlabeled. Patients underwent scanning 3 to 7 days after infusion by planar and emission computed tomography. ZCE-025 monoclonal antibody imaging detected tumor recurrence or metastasis in 11 of 13 patients. In one patient the monoclonal antibody scan gave a true-negative result, and in one patient the monoclonal antibody scan failed to disclose a metachronous cecal primary. Tumor sites identified were the pelvis (2 patients), abdominal wall (2), retroperitoneum (1), lymph nodes (3); liver (2), bone (2), and lung (1). The accurate localization of colorectal carcinoma recurrences by means of {sup 111}In ZCE-025 monoclonal antibody demonstrates the usefulness of this diagnostic agent in the setting of elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level and negative results of clinical and radiologic workup.

  6. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen as a tumour marker in patients with endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hashiguchi, Y.; Kasai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Ichimura, T.; Yasui, T.; Sumi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background No potential tumour markers have been validated for prognosis in endometrial cancer. However, carcinoembryonic antigen (cea) is one of the most widely used tumour markers in various types of cancer. Although cea expression in endometrial cancer has been investigated, its prognostic value remains controversial, and no studies have investigated serum cea levels in large case series. In the present study, we investigated diagnostic and prognostic applications of serum cea for endometrial cancer. Methods This prospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. Between January 2006 and December 2012, serum cea was measured prospectively in 215 patients with endometrial cancer and was subsequently measured during treatment and at scheduled follow-up examinations in patients with elevated baseline serum cea. Results During the study period, 215 patients (142 stage i, 19 stage ii, 32 stage iii, 22 stage iv) were treated for endometrial cancer. By the time of last follow-up, 52 had relapsed (24.2%), and the median follow-up duration was 45 months (range: 1–95 months). Elevated serum cea was identified in 25 patients (11.6%) and was associated with histologic type (p = 0.04), histologic grade (p = 0.03), and myometrial invasion depth (p = 0.01). Elevated serum cea was not related to clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, age, menopausal status, or body mass index. Relapse of disease was related to elevated serum cea (p = 0.006). Conclusions Serum cea is a potential prognostic indicator for endometrial cancer. PMID:27803603

  7. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  8. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 long isoform modulates malignancy of poorly differentiated colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Arabzadeh, Azadeh; Dupaul-Chicoine, Jeremy; Breton, Valérie; Haftchenary, Sina; Yumeen, Sara; Turbide, Claire; Saleh, Maya; McGregor, Kevin; Greenwood, Celia M T; Akavia, Uri David; Blumberg, Richard S; Gunning, Patrick T; Beauchemin, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nearly 20%–29% of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) succumb to liver or lung metastasis and there is a dire need for novel targets to improve the survival of patients with metastasis. The long isoform of the Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1-L or CC1-L) is a key regulator of immune surveillance in primary CRC, but its role in metastasis remains largely unexplored. We have examined how CC1-L expression impacts on colon cancer liver metastasis. Design Murine MC38 transfected with CC1-L were evaluated in vitro for proliferation, migration and invasion, and for in vivo experimental liver metastasis. Using shRNA silencing or pharmacological inhibition, we delineated the role in liver metastasis of Chemokine (C-C motif) Ligand 2 (CCL2) and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) downstream of CC1-L. We further assessed the clinical relevance of these findings in a cohort of patients with CRC. Results MC38-CC1-L-expressing cells exhibited significantly reduced in vivo liver metastasis and displayed decreased CCL2 chemokine secretion and reduced STAT3 activity. Down-modulation of CCL2 expression and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 activity in MC38 cells led to reduced cell invasion capacity and decreased liver metastasis. The clinical relevance of our findings is illustrated by the fact that high CC1 expression in patients with CRC combined with some inflammation-regulated and STAT3-regulated genes correlate with improved 10-year survival. Conclusions CC1-L regulates inflammation and STAT3 signalling and contributes to the maintenance of a less-invasive CRC metastatic phenotype of poorly differentiated carcinomas. PMID:25666195

  9. Carcinoembryonic antigen radioimmunodetection in the evaluation of colorectal cancer and in the detection of occult neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Kim, E.E.; Bennett, S.J.; Nelson, M.O.; Deland, F.H.

    1983-03-01

    Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer was evaluated in 51 patients by injecting /sup 131/I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G against carcinoembryonic antigen and performing total-body photoscans with a gamma scintillation camera 24 and 48 h later. The scintigrams were then processed by computer to subtract the images of the /sup 99m/Tc-serum albumin and pertechnetate administered, which reflect background and nontarget radioactivity, from the /sup 131/I-antibody scans. The results indicate that radioimmunodetection is a safe and a potentially clinically useful cancer detection method, which in this study demonstrated primary colorectal carcinomas in 10 of 12 (83%) of the patients evaluated preoperatively and between 87% (46 of 53) and 92% (49 of 53) of known metastatic tumor sites. Thus, the method's overall sensitivity (true-positive rate) was 86%-91% on a tumor-site basis. A false-negative rate of between 9% and 14% and a false-positive rate of less than 4% were found. In 11 of the 51 patients evaluated, tumor sites were detected that were not found by other clinical methods of cancer detection. These sites of tumor were then confirmed later, as much as 40 wk after radioimmunodetection was performed. It is concluded that in colorectal cancer patients, the current method of carcinoembryonic antigen radioimmunodetection can contribute to the preoperative clinical staging of the patients, assist in the postoperative evaluation of tumor recurrence or spread, complement other methods used to assess tumor response to therapy, support the indication of a rising carcinoembryonic antigen titer (when other methods cannot detect tumor) for second-look surgery, and confirm the findings of other detection measures that are less tumor-specific.

  10. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  11. Proper exercise decreases plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels with the improvement of body condition in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Ko, Il-Gyu; Park, Eung-Mi; Choi, Hye-Jung; Yoo, Jaehyun; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of chronic diseases including cancers. Physical exercise has the beneficial effects for the elderly susceptible to the development of cancers, through maintaining a healthy body condition and improving the immune system. However, excessive or insufficient exercise might increase the risk for cancer. In the present study, we investigated what exercise frequency improves cancer-related biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), red blood cell (RBC), and white blood cell (WBC), and the body composition of elderly women. Fifty-four females, aged 70 to 77 years, were divided into 4 groups: control, 1-day exercise (1E), 2-3-day exercise (2-3E), and 5-day exercise (5E) groups. The control group did not participate in any physical activity, while the subjects in the exercise groups underwent the exercise program for 12 weeks. As results, CEA was significantly decreased in the exercise groups, with the lowest values in 2-3E group. In contrast, AFP, RBC and WBC were not significantly changed. CEA is an oncofetal glycoprotein that is overexpressed in adenocarcinomas. Although the function of CEA has not been fully understood, CEA has been suggested to be involved in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines via stimulating monocytes and macrophages. Moreover, body weight and body mass index were improved in the exercise groups, with the lowest levels in 5E group. Thus, we suggest that exercise for 2-3 days per week decreases the expression of CEA and improves body condition, without loading fatigue or stress, which may contribute to preventing cancer in the elderly women.

  12. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering study of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum from patients with colorectal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Yanping; Zheng, Xiongwei; He, Cheng; Lu, Jianping; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haisan

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we developed a SERS platform for quantitative detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum of patients with colorectal cancers. Anti-CEA-functionalized 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-labeled Au/Ag core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared first and then used to analyze CEA antigen solutions of different concentrations. A calibration curve was established in the range from 5 × 10-3 to 5 × 105 ng/mL. Finally, this new SERS probe was applied for quantitative detection of CEA in serum obtained from 26 colorectal cancer patients according to the calibration curve. The results were in good agreement with that obtained by electrochemical luminescence method, suggesting that SERS immunoassay has high sensitivity and specificity for CEA detection in serum. A detection limit of 5 pg/ml was achieved. This study demonstrated the feasibility and great potential for developing this new technology into a clinical tool for analysis of tumor markers in the blood.

  14. Detection of targeted carcinoembryonic antigens using a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jian; Lei, Chong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Zhen; Zhou, Yong

    2013-11-01

    In this work, a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor was designed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) labeled by Dynabeads. The sensor with Fe-based amorphous core and three dimension solenoid coils was fabricated by Micro Electro-Mechanical system technology. Sandwich assays are performed using antibody-antigen pair combination of biotin-streptavidin assay on a separated Au film substrate surface with a self-assembled layer. With dc magnetic fields in the range of 560 μT to 875 μT, detection of CEAs with different concentrations was performed and a minimum detectable concentration of 1 pg/ml was achieved. Furthermore, CEA samples with different concentrations can be distinguished.

  15. An electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen enhanced by self-assembled nanogold coatings on magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Gao, Huiling; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wei, Xiaoping; Yang, Catherine F

    2010-04-14

    A quick and reproducible electrochemical-based immunosensor technique, using magnetic core/shell particles that are coated with self-assembled multilayer of nanogold, has been developed. Magnetic particles that are structured from Au/Fe(3)O(4) core-shells were prepared and aminated after a reaction between gold and thiourea, and additional multilayered coatings of gold nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of the core/shell particles. The carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA) was immobilized on the modified magnetic particles, which were then attached on the surface of solid paraffin carbon paste electrode (SPCE) by an external magnetic field. This is an assembly of a novel immuno biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The sensitivity and response features of this immunoassay are significantly affected by the surface area and the biological compatibility of the multilayered nanogold. The linear range for the detection of CEA was from 0.005 to 50 ng mL(-1) and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.001 ng mL(-1). The LOD is approximately 500 times more sensitive than that of the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for CEA detection.

  16. Disposable electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen using ferrocene liposomes and MWCNT screen-printed electrode.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Subramanian; Rani, Chinnakkaruppanan; Vijay Anand, Annadurai; Ho, Ja-An Annie

    2009-03-15

    Disposable electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in saliva and serum was developed. Monoclonal anti-CEA antibodies (alphaCEA) were covalently immobilized on polyethyleneimine wrapped multiwalled carbon nanotubes screen-printed electrode. A sandwich immunoassay was performed with CEA and alphaCEA tagged ferrocene carboxylic acid encapsulated liposomes (alphaCEA-FCL). The square wave voltammetry (SWV) was employed to analyze faradic redox responses of the released ferrocene carboxylic acid from the immunoconjugated liposomes on the electrode surface. The magnitude of the SWV peak current was directly related to the concentration of CEA. The calibration curve for CEA concentration was in the range of 5 x 10(-12) to 5 x 10(-7)gmL(-1) with a detection limit of 1 x 10(-12)gmL(-1) (S/N=3). This method provides a high precise and sensitive determination of CEA in human blood serum and saliva samples. PMID:19038538

  17. Development of a PMMA Electrochemical Microfluidic Device for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Trung, Hoang; Tien, Bui Quang; Binh, Nguyen Hai; Ha, Cao Hong; Le Huy, Nguyen; Loc, Nguyen Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Lam, Tran Dai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic device fabricated by an inexpensive CO2 laser etching system was developed for detection of carcino-embryonic antigens (CEA). The device was capable of working in continuous mode and was designed with the aid of numerical simulation. The detection of target CEA was based on immuno-assay via magnetic particles and electrochemical sensing. The as-prepared microfluidic can be used to detect CEA at the relatively low concentration of 150 pg mL-1. The device could be reused many times, since the capture and removal of magnetic particles in the assay could be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The proposed approach appears to be suitable for high-throughput and automated analysis of large biomolecules such as tumor markers and pathogens.

  18. Kinetics of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody internalization: effects of affinity, bivalency, and stability

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael M.; Thurber, Greg M.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical analyses suggest that the cellular internalization and catabolism of bound antibodies contribute significantly to poor penetration into tumors. Here we quantitatively assess the internalization of antibodies and antibody fragments against the commonly targeted antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Although CEA is often referred to as a non-internalizing or shed antigen, anti-CEA antibodies and antibody fragments are shown to be slowly endocytosed by LS174T cells with a half-time of 10–16 h, a time scale consistent with the metabolic turnover rate of CEA in the absence of antibody. Anti-CEA single chain variable fragments (scFvs) with significant differences in affinity, stability against protease digestion, and valency exhibit similar uptake rates of bound antibody. In contrast, one anti-CEA IgG exhibits unique binding and trafficking properties with twice as many molecules bound per cell at saturation and significantly faster cellular internalization after binding. The internalization rates measured herein can be used in simple computational models to predict the microdistribution of these antibodies in tumor spheroids. PMID:18408925

  19. Electrochemical Immunoassay of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on A Lead Sulfide Nanoparticle Label

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shengfu; Zhang, Xing; Mao, Xun; Zeng, Qingxiang; Xu, Hui; Lin, Yuehe; Chen, Wei; Liu, Guodong

    2008-10-01

    We describe a Lead sulfide nanoparticle (PbS NP) based electrochemical immunoassay to detect a tumor biomarker, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Cubic PbS NPs were prepared and functionalized with thioglycolic acid (TGA), which stabilized the formed NPs and offered carboxyl groups to conjugate with CEA antibodies. PbS NP conjugated with monoclonal CEA antibody was used as a label in an immnorecognition event. After a complete sandwich immunoreaction among the primary CEA antibody (immobilized on the carboxyl-modified magnetic beads), CEA, and the PbS-labeled secondary antibody (PbS-anti-CEA), PbS labels were captured to the magnetic-bead (MB) surface through the antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Electrochemical stripping analysis of the captured PbS was used to quantify the concentration of CEA after an acid-dissolution step. The MBs and the magnetic separation platform were used to integrate a facile antibody immobilization with immunoreactions and the isolation of immunocomplexes from reaction solutions in the immunoassay. The performance of this nanoparticle based electrochemical immunoassay was successfully evaluated with human serum spiked with CEA, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for rapid, simple, and cost-effective analysis of tumor biomarkers in biological fluids.

  20. Adenovirus tumor targeting and hepatic untargeting by a coxsackie/adenovirus receptor ectodomain anti-carcinoembryonic antigen bispecific adapter.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Jung; Everts, Maaike; Pereboeva, Larisa; Komarova, Svetlana; Idan, Anat; Curiel, David T; Herschman, Harvey R

    2007-06-01

    Adenovirus vectors have a number of advantages for gene therapy. However, because of their lack of tumor tropism and their preference for liver infection following systemic administration, they cannot be used for systemic attack on metastatic disease. Many epithelial tumors (e.g., colon, lung, and breast) express carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). To block the natural hepatic tropism of adenovirus and to "retarget" the virus to CEA-expressing tumors, we used a bispecific adapter protein (sCAR-MFE), which fuses the ectodomain of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (sCAR) with a single-chain anti-CEA antibody (MFE-23). sCAR-MFE untargets adenovirus-directed luciferase transgene expression in the liver by >90% following systemic vector administration. Moreover, sCAR-MFE can "retarget" adenovirus to CEA-positive epithelial tumor cells in cell culture, in s.c. tumor grafts, and in hepatic tumor grafts. The sCAR-MFE bispecific adapter should, therefore, be a powerful agent to retarget adenovirus vectors to epithelial tumor metastases.

  1. Monoclonal antibody recognizing human melanoma-carcinoma cross-reacting oncofetal antigen epitopically associated with carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Liao, S K; Kwong, P C; Clarke, B J; Dent, P B; Ryan, E D; Khosravi, M J; Laferte, S; Krantz, M J

    1985-05-01

    By fusion of mouse NS1 myeloma cells with splenocytes from a BALB/c mouse immunized with human melanoma cells, an IgG1 monoclonal antibody, designated as 140.72, was produced. By the mixed hemadsorption antibody binding assay, 140.72 was shown to react with 17 of 20 melanoma cell lines and with 5 of 14 carcinoma cell lines. This antibody also reacted with 3 of 3 normal melanocyte cultures in much lower titers. It did not react with any of 35 other normal and malignant lines, including neuroblastoma, glioblastoma, sarcoma, teratoma, fibroblast, and lymphoid cell lines. Absorption with fresh melanoma and carcinoma homogenates confirmed the results of direct tests. Fetal reactivity of antibody 140.72 was determined by positive absorption with 10 of 11 tissue homogenates derived from different fetuses of 10-16 weeks' gestation. The reactivity of this antibody was completely removed by absorption with a highly purified preparation of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) derived from a colon carcinoma. The antigenic activity was detected in the culture medium of reactive cell lines. Immunoprecipitation analyses of melanoma and carcinoma cells indicated that the antigenic determinant recognized by antibody 140.72 is on a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular weight of 95,000-150,000 common to both serologically reactive cell types. Additionally, a 200,000-molecular-weight glycoprotein corresponding to the CEA molecule was detected only on the reactive carcinoma cells. These data confirmed previous findings obtained with polyclonal anti-CEA antisera for the existence of shared CEA-related antigenic determinants on human carcinomas and melanomas and provided additional molecular characterization of these glycoproteins. Further characterization of the molecules bearing the antigenic determinant recognized by antibody 140.72 should be performed with a view to exploring its potential in the immunodiagnosis and immunotherapy of patients with melanoma.

  2. [Optical Analysis of the Interaction of Mercaptan Derivatives of Nanogold Particles with Carcinoembryonic Antigen].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong-juan; Zhao, Ran-lin; Wang, De-shun; Li, Cai-xia; Liu, Yi-yao

    2016-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been the subject of intense research for use in biomedicine over the past couple of decades. AuNPs, also referred to as colloidal gold, possess some astounding optical and physical properties that have earned them a prime spot among the new promising tools for medical applications. Today, AuNPs are offered to provide the clinical laboratory with more sensitive, faster, and simpler assays, which are also cost-effective. AuNPs can be used to develop point-of- care tests and novel testing strategies such as in drug targeting, disease detection, molecular recognition, and biological labels. The typical structure of AuNPs is spherical nano-sized gold particles, but they can also be composed of a thin gold shell surrounding a dielectric core, such as silica (gold nanoshells). their size range from 0.8 to 250 nm and are characterized by high absorption coefficients. AuNPs have some unique optical properties, such as enhanced absorption and scattering, where the absorption cross-section of AuNPs is 4~5 orders of magnitude greater than that of rhodamine 6G. When AuNPs aggregate, interaction of locally adjacent AuNPs (plasmon-plasmon interaction) shifts their color to blue. Thus, the binding of AuNP-labeled entities to their respective target would lead to aggregation of the nanoparticles and a detectable shift in the optical signal. The strong absorption of AuNPs can also be used in colorimetric detection of analytes by measuring changes in the refractive index of the AuNP's environment caused by adsorption of the target analytes. However, a large number of surface atoms of nanoparticles have huge surplus bonding ability, because of surface effect of gold nanoparticles, result in reuniting and sinking among the nanoparticles which make them unstable. In order to detect traces of carcinoembryonic antigen, one of the tumor targets, a new kind of gold nanoparticle with hyperchormic effect and fluorescence sensitization effect material needs to

  3. [Optical Analysis of the Interaction of Mercaptan Derivatives of Nanogold Particles with Carcinoembryonic Antigen].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong-juan; Zhao, Ran-lin; Wang, De-shun; Li, Cai-xia; Liu, Yi-yao

    2016-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been the subject of intense research for use in biomedicine over the past couple of decades. AuNPs, also referred to as colloidal gold, possess some astounding optical and physical properties that have earned them a prime spot among the new promising tools for medical applications. Today, AuNPs are offered to provide the clinical laboratory with more sensitive, faster, and simpler assays, which are also cost-effective. AuNPs can be used to develop point-of- care tests and novel testing strategies such as in drug targeting, disease detection, molecular recognition, and biological labels. The typical structure of AuNPs is spherical nano-sized gold particles, but they can also be composed of a thin gold shell surrounding a dielectric core, such as silica (gold nanoshells). their size range from 0.8 to 250 nm and are characterized by high absorption coefficients. AuNPs have some unique optical properties, such as enhanced absorption and scattering, where the absorption cross-section of AuNPs is 4~5 orders of magnitude greater than that of rhodamine 6G. When AuNPs aggregate, interaction of locally adjacent AuNPs (plasmon-plasmon interaction) shifts their color to blue. Thus, the binding of AuNP-labeled entities to their respective target would lead to aggregation of the nanoparticles and a detectable shift in the optical signal. The strong absorption of AuNPs can also be used in colorimetric detection of analytes by measuring changes in the refractive index of the AuNP's environment caused by adsorption of the target analytes. However, a large number of surface atoms of nanoparticles have huge surplus bonding ability, because of surface effect of gold nanoparticles, result in reuniting and sinking among the nanoparticles which make them unstable. In order to detect traces of carcinoembryonic antigen, one of the tumor targets, a new kind of gold nanoparticle with hyperchormic effect and fluorescence sensitization effect material needs to

  4. Fabrication of graphene/gold-modified screen-printed electrode for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Chan, K F; Lim, H N; Shams, N; Jayabal, S; Pandikumar, A; Huang, N M

    2016-01-01

    Immunosensors based on gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (AuNPs/rGO)-modified screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) were successfully synthesized using an electrochemical deposition method. The modified SPEs were characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the morphology and composition of AuNPs and rGO. Both the FESEM and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the AuNPs were successfully anchored on the thin film of rGO deposited on the surface of the SPEs. Characterization with a ferri-ferrocyanide couple [Fe(CN)6(3-/4-)] showed that the electron transfer kinetic between the analyte and electrode was enhanced after the modification with the AuNPs/rGO composite on the electrode surface, in addition to increasing the effective surface area of the electrode. The modified SPE was immobilized with a sandwich type immunosensor to mimic the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) immunoassay. The modified SPE that was fortified with the sandwich type immunosensor exhibited double electrochemical responses in the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with linear ranges of 0.5-50 ng/mL and 250-2000 ng/mL and limits of detection of 0.28 ng/mL and 181.5 ng/mL, respectively. PMID:26478358

  5. Electrochemical immunosensor based on nanoporpus gold loading thionine for carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaobin; Ma, Zhanfang

    2013-05-30

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) has recently received considerable attention in analytical electrochemistry because of its good conductivity and large specific surface area. A facile layer-by-layer assembly technique fabricated NPG was used to construct an electrochemical immunosensor for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). NPG was fabricated on glassy carbon (GC) electrode by alternatively assembling gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol as a cross-linker, and then AgNPs were dissolved with HNO3. The thionine was absorbed into the NPG and then gold nanostructure was electrodeposited on the surface through the electrochemical reduction of gold chloride tetrahydrate (HAuCl4). The anti-CEA was directly adsorbed on gold nanostructure fixed on the GC electrode. The linear range of the immunosensor was from 10 pg mL(-1) to 100 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 3 pg mL(-1) (S/N=3). The proposed immunosensor has high sensitivity, wide linear range, low detection limit, and good selectivity. The present method could be widely applied to construct other immunosensors.

  6. Radioimmunoguided surgery in recurrent colorectal cancer: The role of carcinoembryonic antigen, computerized tomography, and physical examination

    SciTech Connect

    Sardi, A.; Agnone, C.M.; Nieroda, C.A.; Mojzisik, C.; Hinkle, G.; Ferrara, P.; Farrar, W.B.; Bolton, J.; Thurston, M.O.; Martin, E.W. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    From January 1986 to December 1987, 32 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer had second-look radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS system). All patients had pathologic confirmation of recurrence. The RIGS system identified 81% of recurrences, and in six patients recurrent tumor was identified only by RIGS. All patients had physical examination, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) assay, and computerized tomography of the abdomen and pelvis. Detection of recurrence was based on symptoms in six, elevated CEA value in 25, and physical examination in one. The CEA was elevated preoperatively in 30 patients; two false-negative results occurred in symptomatic patients who had pelvic recurrence. The median CEA value in those with liver recurrence was 30 ng/ml (range 5.2 to 298) and for pelvic recurrence 13 ng/ml (range 1.9 to 31) (P less than .05). The overall sensitivity of CT was 41% (abdomen other than liver 37%, liver 56%, and pelvis 22%). The combination of elevated CEA, symptoms, and physical findings identified 100% of recurrences. We conclude that a rising CEA remains the most accurate indicator of recurrence. CT should not be done routinely to detect recurrent colorectal cancer unless CEA is elevated or the patient is symptomatic. In our study the intraoperative use of the RIGS system aided the surgeon in identifying occult tumors.

  7. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen is related to tumour stage and long-term survival in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M. A.; Buckley, D.; Henson, D. B.; Armitage, N. C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence as to the value of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in guiding treatment for patients with colorectal cancer is conflicting. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the value of preoperative CEA in predicting tumour factors of proven prognostic value and long-term survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Preoperative serum CEA, tumour ploidy, stage and grade were ascertained in 277 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. This cohort of patients were followed up for a minimum of 5 years, or until death, in a dedicated colorectal clinic. Patients with an elevated CEA had a 5 year survival of 39%. This increased to 57% if the CEA was normal (P=0.001). The proportion of patients with a raised CEA increased with a more advanced tumour stage (P < 0.000001) and a poorly differentiated tumour grade (P < 0.005). Once stage had been controlled for, CEA was not a predictor of survival. No relationship between tumour ploidy and CEA was found. In conclusion, a raised preoperative serum CEA is likely to be associated with advanced tumour stage and poor long-term survival, compared with patients with a normal value. PMID:9823977

  8. Nanogold-actuated biomimetic peroxidase for sensitized electrochemical immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huafeng; Tang, Juan; Su, Biling; Chen, Guonan; Huang, Jianxin; Tang, Dianping

    2010-09-30

    A new electrochemical immunoassay protocol for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum was developed by means of immobilizing horseradish peroxidase-labeled anti-CEA antibodies (HRP-anti-CEA) on the nanogold/nano-Fe(3)O(4) particles-functionalized polyion complex (PIC) membrane. With a one-step immunoassay format, the formed immunocomplex inhibited partly the bioactive center of the immobilized HRP, and decreased the HRP toward the reduction of H(2)O(2). Nanogold-actuated nano-Fe(3)O(4) mimetic peroxidase was used for the sensitivity improvement of the electrochemical immunosensor with Prussian blue (PB) as mediators. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor displayed a wide dynamic range of 0.1-220 ng mL(-1) with a relative low detection limit (LOD) of 10 pg mL(-1) CEA (at 3σ). Intra- and inter-assay show good precisions with a coefficient of variation (CV) lower than 7.8% and 7.3%, respectively. No significant difference at the 95% confidence level was encountered in the analysis of 17 human serum specimens between the electrochemical immunosensor and automatic electrochemiluminescent (ECL) analyzer for the determination of CEA.

  9. The role of bile carcinoembryonic antigen in diagnosing bile duct cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kwang Ro; Kim, Do Ha; Park, Jong Ho; Bang, Sung-Jo; Shin, Jung Woo; Park, Neung Hwa; Park, Jae Hoo

    2003-01-01

    It is known that the fluids bathing tumors might contain a higher level of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) than those found in the blood. Therefore, we evaluated the role of bile CEA in diagnosing bile duct cancer. One hundred and thirty two patients were prospectively studied. The patients were divided into 3 groups: the bile duct cancer (n=32), pancreatic cancer (n=16), and benign biliary diseases (n=84) groups. Bile samples were obtained on the next day of the biliary drainage procedures. The mean bile CEA level in those with bile duct cancer (120.6 +/- 156.9 ng/mL) was significantly higher than those with pancreatic cancer and benign biliary diseases (32.0 +/- 28.5 ng/mL, 29.3 +/- 56.3 ng/mL). Using the level of 20 ng/mL, the sensitivity and specificity of bile CEA in the diagnosis of bile duct cancer from benign biliary diseases were 65.6% and 66.7%, respectively. Both the bile CEA and total bilirubin level were found to be an independent factor linked to bile duct cancer. This study result suggests that bile CEA level is a useful supplementary test for diagnosing bile duct cancer. PMID:14676443

  10. Pattern recognition of neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen in whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Stanciu-Gavan, Camelia

    2015-02-01

    New tools and methods for pattern recognition of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were proposed for the screening of whole blood samples. The new tools were based on stochastic sensors designed using nanoporous gold microspheres, graphite, graphene, diamond paste as well as α-CDs, and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin. The best sensor for the assay of CEA was the one based on P/graphite (the limit of determination was 16 fg/ml and sensitivity was 2.32 × 10(7)  s mg(-1)  ml), while for the assay of NSE the, best sensor was the one based on P/graphene (the limit of determination was 7.45 pg/ml and sensitivity was 2.49 × 10(8)  s mg(-1)  ml). The sensor of choice for simultaneous detection of NSE and CEA is the one based on P/graphene because we need high sensitivity and low limit of determination for NSE. To our knowledge, this is the only one screening test for early detection of lung cancer, by identification of NSE and CEA in whole blood samples. PMID:25604868

  11. Malignant neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad; Qureshi, Asim; Saparamadu, Anna; Kumar, Shiyam

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman presented to a tertiary care centre with signs and symptoms of acute cholecystitis, cholelithiasis and diagnoses of a high-grade neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder primarily with peritoneal and liver metastases. She had a liver abscess secondary to Salmonella and Enterococcus fecalis that was drained and treated with appropriate antibiotics. Interestingly, the serum chromogranin A levels were within normal limits, but carcinoembryonic antigen was elevated, which helped evaluate responses and pick progression. She was treated with 10 cycles of palliative chemotherapy when malignancy associated complications started to recur, that is, cholangitis, worsening pain, cachexia, intestinal obstruction, etc leading to chemotherapy delays. Her disease progressed during these times with rapid deterioration of performance status. She died of septic complications postlaparotomy for intestinal obstruction. Her progression-free survival remained for 8 months with subjective and objective improvements, and her overall survival remained at 13 months. We describe the course of her illness and give a brief review of the literature. PMID:23661652

  12. Crosstalk of carcinoembryonic antigen and transforming growth factor-β via their receptors: comparing human and canine cancer.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Fazekas, Judit; Singer, Josef; Hofstetter, Gerlinde; Oida, Kumiko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2015-05-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) pathways are tightly connected and play a key role in malignant transformation in cancer. Immune infiltration by regulatory T- and B-lymphocytes (Tregs, Bregs) has recently gained increased attention for being an important source of TGF-β. There is a plethora of studies examining the pro-tumorigenic functions of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), but its receptor CEAR is far less studied. So far, there is a single connecting report that TGF-β also may signal through CEAR. The crosstalk between cancer tissues is further complicated by the expression of CEAR and TGF-β receptors in stromal cells, and implications of TGF-β in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, tumor-infiltrating Tregs and Bregs may directly instruct cancer cells by secreting TGF-β binding to their CEAR. Therefore, both TGF-β and CEA may act synergistically in breast cancer and cause disease progression, and NFκB could be a common crossing point between their signaling. CEAR, TGF-β1-3, TGF-β-R types I-III and NFκB class I and II molecules have an outstanding human-canine sequence identity, and only a canine CEA homolog has not yet been identified. For these reasons, the dog may be a valid translational model patient for investigating the crosstalk of the interconnected CEA and TGF-β networks.

  13. Comparison between tissue and serum content of CA 125, CA 19-9, and carcinoembryonic antigen in ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Breitenecker, G; Neunteufel, W; Bieglmayer, C; Kölbl, H; Schieder, K

    1989-01-01

    Tumor markers CA 125, CA 19-9, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were detected by immunohistochemistry in paraffin embedded tissue samples obtained from two different locations in 35 ovarian tumors. In addition, serum concentrations of these tumor markers were measured before cytoreductive surgery. The staining reaction was heterogeneous in different parts of the tumor as well as within the parenchyma. Of the marker positive tumors, a staining reaction was observed in both tissue samples in only 10 of 22 cases for CA 125, in eight of 13 cases for CEA, and in three of eight cases for CA 19-9. Eighty-one percent of the patients whose tumor was positive for CA 125 also showed elevated serum levels of this marker. A poor correlation was found between tissue and circulating CA 19-9 levels. CEA was detected in 28% of the tumors and seemed to be valuable only for monitoring in rare cases of ovarian cancer. For purposes of selecting a marker for monitoring of patients with ovarian carcinoma, immunohistochemistry has a predictive value for CA 125 only. In order to better define the marker expressed in a tumor, it is necessary to examine at least two samples of different parts of the malignant tissue.

  14. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 regulates granulopoiesis by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2010-10-29

    Although carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is an activation marker for neutrophils and delays neutrophil apoptosis, the role of CEACAM1 in granulopoiesis and neutrophil-dependent host immune responses has not been investigated. CEACAM1 expression correlated with granulocytic differentiation, and Ceacam1(-/-) mice developed neutrophilia because of loss of the Src-homology-phosphatase-1 (SHP-1)-dependent inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat3) pathway provided by CEACAM1. Moreover, Ceacam1(-/-) mice were hypersensitive to Listeria Monocytogenes (LM) infection with an accelerated mortality. Reintroduction of CEACAM1 into Ceacam1(-/-) bone marrow restored normal granulopoiesis and host sensitivity to LM infection, while mutation of its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) abrogated this restoration. shRNA-mediated reduction of Stat3 amounts rescued normal granulopoiesis, attenuating host sensitivity to LM infection in Ceacam1(-/-) mice. Thus, CEACAM1 acted as a coinhibitory receptor for G-CSFR regulating granulopoiesis and host innate immune response to bacterial infections.

  15. Crosstalk of carcinoembryonic antigen and transforming growth factor-β via their receptors: comparing human and canine cancer.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Fazekas, Judit; Singer, Josef; Hofstetter, Gerlinde; Oida, Kumiko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2015-05-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB) pathways are tightly connected and play a key role in malignant transformation in cancer. Immune infiltration by regulatory T- and B-lymphocytes (Tregs, Bregs) has recently gained increased attention for being an important source of TGF-β. There is a plethora of studies examining the pro-tumorigenic functions of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), but its receptor CEAR is far less studied. So far, there is a single connecting report that TGF-β also may signal through CEAR. The crosstalk between cancer tissues is further complicated by the expression of CEAR and TGF-β receptors in stromal cells, and implications of TGF-β in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, tumor-infiltrating Tregs and Bregs may directly instruct cancer cells by secreting TGF-β binding to their CEAR. Therefore, both TGF-β and CEA may act synergistically in breast cancer and cause disease progression, and NFκB could be a common crossing point between their signaling. CEAR, TGF-β1-3, TGF-β-R types I-III and NFκB class I and II molecules have an outstanding human-canine sequence identity, and only a canine CEA homolog has not yet been identified. For these reasons, the dog may be a valid translational model patient for investigating the crosstalk of the interconnected CEA and TGF-β networks. PMID:25832000

  16. Simultaneous Detection of α-Fetoprotein and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Si Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kuiyu; Zhang, Ye; Li, Zengyao; Zhou, Fan; Feng, Kang; Dou, Huiqiang; Wang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, resulting in death within six to 20 months. The survival rate can be improved by effective treatments when diagnosed at an early stage. The α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have been identified as markers that are expressed at higher levels in PHC patients. In this study, we employed silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (SiNW-FETs) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels to simultaneously detect AFP and CEA in desalted human serum. Dual-channel PDMS was first utilized for the selective modification of AFP and CEA antibodies on SiNWs, while single-channel PDMS offers faster and more sensitive detection of AFP and CEA in serum. During the SiNW modification process, 0.1% BSA was utilized to minimize nonspecific protein binding from serum. The linear dynamic ranges for the AFP and CEA detection were measured to be 500 fg/mL to 50 ng/mL and 50 fg/mL to 10 ng/mL, respectively. Our work demonstrates the promising potential of fabricated SiNW-FETs as a direct detection kit for multiple tumor markers in serum; therefore, it provides a chance for early stage diagnose and, hence, more effective treatments for PHC patients. PMID:26251912

  17. Clinical significance of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakagawa, Satoru; Ohashi, Manabu; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen levels were assessed to determine if their levels are useful for staging esophageal cancer preoperatively and for predicting patient survival after esophagectomy. Hence their seropositivity was investigated for a correlation with resectability, clinicopathologic parameters of tumor progression, and treatment outcomes in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer ( n = 63) and those undergoing esophagectomy for resectable disease ( n = 267). Abnormal elevation of serum SCC antigen levels showed a significant correlation with resectability ( p< 0.0001), depth of tumor invasion ( p < 0.0001), lymph node status ( p = 0.0015), TNM stage ( p < 0.0001), lymphatic invasion ( p = 0.0019), blood vessel invasion ( p = 0.0079), and poor survival after esophagectomy ( p = 0.0061). A significant relation ( p = 0.0145) was found between elevated serum CEA levels and distant metastasis, whereas the seropositivity of CA 19-9 showed no association with resectability, tumor progression, or patient survival. These results indicate that abnormal elevation of serum SCC antigen is a useful predictor of advanced esophageal cancer associated with poor survival after esophagectomy.

  18. Surface-Enhanced Electrochemiluminescence of Ru@SiO2 for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daifang; Li, Yanyan; Lin, Zhenyu; Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua

    2015-06-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is recognized as a disease biomarker to reflect the existence of various cancers and tumors in the human body. Sensitive detection of CEA in body fluid is valuable for clinical diagnosis and treatment assessment of cancers. Herein, we present a new approach for ultrasensitive determination of CEA in human serum based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of Ru(bpy)3(2+). In this surface-enhanced ECL (SEECL) sensing scheme, Ru(bpy)3(2+)-doped SiO2 nanoparticles (Ru@SiO2) act as ECL luminophores, and AuNPs are used as LSPR source to enhance the ECL signal. Two different kinds of aptamers specific to CEA are modified on the surface of Ru@SiO2 and AuNPs, respectively. In the presence of CEA, a multilayer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures would be formed. Our investigation reveals that the ECL signal of Ru@SiO2 can be effectively enhanced by AuNPs. One layer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures would generate about 3-fold ECL enhancement compared with the ECL of the nanoarchitectures without the presence of AuNPs. As much as 30-fold ECL enhancement could be obtained by a multilayer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 1.52 × 10(-6) ng/mL of CEA in human serum was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, CEA assays with such a low LOD have never been reported for an ECL sensor.

  19. Elevated Level of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Search for a Malignancy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Asad-Ur-Rahman, Fnu; Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to be associated with tumor burden in patients with colorectal cancer. However, it is also elevated to a significant degree in a number of other malignant and non-malignant conditions. We report a case of reversible CEA elevation in a patient using lithium for bipolar disorder. A 58-year-old female with a longstanding smoking history and a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bipolar illness, hypothyroidism, and obesity was found to have an elevated CEA level of 11.2 ng/ml (normal level <5 ng/ml) in the workup for postmenopausal bleeding. Her history was not positive for malignancy of colorectum, ovaries, thyroid, or breast.  She underwent a large number of imaging and endoscopic studies to evaluate for colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer; however, it did not reveal any evidence of malignancy. Upon review of her medications, she reported that she had recently started lithium for her bipolar illness. We followed up her CEA level while her dose of lithium was reduced from 450 to 300 mg per day. Her CEA level decreased from 25 mg/dl to 6.1 mg/dl and remained stable over the course of the next eight months. Our case is the first case report that identifies lithium as a potential cause of reversible CEA elevation. The underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated, but it underscores the importance of investigating the medications as part of the workup. PMID:27446768

  20. Elevated Level of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Search for a Malignancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to be associated with tumor burden in patients with colorectal cancer. However, it is also elevated to a significant degree in a number of other malignant and non-malignant conditions. We report a case of reversible CEA elevation in a patient using lithium for bipolar disorder. A 58-year-old female with a longstanding smoking history and a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bipolar illness, hypothyroidism, and obesity was found to have an elevated CEA level of 11.2 ng/ml (normal level <5 ng/ml) in the workup for postmenopausal bleeding. Her history was not positive for malignancy of colorectum, ovaries, thyroid, or breast.  She underwent a large number of imaging and endoscopic studies to evaluate for colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer; however, it did not reveal any evidence of malignancy. Upon review of her medications, she reported that she had recently started lithium for her bipolar illness. We followed up her CEA level while her dose of lithium was reduced from 450 to 300 mg per day. Her CEA level decreased from 25 mg/dl to 6.1 mg/dl and remained stable over the course of the next eight months. Our case is the first case report that identifies lithium as a potential cause of reversible CEA elevation. The underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated, but it underscores the importance of investigating the medications as part of the workup. PMID:27446768

  1. Elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen level in a patient with hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for cervical esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Gen; Abe, Eisuke; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Sasai, Keisuke

    2010-02-01

    We report the case of a 51-year-old woman who showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level 14 months after chemoradiation therapy for her cervical esophageal cancer. Close examination demonstrated that the patient was suffering from hypothyroidism probably due to the chemoradiation therapy. The serum CEA level decreased after starting supplementary treatment with oral levothyroxine. The exact mechanism underlying the elevated level of CEA observed in a patient with hypothyroidism is unclear. However, we should be aware of the possibility of transient elevation of CEA affected by thyroid function in patients after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer.

  2. Radiocurability by Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor-{alpha} Using a Bispecific Antibody in Carcinoembryonic Antigen Transgenic Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Larbouret, Christel; Robert, Bruno; Linard, Christine; Teulon, Isabelle; Gourgou, Sophie M.Sc.; Bibeau, Frederic; Martineau, Pierre; Santoro, Lore; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Pelegrin, Andre; Azria, David

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) enhances radiotherapy (RT) killing of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. To overcome systemic side effects, we used a bispecific antibody (BsAb) directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and TNF-{alpha} to target this cytokine in a CEA-expressing colon carcinoma. We report the evaluation of this strategy in immunocompetent CEA-transgenic mice. Methods and Materials: The murine CEA-transfected colon carcinoma MC-38 was used for all experiments. In vitro, clonogenic assays were performed after RT alone, TNF-{alpha} alone, and RT plus TNF-{alpha}. In vivo, the mice were randomly assigned to treatment groups: control, TNF-{alpha}, BsAb, BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}, RT, RT plus TNF-{alpha}, and RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}. Measurements of endogenous TNF-{alpha} mRNA levels and evaluation of necrosis (histologic evaluation) were assessed per treatment group. Results: In vitro, combined RT plus TNF-{alpha} resulted in a significant decrease in the survival fraction at 2 Gy compared with RT alone (p < 0.00001). In vivo, we observed a complete response in 5 (50%) of 10, 2 (20%) of 10, 2 (18.2%) of 11, and 0 (0%) of 12 treated mice in the RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha}, RT plus TNF-{alpha}, RT alone, and control groups, respectively. This difference was statistically significant when TNF-{alpha} was targeted with the BsAb (p = 0.03). The addition of exogenous TNF-{alpha} to RT significantly increased the endogenous TNF-{alpha} mRNA level, particularly when TNF-{alpha} was targeted with BsAb (p < 0.01). The percentages of necrotic area were significantly augmented in the RT plus BsAb plus TNF-{alpha} group. Conclusion: These results suggest that targeting TNF-{alpha} with the BsAb provokes RT curability in a CEA-expressing digestive tumor syngenic model and could be considered as a solid rationale for clinical trials.

  3. A chitosan-Au-hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles-based antifouling immunosensor for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chong; Ma, Lie; Qian, Qiuhui; Parmar, Soniya; Zhao, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Shen, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Analysts are always interested in finding new functional nanomaterials and devices with good properties for electrochemical sensor applications. In this paper, hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles with carboxylic acid functional groups (HBPE-CA NPs) were synthesized and combined with chitosan wrapped around Au nanoparticles (CS-Au NPs) to prepare a novel and sensitive electrochemical immunosensor by adsorption of carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA) on the (HBPE-CA)/CS-Au NPs modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). Under the optimized conditions, the proposed immunosensor displayed a good amperometric response to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Moreover, based on the antibiofouling properties, the immunosensor could be used for the direct detection of CEA in whole blood, and exhibited a wide detection range (1-10(7) fg mL(-1)), and a low detection limit of 0.251 fg mL(-1) (signal/noise = 3). Control experiments were also carried out by using ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), human immunoglobulin G (IgG), BSA and glucose in the absence of CEA. The good stability and repeatability of this immunosensor were also proven. Importantly, the results of the detection of clinical whole blood specimens with the proposed immunosensor showed good consistency with the data determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum samples. Furthermore, the developed immunosensor could provide a promising immunoassay strategy for clinical applications, since the values we measured in whole blood directly are likely closer to the real values. PMID:24957417

  4. Signal sequence deletion and fusion to tetanus toxoid epitope augment antitumor immune responses to a human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) plasmid DNA vaccine in a murine test system.

    PubMed

    Lund, Lars H; Andersson, Karolina; Zuber, Bartek; Karlsson, Anneli; Engström, Gunnel; Hinkula, Jorma; Wahren, Britta; Winberg, Gösta

    2003-05-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) is expressed on several human carcinomas including colon cancer. CEA contains signal peptides that target the protein through the endoplasmic reticulum and to the cell membrane. We constructed a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding a truncated CEA (deltaCEA), devoid of its signal peptides, and demonstrated that it was retained inside the cell, while full-length CEA (wtCEA) was expressed on the membrane. We hypothesized that intracellular retention of deltaCEA would enhance MHC class I presentation of CEA peptides, thus favoring cellular immune responses. In addition, a promiscuous T-helper epitope (Q830-L844 of tetanus toxoid) was fused to the N-terminal of the truncated CEA gene (tetdeltaCEA). C57BL/6 mice immunized with DNA encoding wtCEA or tetdeltaCEA developed both humoral and cellular immune responses to CEA. SCID mice transplanted with spleen cells from tetdeltaCEA but not wtCEA-immunized C57BL/6 mice showed strong suppression of tumor growth after inoculation of human CEA-expressing colon carcinoma cells. Immune spleen cell populations depleted for either B, T or both B and T cells were active, indicating that effector cells might also reside in other populations. The present approach to manipulating antigen presentation may open new possibilities for immunotherapy against colon and other CEA-secreting carcinomas.

  5. A Prospective Study of Comparing Multi-Gene Biomarker Chip and Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in the Postoperative Surveillance for Patients with Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Tang; Huang, Ming-Yii; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating biomarkers can predict clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of our multigene biomarker chip for detecting circulating tumor cells for postoperative surveillance of stage I–III colorectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods In total, 298 stage I–III colorectal cancer patients were analyzed after curative resection between June 2010 and October 2014. During each follow-up, a postoperative surveillance strategy, including ESMO Guidelines Working Group recommendations and the biochip, was used. Results After a 28.4-month median follow-up, 48 (16.1%) patients had postoperative relapse. Univariate analysis revealed that the postoperative relapse risk factors were rectal tumor, perineural invasion, elevated preoperative and postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, and positive biochip results (all P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that postoperative relapse correlated significantly with elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (odds ratio = 4.136, P = 0.008) and positive biochip results (odds ratio = 66.878, P < 0.001). However, the sensitivity (P = 0.003), specificity (P = 0.003), positive (P = 0.002) and negative (P = 0.006) predictive values, and accuracy (P < 0.001) of the biochip for predicting postoperative relapse were significantly higher than those of elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Moreover, the median lead time between positive biochip result and postoperative relapse detection was significantly earlier than that between elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and postoperative relapse detection (10.7 vs. 2.8 months, P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive biochip results correlated strongly with lower disease-free survival and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Compared with conventional serum carcinoembryonic antigen detection, our multigene

  6. Tumor cells in multiple myeloma patients inhibit myeloma-reactive T cells through carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-6.

    PubMed

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Hose, Dirk; Jünger, Simone; Pfirschke, Christina; Khandelwal, Nisit; Umansky, Ludmila; Seckinger, Anja; Conrad, Heinke; Brackertz, Bettina; Rème, Thierry; Gueckel, Brigitte; Meißner, Tobias; Hundemer, Michael; Ho, Anthony D; Rossi, Jean-Francois; Neben, Kai; Bernhard, Helga; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard; Beckhove, Philipp

    2013-05-30

    Although functionally competent cytotoxic, T cells are frequently observed in malignant diseases, they possess little ability to react against tumor cells. This phenomenon is particularly apparent in multiple myeloma. We here demonstrate that cytotoxic T cells reacted against myeloma antigens when presented by autologous dendritic cells, but not by myeloma cells. We further show by gene expression profiling and flow cytometry that, similar to many other malignant tumors, freshly isolated myeloma cells expressed several carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) at varying proportions. Binding and crosslinking of CEACAM-6 by cytotoxic T cells inhibited their activation and resulted in T-cell unresponsiveness. Blocking of CEACAM-6 on the surface of myeloma cells by specific monoclonal antibodies or CEACAM-6 gene knock down by short interfering RNA restored T-cell reactivity against malignant plasma cells. These findings suggest that CEACAM-6 plays an important role in the regulation of CD8+ T-cell responses against multiple myeloma; therefore, therapeutic targeting of CEACAM-6 may be a promising strategy to improve myeloma immunotherapy.

  7. A novel label-free microfluidic paper-based immunosensor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Huiren; Luo, Jinping; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Li; Fan, Yan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a highly sensitive label-free paper-based electrochemical immunosensor employing screen-printed working electrode (SPWE) for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was fabricated. In order to raise the detection sensitivity and immobilize anti-CEA, amino functional graphene (NH2-G)/thionine (Thi)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposites were synthesized and coated on SPWE. The principle of the immunosensor determination was based on the fact that the decreased response currents of Thi were proportional to the concentrations of corresponding antigens due to the formation of antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Experimental results revealed that the immunoassay enabled the determination of standard CEA solutions with linear working ranges of 50pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1), the limit of detections for CEA is 10pgmL(-1) (S/N=3) and its corresponding correlation coefficients were 0.996. Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor could be used for the determination of clinical serum samples. A large number of clinical serum samples were detected and the relative errors between measured values and reference concentrations were calculated. Results showed that this novel paper-based electrochemical immunosensor could provide a new platform for low cost, sensitive, specific, and point-of-care diagnosis in cancer detection. PMID:27132007

  8. A novel label-free microfluidic paper-based immunosensor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Huiren; Luo, Jinping; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Li; Fan, Yan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a highly sensitive label-free paper-based electrochemical immunosensor employing screen-printed working electrode (SPWE) for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was fabricated. In order to raise the detection sensitivity and immobilize anti-CEA, amino functional graphene (NH2-G)/thionine (Thi)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposites were synthesized and coated on SPWE. The principle of the immunosensor determination was based on the fact that the decreased response currents of Thi were proportional to the concentrations of corresponding antigens due to the formation of antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Experimental results revealed that the immunoassay enabled the determination of standard CEA solutions with linear working ranges of 50pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1), the limit of detections for CEA is 10pgmL(-1) (S/N=3) and its corresponding correlation coefficients were 0.996. Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor could be used for the determination of clinical serum samples. A large number of clinical serum samples were detected and the relative errors between measured values and reference concentrations were calculated. Results showed that this novel paper-based electrochemical immunosensor could provide a new platform for low cost, sensitive, specific, and point-of-care diagnosis in cancer detection.

  9. The Genome-Wide Analysis of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Signaling by Colorectal Cancer Cells Using RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bajenova, Olga; Gorbunova, Anna; Evsyukov, Igor; Rayko, Michael; Gapon, Svetlana; Bozhokina, Ekaterina; Shishkin, Alexander; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Сarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5, CD66) is a promoter of metastasis in epithelial cancers that is widely used as a prognostic clinical marker of metastasis. The aim of this study is to identify the network of genes that are associated with CEA-induced colorectal cancer liver metastasis. We compared the genome-wide transcriptomic profiles of CEA positive (MIP101 clone 8) and CEA negative (MIP 101) colorectal cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential in vivo. The CEA-producing cells displayed quantitative changes in the level of expression for 100 genes (over-expressed or down-regulated). They were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. The KEGG pathway analysis identified 4 significantly enriched pathways: cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, MAPK signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and pyrimidine metabolism. Our results suggest that CEA production by colorectal cancer cells triggers colorectal cancer progression by inducing the epithelial- mesenchymal transition, increasing tumor cell invasiveness into the surrounding tissues and suppressing stress and apoptotic signaling. The novel gene expression distinctions establish the relationships between the existing cancer markers and implicate new potential biomarkers for colorectal cancer hepatic metastasis. PMID:27583792

  10. The Genome-Wide Analysis of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Signaling by Colorectal Cancer Cells Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Anna; Evsyukov, Igor; Rayko, Michael; Gapon, Svetlana; Bozhokina, Ekaterina; Shishkin, Alexander; O’Brien, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Сarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5, CD66) is a promoter of metastasis in epithelial cancers that is widely used as a prognostic clinical marker of metastasis. The aim of this study is to identify the network of genes that are associated with CEA-induced colorectal cancer liver metastasis. We compared the genome-wide transcriptomic profiles of CEA positive (MIP101 clone 8) and CEA negative (MIP 101) colorectal cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential in vivo. The CEA-producing cells displayed quantitative changes in the level of expression for 100 genes (over-expressed or down-regulated). They were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. The KEGG pathway analysis identified 4 significantly enriched pathways: cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, MAPK signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and pyrimidine metabolism. Our results suggest that CEA production by colorectal cancer cells triggers colorectal cancer progression by inducing the epithelial- mesenchymal transition, increasing tumor cell invasiveness into the surrounding tissues and suppressing stress and apoptotic signaling. The novel gene expression distinctions establish the relationships between the existing cancer markers and implicate new potential biomarkers for colorectal cancer hepatic metastasis. PMID:27583792

  11. Sensitive electrochemical immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen with signal dual-amplification using glucose oxidase and an artificial catalase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Tang, Dianping; Li, Qunfang; Su, Biling; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2011-07-01

    A new dual-amplification strategy of electrochemical signal based on the catalytic recycling of the product was developed for the antigen-antibody interaction by glucose oxidase (GOD)- conjugated gold-silver hollow microspheres (AuAgHSs) coupled with an artificial catalase, Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB), on a graphene-based immunosensing platform. The first signal amplification introduced in this study was based on the labeled GOD on the AuAgHSs toward the catalytic oxidation of glucose. The generated H(2)O(2) was catalytically reduced by the immobilized PB on the graphene nanosheets with the second amplification. With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was monitored as a model analyte by using the synthesized AuAgHSs as labels in pH 6.0 phosphate buffer containing 10mM glucose. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range of 0.005-50 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit (LOD) of 1.0 pg mL(-1) CEA (at 3σ). Both the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CVs) were lower than 10%. The specificity and stability of the immunosensor were acceptable. In addition, the assay was evaluated for clinical serum specimens, and received a good correlation with those obtained by the referenced electrochemiluminescent (ECL). PMID:21641413

  12. Dysregulation of carcinoembryonic antigen group members CGM2, CD66a (biliary glycoprotein), and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen in colorectal carcinomas. Comparative analysis by northern blot and in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Nollau, P.; Prall, F.; Helmchen, U.; Wagener, C.; Neumaier, M.

    1997-01-01

    Genes coding for CD66a (biliary glycoprotein), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) group member 2 (CGM2), and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) are members of the human CEA gene subgroup. We investigated a series of 11 colorectal carcinomas by Northern blot and isotopic in situ hybridization (ISH), demonstrating underexpression of CD66a and CGM2 in the majority of the carcinomas as compared with the normal mucosa, whereas NCA was overexpressed. ISH for CD66a and CGM2 mRNA revealed that large areas of the carcinomas remained without or with only faint hybridization signals. However, in every carcinoma, at least some positive foci were observed, indicating remaining cell populations that actively transcribe CD66a and CGM2. In contrast, ISH for NCA displayed strong and extensive autoradiographic signals. By analysis of step sections, foci of CD66a and CGM2 expression were shown to co-localize. Furthermore, these foci contained relatively few nuclei immunohistochemically positive for the proliferation-associated nuclear antigen Ki-67. Our data indicate a dysregulation of the three genes possibly with a common transcriptional control for CD66a and CGM2 and a different control for NCA. The focal expression of CD66a and CGM2 could be interpreted as due to a focal, incomplete, and abortive differentiation or, alternatively, as a consequence of genetic heterogeneity with foci of slow-proliferating subclones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:9250164

  13. In vivo subcellular imaging of tumors in mouse models using a fluorophore-conjugated anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in two-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Shigehiro; Oshima, Yusuke; Honkura, Naoki; Iimura, Tadahiro; Kameda, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Yoshida, Motohira; Yamamoto, Yuji; Watanabe, Yuji; Hikita, Atsuhiko; Imamura, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in applying fluorescence imaging techniques to the study of various disease processes and complex biological phenomena in vivo. To apply these methods to clinical settings, several groups have developed protocols for fluorescence imaging using antibodies against tumor markers conjugated to fluorescent substances. Although these probes have been useful in macroscopic imaging, the specificity and sensitivity of these methods must be improved to enable them to detect micro-lesions in the early phases of cancer, resulting in better treatment outcomes. To establish a sensitive and highly specific imaging method, we used a fluorophore-conjugated anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody to perform macroscopic and microscopic in vivo imaging of inoculated cancer cells expressing GFP with or without CEA. Macroscopic imaging by fluorescence zoom microscopy revealed that bio-conjugation of Alexa Fluor 594 to the anti-CEA antibody allowed visualization of tumor mass consisting of CEA-expressing human cancer cells, but the background levels were unacceptably high. In contrast, microscopic imaging using a two-photon excitation microscope and the same fluorescent antibody resulted in subcellular-resolution imaging that was more specific and sensitive than conventional imaging using a fluorescence zoom microscope. These results suggest that two-photon excitation microscopy in conjunction with fluorophore-conjugated antibodies could be widely adapted to detection of cancer-specific cell-surface molecules, both in cancer research and in clinical applications. PMID:25117702

  14. The usefulness of CA15.3, mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen in determining the clinical course in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Deprés-Brummer, P; Itzhaki, M; Bakker, P J; Hoek, F J; Veenhof, K H; de Wit, R

    1995-01-01

    Levels of mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen (MCA), CA15.3 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were measured in consecutive serum samples of 40 women with metastatic breast cancer. A change in antigen level of more than 25%, either an increase or a decrease, was considered to predict progressive or responsive disease respectively. A change of less than 25% was considered to predict stable disease. MCA, CA15.3 and CEA were elevated in the serum of 68%, 76% and 48% of the patients respectively (P < 0.05). The overall prediction of clinical course was similar for all three markers. A more than 25% increase of MCA, CA15.3, and CEA was observed in 61%, 54% and 36% respectively. The predictive value of a more than 25% increase was high for all three markers: 94%, 94%, 83%. Changes in marker levels were correlated with each other. Logistic regression analysis showed that combining MCA and CA15.3 did not improve the prediction further. In conclusion, these tumour markers may help in evaluating the disease course and there is no advantage in combining MCA and CA15.3.

  15. Cost/effectiveness ratio of carcinoembryonic antigen--importance of adequacy of routine requests of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Gion, M; Rampazzo, A; Mione, R; Bruscagnin, G

    1992-01-01

    Since 1987 we have been evaluating the cost/effectiveness ratio of tumor markers using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a leading indicator. Preliminary to the evaluation of cost/effectiveness ratio we verified the fitness of CEA requests to the proper clinical problems in order to identify any bias of cost due to inadequate CEA use. 2677 CEA orders were evaluated in 1987. The percentage of inadequate requests was very high (43%). Therefore, it seemed not advisable to carry out the evaluation of cost/effectiveness ratio, while educational actions (divulgation of informative material, service of telephone consultation) were addressed to the physicians of the geographic area of laboratory users. In 1991 the adequacy of CEA requests was reevaluated. The percentage of inadequate requests on 2647 orders was 29.4%. This result, although not yet satisfactory, suggests that proper educational programs may probably improve the fitness of tumor marker requests to correct clinical problems. Additional educational actions are mandatory to further reduce the rate of inadequate tumor marker orders.

  16. Ultrasensitive non-enzymatic immunosensor for carcino-embryonic antigen based on palladium hybrid vanadium pentoxide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian; Jiang, Liping; Li, Faying; Wang, Ping; Liu, Qing; Dong, Yunhui; Li, Yueyun; Wei, Qin

    2016-03-15

    A novel and sensitive sandwich-type non-enzymatic electrochemical immunosensor was fabricated for quantitative monitoring of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). Nanocomposite of stannic oxide/reduced graphene oxide was used as substrate material to increase the specific surface area and enhance the conductivity of the glassy carbon electrode. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were introduced to link substrate materials and primary antibodies (Ab1) and accelerate the electron transfer in this system. At the same time, the palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs)-vanadium pentoxide (V2O5)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the label of secondary antibodies (Ab2). This composite label has shown excellent catalytic activity towards the reduction of H2O2. The nanomaterial-based signal amplification can improve the sensitivity and lower the limit of detection. The proposed immunosensor showed wide linear range from 0.5 pgmL(-1) to 25 ngmL(-1) with limit of detection of 0.17 pgmL(-1). This novel immunosensor was used to analyze serum sample. The results indicated that this immunosensor may find huge potential application for quantitative detection of CEA in the clinical diagnosis.

  17. Nanogold/mesoporous carbon foam-mediated silver enhancement for graphene-enhanced electrochemical immunosensing of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dajie; Wu, Jie; Ju, Huangxian; Yan, Feng

    2014-02-15

    Nanogold functionalized mesoporous carbon foam (Au/MCF) coupling with a signal amplification by C-Au synergistic silver enhancement was designed for sensitive electrochemical immunosensing of biomarker. The Au/MCF was prepared by in situ growth of nanogold on carboxylated MCF and used as a tracing tag to label signal antibody via the inherent interaction between protein and nanogold. The immunosensor was prepared by covalently immobilizing capture antibody on an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide/chitosan film modified glassy carbon electrode. Through a sandwich-type immunoreaction, Au/MCF tags were captured on the immunoconjugates to induce a silver deposition process. The electrochemical stripping signal of the deposited silver was used to monitor the immunoreaction. The Au/MCF-mediated silver enhancement along with the graphene-promoted electron transfer led to high detection sensitivity of carcinoembryonic antigen. Under optimal conditions, the proposed immunoassay method showed wide linear range from 0.05 pg mL(-1) to 1 ng mL(-1) and a detection limit down to 0.024 pg mL(-1). The newly designed amplification strategy holds great potential for ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing of other analytes.

  18. D-Dimer and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels: Useful Indicators for Predicting the Tumor Stage and Postoperative Survival.

    PubMed

    Tekeşin, Kemal; Bayrak, Savaş; Esatoğlu, Varol; Özdemir, Ebru; Özel, Leyla; Melih Kara, Veli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the preoperative plasma D-dimer and serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) levels of patients scheduled for curative surgical resection for colorectal cancer and to evaluate the significance of these levels on the prognosis and postoperative survival rate. One hundred sixty-five patients with colorectal cancer, who were scheduled to have elective resection between January 2008 and January 2011, were included in the study. A significant increase was observed in the D-dimer levels, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. The distance covered by the tumor inside the walls of the colon and rectum (T-stage) was significant for both D-dimer and CEA levels. As the T-stage increased, there was also a significant increase in the D-dimer and CEA levels. A high significance and correlation level was detected between the TNM staging and both D-dimer and CEA. A significant relationship was found between the advanced tumor stage and short postoperative survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, the analysis of preoperative D-dimer and CEA levels can be useful in predicting the stage and differentiation of the tumor and the postoperative survival rate. PMID:27651789

  19. D-Dimer and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels: Useful Indicators for Predicting the Tumor Stage and Postoperative Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tekeşin, Kemal; Esatoğlu, Varol; Özdemir, Ebru; Özel, Leyla; Melih Kara, Veli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the preoperative plasma D-dimer and serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) levels of patients scheduled for curative surgical resection for colorectal cancer and to evaluate the significance of these levels on the prognosis and postoperative survival rate. One hundred sixty-five patients with colorectal cancer, who were scheduled to have elective resection between January 2008 and January 2011, were included in the study. A significant increase was observed in the D-dimer levels, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. The distance covered by the tumor inside the walls of the colon and rectum (T-stage) was significant for both D-dimer and CEA levels. As the T-stage increased, there was also a significant increase in the D-dimer and CEA levels. A high significance and correlation level was detected between the TNM staging and both D-dimer and CEA. A significant relationship was found between the advanced tumor stage and short postoperative survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, the analysis of preoperative D-dimer and CEA levels can be useful in predicting the stage and differentiation of the tumor and the postoperative survival rate. PMID:27651789

  20. Crystal structure of the anti-(carcinoembryonic antigen) single-chain Fv antibody MFE-23 and a model for antigen binding based on intermolecular contacts.

