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Sample records for cardiac activity detected

  1. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG). The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  2. Detection of cardiac activity changes from human speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovarek, Jaromir; Partila, Pavol; Voznak, Miroslav; Mikulec, Martin; Mehic, Miralem

    2015-05-01

    Impact of changes in blood pressure and pulse from human speech is disclosed in this article. The symptoms of increased physical activity are pulse, systolic and diastolic pressure. There are many methods of measuring and indicating these parameters. The measurements must be carried out using devices which are not used in everyday life. In most cases, the measurement of blood pressure and pulse following health problems or other adverse feelings. Nowadays, research teams are trying to design and implement modern methods in ordinary human activities. The main objective of the proposal is to reduce the delay between detecting the adverse pressure and to the mentioned warning signs and feelings. Common and frequent activity of man is speaking, while it is known that the function of the vocal tract can be affected by the change in heart activity. Therefore, it can be a useful parameter for detecting physiological changes. A method for detecting human physiological changes by speech processing and artificial neural network classification is described in this article. The pulse and blood pressure changes was induced by physical exercises in this experiment. The set of measured subjects was formed by ten healthy volunteers of both sexes. None of the subjects was a professional athlete. The process of the experiment was divided into phases before, during and after physical training. Pulse, systolic, diastolic pressure was measured and voice activity was recorded after each of them. The results of this experiment describe a method for detecting increased cardiac activity from human speech using artificial neural network.

  3. Nuclear cardiac blood volume detecting apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N.; Wake, R.H.

    1980-04-15

    A built up image illustrating blood volume in the heart versus time taken over many cardiac cycles is produced by continuously displaying a graph of cumulative data indicating the amount of radioactivity from a tracer in the blood detected in the heart during each of a series of intervals into which the average cardiac period is divided. The parallel lines of a raster scan display correspond respectively to the memory channels. The count stored in a particular memory channel causes the video signal for the corresponding line to be maintained at a binary level for a corresponding time interval thus generating a bar graph in which the length of each bar indicates the amount of radioactivity sensed during the corresponding interval of the cardiac cycle. As each memory channel accumulates radioactivity data with each successive cardiac cycle, each bar displayed in the bar graph lengthens to indicate the cumulative activity until an interpretable curve is obtained.

  4. Detecting cardiac contractile activity in the early mouse embryo using multiple modalities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiann-Mun; Miranda, António M. A.; Bub, Gil; Srinivas, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    The heart is one of the first organs to develop during mammalian embryogenesis. In the mouse, it starts to form shortly after gastrulation, and is derived primarily from embryonic mesoderm. The embryonic heart is unique in having to perform a mechanical contractile function while undergoing complex morphogenetic remodeling. Approaches to imaging the morphogenesis and contractile activity of the developing heart are important in understanding not only how this remodeling is controlled but also the origin of congenital heart defects (CHDs). Here, we describe approaches for visualizing contractile activity in the developing mouse embryo, using brightfield time lapse microscopy and confocal microscopy of calcium transients. We describe an algorithm for enhancing this image data and quantifying contractile activity from it. Finally we describe how atomic force microscopy can be used to record contractile activity prior to it being microscopically visible. PMID:25610399

  5. Blu-ray Technology-Based Quantitative Assays for Cardiac Markers: From Disc Activation to Multiplex Detection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Samuel; Li, Xiaochun; Niu, Michelle; Ge, Bixia; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity globally. To reduce the number of mortalities, reliable and rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnosis of AMI is extremely critical. We herein present a Blu-ray technology-based assay platform for multiplex cardiac biomarker detection; not only off-the-shelf Blu-ray discs (BDs) were adapted as substrates to prepare standard immunoassays and DNA aptamer/antibody hybrid assays for the three key cardiac marker proteins (myoglobin, troponin I, and C-creative protein) but also an unmodified optical drive was directly employed to read the assay results digitally. In particular, we have shown that all three cardiac markers can be quantitated in their respective physiological ranges of interest, and the detection limits achieved are comparable with conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The Blu-ray assay platform was further validated by measuring real-world samples and establishing a linear correlation with the simultaneously obtained ELISA data. Without the need to modify either the hardware (Blu-ray discs and optical drives) or the software driver, this assay-on-a-BD technique promises to be a low-cost user-friendly quantitative tool for on-site chemical analysis and POC medical diagnosis.