    PubMed

    Boehm, M K; Corper, A L; Wan, T; Sohi, M K; Sutton, B J; Thornton, J D; Keep, P A; Chester, K A; Begent, R H; Perkins, S J

    2000-03-01

    MFE-23 is the first single-chain Fv antibody molecule to be used in patients and is used to target colorectal cancer through its high affinity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a cell-surface member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. MFE-23 contains an N-terminal variable heavy-chain domain joined by a (Gly(4)Ser)(3) linker to a variable light-chain (V(L)) domain (kappa chain) with an 11-residue C-terminal Myc-tag. Its crystal structure was determined at 2.4 A resolution by molecular replacement with an R(cryst) of 19.0%. Five of the six antigen-binding loops, L1, L2, L3, H1 and H2, conformed to known canonical structures. The sixth loop, H3, displayed a unique structure, with a beta-hairpin loop and a bifurcated apex characterized by a buried Thr residue. In the crystal lattice, two MFE-23 molecules were associated back-to-back in a manner not seen before. The antigen-binding site displayed a large acidic region located mainly within the H2 loop and a large hydrophobic region within the H3 loop. Even though this structure is unliganded within the crystal, there is an unusually large region of contact between the H1, H2 and H3 loops and the beta-sheet of the V(L) domain of an adjacent molecule (strands DEBA) as a result of intermolecular packing. These interactions exhibited remarkably high surface and electrostatic complementarity. Of seven MFE-23 residues predicted to make contact with antigen, five participated in these lattice contacts, and this model for antigen binding is consistent with previously reported site-specific mutagenesis of MFE-23 and its effect on CEA binding.

  1. Evaluation of primary lung cancer with indium 111 anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (type ZCE-025) monoclonal antibody scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Morris, J.F.; Antonovic, R.; Ahmed, A.; Galey, W.T.; Duncan, C.; Krishnamurthy, G.T. )

    1990-02-01

    A study was undertaken to test whether indium 111 (111In)-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (type ZCE 025) monoclonal intact antibody (MoAb) would concentrate in primary lung cancer enabling its detection and localization by scintigraphy. The scintigraphic results were correlated with chest radiograph, computed tomograph (CT), bronchoscopy, surgical resection, and tumor CEA analysis. Twenty adult male patients with clinical suspicion of primary lung cancer were studied. Each subject was infused with 4 to 5 mCi of 111In anti-CEA ZCE 025 MoAb, and planar and tomographic scintiphotos were obtained on days 3 and 6 or 7 postinfusion. The scintigraphy was true-positive in 12 of 16 patients with primary lung cancer, eight of nine patients with squamous cell carcinoma, and four of seven with adenocarcinoma; it was true-negative in three of four patients with benign lung disease with an overall accuracy of 75%. In seven patients with confirmed primary lung cancer, but with negative bronchoscopic findings, the scintigraphy was true-positive in four. In 11 patients with definitely positive or suspicious malignancy by bronchoscopy the monoclonal scintigraphy was positive in eight. In true-positive cases, the location and size of the lesion by 111In anti-CEA ZCE 025 MoAb imaging correlated well with CT findings and also tumor mass at surgery. Only one of 12 tumors stained positive for CEA had serum CEA levels greater than 10 ng/ml, indicating nonleakage of the tumor antigen into general circulation in early lung cancer. It is concluded that 111In anti-CEA ZCE 025 MoAb planar and tomographic imaging shows potential to serve as a noninvasive diagnostic test in the evaluation of primary lung cancer. The lung lesion is likely to be malignant if it concentrates 111In anti-CEA ZCE 025 MoAb and benign if it does not.

  2. Engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: revealing distinct processes of bacterial entry by individual carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule family receptors.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Liao, Edward H; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2004-05-01

    Individual Neisseria gonorrhoeae colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein variants can bind up to four different carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule (CEACAM) receptors. Most human cells encountered by gonococci express a combination of CEACAM receptors, thereby complicating the elucidation of intracellular signaling pathways triggered by individual receptors. Here, we compare the process of bacterial engulfment by a panel of stably transfected HeLa epithelial cell lines expressing each CEACAM receptor in isolation. CEACAM1 and CEACAM3 each contain proteinaceous transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains; however, the processes of neisserial uptake mediated by these receptors differ with respect to their susceptibilities to both tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the actin microfilament-disrupting agent cytochalasin D. Neisserial uptake mediated by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 was not significantly affected by any of a broad spectrum of inhibitors tested. However, cleavage of the GPI anchor by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C reduced bacterial uptake by HeLa cells expressing CEACAM5, consistent with a single zipper-like mechanism of uptake mediated by this receptor. Regardless of the CEACAM receptor expressed, internalized gonococci were effectively killed by a microtubule-dependent process that required acidification of the bacterium-containing phagosome. Given the phase-variable nature of neisserial Opa proteins, these results indicate that the mechanism of bacterial engulfment and the cellular response to gonococcal infection depend on both the receptor specificities of the neisserial Opa protein variants expressed and the spectrum of CEACAM receptors present on target cells, each of which determines the combination of receptors ultimately engaged. PMID:15102784

  3. Computed tomography of pulmonary changes in rheumatoid arthritis: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a marker of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Koch, Milene Caroline; Pereira, Ivânio Alves; Nobre, Luiz Felipe Souza; Neves, Fabricio Souza

    2016-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) classically affects the joints, but can present extra-articular manifestations, including pulmonary disease. The present study aimed to identify possible risk factors or laboratory markers for lung involvement in RA, particularly the presence of rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA), and tumor markers, by correlating them with changes observed on chest high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT). This cross-sectional study involved RA patients who were examined and questioned by a specialist physician and later subjected to chest HRCT and blood collection for measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), rheumatoid factor (RF), ACPA (anti-vimentin and/or anti-CCP3), and the tumor markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CA 125, CA 15-3, and CA 19-9. A total of 96 patients underwent chest HRCT. The most frequent findings were bronchial thickening (27/28.1 %) and bronchiectasis (25/26 %). RF was present in 63.2 % of patients (55/87), and ACPA (anti-vimentin or anti-CCP3) was present in 72.7 % of patients (64/88). CEA levels were high in 14 non-smokers (37.8 %) and 23 smokers (62.2 %). CA-19-9 levels were high in 6 of 86 patients (7.0 %), CA 15-3 levels were high in 3 of 85 patients (3.5 %), and CA 125 levels were high in 4 of 75 patients (5.3 %). Multivariate analysis indicated a statistically significant association between high CEA levels and the presence of airway changes in patients with RA (p = 0.048). CEA can serve as a predictor of lung disease in RA and can help identify individuals who require more detailed examination for the presence of respiratory disorders.

  4. Correlation of the Serum Level of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Prolactin with Different Stages of Colorectal Carcinoma According to Dukes' Staging.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M R; Sheikh, S H; Lima, I J; Islam, M R; Faisal, M; Islam, M S; Faruk, M O; Jalal, M T

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is well established tumor marker for colorectal cancers worldwide. Recent studies show that serum prolactin level is also raised in colorectal cancers. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the correlation of serum CEA and Prolactin with Dukes' staging of colorectal carcinomas. Between January 2013 and June 2013, Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin were measured by radioimmunoassay from 103 patients who were histopathologically diagnosed as colorectal carcinomas. Evaluation of the stages of the colorectal cancers was done on the basis of preoperative investigations and postoperative histopathology and correlated with Preoperative Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin. Results were presented as median value, range and percentage. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1 with median age of 42.26 years (range 17-78 years). Most of the patients in this series presented with carcinoma rectum (42%). Most of the patients (52%) were found in Dukes' stage C and 27% and 15% cases were found as Dukes' stage B and Dukes' stage D respectively. Stage of the disease is directly proportionate to percentage of the patient with high serum prolactin except early stage (Dukes' A-50%, Dukes' B-28.6%, Dukes' C-33.3% & Dukes' D-46.7%). Similarly serum CEA level is directly proportionate to tumor stage (Dukes' A-0%, Dukes' B-32%, Dukes' C-40.7% & Dukes' D-74.7%). A preoperative high serum CEA value suggests advanced disease either locally or with distant metastasis. In contrast preoperative high serum prolactin (hyperprolactinaemia) did not suggest advanced disease as it can be elevated even in early stage of disease. Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin both are valuable tumor markers but serum CEA could not be replaced by serum Prolactin. Serum Prolactin may be a helpful marker in earlier stages of the colorectal cancer.

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules as surrogate markers for EGFR inhibitor sensitivity in human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, M; Miki, Y; Ebina, M; Abe, K; Mori, K; Narumi, S; Suzuki, T; Sato, I; Maemondo, M; Endo, C; Inoue, A; Kumamoto, H; Kondo, T; Yamada-Okabe, H; Nukiwa, T; Sasano, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lung adenocarcinoma (LADCA) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are in general associated with relatively high clinical response rate to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) but not all responded to TKI. It has therefore become important to identify the additional surrogate markers regarding EGFR-TKI sensitivity. Methods: We first examined the effects of EGFR-TKIs, gefitinib and erlotinib, upon cell proliferation of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. We then evaluated the gene profiles related to EGFR-TKI sensitivity using a microarray analysis. Results of microarray analysis led us to focus on carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) family, CEACAM 3, 5, 6, 7, and 19, as potential further surrogate markers of EGFR-TKI sensitivity. We then examined the correlation between the status of CEACAM 3, 5, 6, 7, and 19 immunoreactivity in LADCA and clinicopathological parameters of individual cases. Results: In the cases with EGFR mutations, the status of all CEACAMs examined was significantly higher than that in EGFR wild-type patients, but there were no significant differences in the status of CEACAMs between TKI responder and nonresponder among 22 patients who received gefitinib therapy. However, among 115 EGFR mutation-negative LADCA patients, both CEACAM6 and CEACAM3 were significantly associated with adverse clinical outcome (CEACAM6) and better clinical outcome (CEACAM3). Conclusion: CEACAMs examined in this study could be related to the presence of EGFR mutation in adenocarcinoma cells but not represent the effective surrogate marker of EGFR-TKI in LADCA patients. However, immunohistochemical evaluation of CEACAM3/6 in LADCA patients could provide important information on their clinical outcome. PMID:23099808

  6. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 negatively regulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor production by breast tumor-associated macrophages that mediate tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Samineni, Sridhar; Zhang, Zhifang; Shively, John E

    2013-07-15

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1), a cell adhesion molecule expressed on epithelial cells and activated immune cells, is downregulated in many cancers and plays a role in inhibition of inflammation in part by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production by myeloid cells. As macrophages are associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer, but play important roles in normal breast, we hypothesized that CEACAM1 downregulation would lead to tumor promotion under inflammatory conditions. Cocultures of proinflammatory M1 macrophages with CEACAM1 negative MCF7 breast cells produced high levels of G-CSF (10 ng/mL) compared to CEACAM1-transfected MCF7/4S cells (1 ng/mL) or anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage cocultures (0.5 or 0.1 ng/mL, MCF7 or MCF7/4S, respectively). The expression of CEACAM1 on M1s was much greater than for M2s and was observed only in cocultures with either MCF7 or MCF7/4S cells. When M1 macrophages were mixed with MCF7 cells and implanted in murine mammary fat pads of nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice, tumor size and blood vessel density were significantly greater than MCF7 or MCF7/4S only tumors which were hardly detected after 8 weeks of growth. In contrast, M1 cells had a much reduced effect on MCF7/4S tumor growth and blood vessel density, indicating that the tumor inhibitory effect of CEACAM1 is most likely related to its anti-inflammatory action on inflammatory macrophages. These results support our previous finding that CEACAM1 inhibits both G-CSF production by myeloid cells and G-CSF-stimulated tumor angiogenesis.

  7. Major Protein of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Gene Family - CD66c, A Novel Marker in Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Suma M; Prema, Chaitra Linganna; Vimalambike, Manjunath Gubbanna; Shivalingaiah, Sheeladevi Chandakavadi; Sundaram, Shivakumar; Kumar, Anjali Pradeep; Math, Ananda Kuruvatti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In view of rising trend of the incidence of colorectal carcinoma in the Indian population due to adoption of western lifestyles and behaviours, we investigated the expression of the new emerging stem cell biomarker, CD66c in colorectal carcinoma of Indian origin. Aim To study the expression of CD66c in human colorectal carcinoma and to correlate level of marker expression with tumour staging. Materials and Methods This hospital based prospective study was conducted on 26 colorectal carcinoma patients in the age group of 20 years to 70 years. Surgically resected tumour specimens along with adjacent normal tissue were collected taking necessary precautions, paraffin embedded sections were prepared and used for histological and immunohistochemical analysis of CD66c. Statistical analysis Descriptive statistical measures like mean, standard deviation, percentage was applied. Other inferential statistical tests like Chi-square, Fisher’s-exact test and one-way ANOVA was applied to find out the association of CD66c with different stages. The difference were interpreted as statistically significant when p <0.05. Results CD66c showed differential expression with membrane positivity in normal colorectal epithelial cells and cytoplasmic expression in tumour cells. There was significant correlation between CD66c expression and tumour site (p=0.02) with colon carcinoma showing positive expression compared to the rectal carcinoma. There was no significant correlation between CD66c staining and tumour stage (p=0.947). No significant relationship was observed between CD66c expression and other clinicopathologic variables studied such as sex (p=0.552), age (p=0.713) and tumour grade (p=0.263). Conclusion CD66c can be specifically used for colon carcinoma and may be a novel marker in colon carcinoma stem cell isolation. The quantification of CD66c can be further verified by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Further studies can be carried out using CD66c alone or in

  8. Serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-III and their relation with carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in cases of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, O; Eroglu, A; Dag, E; Karaoglanoglu, N; Yilmaz, A

    2006-12-01

    Tumour markers are used for diagnosis, staging, evaluation of response to treatment, prognosis and detection of recurrences in clinical oncology. In this study, we aim to investigate the levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-III in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. We investigated their possible use as tumour markers and their relation to other tumour markers. Forty patients who were diagnosed as having oesophageal carcinoma by histopathological evaluation of endoscopic biopsies between January 2003 and July 2004 and 40 healthy people as the control group were included in the study. The serum levels of tumour markers including IGF-I, IGFBP-III, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 were measured in both groups. Data were compared statistically, and the importance of IGF-I and IGFBP-III levels were investigated in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. IGF-I levels were significantly higher in patients with oesophageal carcinoma when compared with the control group (p < 0.05), whereas IGFBP-III levels were significantly lower (p < 0.05). The increase in CEA levels was not statistically significant when compared with the control group. The increase in CA 19-9 levels was statistically significant when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). No correlation was detected between levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-III and levels of CEA and CA 19-9. We suggest that the serum IGF-I level may be used as a tumour marker in oesophageal carcinoma. A low level of serum IGFBP-III is also significant in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. We believe that drugs which inhibit IGF-I function or which stimulate the function of IGFBP-III may open new horizons in extra-surgical modalities for the treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  9. Higher importance of interleukin 6 than classic tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen and squamous cell cancer antigen) in the diagnosis of esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Łukaszewicz-Zając, M; Mroczko, B; Kozłowski, M; Nikliński, J; Laudański, J; Szmitkowski, M

    2012-04-01

    It has been suggested that interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a potential role in the growth and progression of tumors, including esophageal cancer (EC). The aim of the study was to compare clinical significance of serum IL-6 with classic tumor markers - carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cell cancer antigen (SCC-Ag) - in EC patients in relation to its histological types - squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus (ESCC) and adenocarcinoma (AD) of esophagus. The study included 53 EC patients and 90 healthy subjects. Serum IL-6 and CEA levels were determined using immunoenzyme assays, while SCC-Ag - chemiluminescent assay. The diagnostic criteria and prognostic values for markers were defined. The levels of all proteins tested in EC, ESCC, and AD were higher than in healthy subjects. The percentage of elevated results was substantially higher for IL-6 (86%) than for CEA (30%) and SCC-Ag (24%) in EC, similarly as in ESCC (87%, 23%, and 33%) and AD (87%, 39%, and 13%, respectively) patients. Concentrations of IL-6 depended on distant metastases and patients' survival in EC and were significantly higher in ESCC patients with more advanced tumor stage and nodal metastases. The IL-6 area under receiver operating characteristic curve (0.92) was larger than for CEA (0.84) and SCC-Ag (0.62) in EC, likewise in ESCC (0.92, 0.87, 0.77) and AD (0.91, 0.79, 0.57, respectively). Our findings indicate better usefulness of IL-6 than classic tumor markers in the diagnosis of EC, especially in patients with ESCC.

  10. Measurement of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, cytokeratin-19 fragment and matrix metalloproteinase-7 for detecting cholangiocarcinoma: a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Lo Re, Giovanni; Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Facomer, Flavio; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2014-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the liver arising from the bile duct epithelium, accounting for 10-25% of all primary hepatic cancers. The clinical presentation of this tumor is not specific and the diagnosis of early cholangiocarcinoma is difficult, especially in patients with other biliary diseases. Measurement of serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) are commonly used to monitor response to therapy, but are also useful for confirming the presence of a cholangiocarcinoma. In this setting, other biomarkers have been previously tested, including cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) and the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7). The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical usefulness of the assay of serum CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1 and MMP7, individually and together, as tumor markers for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-four patients (14 men, 10 women, 62.6±8.2 years of age) with histologically-confirmed cholangiocarcinoma (cases) and 25 age- and sex-matched patients with benign liver disease (controls) underwent measurement of these biomarkers. The mean values of all serum markers of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that of the controls. No correlation was found between serum tumor markers and total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were: CEA: 52%, 55%, and 58%; CA 19-9: 74%, 82% and 78%; CYFRA 21-1: 76%, 79% and 78%; MMP7: 78%, 77% and 80%, respectively. The combination of all serum markers afforded 92.0% sensitivity and 96% specificity in detecting cholangiocarcinoma, showing the highest diagnostic accuracy (94%). In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest that the measurement of all four biomarkers together can help in the early detection of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25368272

  11. Prognosis Can Be Predicted More Accurately Using Pre- and Postchemoradiotherapy Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels Compared to Only Prechemoradiotherapy Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Who Received Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, SooYoon; Son, Seok Hyun; Kay, Chul Seung; Lee, Yoon Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of a change in the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 110 patients with clinical T3/T4 or node-positive disease underwent nCRT and curative total mesorectal resection from February 2006 to December 2013. Serum CEA level was measured before nCRT, after nCRT, and then again after surgery. A cut-off value for CEA level to predict prognosis was determined using the maximally selected log-rank test. According to the test, patients were classified into 3 groups, based on their CEA levels (Group A: pre-CRT CEA ≤3.2; Group B: pre-CRT CEA level >3.2 and post-CRT CEA ≤2.8; and Group C: pre-CRT CEA >3.2 and post-CRT CEA >2.8). The median follow-up time was 31.1 months. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates of Group A and Group B were similar, while Group C showed a significantly lower 3-year DFS rate (82.5% vs. 89.5% vs. 55.1%, respectively, P = 0.001). Other clinicopathological factors that showed statistical significance on univariate analysis were pre-CRT CEA, post-CRT CEA, tumor distance from the anal verge, surgery type, downstage, pathologic N stage, margin status and perineural invasion. The CEA group (P = 0.001) and tumor distance from the anal verge (P = 0.044) were significant prognostic factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. Post-CRT CEA level may be a useful prognostic factor in patients whose prognosis cannot be predicted exactly by pre-CRT CEA levels alone in the neoadjuvant treatment era. Combined pre-CRT CEA and post-CRT CEA levels enable us to predict prognosis more accurately and determine treatment and follow-up policies. Further large-scale studies are necessary to validate the prognostic value of CEA levels. PMID:26962798

  12. Second antibody clearance of /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen for improved tumor imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, R.M.; Primus, F.J.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have investigated the use of a second antibody (SA) directed against the radiolabeled primary anti-tumor antibody (PA) to enhance the clearance rate of the PA from the circulation and nontarget tissues. Administration of 50 or 250 ..mu..g of anti-goat IgG (SA) hr after the administration of 10 ..mu..g of /sup 131/I-goat anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody (PA) to hamsters bearing human colonic tumor xenografts resulted in a 5-fold reduction in the level of circulating PA after 4 hr in comparison to the control group only given /sup 131/I-PA. The percentage of PA in the blood decreased rapidly over 72 hr in animals given 250 ..mu..g of the SA, but at 50 ..mu..g of SA the level of activity in the blood after 24 hr was similar to the control. Tumor accretion was identical after 4 hr, but after 24 hr the animals given 250 ..mu..g of SA had 2-3 fold less PA in the tumor than either the control group or the 50 ..mu..g dose of SA. Tumor/nontumor ratios for all major organs but the spleen improved 6-8 fold within 48 hr after injection of 250 ..mu..g of the SA with tumor/blood ratios as high as 40:1. A SA dose of 50 ..mu..g resulted in a significantly higher tumor/blood ratio after only 4 hr; tumor/nontumor ratios at later times were similar to the control group. Tumors located in the hind legs were visible in all groups by imaging 24 hr after injection of the SA, but only the 250 ..mu..g dose of SA showed a significant reduction in total body activity. These results suggest that the SA approach may be used to reduce the total background radioactivity while maintaining tumor accretion of /sup 131/I-PA to allow for selective tumor imaging.

  13. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, CEA ratio, and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiation and surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods Between 2000 and 2009, 138 patients with advanced rectal cancer receiving CRT before surgery at our hospital were retrospectively classified into 3 groups: pre-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group L; n = 87); pre-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml and post-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group H-L; n = 32); and both pre- and post-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml (group H-H; n = 19). CEA ratio (defined as post-CRT CEA divided by pre-CRT CEA), post-CRT CEA level and other factors were reviewed for prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR). Results Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was better in groups L (69.0%) and H-L (74.5%) than in group H-H (44.9%) (p = 0.024). Pathologic complete response was observed in 19.5%, 21.9% and 5.3% of groups L, H-L and H-H respectively (p = 0.281). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage and pCR were independent prognostic factors for DFS and that post-CRT CEA level was independently predictive of pCR. As a whole, post-CRT CEA <2.61 ng/ml predicted pCR (sensitivity 76.0%; specificity 58.4%). For those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml, post-CRT CEA and CEA ratio both predicted pCR (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 76.7%). Conclusions In patients with pre-CRT serum CEA ≥6 ng/ml, those with “normalized” CEA levels after CRT may have similar DFS to those with “normal” (<6 ng/ml) pre-CRT values. Post-CRT CEA level is a predictor for pCR, especially in those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml. PMID:23452434

  14. Aptamers directly radiolabeled with technetium-99m as a potential agent capable of identifying carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in tumor cells T84.

    PubMed

    Correa, Cristiane Rodrigues; de Barros, André Luís Branco; Ferreira, Carolina de Aguiar; de Goes, Alfredo Miranda; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; de Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro

    2014-04-15

    Aptamers are small oligonucleotides that are selected to bind with high affinity and specificity to a target molecule. Aptamers are emerging as a new class of molecules for radiopharmaceutical development. In this study a new method to radiolabel aptamers with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) was developed. Two aptamers (Apt3 and Apt3-amine) selected against the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used. Labeling was done by the direct method and the developed complex was subjected to quality control tests. Radiochemical purity and stability were monitored by Thin Layer Chromatography. Binding and specificity assays were carried out in the T84 cell line (CEA+) to evaluate tumor affinity and specificity after radiolabeling. Aptamers were successfully labeled with (99m)Tc in high radiochemical yields, showing in vitro stability in presence of plasma and cystein. In binding assays the radiolabeled aptamer Apt3-amine showed the highest affinity to T84 cells. When evaluated with HeLa cells (CEA-), lower uptake was observed, suggesting high specificity for this aptamer. These results suggest that the Apt3-amine aptamer directly labeled with (99m)Tc could be considered a promising agent capable of identifying the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) present in tumor cells.

  15. CEA (Carcinoembryonic Antigen) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also be used as a marker for medullary thyroid cancer and cancers of the rectum, lung , ... ulcerative colitis , rectal polyps , emphysema , and benign breast disease. ^ Back to top Proudly sponsored by ... Learn more ...

  16. Relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations with the influence on the prognosis of non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zuxun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and to analyze the influence of CEA level on postoperative survival time in lung cancer patients. Methods A total of 296 patients who were treated in Thoracic Surgery Department of Henan Provincial Chest Hospital from September 2011 to September 2013 were recruited. The level of tumor markers, such as CEA, was determined before the surgery, and EGFR gene mutations were detected after surgery. Thereby, the relationship between tumor makers, including CEA, and EGFR mutation and its influence on prognosis could be investigated. Results Among 296 patients, the positive rate of EGFR gene mutation was 37.84% (112/296); the mutation occurred more frequently in nonsmokers, adenocarcinoma patients, women, and patients aged <60 years (P<0.05). Both tumor markers and chemosensitivity indicators were related to the profile of EGFR mutations. Elevated squamous cell carcinoma and Cyfra21-1 as well as positively expressed ERCC1 were more common in patients with wild-type EGFR (P<0.05), whereas increased CEA level was observed more frequently in patients with EGFR gene mutation (P=0.012). The positive rate of EGFR gene mutations was higher as the serum CEA level increased, that is, the positive rate in patients with serum CEA level <5, 5–20, and >20 μg/L was 39.81%, 45.32%, and 65.47%, respectively (P=0.004). Logistic regression analysis showed that CEA level was an independent factor in predicting EGFR gene mutations, and serum CEA level was also an independent factor in affecting the prognosis of NSCLC patients, as the overall 2-year survival rate was 73.86% in elevated CEA group and 86.43% in normal group (P<0.01). Conclusion The prognosis of NSCLC patients receiving resection can be predicted according to serum CEA level, which is associated with EGFR mutations in NSCLC patients

  17. Imaging with indium111-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 of recurrent colorectal or carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cancer in patients with rising serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels and occult metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, J.; Jessup, J.M.; Charnsangavej, C.; Ajani, J.A.; Levin, B.; Merchant, B.; Halverson, C.; Murray, J.L. )

    1990-07-01

    We tested whether nuclear imaging with indium111 (111In)-labeled murine monoclonal (MoAb) anticarcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) ZCE-025 antibody could detect recurrent disease in patients with a rising serum CEA level but negative findings for computed tomographic (CT) scans of the abdomen and pelvis, chest radiograph, and colonoscopy or barium enema. Twenty patients with a history of completely resected CEA-producing adenocarcinoma and a rising serum CEA level were given an intravenous infusion of 2 mg of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 mixed with 38 mg of unlabeled ZCE-025. Planar and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) scans were acquired at 72 and 144 hours, and in 19 of the 20 patients these were positive. Of those 19, 13 underwent exploratory surgery, and cancer was found in 10, and two had a diagnostic biopsy, which confirmed cancer. Three patients who had negative laparotomies and all four patients who did not undergo surgery or biopsy were followed radiologically. In all seven, cancer was subsequently detected at the sites suggested by the ZCE-025 scan. Thus, tumor was confirmed in all 19 patients with positive scans. Five of 13 patients who were explored benefited from the study and the exploratory laparotomy, as disease was entirely resected in four or was subjected to definitive radiation therapy to the pelvis in the fifth. In two additional patients who were not explored, MoAb imaging resulted in definitive therapy to regionally confined recurrent disease. 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb ZCE-025 scanning in patients with rising CEA successfully imaged metastatic colorectal cancer that eluded detection by other methods and affected the care given to some. These results suggest an important role for 111In-labeled ZCE-025 scanning among patients with rising CEA and otherwise occult metastatic cancer.

  18. Use of a vaccine strain of measles virus genetically engineered to produce carcinoembryonic antigen as a novel therapeutic agent against glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Phuong, Loi K; Allen, Cory; Peng, Kah-Whye; Giannini, Caterina; Greiner, Suzanne; TenEyck, Cynthia J; Mishra, Prasanna K; Macura, Slobodan I; Russell, Stephen J; Galanis, Evanthia C

    2003-05-15

    Despite the most aggressive medical and surgical treatments, glioblastoma multiforme remains incurable with a median survival of <1 year. We investigated the antitumor potential of a novel viral agent, an attenuated strain of measles virus (MV), derived from the Edmonston vaccine lineage, genetically engineered to produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). CEA production as the virus replicates can serve as a marker of viral gene expression. Infection of a variety of glioblastoma cell lines including U87, U118, and U251 at MOIs 0.1, 1, and 10 resulted in significant cytopathic effect consisting of excessive syncycial formation and massive cell death at 72-96 h from infection. terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated nick end labeling assays demonstrated the mechanism of cell death to be predominantly apoptotic. The efficacy of this approach in vivo was examined in BALB/c nude mice by using both s.c. and intracranial orthotopic U87 tumor models. In the s.c. U87 model, mice with established xenografts were treated with a total dose of 8 x 10(7) plaque forming units of MV-CEA, administered i.v. Mice treated with UV light inactivated MV, and untreated mice with established U87 tumors were used as controls. There was statistically significant regression of s.c. tumors (P < 0.001) and prolongation of survival (P = 0.007) in MV-CEA treated animals compared with the two control groups. In the intracranial orthotopic U87 model, there was significant regression of intracranial U87 tumors treated with intratumoral administration of MV-CEA at a total dose of 1.8 x 10(6) plaque forming units as assessed by magnetic resonance image (P = 0.002), and statistically significant prolongation of survival as compared with mice that received UV-inactivated virus and untreated mice (P = 0.02). Histological examination of brains of MV-CEA-treated animals revealed complete regression of the tumor with the presence of a residual glial scar and reactive changes, mainly presence of

  19. The efficacy of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels in determining the malignancy of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Bekci, T T; Senol, T; Maden, E

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the utility of the tumour markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant solitary pulmonary nodules in 42 hospitalized patients. Routine medical history and physical examination of each patient was performed and each patient also had a chest X-ray and a thoracic computed tomography scan. The following diagnostic procedures were also undertaken: bronchoscopy, transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy, sputum cytology and culture, analysis of sputum acid-fast bacilli and thoracotomy. Measurement of serum levels of tumour antigens by Immulite 2000 radioimmunoassay found that three tumour markers, CEA, CA125 and CA15-3, could be used in the diagnosis of malignant solitary pulmonary nodules. More research is now required involving a larger group of patients.

  20. [Clinical evaluation of the tumor marker CA 19-9 in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in surgical pre- and postoperative diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M; Happ, J; Hottenrott, C; Maul, F D; Baum, R P; Hör, G; Encke, A

    1986-02-01

    A new tumor marker (CA 19-9) was investigated. CA 19-9 is a tumor-associated antigen which is detected by a monoclonal antibody. CA 19-9 (CIS-Centocor) was compared simultaneously with CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) in 347 patients. 123 patients with gastrointestinal tumors showed a sensitivity of 31% for CA 19-9 (CEA 49%), combination increased sensitivity to 58%. The highest sensitivity was found in pancreas carcinoma (CA 19-9 75%, CEA 66%, combination 92%); it was lower in gastric, colon, and oesophagus carcinomas. In relapsed colorectal carcinomas sensitivity was 53% (CEA 78%, combination 85%). In cases of relapse, tumor markers may become positive even if they were not detectable before resection of the primary tumor. Specificity for CA 19-9 was 100% (CEA 84%) compared to a group of non-malignant diseases including patients with inflammations and patients with nicotin abuse (n = 102). Because of its high specificity and superior sensitivity to CEA in pancreas carcinomas CA 19-9 should be determined in primary and relapse diagnosis in combination with CEA. PMID:3459133

  1. [Clinical evaluation of the tumor marker CA 19-9 in comparison with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in surgical pre- and postoperative diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M; Happ, J; Hottenrott, C; Maul, F D; Baum, R P; Hör, G; Encke, A

    1986-02-01

    A new tumor marker (CA 19-9) was investigated. CA 19-9 is a tumor-associated antigen which is detected by a monoclonal antibody. CA 19-9 (CIS-Centocor) was compared simultaneously with CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) in 347 patients. 123 patients with gastrointestinal tumors showed a sensitivity of 31% for CA 19-9 (CEA 49%), combination increased sensitivity to 58%. The highest sensitivity was found in pancreas carcinoma (CA 19-9 75%, CEA 66%, combination 92%); it was lower in gastric, colon, and oesophagus carcinomas. In relapsed colorectal carcinomas sensitivity was 53% (CEA 78%, combination 85%). In cases of relapse, tumor markers may become positive even if they were not detectable before resection of the primary tumor. Specificity for CA 19-9 was 100% (CEA 84%) compared to a group of non-malignant diseases including patients with inflammations and patients with nicotin abuse (n = 102). Because of its high specificity and superior sensitivity to CEA in pancreas carcinomas CA 19-9 should be determined in primary and relapse diagnosis in combination with CEA.

  2. Assessing Clinical Significance of Serum CA15-3 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Levels in Breast Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yijie; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer in women worldwide. The tumor markers Cancer Antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) are frequently used for screening and monitoring breast cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a meta-analysis of 13 published case-control studies to assess the associations between serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA with breast cancer susceptibility, including 1179 cases and 493 controls. The analyses were performed on malignant tumor and benign tumor, as well as in different subgroups with respect to the patient ethnicities and clinical tumor stages. RESULTS This systematic review and meta-analysis of association studies shows that serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA are potential biomarkers for breast cancer monitoring. When stratified by clinical stage, we noticed that although malignant tumors in all stages show elevated levels of CA15-3, it is greatly associated with the tumor stage, as it increases as breast tumor stage worsens. CONCLUSIONS This study clarifies the inconsistent conclusions from multiple studies, and provides a precise estimation for clinical utility of 2 important biomarkers, CA15-3 and CEA, in breast cancer monitoring. Thus, our study will shed lights on the prognosis of breast cancer patients. PMID:27596019

  3. Molecular cloning of a cDNA coding biliary glycoprotein I: Primary structure of a glycoprotein immunologically crossreactive with carcinoembryonic antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hinoda, Y.; Neumaier, M.; Hefta, S.A.; Drzeniek, Z.; Wagener, C.; Shively, L.; Hefta, L.J.F.; Shively, J.E.; Paxton, R.J.

    1988-09-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced four overlapping cDNA clones from a normal adult human colon library, which together gave the entire nucleotide sequence for biliary glycoprotein I (BGPI). BGPI is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family, which is a subfamily in the immunoglobulin gene superfamily. The deduced amino acid sequence of the combined clones for BGP I revealed a 34-residue leader sequence followed by a 108-residue N-terminal domain, a 178-residue immunoglobulin-like domain, a 108-residue region specific to BGP I, a 24-residue transmembrane domain, and a 35-residue cytoplasmic domain. The nucleotide sequence of BGP I exhibited greater than 80% identity with CEA and nonspecific crossreacting antigen (NCA) in the leader peptide, N-terminal domain, and immunoglobulin-like domain. They propose that BGP I diverged from NCA by acquiring an immunoglobulin-like domain substantially different from the domains found in NCA or CEA and also a new cytoplasmic domain. The latter feature should result in a substantially different membrane anchorage mechanism of BGP I compared to CEA, which lacks the cytoplasmic domain and is anchored via a phosphatidylinositol-glycan structure. Protein structural analysis of BGP I isolated from human bile revealed a blocked N terminus, 129 amino acids of internal sequence that are in agreement with the translated cDNA sequence, and five glycosylation sites in the peptides sequenced.

  4. Assessing Clinical Significance of Serum CA15-3 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Levels in Breast Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yijie; Li, Hui

    2016-09-06

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer in women worldwide. The tumor markers Cancer Antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) are frequently used for screening and monitoring breast cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a meta-analysis of 13 published case-control studies to assess the associations between serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA with breast cancer susceptibility, including 1179 cases and 493 controls. The analyses were performed on malignant tumor and benign tumor, as well as in different subgroups with respect to the patient ethnicities and clinical tumor stages. RESULTS This systematic review and meta-analysis of association studies shows that serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA are potential biomarkers for breast cancer monitoring. When stratified by clinical stage, we noticed that although malignant tumors in all stages show elevated levels of CA15-3, it is greatly associated with the tumor stage, as it increases as breast tumor stage worsens. CONCLUSIONS This study clarifies the inconsistent conclusions from multiple studies, and provides a precise estimation for clinical utility of 2 important biomarkers, CA15-3 and CEA, in breast cancer monitoring. Thus, our study will shed lights on the prognosis of breast cancer patients.

  5. Assessing Clinical Significance of Serum CA15-3 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Levels in Breast Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yijie; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer in women worldwide. The tumor markers Cancer Antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) are frequently used for screening and monitoring breast cancer. Material/Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of 13 published case-control studies to assess the associations between serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA with breast cancer susceptibility, including 1179 cases and 493 controls. The analyses were performed on malignant tumor and benign tumor, as well as in different subgroups with respect to the patient ethnicities and clinical tumor stages. Results This systematic review and meta-analysis of association studies shows that serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA are potential biomarkers for breast cancer monitoring. When stratified by clinical stage, we noticed that although malignant tumors in all stages show elevated levels of CA15-3, it is greatly associated with the tumor stage, as it increases as breast tumor stage worsens. Conclusions This study clarifies the inconsistent conclusions from multiple studies, and provides a precise estimation for clinical utility of 2 important biomarkers, CA15-3 and CEA, in breast cancer monitoring. Thus, our study will shed lights on the prognosis of breast cancer patients. PMID:27596019

  6. Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres as an electrochemical interface for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in real sample.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Xie, Hangqing; Liu, Yuhong; Ren, Hang; Zhao, Wenbo; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based signal-amplification strategies hold a great promise in realizing sensitive biological detection. A simple label-free electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed by immobilizing anti-CEA antibodies onto the Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres modified glassy carbon electrode (Au-F127/GCE). The Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres offered a large surface and multifunctional substrate for the effective immobilization of anti-CEA and the existence of Au could accelerate electron transfer and make the electrochemical signal amplified. The Au-F127 nanocomposites and anti-CEA were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), polycrystalline electron diffraction ring pattern, ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were employed to verify the stepwise assembly of the immunosensor and evaluated the analytical performance of the fabricated immunosensor, respectively. The immunosensor showed a wide liner response range between 0.01 and 80 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.24 pg mL(-1) at a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 3. Additionally, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine CEA in human serum samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26452840

  7. Single-step cycle pulse operation of the label-free electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on branched polypyrrole for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Wang, Qi; Ma, Hongmin; Lv, Xiaohui; Wu, Dan; Sun, Xu; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A novel label-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor based on luminol functional-Au NPs@polypyrrole has been developed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In this work, polypyrrole prepared by chemical polymerization provided a large surface area to load amounts of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Au NPs could not only attach abundant luminol for the enhancement of ECL signal, but also provide a friendly microenvironment for the immobilization of antibodies. Moreover, 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluroborate ([BPy]BF4) were used to disperse luminol functional-Au NPs@polypyrrole nanocomposites, resulting in the film-formation of composites on the electrode, which could improve the stability of immunosensor. In particular, employment of single-step cycle pulse could limit the consecutive reaction between luminol and H2O2 efficiently, thus leading to stable and strong signals. The proposed method presents good ECL response for the detection of CEA allowing a wide linear range from 0.01 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL and a limit of detection as low as 3 fg/mL. The immunosensor would be a promising tool in the early diagnosis of CEA due to its high sensitivity, simplicity and cost-effective. PMID:27091590

  8. Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres as an electrochemical interface for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in real sample.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Xie, Hangqing; Liu, Yuhong; Ren, Hang; Zhao, Wenbo; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based signal-amplification strategies hold a great promise in realizing sensitive biological detection. A simple label-free electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was developed by immobilizing anti-CEA antibodies onto the Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres modified glassy carbon electrode (Au-F127/GCE). The Au-F127 strawberry-like nanospheres offered a large surface and multifunctional substrate for the effective immobilization of anti-CEA and the existence of Au could accelerate electron transfer and make the electrochemical signal amplified. The Au-F127 nanocomposites and anti-CEA were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), polycrystalline electron diffraction ring pattern, ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were employed to verify the stepwise assembly of the immunosensor and evaluated the analytical performance of the fabricated immunosensor, respectively. The immunosensor showed a wide liner response range between 0.01 and 80 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.24 pg mL(-1) at a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 3. Additionally, the proposed method was successfully applied to determine CEA in human serum samples with satisfactory results.

  9. Label-Free Electrochemiluminescent Immunosensor for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Nanocomposites of GO/MWCNTs-COOH/Au@CeO₂.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xuehui; Li, Jianxiu; Zhao, Yongbei; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yong; Du, Bin; Ma, Hongmin; Wei, Qin

    2015-09-01

    A high-sensitivity electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor was conducted to detect carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Nanocomposites of graphene oxide/carboxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes/gold/cerium oxide nanoparticles (GO/MWCNTs-COOH/Au@CeO2) were used as antibody carriers and sensing platforms to modify on glassy carbon electrodes (GCE). CeO2 nanoparticles were first exploited as an ECL luminescent material and the possible ECL mechanism was proposed in this work. GO/MWCNTs-COOH was used as a loading matrix for CeO2 nanoparticles because of the superior conductivity and large specific surface area. Au nanoparticles were further deposited on this matrix to attach anti-CEA and enhance the sensitivity of immunosensor. The proposed sensing platform showed excellent cathodic ECL performance and sensitive response to CEA. The effects of experimental conditions on the ECL performance were investigated. The proposed immunosensor showed the broad linear range (0.05-100 ng/mL) and the low detection limit (LOD, 0.02 ng/mL, signal-to-noise ratio = 3) according to the selected experimental conditions. The excellent analysis performance for determination of CEA in the human serum samples simplied this immunosensor displayed high sensitivity and excellent repeatability. More importantly, this conducted immunosensor broadens the use scope of CeO2 nanoparticles.

  10. Magnetic immunoassay coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for simultaneous quantification of alpha-fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yiwen; Xiao, Guangyang; Hu, Bin

    2015-04-01

    The absolute quantification of glycoproteins in complex biological samples is a challenge and of great significance. Herein, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized magnetic beads were prepared to selectively capture glycoproteins, while antibody conjugated gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized as element tags to label two different glycoproteins. Based on that, a new approach of magnetic immunoassay-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for simultaneous quantitative analysis of glycoproteins. Taking biomarkers of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as two model glycoproteins, experimental parameters involved in the immunoassay procedure were carefully optimized and analytical performance of the proposed method was evaluated. The limits of detection (LODs) for AFP and CEA were 0.086 μg L- 1 and 0.054 μg L- 1 with the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 7, c = 5 μg L- 1) of 6.5% and 6.2% for AFP and CEA, respectively. Linear range for both AFP and CEA was 0.2-50 μg L- 1. To validate the applicability of the proposed method, human serum samples were analyzed, and the obtained results were in good agreement with that obtained by the clinical chemiluminescence immunoassay. The developed method exhibited good selectivity and sensitivity for the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA, and extended the applicability of metal nanoparticle tags based on ICP-MS methodology in multiple glycoprotein quantifications.

  11. Single-step cycle pulse operation of the label-free electrochemiluminescence immunosensor based on branched polypyrrole for carcinoembryonic antigen detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Wang, Qi; Ma, Hongmin; Lv, Xiaohui; Wu, Dan; Sun, Xu; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A novel label-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor based on luminol functional-Au NPs@polypyrrole has been developed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In this work, polypyrrole prepared by chemical polymerization provided a large surface area to load amounts of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Au NPs could not only attach abundant luminol for the enhancement of ECL signal, but also provide a friendly microenvironment for the immobilization of antibodies. Moreover, 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluroborate ([BPy]BF4) were used to disperse luminol functional-Au NPs@polypyrrole nanocomposites, resulting in the film-formation of composites on the electrode, which could improve the stability of immunosensor. In particular, employment of single-step cycle pulse could limit the consecutive reaction between luminol and H2O2 efficiently, thus leading to stable and strong signals. The proposed method presents good ECL response for the detection of CEA allowing a wide linear range from 0.01 pg/mL to 10 ng/mL and a limit of detection as low as 3 fg/mL. The immunosensor would be a promising tool in the early diagnosis of CEA due to its high sensitivity, simplicity and cost-effective. PMID:27091590

  12. Preparation of Au-polydopamine functionalized carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposites and their application for ultrasensitive detection of carcino-embryonic antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lei; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Gao, Jian; Wang, Qi; Hu, Lihua; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A novel carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in two-dimensional (2D) porous graphitic carbon nanocomposites (Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites) were synthesized by situ synthesis strategy, which provided a sensor platform owing to a large aspect ratio and porous structure. Polydopamine (PDA) were modified on the surface of Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites through self-polymerization of dopamine, acting as both the reductant and template for one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The prepared Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites show ferromagnetic features, extremely excellent electron transfer, large specific surface area and excellent dispersing property. These are conducive to the electrochemical signal output and the immobilization of antibody. In this work, a highly label-free sensitive magnetic immunosensor was developed based on Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites for the detection of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). The magnetic glassy carbon electrode was used to fix the Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites with the help of magnetic force. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range (0.001 ng/mL–20.0 ng/mL), a low detection limit (0.33 pg/mL), good reproducibility, selectivity and acceptable stability. The proposed sensing strategy may provide a potential application in the detection of other cancer biomarkers. PMID:26868035

  13. Preparation of Au-polydopamine functionalized carbon encapsulated Fe₃O₄ magnetic nanocomposites and their application for ultrasensitive detection of carcino-embryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lei; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Gao, Jian; Wang, Qi; Hu, Lihua; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2016-02-12

    A novel carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in two-dimensional (2D) porous graphitic carbon nanocomposites (Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites) were synthesized by situ synthesis strategy, which provided a sensor platform owing to a large aspect ratio and porous structure. Polydopamine (PDA) were modified on the surface of Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites through self-polymerization of dopamine, acting as both the reductant and template for one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The prepared Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites show ferromagnetic features, extremely excellent electron transfer, large specific surface area and excellent dispersing property. These are conducive to the electrochemical signal output and the immobilization of antibody. In this work, a highly label-free sensitive magnetic immunosensor was developed based on Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites for the detection of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). The magnetic glassy carbon electrode was used to fix the Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites with the help of magnetic force. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range (0.001 ng/mL-20.0 ng/mL), a low detection limit (0.33 pg/mL), good reproducibility, selectivity and acceptable stability. The proposed sensing strategy may provide a potential application in the detection of other cancer biomarkers.

  14. Carcinoembryonic antigen: assay following heat compared with perchloric acid extraction in patients with colon cancer, non-neoplastic gastrointestinal diseases, or chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, L R; Shuler, S E; Alyea, K; Husserl, F E

    1983-10-01

    Heat inactivation has been proposed as an alternative to perchloric acid (PCA) precipitation for the extraction of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) from human plasma. We examined a commercial RIA kit using heat inactivation, and compared results with those obtained with PCA precipitation. Adequate sensitivity (1.5 micrograms CEA/l plasma), satisfactory analytical recovery of CEA added to plasma, and dilutional linearity of samples found to have elevated CEA concentrations, were demonstrated for the heat-inactivation assay. Between-assay precision was better with the heat inactivation than with the PCA assay. Although the absolute concentration of CEA estimated after heat inactivation was consistently lower than that estimated after PCA extraction of plasma specimens, there was excellent correlation between results obtained with the two methods in colon cancer patients free of disease, colon cancer patients with residual or recurrent disease, patients with benign gastrointestinal disease, and in patients with chronic renal failure. We conclude that the heat-inactivation assay is an excellent alternative to the PCA assay.

  15. [Absence of correlation between the concentrations of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and the tumor growth factor beta 2 (TGFB2) in the two main types of breast macrocysts].

    PubMed

    Ruibal, A; Núñez, M I; Schneider, J; del Río, M f; Delgado, S; Rabadán, F; Tejerina, A

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the possible correlation between carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and cellular proliferation, we assayed the concentrations of this substance in the fluid of 77 bening macrocysts of the breast classified according to their Na+/K+ ratio and compared them with those of transforming growth factor beta 2. CEA levels correlated positively and significantly with the cationic ratio, the concentrations of albumin, glucose, Cl- and pH and were higher (range: 2.5-81.5, median 12.8 vs range: 0.4-41.5, median 3.2 ng/ml (p: 0.00000) in type 2 (Na+/K+ > 3) than in type 1 (Na+/K+ < 3) cysts. There was no correlation between CEA and TGFb2, nor between the former and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels. These results led us to suggest that the high CEA concentrations in type 2 cysts seem to be the consequence of loos of cellular differentiation and disruption of the cyst wall lining as well as the acquisition of embryonary properties by the latter as a consequence of a reduced hormonal microenvironment. PMID:10352320

  16. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  17. Comparison of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated with visible or near-infrared fluorescent dyes for imaging pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models.

    PubMed

    Maawy, Ali A; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Luiken, George A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a set of visible and near-infrared dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific chimeric antibody for high-resolution tumor imaging in orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer was orthotopically implanted into pancreata of nude mice. Mice received a single intravenous injection of a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody conjugated to one of the following fluorophores: 488-nm group (Alexa Fluor 488 or DyLight 488); 550-nm group (Alexa Fluor 555 or DyLight 550); 650-nm group (Alexa Fluor 660 or DyLight 650), or the 750-nm group (Alexa Fluor 750 or DyLight 755). After 24 h, the Olympus OV100 small-animal imaging system was used for noninvasive and intravital fluorescence imaging of mice. Dyes were compared with respect to depth of imaging, resolution, tumor-to-background ratio (TBR), photobleaching, and hemoglobin quenching. The longer wavelength dyes had increased depth of penetration and ability to detect the smallest tumor deposits and provided the highest TBRs, resistance to hemoglobin quenching, and specificity. The shorter wavelength dyes were more photostable. This study showed unique advantages of each dye for specific cancer imaging in a clinically relevant orthotopic model.

  18. Antigenic variation in ciliates: antigen structure, function, expression.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2007-01-01

    In the past decades, the major focus of antigen variation research has been on parasitic protists. However, antigenic variation occurs also in free-living protists. The antigenic systems of the ciliates Paramecium and Tetrahymena have been studied for more than 100 yr. In spite of different life strategies and distant phylogenetic relationships of free-living ciliates and parasitic protists, their antigenic systems have features in common, such as the presence of repeated protein motifs and multigene families. The function of variable surface antigens in free-living ciliates is still unknown. Up to now no detailed monitoring of antigen expression in free-living ciliates in natural habitats has been performed. Unlike stochastic switching in parasites, antigen expression in ciliates can be directed, e.g. by temperature, which holds great advantages for research on the expression mechanism. Regulated expression of surface antigens occurs in an exclusive way and the responsible mechanism is complex, involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional features. The involvement of homology-dependent effects has been proposed several times but has not been proved yet.

  19. Photoelectrochemical Immunosensor for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on 2D TiO2 Nanosheets and Carboxylated Graphitic Carbon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Qi; Ren, Xiang; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin

    2016-06-06

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was used as the model, an ultrasensitive label-free photoelectrochemical immunosensor was developed using 2D TiO2 nanosheets and carboxylated graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as photoactive materials and ascorbic acid as an efficient electron donor. 2D TiO2 nanosheets was sythsized by surfactant self-assembly method and proved to have higher photoelectrochemical signals than TiO2 nanoparticles. Firstly, carboxylated g-C3N4 could be attached to 2D TiO2 nanosheets through the bond formed between carboxyl group of carboxylated g-C3N4 and TiO2. And the photocurrent of g-C3N4/TiO2 drastically enhances compared to carboxylated g-C3N4 and TiO2. Then, antibody of CEA was bonded to TiO2 through the dentate bond formed between carboxyl group of anti-CEA and TiO2, leading to the decrease of the photocurrents. As proven by PEC experiments and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, the fabrication process of the immunosensor is successful. Under the optimal conditions, the intensity decreased linearly with CEA concentration in the range of 0.01~10 ng/mL. The detection limit is 2.1 pg/mL. The work provides an effective method for the detection of tumor markers and can be extended for the application in food safety and environmental monitoring analysis.

  20. Photoelectrochemical Immunosensor for Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on 2D TiO2 Nanosheets and Carboxylated Graphitic Carbon Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Yaoguang; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Qi; Ren, Xiang; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was used as the model, an ultrasensitive label-free photoelectrochemical immunosensor was developed using 2D TiO2 nanosheets and carboxylated graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) as photoactive materials and ascorbic acid as an efficient electron donor. 2D TiO2 nanosheets was sythsized by surfactant self-assembly method and proved to have higher photoelectrochemical signals than TiO2 nanoparticles. Firstly, carboxylated g-C3N4 could be attached to 2D TiO2 nanosheets through the bond formed between carboxyl group of carboxylated g-C3N4 and TiO2. And the photocurrent of g-C3N4/TiO2 drastically enhances compared to carboxylated g-C3N4 and TiO2. Then, antibody of CEA was bonded to TiO2 through the dentate bond formed between carboxyl group of anti-CEA and TiO2, leading to the decrease of the photocurrents. As proven by PEC experiments and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, the fabrication process of the immunosensor is successful. Under the optimal conditions, the intensity decreased linearly with CEA concentration in the range of 0.01~10 ng/mL. The detection limit is 2.1 pg/mL. The work provides an effective method for the detection of tumor markers and can be extended for the application in food safety and environmental monitoring analysis. PMID:27263659

  1. Pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging of regional lymph nodes with carcinoembryonic antigen in prediction of synchronous distant metastasis in patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wei; Fan, Xingwen; Cui, Long; Zhang, Caiyuan; Ren, Gang; Fu, Jihong; Wang, Dengbin

    2016-01-01

    Distant metastasis in patients with rectal cancer remains a problem influencing prognosis. Prediction of synchronous distant metastasis is important for the choice of personalized treatment strategies and postoperative follow-up protocol. So far, there are few studies about the predictive value of MRI features combined with clinical characteristics for synchronous distant metastasis in rectal cancer, especially for the lesions developed within 6 months after surgery. We retrospectively reviewed the pretreatment clinical characteristics and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 271 patients from January 2010 to December 2011with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma and tried to identify independent risk factors for synchronous distant metastasis. Forty-nine patients (18.1%) were confirmed to have synchronous distant metastasis. Multivariate logistic regression model demonstrated that the elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), positive MRI-predicted lymph nodes staging (mrN), and MRI-predicted mesorectal fascia (mrMRF) involvement were independent risk factors. The odd ratios were 12.2 for elevated CEA, 5.4 for mrN1 and 7.6 for mrN2, and 3.8 for mrMRF involvement, respectively. The accuracy and specificity for predicting synchronous distant metastasis by evaluating the positive mrN combined with elevated CEA were improved to 87.8% and 94.6%, respectively. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of positive mrN assessment were 86.1%, 71.4% and 91.7%, respectively using the histopathologic results as the reference standard. Altogether, our findings suggest that pretreatment positive mrN and elevated CEA are independent risk factors for synchronous distant metastasis in rectal cancer and combination of both could help to recognize the patients with high risk for structuring personalized treatment protocol. PMID:27070083

  2. Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Predictor of Pathologic Response and a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a predictor of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and prognostic factor for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: The study retrospectively evaluated 352 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery. Serum CEA levels were determined before CRT administration (pre-CRT CEA) and before surgery (post-CRT CEA). Correlations between pre-CRT CEA levels and rates of good response (Tumor regression grade 3/4) were explored. Patients were categorized into three CEA groups according to their pre-/post-CRT CEA levels (ng/mL) (Group A: pre-CRT CEA {<=} 3; B: pre-CRT CEA >3, post-CRT CEA {<=}3; C: pre- and post-CRT CEA >3 ng/mL), and their oncologic outcomes were compared. Results: Of 352 patients, good responses were achieved in 94 patients (26.7%). The rates of good response decreased significantly as the pre-CRT CEA levels became more elevated (CEA [ng/mL]: {<=}3, 36.4%; 3-6, 23.6%; 6-9, 15.6%; >9, 7.8%; p < 0.001). The rates of good response were significantly higher in Group A than in Groups B and C (36.4% vs. 17.3% and 14.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The 3-year disease-free survival rate was significantly better in Groups A and B than in Group C (82% and 79% vs. 57%, respectively; p = 0.005); the CEA grouping was identified as an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.025). Conclusions: In locally advanced rectal cancer patients, CEA levels could be of clinical value as a predictor of response to preoperative CRT and as an independent prognostic factor after preoperative CRT and curative surgery.

  3. Improved tumor localization with increasing dose of indium-111-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 in metastatic colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Shirkhoda, A.; Murray, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) react with human colorectal cancer cells, and when labeled with a gamma-emitting radioisotope, may help to localize known and occult metastatic disease. We tested ZCE-025, a high-affinity immune gamma globulin1 (IgG1) MoAb anti-CEA that does not react with normal granulocyte glycoproteins in a phase I/II trial to determine the reagent's toxicity and its maximum efficacy in detecting metastatic colorectal cancer. Increasing doses of unlabeled ZCE-025 were mixed with 1 mg of Indium-111 (111In)-radiolabeled MoAb and administered intravenously (IV) to 34 patients who had metastatic colorectal cancer. Planar nuclear or single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans were performed 48 to 72 and 120 to 144 hours later. Total dose of MoAb and scanning sensitivity (number of imaged lesions/number of known lesions) were correlated up to 80 mg. At doses of 2.5 to 20 mg, a mean of 22% of the lesions were imaged; at 40 mg, 77% were imaged (P less than .01). Liver metastases were detected as areas of increased activity (hot) at the 40 mg dose but showed decreased MoAb uptake at lower doses. At the 40 mg dose normal liver parenchymal uptake of the labeled MoAb was lower with respect to blood pool compared with the other doses. At 80 mg, however, sensitivity of detection declined to 21%. One milligram of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 antibody coinfused with 39 mg of unlabeled antibody appeared optimal for detecting metastatic colorectal cancer, particularly in the liver. Although the exact mechanism(s) for this dose effect is currently unknown, a partial blocking effect of unlabeled antibody with a change in MoAb biodistribution may be occurring.

  4. Interaction of actin with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) receptor in liposomes is Ca2+- and phospholipid-dependent.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongze; Niesen, Michiel J M; Hu, Weidong; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Shively, John E

    2011-08-01

    The regulation of binding of G-actin to cytoplasmic domains of cell surface receptors is a common mechanism to control diverse biological processes. To model the regulation of G-actin binding to a cell surface receptor we used the cell-cell adhesion molecule carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1-S) in which G-actin binds to its short cytoplasmic domain (12 amino acids; Chen, C. J., Kirshner, J., Sherman, M. A., Hu, W., Nguyen, T., and Shively, J. E. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 5749-5760). A liposome model system demonstrates that G-actin binds to the cytosolic domain peptide of CEACAM1-S in the presence of negatively charged palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylserine (POPS) liposomes and Ca(2+). In contrast, no binding of G-actin was observed in palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes or when a key residue in the peptide, Phe-454, is replaced with Ala. Molecular Dynamics simulations on CEACAM1-S in an asymmetric phospholipid bilayer show migration of Ca(2+) ions to the lipid leaflet containing POPS and reveal two conformations for Phe-454 explaining the reversible availability of this residue for G-actin binding. NMR transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopic analysis of (13)C-labeled Phe-454 CEACAM1-S peptide in liposomes plus actin further confirmed the existence of two peptide conformers and the Ca(2+) dependence of actin binding. These findings explain how a receptor with a short cytoplasmic domain can recruit a cytosolic protein in a phospholipid and Ca(2+)-specific manner. In addition, this model system provides a powerful approach that can be applied to study other membrane protein interactions with their cytosolic targets.

  5. Increased electrocatalyzed performance through hairpin oligonucleotide aptamer-functionalized gold nanorods labels and graphene-streptavidin nanomatrix: Highly selective and sensitive electrochemical biosensor of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Huang, Jing-Yi; Bao, Ting; Zhou, Jun; Xia, Hong-Xing; Zhang, Xiu-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Fu; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2016-09-15

    We report a triplex signal amplification strategy for sensitive biosensing of cancer biomarker by taking advantage of hairpin-shaped oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanorods (HO-GNRs), graphene and the avidin-biotin reation. The strategy expands electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by using an aptamer as biosensor's recognition element and HO-GNRs as signal enhancer. To construct this biosensor, the GNR was used as a carrier of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and HO aptamer with a biotin at the 3'-end and a thiol at the 5'-end, which amplified the electrochemical response because of a large molar ratio of HRP to HO. In the presence of target CEA, the binding reactions of CEA with the loop portions of the HOs caused HOs' loop-stem structure opened and exposed the biotins, and then HRP-GNRs-HO conjugates were captured on graphene and streptavidin modified electrodes via the reaction between the exposed biotins and preimmobilized streptavidins. The accumulation of HRP effectively catalyzed the hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidation of o-phenylenediamine to generate an electrochemical reduction current for CEA detection. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical biosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range of 5pgmL(-1) and 50ngmL(-1) toward CEA standards with a low detection limit of 1.5pgmL(-1) (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The proposed biosensor accurately detected CEA concentration in 8 human serum samples from patients with lung diseases, showing excellent correlations with standard chemiluminescence immunoassay. Furthermore, these results of target DNA detection made it abundantly clear that the proposed strategy can also be extended for detection of other relative biomarkers using different functional DNA structures, which shows great prospects in single-nucleotide polymorphisms analysis, biomedical sensing and application for accurate clinical diseases diagnostic.

  6. Increased electrocatalyzed performance through hairpin oligonucleotide aptamer-functionalized gold nanorods labels and graphene-streptavidin nanomatrix: Highly selective and sensitive electrochemical biosensor of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Huang, Jing-Yi; Bao, Ting; Zhou, Jun; Xia, Hong-Xing; Zhang, Xiu-Hua; Wang, Sheng-Fu; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2016-09-15

    We report a triplex signal amplification strategy for sensitive biosensing of cancer biomarker by taking advantage of hairpin-shaped oligonucleotide-functionalized gold nanorods (HO-GNRs), graphene and the avidin-biotin reation. The strategy expands electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by using an aptamer as biosensor's recognition element and HO-GNRs as signal enhancer. To construct this biosensor, the GNR was used as a carrier of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and HO aptamer with a biotin at the 3'-end and a thiol at the 5'-end, which amplified the electrochemical response because of a large molar ratio of HRP to HO. In the presence of target CEA, the binding reactions of CEA with the loop portions of the HOs caused HOs' loop-stem structure opened and exposed the biotins, and then HRP-GNRs-HO conjugates were captured on graphene and streptavidin modified electrodes via the reaction between the exposed biotins and preimmobilized streptavidins. The accumulation of HRP effectively catalyzed the hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidation of o-phenylenediamine to generate an electrochemical reduction current for CEA detection. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical biosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range of 5pgmL(-1) and 50ngmL(-1) toward CEA standards with a low detection limit of 1.5pgmL(-1) (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The proposed biosensor accurately detected CEA concentration in 8 human serum samples from patients with lung diseases, showing excellent correlations with standard chemiluminescence immunoassay. Furthermore, these results of target DNA detection made it abundantly clear that the proposed strategy can also be extended for detection of other relative biomarkers using different functional DNA structures, which shows great prospects in single-nucleotide polymorphisms analysis, biomedical sensing and application for accurate clinical diseases diagnostic. PMID:27111123

  7. Immunoscintigraphy of adenocarcinomas by means of radiolabeled F(ab')2 fragments of an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody: A multicenter study

    SciTech Connect

    Siccardi, A.G.; Buraggi, G.L.; Callegaro, L.; Colella, A.C.; De Filippi, P.G.; Galli, G.; Mariani, G.; Masi, R.; Palumbo, R.; Riva, P. )

    1989-06-01

    F(ab')2 fragments of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody F023C5, determined to be more suitable than intact IgG and Fab fragments for immunoscintigraphy, were labeled with 131I or conjugated to DTPA for instant 111In-labeling, and administered i.v. (2-3 mCi/0.5 mg) to 509 patients in 11 nuclear medicine departments: 284 patients had gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, 204 had nongastrointestinal adenocarcinomas and 21 were control; serum CEA was elevated in 169 patients, normal in 115, and not determined in 225. The following results were obtained: (a) no adverse reactions; (b) tumor imaging in 324 patients (in particular, in 81.5% CEA-seropositive and in 69.0% CEA-seronegative patients); (c) no significant difference in sensitivity among the results of the 11 departments; (d) no significant difference in overall sensitivity between 131I-and 111In-labeled immunoradiopharmaceuticals; (e) the fraction of documented lesions imaged was 73.3% in CEA-seropositive and 53.7% in CEA-seronegative patients; (f) the detection of liver metastases was hampered, particularly when using the 111In-labeled reagent, by nonspecific radioactivity uptake; (g) the major cause of negative immunoscintigraphy results was a lack of CEA in tumor lesions, as documented by immunohistochemistry; (h) lesion size is also important since the sensitivity was 64% for lesions up to 2 cm in diameter and 84% for larger lesions; (i) many unexpected radiolocalizations were recorded. Most were identified as occult tumor lesions. In 35 patients, this finding contributed to the early detection of tumor recurrences.

  8. Prognostic significance of postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels in patients with completely resected pathological-stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Until date, there are no clear recommendations for regular perioperative measurements of serum CEA levels for lung cancer in any guidelines. The purpose in the present study is to evaluate the prognostic significance of perioperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in patients with pathological-stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 263 completely resected pathological-stage I NSCLC patients whose preoperative and postoperative serum CEA levels were measured. Patients were subdivided according to the perioperative change of CEA levels: continuously normal CEA levels (NN group), continuously high CEA levels (HH group), and high preoperative CEA levels that returned to normal levels post-operation (HN group). The clinicopathological factors and overall survival (OS) among these 3 groups were compared. Univariate and multivariate analyses of the correlation between clinicopathological factors and OS were performed. Results High preoperative CEA levels significantly correlated with men aged >70 years with smoking history, high serum CYFRA 21–1 levels, greater tumor diameter, presence of visceral pleural invasion (VPI), and moderate-to-poor differentiation. Five-year OS rates in the NN and HH groups were 95.5% and 59.3%, respectively. Four-year OS rate in the HN group was 85.5%. Multivariate analyses indicated tumor diameter of more than 30 mm, presence of VPI, and the HH group were independent unfavorable prognostic factors. Conclusions A high postoperative CEA level was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor in pathological-stage I NSCLC patients. Patients with high postoperative CEA levels may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23607757

  9. Prognostic Value of Pretreatment Carcinoembryonic Antigen After Definitive Radiotherapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eng-Yen; Hsu, Hsuan-Chih; Sun, Li-Min; Chanchien, Chan-Chao; Lin, Hao; Chen, Hui-Chun; Tseng, Chih-Wen; Ou, Yu-Che; Chang, Hung-Yao; Fang, Fu-Min; Huang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Chang-Yu; Lu, Hsien-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Chou; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels have a prognostic role in patients after definitive radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 550 patients was performed. The SCC antigen (SCC-Ag) and CEA levels were regarded as elevated when they were {>=}2 and {>=}5 ng/mL, respectively. A total of 208 patients underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the distant metastasis (DM), local failure (LF), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. The hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was evaluated for the risk of a poor prognosis. Results: Compared with the patients with normal CEA/SCC-Ag levels, CEA levels {>=}10 ng/mL but without elevated SCC-Ag levels was an independent factor for LF (HR, 51.81; 95% CI, 11.51-233.23; p < .001), DM (HR, 6.04; 95% CI, 1.58-23.01; p = .008), DFS (HR, 10.17; 95% CI, 3.18-32.56; p < .001), and OS (HR, 5.75; 95% CI, 1.82-18.18; p = .003) after RT alone. However, no significant role for CEA was noted in patients with SCC-Ag levels {>=}2 ng/mL. In patients undergoing CCRT, a CEA level {>=}10 ng/mL was an independent factor for LF (HR, 2.50; 95% CI, 1.01-6.21; p = .047), DM (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.56-7.46; p = .002), DFS (HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.39-5.36; p = .003), and OS (HR, 3.93; 95% CI 1.99-7.75; p < .001). A SCC-Ag level of {>=}40 ng/mL was another prognostic factor for DM, DFS, and OS in patients undergoing not only CCRT, but also RT alone. The 5-year OS rate for CCRT patients with CEA <10 ng/mL and {>=}10 ng/mL was 75.3% and 35.8%, respectively (p < .001). CCRT was an independent factor for better OS (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.50-0.97; p = .034). Conclusion: Pretreatment CEA levels in patients with SCC of the uterine cervix provide complementary information for predicting LF, DM

  10. Mechanistic Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (CEACAM1) Splice Isoforms by the Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonuclear Proteins hnRNP L, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP M*

    PubMed Central

    Dery, Kenneth J.; Gaur, Shikha; Gencheva, Marieta; Yen, Yun; Shively, John E.; Gaur, Rajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is expressed in a variety of cell types and is implicated in carcinogenesis. Alternative splicing of CEACAM1 pre-mRNA generates two cytoplasmic domain splice variants characterized by the inclusion (L-isoform) or exclusion (S-isoform) of exon 7. Here we show that the alternative splicing of CEACAM1 pre-mRNA is regulated by novel cis elements residing in exon 7. We report the presence of three exon regulatory elements that lead to the inclusion or exclusion of exon 7 CEACAM1 mRNA in ZR75 breast cancer cells. Heterologous splicing reporter assays demonstrated that the maintenance of authentic alternative splicing mechanisms were independent of the CEACAM1 intron sequence context. We show that forced expression of these exon regulatory elements could alter CEACAM1 splicing in HEK-293 cells. Using RNA affinity chromatography, three members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family (hnRNP L, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP M) were identified. RNA immunoprecipitation of hnRNP L and hnRNP A1 revealed a binding motif located central and 3′ to exon 7, respectively. Depletion of hnRNP A1 or L by RNAi in HEK-293 cells promoted exon 7 inclusion, whereas overexpression led to exclusion of the variable exon. By contrast, overexpression of hnRNP M showed exon 7 inclusion and production of CEACAM1-L mRNA. Finally, stress-induced cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in MDA-MB-468 cells dynamically alters the CEACAM1-S:CEACAM1:L ratio in favor of the l-isoform. Thus, we have elucidated the molecular factors that control the mechanism of splice-site recognition in the alternative splicing regulation of CEACAM1. PMID:21398516

  11. HLA antigen expression and malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T I; Manning, L S; Davis, M R; Robinson, B W; Garlepp, M J

    1991-09-01

    The expression of HLA antigens by a tumor may determine its progression and metastatic potential by influencing the immune response to that tumor. The upregulation of HLA antigen expression on some cell types by interferons (IFNs) may contribute to their antitumor activity. Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor that has a poor prognosis and is unaffected by conventional therapy, although immunotherapy has not been adequately assessed. In this study, we have examined the constitutive and IFN-inducible expression of class I and class II HLA antigens on MM cell lines using indirect immunofluorescence and Northern blotting. All MM cell lines constitutively expressed class I, but not class II, surface antigen, and all three class I loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C) were expressed. The MM cell lines were heterogeneous in their response to the IFNs. Treatment with IFN-alpha marginally increased class I surface expression, but not class II. Class I mRNA was, however, clearly increased in all cell lines after IFN-alpha treatment, suggesting that class I surface antigen was already maximally expressed. IFN-gamma increased class I mRNA expression in all but one cell line and induced DR expression on three of the cell lines. DQ-beta, but not DQ-alpha, mRNA was inducible in the same three cell lines, but DQ surface antigen was never demonstrable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Utility of slot-blot-ELISA as a new, fast, and sensitive immunoassay for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in the urine samples of patients with various gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    El-Masry, Samir; El-Sayed, Ibrahim H; Lotfy, Mahmoud; Mahmoud, Lamiaa; El-Naggar, Mohamed

    2007-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is the most widely used clinical tumor marker. CEA immunoassay has found acceptance as a diagnostic adjunct in clinical diagnosis of gastrointestinal tumors (GIT). Several immunoassays have been established for detection of CEA in plasma, serum, tissue, feces, and urine of cancer patients using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies raised against CEA. Some of these assays display both high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CEA. However, these assays require special and highly expensive equipment and the procedures require long periods for their completion. In the present study, we established a Slot-Blot Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (SB-ELISA), based on anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (CEA-mAb), as a new, simple, fast, cheap, and non-invasive immunodiagnostic technique for detection of CEA in the urine of GIT patients. Urine and serum samples were collected from 248 GIT patients (58 with pancreatic cancer, 20 with hepatoma, 23 with ampullary carcinoma, 15 with hilar cholangiocarcinoma, 28 with gastric cancer, 14 with esophageal cancer, and 90 with colorectal cancer). Moreover, urine and serum samples were collected from 50 healthy individuals to serve as negative controls. The traditional ELISA technique was used for determination of CEA in the sera of GIT patients using anti-CEA monoclonal antibody. A comparison between the results of both techniques (ELISA and SB-ELISA) was carried out. The traditional ELISA detected CEA in the sera of 154 out of 248 GIT patients with a sensitivity of 59.8%, 51.7% positive predictive value (PPV) and 75.37% negative predictive value (NPV). In addition, it identified 15 false positive cases out of 50 healthy individuals with a specificity of 70%. The urinary CEA was identified by a Western blotting technique and CEA-mAb at a molecular mass of 180 Kda. The developed SB-ELISA showed higher sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV (70.1%, 78%, 62.4%, and 82.13%, respectively) for detection

  13. Cystadenocarcinoma and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA).

    PubMed

    Ferrer, J P; Hensley, G; Kalser, M H; Zeppa, R

    1978-08-01

    A 40-year-old woman with back pain, an abdominal and a serum CEA level of 200 ng/ml was found to have at laparotomy, a large but resectable mucinous retroperitoneal mass. Pathologic diagnosis revealed cystadenocarcinoma, probably of pancreatic origin. It is remarkable that the cyst fluid contained a CEA level 100,000-fold normal. Serum CEA fell to normal levels in the postoperative period. This suggests that the CEA was of cyst epithelial origin.

  14. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  15. Fungal Antigens Expressed during Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Denikus, Nicole; Orfaniotou, Foteini; Wulf, Gerald; Lehmann, Paul F.; Monod, Michel; Reichard, Utz

    2005-01-01

    Rabbits that had been infected intravenously with conidiospores of Aspergillus fumigatus were used as sources of antibody for screening a λ phage cDNA expression library. The cDNA was derived from A. fumigatus mRNA that had been extracted from newly formed, germling hyphae. Thirty-six antigens were identified using antisera from six rabbits. Though many of these antigens were expected to be intracellular proteins because their genes did not encode a signal sequence, the antisera showed consistently a stronger immunoblot reaction with a cell fraction enriched for the fungal cell wall than with a fraction of predominantly intracellular components. Antibodies to eight antigens, including the glycosylhydrolase Asp f 16, were produced by more than one rabbit. In current vaccine studies, Asp f 16 is the only single antigen which has been reported to be capable of inducing protection against invasive aspergillosis in mice (S. Bozza et al., Microb. Infect. 4:1281-1290, 2002). Enolase and Aspergillus HSP90 were detected also; their homologues in Candida albicans have been tested as vaccines and have been reported to provide a partially protective response against invasive candidiasis in mice. The Aspergillus antigens reported here may have value both in diagnostic tests for different forms of aspergillosis and as vaccine candidates for protection against invasive disease. PMID:16040983

  16. Toxicology study of repeat intracerebral administration of a measles virus derivative producing carcinoembryonic antigen in rhesus macaques in support of a phase I/II clinical trial for patients with recurrent gliomas.

    PubMed

    Myers, Rae; Harvey, Mary; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Greiner, Suzanne M; Krempski, James W; Raffel, Corey; Shelton, Steven E; Soeffker, Diane; Zollman, Paula; Federspiel, Mark J; Blanco, Michael; Galanis, Evanthia

    2008-07-01

    Gliomas have a dismal prognosis, with the median survival of patients with the most common histology, glioblastoma multiforme, being only 12-15 months. Development of novel therapeutic agents is urgently needed. We have previously demonstrated that oncolytic measles virus strains derived from the Edmonston vaccine lineage have significant antitumor activity against gliomas [Phuong, L.K., Allen, C., Peng, K.W., Giannini, C., Greiner, S., Teneyck, C.J., Mishra, P.K., Macura, S.I., Russell, S.J., Galanis, E.C. (2003). Cancer. Res. 63, 2462-2469]. MV-CEA is an Edmonston vaccine lineage measles virus strain engineered to express the marker peptide carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA): CEA levels can serve as a correlate of viral gene expression. In support of a phase I clinical trial of intratumoral and resection cavity administration of MV-CEA to patients with recurrent gliomas, we assessed the neurotoxicity of MV-CEA in adult immune male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). The animals ' immune status and administration schedule mimicked the trial population and proposed administration schema. Macaca mulatta represents the prototype animal species for assessment of measles neurotoxicity. The animals were stereotactically administered either vehicle (n = 1) or MV-CEA at 2 x 10(5)or 2 x 10(6) TCID(50) (each, n = 2) in the right frontal lobe in two injections on days 1 and 5. Macaques were closely monitored clinically for neurotoxicity. Body weight, temperature, complete blood count, CEA, clinical chemistries, coagulation, complement levels, immunoglobulin, measles antibody titers, viremia, and shedding (buccal swabs) were tested at multiple time points. Furthermore, cisterna magna spinal taps were performed on day 9 and 1 year after the first viral dose administration, and samples were analyzed for protein, glucose, cell differential, and presence of MV-CEA. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed between 4 and 5 months after article administration to assess for

  17. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) linked to near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody enhances imaging of liver metastases in a nude-mouse model of human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Maawy, Ali A; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We report here that polyethylene glycol (PEG) linked to near infrared dyes conjugated to chimeric mouse-human anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody greatly improves imaging of liver metastases in a nude mouse model of colon-cancer experimental metastases. PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were conjugated to the chimeric anti-CEA antibody. The dyes were initially injected intravenously into nude mice without tumors. Tissue biodistribution was determined by tissue sonication and analyzing tissue dye concentration profiles over time. PEGylated dyes had significantly lower accumulation in the liver (p = 0.03 for the 650 dyes; p = 0.002 for the 750 dyes) compared to non-PEGylated dyes. In an experimental liver metastasis model of HT-29 colon cancer, PEGylated dyes conjugated to the anti-CEA antibody showed good labeling of metastatic tumors with high contrast between normal and malignant tissue which was not possible with the non-PEGylated dyes since there was so much non-specific accumulation in the liver. PEGylation of the DyLight 650 and 750 NIR dyes significantly altered tissue biodistribution, allowing brighter tissue labeling, decreased accumulation in normal organs, particularly the liver. This enabled high fidelity and high contrast imaging of liver metastases.

  18. Role of tumor-associated antigen expression in radioimmunoguided surgery for colorectal and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, S; Percivale, P; Schenone, F; Peressini, A; Murolo, C; Badellino, F

    1998-12-01

    One hundred thirty-six patients with colorectal and breast cancer were enrolled in a retrospective study using radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) with Iodine-125 (I125) radiolabeled B72.3 (Group A, 73 patients) and F023C5 (Group B, 63 patients) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The correlation between intraoperative tumor-to-normal tissue (T/NT) gamma-detecting probe (GDP) counts ratio and the expression of tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 (GroupA patients) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA; Group B patients) tumor-associated antigens (TAA) expression of 209 resected or biopsy tumor specimens was assessed. Ex vivo radioimmunolocalization index (R.I.) was carried out on the same specimens as a control of intraoperative GDP ratio values. RIGS positive definition of tumor occurred in 80/113 (70.8%) tumor sites of Group A patients and in 84/96 (87.5%) tumor sites of Group B patients. Mean percent B72.3 TAA expression of 113 tumor sites of Group A patients was 62.74 +/- 28.79% vs. 73.00 +/- 26.28% of 96 tumor sites of Group B patients (P < 0.05). The higher incidence of positive RIGS results was observed in tumor sites with the higher expression of the relative TAA. A statistically significant correlation between RIGS ratios and B72.3 and CEA expression was observed in the 113 tumor sites of Group A (P < 0.05) and in the 96 tumor sites of Group B (P < 0.01), respectively. The role of a preoperative evaluation of TAA expression in patients undergoing RIGS is discussed. Its assessment, whenever possible, may help to select those patients who will benefit more from this immunodiagnostic technique.

  19. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  20. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maawy, Ali A.; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A.; Hoffman, Robert M.; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and p<0.001 for the 750 dyes). Human pancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (p<0.001 for the 650 dyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  1. Specific tumor labeling enhanced by polyethylene glycol linkage of near infrared dyes conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Maawy, Ali A; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Luiken, George A; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Labeling of metastatic tumors can aid in their staging and resection of cancer. Near infrared (NIR) dyes have been used in the clinic for tumor labeling. However, there can be a nonspecific uptake of dye by the liver, lungs, and lymph nodes, which hinders detection of metastasis. In order to overcome these problems, we have used two NIR dyes (DyLight 650 and 750) conjugated to a chimeric anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody to evaluate how polyethylene glycol linkage (PEGylation) can improve specific tumor labeling in a nude mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. The conjugated PEGylated and non-PEGylated DyLight 650 and 750 dyes were injected intravenously into non-tumor-bearing nude mice. Serum samples were collected at various time points in order to determine serum concentrations and elimination kinetics. Conjugated PEGylated dyes had significantly higher serum dye concentrations than non-PEGylated dyes (p=0.005 for the 650 dyes and p<0.001 for the 750 dyes). Human pancreatic tumors subcutaneously implanted into nude mice were labeled with antibody-dye conjugates and serially imaged. Labeling with conjugated PEGylated dyes resulted in significantly brighter tumors compared to the non-PEGylated dyes (p<0.001 for the 650 dyes; p=0.01 for 750 dyes). PEGylation of the NIR dyes also decreased their accumulation in lymph nodes, liver, and lung. These results demonstrate enhanced selective tumor labeling by PEGylation of dyes conjugated to a tumor-specific antibody, suggesting their future clinical use in fluorescence-guided surgery.

  2. Randomised Phase I/II trial assessing the safety and efficacy of radiolabelled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen I131 KAb201 antibodies given intra-arterially or intravenously in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Advanced pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis, and the current standard of care (gemcitabine based chemotherapy) provides a small survival advantage. However the drawback is the accompanying systemic toxicity, which targeted treatments may overcome. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of KAb201, an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody, labelled with I131 in pancreatic cancer (ISRCTN 16857581). Methods Patients with histological/cytological proven inoperable adenocarcinoma of the head of pancreas were randomised to receive KAb 201 via either the intra-arterial or intravenous delivery route. The dose limiting toxicities within each group were determined. Patients were assessed for safety and efficacy and followed up until death. Results Between February 2003 and July 2005, 25 patients were enrolled. Nineteen patients were randomised, 9 to the intravenous and 10 to the intra-arterial arms. In the intra-arterial arm, dose limiting toxicity was seen in 2/6 (33%) patients at 50 mCi whereas in the intravenous arm, dose limiting toxicity was noted in 1/6 patients at 50 mCi, but did not occur at 75 mCi (0/3). The overall response rate was 6% (1/18). Median overall survival was 5.2 months (95% confidence interval = 3.3 to 9 months), with no significant difference between the intravenous and intra-arterial arms (log rank test p = 0.79). One patient was still alive at the time of this analysis. Conclusion Dose limiting toxicity for KAb201 with I131 by the intra-arterial route was 50 mCi, while dose limiting toxicity was not reached in the intravenous arm. PMID:19243606

  3. Vaccination with a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a tumor antigen breaks immune tolerance and elicits therapeutic antitumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Chakraborty, Mala; Hance, Kenneth W.; Bernstein, Michael B.; Boehm, Amanda L.; Guo, Zhimin; Quick, Deborah; Franzusoff, Alex; Greiner, John W.; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a nonpathogenic yeast, has previously been used as a vehicle to elicit immune responses to foreign antigens, and tumor-associated antigens, and has been shown to reduce tumorburden in mice. Studies were designed to determine if vaccination of human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-transgenic mice (where CEA is a self-antigen) with a recombinant S. cerevisiae construct expressing human CEA (yeast-CEA) elicits CEA-specific T-cell responses and antitumor activity. Experimental Design CEA-transgenic mice were vaccinated with yeast-CEA, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were assessed after one and multiple administrations or vaccinations at multiple sites per administration. Antitumor activity was determined by tumor growth and overall survival in both pulmonary metastasis and subcutaneous pancreatic tumor models. Results These studies demonstrate that recombinant yeast can break tolerance and that a) yeast-CEA constructs elicit both CEA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses; b) repeated yeast-CEA administration causes increased antigen-specific T-cell responses after each vaccination; c) vaccination with yeast-CEA at multiple sites induces a greater T-cell response than the same dose given at a single site; d) tumor-bearing mice vaccinated with yeast-CEA show a reduction in tumor burden and increased overall survival compared to mock-treated or control yeast-vaccinated mice in both pulmonary metastasis and subcutaneous pancreatic tumor models. Conclusions Vaccination with a heat-killed recombinant yeast expressing the tumor-associated antigen CEA induces CEA-specific immune responses, reduces tumor burden, and extends overall survival in CEA-transgenic mice. These studies thus form the rationale for the incorporation of recombinant yeast-CEA and other recombinant yeast constructs in cancer immunotherapy protocols. PMID:18594015

  4. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  5. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum surface antigens in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Reese, R T

    1985-01-01

    The asexual blood stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce many antigens, only some of which are important for protective immunity. Most of the putative protective antigens are believed to be expressed in schizonts and merozoites, the late stages of the asexual cycle. With the aim of cloning and characterizing genes for important parasite antigens, we used late-stage P. falciparum mRNA to construct a library of cDNA sequences inserted in the Escherichia coli expression vector pUC8. Nine thousand clones from the expression library were immunologically screened in situ with serum from Aotus monkeys immune to P. falciparum, and 95 clones expressing parasite antigens were identified. Mice were immunized with lysates from 49 of the bacterial clones that reacted with Aotus sera, and the mouse sera were tested for their reactivity with parasite antigens by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting assays. Several different P. falciparum antigens were identified by these assays. Indirect immunofluorescence studies of extracellular merozoites showed that three of these antigens appear to be located on the merozoite surface. Thus, we have identified cDNA clones to three different P. falciparum antigens that may be important in protective immunity. Images PMID:3887406

  6. Expression of Treponema pallidum Antigens in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walfield, Alan M.; Hanff, Philip A.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1982-04-01

    Treponema pallidum DNA was cloned in a bacteriophage. Clones were screened for expression of Treponema pallidum antigens by an in situ radio-immunoassay on nitrocellulose, with the use of subsequent reactions with syphilitic serum and radioiodinated Staphylococcus aureus protein A. One clone, which gave a strong signal, codes for at least seven antigens that react specifically with human antibodies to Treponema pallidum.

  7. Baseline, Trend, and Normalization of Carcinoembryonic Antigen as Prognostic Factors in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mutant Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With First-Line Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Mu; Lai, Chien-Hao; Chang, Huang-Chih; Chao, Tung-Ying; Tseng, Chia-Cheng; Fang, Wen-Feng; Wang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Kuo-Tung; Chen, Hung-Cheng; Chang, Ya-Chun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Among epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status unknown nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, those with higher carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level are more likely to response to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) because they tend to have mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, patients with higher CEA also have more tumor burden. With the above paradoxical evidence, it is prudent to understand the prognostic significance of baseline CEA in patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC treated with first-line EGFR-TKIs. The clinical significance of the trend in CEA after treatment and the impact of CEA normalization during EGFR-TKI therapy are also unknown and potentially important. A total of 241 patients who received first-line EGFR-TKIs were included. As to baseline CEA, patients were divided into normal, low, and high baseline CEA by cut point determined by receiver operating characteristic curves. As to CEA responses, patients were divided into 3 groups accordingly to their amount of CEA change after taking TKIs. In group A, 1-month follow-up CEA level decreased more than 35% with nadir CEA normalization; in group B, 1-month follow-up CEA level decreased more than 35% without nadir CEA normalization; and in group C, 1-month follow-up CEA level decreased less than 35% or increased. Patients with higher baseline CEA levels had shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) (CEA > 32 vs 5–32 vs <5 ng/mL, PFS = 8.8 vs 11.3 vs 14.4 months, respectively, P < 0.001; OS = 17.8 vs 22.0 vs 27.9 months, respectively, P = 0.01). For trend and CEA normalization in groups A, B, and C, PFS was 14.3, 10.6, and 7.1 months, respectively (P < 0.001); OS was 29.7, 20.0, and 16.2 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Baseline, trend, and normalization of CEA levels are potential prognostic markers for patients with EGFR-mutant advanced NSCLC treated with first line EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26683939

  8. A Novel Malaria Vaccine Candidate Antigen Expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Eleni-Muus, Janna; Aldag, Ingo; Samuel, Kay; Creasey, Alison M.; Hartmann, Marcus W. W.; Cavanagh, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of effective malaria vaccines is hampered by the problem of producing correctly folded Plasmodium proteins for use as vaccine components. We have investigated the use of a novel ciliate expression system, Tetrahymena thermophila, as a P. falciparum vaccine antigen platform. A synthetic vaccine antigen composed of N-terminal and C-terminal regions of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) was expressed in Tetrahymena thermophila. The recombinant antigen was secreted into the culture medium and purified by monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity chromatography. The vaccine was immunogenic in MF1 mice, eliciting high antibody titers against both N- and C-terminal components. Sera from immunized animals reacted strongly with P. falciparum parasites from three antigenically different strains by immunofluorescence assays, confirming that the antibodies produced are able to recognize parasite antigens in their native form. Epitope mapping of serum reactivity with a peptide library derived from all three MSP-1 Block 2 serotypes confirmed that the MSP-1 Block 2 hybrid component of the vaccine had effectively targeted all three serotypes of this polymorphic region of MSP-1. This study has successfully demonstrated the use of Tetrahymena thermophila as a recombinant protein expression platform for the production of malaria vaccine antigens. PMID:24489871

  9. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response.

  10. Minor Histocompatibility Antigens Are Expressed in Syncytiotrophoblast and Trophoblast Debris

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Olivia J.; Linscheid, Caitlin; Hodes, Herbert C.; Nauser, Traci L.; Gilliam, Melissa; Stone, Peter; Chamley, Larry W.; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2012-01-01

    The fetal semi-allograft can induce expansion and tolerance of antigen-specific maternal T and B cells through paternally inherited major histocompatibility complex and minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs). The effects of these antigens have important consequences on the maternal immune system both during and long after pregnancy. Herein, we investigate the possibility that the placental syncytiotrophoblast and deported trophoblastic debris serve as sources of fetal mHAgs. We mapped the expression of four mHAgs (human mHAg 1, pumilio domain-containing protein KIAA0020, B-cell lymphoma 2–related protein A1, and ribosomal protein S4, Y linked) in the placenta. Each of these proteins was expressed in several placental cell types, including the syncytiotrophoblast. These antigens and two additional Y chromosome–encoded antigens [DEAD box polypeptide 3, Y linked (DDX3Y), and lysine demethylase5D] were also identified by RT-PCR in the placenta, purified trophoblast cells, and cord blood cells. Finally, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the presence of mHAgs in the syncytiotrophoblast and trophoblast debris shed from first-trimester placenta. By this method, four antigens (DDX3Y; ribosomal protein S4, Y linked; solute carrier 1A5; and signal sequence receptor 1) were found in the syncytiotrophoblast, and one antigen (DDX3Y) was found in shed trophoblast debris. The finding of mHAgs in the placenta and in trophoblast debris provides the first direct evidence that fetal antigens are present in debris shed from the human placenta. The data, thus, suggest a mechanism by which the maternal immune system is exposed to fetal alloantigens, possibly explaining the relationship between parity and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:22079431

  11. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate.

  12. Identification of Enterococcus faecalis antigens specifically expressed in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shet, Uttom K.; Park, Sang-Won; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kang, Seong Soo; Kim, Se Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Molecular mechanism of the pathogenicity of Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), a suspected endodontic pathogen, has not yet been adequately elucidated due to limited information on its virulence factors. Here we report the identification of in vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis by using a novel immunoscreening technique called change-mediated antigen technology (CMAT) and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Materials and Methods Among 4,500 E. coli recombinant clones screened, 19 positive clones reacted reproducibly with hyperimmune sera obtained from rabbits immunized with E. faecalis cells isolated from an experimental endodontic infection. DNA sequences from 16 of these in vivo-induced (IVI) genes were determined. Results Identified protein antigens of E. faecalis included enzymes involved in housekeeping functions, copper resistance protein, putative outer membrane proteins, and proteins of unknown function. Conclusions In vivo expressed antigens of E. faecalis could be identified by using a novel immune-screening technique CMAT and an experimental animal model of endodontic infection. Detailed analysis of these IVI genes will lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the endodontic infection of E. faecalis. PMID:26587417

  13. Induction of cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen expression by group A streptococcal antigens in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Baker, B S; Garioch, J J; Hardman, C; Powles, A; Fry, L

    1997-11-01

    The cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA) has been proposed as a homing receptor for the selective migration of memory T cells into the skin. To investigate the effect of group A streptococci (GAS) on the migration of T cells in psoriasis, CLA expression was assessed by double-staining for CD3 and the HECA-452 epitope on peripheral blood T cells from 13 patients with psoriasis, 10 patients with other inflammatory skin diseases and 12 normal controls before and after 7 days culture with a GAS sonicate, Candida albicans (control antigen) or medium. In addition, CLA+, and CLA-, CD3+ CD45RO+ subsets were isolated from individuals in each group and V beta 2 expression and proliferation to GAS studied. Mean CLA expression by freshly isolated T cells was almost identical in the three groups. After culture with GAS, T cells from the psoriatic patients and control showed a significant increase in mean percentage CLA+ expression compared to medium (P < 0.002, P < 0.05, respectively). This induction was inhibited by the addition of anti-IL-12 antibody. However, in psoriatic patients, but not in controls, the GAS-induced increase was significantly greater than that of C. albicans (P < 0.002) and was accompanied by a decrease in T cells positive for the peripheral lymph node homing receptor, L-selectin (P < 0.05). The percentage of V beta 2+ T cells was markedly higher in the CLA+ than in the CLA- T-cell subset in psoriatic patients (P < 0.01) and controls; both subsets proliferated to GAS, in each group. These findings suggest a differential modulation of specific tissue homing receptors on T cells by GAS in psoriasis.

  14. Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoite Antigen: Expression by Infectious Recombinant Vaccinia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Godson, G. Nigel; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.; Barnwell, John; Moss, Bernard

    1984-04-01

    The gene coding for the circumsporozoite antigen of the malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under the control of a defined vaccinia virus promoter. Cells infected with the recombinant virus synthesized polypeptides of 53,000 to 56,000 daltons that reacted with monoclonal antibody against the repeating epitope of the malaria protein. Furthermore, rabbits vaccinated with the recombinant virus produced antibodies that bound specifically to sporozoites. These data provide evidence for expression of a cloned malaria gene in mammalian cells and illustrate the potential of vaccinia virus recombinants as live malaria vaccines.

  15. Immunologic ignorance of vascular endothelial cells expressing minor histocompatibility antigen.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Beatrice; Krebs, Philippe; Tian, Yinghua; Engeler, Daniel; Scandella, Elke; Miller, Simone; Palmer, Douglas C; Restifo, Nicholas P; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2008-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) presenting minor histocompatibility antigen (mhAg) are major target cells for alloreactive effector CD8(+) T cells during chronic transplant rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The contribution of ECs to T-cell activation, however, is still a controversial issue. In this study, we have assessed the antigen-presenting capacity of ECs in vivo using a transgenic mouse model with beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) expression confined to the vascular endothelium (Tie2-LacZ mice). In a GVHD-like setting with adoptive transfer of beta-gal-specific T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, beta-gal expression by ECs was not sufficient to either activate or tolerize CD8(+) T cells. Likewise, transplantation of fully vascularized heart or liver grafts from Tie2-LacZ mice into nontransgenic recipients did not suffice to activate beta-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells, indicating that CD8(+) T-cell responses against mhAg cannot be initiated by ECs. Moreover, we could show that spontaneous activation of beta-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells in Tie2-LacZ mice was exclusively dependent on CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs), demonstrating that mhAgs presented by ECs remain immunologically ignored unless presentation by DCs is granted.

  16. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  17. Human leukocyte antigen-E alleles and expression in patients with serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lu, Renquan; Xie, Suhong; Wen, Xuemei; Wang, Hongling; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) is one of the most extensively studied non-classical MHC class I molecules that is almost non-polymorphic. Only two alleles (HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*0103) are found in worldwide populations, and suggested to be functional differences between these variants. The HLA-E molecule can contribute to the escape of cancer cells from host immune surveillance. However, it is still unknown whether HLA-E gene polymorphisms might play a role in cancer immune escape. To explore the association between HLA-E alleles and the susceptibility to serous ovarian cancer (SOC), 85 primary SOC patients and 100 healthy women were enrolled. Here, we indicated that high frequency of HLA-E*0103 allele existed in SOC patients by the allele-specific quantitative real-time PCR method. The levels of HLA-E protein expression in SOC patients with the HLA-E*0103 allele were higher than those with the HLA-E*0101 allele using immunohistochemistry analysis. The cell surface expression and functional differences between the two alleles were verified by K562 cells transfected with HLA-E*0101 or HLA-E*0103 allelic heavy chains. The HLA-E*0103 allele made the transfer of the HLA-E molecule to the cell surface easier, and HLA-E/peptides complex more stable. These differences ultimately influenced the function of natural killer cells, showing that the cells transfected with HLA-E*0103 allele inhibited natural killer cells to lysis. This study reveals a novel mechanism regarding the susceptibility to SOC, which is correlated with the HLA-E*0103 allele. PMID:25711417

  18. Genetic regulation of variable Vi antigen expression in a strain of Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Snellings, N J; Johnson, E M; Kopecko, D J; Collins, H H; Baron, L S

    1981-02-01

    Certain strains of the genus Citrobacter exhibit a variable expression of the Vi surface antigen that appears to involve a special mechanism for regulation of gene expression. Two nonlinked chromosomal loci, viaA and viaB, are known to determine nonvariable Vi antigen expression in strains of Salmonella. To confirm the presence of analogous loci in Citrobacter and to ascertain whether either of them is involved in variable Vi antigen expression in this organism, donor strains were constructed from Citrobacter freundii WR7004 and used to transfer their Vi antigen-determining genes to ViaA- and ViaB- Salmonella typhi recipient strains. Vi antigen expression in C. freundii was found to be controlled by loci analogous to the Salmonella via genes. S. typhi recipients of the C. freundii viaA+ genes were restored to the full, continuous expression of the Vi antigen normally seen in S. typhi. Thus, the C. freundii viaA genes appeared to play no role in the variable expression of the Vi antigen. In contrast, S. typhi recipients of the C. freundii viaB+ genes exhibited the rapid, reversible alternation between full Vi antigen expression and markedly reduced Vi antigen expression that was seen to occur in the C. freundii parent. The C. freundii viaB locus was thus identified as the one whose genes are regulated so as to produce variable Vi antigen expression. Genes determining another C. freundii surface antigen, the synthesis of which is not affected by the mechanism regulating Vi expression, were coinherited with the C. freundii viaB+ genes. An invertible, insertion sequence element located within the C. freundii viaB locus is proposed to account for the regulation of variable Vi antigen expression.

  19. JC Virus T-Antigen Expression in Anal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Sonia; Deveraj, Bikash; Miyai, Katsumi; Luo, Linda; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay; Carethers, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Anal carcinoma is thought driven by HPV infection through interrupting function of cell regulatory proteins such as p53 and pRb. JCV expresses a T-antigen (T-Ag) that causes malignant transformation through development of aneuploidy and interaction with some of the same regulatory proteins as HPV. JCV T-Ag is present in brain, gastric and colon malignancies, but has not been evaluated in anal cancers. We examined a cohort of anal cancers for JCV T-Ag and correlated this with clinicopathologic data. Methods Archived anal carcinomas were analyzed for JCV T-Ag expression. DNA from tumor and normal tissue was sequenced for JCV with viral copies determined by qPCR and Southern blotting. HPV and MSI status was correlated with JCV T-Ag expression. Results Of 21 cases of anal cancer (mean age 49 years, 38% female), 12 (57%) were in HIV-positive individuals. All 21 cancers expressed JCV T-Ag, including 9 HPV-negative specimens. More JCV copies were present in cancer vs. surrounding normal tissue (mean 32.54 copies/μg DNA vs. 2.98 copies/μg DNA, P=0.0267). There was no correlation between disease stage and viral copies, nor between viral copies and HIV-positive or -negative status (28.7 vs. 36.34 copies/μg DNA, respectively, P=0.7804). In subset analysis, we found no association between JCV T-Ag expression and HPV or MSI status. Conclusions Anal carcinomas uniformly express JCV T-Ag and contain more viral copies compared to surrounding normal tissue. JCV and its T-Ag oncogenic protein, presumably through interruption of cell regulatory proteins, may play a role in anal cancer pathogenesis. PMID:24048785

  20. Ontogeny of pig discrete Peyer's patches: expression of surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Makala, L H; Kamada, T; Nagasawa, H; Igarashi, I; Fujisaki, K; Suzuki, N; Mikami, T; Haverson, K; Bailey, M; Stokes, C R; Bland, P W

    2001-06-01

    Leukocyte populations present in the discrete Peyer's patches (PP) of the pig were characterized from birth (Day 0) to day 35 after birth by immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Immediately after birth, cell membrane expression of CD2 and CD3, major histocompatibilty complex (MHC) class 11 (both SLA (swine leukocyte antigen) -DQ+ and SLA-DR+), CD21, 74-22-15 and surface immunoglobulin (sIg) were all demonstrable. Computer assisted morphometric techniques were used to confirm the significant expansion of these cell populations from birth onwards. The distribution of the cell types was not random but suggested a preferential retention of cells at specific sites. This implies a degree of organization of immunological cells within the discrete PP, enhancing the potential to mount immune responses in the most efficient manner.

  1. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma Prevents Lung Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhengwang; Li, Lei; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Cao, Wenjiao; Xu, Yunfei; Song, Dianwen; Yang, Xinghai; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The poor survival rate is largely due to the extensive local invasion and metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells remain largely elusive. In this study, we examined the role of preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) in lung cancer metastasis. Our results show that PRAME is downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma and lung bone metastasis compared with normal human lung. Knockdown of PRAME decreases the expression of E-Cadherin and promotes the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of lung cancer cells by regulating multiple critical genes, most of which are related to cell migration, including MMP1, CCL2, CTGF, and PLAU. Clinical data analysis reveals that the expression of MMP1 correlates with the clinical features and outcome of lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PRAME plays a role in preventing the invasion and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma and novel diagnostic or therapeutic strategies can be developed by targeting PRAME. PMID:27391090

  2. Surface antigen expression and complement susceptibility of differentiated neuroblastoma clones.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Caragine, T; Cheung, N K; Tomlinson, S

    2000-03-01

    Human neuroblastoma cell lines typically consist of heterogenous subpopulations of cells that are morphologically and biochemically distinct. The cell types are characterized as neuroblastic (N-type), substrate-adherent Schwann-like (S-type), or intermediate (I). These cell types can undergo spontaneous or induced transdifferentiation in vitro. We investigated the complement sensitivity of different neuroblastoma cell lines and of matched sets of cloned N- and S-type neuroblastoma cell lines. Human neuroblastoma cell lines that consisted predominantly of a neuroblastic phenotype were shown to be significantly more susceptible to human complement-mediated lysis than cell lines of other cancer types. Complement sensitivity of neuroblastoma cell lines was correlated with low levels of CD59, decay-accelerating factor, and membrane cofactor protein expression. We found that cloned S-type neuroblastoma cells were much more resistant to complement-mediated lysis than cloned N-type cells. The increased complement resistance of S-type cells was shown to be due to increased expression of membrane-bound complement inhibitors. CD59 was the single most important protein in providing S-type cells with protection from complement lysis. S-type cells were also found to express lower levels of GD2, a target antigen for a complement activating monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials for neuroblastoma immunotherapy. The ability of S-type cells to evade complement, and the ability of S-type cells to differentiate into the more tumorigenic N-type cells, may represent a mechanism of tumor survival and regrowth, a phenomenon often observed with this cancer.

  3. Human erythrocyte antigens. Regulation of expression of a novel erythrocyte surface antigen by the inhibitor Lutheran In(Lu) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Telen, M J; Eisenbarth, G S; Haynes, B F

    1983-01-01

    Our study describes a novel human erythrocyte protein antigen, the expression of which is regulated by the rare Lutheran inhibitor In(Lu) gene. We have produced a monoclonal antibody (A3D8) that bound strongly to erythrocytes from subjects with Lutheran phenotypes Lu(a+b+), Lu(a+b-), and Lu(a-b+) but bound negligibly to erythrocytes from subjects with the dominant form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype, reflecting inheritance of the In(Lu) gene. Importantly, erythrocytes from an individual with the recessive form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype (i.e., absence of the In(Lu) gene and absence of genes encoding for Lutheran antigens) showed reactivity with A3D8 antibody comparable to that seen with Lu(a+) or Lu(b+) erythrocytes. A3D8 antigen activity was also found on all leukocytes and in serum and plasma; this activity also appeared to be regulated by the In(Lu) gene in serum, plasma, and on a subset of leukocytes. Thus, we have identified a human erythrocyte protein whose expression is modified by the In(Lu) gene. This knowledge that such an antigen exists on erythrocytes and in normal plasma should allow further studies into the molecular genetics of the In(Lu) gene and into the functional and structural significance of the A3D8 antigen. PMID:6863545

  4. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment. PMID:26297626

  5. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment.

  6. Protective antigens against glanders identified by expression library immunization.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Gregory C; Robida, Mark D; Judy, Barbara M; Qazi, Omar; Brown, Katherine A; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Taylor, Katherine; Massey, Shane; Loskutov, Andrey; Borovkov, Alex Y; Brown, Kevin; Cano, Jose A; Torres, Alfredo G; Estes, D Mark; Sykes, Kathryn F

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens' proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine.

  7. Protective Antigens Against Glanders Identified by Expression Library Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Gregory C.; Robida, Mark D.; Judy, Barbara M.; Qazi, Omar; Brown, Katherine A.; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Taylor, Katherine; Massey, Shane; Loskutov, Andrey; Borovkov, Alex Y.; Brown, Kevin; Cano, Jose A.; Magee, D. Mitchell; Torres, Alfredo G.; Estes, D. Mark; Sykes, Kathryn F.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens’ proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine. PMID:22125550

  8. Universal artificial antigen presenting cells to selectively propagate T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor independent of specificity.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-05-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to nonviral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through coculture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed 1 ligand that could activate CAR T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated that CARL aAPC propagate CAR T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Using CARL enables 1 aAPC to numerically expand all CAR T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  9. Universal Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells to Selectively Propagate T Cells Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Independent of Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, David; Jena, Bipulendu; Olivares, Simon; Maiti, Sourindra; Briggs, Neima; Somanchi, Srinivas; Dai, Jianliang; Lee, Dean; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    T cells genetically modified to stably express immunoreceptors are being assessed for therapeutic potential in clinical trials. T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) are endowed with a new specificity to target tumor-associated antigen (TAA) independent of major histocompatibility complex. Our approach to non-viral gene transfer in T cells uses ex vivo numeric expansion of CAR+ T cells on irradiated artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) bearing the targeted TAA. The requirement for aAPC to express a desired TAA limits the human application of CARs with multiple specificities when selective expansion through co-culture with feeder cells is sought. As an alternative to expressing individual TAAs on aAPC, we expressed one ligand that could activate CAR+ T cells for sustained proliferation independent of specificity. We expressed a CAR ligand (designated CARL) that binds the conserved IgG4 extracellular domain of CAR and demonstrated CARL+ aAPC propagate CAR+ T cells of multiple specificities. CARL avoids technical issues and costs associated with deploying clinical-grade aAPC for each TAA targeted by a given CAR. Employing CARL enables one aAPC to numerically expand all CAR+ T cells containing the IgG4 domain, and simplifies expansion, testing, and clinical translation of CAR+ T cells of any specificity. PMID:24714354

  10. Cell-type specific regulation of gene expression by simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Saenz-Robles, Maria Teresa; Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Patterson, William H.; Whitehead, Robert H.; Pipas, James M.

    2009-03-30

    SV40 transforms cells through the action of two oncoproteins, large T antigen and small t antigen. Small t antigen targets phosphatase PP2A, while large T antigen stimulates cell proliferation and survival by action on multiple proteins, including the tumor suppressors Rb and p53. Large T antigen also binds components of the transcription initiation complex and several transcription factors. We examined global gene expression in SV40-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts, and in enterocytes obtained from transgenic mice. SV40 transformation alters the expression of approximately 800 cellular genes in both systems. Much of this regulation is observed in both MEFs and enterocytes and is consistent with T antigen action on the Rb-E2F pathway. However, the regulation of many genes is cell-type specific, suggesting that unique signaling pathways are activated in different cell types upon transformation, and that the consequences of SV40 transformation depends on the type of cell targeted.

  11. Expression of four CEA family antigens (CEA, NCA, BGP and CGM2) in normal and cancerous gastric epithelial cells: up-regulation of BGP and CGM2 in carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, T; Kuroki, M; Takeo, H; Matsuo, Y; Ohshima, K; Yamashita, Y; Shirakusa, T; Matsuoka, Y

    1998-03-30

    Four human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family members, CEA (CD66e), non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA, CD66c), biliary glycoprotein (BGP, CD66a) and CEA gene-family member 2 (CGM2), are expressed in normal mucosal epithelia of the colon. Expression of BGP and CGM2 has recently been demonstrated to be down-regulated in colorectal adenocarcinomas. We have now investigated the expression of the 4 CEA family antigens in gastric adenocarcinoma and carcinoma cell lines in comparison with adjacent normal gastric mucosa. The transcripts of the CEA, NCA and BGP genes evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were detectable at various levels in all the gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines tested, while CGM2 mRNA was detectable in the cell lines of poorly differentiated but not of well-differentiated carcinomas. The levels of CEA mRNA in normal gastric mucosa were variable but mostly increased in adenocarcinomas. The sparse expression of NCA observed in the normal tissues was markedly up-regulated in the carcinomas. In contrast to previous findings on normal and cancerous colonic tissues, the transcripts of CGM2 were totally undetectable and those of BGP were recognized only marginally, if at all, in normal gastric mucosa, while both messages were detected at significant levels in most of the gastric adenocarcinomas. This was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Our findings indicate that expression of the CEA family antigens, particularly that of BGP and CGM2, is differently regulated in epithelial cells of the colon and the stomach.

  12. Production of recombinant botulism antigens: a review of expression systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, G M S G; Cunha, C E P; Salvarani, F M; Gonçalves, L A; Pires, P S; Conceição, F R; Lobato, F C F

    2014-08-01

    Botulism is a paralytic disease caused by intoxication with neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. Despite their similar mechanism of action, the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are classified in eight serotypes (A to H). As to veterinary medicine, the impact of this disease is essentially economic, since different species of production animals can be affected, especially by BoNT/C and D. In human health, botulism is feared in a possible biological warfare, what would involve mainly the BoNT/A, B, E and F. In both cases, the most effective way to deal with botulism is through prevention, which involves vaccination. However, the current vaccines against this disease have several drawbacks on their process of production and, besides this, can be dangerous to producers since it requires certain level of biosafety. This way, recombinant vaccines have been shown to be a great alternative for the development of vaccines against both animal and human botulism. All BoNTs have a 50-kDa light chain (LC) and a 100-kDa heavy chain (HC). The latter one presents two domains of 50 kDa, called the N-terminal (HN) and C-terminal (HC) halves. Among these regions, the HC alone seem to confer the proper immune response against intoxication. Since innumerous studies describe the expression of these distinct regions using different systems, strategies, and protocols, it is difficult to define the best option for a viable vaccine production. Thereby, the present review describes the problematic of botulism and discusses the main advances for the viable production of vaccines for both human and veterinary medicine using recombinant antigens.

  13. Production of recombinant botulism antigens: a review of expression systems.

    PubMed

    Moreira, G M S G; Cunha, C E P; Salvarani, F M; Gonçalves, L A; Pires, P S; Conceição, F R; Lobato, F C F

    2014-08-01

    Botulism is a paralytic disease caused by intoxication with neurotoxins produced by Clostridium botulinum. Despite their similar mechanism of action, the botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are classified in eight serotypes (A to H). As to veterinary medicine, the impact of this disease is essentially economic, since different species of production animals can be affected, especially by BoNT/C and D. In human health, botulism is feared in a possible biological warfare, what would involve mainly the BoNT/A, B, E and F. In both cases, the most effective way to deal with botulism is through prevention, which involves vaccination. However, the current vaccines against this disease have several drawbacks on their process of production and, besides this, can be dangerous to producers since it requires certain level of biosafety. This way, recombinant vaccines have been shown to be a great alternative for the development of vaccines against both animal and human botulism. All BoNTs have a 50-kDa light chain (LC) and a 100-kDa heavy chain (HC). The latter one presents two domains of 50 kDa, called the N-terminal (HN) and C-terminal (HC) halves. Among these regions, the HC alone seem to confer the proper immune response against intoxication. Since innumerous studies describe the expression of these distinct regions using different systems, strategies, and protocols, it is difficult to define the best option for a viable vaccine production. Thereby, the present review describes the problematic of botulism and discusses the main advances for the viable production of vaccines for both human and veterinary medicine using recombinant antigens. PMID:24930432

  14. Flow cytometric determination of the frequency and heterogeneity of expression of human melanoma-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Berd, D; Herlyn, M; Koprowski, H; Mastrangelo, M J

    1989-12-01

    We used flow cytometry to measure the expression of human melanoma antigens on cell suspensions dissociated from metastatic masses. The objective was to study the heterogeneity between tumor samples from different patients and between different tumors excised from a single patient. Fifty-three metastases excised from 34 melanoma patients were analyzed with a panel of nine murine monoclonal antibodies (MOABs). Melanoma cells were stained by an indirect fluorescent method and analyzed on a Coulter EPICS C flow cytometer after gating to exclude tumor-infiltrating leukocytes and dead cells. The most consistently and most strongly expressed antigen was the high-molecular-weight proteoglycan (detected by the MOAB 9.2.27), which was expressed on 95% of the melanoma specimens and by a high proportion of cells within each specimen (mean +/- SE, 79.2 +/- 5.5). However, strong expression of this antigen was limited to melanoma cells that had been dissociated mechanically and was markedly diminished by exposure to collagenase. Culture of collagenase-dissociated tumor cells for 24 to 48 h resulted in reexpression of the antigen. The expression of other melanoma-associated antigens was not affected by collagenase treatment, but for these antigens there was more variability between cells from an individual tumor and between tumors from different patients. The percentage of enzyme-dissociated tumors considered positive for MOAB binding (defined as at least 10% of cells positive) and the mean +/- SE of the percentage of positive cells within a tumor were as follows: MOAB ME-9-61 (antigen, p97) = 84% + (41.2 +/- 5.4%); MOAB ME-20.4 (antigen, nerve growth factor receptor) = 40% + (18.7 +/- 5.1%); MOAB ME-24 (antigen, ganglioside GD3) = 84% + (50.8 +/- 4.8%); MOAB ME-311 (antigen, ganglioside 9-O-acetyl-GD3) = 76% + (42.5 +/- 5.1%); MOAB ME-361 (antigen, mainly ganglioside GD2) = 3% + (1.9 +/- 0.8%); MOAB 3F8 (antigen, ganglioside GD2) = 36% (10.5 +/- 3.8%); MOAB 14G2a (antigen

  15. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei.

  16. Expression of Human Herpesvirus-6 Antigens in Benign and Malignant Lymphoproliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Garber, Richard; Maiorana, Antonio; Bonacorsi, Goretta; Artusi, Tullio; Trovato, Raffaella; Marasca, Roberto; Torelli, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to look for the expression of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) antigens in a well characterized series of benign, atypical, and malignant lymphoid lesions, which tested positive for the presence of HHV-6 DNA. A panel of specific antibodies against HHV-6 antigens, characteristic either of the early (p41) or late (p101K, gp106, and gp116) phases of the viral cycle, was applied to the lymphoid tissues from 15 non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, 14 Hodgkin’s disease cases, 5 angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathies with dysproteinemia, 14 reactive lymphadenopathies, and 2 cases of sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease). In lymphomatous tissues, the expression of late antigens was documented only in reactive cells, and mainly in plasma cells. Of interest, the expression of the early p41 antigen was detected in the so-called “mummified” Reed-Sternberg cells, in two Hodgkin’s disease cases. In reactive lymphadenopathies, the HHV-6 late antigen-expressing cells were plasma cells, histiocytes, and rare granulocytes distributed in interfollicular areas. In both cases of Rosai-Dorfman disease, the p101K showed an intense staining in follicular dendritic cells of germinal centers, whereas the gp106 exhibited an intense cytoplasmic reaction in the abnormal histiocytes, which represent the histological hallmark of the disease. The expression of HHV-6 antigens is tightly controlled in lymphoid tissues. The lack of HHV-6 antigen expression in neoplastic cells and the limited expression in degenerating Reed-Sternberg cells argue against a major pathogenetic role of the virus in human lymphomagenesis. The detection of a rather unique pattern of viral late antigen expression in Rosai-Dorfman disease suggests a possible pathogenetic involvement of HHV-6 in some cases of this rare lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:9736030

  17. Posttranscriptional control is a strong factor enabling exclusive expression of surface antigens in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Marker, Simone; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2006-01-01

    Variable antigens are large proteins located on the outer membrane of parasitic but also of free-living protists. Multigene families encoding surface antigens demonstrate an exclusive expression of proteins. The resulting presence of just one protein species on the cell surface is required for surface antigen function; therefore, the molecular mechanism of exclusive expression is of main interest. Regulation of gene expression and mechanisms establishing switching of antigens are hardly understood in any organism. Here we report on the reaction of Paramecium to the artificial knock down of surface antigen 51A expression by bacteria-mediated RNAi. This technique involves the feeding of dsRNA-producing bacteria. We analyzed different fragments of the target gene for dsRNA template regarding their specific knock down efficiency and found great differences. Treatment of Paramecia with RNAi against the 51A antigen demonstrated that although a massive amount of mRNA was present, the protein was not detected on the cell surface. Moreover, a minor abundance of 51D transcripts resulted in an exclusive presence of 51D proteins on the cell surface. This posttranscriptional regulation was confirmed by the transcript ratio (51A/51D) determined by real-time (RT) PCR of single cells. Because we were able to document unexclusive transcription also in wild-type cells our results indicate that this posttranscriptional regulation is a main factor of enabling exclusive gene expression. The comparison of serotype shifts, caused by efficient and inefficient knock down, indicates an involvement of full-length transcripts in regulation of gene expression. Thus, our study gives new insights into the mechanism of exclusive expression on the molecular level: (i) exclusive transcription does not occur, (ii) posttranscriptional regulation is a powerful factor enabling exclusive antigen expression, and (iii) surface antigen mRNA is shown to be involved in this mechanism in a regulating way.

  18. Expression of the human mucosal lymphocyte antigen, HML-1, by T cells activated with mitogen or specific antigen in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brew, R; West, D C; Burthem, J; Christmas, S E

    1995-06-01

    Expression of the human mucosal lymphocyte antigen, HML-1 (CD103), recently identified as a novel alpha E beta 7 integrin, was studied on peripheral blood lymphocytes activated with mitogen or specific antigen. HML-1 was up-regulated on PHA activated T-lymphoblasts cultured in 100IU/ml interleukin-2 (IL-2), reaching a peak of > 50% positive cells at day 7, and expression was maintained at this level throughout the 28-day culture period. Following a transient decrease in the percentage of L-selectin cells, expression of this molecule was maintained on most PHA T-lymphoblasts. Cells activated by purified protein derivative of M. tuberculosis (PPD) or in mixed lymphocyte culture also up-regulated and maintained HML-1 expression for 14 days. In contrast, in all cases the percentage of CD25+ cells rose initially but subsequently declined over the same time periods. When freshly isolated cells from tonsil, spleen, mesenteric lymph node and lung were analysed, only lung contained significant numbers (39 +/- 6%) of HML-1+ cells. In both freshly isolated and activated cell populations the great majority of HML-1+ cells co-expressed CD8 although some HML-1+ CD8- cells were also present. Production of TGF-beta 1 peaked early during T-lymphoblast and MLR cultures and was not related to induction of HML-1 expression. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that the HML-1 molecule expressed on 10-day PHA T-lymphoblasts was indistinguishable from that found on intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and that no alpha 4 beta 7 integrin was expressed by these cells. Although HML-1 expression is essentially restricted to mucosal leucocytes in vivo, these experiments show that it is readily induced and maintained along with co-expression of L-selectin following CD8+ T-lymphocyte activation in vitro.

  19. Expression and characterization of a parasite-specific antigen on macrophages after infection with Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Basu, N; Kole, L; Ghosh, A; Das, P K

    1994-03-16

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody to crude soluble antigen of Leishmania donovani promastigotes recognized a determinant expressed on the surface membrane of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human monocyte derived macrophages infected in vitro. The determinant was recognized on infected macrophage surface only when F(ab')2 fragments of anti-leishmanial antiserum was employed in immunofluorescence. F(ab')2 fragments of human patient sera also could recognize the determinant. The expression of this antigen was not stage-specific for the parasite. Immunochemical analyses revealed this antigen to be of 51 kDa protein. Specific leaching of membrane proteins by trypsin showed three bands of expressed antigens of 26, 11 and 10 kDa, which in all likelihood might be arising from the 51 kDa antigen. The antigen was not expressed until 12 h of post infection, reached a maximum level at 24 h and thereafter attained a steady state level as studied upto 96 h of post infection. This type of antigen might have a great potential in immunodiagnostics and site-specific drug targeting. PMID:8078503

  20. IRF-1 regulates alternative mRNA splicing of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) in breast epithelial cells generating an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) containing isoform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a master regulator of IFN-γ induced gene transcription. Previously we have shown that IRF-1 transcriptionally induces CEACAM1 via an ISRE (Interferon-Stimulated Response Element) in its promoter. CEACAM1 pre-mRNA undergoes extensive alternative splicing (AS) generating isoforms to produce either a short (S) cytoplasmic domain expressed primarily in epithelial cells or as an ITIM-containing long (L) isoform in immune cells. Methods The transcriptional and molecular mechanism of CEACAM1 minigenes AS containing promoter ISREs mutations in the breast epithelial, MDA-MB-468, cell line was detected using flow cytometry. In addition, transcriptome sequencing was utilized to determine whether IRF-1 could direct the AS of other genes as well. Tumor xenografts were used to evaluate CEACAM1 isoform expression on the leading edge of breast tumor cells. Results In the present study, we provide evidence that CEACAM1’s promoter and variable exon 7 cross-talk allowing IRF-1 to direct AS events. Transcriptome sequencing shows that IRF-1 can also induce the global AS of genes involved in regulation of growth and differentiation as well as genes of the cytokine family. Furthermore, MDA-MB-468 cells grown as tumor xenografts exhibit an AS switch to the L-isoform of CEACAM1, demonstrating that an in vivo inflammatory milieu is also capable of generating the AS switch, similar to that found in human breast cancers Mol Cancer 7:46, 2008. Conclusions The novel AS regulatory activities attributed to IRF-1 indicate that the IFN-γ response involves a global change in both gene transcription and AS in breast epithelial cells. PMID:24650050

  1. Cancer-testis antigen expression in digestive tract carcinomas: frequent expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and its precursor lesions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Tseng; Panarelli, Nicole C; Piotti, Kathryn C; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2014-05-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are attractive tumor antigens for cancer immunotherapy. They comprise a group of proteins normally expressed in germ cells and aberrantly activated in a variety of human cancers. The protein expression of eight cancer-testis antigens [MAGEA, NY-ESO-1, GAGE, MAGEC1 (CT7), MAGEC2 (CT10), CT45, SAGE1, and NXF2] was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 61 esophageal carcinomas (40 adenocarcinoma and 21 squamous cell carcinoma), 50 gastric carcinomas (34 diffuse and 16 intestinal type), and 141 colorectal carcinomas. The highest frequency of expression was found in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas: Positive staining for MAGEA, CT45, CT7, SAGE1, GAGE, NXF2, NY-ESO-1, and CT10 was observed in 57%, 38%, 33%, 33%, 29%, 29%, 19%, and 14% of squamous cell carcinomas, respectively. Similar staining patterns were observed in squamous dysplasias. Expression frequencies of cancer-testis antigens were seen in 2% to 24% of gastroesophageal adenocarcinomas and were not significantly different between adenocarcinomas of the stomach versus the esophagus, or between diffuse and intestinal types of gastric adenocarcinomas. Colorectal cancers did not express NY-ESO-1, CT7, CT10, or GAGE, and only infrequently expressed SAGE1 (0.7%) MAGEA (1.4%), CT45 (3.5%), and NXF2 (8.5%). We conclude that cancer-testis antigens are frequently expressed in esophageal squamous neoplasms. Although cancer-testis antigens are generally considered to be expressed later in tumor progression, they are found in squamous dysplasias, suggesting a potential diagnostic role for cancer-testis antigens in the evaluation of premalignant squamous lesions.