  6. Blu-ray Technology-Based Quantitative Assays for Cardiac Markers: From Disc Activation to Multiplex Detection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Samuel; Li, Xiaochun; Niu, Michelle; Ge, Bixia; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity globally. To reduce the number of mortalities, reliable and rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnosis of AMI is extremely critical. We herein present a Blu-ray technology-based assay platform for multiplex cardiac biomarker detection; not only off-the-shelf Blu-ray discs (BDs) were adapted as substrates to prepare standard immunoassays and DNA aptamer/antibody hybrid assays for the three key cardiac marker proteins (myoglobin, troponin I, and C-creative protein) but also an unmodified optical drive was directly employed to read the assay results digitally. In particular, we have shown that all three cardiac markers can be quantitated in their respective physiological ranges of interest, and the detection limits achieved are comparable with conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The Blu-ray assay platform was further validated by measuring real-world samples and establishing a linear correlation with the simultaneously obtained ELISA data. Without the need to modify either the hardware (Blu-ray discs and optical drives) or the software driver, this assay-on-a-BD technique promises to be a low-cost user-friendly quantitative tool for on-site chemical analysis and POC medical diagnosis. PMID:27268387

  7. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction (EF) of the left ventricle (LV). Despite research on cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, has been shown to have high inter-observer variability, with a variation of the EF by up to 8%. Therefore, an automatic way of identifying the basal slice is still required. Prior published methods operate by automatically tracking the mitral valve points from the long-axis view of the LV. These approaches assumed that the basal slice is the first short-axis slice below the mitral valve. However, guidelines published in 2013 by the society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance indicate that the basal slice is the uppermost short-axis slice with more than 50% myocardium surrounding the blood cavity. Consequently, these existing methods are at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under these guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that focuses on the two-chamber slice to find the basal slice. To this end, an active shape model is trained to automatically segment the two-chamber view for 51 samples using the leave-one-out strategy. The basal slice was detected using temporal binary profiles created for each short-axis slice from the segmented two-chamber slice. From the 51 successfully tested samples, 92% and 84% of detection results were accurate at the end-systolic and the end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle, respectively.

  8. Automatic basal slice detection for cardiac analysis.

    PubMed

    Paknezhad, Mahsa; Marchesseau, Stephanie; Brown, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Identification of the basal slice in cardiac imaging is a key step to measuring the ejection fraction of the left ventricle. Despite all the effort placed on automatic cardiac segmentation, basal slice identification is routinely performed manually. Manual identification, however, suffers from high interobserver variability. As a result, an automatic algorithm for basal slice identification is required. Guidelines published in 2013 identify the basal slice based on the percentage of myocardium surrounding the blood cavity in the short-axis view. Existing methods, however, assume that the basal slice is the first short-axis view slice below the mitral valve and are consequently at times identifying the incorrect short-axis slice. Correct identification of the basal slice under the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines is challenging due to the poor image quality and blood movement during image acquisition. This paper proposes an automatic tool that utilizes the two-chamber view to determine the basal slice while following the guidelines. To this end, an active shape model is trained to segment the two-chamber view and create temporal binary profiles from which the basal slice is identified. From the 51 tested cases, our method obtains 92% and 84% accurate basal slice detection for the end-systole and the end-diastole, respectively. PMID:27660805

  9. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient's cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  10. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  11. Cardiac phase detection in intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Lemos, Pedro Alves; Yoneyama, Takashi; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi

    2008-03-01

    Image gating is related to image modalities that involve quasi-periodic moving organs. Therefore, during intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination, there is cardiac movement interference. In this paper, we aim to obtain IVUS gated images based on the images themselves. This would allow the reconstruction of 3D coronaries with temporal accuracy for any cardiac phase, which is an advantage over the ECG-gated acquisition that shows a single one. It is also important for retrospective studies, as in existing IVUS databases there are no additional reference signals (ECG). From the images, we calculated signals based on average intensity (AI), and, from consecutive frames, average intensity difference (AID), cross-correlation coefficient (CC) and mutual information (MI). The process includes a wavelet-based filter step and ascendant zero-cross detection in order to obtain the phase information. Firstly, we tested 90 simulated sequences with 1025 frames each. Our method was able to achieve more than 95.0% of true positives and less than 2.3% of false positives ratio, for all signals. Afterwards, we tested in a real examination, with 897 frames and ECG as gold-standard. We achieved 97.4% of true positives (CC and MI), and 2.5% of false positives. For future works, methodology should be tested in wider range of IVUS examinations.

  12. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study.

    PubMed

    Petibon, Y; Ouyang, J; Zhu, X; Huang, C; Reese, T G; Chun, S Y; Li, Q; El Fakhri, G

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac motion and partial volume effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector point spread function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion 'deblurring' and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given the inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p < 0.01) and defect detectability (39-56%, p < 0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion

  13. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibon, Y.; Ouyang, J.; Zhu, X.; Huang, C.; Reese, T. G.; Chun, S. Y.; Li, Q.; El Fakhri, G.

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac motion and partial volume effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector point spread function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion ‘deblurring’ and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given the inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p < 0.01) and defect detectability (39-56%, p < 0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion

  14. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    PubMed Central

    Boularan, Cédric; Gales, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors' signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability. PMID:26483685

  15. Infant Cardiac Activity: Developmental Changes and Relations with Attachment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Carroll E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined cardiac activity during the first 13 months of life. Indexes of cardiac activity changed in an orderly way with development. There were intercorrelations among the cardiac measures. Analyses indicated that measures of heart-rate variability were significantly higher in insecure children than in secure children. (BC)

  16. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further

  17. Functional consequences of caspase activation in cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Communal, Catherine; Sumandea, Marius; de Tombe, Pieter; Narula, Jagat; Solaro, R. John; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2002-04-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis is present in many cardiac disease states, including heart failure and ischemic heart disease. Apoptosis is associated with the activation of caspases that mediate the cleavage of vital and structural proteins. However, the functional contribution of apoptosis to these conditions is not known. Furthermore, in cardiac myocytes, apoptosis may not be complete, allowing the cells to persist for a prolonged period within the myocardium. Therefore, we examined whether caspase-3 cleaved cardiac myofibrillar proteins and, if so, whether it affects contractile function. The effects of caspase-3 were studied in vitro on individual components of the cardiac myofilament including -actin, -actinin, myosin heavy chain, myosin light chain 1/2, tropomyosin, cardiac troponins (T, I, C), and the trimeric troponin complex. Exposure of the myofibrillar protein (listed above) to caspase-3 for 4 h resulted in the cleavage of -actin and -actinin, but not myosin heavy chain, myosin light chain 1/2, and tropomyosin, into three fragments (30, 20, and 15 kDa) and one major fragment (45 kDa), respectively. When cTnT, cTnI, and cTnC were incubated individually with caspase-3, there was no detectable cleavage. However, when the recombinant troponin complex was exposed to caspase-3, cTnT was cleaved, resulting in fragments of 25 kDa. Furthermore, rat cardiac myofilaments exposed to caspase-3 exhibited similar patterns of myofibrillar protein cleavage. Treatment with the caspase inhibitor DEVD-CHO or z-VAD-fmk abolished the cleavage. Myofilaments, isolated from adult rat ventricular myocytes after induction of apoptotic pathway by using -adrenergic stimulation, displayed a similar pattern of actin and TnT cleavage. Exposure of skinned fiber to caspase-3 decreased maximal Ca2+-activated force and myofibrillar ATPase activity. Our results indicate that caspase-3 cleaved myofibrillar proteins, resulting in an impaired force/Ca2+ relationship and myofibrillar ATPase activity

  18. Cardiac elastography: detecting pathological changes in myocardium tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Harrigan, Timothy; Solomon, Scott

    2003-05-01

    Estimation of the mechanical properties of the cardiac muscle has been shown to play a crucial role in the detection of cardiovascular disease. Elastography was recently shown feasible on RF cardiac data in vivo. In this paper, the role of elastography in the detection of ischemia/infarct is explored with simulations and in vivo experiments. In finite-element simulations of a portion of the cardiac muscle containing an infarcted region, the cardiac cycle was simulated with successive compressive and tensile strains ranging between -30% and 20%. The incremental elastic modulus was also mapped uisng adaptive methods. We then demonstrated this technique utilizing envelope-detected sonographic data (Hewlett-Packard Sonos 5500) in a patient with a known myocardial infarction. In cine-loop and M-Mode elastograms from both normal and infarcted regions in simulations and experiments, the infarcted region was identifed by the up to one order of magnitude lower incremental axial displacements and strains, and higher modulus. Information on motion, deformation and mechanical property should constitute a unique tool for noninvasive cardiac diagnosis.