  2. Novel methods for expression of foreign antigens in live vector vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Harley, Regina H.; Galen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial live vector vaccines represent a vaccine development strategy that offers exceptional flexibility. In this approach, genes encoding protective antigens of unrelated bacterial, viral or parasitic pathogens are expressed in an attenuated bacterial vaccine strain that delivers these foreign antigens to the immune system, thereby eliciting relevant immune responses. Rather than expressing these antigens using low copy expression plasmids, here we pursue expression of foreign proteins from the live vector chromosome. Our strategy is designed to compensate for the inherent disadvantage of loss of gene dosage (vs. plasmid-based expression) by integrating antigen-encoding gene cassettes into multiple chromosomal sites already inactivated in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine candidate. We tested expression of a cassette encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) integrated separately into native guaBA, htrA or clyA chromosomal loci. Using single integrations, we show that expression levels of GFPuv are significantly affected by the site of integration, regardless of the inclusion of additional strong promoters within the incoming cassette. Using cassettes integrated into both guaBA and htrA, we observe cumulative synthesis levels from two integration sites superior to single integrations. Most importantly, we observe that GFPuv expression increases in a growth phase-dependent manner, suggesting that foreign antigen synthesis may be “tuned” to the physiology of the live vaccine. We expect this novel platform expression technology to prove invaluable in the development of a wide variety of multivalent live vector vaccines, capable of expressing multiple antigens from both chromosomal and plasmid-based expression systems within a single strain. PMID:23406777

  3. Expression and immunogenicity of novel subunit enterovirus 71 VP1 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Juan; Wang, Shixia; Gan, Weihua; Zhang, Wenhong; Ju, Liwen; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EV71 is a major emerging infectious disease in many Asian countries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivated EV71 vaccines are in clinical studies but their safety and efficacy are unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developing subunit based EV71 vaccines is significant and novel antigen design is needed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA immunization is an efficient tool to test the immunogenicity of VP1 based EV71 vaccines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple VP1 antigens are developed showing immunogenic potential. -- Abstract: Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common viral illness in young children. HFMD is caused by viruses belonging to the enterovirus genus of the picornavirus family. Recently, enterovirus 71 (EV71) has emerged as a virulent agent for HFMD with severe clinical outcomes. In the current report, we conducted a pilot antigen engineering study to optimize the expression and immunogenicity of subunit VP1 antigen for the design of EV71 vaccines. DNA immunization was adopted as a simple technical approach to test different designs of VP1 antigens without the need to express VP1 protein in vitro first. Our studies indicated that the expression and immunogenicity of VP1 protein can be improved with alternated VP1 antigen designs. Data presented in the current report revealed novel pathways to optimize the design of VP1 antigen-based EV71 vaccines.

  4. Enhanced antigen-presenting capacity of cultured Langerhans' cells is associated with markedly increased expression of Ia antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, S.; Caughman, S.W.; Sharrow, S.O.; Stephany, D.; Katz, S.I.

    1987-10-15

    Recent studies indicate that when epidermal Langerhans' cells (LC) are cultured for 2 to 3 days they, in comparison to freshly prepared LC, exhibit markedly enhanced ability to stimulate T cell proliferative responses in oxidative mitogenesis and in the mixed epidermal-leukocyte reaction. In this study, we determined whether cultured LC enhance antigen-specific T cell responses, and whether such enhanced stimulatory capacity correlates with the level of Ia antigen expressed on LC. We used C3H/He (Iak) epidermal cells as stimulators and, as responder cells, both the trinitrophenyl-specific clones D8 and SE4, which were assayed for (/sup 3/H)dThd incorporation, and the pigeon cytochrome c specific hybridoma 2C2, which was assayed for interleukin 2 production. Cultured LC induced 10 to 100 times greater proliferation or interleukin 2 production by responder cells than did freshly prepared LC. The intensity of I-Ak and I-Ek, expressed on cultured LC as assessed by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, was found to be 10 to 36 times greater on a per cell basis than that on freshly prepared LC. Depletion of LC from fresh epidermal cell suspensions by anti-Iak and complement or treatment with 50 mJ/cm/sup 2/ medium range ultraviolet light or cycloheximide before culture abrogated both the increase in Ia expression and antigen-specific clonal proliferation. The results suggest that when LC are removed from their usual epidermal milieu, they express increased amounts of Ia and become more potent stimulators of T cell responses.

  5. Impaired Tumor Antigen Processing by Immunoproteasome-expressing CD40-Activated B cells and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen S.; Zeng, Wanyong; Sasada, Tetsuro; Su, Mei; Choi, Jaewon; Drakoulakos, Donna; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Brusic, Vladimir; Wu, Catherine; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2012-01-01

    Professional APCs, such as dendritic cells, are routinely used in vitro for the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for tumor antigens. In addition to dendritic cells, CD40-activated B cells and variant K562 leukemic cells can be readily transfected with nucleic acids for in vitro and in vivo antigen presentation. However, the expression of immunoproteasome components in dendritic cells may preclude display of tumor antigens such as Mart1/MelanA. Here, we use three target epitopes, two derived from tumor antigens [Mart126–34 (M26) and Cyp1B1239–247 (Cyp239)] and one derived from the Influenza A viral antigen [FluM158–66 (FluM58)], to demonstrate that CD40-activated B cells, like dendritic cells, have a limited capability to process certain tumor antigens. In contrast, the K562 HLA-A*0201 transfectant efficiently processes and presents M26 and Cyp239 as well as the influenza FluM58 epitopes to T cells. These results demonstrate that the choice of target APC for gene transfer of tumor antigens may be limited by the relative efficacy of proteasome components to process certain tumor epitopes. Importantly, K562 can be exploited as an artificial APC, efficient in processing both M26 and Cyp239 epitopes and presumably, by extension, other relevant tumor antigens. PMID:21400024

  6. Expression of PCV2 antigen in the ovarian tissues of gilts.

    PubMed

    Tummaruk, Padet; Pearodwong, Pachara

    2016-03-01

    The present study was performed to determine the expression of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) antigen in the ovarian tissue of naturally infected gilts. Ovarian tissues were obtained from 11 culled gilts. The ovarian tissues sections were divided into two groups according to PCV2 DNA detection using PCR. PCV2 antigen was assessed in the paraffin embedded ovarian tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. A total of 2,131 ovarian follicles (i.e., 1,437 primordial, 133 primary, 353 secondary and 208 antral follicles), 66 atretic follicles and 131 corpora lutea were evaluated. It was found that PCV2 antigen was detected in 280 ovarian follicles (i.e., 239 primordial follicles, 12 primary follicles, 10 secondary follicles and 19 antral follicles), 1 atretic follicles and 3 corpora lutea (P<0.05). PCV2 antigen was detected in primordial follicles more often than in secondary follicles, atretic follicles and corpora lutea (P<0.05). The detection of PCV2 antigen was found mainly in oocytes. PCV2 antigen was found in both PCV2 DNA positive and negative ovarian tissues. It can be concluded that PCV2 antigen is expressed in all types of the ovarian follicles and corpora lutea. Further studies should be carried out to determine the influence of PCV2 on porcine ovarian function and oocyte quality. PMID:26522687

  7. Expression of PCV2 antigen in the ovarian tissues of gilts

    PubMed Central

    TUMMARUK, Padet; PEARODWONG, Pachara

    2015-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine the expression of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) antigen in the ovarian tissue of naturally infected gilts. Ovarian tissues were obtained from 11 culled gilts. The ovarian tissues sections were divided into two groups according to PCV2 DNA detection using PCR. PCV2 antigen was assessed in the paraffin embedded ovarian tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. A total of 2,131 ovarian follicles (i.e., 1,437 primordial, 133 primary, 353 secondary and 208 antral follicles), 66 atretic follicles and 131 corpora lutea were evaluated. It was found that PCV2 antigen was detected in 280 ovarian follicles (i.e., 239 primordial follicles, 12 primary follicles, 10 secondary follicles and 19 antral follicles), 1 atretic follicles and 3 corpora lutea (P<0.05). PCV2 antigen was detected in primordial follicles more often than in secondary follicles, atretic follicles and corpora lutea (P<0.05). The detection of PCV2 antigen was found mainly in oocytes. PCV2 antigen was found in both PCV2 DNA positive and negative ovarian tissues. It can be concluded that PCV2 antigen is expressed in all types of the ovarian follicles and corpora lutea. Further studies should be carried out to determine the influence of PCV2 on porcine ovarian function and oocyte quality. PMID:26522687

  8. A role for multiple chimeric antigen receptor-expressing leukocytes in antigen-specific responses to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Carmen S.M.; John, Liza B.; Devaud, Christel; Prince, Miles H.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Trapani, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    While adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells can induce remission of some tumors, the role of other CAR-modified leukocytes is not well characterized. In this study, we characterize the function of leukocytes including natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages and CAR T cells from transgenic mice expressing a CAR under the control of the pan-hematopoietic promoter, vav, and determine the ability of these mice to respond to ERB expressing tumors. We demonstrate the anti-tumor functions of leukocytes, including antigen specific cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion. The adoptive transfer of CAR T cells provided a greater survival advantage in the E0771ERB tumor model than their wildtype (WT) counterparts. In addition, CAR NK cells and CAR T cells also mediated increased survival in the RMAERB tumor model. When challenged with Her2 expressing tumors, F38 mice were shown to mount an effective immune response, resulting in tumor rejection and long-term survival. This was shown to be predominantly dependent on both CD8+ T cells and NK cells. However, macrophages and CD4+ T cells were also shown to contribute to this response. Overall, this study highlights the use of the vav-CAR mouse model as a unique tool to determine the anti-tumor function of various immune subsets, either alone or when acting alongside CAR T cells in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27153556

  9. Lewis Antigen Expression by Helicobacter pylori Strains Colonizing Different Regions of the Stomach of Individual Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    González-Valencia, Gerardo; Muñoz-Perez, Leopoldo; Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres, Javier

    2008-01-01

    The diversity in the expression of Lewis antigens (Le) of 226 single colonies of Helicobacter pylori isolated from four regions of the stomach of eight adults is shown. Ley was expressed more in strains colonizing antrum than in strains colonizing fundus, whereas Lex was more common in fundus strains. cagA+ strains were more associated with Le-negative strains. PMID:18550746

  10. Human macrophages can express the Hodgkin's cell-associated antigen Ki-1 (CD30).

    PubMed Central

    Andreesen, R.; Brugger, W.; Löhr, G. W.; Bross, K. J.

    1989-01-01

    The normal precursor of the neoplastic cell in Hodgkin's lymphoma is still unknown. Previous reports on the expression of the Hodgkin's cell-associated antigen Ki-1, CD30, on normal cells have been limited to activated lymphocytes. This study demonstrates, however, that cells of the macrophage lineage also are able to express the Ki-1 antigen. The Ki-1 antigen is absent from normal blood monocytes but expressed on up to 85% of macrophage-type cells developed during subsequent in vitro differentiation on Teflon membranes. Unlike other maturation-associated antigens, Ki-1 is found only at late stages of the macrophage primary cultures. Its expression can be enhanced by human interferon-gamma in a fashion similar to that of HLA-DR molecules. In addition, freshly explanted tumor cells from three patients with histopathologic and clinical features consistent with the diagnosis of true histiocytic lymphoma or malignant histiocytosis as well as the permanent cell line SU-DHL-1 could be demonstrated to express the Ki-1 antigen. The phenotype of histiocytic malignancy was further evaluated to be HLA-DR+MAX.26+CD25+-EMA+OKT9+Ki-1+. The results could indicate either that Hodgkin's lymphoma may arise not only from the lymphocyte but also from the macrophage lineage or may emphasize a macrophage involvement in the pathogenesis of this disease. Images Figure 3 PMID:2536522

  11. Autologous tumor cells engineered to express bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Ramiya, Vijayakumar K; Jerald, Maya M; Lawman, Patricia D; Lawman, Michael J P

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapies are emerging as promising treatment modalities in the management of the disease. As a result, cancer vaccines are considered to be immensely crucial in preventing recurrence, a well-known nemesis in cancer patients because they have the potential to activate memory antitumor immunity. Due to poor antigenicity and self-tolerance, most tumor antigens require interventional vaccine therapies to provide an adequate "danger" signal to the immune system in order to activate a robust, clinically meaningful antitumor immunity. It has been postulated that this requirement may be achieved by providing bacterial and/or viral immunogens to prime this type of immune response. Briefly, we provide here a method of transfecting whole tumor cells with plasmid DNA encoding an immunogenic bacterial protein such as Emm55, which was derived from Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes). Subsequent inactivation of the transfected cells by irradiation (100 Gray) prevents replication. This type of whole-cell vaccine, e.g., ImmuneFx™, has demonstrated activity in a murine neuroblastoma model, in canine lymphoma patients with naturally occurring disease, and in many cancer types in companion animals. The protocols described in this chapter provide the necessary materials and methodologies to manufacture such a vaccine.

  12. Advances in Biomarkers: Going Beyond the Carcinoembryonic Antigen.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Nicole E; Peterson, Carrie Y

    2016-09-01

    Using biologically available markers to guide treatment decisions in colorectal cancer care is becoming increasingly common, though our understanding of these biomarkers is in its infancy. In this article, we will discuss how this area is rapidly changing, review important biomarkers being used currently, and explain how the results influence clinical decision-making. We will also briefly discuss the possibility of a liquid biopsy and explore several exciting and new options. PMID:27582644

  13. Regulation of human peripheral blood monocyte DR antigen expression in vitro by lymphokines and recombinant interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Sztein, M B; Steeg, P S; Johnson, H M; Oppenheim, J J

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro regulation of adult human monocyte DR antigen expression was studied. Normally about 75% of freshly obtained human peripheral blood monocytes express DR antigens as determined by anti-DR and complement-mediated cytotoxicity assays. DR expression on monocytes in unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures persisted to variable degrees for up to 5 d of incubation. However, when the mononuclear cells were thoroughly depleted of nonadherent cells, cultured monocytes consistently exhibited progressively decreased DR expression over 2-5 d of incubation. Readdition of nonadherent cells to the adherent cell population prevented or delayed this decrease in monocyte DR antigen expression. Thus, monocyte DR expression diminished markedly during in vitro incubation; however, the presence of nonadherent cells somehow interfered with this process. In other experiments, peripheral adherent monocytes, which had been cultured for 2-3 d to reduce their DR expression, could be induced to reexpress DR antigens after 2 d of incubation with unpurified lymphokine-containing culture supernatants, recombinant human interferon-alpha, or recombinant human gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). The reinduction of DR expression on human monocytes by lymphokines was abrogated by an antiserum produced to the synthetic N-terminal amino acids of human IFN-gamma, indicating that IFN-gamma is the active mediator in the lymphokine-containing preparations. Monocytes cultured with lymphokines or recombinant interferons also could initiate a significantly greater mixed lymphocyte response than control monocytes. Thus, IFN-gamma-containing lymphokines and recombinant interferons are required to induce human monocyte DR expression and accessory cell capacity in vitro, since in their absence monocytes become DR antigen-deficient. Finally, incubation of unfractionated human mononuclear cells with anti-human IFN-gamma also promoted the loss of monocyte DR expression. These findings suggest

  14. Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of a 200-Kilodalton Diagnostic Antigen of Babesia bigemina†

    PubMed Central

    Tebele, N.; Skilton, R. A.; Katende, J.; Wells, C. W.; Nene, V.; McElwain, T.; Morzaria, S. P.; Musoke, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Current serological tests for Babesia bigemina use semipurified merozoite antigens derived from infected erythrocytes. One of the major drawbacks of these tests is that antigen quality can vary from batch to batch. Since the quality of the antigen contributes to the sensitivity and specificity of serological tests, the use of standardized recombinant antigens should ensure consistency in assay quality. Previously, a 200-kDa merozoite antigen (p200) was identified as a candidate diagnostic antigen for use in a serological assay for the detection of B. bigemina antibodies in infected cattle. In this study, we have cloned, characterized, and expressed p200. A 3.5-kbp cDNA clone encoding p200 was isolated and shown to be almost full length, lacking approximately 300 bp at the 5′ end. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that p200 consists of a long, highly charged central repeat region of an uninterrupted α helix, indicative of a fibrous protein. Immunoelectron microscopy localized p200 to the merozoite cytoplasm, suggesting that the antigen may be a structural protein involved in forming filament structures within the cytoskeleton. The 3.5-kbp cDNA was expressed in bacteria as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST), but the yield was poor. To improve the yield, cDNA fragments encoding antigenic domains of p200 were expressed as fusions with GST. One of these fusion proteins, C1A-GST, is composed of a 7-kDa fragment of the p200 repeat region and contains epitopes that react strongly with sera from cattle experimentally infected with B. bigemina. Recombinant C1A-GST should permit the development of an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies against B. bigemina. PMID:10834983

  15. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jonathan Cy; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. PMID:27205882

  16. Cholera Toxin B Subunit as a Carrier Molecule Promotes Antigen Presentation and Increases CD40 and CD86 Expression on Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    George-Chandy, Annie; Eriksson, Kristina; Lebens, Michael; Nordström, Inger; Schön, Emma; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is an efficient mucosal carrier molecule for the generation of mucosal antibody responses and/or induction of systemic T-cell tolerance to linked antigens. CTB binds with high affinity to GM1 ganglioside cell surface receptors. In this study, we evaluated how conjugation of a peptide or protein antigen to CTB by chemical coupling or genetic fusion influences the T-cell-activating capacity of different antigen-presenting cell (APC) subsets. Using an in vitro system in which antigen-pulsed APCs were incubated with antigen-specific, T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, we found that the dose of antigen required for T-cell activation could be decreased >10,000-fold using CTB-conjugated compared to free antigen. In contrast, no beneficial effects were observed when CTB was simply admixed with antigen. CTB conjugation enhanced the antigen-presenting capacity not only of dendritic cells and B cells but also of macrophages, which expressed low levels of cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and were normally poor activators of naive T cells. Enhanced antigen-presenting activity by CTB-linked antigen resulted in both increased T-cell proliferation and increased interleukin-12 and gamma interferon secretion and was associated with up-regulation of CD40 and CD86 on the APC surface. These results imply that conjugation to CTB dramatically lowers the threshold concentration of antigen required for immune cell activation and also permits low-MHC II-expressing APCs to prime for a specific immune response. PMID:11500448

  17. Expression of I-A and I-E,C region-coded Ia antigens on functional B cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, J A; Hibbler, F J; Hill, S W

    1978-12-01

    Ia antigens from specific subregions have been examined on functional B cell populations. Expression of both I-A and I-E,C region antigens was demonstrated on cells required for both lipopolysaccharide mitogenesis and polyclonal activation. Similar I-A and I-E,C subregion expression was found on cells required for response to the T-independent antigen, polyvinylpyrrolidone. TNP-specific IgM and hen egg lysozyme-specific IgG plaque-forming cells also express I-A and I-E,C region antigens. No evidence was found for an Ia- population responsive in the systems tested. Further, no evidence of preferential expression of I-A or I-E,C region antigens was observed in any system examined. Therefore, it appears that B cells express both I-A and I-E,C region-coded Ia antigens.

  18. Multivalent Chromosomal Expression of the Clostridium botulinum Serotype A Neurotoxin Heavy-Chain Antigen and the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent toxins that cause severe disease in humans. New and improved vaccines are needed for both of these pathogens. For mucosal vaccine delivery using lactic acid bacteria, chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid-based expression systems, as chromosomal expression circumvents plasmid instability and the need for antibiotic pressure. In this study, we constructed three strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM expressing from the chromosome (i) the nontoxic host receptor-binding domain of the heavy chain of Clostridium botulinum serotype A neurotoxin (BoNT/A-Hc), (ii) the anthrax protective antigen (PA), and (iii) both the BoNT/A-Hc and the PA. The BoNT/A-Hc vaccine cassette was engineered to contain the signal peptide from the S-layer protein A from L. acidophilus and a dendritic-cell-targeting peptide. A chromosomal region downstream of lba0889 carrying a highly expressed enolase gene was selected for insertion of the vaccine cassettes. Western blot analysis confirmed the heterologous expression of the two antigens from plasmid and chromosome locations. Stability assays demonstrated loss of the vaccine cassettes from expression plasmids without antibiotic maintenance. RNA sequencing showed high expression of each antigen and that insertion of the vaccine cassettes had little to no effect on the transcription of other genes in the chromosome. This study demonstrated that chromosomal integrative recombinant strains are promising vaccine delivery vehicles when targeted into high-expression chromosomal regions. Levels of expression match high-copy-number plasmids and eliminate the requirement for antibiotic selective maintenance of recombinant plasmids. IMPORTANCE Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent neurotoxins that pose a biochemical warfare concern; therefore, effective vaccines against these bacteria are required. Chromosomal expression of antigens is

  19. Cellular gene expression induced by parasite antigens and allergens in neonates from parasite-infected mothers.

    PubMed

    Soboslay, Peter T; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Huang, Xiangsheng; Gille, Christian; Spring, Bärbel; Kocherscheidt, Lars; Agossou, Abram; Banla, Meba; Bonin, Michael; Köhler, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal exposure to parasite antigens or allergens will influence the profile and strength of postnatal immune responses, such contact may tolerize and increase susceptibility to future infections or sensitize to environmental allergens. Exposure in utero to parasite antigens will distinctly alter cellular gene expression in newborns. Gene microarrays were applied to study gene expression in umbilical cord blood cell (UCBC) from parasite-exposed (Para-POS) and non-exposed (Para-NEG) neonates. UCBC were activated with antigens of helminth (Onchocerca volvulus), amoeba (Entamoeba histolytica) or allergens of mite (Dermatophagoides farinae). When UCBC from Para-POS and Para-NEG newborns were exposed to helminth antigens or allergens consistent differences occurred in the expression of genes encoding for MHC class I and II alleles, signal transducers of activation and transcription (STATs), cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulin heavy and light chains, and molecules associated with immune regulation (SOCS, TLR, TGF), inflammation (TNF, CCR) and apoptosis (CASP). Expression of genes associated with innate immune responses were enhanced in Para-NEG, while in Para-POS, the expression of MHC class II and STAT genes was reduced. Within functional gene networks for cellular growth, proliferation and immune responses, Para-NEG neonates presented with significantly higher expression values than Para-POS. In Para-NEG newborns, the gene cluster and pathway analyses suggested that gene expression profiles may predispose for the development of immunological, hematological and dermatological disorders upon postnatal helminth parasite infection or allergen exposure. Thus, prenatal parasite contact will sensitize without generating aberrant inflammatory immune responses, and increased pro-inflammatory but decreased regulatory gene expression profiles will be present in those neonates lacking prenatal parasite antigen encounter. PMID:27062712

  20. Polymorphic Expression of a Human Superficial Bladder Tumor Antigen Defined by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradet, Yves; Islam, Nazrul; Boucher, Lucie; Parent-Vaugeois, Carmen; Tardif, Marc

    1987-10-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up.

  1. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Modulation of MUC1 and blood group antigen expression in gastric adenocarcinoma cells by cytokines.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Georg P M; Schirmacher, Peter; Manzke, Oliver; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Dienes, Hans P; Baldus, Stephan E

    2003-08-01

    Immunohistological studies demonstrated that MUC1 expression in gastric cancer is associated with a poor prognosis. As a mediator of cell-cell interactions, MUC1 may also be involved in metastasis. However, these aspects are of relevance since cytokine levels are locally increased as a consequence of peritumorous inflammatory response and coexisting chronic gastritis. Therefore we analyzed the potential influence of several cytokines on the expression of tumor-associated MUC1 and Lewis blood group antigens in gastric carcinoma cells. Gastric cancer cell lines AGS and KATOIII were incubated with the cytokines interleukin-1beta, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and hepatocyte growth factor over a period of 72 h. Expressions of mucin antigens and cytokine secretion were measured by immunocytochemistry and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) demonstrated that MUC1 and sialyl Lewis A reactivities of AGS cells were increased significantly following TNF-alpha stimulation but not by other cytokines. Expression of mucin-associated antigens by cell line KATOIII was not affected by any of the employed cytokines. These data provide evidence that TNF-alpha can raise the expression of important mucin peptide as well as mucin-associated carbohydrate antigens and thereby potentially influence the progression of gastric carcinomas. PMID:12906871

  3. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J R; Rayasam, Swati D G; Saelens, Joseph W; Chen, Ching-Ju; Seay, Sarah A; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E; Ng, Tony W; Tobin, David M; Porcelli, Steven A; Larsen, Michelle H; Schmitz, Joern E; Haynes, Barton F; Jacobs, William R; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 10(24)-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >10(68)-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  4. Targeted Surface Expression of an Exogenous Antigen in Stably Transfected Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    Laughery, Jacob M.; Knowles, Donald P.; Schneider, David A.; Bastos, Reginaldo G.; McElwain, Terry F.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. One use of transfected B. bovis parasites may be as a vaccine delivery platform. Previous transfection methods for B. bovis were limited by single expression sites and intracellular expression of transfected antigens. This study describes a novel transfection system in which two exogenous genes are expressed: one for selection and the other for a selected antigen designed to be delivered to the surface of the parasites. The strategy for duplicating the number of transfected genes was based on the use of the putative bidirectional promoter of the B. bovis 1.4 Kb ef-1α intergenic region. The ability of this region to regulate two independent expression sites was demonstrated using a luciferase assay on transiently transfected B. bovis parasites and then incorporated into a stable transfection plasmid to control independent expression of the selectable marker GFP-BSD and another gene of interest. A chimeric gene was synthetized using sequences from the protective B-cell epitopes of Rhipicephalus microplus tick antigen Bm86 along with sequences from the surface exposed B. bovis major surface antigen-1. This chimeric gene was then cloned into the additional expression site of the transfection plasmid. Transfection of the B. bovis Mo7 strain with this plasmid resulted in stable insertion into the ef-1α locus and simultaneous expression of both exogenous genes. Expression of the Bm86 epitopes on the surface of transfected merozoites was demonstrated using immunofluorescence analyses. The ability to independently express multiple genes by the inclusion of a bidirectional promoter and the achievement of surface expression of foreign epitopes advances the potential of transfected B. bovis as a future vaccine

  5. Expression of the immune regulation antigen CD70 in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Jens Hw; Santos, Susy J; Kuijjer, Marieke L; Boerman, Gerharda H; Sand, Laurens Gl; Szuhai, Karoly; Cleton-Jansen, Annemarie; Egeler, R Maarten; Boveé, Judith Vmg; Schilham, Marco W; Lankester, Arjan C

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone cancer in children and young adults. The outcome of patients with advanced disease is dismal. Exploitation of tumor-immune cell interactions may provide novel therapeutic approaches. CD70-CD27 interactions are important for the regulation of adaptive immunity. CD70 expression has been reported in some solid cancers and implicated in tumor escape from immunosurveillance. In this study, expression of CD70 and CD27 was analyzed in osteosarcoma cell lines and tumor specimens. CD70 protein was expressed on most osteosarcoma cell lines (5/7) and patient-derived primary osteosarcoma cultures (4/6) as measured by flow cytometry. In contrast, CD70 was detected on few Ewing sarcoma cell lines (5/15) and was virtually absent from neuroblastoma (1/7) and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines (0/5). CD70(+) primary cultures were derived from CD70(+) osteosarcoma lesions. CD70 expression in osteosarcoma cryosections was heterogeneous, restricted to tumor cells and not attributed to infiltrating CD3(+) T cells as assessed by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence. CD70 was detected in primary (1/5) but also recurrent (2/4) and metastatic (1/3) tumors. CD27, the receptor for CD70, was neither detected on tumor cells nor on T cells in CD70(+) or CD70(-) tumors, suggesting that CD70 on tumor cells is not involved in CD27-dependent tumor-immune cell interactions in osteosarcoma. CD70 gene expression in diagnostic biopsies of osteosarcoma patients did not correlate with the occurrence of metastasis and survival (n = 70). Our data illustrate that CD70 is expressed in a subset of osteosarcoma patients. In patients with CD70(+) tumors, CD70 may represent a novel candidate for antibody-based targeted immunotherapy.

  6. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P < 0.05), and the highest amount of antigen was detected in flounders immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P < 0.05) compared with the spleen, kidney and liver. Antigen uptake in the gill and skin both peaked at 30 min post immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P < 0.05), and then quickly declined. In contrast, antigen uptake in the spleen, kidney and liver gradually increased 3 h post immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P < 0.05). In the mucosal-associated tissues, the expression of MHC Iα and CD8α genes peaked at 24 hpi, while the expression of MHC IIα and CD4-1 genes showed up-regulation in the gill and skin

  7. Enhanced induction of thyroid cell MHC class II antigen expression in rats highly responsive to thyroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Lahat, N; Hirose, W; Davies, T F

    1989-04-01

    Initial experiments demonstrated that the degree of autoantibody and proliferative T cell responses to syngeneic rat thyroglobulin differed markedly between Buffalo (high responder) and Fisher (low responder) rats after classical immunization schedules. While varying immune responsiveness may be due to qualitative and quantitative T and B cell differences, the role of thyroid cell MHC class II antigens may be pivotal to the onset of autoimmune thyroiditis in such animal models. We, therefore, examined the induction of MHC class II antigens in thyroid monolayers derived from Buffalo and Fisher rats treated with methimazole (0.1% in their water) for 4 weeks to induce mild thyroid hyperplasia. After thyroidectomy, thyroid cell monolayers were prepared and exposed to recombinant rat gamma-interferon (gamma IF; 10-1000 U/ml) for 1-7 days in the presence and absence of TSH (1 mU/ml). Both Buffalo and Fisher thyroid monolayers responded to gamma IF with MHC class II antigen expression when assessed by laser flow cytometry using MRC OX-6 monoclonal anti-RT1.B. In both types of culture, TSH enhanced MHC class II antigen expression in the presence of gamma IF to the same degree. However, there was a consistently earlier and greater degree of MHC class II antigen expression in Buffalo thyroid monolayers compared to Fisher monolayers, a phenomenon not explicable on the basis of fibroblast contamination as assessed by cytokeratin staining. These data demonstrate that end-organ sensitivity to MHC class II antigen expression may be important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  8. Induction of cancer testis antigen expression in circulating acute myeloid leukemia blasts following hypomethylating agent monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pragya; Paluch, Benjamin E.; Matsuzaki, Junko; James, Smitha R.; Collamat-Lai, Golda; Blagitko-Dorfs, Nadja; Ford, Laurie Ann; Naqash, Rafeh; Lübbert, Michael; Karpf, Adam R.; Nemeth, Michael J.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTAs) are promising cancer associated antigens in solid tumors, but in acute myeloid leukemia, dense promoter methylation silences their expression. Leukemia cell lines exposed to HMAs induce expression of CTAs. We hypothesized that AML patients treated with standard of care decitabine (20mg/m2 per day for 10 days) would demonstrate induced expression of CTAs. Peripheral blood blasts serially isolated from AML patients treated with decitabine were evaluated for CTA gene expression and demethylation. Induction of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6, were observed following decitabine. Re-expression of NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6 was associated with both promoter specific and global (LINE-1) hypomethylation. NY-ESO-1 and MAGEA3/A6 mRNA levels were increased irrespective of clinical response, suggesting that these antigens might be applicable even in patients who are not responsive to HMA therapy. Circulating blasts harvested after decitabine demonstrate induced NY-ESO-1 expression sufficient to activate NY-ESO-1 specific CD8+ T-cells. Induction of CTA expression sufficient for recognition by T-cells occurs in AML patients receiving decitabine. Vaccination against NY-ESO-1 in this patient population is feasible. PMID:26883197

  9. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  10. Cloning and expression of the tumor-associated antigen L6.

    PubMed Central

    Marken, J S; Schieven, G L; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E; Aruffo, A

    1992-01-01

    The L6 cell surface antigen, which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas, has attracted attention as a therapeutic target for murine monoclonal antibodies and their humanized counterparts. Its molecular nature has, however, remained elusive. Here we describe the expression cloning of a cDNA encoding the L6 antigen. COS cells transfected with this cDNA direct the expression of an approximately 24-kDa surface protein that reacts with the two anti-L6 monoclonal antibodies available. The predicted L6 peptide sequence is 202 amino acids long and contains three predicted NH2-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane regions, which are followed by a hydrophilic region containing two potential N-linked glycosylation sites and a COOH-terminal hydrophobic transmembrane region. The L6 antigen is related to a number of cell surface proteins with similar predicted membrane topology that have been implicated in cell growth. Two other members of this family of proteins, CD63 (ME491) and CO-029, are also highly expressed on tumor cells. The present findings should make it possible to further study the role of the L6-defined antigen in normal and neoplastic cells and to construct animal models for development of improved agents for active and passive cancer immunotherapy. Images PMID:1565644

  11. Modification of a salmonid alphavirus replicon vector for enhanced expression of heterologous antigens.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tz-Chun; Johansson, Daniel X; Liljeström, Peter; Evensen, Øystein; Haugland, Øyvind

    2015-03-01

    A salmonid alphavirus (SAV) replicon has been developed to express heterologous antigens but protein production was low to modest compared with terrestrial alphavirus replicons. In this study, we have compared several modifications to a SAV replicon construct and analysed their influence on foreign gene expression. We found that an insertion of a translational enhancer consisting of the N-terminal 102 nt of the capsid gene, together with a nucleotide sequence encoding the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A peptide, caused a significant increase in EGFP reporter gene expression. The importance of fusing a hammerhead (HH) ribozyme sequence at the 5' end of the viral genome was also demonstrated. In contrast, a hepatitis D virus ribozyme (HDV-RZ) sequence placed at the 3' end did not augment expression of inserted genes. Taken together, we have developed a platform for optimized antigen production, which can be applied for immunization of salmonid fish in the future. PMID:25395591

  12. High Expression of Water-Soluble Recombinant Antigenic Domains of Toxoplasma gondii Secretory Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Ahn, Hye-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant antigenic proteins of Toxoplasma gondii are alternative source of antigens which are easily obtainable for serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis. In this study, highly antigenic secretory organellar proteins, dense granular GRA2 and GRA3, rhoptrial ROP2, and micronemal MIC2, were analyzed by bioinformatics approach to express as water-soluble forms of antigenic domains. The transmembrane region and disorder tendency of 4 secretory proteins were predicted to clone the genes into pGEX-4T-1 vector. Recombinant plasmids were transformed into BL21 (DE3) pLysS E. coli, and GST fusion proteins were expressed with IPTG. As a result, GST fusion proteins with GRA225-105, GRA339-138, ROP2324-561, and MIC21-284 domains had respectively higher value of IgG avidity. The rGST-GRA225-105 and rGST-GRA339-138 were soluble, while rGST-ROP2324-561 and rGST-MIC21-284 were not. GRA231-71, intrinsically unstructured domain (IUD) of GRA2, was used as a linker to enhance the solubility. The rGST-GRA231-71-ROP2324-561, a chimeric protein, appeared to be soluble. Moreover, rGST-GRA231-71-MIC21-284 was also soluble and had higher IgG avidity comparing to rGST-MIC21-284. These 4 highly expressed and water-soluble recombinant antigenic proteins may be promising candidates to improve the serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis in addition to the major surface antigen of SAG1. PMID:25246715

  13. Senescent erythrocytes: modification of rheologic properties, antigenic expression and interaction with monocytes.

    PubMed

    Racca, A; Biondi, C; Cotorruelo, C; Galizzi, S; Rasia, R J; Stoltz, J F; Valverde, J

    1999-01-01

    Human erythrocytes have a well-defined lifespan of 120 days. Their eventual removal from circulation is a complex process affected by many cellular parameters, making them susceptible to sequestration in the spleen and other organs. The purpose of this study was to investigate putative changes in rheologic properties, antigenic expression and interaction with monocytes of senescent erythrocytes (SE). SE and young erythrocyte (YE) fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation from 20 healthy donor blood samples. Membrane rheomechanic properties (by diffractometric method), ABO and MN antigens reactivity and erythrophagocytosis by peripheral monocytes were investigated in each fractions. SE showed a little decrease in the deformability index and an increase of both membrane elastic modulus and surface viscosity. The studies performed indicate a decreased expression in the antigens of both blood group systems studied (p < 0.01) and an increased rate of erythrophagocytosis by monocytes in SE compared to YE (p < 0.01). The significant modifications in the biomechanic properties of senescent red blood cell membrane and the loss of antigenic expression could lead to physiological phagocytosis.

  14. Re-expression by Candida albicans germ tubes of antigens lost during subculture of blastospores.

    PubMed

    Hernando, F L; Calvo, E; Rodriguez, J A; Barea, P L; Rementeria, A; Sevilla, M J; Ponton, J

    1996-01-01

    The effect of germ tube induction on the antigenic variability in C.albicans was studied in strains from blood cultures (Group I) and superficial candidiasis (Group II). When compared by immunoblotting with a rabbit antiserum, antigenic extracts from Group I strains grown as blastospores showed a higher reactivity than that of Group II strains. Major bands in Group I strains (45-47, 33, 30 kDa) were continuously expressed through the subcultures in vitro but, with the exception of the 45 kDa band, the reactivity of all of them decreased or disappeared after the tenth subculture in Group II strains. The induction of the germ tubes produced the re-expression of the antigens lost during subculture in the yeast form, the effect being very clear in Group II strains. The re-expression by C. albicans germ tubes of antigens lost during subculture of blastospores in vitro and the higher reactivity shown by Group I strains grown in mycelial phase should be taken into consideration when a test to detect anti-C. albicans antibodies is to be developed.

  15. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  16. Variable severity and Ia antigen expression in streptococcal-cell-wall-induced hepatic granulomas in rats.

    PubMed

    Allen, J B; Wilder, R L

    1987-03-01

    We have previously reported that a single intraperitoneal injection of an aqueous suspension of group A streptococcal cell wall (SCW) fragments induces extensive hepatic granulomas in LEW/N female rats, but not in F344/N female rats. To further understand the mechanisms underlying these differences, we compared granuloma development and class II major histocompatibility complex antigen (Ia) expression in histocompatible LEW/N, F344/N, and CAR/N female rats in response to SCW fragments of four different average molecular sizes. In LEW/N female rats, the smallest fragments (less than 5 megadaltons) induced the most severe hepatic inflammatory disease, with development of widespread granulomas composed of macrophages, lymphocytes, and a peripheral rim of fibroblasts. The largest fragments (greater than 500 megadaltons) induced equivocal disease. Fragments of intermediate size induced granulomas of intermediate severity. The extent of granuloma development, the intensity of Ia antigen expression, and the amount of SCW antigen deposited in the liver qualitatively paralleled each other. In contrast, injection of the most granulomagenic SCW fragments into F344/N and CAR/N rats did not induce granulomas. Although these rat strains are histocompatible with the LEW/N (i.e., RTL.1) strain, hepatic Ia antigen expression in these strains was not increased significantly above basal levels. The amount of SCW antigen in the livers of the resistant rat strains appeared similar to the amount in the susceptible LEW/N strain. These data indicate that granuloma development is dependent on the size of the SCW fragment and host genetic background and that Ia expression directly parallels the severity of the hepatic disease. In addition, the data suggest that non-major histocompatibility complex genetic loci play a major role in regulating the development of the hepatic disease.

  17. Identification of Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma as a Potential Tumor Suppressor in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Quan; Li, Lin; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Zhao, Chenglong; Li, Lei; Cao, Wenjiao; Yang, Xinghai; Wei, Haifeng; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Background Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) is known as a tumor-associated antigen that is altered in a variety of malignancies, including lung cancer. However, the role of PRAME in lung cancer remains unclear. Material/Methods We analyzed the expression of PRAME in human lung adenocarcinomas and studied the function of PRAME using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced gene knockdown in lung cancer cell lines PC9 and A549. Results We found that PRAME expression is down-regulated in lung adenocarcinomas. Knockdown of PRAME promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of PC9 and A549 cells. Conclusions In line with its roles in controlling cell growth, RPAME regulates multiple critical cell-growth related genes, including IGF1R oncogene. IGF1R up-regulation contributes to increase of cell growth upon the knockdown of PRAME. Taken together, our results suggest that PRAME has inhibitory roles in lung cancer. PMID:27241212

  18. Mechanism of induction of class I major histocompatibility antigen expression by murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Faller, D V; Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C

    1988-03-01

    Alterations in expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens on tumor cells clearly correlate with the tumorgenicity and metastatic potential of those cells. These changes in the biological behavior of the tumor cells are presumably secondary to resulting changes in their susceptibility to immune recognition and destruction. Murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) exert regulatory effects on class I genes of the MHC locus. MuLV infection results in substantial increases in cell surface expression of all three class I MHC antigens. These viral effects on MHC antigen expression profoundly influence immune-mediated interaction with the infected cells, as assessed by cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition and killing. Control of class I MHC and beta-2 microglobulin genes by MuLV takes place via a trans-acting molecular mechanism. MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular MHC genes, transfected xenogeneic class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to a bacterial reporter gene. These findings indicate that MuLV exerts its effects on MHC expression via a trans mechanism. The MuLV-responsive sequences on the MHC genes appear to lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for those genes.

  19. Differential expression of HLA-DR antigens in subsets of human CFU-GM.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Sabbath, K D; Herrmann, F; Larcom, P; Nichols, K; Kornacki, M; Levine, H; Cannistra, S A

    1985-10-01

    Expression of HLA-DR surface antigens by granulocyte/monocyte colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) may be important in the regulation of proliferation of these cells. Using immunological techniques to enrich for progenitor cells, we investigated the expression of HLA-DR in subsets of CFU-GM. "Early" (day 14) CFU-GM express higher levels of HLA-DR than do "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. Among late CFU-GM, cells destined to form monocyte (alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase-positive) colonies express higher levels of HLA-DR than do CFU-GM destined to form granulocyte (chloroacetate esterase-positive) colonies. Because high-level expression of DR antigen was a marker for monocyte differentiation, we examined several lymphokines for their effects on both DR expression and in vitro commitment to monocyte differentiation by myeloid precursor cells. DR antigen density could be increased by more than twofold over 48 hours upon exposure to gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN), whereas colony-stimulating factors had no effect. This was associated with a dose-dependent inhibition of total CFU-GM number, and a relative, but not absolute, increase in the ratio of monocyte colonies to granulocyte colonies. Similarly, in day 7 suspension cultures of purified myeloid precursor cells, gamma-IFN inhibited cell proliferation and increased the ratio of monocytes to granulocytes. Thus, despite the induction of high levels of HLA-DR antigen on precursor cells (a marker of monocyte commitment), the dominant in vitro effect of gamma-IFN was inhibition of granulocyte differentiation.

  20. Glycoprotein screening in colorectal cancer based on differentially expressed Tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyun; Cheng, Zongyong; Ouyang, Chunhui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yanyan; Chen, Shuijiao; Wang, Chunlian; Lu, Fanggen; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and the identification of new biomarkers for CRC is valuable for its diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to screen differentially expressed glycoproteins (especially O-glycoproteins) and to identify diagnostic or therapeutic candidates for colorectal cancer (CRC) based on different Tn antigen expression levels. Fresh cancer tissues and adjacent healthy tissues were obtained from CRC patients and classified into three groups based on their Tn antigen expression: CRC with negative Tn expression (CRC Tn‑), CRC with positive Tn expression (CRC Tn+) and normal control without Tn expression (NC). Protein extractions were separated and identified by iTRAQ technology. Glycoproteins and O-glycoproteins were selected using UniProt and DAVID. Deep bioinformatic analysis, including Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KO), was used to annotate this O-glycoprotein interaction network. Subsequently, two O‑glycoproteins were verified by western blotting and immunohistochemistry in either LS174T cells or CRC tissues. We found that 330 differentially expressed proteins were identified by iTRAQ between CRC Tn‑ and NC tissues, 317 between CRC Tn+ and NC tissues, and 316 between CRC Tn‑ and Tn+ tissues. Of the 316 proteins, 55 glycoproteins and 19 O‑glycoproteins were identified and analyzed via deep informatics. Namely, different Tn antigen expression levels in CRC led to differential protein expression patterns, especially for glycoproteins and O‑glycoproteins. Decorin and SORBS1, two representative functional O-glycoproteins, were significantly downregulated in the CRC Tn+ tissues compared with the level in the CRC Tn‑ or NC tissues. Based on this deep bioinformatic analysis, Decorin and SORBS1 are hypothesized to be involved in the TGF‑β and PPAR‑γ signaling pathways, respectively. PMID:27432485

  1. Expression of beta2 integrins and macrophage-associated antigens in meningeal tumours.

    PubMed

    Mosnier, J F; Perret, A G; Scoazec, J Y; Brunon, J

    2000-02-01

    This study assessed the expression of leukocyte integrins and macrophage-associated antigens in meningiomas. Fourteen benign meningiomas, ten atypical/anaplastic meningiomas, two hemangiopericytomas and one solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) were included. Frozen sections were immunostained using antibodies directed against leukocyte integrins, CD68, CD14, CD2, CD1a, DRC1 and CD34. Their expression was evaluated semi-quantitatively. Ki67 positive cells were counted. Arachnoid membranes served as controls. Arachnoid cells expressed the beta2-integrin subunit and KP1. Beta2 was detected in the tumour cells of 14 meningiomas. In nine cases, this was associated with an alpha-integrin subunit. There was no statistical difference in the expression of beta2 between benign and atypical/anaplastic meningiomas. KP1 was constantly expressed by the tumour cells of meningiomas. It was not expressed by other meningeal tumours. CD34 was detected in the fibrous meningiomas, hemangiopericytomas and the SFT. In each tumour, macrophages were more numerous than T lymphocytes. There was no statistical difference in the density of macrophages and T lymphocytes between the benign and atypical/anaplastic meningiomas. There was no correlation between the Ki67 proliferation index and macrophage infiltration. Meningiomas, through the expression of leukocyte antigens, have a very particular phenotype. The expression of beta2 integrins could play a role in the attraction of immunocompetent cells in the stroma of meningiomas.

  2. Expression of CD3-associated antigen-binding receptors on suppressor T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuchroo, V K; Steele, J K; Billings, P R; Selvaraj, P; Dorf, M E

    1988-01-01

    Three suppressor T (Ts)-cell hybridomas specific for 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (NP) hapten were selected for surface expression of cluster determinant 3 (CD3) by using antibody (anti-CD3) or antigen (NP-bovine serum albumin) panning procedures followed by cloning at limiting dilution. The CD3-selected Ts hybridomas showed a 1-2 logarithmic enrichment in suppressor activity when compared to the parent lines; they also specifically bound NP-coupled sheep red blood cells in rosette assays. This antigen-binding ability could be down-modulated by anti-CD3 antibody. Similarly, surface expression of CD3 was specifically down-modulated by preincubation of these hybridomas with antigen. Anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody under reducing conditions coprecipitated a broad band of 38-50 kDa associated with two CD3 (25 and 16 kDa) bands. T-cell receptor, anti-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody also immunoprecipitated a broad band in the 41 to 49-kDa region. The combined results suggest that, like helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, Ts cells also bear antigen-specific receptors associated with CD3 molecules. Images PMID:2973609

  3. Rearrangement and expression of T cell antigen receptor and gamma genes during thymic development

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Rearrangement and expression of the T cell antigen receptor and the gamma genes during T cell ontogeny is a regulated process; the gamma genes are rearranged and expressed first, followed by the beta and then the alpha genes. Expression of both functional alpha and beta gene RNA first occurs at day 17 of gestation, along with the expression of T3 delta chain RNA. T cell antigen receptor gene rearrangements occur primarily or exclusively in the thymus, although some gamma gene rearrangements occur outside the thymus in fetal liver cells that may be committed T cell progenitors. There is no gross difference in the extent of beta and gamma gene rearrangements in the adult thymocyte subpopulations that were analyzed, despite the fact that some of these populations cannot respond to antigen and never emigrate from the thymus. Quantitative analysis of rearrangements in total adult thymocyte DNA shows that beta gene rearrangements generally occur on both chromosomal homologs, and that rearrangements occur preferentially to the J beta 2 gene segment cluster. PMID:3487610

  4. Antibody response to a T-dependent antigen requires B cell expression of complement receptors

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody responses to T- dependent antigens require complement receptors expressed on either B lymphocytes or follicular dendritic cells. We have used RAG-2 deficient blastocyst complementation to create mice specifically lacking B cell complement receptors. Despite normal expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1[CD35]) and CR2 (CD21) on follicular dendritic cells, these mice have a profound defect in their capacity to mount a T-dependent antibody response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This is the first direct demonstration in vivo that B cell expression of complement receptors is required for a humoral immune response. This suggests that CD21 and/or CD35 on B lymphocytes may be required for cellular activation, adsorptive endocytosis of antigen, recruitment to germinal centers, and/or protection from apoptosis during the humoral response to T-dependent antigens. PMID:8666942

  5. Comparison of Z and R3 antigen expression and of genes encoding other antigenic markers in invasive human and bovine Streptococcus agalactiae strains from Norway.

    PubMed

    Maeland, Johan A; Radtke, Andreas

    2013-12-27

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) may cause a variety of infectious diseases in humans caused by human GBS and mastitis in cattle caused by bovine GBS. Over the last few years molecular testing has provided evidence that human and bovine GBS have evolved along diverse phylogenetic lines. In the present study 173 invasive human GBS strains and 52 invasive bovine strains were tested for altogether 18 strain-variable and surface-localized antigenic markers including all 10 capsular polysaccharides (CPS) and proteins including Cβ, the alpha-like proteins, R3 and the recently described Z1 and Z2 antigens. PCR was used to detect encoding genes and antibody-based methods to detect expression of antigens. Thirteen of the 18 markers were detected in isolates of both strain categories. Seven of the ten CPS antigens were detected in both groups with types III and V predominating in the human GBS strains, types IV and V in the bovine isolates. Z1, Z2 and/or R3 expression and the genes encoding Cβ, Cα, Alp1, Alp2/3 or R4 (Rib) were detected in both groups. Protein antigen-CPS associations well known for human strains were essentially the same in the bovine isolates. The results show that in spite of evolution along different lines, human and bovine GBS share a variety of surface-exposed antigenic markers, substantiating close relationship between the two GBS subpopulations. PMID:24120184

  6. Relationship between expression of epidermal growth factor and simian virus 40 T antigen in a line of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lafond, R E; Giammalvo, J T; Norkin, L C

    1995-09-01

    The pattern of expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen gene and resultant dysplasia were re-examined in a line of transgenic mice in which the T antigen gene was under the control of the SV40 early promoter. We found that T antigen expression in the kidney, and resulting dysplastic lesions, occurred exclusively in the distal convoluted tubules and the ascending limbs of Henle. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in the kidney of normal mice was similarly immunolocalized. The correlation between high EGF immunoreactivity in normal mouse tissues and T antigen expression in the transgenic counterpart was also seen in the choroid plexus epithelium and in the submandibular glands of male mice. T antigen was not found in the submandibular gland of transgenic females. Similarly, EGF was only rarely detected in the normal female submandibular gland. In contrast to the correlation between T antigen expression in the transgenic mice and EGF expression in the corresponding tissues of the normal mice, within the dysplastic lesions of the transgenic mice EGF expression was severely diminished. Adenocarcinomas of the male submandibular gland from another line of transgenic mice that expresses the Int-1 transgene, showed similarly reduced levels of immunostaining for EGF. Thus, reduced expression of EGF might be a general feature of dysplasia and tumorigenesis in those tissues that normally express EGF.

  7. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and HLA-F expression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Sumiya; Arigami, Takaaki; Okumura, Hiroshi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Kita, Yoshiaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Kijima, Yuko; Ishihara, Yuka; Sasaki, Ken; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and HLA-F are classified as non-classical HLA class Ib antigens. Ectopic HLA-E and HLA-F expression was recently detected in cancer cells; however, the clinical implication of their expression remains unknown. A total of 209 patients with gastric cancer were enrolled in this study. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of HLA-E and HLA-F in gastric cancer specimens. HLA-E and HLA-F expression were seen in the cell membrane. HLA-E and HLA-F expression significantly correlated with depth of invasion, nodal involvement, lymphatic invasion, and venous invasion. No significant correlation between HLA-E and HLA-F expression was found (p<0.05, r=0.24). The five-year survival rate of the HLA-E-positive group and HLA-F-positive group were significantly poorer than that of their respective negative groups. Combination of HLA-E and HLA-F made the p-value smaller than single analysis (p<0.009). This is the first report detailing a clinical implication of HLA-E and HLA-F expression simultaneously in gastric cancer. We identified that the HLA-E and HLA-F in gastric cancer independently affected clinical factors, including postoperative outcome. For HLA-E- or HLA-F-positive gastric cancer, we should settle on a treatment strategy that reinforces the host immune response.

  8. Plant expressed coccidial antigens as potential vaccine candidates in protecting chicken against coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Kota; Sriraman, Rajan; Subramanian, B Mohana; Rao, N Hanumantha; Kasa, Balaji; Donikeni, Jagan; Narasu, M Lakshmi; Srinivasan, V A

    2012-06-22

    Coccidiosis is a disease caused by intracellular parasites belonging to the genus Eimeria. In the present study, we transiently expressed two coccidial antigens EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as poly histidine-tagged fusion proteins in tobacco. We have evaluated the protective efficacy of plant expressed EtMIC1 as monovalent and as well as bi-valent formulation where EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 were used in combination. The protective efficacy of these formulations was evaluated using homologous challenge in chickens. We observed better serum antibody response, weight gain and reduced oocyst shedding in birds immunized with EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as bivalent formulation compared to monovalent formulation. However, IFN-γ response was not significant in birds immunized with EtMIC1 compared to the birds immunized with EtMIC2. Our results indicate the potential use of these antigens as vaccine candidates. PMID:22554463

  9. Quantitating Antibody Uptake In Vivo: Conditional Dependence on Antigen Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Antibodies form an important class of cancer therapeutics, and there is intense interest in using them for imaging applications in diagnosis and monitoring of cancer treatment. Despite the expanding body of knowledge describing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of antibodies in vivo, discrepancies remain over the effect of antigen expression level on tumoral uptake with some reports indicating a relationship between uptake and expression and others showing no correlation. Procedures Using a cell line with high EpCAM expression and moderate EGFR expression, fluorescent antibodies with similar plasma clearance were imaged in vivo. A mathematical model and mouse xenograft experiments were used to describe the effect of antigen expression on uptake of these high affinity antibodies. Results As predicted by the theoretical model, under subsaturating conditions, uptake of the antibodies in such tumors is similar because localization of both probes is limited by delivery from the vasculature. In a separate experiment, when the tumor is saturated, the uptake becomes dependent on the number of available binding sites. In addition, targeting of small micrometastases is shown to be higher than larger vascularized tumors. Conclusions These results are consistent with the prediction that high affinity antibody uptake is dependent on antigen expression levels for saturating doses and delivery for subsaturating doses. It is imperative for any probe to understand whether quantitative uptake is a measure of biomarker expression or transport to the region of interest. The data provide support for a predictive theoretical model of antibody uptake, enabling it to be used as a starting point for the design of more efficacious therapies and timely quantitative imaging probes. PMID:20809210

  10. Restricted expression of LW antigen on subsets of human B and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, O L; Thomas, D B; Lomas, C G; Tippett, P

    1984-01-01

    NIM-M8 is a monoclonal IgM antibody, specific for the LWab antigen as shown by its reaction with red cells of all donors except those lacking LWa, LWb and LWab. Indirect immunofluorescent staining and cell sorter analyses have shown that LWab is present on a subpopulation of human lymphocytes. Cell fractionation studies indicate that subsets of both B and T cells express LWab and it may, therefore, provide a further marker for heterogeneity in these lymphocyte populations. PMID:6443217

  11. Genetic control of antibody responses induced by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lagranderie, M; Lo-Man, R; Dériaud, E; Gicquel, B; Gheorghiu, M; Leclerc, C

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG expressing foreign antigens represents a promising candidate for the development of future vaccines and was shown in several experimental models to induce protective immunity against bacterial or parasitic infections. Innate resistance to BCG infection is under genetic control and could modify the immune responses induced against an antigen delivered by such engineered microorganisms. To investigate this question, we analyzed the immune responses of various inbred strains of mice to recombinant BCG expressing beta-galactosidase. These experiments demonstrated that BALB/c mice developed strong antibody responses against BCG expressing beta-galactosidase under the control of two different promoters. In contrast, C57BL/6, C3H, and CBA mice produced high anti-beta-galactosidase antibody titers only when immunized with recombinant BCG expressing beta-galactosidase under the control of the pblaF* promoter, which induced the production of high levels of this antigen. This difference in mouse responsiveness to recombinant BCG was not due to innate resistance to BCG infection, since similar immune responses were induced in Ity(r) and Ity(s) congenic strains of mice. In contrast, the analysis of anti-beta-galactosidase antibody responses of H-2 congenic mice in two different genetic backgrounds demonstrated that H-2 genes are involved in the immune responsiveness to beta-galactosidase delivered by recombinant BCG. Together, these results demonstrate that immune responses to an antigen delivered by recombinant BCG are under complex genetic influences which could play a crucial role in the efficiency of future recombinant BCG vaccines. PMID:9234754

  12. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene of herpesvirus saimiri. KSHV sVCA was expressed from a 0.85-kb mRNA present late in lytic KSHV replication in BC-1 cells. This transcript was sensitive to phosphonoacetic acid and phosphonoformic acid, inhibitors of herpesvirus DNA replication. KSHV sVCA expressed in mammalian cells or Escherichia coli or translated in vitro was recognized as an antigen by antisera from KS patients. Rabbit antisera raised to KSHV sVCA expressed in E. coli detected a 22-kDa protein in KSHV-infected human B cells. Overexpressed KSHV sVCA purified from E. coli and used as an antigen in immunoblot screening assay did not cross-react with EBV BFRF3. Antibodies to sVCA were present in 89% of 47 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with KS, in 20% of 54 HIV-positive patients without KS, but in none of 122 other patients including children born to HIV-seropositive mothers and patients with hemophilia, autoimmune disease, or nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Low-titer antibody was detected in three sera from 28 healthy subjects. Antibodies to recombinant sVCA correlate with KS in high-risk populations. Recombinant sVCA can be used to examine the seroepidemiology of infection with KSHV in the general population. PMID:9060668

  13. Development of an enzyme immunoassay using recombinant expressed antigen to detect hepatitis delta virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Puig, J; Fields, H A

    1989-10-01

    Two generic enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were developed for detection of anti-hepatitis delta virus antibodies (anti-HD) and compared with a commercially available radioimmunoassay. Both generic assays were configured as blocking assays and used hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) derived from infected chimpanzee liver (EIA-1) or from Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing an insert from within an open reading frame encoding HDAg (EIA-2). Absolute sensitivity was ascertained by endpoint titration, which demonstrated essentially identical endpoints for EIA-1 and EIA-2. The absolute sensitivities of the EIAs were approximately four times greater than that of the radioimmunoassay. Specificity and sensitivity were ascertained by testing a panel of 176 serum specimens by each assay. The specimens were selected to represent a panel composed of sera from individuals with or without markers of viral hepatitis as follows: (i) serologically confirmed by exclusion as posttransfusion non-A, non-B hepatitis; (ii) acute or chronic hepatitis B virus infection, positive for hepatitis B surface antigen; (iii) resolved hepatitis B virus infection, positive for anti-hepatitis B surface antigen; (iv) acute hepatitis A virus infection, positive for anti-hepatitis A virus immunoglobulin M; and (v) normal human sera. All three assays for anti-HD gave similar specificity and sensitivity values. In conclusion, the recombinant expressed HDAg can replace antigen derived from infected liver tissue as a diagnostic reagent used to configure an EIA for detection of anti-HD. Furthermore, the results suggest that the expressed antigen contains the important immunodominant epitope(s).

  14. Rh mosaicism and aberrant MNSs antigen expression in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bracey, A W; McGinniss, M H; Levine, R M; Whang-Peng, J

    1983-03-01

    This is, to our knowledge, the first report of combined Rh and MNSs antigen alteration in a leukemic patient. Red blood cells of a chronic myelogenous leukemia patient demonstrated mixed field reactions with anti-Rho (D) reagents in August 1980. Earlier tests indicated he was Rho (D) positive in 1967, but Rho (D) and Du negative from 1973 to 1980. Titration studies with anti-hr' (c) and anti-hr" (e) indicated depressed expression, and there was also very weak s expression. One hundred per cent of cells studied from 1967 to 1980 were Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) positive. No abnormalities in chromosomes associated with the Rh or MNSs blood groups 1 and 4, respectively, were noted. Phenotypes from August 1980 through September 1981 revealed normalization of red blood cell antigen status with an increase of Rho (D) positive cells from 35% to 100%. Chromosomal studies in October, 1980 and June, 1981 revealed Ph1 mosaicism with 25 and 75% Ph1 negative cells, respectively. These findings suggest that normalization of previously altered red blood cell antigen expression may reflect resurgence of normal stem cell lines.

  15. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jonathan CY; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15312.001 PMID:27205882

  16. Differential expression of melanoma-associated antigens and molecules involved in antigen processing and presentation in three cell lines established from a single patient.

    PubMed

    Kovalcsik, Edit; John, Justin; Turner, Matthew; Birchall, Lindsay; Sage, Deborah; Whittle, Robert; Dalgleish, Angus; Pandha, Hardev

    2004-12-01

    Tumour cells are able to evade the immune system by using several 'escape mechanisms'. Downregulation of molecules involved in the processing and presentation of self-antigens has been reported. However, these adaptations have not been compared in metastases in different anatomical locations but derived from a single patient. We investigated three melanoma cell lines--MJT1 from the parietal lobe of the brain, MJT3 from the cerebellum and MJT5 from the left side of the neck--established from biopsies excised from a 45 year old female patient. Although human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I was detected in all three cell lines by flow cytometry using an anti-HLA monomorphic antibody, further serological analysis demonstrated HLA B38 loss in all three cell lines, HLA B7 downregulation in MJT5 (skin metastases) and B7 loss in MJT3 and MJT1 (brain metastases) compared with the HLA type of the patient's normal autologous lymphocytes. Interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) treatment increased the expression of HLA class I and transporters associated with antigen processing 1 (TAP1) in all three cell lines. De novo HLA class II molecule expression was observed after IFNgamma treatment in MJT3 and MJT5. Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results revealed heterogeneity of melanoma-associated antigen (MAA) expression in the cell lines: MJT3 cells expressed higher levels of MAAs than the other two cell lines. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that three metastatic lesions from a single patient can have differential expression of molecules involved in antigen processing (TAP1) and presentation (HLA I and II), but that expression of these molecules is modulated by IFNgamma to a similar degree in all cell lines. In contrast, the downregulation of expression of specific MAAs between the three cell lines was unaffected by the addition of IFNgamma.

  17. Receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells induces apoptosis via ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Kenzo; Miyamoto, Shingo; Nakashima, Manabu; Wake, Norio

    2010-07-01

    Receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) is a secreted antigen that induces apoptosis in putative receptor-expressing cells, including peripheral lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. RCAS1 expression is associated with aggressive characteristics and poor overall survival for 15 different human malignancies. The putative RCAS1 receptor has not been isolated and the mechanism of RCAS1 apoptosis induction remains unclear. This study explores how RCAS1 is involved in apoptosis initiation. The cell lines SiSo and MCF-7, human uterine carcinoma and breast adenocarcinoma, respectively, both express RCAS1, but RCAS1 secretion is undetectable in MCF-7 cells. SiSo and MCF-7 cells were stimulated to induce RCAS1 ectodomain shedding followed by assessment of RCAS1 expression and secretion. Additionally, the RCAS1 putative receptor-expressing human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 was co-cultured with SiSo, MCF-7, or soluble RCAS1 to follow RCAS1 secretion in apoptosis initiation. RCAS1 secretion was strongly suppressed by inhibitors of metalloproteases, protein kinase C (PKC)-delta, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). K562 apoptosis could be induced only by co-culturing with SiSo or soluble RCAS1. RCAS1 is thus secreted by ectodomain shedding, which may represent a pivotal step in RCAS1-induced apoptosis initiation.