  19. HSP27 Alleviates Cardiac Aging in Mice via a Mechanism Involving Antioxidation and Mitophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shenglan; Wang, Yana; Zhang, Xiaojin; Kong, Qiuyue; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-01-01

    Aging-induced cardiac dysfunction is a prominent feature of cardiac aging. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) protects cardiac function against ischemia or chemical challenge. We hypothesized that HSP27 attenuates cardiac aging. Transgenic (Tg) mice with cardiac-specific expression of the HSP27 gene and wild-type (WT) littermates were employed in the experiments. Echocardiography revealed a significant decline in the cardiac function of old WT mice compared with young WT mice. In striking contrast, the aging-induced impairment of cardiac function was attenuated in old Tg mice compared with old WT mice. Levels of cardiac aging markers were lower in old Tg mouse hearts than in old WT mouse hearts. Less interstitial fibrosis and lower contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins were detected in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Furthermore, old Tg hearts demonstrated lower accumulation of LC3-II and p62 than old WT hearts. Levels of Atg13, Vps34, and Rab7 were also higher in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Additionally, old Tg hearts had higher levels of PINK1 and Parkin than old WT hearts, suggesting that mitophagy was activated in old Tg hearts. Taken together, HSP27 alleviated cardiac aging and this action involved antioxidation and mitophagy activation. PMID:27110324

  20. Video imaging of cardiac transmembrane activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, William T.; Davidenko, Jorge; Cabo, Candido; Jalife, Jose

    1994-05-01

    High resolution movies of transmembrane electrical activity in thin (0.5 mm) slices of sheep epicardial muscle were recorded by optical imaging with voltage-sensitive dyes and a CCD video camera. Activity was monitored at approximately 65,000 picture elements per 2 cm2 tissue for several seconds at a 16 msec sampling rate. Simple image processing operations permitted visualization and analysis of the optical signal, while isochrome maps depicted complex patterns of propagation. Maps of action potential duration and regional intermittent conduction block showed that even these small preparations may exhibit considerable spatial heterogeneity. Self-sustaining reentrant activity in the form of spiral waves was consistently initiated and observed either drifting across the tissue or anchored to small heterogeneities. The current limitations of video optical mappings are a low signal-to- noise ratio and low temporal resolution. The advantages include high spatial resolution and direct correlation of electrical activity with anatomy. Video optical mapping permits the analysis of the electrophysiological properties of any region of the preparation during both regular stimulation and reentrant activation, providing a useful tool for studying cardiac arrhythmias.

  1. Comparative Analysis of Telomerase Activity in CD117+CD34+ Cardiac Telocytes with Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Cardiac Fibroblasts and Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Lu, Shan-Shan; Xu, Ting; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Li, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study characterized the cardiac telocyte (TC) population both in vivo and in vitro, and investigated its telomerase activity related to mitosis. Methods: Using transmission electron microscopy and a phase contrast microscope, the typical morphological features of cardiac TCs were observed; by targeting the cell surface proteins CD117 and CD34, CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were sorted via flow cytometry and validated by immunofluorescence based on the primary cell culture. Then the optimized basal nutrient medium for selected population was examined with the cell counting kit 8. Under this conditioned medium, the process of cell division was captured, and the telomerase activity of CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was detected in comparison with bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), cardiac fibroblasts (CFBs), cardiomyocytes (CMs). Results: Cardiac TCs projected characteristic telopodes with thin segments (podomers) in alternation with dilation (podoms). In addition, 64% of the primary cultured cardiac TCs were composed of CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs; which was verified by immunofluorescence. In a live cell imaging system, CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs were observed to enter into cell division in a short time, followed by an significant invagination forming across the middle of the cell body. Using a real-time quantitative telomeric-repeat amplification assay, the telomerase concentration in CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs was obviously lower than in BMSCs and CFBs, and significantly higher than in CMs. Conclusions: Cardiac TCs represent a unique cell population and CD117+CD34+ cardiac TCs have relative low telomerase activity that differs from BMSCs, CFBs and CMs and thus they might play an important role in maintaining cardiac homeostasis. PMID:26168836

  2. Early detection of acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John Lynn; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a common problem in children undergoing cardiac surgery, with well documented increases in morbidity and mortality in both the short and the long term. Traditional approaches to the identification of AKI such as changes in serum creatinine have revealed a large incidence in this population with significant negative impact on clinical outcomes. However, the traditional diagnostic approaches to AKI diagnosis have inherent limitations that may lead to under-diagnosis of this pathologic process. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials for the prevention and treatment of AKI associated with cardiac surgery, at least in part due to the paucity of early predictive biomarkers. Novel non-invasive biomarkers have ushered in a new era that allows for earlier detection of AKI. With these new diagnostic tools, a more consistent approach can be employed across centers that may facilitate a more accurate representation of the actual prevalence of AKI and more importantly, clinical investigation that may minimize the occurrence of AKI following pediatric cardiac surgery. A thoughtful management approach is necessary to mitigate the effects of AKI after cardiac surgery, which is best accomplished in close collaboration with pediatric nephrologists. Long-term surveillance for improvement in kidney function and potential development of chronic kidney disease should also be a part of the comprehensive management strategy. PMID:27429538

  3. Cardiac-Specific YAP Activation Improves Cardiac Function and Survival in an Experimental Murine MI Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiqiang; von Gise, Alexander; Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Ma, Qing; Jiang, Jiangming; Yau, Allan L.; Buck, Jessica N.; Gouin, Katryna A.; van Gorp, Pim R. R.; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Jinghai; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Wang, Da-zhi; Pu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Yes-Associated Protein (YAP), the terminal effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, is crucial for regulating embryonic cardiomyocyte (CM) proliferation. Objective We hypothesized that YAP activation after myocardial infarction would preserve cardiac function and improve survival. Methods and Results We used a cardiac-specific, inducible expression system to activate YAP in adult mouse heart. Activation of YAP in adult heart promoted CM proliferation and did not deleteriously affect heart function. Furthermore, YAP activation after myocardial infarction (MI) preserved heart function and reduced infarct size. Using adeno-associated virus subtype 9 (AAV9) as a delivery vector, we expressed human YAP in the adult murine myocardium immediately after MI. We found that AAV9:hYAP significantly improved cardiac function and mouse survival. AAV9:hYAP did not exert its salutary effects by reducing CM apoptosis. Rather, AAV9:hYAP stimulated adult CM proliferation. Gene expression profiling indicated that AAV9:hYAP stimulated expression of cell cycle genes and promoted a less mature cardiac gene expression signature. Conclusions Cardiac specific YAP activation after MI mitigated myocardial injury, improved cardiac function, and enhanced survival. These findings suggest that therapeutic activation of YAP or its downstream targets, potentially through AAV-mediated gene therapy, may be a strategy to improve outcome after MI. PMID:24833660

  4. NUCLEOSIDE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITIES IN RAT CARDIAC MUSCLE.

    PubMed

    ESSNER, E; NOVIKOFF, A B; QUINTANA, N

    1965-05-01

    Localizations of aldehyde-resistant nucleoside phosphatase activities in frozen sections of rat cardiac muscle have been studied by electron microscopy. Activities are higher after fixation with formaldehyde than with glutaraldehyde. After incubation with adenosine triphosphate or inosine diphosphate at pH 7.2, reaction product is found in the "terminal cisternae" or "transverse sacs" of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which, together with the "intermediary vesicles" (T system), constitute the "dyads" or "triads". Reaction product is also present at the membranes of micropinocytotic vacuoles which apparently form from the plasma membrane of capillary endothelial cells and from the sarcolemma. In certain regions of the intercalated discs, reaction product is found within the narrow spaces between sarcolemmas of adjacent cells and within micropinocytotic vacuoles that seem to form from the sarcolemma. With inosine diphosphate, reaction product is also found in other parts of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. After incubation with cytidine monophosphate at pH 5, reaction product is present in the transverse sacs of sarcoplasmic reticulum, in micropinocytotic vacuoles in capillary endothelium, and in lysosomes of muscle fibers and capillaries. The possible significance of the sarcoplasmic reticulum phosphatases is discussed in relation to the role the reticulum probably plays in moving calcium ions and thereby controlling contraction and relaxation of the muscle fiber.