  18. Fezf2 Orchestrates a Thymic Program of Self-Antigen Expression for Immune Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Tomofuji, Yoshihiko; Danks, Lynett; Nitta, Takeshi; Komatsu, Noriko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Self-tolerance to immune reactions is established via promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), leading to the elimination of T cells that respond to self-antigens. The transcriptional regulator Aire has been thought to be sufficient for the induction of TRAs, despite some indications that other factors may promote TRA expression in the thymus. Here, we show that the transcription factor Fezf2 directly regulates various TRA genes in mTECs independently of Aire. Mice lacking Fezf2 in mTECs displayed severe autoimmune symptoms, including the production of autoantibodies and inflammatory cell infiltration targeted to peripheral organs. These responses differed from those detected in Aire-deficient mice. Furthermore, Fezf2 expression and Aire expression are regulated by distinct signaling pathways and promote the expression of different classes of proteins. Thus, two independent factors, Fezf2 and Aire, permit the expression of TRAs in the thymus to ensure immune tolerance. PMID:26544942

  19. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the GAP promoter.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, A; Chugh, D A; Swaminathan, S; Khanna, N

    2001-06-01

    High-level expression and efficient assembly of Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) particles have been reported in Pichia pastoris by integrating a single copy of the HBsAg gene under the control of the alcohol oxidase (AOX1) promoter. However, the time taken to reach peak product concentration is usually very long ( approximately 240 h). In this paper, we describe the expression of HBsAg in P. pastoris using the recently described glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) promoter. Unlike the previously described AOX1 promoter based system (in which biomass is generated first followed by methanol-induced antigen production), biomass generation and antigen production occur simultaneously in medium containing glycerol or glucose. Maximal levels of HBsAg expression in case of the single copy AOX1 integrant (attained after 6 days of induction) exceeded the levels of antigen produced by the single copy GAP integrant. However, this was offset by continuous antigen production by the GAP clone. In an attempt to further enhance antigen production levels of the GAP clones, we isolated multicopy Pichia integrants containing up to four copies of the GAP promoter-driven constitutive expression cassette using the Zeocin screening procedure. The data demonstrated a direct correlation between the gene dosage and the levels of HBsAg expressed by the GAP clones. The effect of copy number was additive and the four copy clone resulted in about four-fold higher yield of HBsAg. The majority of HBsAg produced in the constitutive expression system was found to be of particulate form, based on sedimentation behaviour and particle-specific ELISA, suggesting that it has the potential to serve as an effective immunogen. These particles were sensitive to thiol reagents. We also explored the possibility of secreting the GAP expressed HBsAg in P. pastoris. In-frame fusion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor secretion signal under the constitutive GAP promoter resulted in

  20. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 expression in esophageal carcinoma: implications for prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Pan, Ke; Weng, De-Sheng; Chen, Chang-Long; Wang, Qi-Jing; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Pan, Qiu-Zhong; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Shan-Shan; Li, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Xia, Jian-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    To examine the relationship between cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) expression and esophageal carcinoma prognosis, CTLA-4 expression was immunohistochemically detected in paraffin-embedded primary tumor specimens from 158 patients with esophageal cancer. CTLA-4 was detected in the cytoplasm and cell membranes of esophageal cancer cells and in interstitial lymphocytes. In univariate analyses (log-rank), higher interstitial CTLA-4+ lymphocyte density and higher tumor CTLA-4 expression were associated with shorter overall survival (OS). After controlling for age and clinical stage, multivariate analysis (Cox) found that tumor CTLA-4 expression was an independent predictor of shorter OS (HR 2.016, P = 0.004). These results indicate that CTLA-4 expression in the tumor environment (both lymphocytes and tumor cells) is associated with poorer prognosis. In addition, CTLA-4 profiles may be useful for predicting the benefits and toxicity of CTLA-4 blockade in patients with esophageal carcinoma. PMID:27050369

  1. Serological characterization and gene localization of an Escherichia coli-expressed 37-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, G C; Laird, W J; Coates, S R; Mack, D H; Huston, M; Sninsky, J J

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing a 5.6-kilobase-pair DNA fragment of the Treponema pallidum genome was characterized by endonuclease mapping, and the encoded proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and analyzed by use of in vitro transcription and translation. One of the proteins, identified as having a molecular weight of 37,000 (37K protein), was selected for further study. Initially, the seroreactivity of the partially purified 37K antigen was demonstrated by immunoblotting. After its purification to near homogeneity, the cloned T. pallidum protein was assessed for diagnostic significance by radioimmunoassay. Although first identified as seroreactive by screening with secondary syphilitic sera (T. E. Fehniger, A. M. Walfield, T. M. Cunningham, J. D. Radolf, J. N. Miller, and M. A. Lovett, Abstr. Annu. Meet. Am. Soc. Microbiol. 1985, B156, p. 44), the antigen was shown to be serologically reactive with antibodies in serum from all stages of syphilis but was not recognized by serum from controls by both immunoblotting and radioimmune assay. Further, a monospecific polyclonal rabbit antiserum generated to the 37K antigen recognized a polypeptide of the same molecular weight from T. pallidum but did not efficiently recognize proteins from five nonpathogenic treponemes tested. Therefore, because of reactivity with and specificity for T. pallidum antibodies, the 37K antigen may be of serodiagnostic value in the detection of syphilis. Images PMID:3522427

  2. A Phase 1 Study of a Vaccine Targeting Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma and Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey S.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Goodman, Oscar B.; Cranmer, Lee D.; Marshall, John L.; Miles, Sabrina; Rosario, Dar; Diamond, David C.; Qiu, Zhiyong; Obrocea, Mihail; Bot, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are tumor-associated antigens implicated in cellular differentiation, genetic stability, and angiogenesis. MKC1106-PP is an immunotherapeutic regimen cotargeting PRAME and PSMA, comprised of a recombinant plasmid (pPRA-PSM encoding fragments derived from both antigens) and 2 peptides (E-PRA and E-PSM derived from PRAME and PSMA, respectively). This multicenter study evaluated MKC1106-PP with a fixed plasmid dose and 2 different peptide doses, administered by intralymph node injection in a prime-boost sequence in human leukocyte antigen-A*0201 and tumor-antigen-positive patients with progressing metastatic solid tumors who had failed standard therapy. Immune monitoring was done by tetramer and enzymatic-linked immune spot analysis. The treatment was well tolerated, with no significant differences in safety, immune response, and clinical outcome relative to peptide doses. Fifteen of 24 evaluable patients showed an immune response, as defined by the expansion of PRAME-specific or PSMA-specific T cells in the blood. There were no partial or complete responses by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Seven patients showed stable disease (SD) for 6 months or longer, or prostate specific antigen decline: 4 of 10 with prostate carcinoma, 2 of 2 with renal clear cell carcinoma, and 1 of 10 with metastatic melanoma. In addition, there was an association between the induction and persistence of antigen-specific T cells in blood above baseline levels and disease control, defined as SD for 6 months or longer. These results support further development of MKC1106-PP in specific clinical indications. PMID:21760528

  3. Expression of SV40 T antigen under control of rabbit uteroglobin promoter in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    DeMayo, F J; Finegold, M J; Hansen, T N; Stanley, L A; Smith, B; Bullock, D W

    1991-08-01

    The rabbit uteroglobin gene is expressed in the lungs and reproductive tracts of male and female rabbits. To examine whether the promoter region of the uteroglobin gene could be used to target a heterologous gene to the lungs of transgenic mice, a fusion gene consisting of 3.3 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the rabbit uteroglobin gene and the large T antigen gene of the SV40 virus was constructed and microinjected into the pronuclei of one-cell mouse embryos. Eleven founder transgenic mice (5 female and 6 male) were generated. Seven of these mice developed bronchioalveolar neoplasms. Four of the founder males also developed primitive undifferentiated urogenital tract tumors. One founder female and one female offspring of a founder male developed glandular paraovarian tumors. Northern analysis revealed that the predominant site of expression of the transgene was the lung. Immunohistochemical staining showed T antigen predominantly in epithelial cells lining the bronchioles, the submucosal glands of the trachea, and the neoplasms. There appeared to be a high level of mosaicism for the transgene in the founder mice, with poor transmission of the transgene to subsequent generations. This suggests that, under the control of the uteroglobin promoter, the T antigen gene may be lethal to the fetus.

  4. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax.

  5. Recombinant expression of Taenia solium TS14 antigen and its utilization for immunodiagnosis of neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcia Ramos Monteiro; Maia, Antônio Augusto Mendes; Espíndola, Noeli Maria; Machado, Luís dos Ramos; Vaz, Adelaide José; Henrique-Silva, Flávio

    2006-12-01

    In order to evaluate the potential use of TS14 antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for immunodiagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NC), its open reading frame (ORF) was amplified by RT-PCR from mRNA isolated from Taenia solium cysticerci. The ORF was subcloned into the expression vector pET-28a, and was used to transform Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells to produce TS14 antigen. The His-tagged expressed protein was purified on a nickel affinity column. Using the HISTS14 as antigen, ELISA was positive for 100% of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and 97% of serum samples from NC patients. No positive results were observed with sera and CSF samples from control groups. Cross-reactivity with sera from patients with schistosomiasis and Chagas' disease was not observed. Serum samples from patients with taeniasis were evaluated and 2 of 13 cases showed reactivity in this assay. Our data indicate the usefulness of HISTS14 in ELISA for an accurate and rapid assay for diagnosis of NC and seroepidemiological studies.

  6. Cloning, auto-induction expression, and purification of rSpaA swine erysipelas antigen.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adilson José; da Costa Iemma, Mônica Rosas; Luperni Horta, Antônio Carlos; Sargo, Cíntia Regina; de Lima Camargo Giordano, Raquel; de Campos Giordano, Roberto; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina; Marques Novo, Maria Teresa

    2012-10-01

    This work reports the cloning, expression, and purification of a 42-kDa fragment of the SpaA protein from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the main antigenic candidate for a subunit vaccine against swine erysipelas. The use of an auto-induction protocol to improve heterologous protein expression in recombinant Escherichia coli cultures was also investigated. The cellular growth pattern and metabolite formation were evaluated under different induction conditions. The His-tagged protein was over-expressed as inclusion bodies, and was purified by a single chromatography step under denaturing conditions. Auto-induction conditions were shown to be an excellent process strategy, leading to a high level of rSpaA expression (about 25 % of total cellular protein content) in a short period of time.

  7. Stabilization of Transfected Cells Expressing Low-Incidence Blood Group Antigens: Novel Methods Facilitating Their Use as Reagent-Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Cecilia; Esteban, Rosa; Canals, Carme; Muñiz-Díaz, Eduardo; Nogués, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of erythrocyte antibodies in the serum of patients rely on panels of human red blood cells (RBCs), which coexpress many antigens and are not easily available for low-incidence blood group phenotypes. These problems have been addressed by generating cell lines expressing unique blood group antigens, which may be used as an alternative to human RBCs. However, the use of cell lines implies several drawbacks, like the requirement of cell culture facilities and the high cost of cryopreservation. The application of cell stabilization methods could facilitate their use as reagent cells in clinical laboratories. Methods We generated stably-transfected cells expressing low-incidence blood group antigens (Dia and Lua). High-expresser clones were used to assess the effect of TransFix® treatment and lyophilization as cell preservation methods. Cells were kept at 4°C and cell morphology, membrane permeability and antigenic properties were evaluated at several time-points after treatment. Results TransFix® addition to cell suspensions allows cell stabilization and proper antigen detection for at least 120 days, despite an increase in membrane permeability and a reduction in antigen expression levels. Lyophilized cells showed minor morphological changes and antigen expression levels were rather conserved at days 1, 15 and 120, indicating a high stability of the freeze-dried product. These stabilized cells have been proved to react specifically with human sera containing alloantibodies. Conclusions Both stabilization methods allow long-term preservation of the transfected cells antigenic properties and may facilitate their distribution and use as reagent-cells expressing low-incidence antigens, overcoming the limited availability of such rare RBCs. PMID:27603310

  8. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Permyakova, Natalia V.; Zagorskaya, Alla A.; Belavin, Pavel A.; Uvarova, Elena A.; Nosareva, Olesya V.; Nesterov, Andrey E.; Novikovskaya, Anna A.; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L.; Moshkin, Mikhail P.; Deineko, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25949997

  9. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Christopher D.; Bannantine, John P.; Govender, Rodney; Endersen, Lorraine; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Coffey, Aidan; O'Mahony, Jim; Sleator, Roy D.

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of MAP2121c can enhance the heterologous expression of the major membrane protein (MMP), analogous to the form in which it is produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, we previously engineered MAP3733c (encoding MptD) and show herein that MptD displays the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adheres to the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne's disease. PMID:25237653

  10. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  11. Expression of the Major Surface Antigen of Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoites in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shobhona; Godson, G. Nigel

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite protein, a surface antigen of the sporozoite stage of the monkey malarial parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using an expression vector containing the 5' regulatory region of the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I gene. It was necessary to eliminate the entire 5' upstream region of the parasite DNA to obtain the expression of this protein. Only the circumsporozoite precursor protein was produced by the yeast transformants, as detected by immunoblotting. About 55 and 20 percent of the circumsporozoite protein produced in yeast was associated with the 25,000g and 150,000g particulate fractions, respectively. The protein could be solubilized in Triton X-100 and was stable in solubilized extracts.

  12. Failure of expression of class I major histocompatibility antigens to alter tumor immunogenicity of a spontaneous murine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Carlow, D A; Kerbel, R S; Elliott, B E

    1989-05-10

    We have shown previously that clonal immunogenic variants of murine mammary adenocarcinoma 10.1 can be isolated after treatment in vitro with the DNA-hypomethylating agent 5-azacytidine (5-aza). Such immunogenic variants frequently express elevated class I major histocompatibility complex antigens relative to the level of expression in the parent tumor and are rejected in syngeneic mice by a T-cell-dependent process. To ascertain whether elevated immunogenicity is a function of increased class I antigen expression, we isolated high class I antigen expressors from 5-aza-treated 10.1 cells by using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Clonal variants displaying any increase in class I antigen expression were more efficient stimulators of allo-class I antigen-specific cytolytic T-cell precursors. However, these variants displayed unaltered tumorigenicity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. Thus, phenotypic changes other than, or in addition to, elevated class I antigen expression cause the reduced tumorigenicity of immunogenic clones of 10.1 cells isolated after 5-aza treatment.

  13. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  14. Network-based gene expression analysis of intracranial aneurysm tissue reveals role of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Krischek, B; Kasuya, H; Tajima, A; Akagawa, H; Sasaki, T; Yoneyama, T; Ujiie, H; Kubo, O; Bonin, M; Takakura, K; Hori, T; Inoue, I

    2008-07-17

    Little is known about the pathology and pathogenesis of the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracranial aneurysm (IA) formation we performed a gene expression analysis comparing ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue to a control artery. Tissue samples of six ruptured and four unruptured aneurysms, and four cerebral arteries serving as controls, were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene ontology classification of the differentially expressed genes was analyzed and regulatory functional networks and canonical pathways were identified with a network-based computational pathway analysis tool. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining were performed as confirmation. Analysis of aneurysmal and control tissue revealed 521 differentially expressed genes. The most significantly associated gene ontology term was antigen processing (P=1.64E-16). Further network-based analysis showed the top scoring regulatory functional network to be built around overexpressed major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and II complex related genes and confirmed the canonical pathway "Antigen Presentation" to have the highest upregulation in IA tissue (P=7.3E-10). Real time RT-PCR showed significant overexpression of MHC class II genes. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong positivity for MHC II molecule specific antibody (HLA II), for CD68 (macrophages, monocytes), for CD45RO (T-cells) and HLA I antibody. Our results offer strong evidence for MHC class II gene overexpression in human IA tissue and that antigen presenting cells (macrophages, monocytes) play a key role in IA formation. PMID:18538937

  15. Recent investigations into pig antigen and anti-pig antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Guerard W; McGregor, Christopher G A; Breimer, Michael E

    2015-11-01

    Genetic engineering of donor pigs to eliminate expression of the dominant xenogeneic antigen galactose α1,3 galactose (Gal) has created a sea change in the immunobiology of xenograft rejection. Antibody mediated xenograft rejection of GGTA-1 α-galactosyltransferase (GTKO) deficient organs is now directed to a combination of non-Gal pig protein and carbohydrate antigens. Glycan analysis of GTKO tissues identified no new neo-antigens but detected high levels of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) modified glycoproteins and glycolipids. Humans produce anti-Neu5Gc antibody and in very limited clinical studies sometimes show an induced anti-Neu5Gc antibody response after challenge with pig tissue. The pathogenicity of anti-Neu5Gc antibody in xenotransplantation is not clear however as non-human transplant models, critical for modelling anti-Gal immunity, do not produce anti-Neu5Gc antibody. Antibody induced after xenotransplantation in non-human primates is directed to an array of pig endothelial cells proteins and to a glycan produced by the pig B4GALNT2 gene. We anticipate that immune suppression will significantly affect the T-cell dependent and independent specificity of an induced antibody response and that donor pigs deficient in synthesis of multiple xenogeneic glycans will be important to future studies.

  16. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines.

  17. The MDCK epithelial cell line expresses a cell surface antigen of the kidney distal tubule

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to identify epithelial cell surface macromolecules involved in renal function. Lymphocyte hybrids were generated by fusing P3U-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from a C3H mouse immunized with MDCK cells. Hybridomas secreting anti-MDCK antibodies were obtained and clonal lines isolated in soft agarose. We are reporting on one hybridoma line that secretes a monoclonal antibody that binds to MDCK cells at levels 20-fold greater than background binding. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was utilized to study the distribution of antibody binding on MDCK cells and on frozen sections of dog kidney and several nonrenal tissues. In the kidney the fluorescence staining pattern demonstrates that the antibody recognizes an antigenic determinant that is expressed only on the epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loops and the distal convoluted tubule and appears to be localized on the basolateral plasma membrane. This antigen also has a unique distribution in non-renal tissues and can only be detected on cells known to be active in transepithelial ion movements. These results indicate the probable distal tubule origin of MDCK and suggest that the monoclonal antibody recognizes a cell surface antigen involved in physiological functions unique to the kidney distal tubule and transporting epithelia of nonrenal tissues. PMID:6178742

  18. IDO expressing fibroblasts promote the expansion of antigen specific regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Curran, Terry-Ann; Jalili, Reza Baradar; Farrokhi, Ali; Ghahary, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells (Tregs) can be induced and expanded by dendritic cells (DCs) in the presence of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Here we report that a possible alternative to DCs are IDO expressing dermal fibroblasts (DFs), which are easier to isolate and sustain in culture compared to DCs. When mouse splenocytes were co-cultured with IDO expressing DFs, a significant increase in frequency and the number of Tregs was found compared to those of control group (13.16%±1.8 vs. 5.53%±1.2, p<0.05). Despite observing a higher total number of dead CD4(+) cells in the IDO group, there was a more abundant live CD4(+)CD25(+) subpopulation in this group. Further analysis reveales that these CD4(+) CD25(+) cells have the capacity to expand in the presence of IDO expressing DFs. Greater number of CTLA-4(+) cells and high expression of TGF-β and IL-10 were found in CD4(+) cells of the IDO group compared to those of the controls. This finding confirmed a suppressive functionality of the expanded Tregs. Furthermore, CD4(+) CD25(+) cells isolated from the IDO group showed an alloantigen specific suppressive effect in a mixed lymphocyte reaction assay. These results confirm that IDO expressing dermal fibroblasts can expand a population of suppressive antigen specific Tregs. In conclusion, IDO expressing dermal fibroblasts have the capacity to stimulate the expansion of a subset of Tregs which can be used to generate antigen-specific immune tolerance.

  19. Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Genetic Modification of T cells Overcomes Low Levels of Tumor Antigen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nabil; Salsman, Vita S; Yvon, Eric; Louis, Chrystal U; Perlaky, Laszlo; Wels, Winfried S; Dishop, Meghan K; Kleinerman, Eugenie E; Pule, Martin; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is expressed by the majority of human osteosarcomas and is a risk factor for poor outcome. Unlike breast cancer, osteosarcoma cells express HER2 at too low, a level for patients to benefit from HER2 monoclonal antibodies. We reasoned that this limitation might be overcome by genetically modifying T cells with HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), because even a low frequency of receptor engagement could be sufficient to induce effector cell killing of the tumor. HER2-specific T cells were generated by retroviral transduction with a HER2-specific CAR containing a CD28.ζ signaling domain. HER2-specific T cells recognized HER2-positive osteosarcoma cells as judged by their ability to proliferate, produce immunostimulatory T helper 1 cytokines, and kill HER2-positive osteosarcoma cell lines in vitro. The adoptive transfer of HER2-specific T cells caused regression of established osteosarcoma xenografts in locoregional as well as metastatic mouse models. In contrast, delivery of nontransduced (NT) T cells did not change the tumor growth pattern. Genetic modification of T cells with CARs specific for target antigens, expressed at too low a level to be effectively recognized by monoclonal antibodies, may allow immunotherapy to be more broadly applicable for human cancer therapy. PMID:19532139

  20. Antigen recognition and presentation in periapical tissues: a role for TLR expressing cells?

    PubMed

    Desai, S V; Love, R M; Rich, A M; Seymour, G J

    2011-02-01

    Bacteria are the prime cause of periapical diseases and root canal microbiology is a well-researched area of endodontics. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are present in periapical lesions of endodontic origin and play a substantial role in recognizing, processing and presenting pathogenic antigens to the adaptive immune system such as an effective and long-lasting immune response is generated against the specific pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line encoded pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) expressed by various APCs which induce their maturation, lead to gene transcription in the nucleus and the production of several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thirteen TLRs have been discovered, 10 of which have been identified in humans so far. Preliminary studies of dental pulp tissue have demonstrated various cell types expressing different TLRs in response to commonly encountered microorganisms. However, there is little information available regarding the expression and function of the various TLRs in human periapical lesions. This review discusses the interactions of various APCs in periapical lesions and the possible roles of different TLRs and APCs in pulp/periapical pathogen recognition and presentation to the adaptive immune system in the initiation and sustaining of periapical diseases. PMID:21083574

  1. Molecular cloning and expression in Pichia pastoris of a hypoallergenic antigen 5.

    PubMed

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Pirpignani, María L; Nowicki, Cristina; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2010-09-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order can cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Immunotherapy with venom extracts is the most extensively employed treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality, but purified and safer allergy vaccines are needed. Antigen 5 is an important allergen of vespid venoms. We previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) is likely to be a hypoallergenic variant. On the basis of such findings, this work deals with the recombinant expression and purification of Poly s 5 in Pichia pastoris. In order to overcome non-native glycosylation of the recombinant protein, it was necessary to delete a glycosylation site. On the other hand, different strategies were attempted to obtain a satisfactory yield of the protein; moreover, the influence of the methanol concentration in the expression medium was investigated and found to be crucial. Mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequencing, and IgG-binding inhibition assays were performed. Results allowed us to confirm the immunological equivalence between the recombinant and the natural proteins. In conclusion, a novel protocol for the recombinant expression of Poly s 5 in P. pastoris was designed thus bringing about a high yield of the protein useful for clinical and scientific purposes. PMID:20371379

  2. Molecular cloning and expression in Pichia pastoris of a hypoallergenic antigen 5.

    PubMed

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Pirpignani, María L; Nowicki, Cristina; Biscoglio de Jiménez Bonino, Mirtha

    2010-09-01

    Stings by insects from the Hymenoptera order can cause life-threatening allergic reactions and impair life quality. Immunotherapy with venom extracts is the most extensively employed treatment to reduce morbidity and mortality, but purified and safer allergy vaccines are needed. Antigen 5 is an important allergen of vespid venoms. We previously reported that Antigen 5 from Polybia scutellaris (Poly s 5) is likely to be a hypoallergenic variant. On the basis of such findings, this work deals with the recombinant expression and purification of Poly s 5 in Pichia pastoris. In order to overcome non-native glycosylation of the recombinant protein, it was necessary to delete a glycosylation site. On the other hand, different strategies were attempted to obtain a satisfactory yield of the protein; moreover, the influence of the methanol concentration in the expression medium was investigated and found to be crucial. Mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequencing, and IgG-binding inhibition assays were performed. Results allowed us to confirm the immunological equivalence between the recombinant and the natural proteins. In conclusion, a novel protocol for the recombinant expression of Poly s 5 in P. pastoris was designed thus bringing about a high yield of the protein useful for clinical and scientific purposes.

  3. Prostate specific antigen gene expression in androgen insensitive prostate carcinoma subculture cell line.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chung, Li-Chuan; Chao, Chun-Hsiang; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2008-01-01

    A novel prostate cancer cell line (PC-J) was isolated from an androgen independent non-prostate specific antigen (non-PSA) producing carcinoma cell line. The homologous correlation between PC-J and PC-3 was determined by short tandem repeat analysis. The PSA promoter activity was detected by transient expression assay in the PC-J and LNCaP cells but not in androgen insensitive PC-3 cells. When the PC-J cells were cotransfected with androgen receptor, androgen receptor coactivators and PSA reporter vector cells, the reporter assays indicated that nuclear receptor coactivator 4 (NCOA4) but not androgen receptor activator 24 (ARA24) increased the sensitivity and maximum stimulation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-inducing PSA promoter activity. The RT-PCR assays revealed that the expression of several tumor markers, including interleukin-6, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), prostate epithelium-specific Ets transcription factor (PDEF) and matriptase, was lower in the PC-J cells than in the PC-3 cells. This cell model elucidated the regulation of PSA expression and enabled comparison of the gene profile at different stages of metastasis in prostatic carcinoma.

  4. Late-phase expression of a murine cytomegalovirus immediate-early antigen recognized by cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Reddehase, M J; Fibi, M R; Keil, G M; Koszinowski, U H

    1986-01-01

    The cloned murine cytolytic T-lymphocyte line IE1-IL and several sublines detect a murine cytomegalovirus immediate-early (IE) membrane determinant in conjunction with Ld class I major histocompatibility glycoprotein. The lines retained cytolytic activity, strict antigen specificity, and self-restriction even when adapted to long-term, antigen-independent growth in the presence of interleukin-2 only (M. J. Reddehase, H.-J. Bühring, and U. H. Koszinowski, J. Virol. 57:408-412). These attributes allowed us to use IE1-IL as a stable, monospecific probe for tracing the expression of the IE membrane antigen throughout the viral replication cycle. Presentation of the antigen at the cell membrane proved to be most effective when expression of IE genes in infected mouse embryo fibroblasts was selectively enhanced by consecutive cycloheximide-actinomycin D treatment, whereas without enhancement high numbers of IE1-IL cytolytic T lymphocytes were required to demonstrate the antigen in the IE phase. In the early phase of infection when IE genes were no longer transcribed, cytolysis was not observed, although IE proteins were detectable in the nuclei of the infected cells. Without application of inhibitors IE membrane antigen expression was most prominent during the late phase of infection. Reinitiation of transcription from the genomic region encoding the major IE protein (pp89) and de novo synthesis of pp89 correlated with this reexpression of the IE membrane antigen. Images PMID:2431160

  5. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing CD80, CD70, and 4-1BB ligand efficiently expand functional T cells specific to tumor-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wanyong; Su, Mei; Anderson, Karen S; Sasada, Tetsuro

    2014-08-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), notably dendritic cells (DCs), are the most potent for expanding antigen-specific T cells ex vivo. However, the labor-intensive and expensive procedure for customized preparation of autologous APCs has hampered their broad clinical application. Artificial APC (aAPC) systems, which can be readily prepared from off-the-shelf components, have been proposed as a promising alternative to custom-made professional APCs. Here, in order to develop a novel aAPC system, we established K562 erythroleukemia cells expressing different combinations of co-stimulatory molecule ligands, CD80, CD70, and/or 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL). When nucleofected with in vitro-generated mRNA encoding a tumor-associated antigen, MART-1, the K562 cells expressing all of CD80, CD70, and 4-1BBL were the most efficient for expansion of functional T cells specific to an HLA-A2-restricted immunodominant epitope, MART-126-35. In addition, only the K562 cells expressing all three of these co-stimulatory molecule ligands could clearly expand T cells specific to other less immunogenic antigen epitopes, gp100154-162 and Cyp1B1239-247, through transfection with in vitro generated gp100 and Cyp1B1 mRNA, respectively. These results indicated that non-redundant and synergistic effects of co-stimulation via CD28/CD80, CD27/CD70, and 4-1BB/4-1BBL might be critical for eliciting efficient expansion of T cells; co-stimulation via the 4-1BB/4-1BBL interaction might expand antigen-specific T cells by preventing apoptotic cell death triggered by specific antigens in the presence of the CD28/CD80 and CD27/CD70 signaling. Taken together, our findings suggested that this K562-based aAPC system expressing CD80, CD70, and 4-1BBL would be useful for efficiently stimulating functional antigen-specific T cells ex vivo, in particular when detailed information on the epitope specificities is unavailable. PMID:24713579

  6. Human Skin Cells That Express Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 3 Associate with Dermal Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vega Crespo, Agustin; Awe, Jason P.; Reijo Pera, Renee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3) is a glycosphingolipid that has previously been used to identify cells with stem cell-like, multipotent, and pluripotent characteristics. A rare subpopulation of SSEA3-expressing cells exists in the dermis of adult human skin. These SSEA3-expressing cells undergo a significant increase in cell number in response to injury, suggesting a possible role in regeneration. These SSEA3-expressing regeneration-associated (SERA) cells were derived through primary cell culture, purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and characterized. Longer in vitro culture of the primary skin cells led to lower SSEA3 expression stability after FACS-based purification, suggesting that the current culture conditions may need to be optimized to permit the large-scale expansion of SERA cells. The SERA cells demonstrated a global transcriptional state that was most similar to bone marrow- and fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and the highest expressing SSEA3-expressing cells co-expressed CD105 (clone 35). However, while a rare population of MSCs was observed in primary human skin cell cultures that could differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, or chondrocytes, SERA cells did not possess this differentiation capacity, suggesting that there are at least two different rare subpopulations in adult human skin primary cultures. The identification, efficient purification, and large-scale expansion of these rare subpopulations (SERA cells and MSCs) from heterogeneous adult human skin primary cell cultures may have applications for future patient-specific cellular therapies. PMID:23514702

  7. Artificial antigen presenting cells that express prevalent HLA alleles: A step towards the broad application of antigen-specific adoptive cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Aisha N; Selvakumar, Annamalai; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel W; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    The artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) described in this review were generated to facilitate the production of virus-specific T-cells for the treatment of infections in patients after bone marrow transplant. These AAPCs consist of murine 3T3 cells genetically modified to express critical human molecules needed for T-cell stimulation, such as the co-stimulatory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 and one of a series of 6 common HLA class I alleles. When T-cells were sensitized against cytomegalovirus (CMV) using AAPCs that express a shared HLA allele or using autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) loaded with the CMVpp65 antigen, they were activated and expanded to become HLA-restricted CMVpp65-specific T-cells. These T-cells demonstrated functional activity in vitro against CMV by producing IFN-gamma and inducing CMVpp65-specific cytotoxicity. T-cells sensitized with AAPCs recognized antigenic epitopes presented by each HLA allele known to be immunogenic in Man. Sensitization with AAPCs also permitted expansion of IFN-gamma+ cytotoxic T-cells against subdominant epitopes that were not effectively recognized by T-cells sensitized with autologous APCs. This panel of AAPCs provides a source of immediately accessible, standardizable, and replenishable "off the shelf" cellular reagents with the potential to make adoptive immunotherapy widely available for the treatment of lethal infections, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:20040272

  8. Artificial antigen-presenting cells engineered by recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing antigen, MHC class II, and costimulatory molecules elicit proliferation of CD4+ lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oertli, D; Marti, W R; Norton, J A; Tsung, K

    1997-10-01

    The current study was designed to test the ability of recombinant Vaccinia virus (rVV) encoding essential components of an artificial antigen-presenting cell to activate antigen-specific T cells in vitro. We have constructed a set of rVV encoding separately or in combination a CD4+ T cell-specific epitope (the 133-145 peptide of chicken conalbumin), the MHC class II molecule I-Ak, and costimulatory molecules (mB7-1 and mB7-2). Cultured cells infected with rVV encoding both the antigen and the presenting MHC, but not either one alone, could activate cloned CD4+ T cells specific for the virus-encoded epitope. Additional co-expression of mB7-1 and mB7-2 resulted in further enhancement of T cell response. Thus, our rVV vector expressing four different foreign gene products elicited the highest proliferation rates of antigen-specific cloned T cells. PMID:9353162

  9. Enhancing Antitumor Efficacy of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Through Constitutive CD40L Expression

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kevin J; Seinstra, Beatrijs A; Nikhamin, Yan; Yeh, Raymond; Usachenko, Yelena; van Leeuwen, Dayenne G; Purdon, Terence; Pegram, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier J

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with genetically modified T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a promising therapy for patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, CAR-modified T cells (CAR T cells) have mostly failed in patients with solid tumors or low-grade B-cell malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bulky lymph node involvement. Herein, we enhance the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells through the constitutive expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154). T cells genetically modified to constitutively express CD40L (CD40L-modified T cells) demonstrated increased proliferation and secretion of proinflammatory TH1 cytokines. Further, CD40L-modified T cells augmented the immunogenicity of CD40+ tumor cells by the upregulated surface expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), adhesion molecules (CD54, CD58, and CD70), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules (Class I and HLA-DR), and the Fas-death receptor (CD95). Additionally, CD40L-modified T cells induced maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 by monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Finally, tumor-targeted CD19-specific CAR/CD40L T cells exhibited increased cytotoxicity against CD40+ tumors and extended the survival of tumor-bearing mice in a xenotransplant model of CD19+ systemic lymphoma. This preclinical data supports the clinical application of CAR T cells additionally modified to constitutively express CD40L with anticipated enhanced antitumor efficacy. PMID:25582824

  10. Gene cloning, expression, and localization of antigen 5 in the life cycle of Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhe; Xu, Hongxu; Chen, Jiajia; Gan, Wenjia; Wu, Weihua; Wu, Weiping; Hu, Xuchu

    2012-06-01

    Antigen 5 (Ag5) has been identified as a dominant component of cyst fluid of Echinococcus granulosus and is considered as a member of serine proteases family, which in other helminth, plays an important role in the egg hatch and larva invasion. However, whether Ag5 is expressed and secreted in all life stages is unknown. In this study, according to the sequence in GenBank, we cloned and sequenced the open reading frame (ORF) of Ag5 gene from the protoscolices of E. granulosus isolated from the sheep in Qinhai Province of China, and found several substitutions and a base insert and deletion in a short region near the stop code, leading to a frameshift mutation which is conserved with the homologue of other cestode. The ORF is 1,455 bp in length, encoding 484 amino acids with a secretory signal peptide. Bioinformatics analysis predicted several phosphorylation and myristoylation sites and a N-glycosylation site and a species-specific linear B epitope in the protein. The ORF was cloned into the plasmid pET28a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli . The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. Anti-rEgAg5 antiserum was prepared in rats and used to analyze the localization of Ag5 in protoscolex and adult worm by immunofluorescence technique. Results demonstrated that the Ag5 is strongly expressed in the tegument of protoscolex and the embryonic membrane of egg and surface of oncosphere; meanwhile, it is also weakly expressed in tegument of the adult. This study showed that Ag5 is expressed in all stages of life cycle, secreted from the surface of the worm and may be anchored in membrane by its myristoylation sites; these characteristics make it a candidate antigen for diagnosis and vaccine for both intermediate and definitive hosts. PMID:22200957

  11. Gene cloning, expression, and localization of antigen 5 in the life cycle of Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhe; Xu, Hongxu; Chen, Jiajia; Gan, Wenjia; Wu, Weihua; Wu, Weiping; Hu, Xuchu

    2012-06-01

    Antigen 5 (Ag5) has been identified as a dominant component of cyst fluid of Echinococcus granulosus and is considered as a member of serine proteases family, which in other helminth, plays an important role in the egg hatch and larva invasion. However, whether Ag5 is expressed and secreted in all life stages is unknown. In this study, according to the sequence in GenBank, we cloned and sequenced the open reading frame (ORF) of Ag5 gene from the protoscolices of E. granulosus isolated from the sheep in Qinhai Province of China, and found several substitutions and a base insert and deletion in a short region near the stop code, leading to a frameshift mutation which is conserved with the homologue of other cestode. The ORF is 1,455 bp in length, encoding 484 amino acids with a secretory signal peptide. Bioinformatics analysis predicted several phosphorylation and myristoylation sites and a N-glycosylation site and a species-specific linear B epitope in the protein. The ORF was cloned into the plasmid pET28a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli . The recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. Anti-rEgAg5 antiserum was prepared in rats and used to analyze the localization of Ag5 in protoscolex and adult worm by immunofluorescence technique. Results demonstrated that the Ag5 is strongly expressed in the tegument of protoscolex and the embryonic membrane of egg and surface of oncosphere; meanwhile, it is also weakly expressed in tegument of the adult. This study showed that Ag5 is expressed in all stages of life cycle, secreted from the surface of the worm and may be anchored in membrane by its myristoylation sites; these characteristics make it a candidate antigen for diagnosis and vaccine for both intermediate and definitive hosts.

  12. Expression of Cancer Testis Antigens in Colorectal Cancer: New Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Czerewaty, Michał; Deskur, Anna; Safranow, Krzysztof; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background. While cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are restricted in postnatal tissues to testes and germ line-derived cells, their role in cancer development and the clinical significance of their expression still remain to be better defined. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of CTA expression in colon samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in relation to patient clinical status. Methods. Forty-five patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer were included in the study. We selected a panel of 18 CTAs that were previously detected in CRC as well as some new gene candidates, and their expression was detected at the mRNA level by employing RQ-PCR. Additionally, we evaluated CTA expression in three colon cancer cell lines (CL-188, HTB-39, and HTB-37) after exposure to the DNA methylation-modifying drug 5-azacytidine. Results. We report that 6 out of 18 (33%) CTAs tested (MAGEA3, OIP5, TTK, PLU1, DKKL1, and FBXO39) were significantly (p < 0.05) overexpressed in tumor tissue compared with healthy colon samples isolated from the same patients. Conclusions. Moreover, we found that MAGEA3, PLU-1, and DKKL expression positively correlated with disease progression, evaluated according to the Dukes staging system. Finally, 5-azacytidine exposure significantly upregulated expression of CTAs on CRC cells, which indicates that this demethylation agent could be employed therapeutically to enhance the immune response against tumor cells. PMID:27635108

  13. Expression of Cancer Testis Antigens in Colorectal Cancer: New Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Tarnowski, Maciej; Czerewaty, Michał; Deskur, Anna; Safranow, Krzysztof; Marlicz, Wojciech; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background. While cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are restricted in postnatal tissues to testes and germ line-derived cells, their role in cancer development and the clinical significance of their expression still remain to be better defined. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of CTA expression in colon samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in relation to patient clinical status. Methods. Forty-five patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer were included in the study. We selected a panel of 18 CTAs that were previously detected in CRC as well as some new gene candidates, and their expression was detected at the mRNA level by employing RQ-PCR. Additionally, we evaluated CTA expression in three colon cancer cell lines (CL-188, HTB-39, and HTB-37) after exposure to the DNA methylation-modifying drug 5-azacytidine. Results. We report that 6 out of 18 (33%) CTAs tested (MAGEA3, OIP5, TTK, PLU1, DKKL1, and FBXO39) were significantly (p < 0.05) overexpressed in tumor tissue compared with healthy colon samples isolated from the same patients. Conclusions. Moreover, we found that MAGEA3, PLU-1, and DKKL expression positively correlated with disease progression, evaluated according to the Dukes staging system. Finally, 5-azacytidine exposure significantly upregulated expression of CTAs on CRC cells, which indicates that this demethylation agent could be employed therapeutically to enhance the immune response against tumor cells. PMID:27635108

  14. Transfection, expression, and DNA sequence of a gene encoding a BoLA-A11 antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sawhney, S.M.S.; Hasima, N.N.; Glass, E.J.; Al-Murrani, S.W.K.; Nichani, A.K.; Spooner, R.L.; Williams, J.L.; Russell, G.C.

    1995-02-01

    Cattle major histocompatibility complex [(MHC) (BoLA)] class I molecules are heterodimeric glycoproteins which present endogenous antigenic peptides to CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes, initiating a cellular immune response. The MHC-encoded heavy chains are highly polymorphic and, in cattle, have been characterized mainly by using allo-antisera raised by reciprocal calf/dam immunizations. This has enabled the identification of about 50 serlogical specificities, most of which behave as alleles of a single highly polymorphic class I locus. However, evidence from biochemical and molecular biological studies suggest that more than one BoLA class I locus is expressed. These loci are apparently in linkage disequilibrium, making them difficult to distinguish by conventional methods. In order to investigate the expression and function of individual class I locus products, we are correlating BoLA class I gene sequences with the expressed products by the transfection and characterization of genomic class I clones. Shotgun transfection and expression of BoLA class I molecules has been described previously, but the genes involved were not isolated. In this paper we report the isolation, DNA sequencing, transfection, and expression of a genomic clone encoding a BoLA-A11 determinant from an animal expressing A10 and A11 serological specificities. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Expression of Cancer Testis Antigens in Colorectal Cancer: New Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Czerewaty, Michał; Deskur, Anna; Safranow, Krzysztof; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background. While cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are restricted in postnatal tissues to testes and germ line-derived cells, their role in cancer development and the clinical significance of their expression still remain to be better defined. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of CTA expression in colon samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in relation to patient clinical status. Methods. Forty-five patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer were included in the study. We selected a panel of 18 CTAs that were previously detected in CRC as well as some new gene candidates, and their expression was detected at the mRNA level by employing RQ-PCR. Additionally, we evaluated CTA expression in three colon cancer cell lines (CL-188, HTB-39, and HTB-37) after exposure to the DNA methylation-modifying drug 5-azacytidine. Results. We report that 6 out of 18 (33%) CTAs tested (MAGEA3, OIP5, TTK, PLU1, DKKL1, and FBXO39) were significantly (p < 0.05) overexpressed in tumor tissue compared with healthy colon samples isolated from the same patients. Conclusions. Moreover, we found that MAGEA3, PLU-1, and DKKL expression positively correlated with disease progression, evaluated according to the Dukes staging system. Finally, 5-azacytidine exposure significantly upregulated expression of CTAs on CRC cells, which indicates that this demethylation agent could be employed therapeutically to enhance the immune response against tumor cells.

  16. Genetic Mechanism of Human Neutrophil Antigen 2 Deficiency and Expression Variations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfang; Mair, David C.; Schuller, Randy M.; Li, Ling; Wu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Human neutrophil antigen 2 (HNA-2) deficiency is a common phenotype as 3–5% humans do not express HNA-2. HNA-2 is coded by CD177 gene that associates with human myeloproliferative disorders. HNA-2 deficient individuals are prone to produce HNA-2 alloantibodies that cause a number of disorders including transfusion-related acute lung injury and immune neutropenia. In addition, the percentages of HNA-2 positive neutrophils vary significantly among individuals and HNA-2 expression variations play a role in human diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and gastric cancer. The underlying genetic mechanism of HNA-2 deficiency and expression variations has remained a mystery. In this study, we identified a novel CD177 nonsense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP 829A>T) that creates a stop codon within the CD177 coding region. We found that all 829TT homozygous individuals were HNA-2 deficient. In addition, the SNP 829A>T genotypes were significantly associated with the percentage of HNA-2 positive neutrophils. Transfection experiments confirmed that HNA-2 expression was absent on cells expressing the CD177 SNP 829T allele. Our data clearly demonstrate that the CD177 SNP 829A>T is the primary genetic determinant for HNA-2 deficiency and expression variations. The mechanistic delineation of HNA-2 genetics will enable the development of genetic tests for diagnosis and prognosis of HNA-2-related human diseases. PMID:26024230

  17. A novel laboratory technique demonstrating the influences of RHD zygosity and the RhCcEe phenotype on erythrocyte D antigen expression

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Despotovic, Jenny M.; Howard, Thad A.; Ware, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    D antigen is the most immunogenic and clinically relevant antigen within the complex Rh blood group system. Variability of D antigen expression was first described decades ago but has rarely been investigated quantitatively, particularly in the context of RHD zygosity along with RhCcEe serological phenotype. With IRB approval, 107 deidentified blood samples were analyzed. Rh phenotypes were determined serologically by saline technique using monoclonal antibodies against D, C, c, E, and e antigens. RHD zygosity was determined using both PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphisms and quantitative real-time PCR techniques. A novel and robust method was developed for quantitation of erythrocyte D antigen sites using calibrated microspheres and flow cytometry, allowing correlation of D antigen density with RHD zygosity and expression of Rh CcEe antigens. Subjects homozygous for RHD expressed nearly twice the number of D antigen sites compared with RHD hemizygotes (33,560 ± 8,222 for DD versus 17,720 ± 4,471 for Dd, P < 0.0001). Expression of c or E antigens was associated with significantly increased erythrocyte D antigen expression, whereas presence of C or e antigens reduced expression. These data and this novel quantitation method will be important for future studies investigating the clinical relevance of D antigen variability. PMID:22121029

  18. Expression of blood group antigens in urinary tract tumours: prospective fluorescence study using cryostat sections of fresh frozen tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, S J; Abel, P; Henderson, D; Jones, N; Feizi, T

    1986-01-01

    Cryostat sections of fresh frozen tissues were used in a prospective study of blood group H and A antigen fluorescence in 73 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. The aim was to evaluate antigen expression without subjecting the tumour tissues to organic solvents that extract blood group active glycolipids. Deletion of the genetically predicted antigen was twice as common in tumours of pT1 or greater stage than those of pTa stage and also twice as common in poorly differentiated than in moderately well differentiated tumours. The considerable heterogeneity and overlap, however, in patterns of reactivity in tumours of various histopathological stages and grades and the effect of secretor status on antigenicity meant that there was no obvious antigenic feature that correlated precisely with invasive stage or differentiation grade. It remains to be determined whether the antigen positive and antigen negative tumours represent different disease entities with differing clinical courses. Our results indicate, however, that studies of the blood group antigens in urinary tract tumours are more likely to be of value in research into biochemical disorders in the neoplastic process than in routine clinical assessment as a guide to treatment. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3540013

  19. Differential expression of function-related antigens on blood monocytes in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Gabriela C; Ramos, María V; Gómez, Sonia A; Dran, Graciela I; Exeni, Ramón; Alduncín, Marta; Grimoldi, Irene; Vallejo, Graciela; Elías-Costa, Christian; Isturiz, Martín A; Palermo, Marina S

    2005-10-01

    Monocytes (Mo) mediate central functions in inflammation and immunity. Different subpopulations of Mo with distinct phenotype and functional properties have been described. Here, we investigate the phenotype and function of peripheral Mo from children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). For this purpose, blood samples from patients in the acute period of HUS (HUS AP) were obtained on admission before dialysis and/or transfusion. The Mo phenotypic characterization was performed on whole blood by flow cytometry, and markers associated to biological functions were selected: CD14 accounting for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness, CD11b for adhesion, Fc receptor for immunoglobulin G type I (FcgammaRI)/CD64 for phagocytosis and cytotoxicity, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR for antigen presentation. Some of these functions were also determined. Moreover, the percentage of CD14+ CD16+ Mo was evaluated. We found that the entire HUS AP Mo population exhibited reduced CD14, CD64, and CD11b expression and decreased LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor production and Fcgamma-dependent cytotoxicity. HUS AP showed an increased percentage of CD14+ CD16+ Mo with higher CD16 and lower CD14 levels compared with the same subset from healthy children. Moreover, the CD14++ CD16- Mo subpopulation of HUS AP had a decreased HLA-DR expression, which correlated with severity. In conclusion, the Mo population from HUS AP patients presents phenotypic and functional alterations. The contribution to the pathogenesis and the possible scenarios that led to these changes are discussed.

  20. Chloroplast-Derived Vaccine Antigens and Biopharmaceuticals: Expression, Folding, Assembly and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Chebolu, S.; Daniell, H.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgene expression, transgene containment via maternal inheritance, and multi-gene expression in a single transformation event. Oral delivery is facilitated by hyperexpression of vaccine antigens against cholera, tetanus, anthrax, plague, or canine parvovirus (4%–31% of total soluble protein, TSP) in transgenic chloroplasts (leaves) or non-green plastids (carrots, tomato) as well as the availability of antibiotic free selectable markers or the ability to excise selectable marker genes. Hyperexpression of several therapeutic proteins, including human serum albumin (11.1% TSP), somatotropin (7% TSP), interferon-alpha (19% TSP), interferon-gamma (6% TSP), and antimicrobial peptide (21.5% TSP), facilitates efficient and economic purification. Also, the presence of chaperones and enzymes in chloroplasts facilitates assembly of complex multisubunit proteins and correct folding of human blood proteins with proper disulfide bonds. Functionality of chloroplast-derived vaccine antigens and therapeutic proteins has been demonstrated by several assays, including the macrophage lysis assay, GM1-ganglioside binding assay, protection of HeLA cells or human lung carcinoma cells against encephalomyocarditis virus, systemic immune response, protection against pathogen challenge, and growth or inhibition of cell cultures. Purification of human proinsulin has been achieved using novel purification strategies (inverse temperature transition property) that do not require expensive column chromatography techniques. Thus, transgenic chloroplasts are ideal bioreactors for production of functional human and animal therapeutic proteins in an environmentally friendly manner. PMID:19401820

  1. Functional expression of a cattle MHC class II DR-like antigen on mouse L cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, D.C.; Craigmile, S.; Campbell, J.D.M.

    1996-09-01

    Cattle DRA and DRB genes, cloned by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, were transfected into mouse L cells. The cattle DR-expressing L-cell transfectant generated was analyzed serologically, biochemically, and functionally. Sequence analysis of the transfected DRB gene clearly showed showed that it was DRB3 allele DRB3*0101, which corresponds to the 1D-IEF-determined allele DRBF3. 1D-IEF analysis of the tranfectant confirmed that the expressed DR product was DRBF3. Functional integrity of the transfected gene products was demonstrated by the ability of the transfectant cell line to present two antigens (the foot-and-mouth disease virus-derived peptide FMDV15, and ovalbumin) to antigen-specific CD4{sup +} T cells from both the original animal used to obtain the genes, and also from an unrelated DRBF3{sup +} heterozygous animal. Such transfectants will be invaluable tools, allowing us to dissect the precise contributions each locus product makes to the overall immune response in heterozygous animals, information essential for rational vaccine design. 45 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. [Expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and selection of its specific binding peptide].

    PubMed

    Hou, Li-Hua; Du, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; An, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2004-09-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a homologue of the Ly-6/Thy-1 family of cell surface antigen, is expressed by a majority of human prostate cancers and is a promising target for prostate cancer immunotherapy. To obtain the specific peptide binding with PSCA for targeted immunotherapy, PSCA gene was obtained by RT-PCR from human prostate cancer cell line DU145 and the transcated PSCA (tPSCA) gene was cloned into vector pQE30 for soluble expression in E. coli. The identity of recombinant tPSCA was confirmed through ELISA and western blot by use of anti-PSCA monoclonal antibody. Then the 12-peptide phage display library was screened with the purified tPSCA protein for its specific binding peptide through 3 rounds panning. For identifying the peptide's specificity, the peptide was coupled with EGFP (enhanced green fluorecent protein) by recombinant DNA technology and the recombinant coupled protein was termed 11-EGFP. The binding specificity with tPSCA of 11-EGFP was further confirmed by ELISA and competitive inhibition experiment. Flow cytometry demonstrated its binding specificity with cell line DU145. In conclusion, a 12-amino-acid peptide which could bind with PSCA specifically was found and it may be a potential tool for targeted immunotherapy of prostate carcinoma. PMID:15973992

  3. [Expression characteristics of differentiation antigens on granulocytes in patients with megaloblastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Tao; Ke, Pei-Feng; Shen, Wen-Hong; Chen, Su-Ning; Wang, Guo-Zheng

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to explore the change characteristics of cell differentiation antigen (CD) on bone marrow (BM) granulocytes in patients,with megaloblastic anemia (MA). In combination with BM cell morphology, hemogram, level of blood serum folic acid, level of Vit B(12), cell genetics and biological examination data, the BM granulocytes differentiation antigens in 13 patients with MA were detected by flow cyto metry and analyzed retrospectively, in order to summarize the variation characteristics of CD13, CD33 and CD15 expressed on myeloid cells in patient with MA, including forward scatter light (FSC) and side scatter light (SSC) signal intensity, then these findings were compared with that in normal healthy persons. The results showed that the expression rates of CD13, CD15 and CD33 on granulocytic in patients with MA and normal healthy persons were (44.53 ± 16)%, (96.16 ± 2.67)%, (80.81 ± 14.71)% and (62.33 ± 11.02)%, (99.53 ± 0.46)%, (70.00 ± 7.81)% respectively, in which the expression rate of CD13 and CD15 in patients with MA decreased (P < 0.01), while the expression rate of CD33 increased (P < 0.01). The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CD13, CD15, CD33, SSC and FSC in MA patients and normal healthy persons were 3.39 ± 1.41, 14.29 ± 6.59, 1.95 ± 0.94, 478.78 ± 70.43, 633.46 ± 75.53 and 5.12 ± 1.15, 20.67 ± 5.13, 1.04 ± 0.17, 332.00 ± 38.16, 537.00 ± 16.70 respectively, in which the MFI of CD13 and CD15 on granulocytes in MA patients decreased (P < 0.01),while the MFI of FSC,SSC and CD33 increased (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05). It is concluded that not only the morphology of BM granulocytes in patents with MA shows dysmaturity, but the expressing feature of differentiation antigens on BM granulocytes in MA patients also displays dysmaturity.These findings will contribute to the clinical diagnosis of MA patients. PMID:23998595

  4. A microarray method for identifying tumor antigens by screening a tumor cDNA expression library against cancer sera

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, Kurt; Sykes, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The immune system responds to tumor cells. The challenge has been how to effectively use these responses to treat or protect against cancer. Toward the goal of developing a cancer vaccine, we are pursuing methodologies for the discovery and testing of useful antigens. We present an array-based approach for discovering these B cell antigens by directly screening for specific host-sera reactivity to lysates from tumor-derived cDNA expression libraries. Several cancer-specific antigens were identified, and these are currently being validated as potential candidates. PMID:23851590

  5. Expression of complete transplantation antigens by mammalian cells transformed with truncated class I genes.

    PubMed

    Goodenow, R S; Stroynowski, I; McMillan, M; Nicolson, M; Eakle, K; Sher, B T; Davidson, N; Hood, L

    1983-02-01

    Mouse L cells transformed with the cloned class I genes of the major histocompatibility complex of the mouse express transplantation antigens with serological determinants of the donor haplotype. However, transformation with the truncated subclones of a BALB/c H-2Ld gene containing the exons encoding the external domains also leads to the production of cells which express complete cell-surface molecules. Moreover, full-length products of the foreign haplotype, as judged by serological and biochemical criteria, are generated independently of the use of carrier DNA in transformation. However, the frequency of productive transformation is substantially less than that obtained with a complete gene. The most plausible explanation for these phenomena involves homologous recombination between host chromosomal and donor class I sequences. PMID:6823314

  6. Prostate-specific antigen and hormone receptor expression in male and female breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostate carcinoma is among the most common solid tumors to secondarily involve the male breast. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP) are expressed in benign and malignant prostatic tissue, and immunohistochemical staining for these markers is often used to confirm the prostatic origin of metastatic carcinoma. PSA expression has been reported in male and female breast carcinoma and in gynecomastia, raising concerns about the utility of PSA for differentiating prostate carcinoma metastasis to the male breast from primary breast carcinoma. This study examined the frequency of PSA, PSAP, and hormone receptor expression in male breast carcinoma (MBC), female breast carcinoma (FBC), and gynecomastia. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for PSA, PSAP, AR, ER, and PR was performed on tissue microarrays representing six cases of gynecomastia, thirty MBC, and fifty-six FBC. Results PSA was positive in two of fifty-six FBC (3.7%), focally positive in one of thirty MBC (3.3%), and negative in the five examined cases of gynecomastia. PSAP expression was absent in MBC, FBC, and gynecomastia. Hormone receptor expression was similar in males and females (AR 74.1% in MBC vs. 67.9% in FBC, p = 0.62; ER 85.2% vs. 68.5%, p = 0.18; and PR 51.9% vs. 48.2%, p = 0.82). Conclusions PSA and PSAP are useful markers to distinguish primary breast carcinoma from prostate carcinoma metastatic to the male breast. Although PSA expression appeared to correlate with hormone receptor expression, the incidence of PSA expression in our population was too low to draw significant conclusions about an association between PSA expression and hormone receptor status in breast lesions. PMID:20863373

  7. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates. PMID:25792295

  8. Heat Shock Protein-90 Inhibitors Enhance Antigen Expression on Melanomas and Increase T Cell Recognition of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Timothy J.; Dunn, Ian S.; Rose, Lenora B.; Newton, Estelle E.; Pandolfi, Franco; Kurnick, James T.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90) share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:25503774

  9. The B-cell tumor–associated antigen ROR1 can be targeted with T cells modified to express a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Nishida, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Bleakley, Marie; Turtle, Cameron J.; Chang, Wen-Chung; Greisman, Harvey A.; Wood, Brent; Maloney, David G.; Jensen, Michael C.; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for B-cell lineage surface molecules such as CD20 exert antitumor activity in B-cell malignancies, but deplete normal B cells. The receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) was identified as a highly expressed gene in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), but not normal B cells, suggesting it may serve as a tumor-specific target for therapy. We analyzed ROR1-expression in normal nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic cells including B-cell precursors, and in hematopoietic malignancies. ROR1 has characteristics of an oncofetal gene and is expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells, B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, but not in major adult tissues apart from low levels in adipose tissue and at an early stage of B-cell development. We constructed a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor that when expressed in T cells from healthy donors or CLL patients conferred specific recognition of primary B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, including rare drug effluxing chemotherapy resistant tumor cells that have been implicated in maintaining the malignancy, but not mature normal B cells. T-cell therapies targeting ROR1 may be effective in B-CLL and other ROR1-positive tumors. However, the expression of ROR1 on some normal tissues suggests the potential for toxi-city to subsets of normal cells. PMID:20702778

  10. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor in Multiple Leukocyte Lineages in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Carmen S. M.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Schröder, Jan; Papenfuss, Anthony T.; von Scheidt, Bianca; Moeller, Maria; Devaud, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified CD8+ T lymphocytes have shown significant anti-tumor effects in the adoptive immunotherapy of cancer, with recent studies highlighting a potential role for a combination of other immune subsets to enhance these results. However, limitations in present genetic modification techniques impose difficulties in our ability to fully explore the potential of various T cell subsets and assess the potential of other leukocytes armed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). To address this issue, we generated a transgenic mouse model using a pan-hematopoietic promoter (vav) to drive the expression of a CAR specific for a tumor antigen. Here we present a characterization of the immune cell compartment in two unique vav-CAR transgenic mice models, Founder 9 (F9) and Founder 38 (F38). We demonstrate the vav promoter is indeed capable of driving the expression of a CAR in cells from both myeloid and lymphoid lineage, however the highest level of expression was observed in T lymphocytes from F38 mice. Lymphoid organs in vav-CAR mice were smaller and had reduced cell numbers compared to the wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, the immune composition of F9 mice differed greatly with a significant reduction in lymphocytes found in the thymus, lymph node and spleen of these mice. To gain insight into the altered immune phenotype of F9 mice, we determined the chromosomal integration site of the transgene in both mouse strains using whole genome sequencing (WGS). We demonstrated that compared to the 7 copies found in F38 mice, F9 mice harbored almost 270 copies. These novel vav-CAR models provide a ready source of CAR expressing myeloid and lymphoid cells and will aid in facilitating future experiments to delineate the role for other leukocytes for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26505904

  11. A novel neutralization sensitive and subdominant RAP-1-related antigen (RRA) is expressed by babesia bovis merozoites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The Babesia bovis genome encodes a rap-1 related gene denominated RAP-1 related antigen (RRA). In this study, we analyzed the pattern of expression, immunogenicity and functional relevance of RRA. Methods: Phylogenetic analysis was performed using the program Phylip. Expression of rra wa...

  12. Expression of GD3 disialoganglioside antigen on peripheral T-lymphocytes in patients with disseminated malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Welte, B; Handgretinger, R; Rassner, G; Fierlbeck, G

    1997-04-01

    Disialoganglioside antigens GD2 and GD3 are expressed on most melanoma cells. On melanoma surrounding T-cells in immunohistological sections, disialogangliosides can also be found, as well as in a small % of T-lymphocytes in peripheral blood from healthy persons. In order to find out if there is a difference in ganglioside expression on peripheral T-lymphocytes between melanoma patients and healthy persons, we examined the expression of CD3 as T-lymphocytic antigen and GD2 or GD3 antigens, respectively, by flow cytometry. We used peripheral mononuclear blood cells of 12 patients with advanced disseminated malignant melanoma and of 12 healthy control donors. For immunostaining, murine monoclonal antibodies Leu-4, 14G2a and MB3.6 were used, recognizing CD3, GD2 and GD3. GD2 expression was found on only a low proportion of T-lymphocytes in patients and healthy persons (pat.: mean = 1.2% +/- 0.7%, co.: mean = 0.4% +/- 0.4%). Disialoganglioside antigen GD3, however, could be demonstrated on an average of 8.4% +/- 4.6% of patients' and on 4.0% +/- 2.1% of healthy persons' T-cells. There is a statistically significant difference (P < 0.01) between the data of patients' and control group. We conclude that there is a correlation between advanced malignant melanoma and expression of GD3 antigen on patients' peripheral T-lymphocytes. The immunological relevance of our findings is discussed. PMID:9209886

  13. Evidence that measles virus hemagglutinin initiates modulation of leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Nagendra, A R; Smith, C W; Wyde, P R

    1995-07-01

    Measles virus (MV), human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and other leukotropic viruses can modulate the expression of leukocyte function antigen 1 (LFA-1) on the surface of infected and nearby leukocytes. This ability to induce changes in LFA-1 expression may play an important role in the pathogenesis of these viruses. However, the mechanism(s) involved in virus-mediated regulation of LFA-1 is unknown. Evidence is presented in this report that it is the MV hemagglutinin (H) protein that initiates up-regulation of LFA-1 expression in leukocyte cultures infected with this virus. Indeed, comparison of the abilities of different MV strains to modulate LFA-1 expression, examination of published nucleotide sequences for the H proteins of different vaccine strains, and competitive inhibition assays using oligopeptides homologous or heterologous to a region of the H protein gene encompassing amino acid 116 (from the amino terminus) all suggest that it is this portion of the H protein that is responsible for MV-induced alteration of LFA-1. These comparisons also support the hypothesis that there is a relationship between the abilities of different MV strains to alter LFA-1 expression and their pathogenic potentials.