  5. Towards robust specularity detection and inpainting in cardiac images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaleh, Samar M.; Aviles, Angelica I.; Sobrevilla, Pilar; Casals, Alicia; Hahn, James

    2016-03-01

    Computer-assisted cardiac surgeries had major advances throughout the years and are gaining more popularity over conventional cardiac procedures as they offer many benefits to both patients and surgeons. One obvious advantage is that they enable surgeons to perform delicate tasks on the heart while it is still beating, avoiding the risks associated with cardiac arrest. Consequently, the surgical system needs to accurately compensate the physiological motion of the heart which is a very challenging task in medical robotics since there exist different sources of disturbances. One of which is the bright light reflections, known as specular highlights, that appear on the glossy surface of the heart and partially occlude the field of view. This work is focused on developing a robust approach that accurately detects and removes those highlights to reduce their disturbance to the surgeon and the motion compensation algorithm. As a first step, we exploit both color attributes and Fuzzy edge detector to identify specular regions in each acquired image frame. These two techniques together work as restricted thresholding and are able to accurately identify specular regions. Then, in order to eliminate the specularity artifact and give the surgeon a better perception of the heart, the second part of our solution is dedicated to correct the detected regions using inpainting to propagate and smooth the results. Our experimental results, which we carry out in realistic datasets, reveal how efficient and precise the proposed solution is, as well as demonstrate its robustness and real-time performance.

  6. [Early detection of cancer therapeutics-related cardiac dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Potier, Agathe; Ederhy, Stéphane; Ancedy, Yann; Etienney, Arnaud; Soulat-Dufour, Laurie; Chauvet, Marion; Hollebecque, Antoine; Adavane-Scheuble, Saroumadi; Boccara, Franck; Soria, Jean-Charles; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines and molecular targeted agents have improved prognosis of patients undergoing chemotherapeutics for malignancy. However, the use of these therapies is limited because of risk of cardiac toxicity. The severity of the cardiomyopathy can range from an asymptomatic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction to a severe congestive heart failure. Cardiomyopathy can be reversible or irreversible according to the type of chemotherapy, modality of administration and patient's characteristics. Several studies aimed to early detection and the evaluation of tools to characterize patients at risk to develop cardiac side effects in order to prevent severe LV dysfunction. According to this literature, it is recommended that initial assessment and follow-up of patients undergoing these chemotherapies be performed using troponin dosage, assessment of left ventricle ejection fraction and evaluation of LV myocardial deformation assessing LV global longitudinal strain. PMID:27417336

  7. Application of HTS technology to cardiac dysrhythmia detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, A.L.; Avrin, W.F.

    1994-12-01

    This paper discusses the conceptual design considerations and challenges for development of a contactless, mobile, single channel biomagnetic sensor system based on High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) and employing the Three-SQUID Gradiometer (TSG) concept. Operating in magnetically unshielded environments, as are encountered in many medical scenarios, this instrument class would monitor cardiac electrical activity with minimal patient preparation and intrusiveness, and would notionally be coupled with a clinically adaptive human-system interface (HSI).

  8. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    An, Xiangbo; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Hao; Lu, Zhizhen; Bai, Yan; Xiao, Han; Zhang, Youyi; Song, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO) mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of ISO. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy was established by daily treadmill exercise for six weeks. Strain analysis, including radial strain (RS), radial strain rate (RSR) and longitudinal strain (LS), showed marked decrease as early as 3 days after ISO injection. Moreover, unlike the regional changes in cardiac infarction, strain analysis revealed global cardiac dysfunction that affects the entire heart in ISO-induced hypertrophy. In contrast, conventional echocardiography, only detected altered E/E’, an index reflecting cardiac diastolic function, at 7 days after ISO injection. No change was detected on fractional shortening (FS), E/A and E’/A’ at 3 days or 7 days after ISO injection. Interestingly, strain analysis revealed cardiac dysfunction only in ISO-induced pathological hypertrophy but not the physiological hypertrophy induced by exercise. Taken together, our study indicates that strain analysis offers a more sensitive approach for early detection of cardiac dysfunction than conventional echocardiography. Moreover, multiple strain readouts distinguish pathological cardiac hypertrophy from physiological hypertrophy. PMID:26871457