  14. Engineering artificial antigen-presenting cells to express a diverse array of co-stimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Suhoski, Megan M; Golovina, Tatiana N; Aqui, Nicole A; Tai, Victoria C; Varela-Rohena, Angel; Milone, Michael C; Carroll, Richard G; Riley, James L; June, Carl H

    2007-05-01

    To facilitate the therapeutic application of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), we have developed a cell-based artificial APC (aAPC) system by engineering K562 cells with lentiviruses to direct the stable expression and secretion of a variety of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. Here we report the use of a combinatorial lentiviral gene transfer approach to achieve long-term stable expression of at least seven genes in the K562 parental cell line. Expression of various combinations of genes on the aAPC enables the precise determination of human T-cell activation requirements, such that aAPCs can be tailored for the optimal propagation of T-cell subsets with specific growth requirements and distinct functions. The aAPCs support ex vivo growth and long-term expansion of functional human CD8 T cells without requiring the addition of exogenous cytokines, in contrast to the use of natural APCs. Distinct populations of T cells can be expanded with aAPCs expressing CD137L (4-1BBL) and/or CD80. Finally, the aAPCs provide an efficient platform to expand genetically modified T cells and to maintain CD28 expression on CD8 T cells. Therefore, K562-based aAPCs have therapeutic potential for adoptive immunotherapies and vaccinations. PMID:17375070

  15. T antigen expression and tumorigenesis in transgenic mice containing a mouse major urinary protein/SV40 T antigen hybrid gene.

    PubMed Central

    Held, W A; Mullins, J J; Kuhn, N J; Gallagher, J F; Gu, G D; Gross, K W

    1989-01-01

    A hybrid mouse major urinary protein (MUP)/SV40 T antigen gene was microinjected into fertilized mouse embryos and the resulting transgenic mice analyzed for the regulated expression of the transgene. Available evidence indicates that the MUP gene used for the hybrid gene construct is expressed in both male and female liver and possibly mammary gland. Three different transgenic lines exhibited a consistent pattern of tissue specific expression of the transgene. As a consequence of transgene expression and T antigen synthesis in the liver, both male and female transgenic animals developed liver hyperplasia and tumors. Transgene expression and liver hyperplasia commenced at approximately 2-4 weeks of age, the same time that MUP gene expression is first detected in the liver. The expression of the transgene resulted in an immediate strong suppression of liver MUP mRNA levels but had relatively little effect on other liver specific mRNAs. From 4 to 8 weeks, the liver increased several fold in size, relative to non-transgenic littermates. Definitive tumor nodules were not apparent until 8-10 weeks. The transgene was also consistently found to be expressed in the skin sebaceous glands and the preputial gland, a modified sebaceous gland. The expression of the transgene in the skin sebaceous glands is consistent with the presence of MUP mRNA in the skin and a putative role for MUPs in the transport and excretion of small molecules. Occasional expression of the transgene in other tissues (kidney and mammary connective tissues) was also noted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:2714250

  16. Generation of Salmonella ghost cells expressing fimbrial antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and evaluation of their antigenicity in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Song; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong Kug; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, John Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium ghost cells expressing K88ab, K88ac, K99, and FasA fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in their envelopes were constructed. The genes encoding the fimbriae were individually cloned into an expression plasmid, pMMP81, carrying the asd gene, which was subsequently electroporated into the Δasd S. Typhimurium mutant. Plasmid pJHLP99, carrying the phiX174 lysis gene E, was also subsequently electroporated into the Salmonella mutant. The presence of the individual fimbriae on the ghost cells was examined by Western blot analysis. Forty BALB/c mice were equally divided into 2 groups of 20 mice each. Group A mice were intramuscularly vaccinated with a mixture of the 4 ghost cells expressing the individual fimbriae. The group B mice were inoculated with sterile phosphate-buffered saline as a control. The antigen-specific serum IgG concentrations were significantly higher in group A than in group B from week 2 until week 6 after inoculation. In addition, the antigen-specific IgA concentrations in fecal samples were significantly higher in group A than in group B at week 2 after inoculation. A large difference between the groups in the number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine was observed by immunohistochemical study. Also, the splenic lymphocyte proliferative responses were significantly greater in group A than in the control mice. These results suggest that vaccination with our Salmonella ghost cells can induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses and that the increased number of antigen-specific IgA-secreting cells in the small intestine may be correlated with the elevated fecal IgA immune response. PMID:26733731

  17. Prokaryotic Expression, Purification and Immunogenicity in Rabbits of the Small Antigen of Hepatitis Delta Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tunitskaya, Vera L.; Eliseeva, Olesja V.; Valuev-Elliston, Vladimir T.; Tyurina, Daria A.; Zakirova, Natalia F.; Khomich, Olga A.; Kalis, Martins; Latyshev, Oleg E.; Starodubova, Elizaveta S.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.; Ivanov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a viroid-like blood-borne human pathogen that accompanies hepatitis B virus infection in 5% patients. HDV has been studied for four decades; however, the knowledge on its life-cycle and pathogenesis is still sparse. The studies are hampered by the absence of the commercially-available HDV-specific antibodies. Here, we describe a set of reproducible methods for the expression in E. coli of His-tagged small antigen of HDV (S-HDAg), its purification, and production of polyclonal anti-S-HDAg antibodies in rabbits. S-HDAg was cloned into a commercial vector guiding expression of the recombinant proteins with the C-terminal His-tag. We optimized S-HDAg protein purification procedure circumventing a low affinity of the His-tagged S-HDAg to the Ni-nitrilotriacetyl agarose (Ni-NTA-agarose) resin. Optimization allowed us to obtain S-HDAg with >90% purity. S-HDAg was used to immunize Shinchilla grey rabbits which received 80 μg of S-HDAg in two subcutaneous primes in the complete, followed by four 40 μg boosts in incomplete Freunds adjuvant. Rabbits were bled two weeks post each boost. Antibody titers determined by indirect ELISA exceeded 107. Anti-S-HDAg antibodies detected the antigen on Western blots in the amounts of up-to 100 pg. They were also successfully used to characterize the expression of S-HDAg in the eukaryotic cells by immunofluorescent staining/confocal microscopy. PMID:27775592

  18. Expression and immunotherapeutic targeting of the SSX family of cancer-testis antigens in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heath A; Cronk, Robert J; Lang, Joshua M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-11-01

    Recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of the first immunotherapy for prostate cancer encourages efforts to improve immune targeting of this disease. The synovial sarcoma X chromosome breakpoint (SSX) proteins comprise a set of cancer-testis antigens that are upregulated in MHC class I-deficient germline cells and in various types of advanced cancers with a poor prognosis. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the SSX family member SSX2 can arise spontaneously in prostate cancer patients. Thus, SSX2 and other proteins of the SSX family may offer useful targets for tumor immunotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the expression of SSX family members in prostate cancer cell lines and tumor biopsies to identify which members might be most appropriate for immune targeting. We found that SSX2 was expressed most frequently in prostate cell lines, but that SSX1 and SSX5 were also expressed after treatment with the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. Immunohistochemical analysis of microarrayed tissue biopsies confirmed a differential level of SSX protein expression in human prostate cancers. Notably, SSX expression in patient tumor samples was restricted to metastatic lesions (5/22; 23%) and no expression was detected in primary prostate tumors examined (0/73; P < 0.001). We determined that cross-reactive immune responses to a dominant HLA-A2-specific SSX epitope (p103-111) could be elicited by immunization of A2/DR1 transgenic mice with SSX vaccines. Our findings suggest that multiple SSX family members are expressed in metastatic prostate cancers which are amenable to simultaneous targeting. PMID:21880588

  19. CETN1 is a cancer testis antigen with expression in prostate and pancreatic cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Cancer Testis Antigens (CTAs) are a group of genes that are highly expressed in the normal testis and several types of cancer. Due to their restricted expression in normal adult tissues, CTAs have been attractive targets for immunotherapy and biomarker development. In this work, we discovered that Centrin 1 (CETN1) which is found in the centrosome of all eukaryotes, may be a member of this group and is highly expressed in prostate and pancreatic cancer. Three members of the centrin family of calcium binding proteins (CETN) are localized to the centrosome in all eukaryotes with CDC31 being the sole yeast homolog. CETN1 is a retrogene that probably arose from a retrotransposition of CETN2, an X-linked gene. A previous mouse study shows that CETN1 is expressed solely in the testis, while CETN2 is expressed in all organs. Results In this work, we show that CETN1 is a new member of the growing group of CTAs. Through the mining of publicly available microarray data, we discovered that human CETN1 expression but not CETN2 or CETN3 is restricted to the testis. In fact, CETN1 is actually down-regulated in testicular malignancies compared to normal testis. Using q-PCR, CETN1 expression is shown to be highly up-regulated in cancer of the prostate and in pancreatic xenografts. Unexpectedly however, CETN1 expression was virtually absent in various cell lines until they were treated with the DNA demethylation agent 5’AZA-2’Deoxycytidine (AZA) but showed no increased expression upon incubation with Histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin-A (TSA) alone. Additionally, like most CTAs, CETN1 appears to be an intrinsically disordered protein which implies that it may occupy a hub position in key protein interaction networks in cancer. Neither CETN1 nor CETN2 could compensate for loss of CDC31 expression in yeast which is analogous to published data for CETN3. Conclusions This work suggests that CETN1 is a novel CTA with expression in cancer of the prostate and

  20. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol suppresses macrophage costimulation by decreasing heat-stable antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Clements, D J; Matveyeva, M; McCoy, K L

    1998-08-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) suppresses several immunologic functions of macrophages. The costimulatory activity of a THC-exposed macrophage hybridoma was investigated by its ability to elicit interleukin-2 secretion by a helper T cell hybridoma activated with immobilized monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody. THC added at culture initiation inhibited the T cell response in a dose-dependent manner. When the macrophages were fixed with paraformaldehyde before culture, THC had no effect on T cell stimulation. However, macrophages, which were preincubated with THC and then fixed, were impaired in delivering costimulatory signals to T cells cultured without THC. The drug's inhibitory effect on macrophage costimulatory activity was reversible. THC exposure also decreased macrophage expression of heat-stable antigen (HSA). Antibody blocking experiments showed that HSA expressed on the macrophages provided an important costimulatory signal, whereas B7-1 and B7-2 molecules had a minor role. Treatment of the macrophages with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C cleaved HSA, but not the transmembrane B7 molecules, from the cell surface. Similar to THC, enzyme treatment significantly diminished macrophage costimulatory activity, which was also reversible. After drug or enzyme removal, HSA expression returned to the control level by 4 h. Therefore, THC suppresses macrophage costimulatory activity by diminishing cell surface expression of HSA.

  1. Aire mediates thymic expression and tolerance of pancreatic antigens via an unconventional transcriptional mechanism.

    PubMed

    Danso-Abeam, Dina; Staats, Kim A; Franckaert, Dean; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Liston, Adrian; Gray, Daniel H D; Dooley, James

    2013-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire), mediates central tolerance of peripheral self. Its activity in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) directs the ectopic expression of thousands of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), causing the deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. The molecular mechanisms orchestrating the breadth of transcriptional regulation by Aire remain unknown. One prominent model capable of explaining both the uniquely high number of Aire-dependent targets and their specificity posits that tissue-specific transcription factors induced by Aire directly activate their canonical targets, exponentially adding to the total number of Aire-dependent TRAs. To test this "Hierarchical Transcription" model, we analysed mice deficient in the pancreatic master transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1), specifically in TECs (Pdx1(ΔFoxn1) ), for the expression and tolerance of pancreatic TRAs. Surprisingly, we found that lack of Pdx1 in TECs did not reduce the transcription of insulin or somatostatin, or alter glucagon expression. Moreover, in a model of thymic deletion driven by a neo-TRA under the control of the insulin promoter, Pdx1 in TECs was not required to affect thymocyte deletion or the generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. These findings suggest that the capacity of Aire to regulate expression of a huge array of TRAs relies solely on an unconventional transcriptional mechanism, without intermediary transcription factors.

  2. Human kallikrein 3 (prostate specific antigen) and human kallikrein 5 expression in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Darling, M R; Tsai, S; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Diamandis, E P

    2006-01-01

    The human kallikrein 5 protein (hK5) is expressed in many normal tissues, most notably in skin, breast, salivary gland and esophagus. It has also been shown to be a potential biomarker for breast, ovarian and testicular cancer. Human kallikrein 3 (hK3; prostate-specific antigen) is the most useful marker for adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to determine whether hK3 and hK5 are expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues. Pleomorphic adenomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas, acinic cell carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified of both minor and major salivary glands were examined. The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors do not show high levels of expression of hK5. Staining was most prominent in keratinizing epithelia in pleomorphic adenomas. hK3 is not expressed in salivary gland tumors.

  3. Clonal evolution of myeloma cells leads to quantitative changes in immunoglobulin secretion and surface antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Leibson, P J; Loken, M R; Panem, S; Schreiber, H

    1979-01-01

    We report that a cloned population of tumor cells can rapidly produce variants that differ in their quantitative expression of surface proteins and in their rate of immunoglobulin secretion. A fresh clonal isolate of S107 myeloma cells possessing large amounts of surface IgA was continuously passaged in vitro for 2 years. During this period, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis indicated the development of subpopulations possessing decreased amounts of surface IgA. Cells from these variant subpopulations were isolated by first using the cell sorter to enrich for cells with decreased amounts of surface IgA and then cloning the selected population in soft agar. The 50 sublines that were isolated showed heritable differences in their levels of surface IgA and H-2 antigens and in their rates of myeloma protein secretion. Sublines having either large amounts, intermediate amounts, or absence of surface IgA also had corresponding large amounts, intermediate amounts, or absence of myeloma protein secretion. In contrast, a decrease or loss of surface Ig did not correlate with a decrease or loss of viral envelope glycoprotein gp71 and H-2 antigens. The variants did not resemble the phenotypes of less-differentiated normal lymphocyte populations of the B-cell lineage. The isolation and characterization of these variants allows us to explore the mechanisms and pathways of tumor cell differentiation as well as to study the regulation and function of cell surface proteins. PMID:288078

  4. Stress-induced alterations in interferon production and class II histocompatibility antigen expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Cunnick, J. E.; Armfield, A. V.; Wood, P. G.; Rabin, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Mild electric foot-shock has been shown to be a stressor that can alter immune responses. Male Lewis rats were exposed to one session of 16 5.0-s 1.6-mA foot-shocks. Production of interferon-gamma by splenocytes in response to concanavalin-A was decreased in spleens from the shocked rats compared to control spleens. Spleen cells from rats treated with nadolol, a peripherally acting beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, and then shocked, showed dose-dependent attenuation of the suppression of interferon-gamma production. This suggests that catecholamines mediate shock-induced suppression of interferon-gamma production. The percentage of splenic mononuclear cells expressing class II histocompatibility (Ia) antigens on their surfaces from spleens of shocked rats was determined by flow cytometry. Significantly decreased class II positive mononuclear cells were present in the spleens of shocked rats in comparison to the spleens of control rats. This may reflect an alteration of cell trafficking or decreased production of class II antigens.

  5. Analysis of Structures and Epitopes of Surface Antigen Glycoproteins Expressed in Bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Hua; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Qingli; Gong, Jing; Cong, Haizi; Xin, Qing; He, Shenyi

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite capable of infecting humans and animals. Surface antigen glycoproteins, SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y, are expressed on the surface of bradyzoites. These antigens have been shown to protect bradyzoites against immune responses during chronic infections. We studied structures of SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y proteins using bioinformatics methods. The protein sequence alignment was performed by T-Coffee method. Secondary structural and functional domains were predicted using software PSIPRED v3.0 and SMART software, and 3D models of proteins were constructed and compared using the I-TASSER server, VMD, and SWISS-spdbv. Our results showed that SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y are highly homologous proteins. They share the same conserved peptides and HLA-I restricted epitopes. The similarity in structure and domains indicated putative common functions that might stimulate similar immune response in hosts. The conserved peptides and HLA-restricted epitopes could provide important insights on vaccine study and the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:23586017

  6. Astrocytes produce interferon that enhances the expression of H-2 antigens on a subpopulation of brain cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Using primary culture methods, we show that purified astrocytes from embryonic mouse or rat central nervous system (CNS) can be induced to produce interferon (IFN) activity when pretreated with a standard IFN- superinducing regimen of polyribonucleotide, cycloheximide, and actinomycin D, whereas IFN activity was not inducible in neuronal cultures derived from mouse CNS. Astrocyte IFN displays inductive, kinetic, physicochemical, and antigenic properties similar to those of IFN-alpha/beta, but is dissimilar to lymphocyte IFN (IFN-gamma). Treatment of pure astrocytic cultures or astrocytes cultured with neurons with astrocyte IFN or IFN-alpha/beta induced a dramatic increase in the expression of H-2 antigens on a subpopulation of astrocytes. Neither neurons nor oligodendroglia expressed detectable levels of H-2 antigens when exposed to astrocyte IFN, IFN-alpha/beta, or to IFN-beta. Injection of astrocyte IFN or IFN-alpha/beta directly into brains of newborn mice indicated that H-2 antigens were also induced in vivo. None of the IFNs (astrocyte, alpha/beta, or beta) tested induced Ia antigens on CNS cells in vitro or in vivo. Since H-2 antigens have a critical role in immune responses, astrocyte IFN may initiate and participate in immune reactions that contribute to immunoprotective and immunopathological responses in the CNS. PMID:2423537

  7. A Recombinant Raccoon Poxvirus Vaccine Expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and Truncated V Antigens Protects Animals against Lethal Plague.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Berlier, Willy; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas. PMID:26344891

  8. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  9. The ganglioside antigen GD2 is surface-expressed in Ewing sarcoma and allows for MHC-independent immune targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kailayangiri, S; Altvater, B; Meltzer, J; Pscherer, S; Luecke, A; Dierkes, C; Titze, U; Leuchte, K; Landmeier, S; Hotfilder, M; Dirksen, U; Hardes, J; Gosheger, G; Juergens, H; Rossig, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Novel treatment strategies are needed to cure disseminated Ewing sarcoma. Primitive neuroectodermal features and a mesenchymal stem cell origin are both compatible with aberrant expression of the ganglioside antigen GD2 and led us to explore GD2 immune targeting in this cancer. Methods: We investigated GD2 expression in Ewing sarcoma by immunofluorescence staining. We then assessed the antitumour activity of T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for GD2 against Ewing sarcoma in vitro and in vivo. Results: Surface GD2 was detected in 10 out of 10 Ewing sarcoma cell lines and 3 out of 3 primary cell cultures. Moreover, diagnostic biopsies from 12 of 14 patients had uniform GD2 expression. T cells specifically modified to express the GD2-specific chimeric receptor 14. G2a-28ζ efficiently interacted with Ewing sarcoma cells, resulting in antigen-specific secretion of cytokines. Moreover, chimeric receptor gene-modified T cells from healthy donors and from a patient exerted potent, GD2-specific cytolytic responses to allogeneic and autologous Ewing sarcoma, including tumour cells grown as multicellular, anchorage-independent spheres. GD2-specific T cells further had activity against Ewing sarcoma xenografts. Conclusion: GD2 surface expression is a characteristic of Ewing sarcomas and provides a suitable target antigen for immunotherapeutic strategies to eradicate micrometastatic cells and prevent relapse in high-risk disease. PMID:22374462

  10. Expression of Histo-Blood Group A Type 1, 2 and 3 Antigens in Normal Skin and Extramammary Paget’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Aki; Kimura, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Uede, Koji; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of histo-blood group A type 1, 2 and 3 antigens was investigated using immunohistochemistry in normal human skin and extramammary Paget’s disease (EMPD). We used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) Bioclone-A (BA) and AR-1, which react with histo-blood group A type 1/2, and type 3 antigens, respectively. We found that A type 1, 2 and 3 antigens were expressed in the upper layer of the epidermis. We also found that the duct cells of the eccrine glands expressed A type 1/2 antigens and A type 3 antigens regardless of secretor status. The dark cells of the eccrine glands expressed A type 1, 2 and 3 antigens from A blood group secretors, but not from non-secretors. Apocrine glands, hair follicles and sebaceous glands did not express these antigens. Since these antigens were localized in the eccrine glands, we examined the possibility of a skin tumor marker. Interestingly, 7 out of 16 extramammary Paget’s disease cases were immunopositive for these antigens. Six cases were accompanied by dermal invasion. Five cases without dermal invasion were immunonegative against these antigens. These results suggest that the expression of histo-blood group A antigens in EMPD are associated with a poor histopathological prognosis. PMID:19180201

  11. Differences in sialyl-Tn antigen expression between keratoacanthomas and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P; Clausen, O P; Bryne, M

    1999-04-01

    Keratoacanthoma and squamous cell carcinoma are common skin tumors, especially in immunosuppressed transplant recipients, but the distinction between these two types of epidermal neoplasia may be difficult. Sialyl-Tn (Sia-GalNAc-O-Ser/Thr) is a cell surface carbohydrate associated with hyperplasia in squamous epithelium, and correlated with poor prognosis in several human adenocarcinomas. Twenty-seven keratoacanthomas and 29 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas were examined for the expression of sialyl-Tn and of the Ki67 epitope, the latter a marker for cell proliferation. By immunohistochemistry, basaloid tumor cells at the periphery of tumor nests showed some degree of sialyl-Tn expression in 16 keratoacanthomas (59%), while only three squamous cell carcinomas (10%) showed sialyl-Tn-positive basaloid tumor cells (p<0.001). Keratinized, differentiated tumor cells were more often sialyl-Tn-positive in keratoacanthomas (89%) than in squamous cell carcinomas (31%) (p<0.001). A striking sialyl-Tn-positivity in the basal cell layer was found in a border zone directly adjacent to most tumors of both types (88 and 88%). By immunohistochemical examination of parallel sections and by double immunofluorescence, sialyl-Tn antigen expression was primarily seen in cells that did not express Ki67, although some overlap was present. Keratoacanthomas from transplant recipients did not differ in sialyl-Tn expression compared to those from non-immunosuppressed patients. The results indicate that sialyl-Tn expression is not directly related to cell proliferation, but rather to cellular features of post-mitotic cells, and that sialyl-Tn is not associated with a malignant phenotype. Sialyl-Tn may be linked to tumor regression, as seen in keratoacanthomas. PMID:10335895

  12. Expression, characterisation and antigenicity of a truncated Hendra virus attachment protein expressed in the protozoan host Leishmania tarentolae.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kerstin; dos Reis, Vinicius Pinho; Finke, Stefan; Sauerhering, Lucie; Stroh, Eileen; Karger, Axel; Maisner, Andrea; Groschup, Martin H; Diederich, Sandra; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is an emerging zoonotic paramyxovirus within the genus Henipavirus that has caused severe morbidity and mortality in humans and horses in Australia since 1994. HeV infection of host cells is mediated by the membrane bound attachment (G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins, that are essential for receptor binding and fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The eukaryotic unicellular parasite Leishmania tarentolae has recently been established as a powerful tool to express recombinant proteins with mammalian-like glycosylation patterns, but only few viral proteins have been expressed in this system so far. Here, we describe the purification of a truncated, Strep-tag labelled and soluble version of the HeV attachment protein (sHeV G) expressed in stably transfected L. tarentolae cells. After Strep-tag purification the identity of sHeV G was confirmed by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. The functional binding of sHeV G to the HeV cell entry receptor ephrin-B2 was confirmed in several binding assays. Generated polyclonal rabbit antiserum against sHeV G reacted with both HeV and Nipah virus (NiV) G proteins in immunofluorescence assay and efficiently neutralised NiV infection, thus further supporting the preserved antigenicity of the purified protein.

  13. Differential expression of a new tumor-associated antigen, TLP, during human colorectal cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Guadagni, F; Graziano, P; Roselli, M; Mariotti, S; Bernard, P; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P; Rasi, G; Garaci, E

    1999-04-01

    Tumour liberated particles (TLP) have been proposed as a potential new serum tumor marker. In particular, a high percentage of patients with early stages of lung cancer scored positive for serum TLP, suggesting its possible role as a marker for early diagnosis of disease. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression of TLP in the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence in order to determine whether its expression correlates with the various stages of cancer transformation. TLP distribution was assessed by immunohistochemistry in normal, premalignant, and malignant colorectal lesions. Normal colonic mucosa and hyperplastic polyps showed no positive staining, whereas adenomas and adenocarcinomas reacted to anti-TLP serum. The percentage of positive tumor cells increased from adenomas with mild dysplasia to adenomas with severe dysplasia. Moreover, a supranuclear staining pattern was observed mainly in adenomas with mild dysplasia, whereas adenomas with severe dysplasia as well as adenocarcinomas showed a characteristic diffuse staining pattern and a strong staining intensity. Only a few cases of adenocarcinoma were found to be TLP-negative and all were poorly differentiated. Our results suggest that TLP antigen expression may be considered as a marker of epithelial atypia in the colorectal tract and as a potential target for new diagnostic and/or therapeutic approaches to human colorectal cancer.

  14. Codon optimisation to improve expression of a Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-specific membrane-associated antigen by Lactobacillus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christopher; Douarre, Pierre E; Soulimane, Tewfik; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; MacSharry, John; Coffey, Aidan; Sleator, Roy D; O'Mahony, Jim

    2013-06-01

    Subunit and DNA-based vaccines against Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) attempt to overcome inherent issues associated with whole-cell formulations. However, these vaccines can be hampered by poor expression of recombinant antigens from a number of disparate hosts. The high G+C content of MAP invariably leads to a codon bias throughout gene expression. To investigate if the codon bias affects recombinant MAP antigen expression, the open reading frame of a MAP-specific antigen MptD (MAP3733c) was codon optimised for expression against a Lactobacillus salivarius host. Of the total 209 codons which constitute MAP3733c, 172 were modified resulting in a reduced G+C content from 61% for the native gene to 32.7% for the modified form. Both genes were placed under the transcriptional control of the PnisA promoter; allowing controlled heterologous expression in L. salivarius. Expression was monitored using fluorescence microscopy and microplate fluorometry via GFP tags translationally fused to the C-termini of the two MptD genes. A > 37-fold increase in expression was observed for the codon-optimised MAP3733synth variant over the native gene. Due to the low cost and improved expression achieved, codon optimisation significantly improves the potential of L. salivarius as an oral vaccine stratagem against Johne's disease. PMID:23620276

  15. Altered expression of Lewis blood group and related antigens in fetal, normal adult and malignant tissues of the uterine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Nakayama, M; Tanizawa, O

    1990-01-01

    The expression of the Lewis blood group and its related antigens in fetal, normal adult and malignant tissues of the uterine endometrium was examined immunohistochemically using a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies with specificities for Lewis-a (La), Sialyl Lewis-a (SLa), Lewis-b (Lb), Lewis-X (LX), Sialyl Lewis-X (SLX) and Lewis-Y (LY) antigens. La, SLa and SLX having one fucose residue were detected in a small number of fetal tissues, while Lb and LY having two fucose residues were found in most cases. In the adult endometrium, expression of Lb and LY was considerably lower than those in fetal tissues, although expression of La and SLa was not different between these two tissues. Expression of LX and SLX was pronounced in adult when compared with fetal tissues. Malignant endometrial glands expressed La, SLa, Lb and LY, extensively, while LX and SLX were expressed less than in normal tissues. Lb and LY can thus be considered oncofetal antigens, extensively expressed in fetal and malignant tissues but not in normal adult tissues. Expression of Lb and LY was greater than that of La and SLA in carcinoma; an increase in the activity of fucose transferase might be associated with malignant transformation in the uterine endometrium.

  16. An affinity matured minibody for PET imaging of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-expressing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Jeffrey V.; Zhou, Yu; Olafsen, Tove; Salazar, Felix B.; McCabe, Katelyn E.; Hahm, Scott; Marks, James D.; Reiter, Robert E.; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a cell surface glycoprotein expressed in normal human prostate and bladder, is over-expressed in the majority of localized prostate cancer and most bone metastases. We have previously shown that the hu1G8 minibody, a humanized anti-PSCA antibody fragment (single-chain Fv-CH3 dimer, 80 kDa), can localize specifically and image PSCA-expressing xenografts at 21 h post-injection. However, the humanization and antibody fragment reformatting decreased its apparent affinity. Here, we sought to evaluate PET imaging contrast with affinity matured minibodies. Methods Yeast scFv display, involving four rounds of selection, was used to generate the three affinity matured antibody fragments (A2, A11, and C5) that were reformatted into minibodies. These three affinity matured anti-PSCA minibodies were characterized in vitro, and following radiolabeling with 124I were evaluated in vivo for microPET imaging of PSCA-expressing tumors. Results The A2, A11, and C5 minibody variants all demonstrated improved affinity compared to the parental (P) minibody and were ranked as follows: A2 > A11 > C5 > P. The 124I-labeled A11 minibody demonstrated higher immunoreactivity than the parental minibody and also achieved the best microPET imaging contrast in two xenograft models, LAPC-9 (prostate cancer) and Capan-1 (pancreatic cancer), when evaluated in vivo. Conclusion Of the affinity variant minibodies tested, the A11 minibody that ranked second in affinity was selected as the best immunoPET tracer to image PSCA-expressing xenografts. This candidate is currently under development for evaluation in a pilot clinical imaging study. PMID:20354850

  17. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade CD19-Specific T Cells Stably Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Using Sleeping Beauty System and Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J.; Dawson, Margaret J.; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E.; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼1010 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  18. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10) T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  19. Carbohydrate antigen expression in primary tumors, metastatic lesions, and serous effusions from patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian carcinoma: evidence of up-regulated Tn and Sialyl Tn antigen expression in effusions.

    PubMed

    Davidson, B; Berner, A; Nesland, J M; Risberg, B; Kristensen, G B; Tropé, C G; Bryne, M

    2000-09-01

    The object of this study was the investigation of carbohydrate antigen expression in malignant epithelial cells and benign mesothelial cells in serous effusions from patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian carcinomas. In addition, to compare antigen expression in carcinoma cells in effusions with those of corresponding primary tumors and metastatic lesions. Sections from 63 malignant effusions from ovarian carcinoma patients and 15 reactive effusions were immunohistochemically stained, using 5 monoclonal antibodies for Lewis(y), Sialyl Lewis(x), Tn, and Sialyl Tn antigens. Tissue sections (n = 97) from corresponding primary ovarian carcinomas and metastatic lesions, as well as from 12 malignant mesotheliomas, were additionally stained using the above panel. Staining for the 4 antigens was seen in carcinoma cells in serous effusions in the majority of cases (range = 71% to 85%). In contrast, immunoreactivity was detected in mesothelial cells in only 6% to 23% of the specimens studied (P < .001 for all 5 markers). With the exception of B3 antibody against Lewis(y) antigen, malignant mesotheliomas stained negative, infrequently showing focal immunoreactivity. An up-regulation of Tn and Sialyl Tn expression was detected in carcinoma cells in effusions when compared with both primary tumors (P < .003 and P < .007, respectively) and metastatic lesions (P < .034 and .041, respectively). Cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens can thus be used as an adjunct in the differentiation between malignant epithelial and reactive mesothelial cells. Ovarian carcinoma cells in effusions show up-regulation of Tn and Sialyl Tn, possibly representing a transient phenotypic alteration facilitating metastasis. PMID:11014575

  20. Ontogeny of expression of Pa and RT1.Aa antigens on rat placenta and on fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Ho, H N; Macpherson, T A; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1987-02-01

    The unique pregnancy-associated (Pa) antigen, which is a class I antigen encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), elicits a nondestructive maternal antibody response. By contrast, the class I transplantation antigen RT1.Aa elicits a destructive antibody response in tissue transplantation but not during pregnancy. With the use of the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) immunohistochemical method, the Pa and RT1.Aa antigens were localized on the basophilic and giant cells of the basal zone trophoblast, the endovascular trophoblast and decidual interstitial trophoblast, and the chorioallantoic membrane but not on the labyrinthine zone trophoblast as early as the 12th day of gestation. These two antigens were also expressed on the epidermis, hair follicles, spleen, thymic medulla, bronchial epithelium, intestinal epithelium, the hepatic Kupffer cells, endocardium, endothelium of blood vessels, renal tubular cells and glomeruli, and renal pelvis and ureter of fetal and adult rat tissues. Absorption studies with placental tissue confirmed the presence of these two antigens in the rat placenta, and antibody-blocking studies confirmed their unique specificities.

  1. Differential expression of T cell antigens in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: a quantitative analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Ginaldi, L; Farahat, N; Matutes, E; De Martinis, M; Morilla, R; Catovsky, D

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To obtain reference values of the level of expression of T cell antigens on normal lymphocyte subsets in order to disclose differences which could reflect their function or maturation stages, or both. METHODS: Peripheral blood from 15 healthy donors was processed by flow cytometry with triple colour analysis. For each sample phycoerythrin (PE) conjugated CD2, CD4, CD5, CD8, and CD56 monoclonal antibodies were combined with Cy5-R-phycoerythrin (TC) conjugated CD3 and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated CD7; CD2- and CD7-PE were also combined with CD3-TC and CD4-FITC. Standard microbeads with different capacities to bind mouse immunoglobulins were used to convert the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values of the lymphocyte subsets identified by multiparametric flow cytometry into the number of antigen molecules per cell, measured as antibody binding capacity (ABC). RESULTS: CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells exhibit a higher CD3 antigen expression compared with CD8+ (suppressor/ cytotoxic) T lymphocytes. Within the CD4+ T cells, the CD4+CD7- subset expressed a lower level of CD3 compared with CD4+CD7+ and CD8+CD7+ cells, and higher CD2 and CD5 expression than the main CD3+CD7+ subset. Major differences in antigen expression were also detected between CD3+ T cells and CD3-CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells: NK cells exhibited higher levels of CD7 and CD56 and lower levels of CD2 and CD5 than T cells. Significantly lower CD5 expression was also detected in the small CD5+ B lymphocyte subset compared with T cells. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative flow cytometry with triple colour analysis may be used to detect antigen modulations in disease states and to increase the accuracy of diagnosis by comparison with findings in normal counterparts. Images PMID:8813949

  2. Expression and function of the murine B7 antigen, the major costimulatory molecule expressed by peritoneal exudate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Razi-Wolf, Z; Freeman, G J; Galvin, F; Benacerraf, B; Nadler, L; Reiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The murine B7 (mB7) protein is a potent costimulatory molecule for the T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation of murine CD4+ T cells. We have previously shown that stable mB7-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells but not vector-transfected controls synergize with either anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody-induced or concanavalin A-induced T-cell activation, resulting ultimately in lymphokine production and proliferation. We now have generated a hamster anti-mB7 monoclonal antibody. This reagent recognizes a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50-60 kDa. The mB7 antigen is expressed on activated B cells and on peritoneal exudate cells (PECs). Antibody blocking experiments demonstrate that mB7 is the major costimulatory molecule expressed by PECs for the activation of murine CD4+ T cells. This suggests an important role for mB7 during immune-cell interactions. We have also surveyed a panel of murine cell lines capable of providing costimulatory activity. Our results indicate that mB7 is the major costimulatory molecule on some but not all cell lines and that there may be additional molecules besides mB7 that can costimulate the activation of murine CD4+ T cells. Images PMID:1373896

  3. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Dina A.; Scarff, Jennifer M.; Garcia, Preston P.; Cassidy, Sara K. B.; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M.; Inzana, Thomas J.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine. PMID:26148026

  4. Recombinant Salmonella Expressing Burkholderia mallei LPS O Antigen Provides Protection in a Murine Model of Melioidosis and Glanders.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Dina A; Scarff, Jennifer M; Garcia, Preston P; Cassidy, Sara K B; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Waag, David M; Inzana, Thomas J; Goldberg, Joanna B

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei are the etiologic agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively. These bacteria are highly infectious via the respiratory route and can cause severe and often fatal diseases in humans and animals. Both species are considered potential agents of biological warfare; they are classified as category B priority pathogens. Currently there are no human or veterinary vaccines available against these pathogens. Consequently efforts are directed towards the development of an efficacious and safe vaccine. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an immunodominant antigen and potent stimulator of host immune responses. B. mallei express LPS that is structurally similar to that expressed by B. pseudomallei, suggesting the possibility of constructing a single protective vaccine against melioidosis and glanders. Previous studies of others have shown that antibodies against B. mallei or B. pseudomallei LPS partially protect mice against subsequent lethal virulent Burkholderia challenge. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen against lethal intranasal infection with Burkholderia thailandensis, a surrogate for biothreat Burkholderia spp. in a murine model that mimics melioidosis and glanders. All vaccine-immunized mice developed a specific antibody response to B. mallei and B. pseudomallei O antigen and to B. thailandensis and were significantly protected against challenge with a lethal dose of B. thailandensis. These results suggest that live-attenuated SL3261 expressing B. mallei O antigen is a promising platform for developing a safe and effective vaccine.

  5. NXS2 murine neuroblastomas express increased levels of MHC class I antigens upon recurrence following NK-dependent immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Neal, Zane C; Imboden, Michael; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Kim, Kyung-Mann; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Surfus, Jean; Dixon, John R; Lode, Holger N; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated recurrent NXS2 neuroblastoma tumors that developed following NK- or T-cell-mediated immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice. Recurrent tumors developed following an NK-dependent antitumor response using a suboptimal dose of hu14.18-IL2, a humanized IL-2 immunocytokine targeted to the GD(2)-ganglioside. This treatment initially induced complete resolution of measurable tumor in the majority of mice, followed, however, by delayed tumor recurrence in some mice. These recurrent NXS2 tumors revealed markedly enhanced (> fivefold) MHC class I antigen expression when compared with NXS2 tumors growing in PBS-treated control mice. A similar level of enhanced MHC class I antigen-expression could be induced on NXS2 cells in vitro by culturing with interferon gamma, and was associated with reduced susceptibility to both NK-cell-mediated tumor cell lysis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in vitro. In contrast, Flt3-ligand treatment of NXS2-bearing mice induced a protective T-cell-dependent antitumor memory response. Recurrent NXS2 tumors that developed following Flt3-L therapy revealed a decreased expression of MHC class I antigens. While NXS2 tumors are susceptible to in vivo destruction following either hu14.18-IL2 or Flt3-ligand immunotherapies, these results suggest that some tumor cells may be selected to survive and progress by expressing either higher or lower levels of MHC class I antigen in order to resist either NK- or T-cell-mediated antitumor responses, respectively.

  6. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical. PMID:2468179

  7. Epigenetic repression of E-cadherin expression by hepatitis B virus x antigen in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Arzumanyan, A; Friedman, T; Kotei, E; Ng, I O L; Lian, Z; Feitelson, M A

    2012-02-01

    Loss of E-cadherin is associated with acquisition of metastatic capacity. Numerous studies suggest that histone deacetylation and/or hypermethylation of CpG islands in E-cadherin gene (CDH1) are major mechanisms responsible for E-cadherin silencing in different tumors and cancer cell lines. The hepatitis B virus (HBV)-encoded X antigen, HBx, contributes importantly to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma using multiple mechanisms. Experiments were designed to test if in addition to CDH1 hypermethylation HBx promotes epigenetic modulation of E-cadherin transcriptional activity through histone deacetylation and miR-373. The relationships between HBx, E-cadherin, mSin3A, Snail-1 and miR-373 were evaluated in HBx expressing (HepG2X) and control (HepG2CAT) cells by western blotting, immunoprecipitation (IP), chromatin IP as well as by immunohistochemical staining of liver and tumor tissue sections from HBV-infected patients. In HepG2X cells, decreased levels of E-cadherin and elevated levels of mSin3A and Snail-1 were detected. Reciprocal IP with anti-HBx and anti-mSin3A demonstrated mutual binding. Furthermore, HBx-mSin3A colocalization was detected by immunofluorescent staining. HBx downregulated E-cadherin expression by the recruitment of the mSin3A/histone deacetylase complex to the Snail-binding sites in human CDH1. Histone deacetylation inhibition by Trichostatin-A treatment restored E-cadherin expression. Mir-373, a positive regulator of E-cadherin expression, was downregulated by HBx in HepG2X cells and tissue sections from HBV-infected patients. Thus, histone deacetylation of CDH1 and downregulation of miR-373, together with the previously demonstrated hypermethylation of CDH1 by HBx, may be important for the understanding of HBV-related carcinogenesis.

  8. Linear antigenic mapping of flagellin (FliC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with yeast surface expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Li, Tao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Bin; Si, Wei; Xin, Jiuqing; Yang, Kongbin; Shi, Xuanlin; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Henggui

    2016-02-29

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne illness around the world and can have significant health implications in humans, poultry and other animals. Flagellin (FliC) is the primary component of bacterial flagella. It has been shown that the FliC of S. Enteritidis is a significant antigenic structure and can elicit strong humoral responses against S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. Here, we constructed a FliC antigen library using a yeast surface expression system. Yeast cells expressing FliC peptide antigens were labeled with chicken sera against S. Enteritidis and sorted using FACS. The analyses of FliC peptides revealed that the FliC linear antigenicity in chickens resided on three domains which were able to elicit strong humoral responses in vivo. Animal experiments further revealed that the antibodies elicited by these antigenic domains were able to significantly inhibit the invasion of S. Enteritidis into the liver and spleen of chickens. These findings will facilitate our better understanding of the humoral responses elicited by FliC in chickens upon infection by S. Enteritidis. PMID:26854340

  9. Linear antigenic mapping of flagellin (FliC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with yeast surface expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Li, Tao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Bin; Si, Wei; Xin, Jiuqing; Yang, Kongbin; Shi, Xuanlin; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Henggui

    2016-02-29

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne illness around the world and can have significant health implications in humans, poultry and other animals. Flagellin (FliC) is the primary component of bacterial flagella. It has been shown that the FliC of S. Enteritidis is a significant antigenic structure and can elicit strong humoral responses against S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. Here, we constructed a FliC antigen library using a yeast surface expression system. Yeast cells expressing FliC peptide antigens were labeled with chicken sera against S. Enteritidis and sorted using FACS. The analyses of FliC peptides revealed that the FliC linear antigenicity in chickens resided on three domains which were able to elicit strong humoral responses in vivo. Animal experiments further revealed that the antibodies elicited by these antigenic domains were able to significantly inhibit the invasion of S. Enteritidis into the liver and spleen of chickens. These findings will facilitate our better understanding of the humoral responses elicited by FliC in chickens upon infection by S. Enteritidis.

  10. [Expression of Epstein-Barr virus membrane antigen in CHO cell].

    PubMed

    Ye, P; Li, Y; Gu, S

    1998-12-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pCMV/MA, was generated by isolating the Epstein-Barr Virus(EBV) membrane antigen(MA) gene with anchor sequence removed from pSV40/MA and cloning it into pcDNA3, with MA gene and Neomycin gene under the control of CMV promoter and SV40 promoter respectively. CHO cells were transfected with pCMV/MA using liposome and then grown in DMEM medium in the presence of G418. Two clones highly expressing MA were obtained. EBV-MA was purified from the medium of CHO cells by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Western-blot showed that the molecular weight of proteins expressed were about 340 kD and 220 kD. It could specifically react with anti-MA monoclonal antibody in indirect immunofluorescent and immunodot assay. The yield of MA was estimated to be 1.9 micrograms/ml per day by SDS-PAGE scanning and Lowry methods. The optimal culture condition of the CHO cells was to use medium supplemented with 10% serum until 80% cell confluence, then with 2%-5% serum and collected medium continually. The genetic stability of the cells was confirmed by freeze--revival and culture without G418. The purified MA was used to immunize mice and the geometric mean titer of the specific antibody was 1:180, while the positive rate of antibody was 100%.

  11. Abnormal cell surface antigen expression in individuals with variant CD45 splicing and histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boxall, Sally; McCormick, James; Beverley, Peter; Strobel, Stephan; De Filippi, Paola; Dawes, Ritu; Klersy, Catherine; Clementi, Rita; De Juli, Emanuella; Ferster, Aline; Wallace, Diana; Aricò, Maurizio; Danesino, Cezare; Tchilian, Elma

    2004-03-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) are members of a group of rare heterogenous disorders, the histiocytoses, characterized by uncontrolled accumulation of pleomorphic infiltrates of leukocytes. The etiology of these diseases is mainly unknown. CD45 is a hemopoietic cell specific tyrosine phosphatase essential for antigen receptor mediated signaling in lymphocytes and different patterns of CD45 splicing are associated with distinct functions. Recently a polymorphism (C77G) in exon 4 of CD45 causing abnormal CD45 splicing and a point mutation affecting CD45 dimerization were implicated in multiple sclerosis in humans and lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in mice respectively. Here we show that two patients with HLH exhibited abnormal CD45 splicing caused by the C77G variant allele, while a further 21 HLH patients have normal CD45. We have also examined 62 LCH patients and found three to have the C77G mutation. Peripheral blood thymus-derived (T) CD8(+) cells from normal individuals carrying the C77G mutation show a significant decrease in the proportion of cells expressing L-selectin and increased frequency of cells with LFA-1(hi) expression. It remains to be established whether C77G is a contributing factor in these histiocytic disorders. PMID:14630980

  12. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in oesophageal diseases; correlation with transforming growth factor alpha expression.

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, J; McMenemin, R; Yu, C; Hopwood, D; Wormsley, K G

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to correlate mucosal proliferation in Barrett's oesophagus with expression of a growth promoting peptide, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha). Oesophageal mucosa was studied from 50 patients with oesophageal disease who had been treated by oesophagectomy. Histological analysis showed a range of oesophageal pathology - 18 patients had gastric type Barrett's mucosa, 18 had intestinal type Barrett's mucosa, and 14 had oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Sections were stained immunohistochemically for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (an index of cellular proliferation) and TGF alpha. PCNA immunostaining was seen mainly in the basal cells of the neck/foveolar epithelial compartment of the glands in Barrett's oesophagus. However, in mucosa with high grade dysplasia, the proliferative compartment extended upwards into the superficial layers of the glands. At least 2000 cells were counted in each patient to determine the proportion with PCNA immunoreactivity (PCNA labelling index). The labelling index was highest in adenocarcinoma (25%) and in Barrett's intestinal type mucosa with high grade dysplasia (26%) compared with intestinal type mucosa with no significant dysplasia (20%) and Barrett's gastric type mucosa (12%). There was a significant positive correlation between PCNA labelling indices and TGF alpha expression in Barrett's mucosa (p less than 0.01). In glands showing high grade dysplasia, TGF alpha immunoreactivity was seen in the same regions of the glands as PCNA immunoreactivity, indicating the possibility of involvement of TGF alpha in (pre) neoplastic proliferation in Barrett's oesophagus. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:1351861

  13. Clinical implication of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Aya; Ishigami, Sumiya; Kijima, Yuko; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arigami, Takaaki; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-11-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F is one of the non-classical HLA class I molecules that protects the fetus in pregnancy. HLA-F expression was immunohistochemically examined and the association between clinical parameters and HLA-F expression was analyzed. Cancerous HLA-F and stromal HLA-F-positive infiltrating cells were detected in 91 (40.0%) and 186 (81.6%) cases, respectively. HLA-F positivity in cancer cells was significantly associated with tumor size (P < 0.05). There was a weak correlation between HLA-F positivity of cancer cells and HLA-F positive infiltrative cells (P < 0.01, r = 0.11). HLA-F positivity did not affect patients' survival in 209 breast cancer. However, confined to stage II breast cancer, the HLA-F positive group showed significantly poorer outcomes than the HLA-F negative group (P < 0.05). The present study provides the first evidence that HLA-F positivity in breast carcinoma affects clinicopathological factors and could be selected as a prognostic marker for limited clinical stage.

  14. Binding to histo-blood group antigen-expressing bacteria protects human norovirus from acute heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Breiman, Adrien; le Pendu, Jacques; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate if histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) expressing bacteria have any protective role on human norovirus (NoV) from acute heat stress. Eleven bacterial strains were included, belonging to Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Clostridium difficile, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, and B. longum. HBGA expression of the bacteria as well as binding of human NoV virus-like particles (VLPs, GI.1, and GII.4 strains) to the bacteria were detected by flow cytometry. NoV VLPs pre-incubated with HBGA expressing or non-HBGA expressing bacteria were heated and detected by both direct ELISA and porcine gastric mucin-binding assay. The NoV-binding abilities of the bacteria correlated well with their HBGA expression profiles. Two HBGA expressing E. coli (LMG8223 and LFMFP861, both GI.1 and GII.4 binders) and one non-HBGA expressing E. coli (ATCC8739, neither GI.1 nor GII.4 binder) were selected for the heat treatment test with NoV VLPs. Compared with the same cell numbers of non-HBGA expressing E. coli, the presence of HBGA-expressing E. coli could always maintain higher antigen integrity, as well as mucin-binding ability of NoV VLPs of both GI.1 and GII.4 after heat-treatment at 90°C for 2 min. These results indicate that HBGA-expressing bacteria may protect NoVs during the food processing treatments, thereby facilitating their transmission. PMID:26191052

  15. Cloning of cDNA of major antigen of foot and mouth disease virus and expression in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küpper, Hans; Keller, Walter; Kurz, Christina; Forss, Sonja; Schaller, Heinz

    1981-02-01

    Double-stranded DNA copies of the single-stranded genomic RNA of foot and mouth disease virus have been cloned into the Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. A restriction map of the viral genome was established and aligned with the biochemical map of foot and mouth disease virus. The coding sequence for structural protein VP1, the major antigen of the virus, was identified and inserted into a plasmid vector where the expression of this sequence is under control of the phage λ PL promoter. In an appropriate host the synthesis of antigenic polypeptide can be demonstrated by radioimmunoassay.

  16. A recombinant vaccine expressing a mammalian Mycobacterium sp. antigen is immunostimulatory but not protective in striped bass.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Smith, Stephen A; Schurig, Gerhardt G

    2003-09-15

    A recombinant vaccine was constructed for piscine mycobacteriosis utilizing a Brucella abortus strain RB51 vector expressing a mammalian Mycobacterium sp. 85A antigen. Juvenile striped bass were inoculated with the resulting construct at doses equivalent to 10(6), 10(7), 10(8), 10(9), and 10(10) colony-forming units/fish. Blood and tissue samples from these fish demonstrated significant specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses towards the 85A antigen in a dose-dependent manner. However, survival studies determined that inoculated fish failed to demonstrate cross-protective responses after live Mycobacterium marinum challenge 70 days post-inoculation.

  17. Environmental enrichment alters glial antigen expression and neuroimmune function in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Lauren L; Chao, Agnes; Bilbo, Staci D

    2012-03-01

    Neurogenesis is a well-characterized phenomenon within the dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult hippocampus. Environmental enrichment (EE) in rodents increases neurogenesis, enhances cognition, and promotes recovery from injury. However, little is known about the effects of EE on glia (astrocytes and microglia). Given their importance in neural repair, we predicted that EE would modulate glial phenotype and/or function within the hippocampus. Adult male rats were housed either 12 h/day in an enriched environment or in a standard home cage. Rats were injected with BrdU at 1 week, and after 7 weeks, half of the rats from each housing group were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and cytokine and chemokine expression was assessed within the periphery, hippocampus and cortex. Enriched rats had a markedly blunted pro-inflammatory response to LPS within the hippocampus. Specifically, expression of the chemokines Ccl2, Ccl3 and Cxcl2, several members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family, and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β were all significantly decreased following LPS administration in EE rats compared to controls. EE did not impact the inflammatory response to LPS in the cortex. Moreover, EE significantly increased both astrocyte (GFAP+) and microglia (Iba1+) antigen expression within the DG, but not in the CA1, CA3, or cortex. Measures of neurogenesis were not impacted by EE (BrdU and DCX staining), although hippocampal BDNF mRNA was significantly increased by EE. This study demonstrates the importance of environmental factors on the function of the immune system specifically within the brain, which can have profound effects on neural function.

  18. Osteosarcoma is characterised by reduced expression of markers of osteoclastogenesis and antigen presentation compared with normal bone

    PubMed Central

    Endo-Munoz, L; Cumming, A; Sommerville, S; Dickinson, I; Saunders, N A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone tumour in children and adolescents. Patients who respond poorly to chemotherapy have a higher risk of metastatic disease and 5-year survival rates of only 10–20%. Therefore, identifying molecular targets that are specific for OS, or more specifically, metastatic OS, will be critical to the development of new treatment strategies to improve patient outcomes. Methods: We performed a transcriptomic analysis of chemo-naive OS biopsies and non-malignant bone biopsies to identify differentially expressed genes specific to OS, which could provide insight into OS biology and chemoresistance. Results: Statistical analysis of the OS transcriptomes found differential expression of several metallothionein family members, as well as deregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation. Tumours also exhibited significantly increased expression of ID1 and profound down-regulation of S100A8, highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets for OS. Finally, we found a significant correlation between OS and impaired osteoclastogenesis and antigen-presenting activity. The reduced osteoclastogenesis and antigen-presenting activity were more profound in the chemoresistant OS samples. Conclusion: Our results indicate that OS displays gene signatures consistent with decreased antigen-presenting activity, enhanced chemoresistance, and impaired osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, these alterations are more pronounced in chemoresistant OS tumour samples. PMID:20551950

  19. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV–LACK, rCDV–TSA, and rCDV–LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV–LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV–TSA- and rCDV–LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV–LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs. PMID:26162094

  20. Efficacy of Recombinant Canine Distemper Virus Expressing Leishmania Antigen against Leishmania Challenge in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Miura, Ryuichi; Kooriyama, Takanori; Yoneda, Misako; Takenaka, Akiko; Doki, Miho; Goto, Yasuyuki; Sanjoba, Chizu; Endo, Yasuyuki; Fujiyuki, Tomoko; Sugai, Akihiro; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccination confers long-term protection against CDV reinfection. To investigate the utility of CDV as a polyvalent vaccine vector for Leishmania, we generated recombinant CDVs, based on an avirulent Yanaka strain, that expressed Leishmania antigens: LACK, TSA, or LmSTI1 (rCDV-LACK, rCDV-TSA, and rCDV-LmSTI1, respectively). Dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK were protected against challenge with lethal doses of virulent CDV, in the same way as the parental Yanaka strain. To evaluate the protective effects of the recombinant CDVs against cutaneous leishmaniasis in dogs, dogs were immunized with one recombinant CDV or a cocktail of three recombinant CDVs, before intradermal challenge (in the ears) with infective-stage promastigotes of Leishmania major. Unvaccinated dogs showed increased nodules with ulcer formation after 3 weeks, whereas dogs immunized with rCDV-LACK showed markedly smaller nodules without ulceration. Although the rCDV-TSA- and rCDV-LmSTI1-immunized dogs showed little protection against L. major, the cocktail of three recombinant CDVs more effectively suppressed the progression of nodule formation than immunization with rCDV-LACK alone. These results indicate that recombinant CDV is suitable for use as a polyvalent live attenuated vaccine for protection against both CDV and L. major infections in dogs. PMID:26162094

  1. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nicole R; Hecht, Karen A; Hu, DeHong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C; Rorrer, Gregory L; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-03-18

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins comprising either enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or single chain antibodies engineered with a tetracysteine tagging sequence. Of interest were the site-specific binding of (1) the fluorescent biarsenical probe AsCy3 and AsCy3e to the tetracysteine tagged fusion proteins and (2) high and low molecular mass antigens, the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT), to biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies. Analysis of biarsenical probe binding using fluorescence and structured illumination microscopy indicated differential colocalization with EGFP in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting the use of either EGFP or bound AsCy3 and AsCy3e in studying biosilica maturation. Large increases in the lifetime of a fluorescent analogue of TNT upon binding single chain antibodies provided a robust signal capable of discriminating binding to immobilized antibodies in the transformed frustule from nonspecific binding to the biosilica matrix. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an ability to engineer diatoms to create antibody-functionalized mesoporous silica able to selectively bind chemical and biological agents for the development of sensing platforms.

  2. Expression and purification of recombinant active prostate-specific antigen from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sujin; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2007-05-01

    Human prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a 33 kDa serine protease with comprehensive homology to glandular kallikrein, is secreted from prostatic tissue into the seminal fluid and enters into the circulation. The level of PSA increases in the serum of patients with prostatic cancer and hence is widely employed as a marker of the disease status. In particular, an enzymatically active PSA that is a form cleaved at the N-terminal seven-amino-acids prosequence, APLILSR, of proPSA may play an important roll in the progression of prostate cancer. Thus, the presence of the active form would selectively discriminate the cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this study, we developed a convenient purification method for the acquisition of active PSA and proPSA. Recombinant proPSA and active PSA were expressed directly in Escherichia coli, easily and efficiently isolated from inclusion bodies, refolded, and purified. Moreover, the enzymatic activity of the recombinant active PSA was confirmed as serine protease using chromogenic chymotrypsin substrate. This purified active PSA could be further applied to scrutinize the biological or conformational characteristics of the protein and to develop specific diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents against prostate cancer.

  3. Replication stress and mitotic dysfunction in cells expressing simian virus 40 large T antigen.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Filippakis, Harilaos; Huang, Haomin; Yen, Timothy J; Gjoerup, Ole V

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) binds to the Bub1 kinase, a key regulator of the spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation. Bub1 mutations or altered expression patterns are linked to chromosome missegregation and are considered to be a driving force in some human cancers. Here we report that LT, dependent on Bub1 binding, causes micronuclei, lagging chromatin, and anaphase bridges, which are hallmarks of chromosomal instability (CIN) and Bub1 insufficiency. Using time-lapse microscopy, we demonstrate that LT imposes a Bub1 binding-dependent delay in the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Kinetochore fibers reveal that LT, via Bub1 binding, causes aberrant kinetochore (KT)-microtubule (MT) attachments and a shortened interkinetochore distance, consistent with a lack of tension. Previously, we showed that LT also induces the DNA damage response (DDR) via Bub1 binding. Using inducible LT cell lines, we show that an activated DDR was observed before the appearance of anaphase bridges and micronuclei. Furthermore, LT induction in serum-starved cells demonstrated γ-H2AX accumulation in cells that had not yet entered mitosis. Thus, DDR activation can occur independently of chromosome segregation defects. Replication stress pathways may be responsible, because signatures of replication stress were observed, which were attenuated by exogenous supplementation with nucleosides. Our observations allow us to propose a model that explains and integrates the diverse manifestations of genomic instability induced by LT.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  5. Expression of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen in Drosophila S2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alexandra S.; Spina, Ângela; Pereira, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells were transfected with a plasmid vector (pAcHBsAgHy) containing the S gene, coding for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), under control of the constitutive drosophila actin promoter (pAc), and the hygromycin B (Hy) selection gene. The vector was introduced into Schneider 2 (S2) Drosophila cells by DNA transfection and a cell population (S2AcHBsAgHy) was selected by its resistance to hygromycin B. The pAcHBsAgHy vector integrated in transfected S2 cell genome and approximately 1,000 copies per cell were found in a higher HBsAg producer cell subpopulation. The HBsAg production varied in different subpopulations, but did not when a given subpopulation was cultivated in different culture flasks. Higher HBsAg expression was found in S2AcHBsAgHy cells cultivated in Insect Xpress medium (13.5 μg/1E7 cells) and SFX medium (7 μg/1E7 cells) in comparison to SF900II medium (0.6 μg/1E7 cells). An increase of HBsAg was observed in culture maintained under hygromycin selection pressure. Data presented in the paper show that S2AcHBsAgHy cells produce efficiently the HBsAg which is mainly found in the cell supernatant, suggesting that HBsAg is secreted from the cells. The data also show that our approach using the Drosophila expression system is suitable for the preparation of other viral protein preparation. PMID:19003172

  6. Cloning, expression, and immunological evaluation of two putative secreted serine protease antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Skeiky, Y A; Lodes, M J; Guderian, J A; Mohamath, R; Bement, T; Alderson, M R; Reed, S G

    1999-08-01

    Culture filtrate proteins (CFP) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been shown to contain immunogenic components that elicit at least partial protective immunity against Mycobacterium infection. To clone genes encoding some of the immunogenic proteins, we made a high-titer rabbit anti-CFP serum and used it to screen an M. tuberculosis genomic expression library in Escherichia coli. In this paper, we describe the molecular cloning of two new protein components of CFP and identified them as members of the serine protease gene family. Their open reading frames contain N-terminal hydrophobic secretory signals consistent with their detection in CFP. The predicted molecular masses of the mature, fully processed forms of both antigens are approximately 32 kDa, in agreement with their observed sizes on immunoblots of CFP probed with polyclonal rabbit antisera made to the recombinant proteins. Thus, these proteins have been designated MTB32A and MTB32B. Interestingly, and despite 66% amino acid sequence homology between the two proteins, polyclonal rabbit antisera made to each of the recombinant proteins were found to be specific for the respective immunizing antigens. The recombinant proteins were also evaluated in in vitro assays with donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive individuals of diverse ethnic backgrounds. MTB32A but not MTB32B stimulated PBMC from healthy PPD-positive donors but not from PPD-negative donors to proliferate and secrete gamma interferon. MTB32A is encoded by a single-copy gene which is present in both virulent and avirulent strains of the M. tuberculosis complex and the BCG strain of Mycobacterium bovis but absent in the environmental mycobacterial species tested. In addition, nucleotide sequence comparison of mtb32a of the avirulent H37Ra strain and the virulent Erdman strain, as well as with the corresponding sequences (identified in the databases) of strain H37Rv and the clinical

  7. A new human tumor-associated antigen (TLP) is naturally expressed in rat DHD-K12 colorectal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rasi, G; Sinibaldi-Vallebona, P; Serafino, A; Bernard, P; Pierimarchi, P; Guarino, E; Faticanti-Scucchi, L; Graziano, P; Guadagni, F; Garci, E

    2000-02-15

    Renewed interest in cancer immunotherapy has been raised by the availability of a variety of tumor-associated antigens and animal models. We have recently described the presence of a new antigen, TLP, in sera and cancer tissue from lung and colorectal cancer patients. In order to develop an experimental model suitable for preclinical studies on cancer vaccines, we investigated the presence of TLP antigen in vitro, in the DHD-K12 cell line and in vivo, in metastases induced in syngeneic BDIX rats by DHD-K12 cell injection. TLP was not detected in any tissue of healthy rats nor in normal tissues of tumor-bearing rats. This is in agreement with our previous studies, in which we had demonstrated that TLP is expressed in human colorectal cancer and adenomas but not in normal colonic mucosa. Our results indicate TLP as a possible human tumor-specific antigen naturally expressed in DHD-K12 tumor syngeneic to immunocompetent BDIX rats.

  8. Characterization of the unusual bidirectional ves promoters driving VESA1 expression and associated with antigenic variation in Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyi; Xiao, Yu-Ping; Bouchut, Anne; Al-Khedery, Basima; Wang, Hongbin; Allred, David R

    2012-03-01

    Rapid clonal antigenic variation in Babesia bovis involves the variant erythrocyte surface antigen-1 (VESA1) protein expressed on the infected-erythrocyte surface. Because of the significance of this heterodimeric protein for demonstrated mechanisms of parasite survival and virulence, there is a need to understand how expression of the ves multigene family encoding this protein is controlled. As an initial step toward this goal, we present here initial characterization of the ves promoter driving transcription of VESA1a and -1b subunits. A series of transfection constructs containing various sequence elements from the in vivo locus of active ves transcription (LAT) were used to drive expression of the firefly luciferase gene in a dual luciferase-normalized assay. The results of this approach reveal the presence of two bidirectional promoter activities within the 434-bp intergenic region (IGr), influenced by putative regulatory sequences embedded within the flanking ves1α and ves1β genes. Repressor-like effects on the apposing gene were observed for intron 1 of both ves1α and ves1β. This effect is apparently not dependent upon intronic promoter activity and acts only in cis. The expression of genes within the ves family is likely modulated by local elements embedded within ves coding sequences outside the intergenic promoter region in concert with chromatin modifications. These results provide a framework to help us begin to understand gene regulation during antigenic variation in B. bovis.

  9. Expression and morphology of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli surface antigen CS31A in E. coli K12 and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Kuehni-Boghenbor, Kathrin; Jordi, Helene A; Frey, Joachim; Vilei, Edy M; Favre, Didier; Stoffel, Michael H

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is known as a worldwide cause of diarrheal disease. The pathogenesis involves the attachment of the microorganisms to the mucosa and the production of enterotoxins. Surface expression of CS31A fimbriae was assessed by Western blots, dot blots, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy using negative staining and immunogold labeling. These investigations revealed significant differences in both the morphology of the wild-type and recombinant strains and the antigen exposure of CS31A in the wild-type and recombinant strains. In the wild-type ETEC strain, expression of CS31A was subject to phase variation. The recombinant E. coli strain produced CS31A but was prone to epitope shedding. In Vibrio cholerae vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR, the recombinant CS31A antigen was expressed but was only found intracellularly. Thus, E. coli strains seem to lend themselves better to the development of recombinant vaccines expressing ETEC-specific antigens at the cell's surface than strains from other orders or genera such as V. cholerae. PMID:22607531

  10. Prostate-specific membrane antigen expression in tumor-associated vasculature of breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Wernicke, Alla Gabriella; Varma, Sonal; Greenwood, Eleni A; Christos, Paul J; Chao, K S Clifford; Liu, He; Bander, Neil H; Shin, Sandra J

    2014-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been found to be expressed in the tumor-associated neovasculature of multiple solid tumor types including breast cancers. However, thus far, the number of cases studied from some tumor types has been limited. In this study, we set out to assess PSMA expression in the tumor-associated vasculature associated with invasive breast carcinomas in a sizable cohort of patients. One hundred and six patients with AJCC stage 0-IV breast cancer were identified. Ninety-two of these patients had primary breast cancer [invasive breast carcinoma with or without co-existing ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (74) or DCIS alone (18)]. In addition, 14 patients with breast cancer metastases to the brain were identified. Immunohistochemical staining for PSMA and CD31 was performed on parallel representative tumor sections in each case. Tumor-associated vascular endothelial cell PSMA immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively assessed based on two parameters: overall percent of endothelial positivity and staining intensity. PSMA expression for tumor-associated vascular endothelial cells was scored 0 if there was no detectable PSMA expression, 1 if PSMA staining was detectable in 5-50%, and 2 if PSMA expression was positive in >50% of microvessels. CD 31 staining was concurrently reviewed to confirm the presence of vasculature in each case. Tumor-associated vasculature was PSMA-positive in 68/92 (74%) of primary breast cancers and in 14/14 (100%) of breast cancers metastatic to brain. PSMA was not detected in normal breast tissue or carcinoma cells. All but 2 cases (98%) showed absence of PSMA expression in normal breast tissue-associated vasculature. The 10-year overall survival was 88.7% (95% CI = 80.0%, 93.8%) in patients without brain metastases. When overall survival (OS) was stratified based on PSMA score group, patients with PSMA scores of 0, 1, and 2 had 10-year OS of 95.8%, 96.0%, and 79.7%, respectively (p = 0.12). When PSMA scores

  11. A trans-acting mechanism represses the expression of the major transplantation antigens in mouse hybrid thymoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We have fused an H-2- thymoma (BM5R.9) with an H-2+ thymoma (BW5147) and have found that many of the resulting hybrids exhibit an H-2- phenotype. In several hybrids that were analyzed in detail, this phenotype is related to the absence of steady-state H-2 mRNA and shows some instability, possibly related to the loss of chromosomes in segregants. We conclude from our studies that BM5R.9 cells display a trans-acting mechanism that can repress the expression of H-2 antigens, and that the gene(s) causing the repression are not located on chromosome 17. This mechanism is not sufficient to explain the H-2- phenotype of BM5R.9, for which an additional, cis-acting process, must be postulated. We discuss these results in the context of the regulation of expression of the major class I transplantation antigens. PMID:3746199

  12. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2, Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen, and Tissue Polypeptide-Specific Antigen Expression in Egyptian Patients with Cervical Carcinoma: Relationship with Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Maha Imam; Salahy, Eman-El; Tawfiq, Hassan; Khalifa, Ali; Hassan, Manal M.

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of proteolytic enzymes produced by both stromal and tumor cells, appear to have a key role in the events leading to local invasion and metastasis by malignant neoplasms. In the present study, we evaluated the role of MMP-2, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA), and tissue polypeptide – specific antigen (TPS) in cervical neoplasia. Using Western blotting and enzyme immunoassay (EIA), we analyzed 50 patients with cervical carcinoma (CC) and 25 normal controls for expression of MMP-2 in tissue cell lysates. We also quantified SCCA and TPS with microparticle immunoassay and EIA, respectively. The results were correlated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, clinicopathological findings, and disease outcome. The cutoff point for each marker was estimated from receiver operating characteristic curves. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each marker. MMP-2, SCCA, and TPS protein expression were significantly higher in patients with CC than in normal controls. While TPS was the best marker for discriminating between patients and controls, MMP-2 was associated with an advanced tumor stage (OR, 13.9 [95% CI, 1.4-133.9]) and poor histological grade (OR, 10.2 [95% CI, 1.7-60.5]). Moreover, independent of the effect of an advanced CC stage and grade, the patients' age, and the presence of HPV infection, MMP-2 was considered a strong predictor for CC recurrence (OR, 8.1 [95% CI, 1.3- 49.1]). Tissue markers may be used to select high-risk patients for early detection of and adjuvant therapy for recurrence. Our MMP-2 findings are particularly relevant to the development of protease inhibitors as a new cancer therapy approach. PMID:15665394

  13. Differential susceptibility of cells expressing allogeneic MHC or viral antigen to killing by antigen-specific CTL.

    PubMed

    Lee, Koutetsu; Takenaka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Yukio; Goto, Toshiyuki; Sano, Kouichi; Nakanishi, Mahito; Eguchi, Akiko; Okada, Masashi; Tashiro, Junko; Sakurai, Kanji; Kubota, Takahiro; Yoshida, Ryotaro

    2004-01-01

    CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated by immunization with allogeneic cells or viral infection are able to lyse allogeneic or virally infected in vitro cells (e.g., lymphoma and mastocytoma). In contrast, it is reported that CD8(+) T cells are not essential for allograft rejection (e.g., heart and skin), and that clearance of influenza or the Sendai virus from virus-infected respiratory epithelium is normal or only slightly delayed after a primary viral challenge of CD8-knockout mice. To address this controversy, we generated H-2(d)-specific CD8(+) CTLs by a mixed lymphocyte culture and examined the susceptibility of a panel of H-2(d) cells to CTL lysis. KLN205 squamous cell carcinoma, Meth A fibrosarcoma, and BALB/c skin components were found to be resistant to CTL-mediated lysis. This resistance did not appear to be related to a reduced expression of MHC class I molecules, and all these cells could block the recognition of H-2(d) targets by CTLs in cold target inhibition assays. We extended our observation by persistently infecting the same panel of cell lines with defective-interfering Sendai virus particles. The Meth A and KLN205 lines infected with a variant Sendai virus were resistant to lysis by Sendai virus-specific CTLs. The Sendai virus-infected Meth A and KLN205 lines were able to block the lysis of Sendai virus-infected targets by CTLs in cold target inhibition assays. Taken together, these results suggest that not all in vivo tissues may be sensitive to CTL lysis.

  14. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates.

    PubMed

    Catherine, Christy; Lee, Seung-Won; Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Shin, Hyun-Il; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA. PMID:26599101

  15. Cell-Free Expression and In Situ Immobilization of Parasite Proteins from Clonorchis sinensis for Rapid Identification of Antigenic Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jung Won; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Shin, Hyun-Il; Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Progress towards genetic sequencing of human parasites has provided the groundwork for a post-genomic approach to develop novel antigens for the diagnosis and treatment of parasite infections. To fully utilize the genomic data, however, high-throughput methodologies are required for functional analysis of the proteins encoded in the genomic sequences. In this study, we investigated cell-free expression and in situ immobilization of parasite proteins as a novel platform for the discovery of antigenic proteins. PCR-amplified parasite DNA was immobilized on microbeads that were also functionalized to capture synthesized proteins. When the microbeads were incubated in a reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis, proteins expressed from the microbead-immobilized DNA were instantly immobilized on the same microbeads, providing a physical linkage between the genetic information and encoded proteins. This approach of in situ expression and isolation enables streamlined recovery and analysis of cell-free synthesized proteins and also allows facile identification of the genes coding antigenic proteins through direct PCR of the microbead-bound DNA. PMID:26599101

  16. Immune responses to a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing a Taenia solium oncosphere antigen TSOL18.

    PubMed

    Ding, Juntao; Zheng, Yadong; Wang, Ying; Dou, Yongxi; Chen, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Xueliang; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Shaohua; Liu, Zhenyong; Hou, Junling; Zhai, Junjun; Yan, Hongbin; Luo, Xuenong; Cai, Xuepeng

    2013-01-01

    A tapeworm, Taenia solium, remains a great threat to human health, particularly in developing countries. The life cycle of T. solium is thought to be terminated via vaccination of intermediate hosts. In this study, we constructed a recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium live vaccine strain χ4558 expressing a TSOL18 antigen. SDS-PAGE and Western blot confirmed the expression of the interest protein and its antigenic property. The recombinant strain stably propagated in vitro, of which the growth was not reversely influenced by TSOL18 protein expressed. It was also shown that mice survived 10(12) CFU of S. typhimurium χ4558, while all mice infected with 10(7) CFU of the wild-type died within five days. The mouse experiment indicated that vaccine strain χ4558 induced a high titer of specific antibody for a long time. In contrast to the controls, the vaccinated mice had an obvious augment of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes and the percentage of helper CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes was significantly increased (p<0.01). After oral administration, S. typhimurium χ4558 was first colonized mainly in the Peyer's patches and then predominantly in the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens in the vaccinated mice. In addition, the high levels of specific anti-TSOL18 antibodies were also observed in pigs administrated with S. typhimurium χ4558. Collectively, these results demonstrate the possibility of use of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain as a vector to deliver protective antigens of T. solium.

  17. Induction of the antigen receptor expression on B lymphocytes results in rapid competence for signaling of SLP-65 and Syk.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Wienands, J; Zürn, C; Reth, M

    1998-01-01

    The binding of antigen to the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) results in the activation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as Lyn and Syk, and the phosphorylation of several substrate proteins including HS1 and SLP-65. How these signaling elements are connected to the BCR is not well understood. Using an expression vector for a tamoxifen-regulated Cre recombinase, we have developed a method that allows the inducible expression of the BCR. Disruption of the VH leader reading frame of the immunoglobulin heavy chain by two loxP sites is overcome by Cre-mediated DNA recombination and results in the cell surface expression of the BCR starting 4 h after exposure of transfected B cells to tamoxifen. This method can, in principle, be employed for the inducible expression of any secreted or type I transmembrane protein. By monitoring the activation of signaling elements in pervanadate-stimulated B cells expressing different levels of the BCR, we show here that phosphorylation of SLP-65 and Syk, but not of Lyn, is strictly dependent on the expression of the BCR on the cell surface. These data suggest that the BCR reorganizes its signaling molecules as soon as it appears on the cell surface. PMID:9857187

  18. Enhanced Tumor Trafficking of GD2 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells by Expression of the Chemokine Receptor CCR2b

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, John A; Lu, An; Bear, Adham; Pule, Martin; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Foster, Aaron E

    2010-01-01

    For adoptive T cell therapy to be effective against solid tumors, tumor-specific T cells must be able to migrate to the tumor site. One requirement for efficient migration is that the effector cells express chemokine receptors that match the chemokines produced either by tumor or tumor-associated cells. In this study, we investigated whether the tumor trafficking of activated T cells (ATCs) bearing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2-CAR) could be enhanced by forced co-expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b, since this receptor directs migration towards CCL2, a chemokine produced by many tumors, including neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-AS) and primary tumor cells isolated from six patients all secreted high levels of CCL2, but GD2-CAR transduced ATCs lacked expression of CCR2 (<5%) and migrated poorly to recombinant CCL2 or tumor supernatants. Following retroviral transduction, however, ATCs expressed high levels of CCR2b (>60%) and migrated well in vitro. We expressed firefly luciferase in CCR2b-expressing ATCs and observed improved homing (>10-fold) to CCL2-secreting neuroblastoma compared to CCR2 negative ATCs. As a result, ATCs co-modified with both CCR2b and GD2-CAR had greater anti-tumor activity in vivo. PMID:20842059

  19. Single cell tuning of Myc expression by antigen receptor signal strength and interleukin-2 in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Preston, Gavin C; Sinclair, Linda V; Kaskar, Aneesa; Hukelmann, Jens L; Navarro, Maria N; Ferrero, Isabel; MacDonald, H Robson; Cowling, Victoria H; Cantrell, Doreen A

    2015-08-01

    Myc controls the metabolic reprogramming that supports effector T cell differentiation. The expression of Myc is regulated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2). We now show that the TCR is a digital switch for Myc mRNA and protein expression that allows the strength of the antigen stimulus to determine the frequency of T cells that express Myc. IL-2 signalling strength also directs Myc expression but in an analogue process that fine-tunes Myc quantity in individual cells via post-transcriptional control of Myc protein. Fine-tuning Myc matters and is possible as Myc protein has a very short half-life in T cells due to its constant phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and subsequent proteasomal degradation. We show that Myc only accumulates in T cells exhibiting high levels of amino acid uptake allowing T cells to match Myc expression to biosynthetic demands. The combination of digital and analogue processes allows tight control of Myc expression at the population and single cell level during immune responses. PMID:26136212

  20. Dietary influences over proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in the locust midgut.

    PubMed

    Zudaire, E; Simpson, S J; Illa, I; Montuenga, L M

    2004-06-01

    We have studied the influence of variations in dietary protein (P) and digestible carbohydrate (C), the quantity of food eaten, and insect age during the fifth instar on the expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the epithelial cells of the midgut (with special reference to the midgut caeca) in the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. Densitometric analysis of PCNA-immunostained cells was used as an indirect measure of the levels of expression of PCNA, and a PCNA cellular index (PCNA-I) was obtained. Measurements of the DNA content of the cells have also been carried out by means of microdensitometry of Feulgen-stained, thick sections of midgut. A comparison between the PCNA nuclear level and the DNA content was performed. The PCNA levels were significantly different among the cells of the five regions studied: caeca, anterior ventricle, medial ventricle, posterior ventricle and ampullae of the Malpighian tubules. We have studied in more detail the region with highest PCNA-I, i.e. the caeca. The quality and the quantity of food eaten under ad libitum conditions were highly correlated with both the PCNA and DNA levels in the caeca cells. Locusts fed a diet with a close to optimal P:C content (P 21%, C 21%) showed the highest PCNA and DNA content. In locusts fed a food that also contained a 1:1 ratio of P to C but was diluted three-fold by addition of indigestible cellulose (P 7%, C 7%), a compensatory increase in consumption was critical to maintaining PCNA levels. Our measurements also showed that the nuclear DNA content of the mature and differentiated epithelial cells was several-fold higher than the levels in the undifferentiated stem cells of the regenerative nests. These results, combined with the low number of mitotic figures found in the regenerative nests of the caeca and the marked variation in PCNA levels among groups, suggest that some type of DNA endoreduplication process may be taking place. Our data also indicate that

  1. Measles virus-induced changes in leukocyte function antigen 1 expression and leukocyte aggregation: possible role in measles virus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Attibele, N; Wyde, P R; Trial, J; Smole, S C; Smith, C W; Rossen, R D

    1993-02-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection of U937 cell or peripheral blood leukocyte cultures was shown to induce changes in the expression of leukocyte function antigen 1 (LFA-1) and cause marked aggregation of these cells. Addition of selected monoclonal antibodies specific for LFA-1 epitopes that did not neutralize MV in standard neutralization assays were found to block both virus-induced leukocyte aggregation and virus dissemination. These data suggest that MV modulation of LFA-1 expression on leukocytes may be an important step in MV pathogenesis.

  2. Cloning and Expression of Major Surface Antigen 1 Gene of Toxoplasma gondii RH Strain Using the Expression Vector pVAX1 in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdizadeh, Rahman; Maraghi, Sharif; Ghadiri, Ata A.; Tavalla, Mehdi; Shojaee, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic protozoan infection with a high prevalence in a broad range of hosts infecting up to one-third of the world human population. Toxoplasmosis leads to serious medical problems in immunocompromised individuals and fetuses and also induces abortion and mortality in domestic animals. Therefore, there is a huge demand for the development of an effective vaccine. Surface Antigen 1 (SAG1) is one of the important immunodominant surface antigens of Toxoplasma gondii, which interacts with host cells and primarily involved in adhesion, invasion and stimulation of host immune response. Surface antigen 1 is considered as the leading candidate for development of an effective vaccine against toxoplasmosis. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to clone the major surface antigen1 gene (SAG1) from the genotype 1 of T. gondii, RH strain into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 in order to use for a DNA vaccine. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted from tachyzoite of the parasite using the QIAamp DNA mini kit. After designing the specific primers, SAG1 gene was amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The purified PCR products were then cloned into a pPrime plasmid vector. The aforementioned product was subcloned into the pVAX1 eukaryotic expression vector. The recombinant pVAX1-SAG1 was then transfected into Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and expression of SAG1 antigen was evaluated using Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Immunofluorescence Assay (IFA) and Western Blotting (WB). Results: The cloning and subcloning products (pPrime-SAG1 and pVAX1-SAG1 plasmid vectors) of SAG1 gene were verified and confirmed by enzyme digestion and sequencing. A 30 kDa recombinant protein was expressed in CHO cells as shown by IFA and WB methods. Conclusions: The pVAX1 expression vector and CHO cells are a suitable system for high-level recombinant protein production for SAG1 gene from T. gondii parasites

  3. Expression of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Antigens in Leishmania tarentolae. Potential for Use in Rapid Serodiagnostic Tests (RDTs)

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Barrie; Piening, Turid; Büscher, Philippe; Rogé, Stijn; Smales, C. Mark

    2015-01-01

    The development of rapid serodiagnostic tests for sleeping sickness and other diseases caused by kinetoplastids relies on the affordable production of parasite-specific recombinant antigens. Here, we describe the production of recombinant antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T.b. gambiense) in the related species Leishmania tarentolae (L. tarentolae), and compare their diagnostic sensitivity and specificity to native antigens currently used in diagnostic kits against a panel of human sera. A number of T.b. gambiense protein antigen candidates were chosen for recombinant expression in L. tarentolae based on current diagnostics in field use and recent findings on immunodiagnostic antigens found by proteomic profiling. In particular, the extracellular domains of invariant surface glycoprotein 65 (ISG65), variant surface glycoproteins VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 were fused with C-terminal histidine tags and expressed as soluble proteins in the medium of cultured, recombinant L. tarentolae. Using affinity chromatography, on average 10 mg/L of recombinant protein was purified from cultures and subsequently tested against a panel of sera from sleeping sickness patients from controls, i.e. persons without sleeping sickness living in HAT endemic countries. The evaluation on sera from 172 T.b. gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients and from 119 controls showed very high diagnostic potential of the two recombinant VSG and the rISG65 fragments with areas under the curve between 0.97 and 0.98 compared to 0.98 and 0.99 with native VSG LiTat 1.3 and VSG LiTat 1.5 (statistically not different). Evaluation on sera from 78 T.b. rhodesiense HAT patients and from 100 controls showed an acceptable diagnostic potential of rISG65 with an area under the curve of 0.83. These results indicate that a combination of these recombinant antigens has the potential to be used in next generation rapid serodiagnostic tests. In addition, the L. tarentolae expression system

  4. Mucosal Blood Group Antigen Expression Profiles and HIV Infections: A Study among Female Sex Workers in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Chanzu, Nadia Musimbi; Mwanda, Walter; Oyugi, Julius; Anzala, Omu

    2015-01-01

    Background The ABO blood group antigens are carbohydrate moieties expressed on human red blood cells however; these antigens can also be expressed on some other cells particularly the surface of epithelial cells and may be found in mucosal secretions. In many human populations 80% secrete ABO antigens (termed ‘secretors’) while 20% do not (termed ‘non-secretors’). Furthermore, there are disease conditions that are associated with secretor status. Objective To investigate correlations between secretor status and HIV infection among female sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya. Methodology This cross-sectional study recruited 280 female sex workers aged 18–65 years from the Pumwani Majengo cohort, Kenya. Blood typing was determined by serological techniques using monoclonal antibodies to the ABO blood group antigens. Secretor phenotyping was determined using anti-H specific lectins specific to salivary, vaginal and cervical blood group H antigen using the agglutination inhibition technique and correlated to individual HIV sero-status. Participants were additionally screened for Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis. Results Out of the 280 participants, 212 (75.7%) were secretors and 68 (24.3%) were non-secretors. The incidence of all infections: HIV, Bacterial vaginosis, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Trichomonas vaginalis was higher among secretors compared to non-secretors. However, this difference was only statistically significant for HIV infection incidence rates: HIV infected secretors (83.7%) versus HIV un-infected secretors (71.8%) (p = 0.029) Based on ABO phenotype stratification, the incidence of HIV infection was higher among blood group A secretors (26/52 = 50%), in comparison to B (12/39 = 33.3%: p = 0.066), AB (3/9 = 33.3%: p = 0.355), and O secretors (36/112 = 32.1%: p = 0.028). Conclusion This is the first report to document the variable expression of the ABH blood group antigens profiling secretor and non-secretor phenotypes

  5. Rates of MAGE-A3 and PRAME expressing tumors in FFPE tissue specimens from bladder cancer patients: potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lerut, Evelyne; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Joniau, Steven; Gruselle, Olivier; Coche, Thierry; Therasse, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Antigen-specific active immunotherapy is an investigational therapeutic approach of potential interest for bladder cancer regardless of disease stage. Clinical development of antigen-specific immunotherapeutics against bladder cancer must be preceded by assessment of the expression of relevant genes in bladder tumors. The objectives of this study (NCT01706185) were to assess the rate of expression of the MAGE-A3 and PRAME genes in bladder tumors and to investigate the feasibility of using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues for testing. Materials and methods: Archived FFPE bladder tumor specimens (any stage) were tested for mRNA expression of MAGE-A3 and PRAME using antigen-specific quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Data on patients and tumor characteristics were obtained from hospital records to investigate these characteristics’ possible association with the antigen expression. Results: Over 92% of the 156 tumors examined gave valid antigen test results. Of the tumors with a valid test, 46.5% were MAGE-A3-positive, 32.2% were PRAME-positive and 59.7% positive for at least one of them. Exploratory analyses of possible associations between antigen expression and patient or tumor characteristics did not identify clear associations between antigen expression and any of the variables investigated. Conclusions: Assessment of tumor antigen mRNA expression by using FFPE bladder tissues was feasible. The rates of MAGE-A3-positive and PRAME-positive tumors indicate that both antigens may be interesting targets for immunotherapeutics against bladder cancer. PMID:26464715

  6. Enhanced tumor trafficking of GD2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells by expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b.

    PubMed

    Craddock, John A; Lu, An; Bear, Adham; Pule, Martin; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Foster, Aaron E

    2010-10-01

    For adoptive T-cell therapy to be effective against solid tumors, tumor-specific T cells must be able to migrate to the tumor site. One requirement for efficient migration is that the effector cells express chemokine receptors that match the chemokines produced either by tumor or tumor-associated cells. In this study, we investigated whether the tumor trafficking of activated T cells (ATCs) bearing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for the tumor antigen GD2 (GD2-CAR) could be enhanced by forced coexpression of the chemokine receptor CCR2b, as this receptor directs migration toward CCL2, a chemokine produced by many tumors, including neuroblastoma. Neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-AS) and primary tumor cells isolated from 6 patients all secreted high levels of CCL2, but GD2-CAR transduced ATCs lacked expression of CCR2 (<5%) and migrated poorly to recombinant CCL2 or tumor supernatants. After retroviral transduction, however, ATCs expressed high levels of CCR2b (>60%) and migrated well in vitro. We expressed firefly luciferase in CCR2b-expressing ATCs and observed improved homing (>10-fold) to CCL2-secreting neuroblastoma compared with CCR2-negative ATCs. As a result, ATCs co-modified with both CCR2b and GD2-CAR had greater antitumor activity in vivo.

  7. Spleen-Dependent Regulation of Antigenic Variation in Malaria Parasites: Plasmodium knowlesi SICAvar Expression Profiles in Splenic and Asplenic Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Lapp, Stacey A.; Korir-Morrison, Cindy; Jiang, Jianlin; Bai, Yaohui; Corredor, Vladimir; Galinski, Mary R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Antigenic variation by malaria parasites was first described in Plasmodium knowlesi, which infects humans and macaque monkeys, and subsequently in P. falciparum, the most virulent human parasite. The schizont-infected cell agglutination (SICA) variant proteins encoded by the SICAvar multigene family in P. knowlesi, and Erythrocyte Membrane Protein-1 (EMP-1) antigens encoded by the var multigene family in P. falciparum, are expressed at the surface of infected erythrocytes, are associated with virulence, and serve as determinants of naturally acquired immunity. A parental P. knowlesi clone, Pk1(A+), and a related progeny clone, Pk1(B+)1+, derived by an in vivo induced variant antigen switch, were defined by the expression of distinct SICA variant protein doublets of 210/190 and 205/200 kDa, respectively. Passage of SICA[+] infected erythrocytes through splenectomized rhesus monkeys results in the SICA[-] phenotype, defined by the lack of surface expression and agglutination with variant specific antisera. Principal Findings We have investigated SICAvar RNA and protein expression in Pk1(A+), Pk1(B+)1+, and SICA[-] parasites. The Pk1(A+) and Pk1(B+)1+ parasites express different distinct SICAvar transcript and protein repertoires. By comparison, SICA[-] parasites are characterized by a vast reduction in SICAvar RNA expression, the lack of full-length SICAvar transcript signals on northern blots, and correspondingly, the absence of any SICA protein detected by mass spectrometry. Significance SICA protein expression may be under transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional control, and we show for the first time that the spleen, an organ central to blood-stage immunity in malaria, exerts an influence on these processes. Furthermore, proteomics has enabled the first in-depth characterization of SICA[+] protein phenotypes and we show that the in vivo switch from Pk1(A+) to Pk1(B+)1+ parasites resulted in a complete change in SICA profiles. These results

  8. The B7-2 (B70) costimulatory molecule expressed by monocytes and activated B lymphocytes is the CD86 differentiation antigen.

    PubMed

    Engel, P; Gribben, J G; Freeman, G J; Zhou, L J; Nozawa, Y; Abe, M; Nadler, L M; Wakasa, H; Tedder, T F

    1994-09-01

    T-cell activation is initiated after T-cell receptor binding to antigen, but also requires interactions between costimulatory molecules expressed on antigen-presenting cells. An important costimulatory molecule expressed by monocytes and activated B lymphocytes has been recently identified and termed B7-2 or B70. Independently, a new Cluster of Differentiation was defined in the Fifth International Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop as CD86, a molecule predominantly expressed by monocytes and activated B lymphocytes. In this study, the two monoclonal antibodies that defined CD86, FUN-1 and BU-63, were shown to bind to cDNA transfected cells expressing B7-2/B70. The FUN-1 monoclonal antibody also completely blocked the costimulatory activity of B7-2/B70 in functional assays. Therefore, the serologically defined CD86 differentiation antigen is the B7-2/B70 molecule.

  9. Cytolytic T cells recognize a chimeric MHC class I antigen expressed in influenza A infected transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, W A; Rüther, U; Wagner, E F; Kvist, S

    1988-01-01

    A chimeric H-2Kd/Kk gene, called pC31, contains the extracellular alpha 1 domain of Kd origin whereas the rest of the molecule is of Kk origin. Disruption of the syngeneic alpha 1-alpha 2 structure results in a total abrogation of the function of the C31 protein as a restriction element for H-2Kd and Kk restricted T cells during virus infection. In an attempt to obtain information on the functional polymorphism of MHC class I antigens as restriction elements, we have introduced the pC31 gene into the germ line of C3H/He mice (H-2k). The pC31 gene was transcribed in all tissues examined and the expression pattern paralleled the endogenous H-2Kk gene. However, the mRNA for the transgene was approximately 10-times more abundant, which was reflected in an elevated expression of the C31 protein in transgenic splenocytes. Most of the C31 antigen was found intracellularly. The C31 antigen could condition transgenic cytotoxic T lymphocytes in a specific manner during influenza A virus infection and functioned as the restricting element during T cell lysis of the infected cells. These results suggest that entire exons may be exchanged between MHC class I genes and that this exchange can generate novel and functional restriction elements. Images PMID:2850165

  10. Genetic Analysis for the Lack of Expression of the O157 Antigen in an O Rough:H7 Escherichia coli Strain ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rump, Lydia V.; Feng, Peter C. H.; Fischer, Markus; Monday, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    The O-antigen (rfb) operon and related genes of MA6, an O rough:H7 Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli strain, were examined to determine the cause of the lack of O157 expression. A 1,310-bp insertion, homologous to IS629, was observed within its gne gene. trans complementation with a functional gne gene from O157:H7 restored O157 antigen expression in MA6. PMID:19948859

  11. Oral immunization of broiler chickens against necrotic enteritis with an attenuated Salmonella vaccine vector expressing Clostridium perfringens antigens.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R R; Parreira, V R; Sharif, S; Prescott, J F

    2008-08-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in broiler chickens is caused by Clostridium perfringens but currently no effective vaccine is available. Our previous study showed that certain C. perfringens secreted proteins when administered intramuscularly protected chickens against experimental infection. In the current study, genes encoding three C. perfringens proteins: fructose-biphosphate-aldolase (FBA), pyruvate:ferredoxin-oxidoreductase (PFOR) and hypothetical protein (HP), were cloned into an avirulent Salmonella enterica sv. typhimurium vaccine vector. Broiler chickens immunized orally with recombinant Salmonella expressing FBA or HP proteins were significantly protected against NE challenge. Immunized birds developed serum and mucosal antibodies to both clostridial and Salmonella antigens. This study showed the oral immunizing ability of two C. perfringens antigens against NE in broiler chickens through an attenuated Salmonella vaccine vector. PMID:18597901

  12. [Novel therapy for malignant lymphoma: adoptive immuno-gene therapy using chimeric antigen receptor(CAR)-expressing T lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technology is a novel approach to cancer immuno-gene therapy. CARs are hybrid proteins consisting of target-antigen-specific single-chain antibody fragment fused to intracellular T-cell activation domains (CD28 or CD137/CD3 zeta receptor). CAR-expressing engineered T lymphocytes can directly recognize and kill tumor cells in an HLA independent manner. In the United States, promising results have been obtained in the clinical trials of adoptive immuno-gene therapy using CD19-CAR-T lymphocytes for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this review article, CD19-CAR-T gene therapy for refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma is discussed.

  13. Evaluation of MAGE-1 Cancer-Testis Antigen Expression in Invasive Breast Cancer and its Correlation with Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Rastgoosalami, Mojtaba; Memar, Bahram; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Fanipakdel, Azar

    2016-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of cancer-testis antigens (CTA) in breast carcinoma tissue, and its natural expression in the testis, the tissue away from the immune system, makes them good candidates for cancer immunotherapy and vaccines designing. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the expression of a CTA (MAGE-1) in invasive breast cancer and its correlation with prognostic factors. Methods Paraffin blocks of breast cancer tissues from 113 patients operated in 2011 - 2013 were stained for MAGE-1expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The associations of MAGE-1 expression with known prognostic factors were assessed by statistical analysis using SPSS 16. Results MAGE-1 expression was found in cancer cell cytoplasms of 30.1% of patients, with different degrees of intensity, (23.9% moderate and 6.2% strong). Nuclear staining turned positive in 31.8%, stratified from moderate in 26.5%to to strong in 5.3%. There was a significant association between the number of lymph nodes involved and both nuclear (P = 0.042) and cytoplasmic (P = 0.003) MAGE-1 expression. There was also a significant correlation between the nuclear expression of MAGE-1 and tumor size (P = 0.018). Cytoplasmic expression of MAGE-1 increased with increasing pathologic grade of tumors although the association was not statistically significant (P = 0.119). Conclusions CTA MAGE-1 has significant association with some prognostic factors in breast cancer and may have the role of a prognostic factor. PMID:27761208

  14. Lacking prognostic significance of beta 2-microglobulin, MHC class I and class II antigen expression in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Wintzer, H. O.; Benzing, M.; von Kleist, S.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of MHC antigen expression on the survival of patients with cancer, 77 human breast carcinomas were investigated for the expression of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m), HLA-A,B,C and HLA-DR. Thirty-one benign breast tumours were stained for comparison. The results for the carcinomas were related to the survival data of the cancer patients. The expression of beta 2m, HLA-A,B,C and HLA-DR was significantly lower in malignant tumours compared to the benign lesions. Whereas all benign tumours were positive for beta 2m and HLA-A,B,C and 28/31 positive for HLA-DR the following positivity rates were found in carcinomas: 74/77 for beta 2m, 57/77 for HLA-A,B,C and 10/77 for HLA-DR. The follow-up (median 45 months) of 66 cancer patients for overall survival and of 65 patients for disease-free survival revealed no influence of beta 2m, HLA-A,B,C or HLA-DR expression on the prognosis of this cancer. In conclusion, experimental data indicating the importance of MHC antigens in anti-tumour responses are not confirmed by the analysis of cancer patient survival data. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2201398

  15. Targeting of folate receptor β on acute myeloid leukemia blasts with chimeric antigen receptor–expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C.; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Feng, Yang; Low, Philip S.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2015-01-01

    T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) can produce dramatic results in lymphocytic leukemia patients; however, therapeutic strategies for myeloid leukemia remain limited. Folate receptor β (FRβ) is a myeloid-lineage antigen expressed on 70% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the first CARs specific for human FRβ (m909) in vitro and in vivo. m909 CAR T cells exhibited selective activation and lytic function against engineered C30-FRβ as well as endogenous FRβ+ AML cell lines in vitro. In mouse models of human AML, m909 CAR T cells mediated the regression of engrafted FRβ+ THP1 AML in vivo. In addition, we demonstrated that treatment of AML with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhanced FRβ expression, resulting in improved immune recognition by m909 CAR T cells. Because many cell surface markers are shared between AML blasts and healthy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs), we evaluated FRβ expression and recognition of HSCs by CAR T cells. m909 CAR T cells were not toxic against healthy human CD34+ HSCs in vitro. Our results indicate that FRβ is a promising target for CAR T-cell therapy of AML, which may be augmented by combination with ATRA. PMID:25887778

  16. The piggyBac Transposon-Mediated Expression of SV40 T Antigen Efficiently Immortalizes Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts (MEFs)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jing; Zhang, Hongmei; Chen, Xiang; Li, Ruidong; Wu, Ningning; Chen, Xian; Wen, Sheng; Zhang, Junhui; Yin, Liangjun; Deng, Fang; Liao, Zhan; Zhang, Zhonglin; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Zhengjian; Liu, Wei; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Wang, Zhongliang; Qiao, Min; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; Shi, Lewis L.; Liang, Houjie; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like multipotent progenitor cells and can undergo self-renewal and differentiate into to multiple lineages, including bone, cartilage and adipose. Primary MEFs have limited life span in culture, which thus hampers MEFs’ basic research and translational applications. To overcome this challenge, we investigate if piggyBac transposon-mediated expression of SV40 T antigen can effectively immortalize mouse MEFs and that the immortalized MEFs can maintain long-term cell proliferation without compromising their multipotency. Using the piggyBac vector MPH86 which expresses SV40 T antigen flanked with flippase (FLP) recognition target (FRT) sites, we demonstrate that mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) can be efficiently immortalized. The immortalized MEFs (piMEFs) exhibit an enhanced proliferative activity and maintain long-term cell proliferation, which can be reversed by FLP recombinase. The piMEFs express most MEF markers and retain multipotency as they can differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineages upon BMP9 stimulation in vitro. Stem cell implantation studies indicate that piMEFs can form bone, cartilage and adipose tissues upon BMP9 stimulation, whereas FLP-mediated removal of SV40 T antigen diminishes the ability of piMEFs to differentiate into these lineages, possibly due to the reduced expansion of progenitor populations. Our results demonstrate that piggyBac transposon-mediated expression of SV40 T can effectively immortalize MEFs and that the reversibly immortalized piMEFs not only maintain long-term cell proliferation but also retain their multipotency. Thus, the high transposition efficiency and the potential footprint-free natures may render piggyBac transposition an effective and safe strategy to immortalize progenitor cells isolated from limited tissue supplies, which is essential for basic and translational studies. PMID:24845466

  17. Expression profile of novel cell surface molecules on different subsets of human peripheral blood antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Daniela; Andrés, Martín Pérez; van den Bossche, Wouter BL; Flores-Montero, Juan; de Bruin, Sandra; Teodosio, Cristina; van Dongen, Jacques JM; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Although major steps have been recently made in understanding the role of the distinct subsets of dendritic cells (DC)/antigen-presenting cells (APC), further studies are required to unravel their precise role, including in-depth immunophenotypic characterisation of these cells. Here, we used eight-colour flow cytometry to investigate the reactivity of a panel of 72 monoclonal antibodies (including those clustered in seven new Cluster of Differentiation, CD) on different subsets of APC in peripheral blood (PB) samples from five healthy adults. These experiments were performed in the context of the Tenth International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens (HLDA10). Plasmacytoid DC was the only cell population that expressed CD85g and CD195, whereas they lacked all of the other molecules investigated. In contrast, myeloid DC mostly expressed inhibitory C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and other inhibitory-associated molecules, whereas monocytes expressed both inhibitory and activating CLRs, together with other phagocytosis-associated receptors. Within monocytes, progressively lower levels of expression were generally observed from classical monocytes (cMo) to SLAN− and SLAN+ non-classical monocytes (ncMo) for most of the molecules expressed, except for the CD368 endocytic receptor. This molecule was found to be positive only in cMo, and the CD369 and CD371 modulating/signalling receptors. In addition, the CD101 inhibitory molecule was found to be expressed at higher levels in SLAN+ vs SLAN− ncMo. In summary, the pattern of expression of the different signalling molecules and receptors analysed in this work varies among the distinct subsets of PB APCs, with similar profiles for molecules within each functional group. These findings suggest unique pattern-recognition and signalling capabilities for distinct subpopulations of APCs, and therefore, diverse functional roles. PMID:27766148

  18. Production of dengue virus envelope protein domain III-based antigens in tobacco chloroplasts using inducible and constitutive expression systems.

    PubMed

    Gottschamel, Johanna; Lössl, Andreas; Ruf, Stephanie; Wang, Yanliang; Skaugen, Morten; Bock, Ralph; Clarke, Jihong Liu

    2016-07-01

    Dengue fever is a disease in many parts of the tropics and subtropics and about half the world's population is at risk of infection according to the World Health Organization. Dengue is caused by any of the four related dengue virus serotypes DEN-1, -2, -3 and -4, which are transmitted to people by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Currently there is only one vaccine (Dengvaxia(®)) available (limited to a few countries) on the market since 2015 after half a century's intensive efforts. Affordable and accessible vaccines against dengue are hence still urgently needed. The dengue envelop protein domain III (EDIII), which is capable of eliciting serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, has become the focus for subunit vaccine development. To contribute to the development of an accessible and affordable dengue vaccine, in the current study we have used plant-based vaccine production systems to generate a dengue subunit vaccine candidate in tobacco. Chloroplast genome engineering was applied to express serotype-specific recombinant EDIII proteins in tobacco chloroplasts using both constitutive and ethanol-inducible expression systems. Expression of a tetravalent antigen fusion construct combining EDIII polypeptides from all four serotypes was also attempted. Transplastomic EDIII-expressing tobacco lines were obtained and homoplasmy was verified by Southern blot analysis. Northern blot analyses showed expression of EDIII antigen-encoding genes. EDIII protein accumulation levels varied for the different recombinant EDIII proteins and the different expression systems, and reached between 0.8 and 1.6 % of total cellular protein. Our study demonstrates the suitability of the chloroplast compartment as a production site for an EDIII-based vaccine candidate against dengue fever and presents a Gateway(®) plastid transformation vector for inducible transgene expression. PMID:27116001

  19. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzik, R.; Bandurska, K.; Deka, D.; Golovkin, M.; Koprowski, H. . E-mail: h_koprowski@jefferson.edu

    2005-12-16

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP.

  20. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that express hepatitis B virus surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Mackett, Michael; Moss, Bernard

    1983-04-01

    Potential live vaccines against hepatitis B virus have been produced. The coding sequence for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) has been inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under control of vaccinia virus early promoters. Cells infected with these vaccinia virus recombinants synthesize and excrete HBsAg and vaccinated rabbits rapidly produce antibodies to HBsAg.

  1. [Eukaryotic expression of NS1 major antigen region of PPV and development of an indirect ELISA based on the expressed protein].

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Zhao, Xu-Yong; Bian, Chuan-Zhou

    2012-11-01

    To construct secretory expression vector of PPV NS1 gene, the fragment of PPV NS1 gene coding for major antigen region of the NS1 protein was amplified by PCR and inserted into multiple clone site of eukaryotic expression vector pPICZalpha-A. The recombinant pPICZalpha-A-NS1 plasmid was transferred into P. pastoris strain GS115 mediated by electro transform. Recombinant P. pastoris strain GS115 was induced to express the fusion protein by methanol. The expressed and purified protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western Blot. The recombinant protein was highly-expressed and showed a good immunoreactivity. The indirect ELISA method was developed for detecting antibodies against PPV by checkerboard titration assay. The result showed that the optimal concentration of coated antigen was 3.2 microg/mL and the best dilution of serum was 1 : 80. The positive cut-off value of the ELISA assay was OD450 > 0.4 and OD450 positive serum/OD450 negative serum > 2.0. Compared with HI and commercial ELISA kits, the assay revealed 94.2% and 92.1% agreement respectively. The assay demonstrates good specificity and sensitivity, and can be applied in the detection of porcine parvovirus.

  2. Expression Patterns of Cancer-Testis Antigens in Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Cell Derivatives Indicate Lineage Tracks

    PubMed Central

    Lifantseva, Nadya; Koltsova, Anna; Krylova, Tatyana; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Poljanskaya, Galina; Gordeeva, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into various lineages but undergo genetic and epigenetic changes during long-term cultivation and, therefore, require regular monitoring. The expression patterns of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6, -A8, -B2, and GAGE were examined in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (hES) cells, their differentiated derivatives, teratocarcinoma (hEC) cells, and cancer cell lines of neuroectodermal and mesodermal origin. Undifferentiated hES cells and embryoid body cells expressed MAGE-A3, -A6, -A4, -A8, and GAGEs while later differentiated derivatives expressed only MAGE-A8 or MAGE-A4. Likewise, mouse pluripotent stem cells also express CTAs of Magea but not Mageb family. Despite similarity of the hES and hEC cell expression patterns, MAGE-A2 and MAGE-B2 were detected only in hEC cells but not in hES cells. Moreover, our analysis has shown that CTAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer cell lines and display low tissue specificity. The identification of CTA expression patterns in pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives may be useful for isolation of abnormally CTA-expressing cells to improve the safety of stem-cell based therapy. PMID:21785609

  3. Modification of Hemodynamic and Immune Responses to Exposure with a Weak Antigen by the Expression of a Hypomorphic BMPR2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Hoffman, Carol; Marsh, Leigh M.; West, James; Grunig, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypomorphic mutations in the bone morphogenic protein receptor (BMPR2) confer a much greater risk for developing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, not all carriers of a mutation in the BMPR2 gene suffer from PAH. We have previously shown that prolonged T helper 2 (Th2) responses in the lungs to a mild antigen delivered via the airways induce severe pulmonary arterial remodeling, but no pulmonary hypertension. The current studies were designed to test the idea that Th2 responses to a mild antigen together with the expression of a hypomorphic BMPR2 gene would trigger pulmonary hypertension. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice that expressed a hypomorphic BMPR2 transgene (transgene-positive) and transgene-negative mice were either exposed to saline, or primed and exposed to a mild antigen (Ovalbumin) over a prolonged period of time. Only transgene-positive but not transgene-negative mice exposed to antigen developed significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressures, while both groups showed pulmonary artery remodeling with severe muscularization and airway inflammation to a similar degree. Antigen exposure resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of Interleukin (IL)-13 positive T cells in the lymph nodes, and in a smaller increase in resistin-like-molecule (RELM)α expression and a decreased ratio of expression of IL-33 relative to its receptor (IL-1-receptor-like 1, IL1RL1-ST2) in the right ventricles of transgene-positive mice compared to transgene-negative animals. Furthermore, only antigen-challenged transgene-positive mice showed a significant increase in Interferon (IFN)γ positive T cells over saline-exposed controls. Conclusions/Significance Our study suggests that exposure with a mild Th2 antigen can trigger pulmonary hypertension on the background of the expression of a hypomorphic BMPR2 gene and that conversely, the expression of the hypomorphic BMPR2 gene can alter the immune response to a mild, inhaled antigen

  4. Expression of senescent antigen on erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Winograd, E.; Greenan, J.R.T.; Sherman, I.W.

    1987-04-01

    Erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of Plasmodium falciparum selectively bind IgG autoantibodies in normal human serum. Quantification of membrane-bound IgG, by use of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A, revealed that erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant bound 30 times more protein A than did noninfected erythrocytes; infection with a knobless variant resulted in less than a 2-fold difference compared with noninfected erythrocytes. IgG binding to knobby erythrocytes appeared to be related to parasite development, since binding of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A to cells bearing young trophozoites (less than 20 hr after parasite invasion) was similar to binding to uninfected erythrocytes. By immunoelectron microscopy, the membrane-bound IgG on erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant was found to be preferentially associated with the protuberances (knobs) of the plasma membrane. The removal of aged or senescent erythrocytes from the peripheral circulation is reported to involve the binding of specific antibodies to an antigen (senescent antigen) related to the major erythrocyte membrane protein band 3. Since affinity-purified autoantibodies against band 3 specifically bound to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant of P. falciparum, it is clear that the malaria parasite induces expression of senescent antigen.

  5. SLP-65: A New Signaling Component in B Lymphocytes which Requires Expression of the Antigen Receptor for Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wienands, Jürgen; Schweikert, Jutta; Wollscheid, Bernd; Jumaa, Hassan; Nielsen, Peter J.; Reth, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) consists of the membrane-bound immunoglobulin (Ig) molecule as antigen-binding subunit and the Ig-α/Ig-β heterodimer as signaling subunit. BCR signal transduction involves activation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and phosphorylation of several proteins, only some of which have been identified. The phosphorylation of these proteins can be induced by exposure of B cells either to antigen or to the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate/H2O2. One of the earliest substrates in B cells is a 65-kD protein, which we identify here as a B cell adaptor protein. This protein, named SLP-65, is part of a signaling complex involving Grb-2 and Vav and shows homology to SLP-76, a signaling element of the T cell receptor. In pervanadate/H2O2-stimulated cells, SLP-65 becomes phosphorylated only upon expression of the BCR. These data suggest that SLP-65 is part of a BCR transducer complex. PMID:9705962

  6. Control by H-2 genes of the Th1 response induced against a foreign antigen expressed by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Lo-Man, R; Martineau, P; Dériaud, E; Newton, S M; Jehanno, M; Clément, J M; Fayolle, C; Hofnung, M; Leclerc, C D

    1996-01-01

    Attenuated salmonellae represent an attractive vehicle for the delivery of heterologous protective antigens to the immune system. Here, we have investigated the influence of the genetic background of the host which regulates the growth and elimination of Salmonella cells on the cellular response induced against a foreign antigen delivered by an aroA Salmonella strain. We have tested CD4+ T-cell responses (cell proliferation and cytokine production) in various mouse strains following immunization with Salmonella typhimurium SL3261 expressing a high level of the recombinant Escherichia coli MalE protein. We were able to detect a CD4+ T-cell response against the recombinant MalE protein only in a restricted number of mouse strains, whereas all mice produced good levels of anti-MalE immunoglobulin G antibodies. The Ity gene did not play a major role in these differences in T-cell responses, since both Ity-resistant and -susceptible strains of mice were found to be unresponsive to MalE delivered by recombinant salmonellae. In contrast, when B10 congenic mice were used, a correlation was established between MalE-specific T-cell unresponsiveness and H-2 genes. The discrepancies described in this paper in the ability of various strains of mice to develop an efficient Th1 response against a recombinant antigen displayed by a live Salmonella vaccine underscore the difficulties that can be encountered in the vaccination of human populations by such a strategy. PMID:8890187

  7. Immunoglobulin (Ig) D in Labeo rohita is widely expressed and differentially modulated in viral, bacterial and parasitic antigenic challenges.

    PubMed

    Basu, Madhubanti; Lenka, Saswati S; Paichha, Mahismita; Swain, Banikalyan; Patel, Bhakti; Banerjee, Rajanya; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Das, Surajit; Samanta, Mrinal

    2016-10-15

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) play critical roles in protecting host against diverse pathogenic invasion and diseases. Among all Ig isotypes, IgD is the most recently-evolved and enigmatic molecule detected in all vertebrates species except birds. In South-East Asia, Labeo rohita (rohu) is the leading candidate fish species for freshwater aquaculture, and this article describes about IgD gene expression in rohu following viral, bacterial and parasitic antigenic challenges. The partial cDNA (761bp) of Labeo rohita-IgD (LrIgD) was cloned and submitted in the GenBank with the accession no KT883581. Phylogenetically, LrIgD was closely related to grass carp IgD. Analysis of LrIgD gene expression in juveniles by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay revealed gradual increase in IgD expression with the advancement of time. In the healthy rohu fingerlings, LrIgD expression occurred predominantly in kidney followed by liver and spleen. In response to rhabdoviral antigenic stimulation, LrIgD expression was significantly enhanced in all tested tissues. In bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) infection, transcripts of LrIgD increased more dramatically in liver followed by kidney and gill. In parasitic (Argulus) infection, most significant expression of IgD was noted in the skin, followed by kidney, liver, spleen and gill. These results collectively suggest the key role of IgD in the immune response of rohu during viral, bacterial and parasitic infections. PMID:27590429

  8. Prokaryotic expression, purification and antigenicity analysis of African swine fever virus pK205R protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xulong; Xiao, Lu; Peng, Bin; Wang, Yin; Yang, Zexiao; Yao, Xueping; Hu, Ling; Lin, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    African swine fever is an acute, febrile and highly virulent porcine disease causing serious economic losses worldwide. The pK205R protein of the African swine fever virus (ASFV) is largely expressed in the early stages of infection, which has given the K205R gene extensive attention. In this study, the ASFV K205R was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Expression of histidine-tagged pK205R with a molecular mass of 44 kDa was determined by 12% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis. Optimisation of culture conditions allowed induction of the recombinant protein with 0.4 mM Isopropyl β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) at 37°C for 2 h. The protein existed in cellular supernatant and was purified using a Ni-NTA resin column. The purified protein was used to immunize rabbits four times to enable the production of polyclonal antibodies, and the antiserum titre was detected by ELISA. The results showed that the purified pK205R can react with ASFV positive serum specifically by Western blotting. The pK205R had high antigenicity, which indicated that pK205R could be used as an antigen for detection of ASFV-specific antibodies in ELISA testing, and the recombinant protein could contribute to further research of the action and structure of pK205R. PMID:27096786

  9. Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen-immortalized normal human liver epithelial cells express hepatocyte characteristics and metabolize chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, A M; Cole, K E; Smoot, D T; Weston, A; Groopman, J D; Shields, P G; Vignaud, J M; Juillerat, M; Lipsky, M M; Trump, B F

    1993-01-01

    Normal human liver tissue and cultured human hepatocytes are valuable models to study xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity, but they only have a limited in vitro life-span and are not readily available. This report describes the establishment of replicative cultures of human adult liver epithelial cells in serum-free medium. The longevity of three of these cultures, derived from different donors, was extended by introduction of the simian virus 40 large T antigen gene. Two cell lines, THLE-2 and -3, established with a recombinant simian virus 40 large T antigen virus have undergone > 100 population doublings, are nontumorigenic when injected into athymic nude mice, have near-diploid karyotypes, and do not express alpha-fetoprotein. The cells express cytokeratin 18 and albumin in early passage, whereas higher-passage cells in logarithmic-phase growth also express cytokeratin 19. THLE-2 and -3 cells metabolize benzo[a]pyrene, N-nitrosodimethylamine, and aflatoxin B1 to their ultimate carcinogenic metabolites that adduct DNA, which indicates functional cytochrome P450 pathways. Other enzymes involved in metabolism of chemical carcinogens, such as epoxide hydrolase, NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione S-transferases, and glutathione peroxidase are also retained by THLE cells. Thus, these immortalized human liver cells constitute an in vitro model for pharmacotoxicological studies and for the investigation of etiology and pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7685115

  10. High-yield soluble expression of recombinant influenza virus antigens from Escherichia coli and their potential uses in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Cho, Seung Hee; Son, Ahyun; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Jinhee; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik Lin

    2014-02-01

    Although antiviral drugs and vaccines have been successful for mitigating influenza virus infections, the lack of general technical platform for the timely supply of soluble and highly purified influenza viral antigens presents a serious bottleneck for the subsequent analysis for the effective control of the viral disease. Using the Escherichia coli (E. coli) lysyl tRNA synthetase (LysRS) as a novel fusion partner, this study reports the soluble expression of influenza viral proteins in E. coli host, construction of antibody library against the virus, and detection of anti-influenza antibodies using the expressed viral antigens. When influenza A and B viral proteins were fused with the LysRS, the fusion proteins were expressed predominantly as soluble forms and their production yields were high enough to be amenable to immunization protocols in rabbits for antibody generation. The produced antibodies showed high level binding specificity against the respective viral proteins, with cross-reactivity across heterologous viruses within the same type of influenza viruses. In addition, LysRS-HA fusion protein could bind specifically to anti-HA antibodies in the virus-infected mouse serum in widely accepted two detection methods, Western blot and ELISA. These results present a convenient tool for the production of antibodies specific to the virus as well as the rapid detection of influenza viral infections, ultimately contributing to the control of influenza viruses including highly pathogenic H5N1, pandemic H1N1, or the recent H7N9 influenza viruses.

  11. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the apa gene coding for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 45/47-kilodalton secreted antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Laqueyrerie, A; Militzer, P; Romain, F; Eiglmeier, K; Cole, S; Marchal, G

    1995-10-01

    Effective protection against a virulent challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is induced mainly by previous immunization with living attenuated mycobacteria, and it has been hypothesized that secreted proteins serve as major targets in the specific immune response. To identify and purify molecules present in culture medium filtrate which are dominant antigens during effective vaccination, a two-step selection procedure was used to select antigens able to interact with T lymphocytes and/or antibodies induced by immunization with living bacteria and to counterselect antigens interacting with the immune effectors induced by immunization with dead bacteria. A Mycobacterium bovis BCG 45/47-kDa antigen complex, present in BCG culture filtrate, has been previously identified and isolated (F. Romain, A. Laqueyrerie, P. Militzer, P. Pescher, P. Chavarot, M. Lagranderie, G. Auregan, M. Gheorghiu, and G. Marchal, Infect. Immun. 61:742-750, 1993). Since the cognate antibodies recognize the very same antigens present in M. tuberculosis culture medium filtrates, a project was undertaken to clone, express, and sequence the corresponding gene of M. tuberculosis. An M. tuberculosis shuttle cosmid library was transferred in Mycobacterium smegmatis and screened with a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect the clones expressing the proteins. A clone containing a 40-kb DNA insert was selected, and by means of subcloning in Escherichia coli, a 2-kb fragment that coded for the molecules was identified. An open reading frame in the 2,061-nucleotide sequence codes for a secreted protein with a consensus signal peptide of 39 amino acids and a predicted molecular mass of 28,779 Da. The gene was referred to as apa because of the high percentages of proline (21.7%) and alanine (19%) in the purified protein. Southern hybridization analysis of digested total genomic DNA from M. tuberculosis (reference strains H37Rv and H37Ra) indicated that the apa gene was present as a

  12. MAGE-A3/4 and NY-ESO-1 antigens expression in metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bujas, T; Marusic, Z; Peric Balja, M; Mijic, A; Kruslin, B; Tomas, D

    2011-03-21

    In the present study we analyzed immunohistochemical expression of MAGE-A 3/4 and NY-ESO-1 in 55 samples of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) and their respective lymph node metastases. To our knowledge this is the first study to assess and compare the expression of these antigens in ESCC lymph node metastases. Fifty (90.9%) primary ESCC were positive for MAGE-A 3/4 and 53 (96.6%) were positive for NY-ESO-1. MAGE-A 3/4 was expressed in all lymph node metastases and the intensity of expression was high in a majority of cases. NY-ESO-1 was negative in 2 (7.1%) lymph nodes metastases, while the reaction was predominantly moderate in the positive group. In primary tumors MAGE-A 3/4 showed a significantly higher intensity of expression compared to NY-ESO-1 (P=0.047), while in lymph node metastases the intensity of expression was not significantly different (P=0.387). Primary tumors with and without lymph node metastases showed no significant differences in MAGE-A 3/4 (P=0.672) and NY-ESO-1 (P=0.444) expression. Intensity of MAGE-A 3/4 (P=0.461) and NY-ESO-1 (P=0.414) expression in primary tumors was not significantly different compared to the expression in their respective lymph nodes metastases. Expression of MAGE-A 3/4 in primary tumors showed significant positive correlation with primary tumor expression of NY-ESO-1 (P=0.021) but no significant correlation with the expression of MAGE-A 3/4 in lymph node metastases (P=0.056). Expression of NY-ESO-1 in primary tumors showed significant positive correlation with the expression of NY-ESO-1 in lymph node metastases (P=0.001) and significant negative correlation with patients’ age (P<0.001). Expression of MAGE-A 3/4 and NY-ESO-1 in primary tumors and lymph node metastases showed no significant correlation with prognostic parameters such as tumor grade and TNM stage (P>0.05). We have shown different levels of MAGE-A 3/4 and NY-ESO-1 expression in almost all specimens of primary tumor and lymph node metastases

  13. Surface expression patterns of defined glycan antigens change during Schistosoma mansoni cercarial transformation and development of schistosomula.

    PubMed

    Smit, Cornelis H; Homann, Arne; van Hensbergen, Vincent P; Schramm, Gabriele; Haas, Helmut; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2015-12-01

    During the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma mansoni, a large variety of glycans is expressed. To many of these glycans, antibodies are induced by the infected host and some might be targets for vaccines or diagnostic tests. Spatial changes in glycan expression during schistosome development are largely unexplored. To study the surface-exposed glycans during the important initial stages of infection, we analyzed the binding of a panel of anti-glycan monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to cercariae and schistosomula up to 72 h after transformation by immunofluorescence microscopy. The mAb specificity toward their natural targets was studied using a microarray containing a wide range of schistosomal N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipid glycans. With the exception of GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LDN-F), mono- and multifucosylated GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs were exposed at the surface of all developmental stages studied. Multifucosylated LDN-motifs were present on cercarial glycocalyx-derived O-glycans as well as cercarial glycolipids. In contrast, the Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (Lewis X) and LDN-F-motifs, also expressed on cercarial glycolipids, and in addition on a range of cercarial N- and O-glycans, became surface expressed only after transformation of cercariae to schistosomula. In line with the documented shedding of the O-glycan-rich cercarial glycocalyx after transformation these observations suggest that surface accessible multifucosylated LDN-motifs are mostly expressed by O-glycans in cercariae, but principally by glycosphingolipids in schistosomula. We hypothesize that these temporal changes in surface exposure of glycan antigens are relevant to the interaction with the host during the initial stages of infection with schistosomes and discuss the potential of these glycan antigens as intervention targets. PMID:26347524

  14. Beta 2-microglobulin is not required for cell surface expression of the murine class I histocompatibility antigen H-2Db or of a truncated H-2Db.

    PubMed

    Allen, H; Fraser, J; Flyer, D; Calvin, S; Flavell, R

    1986-10-01

    beta 2-Microglobulin (beta 2m) has been thought essential for transport of all major histocompatibility complex class I antigens to the cell surface. Here, we show that the mouse class I antigen H-2Db is expressed at the cell surface even when there is no beta 2m present within the cell. This was established by transfecting the H-2Db gene into the R1E cell line, which lacks beta 2m. The conformation of the Db antigen expressed by the R1E transfectant is very different from that of the native molecule. This Db antigen is not recognized by Db-allospecific and Db-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes or by most monoclonal antibodies to the native Db. We show further that a deletion construct of the Db gene, which consists of exon 1 linked to exons 4-8, expresses a truncated Db antigen lacking domains 1 and 2 [Db-(1 + 2)] at the cell surface after transfection into the R1E line. Previous biochemical and crystallographic data have indicated that domain 3 is associated with beta 2m; unexpectedly, Db-(1 + 2) does not associate with beta 2m when the mouse beta 2mb gene is transfected into the R1E transfectant expressing the truncated Db. This suggests that interactions with domains 1 and 2 are important for the paired association of domain 3 and beta 2m in the native Db antigen.

  15. Trimming of two major type 1 diabetes driving antigens, GAD65 and IA-2, allows for successful expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Robert, S; Van Huynegem, K; Gysemans, C; Mathieu, C; Rottiers, P; Steidler, L

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterised by excessive immune reactions against auto-antigens of pancreatic β-cells. Restoring auto-antigen tolerance remains the superior therapeutic strategy. Oral auto-antigen administration uses the tolerogenic nature of the gut-associated immune system to induce antigen-specific tolerance. However, due to gastric degradation, proper mucosal product delivery often imposes a challenge. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis have proven to be effective and safe carriers for gastrointestinal delivery of therapeutic products: L. lactis secreting diabetes-associated auto-antigens in combination with interleukin (IL)-10 have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a well-defined mouse model for T1D. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant L. lactis secreting the 65 kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and tyrosine phosphatase-like protein ICA512 (IA-2), two major T1D-related auto-antigens. Attempts to secrete full size human GAD65 and IA-2 protein by L. lactis were unsuccessful. Trimming of GAD65 and IA-2 was investigated to optimise antigen secretion while maintaining sufficient bacterial growth. GAD65370-575 and IA-2635-979 showed to be efficiently secreted by recombinant L. lactis. Antigen secretion was verified by immunoblotting. Plasmid-derived GAD65 and IA-2 expression was combined in single strains with human IL-10 expression, a desired combination to allow tolerance induction. This study reports the generation of recombinant L. lactis secreting two major diabetes-related auto-antigens: human GAD65 and IA-2, by themselves or combined with the anti-inflammatory cytokine human IL-10. Prohibitive sequence obstacles hampering antigen secretion were resolved by trimming the full size proteins.

  16. Pectinesterase Inhibitor from Jelly Fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) Achene Inhibits Surface Antigen Expression by Human Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yu-Yawn

    2013-01-01

    Pectinesterase inhibitor (PEI) isolated from jelly fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) is an edible component of a popular drink consumed in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent in Asia, and current treatments for HBV infection need improvement. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PEI on the surface antigen expression by HBV (HBsAg). Human hepatoma cell lines Hep3B and Huh7 served as in vitro models for assessing the cytotoxicity and HBsAg expression. A culture of primary hepatocytes cultured from mice served as the normal counterpart. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. HBsAg expression was evaluated by measuring HBsAg secretion into the culture medium using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that PEI did not affect the viability of the human hepatoma cell lines or primary mouse hepatocytes. PEI inhibited the expression of HBsAg in hepatoma cell lines harboring endogenous (Hep3B) and integrated (Huh7) HBV genomes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, thus implicating a universal activity against HBV gene expression. In conclusion, it suggests that PEI from jelly fig inhibits the expression of human HBsAg in host cells without toxic effects on normal primary hepatocytes. PMID:24302965

  17. Pectinesterase Inhibitor from Jelly Fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) Achene Inhibits Surface Antigen Expression by Human Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yu-Yawn

    2013-01-01

    Pectinesterase inhibitor (PEI) isolated from jelly fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) is an edible component of a popular drink consumed in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent in Asia, and current treatments for HBV infection need improvement. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PEI on the surface antigen expression by HBV (HBsAg). Human hepatoma cell lines Hep3B and Huh7 served as in vitro models for assessing the cytotoxicity and HBsAg expression. A culture of primary hepatocytes cultured from mice served as the normal counterpart. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. HBsAg expression was evaluated by measuring HBsAg secretion into the culture medium using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that PEI did not affect the viability of the human hepatoma cell lines or primary mouse hepatocytes. PEI inhibited the expression of HBsAg in hepatoma cell lines harboring endogenous (Hep3B) and integrated (Huh7) HBV genomes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, thus implicating a universal activity against HBV gene expression. In conclusion, it suggests that PEI from jelly fig inhibits the expression of human HBsAg in host cells without toxic effects on normal primary hepatocytes. PMID:24302965

  18. Distribution, gene sequence and expression in vivo of the plasmid encoded fimbrial antigen of Salmonella serotype Enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, M. J.; Allen-Vercoe, E.; Redstone, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The pefA gene which encoded the serotype associated plasmid (SAP) mediated fimbrial major subunit antigen of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium shared genetic identity with 128 of 706 salmonella isolates as demonstrated by dot (colony) hybridization. Seventy-seven of 113 isolates of Typhimurium and individual isolates of serotypes Bovis-morbificans, Cholerae-suis and Enteritidis phage type 9b hybridized pefA strongly, whereas 48 isolates of Enteritidis hybridized pefA weakly and one Enteritidis isolate of phage type 14b failed to hybridize. Individual isolates of 294 serotypes and 247 individual isolates of serotype Dublin did not hybridize pefA. Southern hybridization of plasmids extracted from Enteritidis demonstrated that the pefA gene probe hybridized strongly an atypical SAP of 80 kb in size harboured by one Enteritidis isolate of phage-type 9b, whereas the typical SAP of 58 kb in size harboured by 48 Enteritidis isolates hybridized weakly. One Enteritidis isolate of phage type 14b which failed to hybridize pefA in dot (colony) hybridization experiments was demonstrated to be plasmid free. A cosmid library of Enteritidis phage type 4 expressed in Escherichia coli K12 was screened by hybridization for the presence of pef sequences. Recombinant clones which were deduced to harbour the entire pef operon elaborated a PEF-like fimbrial structure at the cell surface. The PEF-like fimbrial antigen was purified from one cosmid clone and used in western blot experiments with sera from chickens infected with Enteritidis phage-type 4. Seroconversion to the fimbrial antigen was observed which indicated that the Enteritidis PEF-like fimbrial structure was expressed at some stage during infection. Nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that the pefA alleles of Typhimurium and Enteritidis phage-type 4 shared 76% DNA nucleotide and 82% deduced amino acid sequence identity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8760946

  19. Invasion-inhibitory antibodies elicited by immunization with Plasmodium vivax apical membrane antigen-1 expressed in Pichia pastoris yeast.

    PubMed

    Vicentin, Elaine C; Françoso, Kátia S; Rocha, Mariana V; Iourtov, Dmitri; Dos Santos, Fernanda L; Kubrusly, Flávia S; Sakauchi, Maria A; Raw, Isaias; Nosten, Francois; Rénia, Laurent; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Russell, Bruce; Soares, Irene S

    2014-03-01

    In a recent vaccine trial performed with African children, immunization with a recombinant protein based on Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA-1) conferred a significant degree of strain-specific resistance against malaria. To contribute to the efforts of generating a vaccine against Plasmodium vivax malaria, we expressed the ectodomain of P. vivax AMA-1 (PvAMA-1) as a secreted soluble protein in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Recognized by a high percentage of sera from individuals infected by P. vivax, this recombinant protein was found to have maintained its antigenicity. The immunogenicity of this protein was evaluated in mice using immunization protocols that included homologous and heterologous prime-boost strategies with plasmid DNA and recombinant protein. We used the following formulations containing different adjuvants: aluminum salts (Alum), Bordetella pertussis monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), flagellin FliC from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, saponin Quil A, or incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The formulations containing the adjuvants Quil A or IFA elicited the highest IgG antibody titers. Significant antibody titers were also obtained using a formulation developed for human use containing MPLA or Alum plus MPLA. Recombinant PvAMA-1 produced under "conditions of good laboratory practice" provided a good yield, high purity, low endotoxin levels, and no microbial contaminants and reproduced the experimental immunizations. Most relevant for vaccine development was the fact that immunization with PvAMA-1 elicited invasion-inhibitory antibodies against different Asian isolates of P. vivax. Our results show that AMA-1 expressed in P. pastoris is a promising antigen for use in future preclinical and clinical studies.

  20. Expression of the adenocarcinoma-related antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody 44-3A6 in salivary gland neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Bentz, B G; Haines, G K; vonSchlegell, A S; Elseth, K M; Hanson, D G; Radosevich, J A

    1998-05-01

    The monoclonal antibody 44-3A6 detects a cell-surface protein that has been shown to be a useful marker in distinguishing adenocarcinomas from other histologic tumor types in a variety of tissues. The objective of this study was to determine whether 44-3A6 could be used as a tool in the classification of salivary gland neoplasms. These complex tumors share overlapping pathologic features but distinct clinical outcomes. This study used 44-3A6 to immunohistochemically describe the pattern and frequency of this antigen in salivary gland neoplasms. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of 22 benign and 26 malignant salivary tumors were evaluated. The patient population consisted of 25 (52.1%) women and 23 (47.9%) men selected from archival pathology files to reflect a range of salivary gland diseases. Normal surrounding salivary glands were found to have intense focal staining almost exclusively localized to ductal luminal cells. There was little staining of either myoepithelial or acinar cells. A wide spectrum of expression was found between and within tumor types, but a trend toward more expression of this antigen with decreasing differentiation was seen. A significant increase in staining was also seen in those tumors with ductal differentiation (n = 41) as opposed to those with predominantly acinar (i.e., acinic cell carcinoma) or myoepithelial (i.e., myoepithelioma; n = 8) differentiation (2.6 vs. 1.3, p < 0.05). No correlation was found between staining intensity and facial paralysis, pain, skin involvement, TNM stage, residual disease, or disease-free or total survival. Therefore this antigen appears to designate a duct luminal phenotype in normal and neoplastic salivary tissues.

  1. Purification and refolding of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies (scFvs) expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2014-02-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr) is an oncofetal antigen that is commonly expressed as a carbohydrate determinant in many adenocarcinomas. Since it is associated with tumor progression and metastasis, production of recombinant antibodies specific for T-antigen could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Previously, we isolated and characterized 11 anti-T-antigen phage clones from a phage library displaying human single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and purified one scFv protein, 1G11. More recently, we purified and characterized 1E8 scFv protein using a Drosophila S2 expression system. In the current study, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Groups 1-4 were purified from inclusion bodies expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Inclusion bodies isolated from E. coli cells were denatured in 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Solubilized His-tagged scFv proteins were purified using Ni(2+)-Sepharose column chromatography in the presence of 3.5 M Gdn-HCl. Purified scFv proteins were refolded according to a previously published method of step-wise dialysis. Two anti-T-antigen scFv proteins, 1E6 and 1E8 that belong to Groups 1 and 2, respectively, were produced in sufficient amounts, thus allowing further characterization of their binding activity with T-antigen. Specificity and affinity constants determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, provided evidence that both 1E8 and 1E6 scFv proteins are T-antigen specific and suggested that 1E8 scFv protein has a higher affinity for T-antigen than 1E6 scFv protein.

  2. The promoter of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene directing SV40 T antigen expression induces malignant proliferation of ependymal cells in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Perraud, F; Yoshimura, K; Louis, B; Dalemans, W; Ali-Hadji, D; Schultz, H; Claudepierre, M C; Chartier, C; Danel, C; Bellocq, J P

    1992-05-01

    Transgenic mice bearing a human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) promoter-SV40 T antigen fusion transgene were generated in order to localize in vivo the potential oncogenesis linked to the tissue-specific activity of the promoter for the CFTR gene. Surprisingly, the only site of tumors resulting from expression of the reporter onc gene was ependymal cells lining the brain ventricles. SV40 T antigen expression in these cells led to a consistent pathology in the first weeks of age: ependymoma and consequent hydrocephaly. Tumor-derived cell lines were established, characterized and shown to originate from SV40 T antigen-induced ependymoma. No pathological alterations were found in other organs, such as lungs and pancreas, in which cystic fibrosis is pathologically manifest in humans. Such transgenic mice and derived cell lines may represent valid models for analysing (1) the role of SV40 T antigen in ependymoma formation and (2) CFTR function in ependymal cells. PMID:1373882

  3. Specific immune response and pathological findings in BALB/c mice inoculated with recombinant BCG expressing HIV-1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Sukpanichnant, Sanya; Sittisombut, Nopporn; Balachandra, Kruavon; Promkhatkaew, Duanthanorm; Butraporn, Raywadee; Sutthent, Ruengpung; Boonlong, Jotika; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Honda, Mitsuo; Warachit, Paijit; Puthavathana, Pilaipan

    2005-03-01

    Recombinant BCGs (rBCGs) containing extrachromosomal plasmids with different HIV-1 insert sequences: nef, env (V3J1 and E9Q), gag p17 or whole gag p55 were evaluated for their immunogenicity, safety and persistent infection in BALB/c mice. Animal injected with, rBCG-plJKV3J1, rBCG-pSO gag p17 or rBCG-pSO gag p55 could elicit lymphocyte proliferation as tested by specific HIV-1 peptides or protein antigen. Inoculation with various concentration of rBCG-pSO gag p55 generated satisfactory specific lymphocyte proliferation in dose escalation trials. The rBCG-pSO gag p55 recovered from spleen tissues at different time interval post-inoculation could express the HIV protein as determined by ELISA p24 antigen detection kit. This result indicated that the extrachromosomal plasmid was stable and capable to express Gag protein. It was also demonstrated that rBCGs did not cause serious pathological change in the inoculated animals. The present study suggested the role of BCG as a potential vehicle for using in HIV vaccine development.

  4. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  5. Expression of the Escherichia coli K5 capsular antigen: immunoelectron microscopic and biochemical studies with recombinant E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kröncke, K D; Boulnois, G; Roberts, I; Bitter-Suermann, D; Golecki, J R; Jann, B; Jann, K

    1990-01-01

    The capsular K5 polysaccharide, a representative of group II capsular antigens of Escherichia coli, has been cloned previously, and three gene regions responsible for polymerization and surface expression have been defined (I. S. Roberts, R. Mountford, R. Hodge, K. B. Jann, and G. J. Boulnois, J. Bacteriol. 170:1305-1310, 1988). In this report, we describe the immunoelectron microscopic analysis of recombinant bacteria expressing the K5 antigen and of mutants defective in either region 1 or region 3 gene functions, as well as the biochemical analysis of the K5 capsular polysaccharide. Whereas the K5 clone expressed the K5 polysaccharide as a well-developed capsule in about 25% of its population, no capsule was observed in whole mount preparations and ultrathin sections of the expression mutants. Immunogold labeling of sections from the region 3 mutant revealed the capsular K5 polysaccharide in the cytoplasm. With the region 1 mutant, the capsular polysaccharide appeared associated with the cell membrane, and, unlike the region 3 mutant polysaccharide, the capsular polysaccharide could be detected in the periplasm after plasmolysis of the bacteria. Polysaccharides were isolated from the homogenized mutants with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The polysaccharide from the region 1 mutant had the same size as that isolated from the capsule of the original K5 clone, and both polysaccharides were substituted with phosphatidic acid. The polysaccharide from the region 3 mutant was smaller and was not substituted with phosphatidic acid. These results prompt us to postulate that gene region 3 products are involved in the translocation of the capsular polysaccharide across the cytoplasmic membrane and that region 1 directs the transport of the lipid-substituted capsular polysaccharide through the periplasm and across the outer membrane. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 6 PMID:2404935

  6. Regulation of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum: censoring freedom of expression?

    PubMed

    Duffy, Michael F; Reeder, John C; Brown, Graham V

    2003-03-01

    Plasmodium falciparum employs a strategy of clonal antigenic variation to evade the host immune response during the intraerythrocytic stage of its life cycle. The major variant parasite molecule is the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein (PfEMP)1, which is encoded by the var multigene family. The parasite switches between different PfEMP1 molecules through regulation of var transcription. Recent studies have shed considerable light on this process, but much remains unknown. However, striking parallels between transcriptional control of var and genes in other organisms provide direction for future studies.

  7. Production of monoclonal antibodies recognizing cancer-associated antigens expressed on mucin-type sugar chains.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, A; Ikeda, K; Sakuragi, N; Fujimoto, S

    1994-09-30

    To obtain monoclonal antibodies directed to mucin-type sugar chains, mice were immunized with bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) that had been conjugated with ovalbumin. Conjugation of BSM with ovalbumin enhanced the antigenicity of BSM to about five to ten times that of intact BSM and resulted in the establishment of ten hybridomas, all of which secreted monoclonal antibodies toward BSM. Most of the antibodies secreted by these hybridomas did not react with glycolipids but did react with glycoproteins. Several antibodies lost their reactivity when sialic acid residues were removed from BSM, indicating that these antibodies recognize carbohydrate moieties of mucins. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that three of the antibodies recognized human ovarian cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens. In addition, one of these three antibodies reacted with a human cultured colonic cancer cell line. The protocol described in this paper was effective in producing monoclonal antibodies that recognize mucin-carbohydrates and some of the generated antibodies can be applied to the detection of cancers.

  8. Low expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DR is associated with hypermethylation of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DR alpha gene regions in B cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Sano, H; Compton, L J; Shiomi, N; Steinberg, A D; Jackson, R A; Sasaki, T

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the expression of HLA-DR antigens and the HLA-DR alpha gene methylation was examined in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Using permanent B cell lines, we found reduced DR expression in SLE. The low DR expression was correlated with high anti-DNA antibody titers in patients' sera. The amounts of DR alpha message were lower in SLE cells than in normal controls, suggesting that the low expression of DR antigens is associated with gene functions. The extent of DNA methylation was examined at five CCGG sites in the HLA-DR alpha locus. DNA from both SLE and normal cells showed variable methylation patterns. Since the DR alpha gene is a single-copy gene, such a variability is the result of assaying a mixture of transformed clones containing methylated DR alpha gene, with other clones containing unmethylated DR alpha gene. A distinctive feature of normal cells was a consistent methylation pattern: 12 normal cell lines showed exactly the same pattern. In contrast, 28 SLE cell lines showed a cell-line-specific methylation, and hypermethylation at the DR alpha locus. The hypermethylation is often associated with transcriptionally inactive genes. Thus, our results suggest that (a) B cells with hypermethylated DR genes might express no or few DR antigens; (b) the ratio of cells with differently methylated DR genes is consistent in normal individuals, while, in SLE patients, cells with hypermethylated DR genes predominate, resulting in apparently reduced DR antigen expression; and (c) the aberrant DR expression could be associated directly with immunoregulatory dysfunctions in SLE disease. Images PMID:2997276

  9. Induction of monocyte expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha by the 30-kD alpha antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and synergism with fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Aung, H; Toossi, Z; Wisnieski, J J; Wallis, R S; Culp, L A; Phillips, N B; Phillips, M; Averill, L E; Daniel, T M; Ellner, J J

    1996-01-01

    Native 30-kD antigen, also known as alpha antigen, is a fibronectin-binding protein that is secreted by live Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This antigen may play an important biological role in the host-parasite interaction since it elicits delayed type hypersensitivity response and protective immunity in vivo and T lymphocyte blastogenesis and IFN-gamma production in vitro. In the present study, we show that, TNF-alpha protein is produced in monocyte culture supernatants in response to 30-kD antigen and the level is as high as that to purified protein derivative of M. tuberculosis. This stimulatory effect was not due to contamination with either bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan. The preincubation of monocytes with plasma fibronectin significantly enhanced the release of TNF-alpha into the culture supernatants in response to 30-kD antigen. This effect was blocked by polygonal antibody to plasma fibronectin. In contrast, the monocytic cell line U937 failed to release TNF-alpha protein in the culture supernatants in response to 30-kD antigen with or without preincubation with plasma fibronectin. To determine whether this observation was due to differential binding of the 30-kD to fibronectin on these cells, a cell based ELISA was used. Pretreatment of monocytes with fibronectin enhanced their binding of the 30-kD antigen. U937 cells bound the 30-kD antigen weakly with or without fibronectin pretreatment. These results indicate that 30-kD antigen which is a known secretary antigen of M. tuberculosis is a stimulus for human monocytes to express TNF-alpha and that stimulatory effect may be mediated through plasma fibronectin. PMID:8787690

  10. Comparison of altered expression of histocompatibility antigens with altered immune function in murine spleen cells treated with ultraviolet radiation and/or TPA

    SciTech Connect

    Pretell, J.O.; Cone, R.E.

    1985-02-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated that several treatments that inhibited the ability of cells to stimulate the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) also blocked the shedding of histocompatibility antigens and Ia antigens from murine spleen cells. In the present studies, one of these treatments, ultraviolet radiation (UV), was shown to cause an initial loss in the density of H-2K, IA, and IE antigens prior to the block in shedding observed after culture of these cells. Further analysis revealed that the UV-induced loss of antigens could be prevented by the presence of colchicine during irradiation. Biosynthetic analyses revealed the IA antigen synthesis was also inhibited in the UV-irradiated cells. Examination of the effects of a second agent, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the turnover of histocompatibility antigens revealed that the biosynthesis and shedding of these antigens were accelerated by this agent. However, addition of TPA to UV-irradiated cells did not result in a reversal of the UV-induced block in biosynthesis of IA antigens. Results of immune function assays correlated with the biochemical studies: UV-irradiation inhibited the generation of the MLR, but TPA enhanced this reaction, and addition of TPA to mixed lymphocyte cultures with UV-irradiated stimulators did not reverse the UV-induced inhibition. These results suggest that, although the turnover of histocompatibility antigens may be affected by TPA and UV in an antagonistic fashion, additional factors other than the expression of histocompatibility antigens are operating in the inhibition of stimulation of an MLR by UV radiation or its enhancement by TPA.

  11. Intramolecular trimerization, a novel strategy for making multispecific antibodies with controlled orientation of the antigen binding domains.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Compte, Marta; Cuesta, Angel M; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Bonet, Jaume; Navarro, Rocio; Muñoz-Briones, Clara; Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Mølgaard, Kasper; Oliva, Baldo; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a new strategy that allows the rapid and efficient engineering of mono and multispecific trivalent antibodies. By fusing single-domain antibodies from camelid heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins (VHHs) to the N-terminus of a human collagen XVIII trimerization domain (TIE(XVIII)) we produced monospecific trimerbodies that were efficiently secreted as soluble functional proteins by mammalian cells. The purified VHH-TIE(XVIII) trimerbodies were trimeric in solution and exhibited excellent antigen binding capacity. Furthermore, by connecting with two additional glycine-serine-based linkers three VHH-TIE(XVIII) modules on a single polypeptide chain, we present an approach for the rational design of multispecific tandem trimerbodies with defined stoichiometry and controlled orientation. Using this technology we report here the construction and characterization of a tandem VHH-based trimerbody capable of simultaneously binding to three different antigens: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Multispecific tandem VHH-based trimerbodies were well expressed in mammalian cells, had good biophysical properties and were capable of simultaneously binding their targeted antigens. Importantly, these antibodies were very effective in inhibiting the proliferation of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Multispecific VHH-based trimerbodies are therefore ideal candidates for future applications in various therapeutic areas. PMID:27345490

  12. Intramolecular trimerization, a novel strategy for making multispecific antibodies with controlled orientation of the antigen binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Compte, Marta; Cuesta, Angel M.; Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Bonet, Jaume; Navarro, Rocio; Muñoz-Briones, Clara; Sørensen, Karen Marie Juul; Mølgaard, Kasper; Oliva, Baldo; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J.; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a new strategy that allows the rapid and efficient engineering of mono and multispecific trivalent antibodies. By fusing single-domain antibodies from camelid heavy-chain-only immunoglobulins (VHHs) to the N-terminus of a human collagen XVIII trimerization domain (TIEXVIII) we produced monospecific trimerbodies that were efficiently secreted as soluble functional proteins by mammalian cells. The purified VHH-TIEXVIII trimerbodies were trimeric in solution and exhibited excellent antigen binding capacity. Furthermore, by connecting with two additional glycine-serine-based linkers three VHH-TIEXVIII modules on a single polypeptide chain, we present an approach for the rational design of multispecific tandem trimerbodies with defined stoichiometry and controlled orientation. Using this technology we report here the construction and characterization of a tandem VHH-based trimerbody capable of simultaneously binding to three different antigens: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Multispecific tandem VHH-based trimerbodies were well expressed in mammalian cells, had good biophysical properties and were capable of simultaneously binding their targeted antigens. Importantly, these antibodies were very effective in inhibiting the proliferation of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Multispecific VHH-based trimerbodies are therefore ideal candidates for future applications in various therapeutic areas. PMID:27345490

  13. Expression of a highly antigenic and native-like folded extracellular domain of the human α1 subunit of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, suitable for use in antigen specific therapies for Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Niarchos, Athanasios; Zouridakis, Marios; Douris, Vassilis; Georgostathi, Assimina; Kalamida, Dimitra; Sotiriadis, Alexandros; Poulas, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the expression of the extracellular domain of the human α1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in lepidopteran insect cells (i-α1-ECD) and its suitability for use in antigen-specific therapies for Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Compared to the previously expressed protein in P. pastoris (y-α1-ECD), i-α1-ECD had a 2-fold increased expression yield, bound anti-nAChR monoclonal antibodies and autoantibodies from MG patients two to several-fold more efficiently and resulted in a secondary structure closer to that of the crystal structure of mouse α1-ECD. Our results indicate that i-α1-ECD is an improved protein for use in antigen-specific MG therapeutic strategies. PMID:24376846

  14. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: Impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression

    SciTech Connect

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M.; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joelle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P.; Bertin, Gerard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 {mu}g pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IFN-{gamma}) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-{gamma} and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  15. Tumor-Targeted Human T Cells Expressing CD28-Based Chimeric Antigen Receptors Circumvent CTLA-4 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Condomines, Maud; Arnason, Jon; Benjamin, Reuben; Gunset, Gertrude; Plotkin, Jason; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy represents a promising treatment for cancer. Human T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognize and kill tumor cells in a MHC-unrestricted manner and persist in vivo when the CAR includes a CD28 costimulatory domain. However, the intensity of the CAR-mediated CD28 activation signal and its regulation by the CTLA-4 checkpoint are unknown. We investigated whether T cells expressing an anti-CD19, CD3 zeta and CD28-based CAR (19-28z) displayed the same proliferation and anti-tumor abilities than T cells expressing a CD3 zeta-based CAR (19z1) costimulated through the CD80/CD28, ligand/receptor pathway. Repeated in vitro antigen-specific stimulations indicated that 19-28z+ T cells secreted higher levels of Th1 cytokines and showed enhanced proliferation compared to those of 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. In an aggressive pre-B cell leukemia model, mice treated with 19-28z+ T cells had 10-fold reduced tumor progression compared to those treated with 19z1+ or 19z1-CD80+ T cells. shRNA-mediated CTLA-4 down-regulation in 19z1-CD80+ T cells significantly increased their in vivo expansion and anti-tumor properties, but had no effect in 19-28z+ T cells. Our results establish that CTLA-4 down-regulation may benefit human adoptive T cell therapy and demonstrate that CAR design can elude negative checkpoints to better sustain T cell function. PMID:26110267

  16. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joëlle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P; Bertin, Gérard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 microg pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IFN-gamma) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-gamma and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  17. Expression of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen in transgenic chloroplasts of tobacco, a non-food/feed crop

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Jennifer; Koya, Vijay; Leppla, Stephen H.; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) lists Bacillus anthracis as a category A agent and estimates the cost of an anthrax attack to exceed US$ 26 billion per 100,000 exposed individuals. Concerns regarding anthrax vaccine purity, a requirement for multiple injections, and a limited supply of the protective antigen (PA), underscore the urgent need for an improved vaccine. Therefore, the 83 kDa immunogenic Bacillus anthracis protective antigen was expressed in transgenic tobacco chloroplasts. The PA gene (pag) was cloned into a chloroplast vector along with the psbA regulatory signals to enhance translation. Chloroplast integration of the transgenes was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Crude plant extracts contained up to 2.5 mg full length PA/g of fresh leaf tissue and this showed exceptional stability for several months in stored leaves or crude extracts. Maximum levels of expression were observed in mature leaves under continuous illumination. Co-expression of the ORF2 chaperonin from Bacillus thuringiensis did not increase PA accumulation or induce folding into cuboidal crystals in transgenic chloroplasts. Trypsin, chymotrypsin and furin proteolytic cleavage sites present in PA were protected in transgenic chloroplasts because only full length PA 83 was observed without any degradation products. Both CHAPS and SDS detergents extracted PA with equal efficiency and PA was observed in the soluble fraction. Chloroplast-derived PA was functionally active in lysing mouse macrophages when combined with lethal factor (LF). Crude leaf extracts contained up to 25 μg functional PA/ml. With an average yield of 172 mg of PA per plant using an experimental transgenic cultivar grown in a greenhouse, 400 million doses of vaccine (free of contaminants) could be produced per acre, a yield that could be further enhanced 18-fold using a commercial cultivar in the field. PMID:15474731

  18. Eradication of B-ALL using chimeric antigen receptor–expressing T cells targeting the TSLPR oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Haiying; Cho, Monica; Haso, Waleed; Zhang, Ling; Tasian, Sarah K.; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Negri, Gian Luca; Lin, Yongshun; Zou, Jizhong; Mallon, Barbara S.; Maude, Shannon; Teachey, David T.; Barrett, David M.; Orentas, Rimas J.; Daugaard, Mads; Sorensen, Poul H. B.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the CD19 B cell–associated protein have demonstrated potent activity against relapsed/refractory B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Not all patients respond, and CD19-negative relapses have been observed. Overexpression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor (TSLPR; encoded by CRLF2) occurs in a subset of adults and children with B-ALL and confers a high risk of relapse. Recent data suggest the TSLPR signaling axis is functionally important, suggesting that TSLPR would be an ideal immunotherapeutic target. We constructed short and long CARs targeting TSLPR and tested efficacy against CRLF2-overexpressing B-ALL. Both CARs demonstrated activity in vitro, but only short TSLPR CAR T cells mediated leukemia regression. In vivo activity of the short CAR was also associated with long-term persistence of CAR-expressing T cells. Short TSLPR CAR treatment of mice engrafted with a TSLPR-expressing ALL cell line induced leukemia cytotoxicity with efficacy comparable with that of CD19 CAR T cells. Short TSLPR CAR T cells also eradicated leukemia in 4 xenograft models of human CRLF2-overexpressing ALL. Finally, TSLPR has limited surface expression on normal tissues. TSLPR-targeted CAR T cells thus represent a potent oncoprotein-targeted immunotherapy for high-risk ALL. PMID:26041741

  19. Expression of T cell antigen receptor genes in the thymus of irradiated mice after bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, G.; Yoshikai, Y.; Kishihara, K.; Nomoto, K.

    1988-01-15

    Sequential appearance of the expression of T cell antigen receptor genes was investigated in the thymus of irradiated mice at the early stage after transplantation of Thy-1 congeneic H-2 compatible allogeneic bone marrow cells. The first cells to repopulate the thymus on day 7 after bone marrow transplantation were intrathymic radioresistant T cell precursors, which expanded mainly to CD4+CD8+ host-type thymocytes by day 14. A high level of gamma gene expression but a much reduced level of alpha and beta gene expression were detected in the host-type thymocytes on day 7. During regeneration of these cells, gamma-chain messages fell to low level and alpha and beta mRNA levels increased. The thymus of the recipients began to be repopulated by donor-derived T cells about 2 wk after bone marrow transplantation and was almost completely replaced by the third week. An ordered expression of gamma then beta and alpha-chain gene transcript was also observed in the donor-type thymocytes at the early stage after bone marrow transplantation. The use of thymocytes at early stage in whole-body irradiated bone marrow chimera provides a pertinent source for investigating the molecular mechanism of T cell differentiation in adult thymus.

  20. Thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) is expressed by lymphatic vessels and mediates cell adhesion to lymphatic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Jurisic, Giorgia; Iolyeva, Maria; Proulx, Steven T; Halin, Cornelia; Detmar, Michael

    2010-10-15

    The lymphatic vascular system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined by comparative transcriptional profiling studies of ex vivo isolated mouse intestinal lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, thymus cell antigen 1 (Thy1, CD90) was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative PCR, and at the protein level by FACS and immunofluorescence analyses. Thy1 was also strongly expressed by tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, as evaluated in a B16 melanoma footpad model in mice. Blockade of Thy1 inhibited tumor cell adhesion to cultured mouse lymphatic endothelial cells. Importantly, treatment of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells with tumor necrosis factor or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate resulted in Thy1 upregulation in podoplanin-expressing lymphatic endothelial cells, but not in podoplanin-negative blood vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, adhesion of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes to human lymphatic endothelial cells was Thy1-dependent. Together, these results identify Thy1 as a novel lymphatic vessel expressed gene and suggest its potential role in the cell adhesion processes required for tumor progression and inflammation.

  1. Targeted expression of SV40 T antigen in the hair follicle of transgenic mice produces an aberrant hair phenotype.

    PubMed

    Keough, R; Powell, B; Rogers, G

    1995-03-01

    Directed expression of SV40 large T antigen (TAg) in transgenic mice can induce tissue-specific tumorigenesis and useful cell lines exhibiting differentiated characteristics can be established from resultant tumor cells. In an attempt to produce an immortalised mouse hair follicle cortical cell line for the study of hair keratin gene control, SV40 TAg expression was targeted to the hair follicles of transgenic mice using a sheep hair gene promoter. Expression of SV40 TAg in the follicle cortex disrupted normal fiber ultrastructure, producing a marked phenotypic effect. Affected hairs were wavy or severely kinked (depending on the severity of the phenotype) producing an appearance ranging from a ruffled coat to a stubble covering the back of the mouse. The transgenic hairs appeared to be weakened at the base of the fibers, leading to premature hair-loss and a thinner pelage, or regions of temporary nudity. No follicle tumors or neoplasia were apparent and immortalisation of cortical cells could not be established in culture. In situ hybridisation studies in the hair follicle using histone H3 as a cell proliferation marker suggested that cell proliferation had ceased prior to commencement of K2.10-TAg expression and was not re-established in the differentiating cortical cells. Hence, TAg was unable to induce cell immortalisation at that stage of cortical cell differentiation. However, transgenic mice developed various other abnormalities including vertebral abnormalities and bladder, liver and intestinal tumors, which resulted in reduced life expectancy.

  2. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Knippertz, Ilka; Deinzer, Andrea; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Steinkasserer, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B' core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based "modular promoter" system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B' core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  3. The Effect of the Nonionic Block Copolymer Pluronic P85 on Gene Expression in Mouse Muscle and Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaymalov, Zagit Z.; Yang, Zhihui; Pisarev, Vladimir M.; Alakhov, Valery Yu.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    DNA vaccines can be greatly improved by polymer agents that simultaneously increase transgene expression and activate immunity. We describe here Pluronic P85 (P85), a triblock copolymer of ethylene oxide (EO) and propylene oxide (PO) EO26-PO40-EO26,. Using a mouse model we demonstrate that co-administration of a bacterial plasmid DNA with P85 in a skeletal muscle greatly increases gene expression in the injection site and distant organs, especially the draining lymph nodes and spleen. The reporter expression colocalizes with the specific markers of myocytes and keratinocytes in the muscle, as well as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages in the muscle, lymph nodes and spleen. Furthermore, DNA/P85 and P85 alone increase the systemic expansion of CD11c+ (DC), and local expansion of CD11c+, CD14+ (macrophages) and CD49b+ (natural killer) cell populations. DNA/P85 (but not P85) also increases maturation of local DC (CD11c+CD86+, CD11c+CD80+, and CD11c+CD40+). We suggest that DNA/P85 promotes the activation and recruitment of the antigen-presenting cells, which further incorporate, express and carry the transgene to the immune system organs. PMID:19064283

  4. Construction of Recombinant Baculoviruses Expressing Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Main Protective Antigen and Their Immune Effects on Chickens.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jingping; An, Qi; Song, Shanshan; Gao, Dongni; Ping, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    In order to overcome the limitations of conventional vaccines for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), we constructed recombinant dual expression system baculoviruses with VP2 and VP2/4/3, the main protective antigens of IBDV. We compared the immune effects of the baculoviruses in avian cells and detected their control effects on chickens with infectious bursal disease. We used Western blot analysis to measure VP2 protein and VP2/4/3 polyprotein expression in avian cells infected using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. The recombinant baculoviruses were used to vaccinate specific pathogen-free chickens, which produced specific protective antibodies and strong cellular immune responses. The results of the virus challenge experiment revealed that the protective efficiency of VP2 and VP2/4/3 virus vaccines were 95.8% and 100%, respectively, both of which were higher than the vaccine group (87.5%), and significantly higher than the control group (50%). The results demonstrated that the immune effect of BV-S-ITRs-VP2/4/3 was superior to that of BV-S-ITRs-VP2. Compared with traditional attenuated vaccine and genetically engineered live vector vaccine, the dual expression viral vector vaccine has good bio-safety. The results of this study provide a foundation for the further development of poultry vaccines, in addition to providing a useful reference for developing non-replicating live vaccines against other viral diseases. PMID:26167907

  5. Targeted expression of SV40 T antigen in the hair follicle of transgenic mice produces an aberrant hair phenotype.

    PubMed

    Keough, R; Powell, B; Rogers, G

    1995-03-01

    Directed expression of SV40 large T antigen (TAg) in transgenic mice can induce tissue-specific tumorigenesis and useful cell lines exhibiting differentiated characteristics can be established from resultant tumor cells. In an attempt to produce an immortalised mouse hair follicle cortical cell line for the study of hair keratin gene control, SV40 TAg expression was targeted to the hair follicles of transgenic mice using a sheep hair gene promoter. Expression of SV40 TAg in the follicle cortex disrupted normal fiber ultrastructure, producing a marked phenotypic effect. Affected hairs were wavy or severely kinked (depending on the severity of the phenotype) producing an appearance ranging from a ruffled coat to a stubble covering the back of the mouse. The transgenic hairs appeared to be weakened at the base of the fibers, leading to premature hair-loss and a thinner pelage, or regions of temporary nudity. No follicle tumors or neoplasia were apparent and immortalisation of cortical cells could not be established in culture. In situ hybridisation studies in the hair follicle using histone H3 as a cell proliferation marker suggested that cell proliferation had ceased prior to commencement of K2.10-TAg expression and was not re-established in the differentiating cortical cells. Hence, TAg was unable to induce cell immortalisation at that stage of cortical cell differentiation. However, transgenic mice developed various other abnormalities including vertebral abnormalities and bladder, liver and intestinal tumors, which resulted in reduced life expectancy. PMID:7542671

  6. Transcriptional Targeting of Mature Dendritic Cells with Adenoviral Vectors via a Modular Promoter System for Antigen Expression and Functional Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Deinzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    To specifically target dendritic cells (DCs) to simultaneously express different therapeutic transgenes for inducing immune responses against tumors, we used a combined promoter system of adenoviral vectors. We selected a 216 bp short Hsp70B′ core promoter induced by a mutated, constitutively active heat shock factor (mHSF) 1 to drive strong gene expression of therapeutic transgenes MelanA, BclxL, and IL-12p70 in HeLa cells, as well as in mature DCs (mDCs). As this involves overexpressing mHSF1, we first evaluated the resulting effects on DCs regarding upregulation of heat shock proteins and maturation markers, toxicity, cytokine profile, and capacity to induce antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Second, we generated the two-vector-based “modular promoter” system, where one vector contains the mHSF1 under the control of the human CD83 promoter, which is specifically active only in DCs and after maturation. mHSF1, in turn, activates the Hsp70B′ core promotor-driven expression of transgenes MelanA and IL-12p70 in the DC-like cell line XS52 and in human mature and hence immunogenic DCs, but not in tolerogenic immature DCs. These in vitro experiments provide the basis for an in vivo targeting of mature DCs for the expression of multiple transgenes. Therefore, this modular promoter system represents a promising tool for future DC-based immunotherapies in vivo. PMID:27446966

  7. Responses of macrophage-associated antigen-expressing cells in the dental pulp of rat molars to experimental tooth replantation.

    PubMed

    Rungvechvuttivittaya, S; Okiji, T; Suda, H

    1998-09-01

    Bacterial infection of the dental pulp is a major hindrance to successful pulp regeneration after tooth replantation. This study examined how macrophages and class II molecule-expressing cells of the pulp respond to tooth replantation, on the hypothesis that they contribute to the defence and repair of the traumatized pulp. Upper right first molars of 5-week-old male Wistar rats were replanted immediately after extraction; contralateral untreated teeth served as controls. Pulpal cells expressing macrophage-associated antigens were immunohistochemically demonstrated at 0 h (immediately after the replantation) to 84 days postoperatively using antirat monoclonal antibodies OX6 (anti-class II molecules), ED1 (pan-macrophage antibody, reactive also with dendritic cells) and ED2 (anti-resident macrophages). Between 3 and 7 days postoperatively, ED1+ and OX6+ cells, but not ED2+ cells, were concentrated in areas of degeneration formed in the coronal pulp, and frequently showed a marked accumulation along the pulp-dentine border of the cuspal area. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that some of the OX6+ cells with a dendritic profile extended several cytoplasmic processes into the dentinal tubules communicating with the enamel-free area at the tip of the cusp. From 14-84 days, approx. two-thirds of specimens exhibited pulp-tissue regeneration with increasing formation of reparative dentine. Following the formation of sound reparative dentine, cells positive to each antibody were distributed more centrally in the pulp than in the controls, and thus did not show any accumulation along the pulp-dentine border. However, in the other specimens where a bone-like hard tissue had formed in the pulp chamber, many ED1+ and OX6+ cells were still concentrated in the remaining pulp tissue and showed a marked accumulation along the pulp dentine border. Few ED2+ cells were observed in these specimens. These findings suggest that, following tooth replantation, exudative

  8. Glycans expressed on Trichinella spiralis excretory-secretory antigens are important for anti-inflamatory immune response polarization.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovic, Jelena; Ilic, Natasa; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Gruden-Movsesijan, Alisa

    2014-12-01

    Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae excretory-secretory antigens (ES L1) are most likely responsible for the induction of immune response during infection by this parasitic. The antigens bear carbohydrate structures that may contribute to immune system activation resulting in a Th2/anti-inflammatory immune response. We show that T. spiralis glycans affect the expression and the production of IL-4 and IL-10 in vivo. Alteration of carbohydrate structures on ES L1 altered dendritic cell (DC) maturation. Periodate treatment of ES L1 led to the reduction in both ERK and p38 phosphorylation which may be the cause of reduced IL-10 and IL-12p70 production. In vitro priming of naïve T cells with DCs stimulated with native and periodate-treated ES L1 emphasized the importance of intact glycans for IL-10 production. We conclude that T. spiralis glycans affect the anti-inflammatory environment and can interfere with the development of inflammatory diseases.

  9. The Hematopoietic System–specific Minor Histocompatibility Antigen HA-1 Shows Aberrant Expression in Epithelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Christoph A.; Wilke, Martina; Pool, Jos; Vermeulen, Corine; Blokland, Els; Burghart, Elke; Krostina, Sabine; Wendler, Nicole; Passlick, Bernward; Riethmüeller, Gert; Goulmy, Els

    2002-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) can induce curative graft-versus-tumor reactions in patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The graft-versus-tumor reaction after human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical SCT is mediated by alloimmune donor T cells specific for polymorphic minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags). Among these, the mHag HA-1 was found to be restricted to the hematopoietic system. Here, we report on the HA-1 ribonucleic acid expression by microdissected carcinoma tissues and by single disseminated tumor cells isolated from patients with various epithelial tumors. The HA-1 peptide is molecularly defined, as it forms an immunogenic peptide ligand with HLA-A2 on the cell membrane of carcinoma cell lines. HA-1–specific cytotoxic T cells lyse epithelial tumor cell lines in vitro, whereas normal epithelial cells are not recognized. Thus, HA-1–specific immunotherapy combined with HLA-identical allogeneic SCT may now be feasible for patients with HA-1+ carcinomas. PMID:12163564

  10. Pediatric Measles Vaccine Expressing a Dengue Antigen Induces Durable Serotype-specific Neutralizing Antibodies to Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Brandler, Samantha; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Moris, Arnaud; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Combredet, Chantal; Février, Michèle; Bedouelle, Hugues; Schwartz, Olivier; Desprès, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    Dengue disease is an increasing global health problem that threatens one-third of the world's population. Despite decades of efforts, no licensed vaccine against dengue is available. With the aim to develop an affordable vaccine that could be used in young populations living in tropical areas, we evaluated a new strategy based on the expression of a minimal dengue antigen by a vector derived from pediatric live-attenuated Schwarz measles vaccine (MV). As a proof-of-concept, we inserted into the MV vector a sequence encoding a minimal combined dengue antigen composed of the envelope domain III (EDIII) fused to the ectodomain of the membrane protein (ectoM) from DV serotype-1. Immunization of mice susceptible to MV resulted in a long-term production of DV1 serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies. The presence of ectoM was critical to the immunogenicity of inserted EDIII. The adjuvant capacity of ectoM correlated with its ability to promote the maturation of dendritic cells and the secretion of proinflammatory and antiviral cytokines and chemokines involved in adaptive immunity. The protective efficacy of this vaccine should be studied in non-human primates. A combined measles–dengue vaccine might provide a one-shot approach to immunize children against both diseases where they co-exist. PMID:18160988

  11. Identification of Novel Components Influencing Colonization Factor Antigen I Expression in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Sara; Gautheron, Sylviane; Nasser, William; Renauld-Mongénie, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Colonization factors (CFs) mediate early adhesion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in the small intestine. Environmental signals including bile, glucose, and contact with epithelial cells have previously been shown to modulate CF expression in a strain dependent manner. To identify novel components modulating CF surface expression, 20 components relevant to the intestinal environment were selected for evaluation. These included mucin, bicarbonate, norepinephrine, lincomycin, carbon sources, and cations. Effects of individual components on surface expression of the archetype CF, CFA/I, were screened using a fractional factorial Hadamard matrix incorporating 24 growth conditions. As most CFs agglutinate erythrocytes, surface expression was evaluated by mannose resistant hemagglutination. Seven components, including porcine gastric mucin, lincomycin, glutamine, and glucose were found to induce CFA/I surface expression in vitro in a minimal media while five others were inhibitory, including leucine and 1,10-phenanthroline. To further explore the effect of components positively influencing CFA/I surface expression, a response surface methodology (RSM) was designed incorporating 36 growth conditions. The optimum concentration for each component was identified, thereby generating a novel culture media, SP1, for CFA/I expression. CFs closely related to CFA/I, including CS4 and CS14 were similarly induced in SP1 media. Other epidemiologically relevant CFs were also induced when compared to the level obtained in minimal media. These results indicate that although CF surface expression is complex and highly variable among strains, the CF response can be predicted for closely related strains. A novel culture media inducing CFs in the CF5a group was successfully identified. In addition, mucin was found to positively influence CF expression in strains expressing either CFA/I or CS1 and CS3, and may function as a common environmental cue. PMID:26517723

  12. Identification of Novel Components Influencing Colonization Factor Antigen I Expression in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Haines, Sara; Gautheron, Sylviane; Nasser, William; Renauld-Mongénie, Geneviève

    2015-01-01

    Colonization factors (CFs) mediate early adhesion of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in the small intestine. Environmental signals including bile, glucose, and contact with epithelial cells have previously been shown to modulate CF expression in a strain dependent manner. To identify novel components modulating CF surface expression, 20 components relevant to the intestinal environment were selected for evaluation. These included mucin, bicarbonate, norepinephrine, lincomycin, carbon sources, and cations. Effects of individual components on surface expression of the archetype CF, CFA/I, were screened using a fractional factorial Hadamard matrix incorporating 24 growth conditions. As most CFs agglutinate erythrocytes, surface expression was evaluated by mannose resistant hemagglutination. Seven components, including porcine gastric mucin, lincomycin, glutamine, and glucose were found to induce CFA/I surface expression in vitro in a minimal media while five others were inhibitory, including leucine and 1,10-phenanthroline. To further explore the effect of components positively influencing CFA/I surface expression, a response surface methodology (RSM) was designed incorporating 36 growth conditions. The optimum concentration for each component was identified, thereby generating a novel culture media, SP1, for CFA/I expression. CFs closely related to CFA/I, including CS4 and CS14 were similarly induced in SP1 media. Other epidemiologically relevant CFs were also induced when compared to the level obtained in minimal media. These results indicate that although CF surface expression is complex and highly variable among strains, the CF response can be predicted for closely related strains. A novel culture media inducing CFs in the CF5a group was successfully identified. In addition, mucin was found to positively influence CF expression in strains expressing either CFA/I or CS1 and CS3, and may function as a common environmental cue. PMID:26517723

  13. Human COL2A1-directed SV40 T antigen expression in transgenic and chimeric mice results in abnormal skeletal development

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The ability of SV40 T antigen to cause abnormalities in cartilage development in transgenic mice and chimeras has been tested. The cis- regulatory elements of the COL2A1 gene were used to target expression of SV40 T antigen to differentiating chondrocytes in transgenic mice and chimeras derived from embryonal stem (ES) cells bearing the same transgene. The major phenotypic consequences of transgenic (pAL21) expression are malformed skeleton, disproportionate dwarfism, and perinatal/neonatal death. Expression of T antigen was tissue specific and in the main characteristic of the mouse alpha 1(II) collagen gene. Chondrocyte densities and levels of alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs were reduced in the transgenic mice. Islands of cells which express cartilage characteristic genes such as type IIB procollagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, alpha 2(XI) collagen, and aggrecan were found in the articular and growth cartilages of pAL21 chimeric fetuses and neonates. But these cells, which were expressing T antigen, were not properly organized into columns of proliferating chondrocytes. Levels of alpha 1(II) collagen mRNA were reduced in these chondrocytes. In addition, these cells did not express type X collagen, a marker for hypertrophic chondrocytes. The skeletal abnormality in pAL21 mice may therefore be due to a retardation of chondrocyte maturation or an impaired ability of chondrocytes to complete terminal differentiation and an associated paucity of some cartilage matrix components. PMID:7822417

  14. γ-Radiation Promotes Immunological Recognition of Cancer Cells through Increased Expression of Cancer-Testis Antigens In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Beata; Wenger, Roland H.; Lehmann, Kuno; Sartori, Alessandro A.; Moch, Holger; Knuth, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Background γ-radiation is an effective treatment for cancer. There is evidence that radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. It was described that irradiation induces de novo protein synthesis and enhances antigen presentation, we therefore investigated whether γ-radiation results in increased expression of cancer-testis (CT) antigens and MHC-I, thus allowing efficient immunological control. This is relevant because the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I on tumor cells is often heterogeneous. We found that the changes induced by γ-radiation promote the immunological recognition of the tumor, which is illustrated by the increased infiltration by lymphocytes after radiotherapy. Methods/Findings We compared the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I in various cancer cell lines and fresh biopsies before and after in vitro irradiation (20 Gy). Furthermore, we compared paired biopsies that were taken before and after radiotherapy from sarcoma patients. To investigate whether the changed expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I is specific for γ-radiation or is part of a generalized stress response, we analyzed the effect of hypoxia, hyperthermia and genotoxic stress on the expression of CT-antigens and MHC-I. In vitro irradiation of cancer cell lines and of fresh tumor biopsies induced a higher or de novo expression of different CT-antigens and a higher expression of MHC-I in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Importantly, we show that irradiation of cancer cells enhances their recognition by tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. The analysis of paired biopsies taken from a cohort of sarcoma patients before and after radiotherapy confirmed our findings and, in addition showed that irradiation resulted in higher infiltration by lymphocytes. Other forms of stress did not have an impact on the expression of CT-antigens or MHC-I. Conclusions Our findings suggest that γ-radiation promotes the immunological recognition of the tumor. We therefore propose that combining

  15. Characterization of a transcriptional promoter of human papillomavirus 18 and modulation of its expression by simian virus 40 and adenovirus early antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Thierry, F.; Heard, J.M.; Dartmann, K.; Yaniv, M.

    1987-01-01

    RNA present in cells derived from cervical carcinoma that contained human papillomavirus 18 genomes was initiated in the 1.053-kilobase BamHI fragment that covered the complete noncoding region of this virus. When cloned upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, this viral fragment directed the expression of the bacterial enzyme only in the sense orientation. Initiation sites were mapped around the ATG of open reading frame E6. This promoter was active in some human and simian cell lines, and its expression was modulated positively by simian virus 40 large T antigen and negatively by adenovirus type 5 E1a antigen.

  16. Lesion human leukocyte antigen-F expression is associated with a poor prognosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongfu; Han, Haixiong; Zhang, Fabiao; Lv, Shangdong; Li, Zhengyu; Fang, Zheping

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-F, a non-classical HLA-class I molecule, has attracted attention as an important immunosuppressive molecule in recent years, although the clinical relevance of HLA-F expression in cancer patients remains unclear. In the present study, HLA-F expression in 90 primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions and 55 corresponding adjacent normal liver tissues was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and the associations between HLA-F expression and clinicopathological parameters and patient survival times were analyzed. Positive HLA-F expression was observed in 47.8% (43/90) of the HCC lesions and in 10.9% (6/55) of the normal liver tissues. HLA-F expression in HCC lesions was significantly correlated with patient gender (P=0.02), and venous or lymphatic invasion (P=0.02). Patients who were HLA-F-positive had worse survival times than those who were HLA-F-negative (P=0.04). The mean overall survival times for HLA-F-negative and -positive patients were 44.2 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 37.7-50.7] and 33.0 months (95% CI, 25.1-40.8), respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that HLA-F was an independent prognostic factor for HCC patients with a hazard ratio of 2.1 (95% CI, 1.0-4.4). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that HLA-F expression was associated with poor survival in HCC patients, and is correlated with tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  17. An Egr-1-specific DNAzyme regulates Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JUNBIAO; GUO, CHANGLEI; WANG, RAN; HUANG, LULI; LIANG, WANQIAN; LIU, RUNNAN; SUN, BING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to transfect rat aortic smooth muscle cells with an early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1)-specific DNAzyme (ED5), to observe its effect on Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and to elucidate the mechanism of ED5-mediated inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. VSMCs in primary culture obtained by tissue block adhesion were identified by morphological observation and α smooth muscle actin (α-SM-actin) immunocytochemistry. The cells were then transfected with ED5 or scrambled ED5 (ED5SCR). The three groups of cells used in the present study were the control group, ED5 group and ED5SCR group. The expression levels of Egr-1 and PCNA protein were detected following transfection by analyzing and calculating the integral optical density value in each group. Primary culture of VSMCs and transfection of ED5 and ED5SCR were successfully accomplished. Following stimulation with 10% fetal calf serum, the Egr-1 protein was expressed most strongly at 1 h and demonstrated a declining trend over time; the expression of PCNA protein began at 4 h, peaked at 24 h and then demonstrated a slightly declining trend over time. Compared with the control group and the ED5SCR group, ED5 inhibited the expression of Egr-1 and PCNA (P<0.05). ED5 was able to inhibit the expression of Egr-1 and PCNA proteins in VSMCs to a certain extent and VSMC proliferation in vitro. DNAzyme gene therapy may be useful as a new method for treating vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:23737882

  18. Hookah smoking and cancer: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in exclusive/ever hookah smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Khan Mohammad; Chaouachi, Kamal; Mahmood, Rubaida

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recently published some work on CEA levels in hookah (also called narghile, shisha elsewhere) and cigarette smokers. Hookah smokers had higher levels of CEA than non-smokers although mean levels were low compared to cigarette smokers. However some of them were also users of other tobacco products (cigarettes, bidis, etc.). Objectives To find serum CEA levels in ever/exclusive hookah smokers, i.e. those who smoked only hookah (no cigarettes, bidis, etc.), prepared between 1 and 4 times a day with a quantity of up to 120 g of a tobacco-molasses mixture each (i.e. the tobacco weight equivalent of up to 60 cigarettes of 1 g each) and consumed in 1 to 8 sessions. Methods Enhanced chemiluminescent immunometric technique was applied to measure CEA levels in serum samples from 59 exclusive male smokers with age ranging from 20–80 years (mean = 58.8 ± 14.7 years) and 8–65 years of smoking (mean = 37.7 ± 16.8). 36 non-smokers served as controls. Subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the number of preparations; the number of sessions and the total daily smoking time: Light (1; 1; ≤ 20 minutes); Medium (1–3; 1–3; >20 min to ≤ 2 hrs) and Heavy smokers (2–4; 3–8; >2 hrs to ≤ 6 hrs). Because of the nature of distribution of CEA levels among our individuals, Wilcoxon's rank sum two-sample test was applied to compare the variables. Results The overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers (mean: 3.58 ± 2.61 ng/ml; n = 59) were not significantly different (p ≤ 0.0937) from the levels in non-smokers (2.35 ± 0.71 ng/ml). Mean levels in light, medium and heavy smokers were: 1.06 ± 0.492 ng/ml (n = 5); 2.52 ± 1.15 ng/ml (n = 28) and 5.11 ± 3.08 ng/ml (n = 26) respectively. The levels in medium smokers and non-smokers were also not significantly different (p ≤ 0.9138). In heavy smokers, the CEA levels were significantly higher than in non-smokers (p ≤ 0.0001567). Conclusion Overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers were low compared to cigarette smokers. However, heavy hookah smoking substantially raises CEA levels. Low-nitrosamines smokeless tobacco of the SNUS Swedish type could be envisaged as an alternative to smoking for this category of users and also, in a broad harm reduction perspective, to the prevalent low-quality moist snuff called naswar. PMID:18501010

  19. Time to lowest postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level is predictive on survival outcome in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huichuan; Luo, Yanxin; Wang, Xiaolin; Bai, Liangliang; Huang, Pinzhu; Wang, Lei; Huang, Meijin; Deng, Yanhong; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    This study was to investigate whether the time to the lowest postoperative CEA can predict cancer survival. We enrolled 155 rectal cancer patients in this retrospective and longitudinal cohort study. Deepness of response (DpR) of CEA refers to the relative change of the lowest postoperative CEA level from baseline, and time to DpR (TTDpR) refers to the time from surgery to the lowest postoperative CEA level. The median of TTDpR and DpR was 4.5 (range, 3.0–18.0) weeks and −67% (range, −99% to 114%) respectively. Patients with TTDpR 4.5 weeks. Using TTDpR as a continuous variable, the HR of DFS and OS was 1.13 (95% CI 1.06–1.22, P = 0.001) and 1.17 (95% CI 1.07–1.29, P = 0.001) respectively. On multivariate analysis, the predictive value of prolonged TTDpR remained [adjusted HRs: 1.12 (95% CI 1.03–1.21, P = 0.006) and 1.17 (95% CI 1.06–1.28, P = 0.001)]. These findings remained significant in patients with normal preoperative CEA. Our results showed prolonged TTDpR of CEA independently predicted unfavorable survival outcomes, regardless of whether preoperative CEA was elevated or not. PMID:27658525

  20. Maternal inhibition of hepatitis B surface antigen gene expression in transgenic mice correlates with de novo methylation.

    PubMed

    Hadchouel, M; Farza, H; Simon, D; Tiollais, P; Pourcel, C

    Differential modifications of the genome during gametogenesis result in a functional difference between the paternal and maternal genomes at the moment of fertilization. A possible cause of this imprinting is the methylation of DNA. The insertion of foreign DNA into transgenic mice allows the tagging of regions that are differentially methylated during gametogenesis. We describe here a transgenic mouse strain in which the expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen gene is irreversibly repressed following its passage through the female germ line. This inhibition is accompanied by the methylation of all the HpaII and HhaI sites within the foreign gene, which we have shown to be integrated into a site on chromosome 13. The irreversibility reported here contrasts with what is found with other transgenic mice sequences which are reversibly methylated after passage through the male or female germ line, though in both cases methylation appears to be important in the imprinting process.

  1. Expression of E2 gene of bovine viral diarrhea virus in Pichia pastoris: a candidate antigen for indirect Dot ELISA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuelan; Ma, Tianyi; Ju, Xingyu; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Min; Liu, Teng; Cao, Wenbo; Bao, Yongzhan; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-02-01

    The E2 gene containing the EcoR I and Not I sites of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was amplified from the plasmid pMD-18T-E2 of the HB-bd isolated, and inserted into Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) expression vector pPIC9K, and transfected into Escherichia coli DH5α. The recombinant plasmid pPIC9K-E2 was digested by the SalI restriction enzyme and transformed into the P. pastoris strain GS115 by electroporation. High copy integrative transformants were obtained by G418 screening and induced for expression with methanol. The expressed products in the culture medium were identified by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the Western blotting and the antibody test for immunity. An indirect Dot-ELISA for the detection of antibody against BVDV was established by the recombinant E2 protein as the coating antigen. The reaction conditions of the indirect Dot-ELISA were optimized. The coating concentration of the E2 recombinant protein antigen, the dilution of serum sample, the optimal concentration of HRP labeled antibody, the optimal blocking reagent and blocking time were studied. 100 sera samples from cows in the field were tested for the antibody against BVDV by the Dot-ELISA and the IDEXX HerdChek BVDV antibody ELISA kit simultaneously to compare the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy. The results showed that the expressed products in the culture medium resulted in single band of 44kDa by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The results of the immunogenicity assay indicated that the protein E2 expressed in P. pastoris could induce the experimental animals of the rabbit to produce BVDV specific antibodies. The results of the indirect Dot-ELISA showed that the optimal coating concentration of the E2 recombinant protein was 2.0μg/mL, the bovine serum dilution was 1:100, the optimal concentration of HRP-labeled rabbit anti-bovine antibody IgG was 1:500, and the optimal blocking reagent was 3% glutin-TBS and blocking for 45min. The

  2. EXPRESSION PROFILING OF FIVE RAT STRAINS REVEAL TRANSCRIPTIONAL MODES IN THE ANTIGEN PROCESSING PATHWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative gene expression profiling of rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases can help decode the transcriptional program that governs cellular behavior. We hypothesized that co-transcribed, intra-pathway, functionally coherent genes can be r...

  3. Molecular basis for variable expression of merozoite surface antigen gp45 among American isolates of Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Fisher, T G; McElwain, T F; Palmer, G H

    2001-06-01

    Immunization with the merozoite surface glycoprotein gp45 induces protection against challenge using the homologous Babesia bigemina strain. However, gp45 B-cell epitopes are highly polymorphic among B. bigemina strains isolated from different geographical locations within North and South America. The molecular basis for this polymorphism was investigated using the JG-29 biological clone of a Mexico strain of B. bigemina and comparison with the Puerto Rico, St. Croix, and Texcoco strains. The molecular size and antibody reactivity of gp45 expressed by the JG-29 clone were identical to those of the parental Mexico strain. gp45 cDNA and the genomic locus encompassing gp45 were cloned and sequenced from JG-29. The locus sequence and Southern blot data were consistent with a single gp45 copy in the JG-29 genome. The JG-29 cDNA expressed the full-length protein recognized by the gp45-specific monoclonal antibody 14/1.3.2. The genomes of the Puerto Rico and St. Croix strains of B. bigemina were shown to lack a closely related gp45-like gene by PCR using multiple primer sets and by Southern blots using both full-length and region-specific gp45 probes. This genomic difference was confirmed using unpassaged isolates from a 1999 disease outbreak in Puerto Rico. In contrast, the Texcoco strain retains a gp45 gene, encoding an open reading frame identical to that of JG-29. However, the Texcoco gp45 gene is not transcribed. These two mechanisms, lack of a closely related gp45-like gene and failure to transcribe gp45, result in generation of antigenic polymorphism among B. bigemina strains, and the latter mechanism is unique compared to prior mechanisms of antigenic polymorphism identified in babesial parasites.

  4. Antigen processing by epidermal Langerhans cells correlates with the level of biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and expression of invariant chain

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two prior studies with a small number of T cell lines have shown that the presentation of native protein antigens by epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) is regulated. When freshly isolated, LC are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC), but after a period of culture LC are inefficient or even inactive. The deficit in culture seems to be a selective loss in antigen processing, since cultured LC are otherwise rich in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II products and are active APC for alloantigens and mitogens, which do not require processing. We have extended the analysis by studying presentation to bulk populations of primed lymph node and a T-T hybrid. Only freshly isolated LC can be pulsed with the protein antigens myoglobin and conalbumin, but once pulsed, antigen is retained in an immunogenic form for at least 2 d. The acquisition of antigen, presumably as MHC-peptide complexes, is inhibited if the fresh LC are exposed to foreign protein in the presence of chloroquine or cycloheximide. The latter, in contrast, improves the efficacy of antigen pulsing in anti-Ig- stimulated B blasts. In additional studies of mechanism, we noted that both fresh and cultured LC endocytose similar amounts of an antigen, rhodamineovalbumin, into perinuclear granules. However, freshly isolated LC synthesize high levels class II MHC molecules and express higher amounts of the class II-associated invariant chain. Fresh LC are at least 5-10 times more active than many other cells types in the level of biosynthesis of MHC class II products. These findings provide a physiologic model in which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules appear to be the principal vehicle for effective antigen processing by APC of the dendritic cell lineage. Another APC, the B lymphoblast, does not appear to require newly synthesized MHC class II molecules for presentation. PMID:2121888