  9. Speckle Tracking Based Strain Analysis Is Sensitive for Early Detection of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    An, Xiangbo; Wang, Jingjing; Li, Hao; Lu, Zhizhen; Bai, Yan; Xiao, Han; Zhang, Youyi; Song, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key pathological process of many cardiac diseases. However, early detection of cardiac hypertrophy is difficult by the currently used non-invasive method and new approaches are in urgent need for efficient diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Here we report that speckle tracking-based strain analysis is more sensitive than conventional echocardiography for early detection of pathological cardiac hypertrophy in the isoproterenol (ISO) mouse model. Pathological hypertrophy was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of ISO. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy was established by daily treadmill exercise for six weeks. Strain analysis, including radial strain (RS), radial strain rate (RSR) and longitudinal strain (LS), showed marked decrease as early as 3 days after ISO injection. Moreover, unlike the regional changes in cardiac infarction, strain analysis revealed global cardiac dysfunction that affects the entire heart in ISO-induced hypertrophy. In contrast, conventional echocardiography, only detected altered E/E', an index reflecting cardiac diastolic function, at 7 days after ISO injection. No change was detected on fractional shortening (FS), E/A and E'/A' at 3 days or 7 days after ISO injection. Interestingly, strain analysis revealed cardiac dysfunction only in ISO-induced pathological hypertrophy but not the physiological hypertrophy induced by exercise. Taken together, our study indicates that strain analysis offers a more sensitive approach for early detection of cardiac dysfunction than conventional echocardiography. Moreover, multiple strain readouts distinguish pathological cardiac hypertrophy from physiological hypertrophy.

  10. Detection of Cardiac Abnormalities from Multilead ECG using Multiscale Phase Alternation Features.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, R K; Dandapat, S

    2016-06-01

    The cardiac activities such as the depolarization and the relaxation of atria and ventricles are observed in electrocardiogram (ECG). The changes in the morphological features of ECG are the symptoms of particular heart pathology. It is a cumbersome task for medical experts to visually identify any subtle changes in the morphological features during 24 hours of ECG recording. Therefore, the automated analysis of ECG signal is a need for accurate detection of cardiac abnormalities. In this paper, a novel method for automated detection of cardiac abnormalities from multilead ECG is proposed. The method uses multiscale phase alternation (PA) features of multilead ECG and two classifiers, k-nearest neighbor (KNN) and fuzzy KNN for classification of bundle branch block (BBB), myocardial infarction (MI), heart muscle defect (HMD) and healthy control (HC). The dual tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) is used to decompose the ECG signal of each lead into complex wavelet coefficients at different scales. The phase of the complex wavelet coefficients is computed and the PA values at each wavelet scale are used as features for detection and classification of cardiac abnormalities. A publicly available multilead ECG database (PTB database) is used for testing of the proposed method. The experimental results show that, the proposed multiscale PA features and the fuzzy KNN classifier have better performance for detection of cardiac abnormalities with sensitivity values of 78.12 %, 80.90 % and 94.31 % for BBB, HMD and MI classes. The sensitivity value of proposed method for MI class is compared with the state-of-art techniques from multilead ECG. PMID:27118009

  11. NOD1 Activation Induces Cardiac Dysfunction and Modulates Cardiac Fibrosis and Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Velasco, María; Prieto, Patricia; Terrón, Verónica; Benito, Gemma; Flores, Juana M.; Delgado, Carmen; Zaragoza, Carlos; Lavin, Begoña; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is responsible for the initial response of an organism to potentially harmful stressors, pathogens or tissue injury, and accordingly plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory processes, including some cardiovascular diseases. Toll like receptors (TLR) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that play an important role in the induction of innate immune and inflammatory responses. There is a line of evidence supporting that activation of TLRs contributes to the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases but less is known regarding the role of NLRs. Here we demonstrate the presence of the NLR member NOD1 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 1) in the murine heart. Activation of NOD1 with the specific agonist C12-iEDAP, but not with the inactive analogue iE-Lys, induces a time- and dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction that occurs concomitantly with cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis. The administration of iEDAP promotes the activation of the NF-κB and TGF-β pathways and induces apoptosis in whole hearts. At the cellular level, both native cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts expressed NOD1. The NLR activation in cardiomyocytes was associated with NF-κB activation and induction of apoptosis. NOD1 stimulation in fibroblasts was linked to NF-κB activation and to increased expression of pro-fibrotic mediators. The down-regulation of NOD1 by specific siRNAs blunted the effect of iEDAP on the pro-fibrotic TGF-β pathway and cell apoptosis. In conclusion, our report uncovers a new pro-inflammatory target that is expressed in the heart, NOD1. The specific activation of this NLR induces cardiac dysfunction and modulates cardiac fibrosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, pathological processes involved in several cardiac diseases such as heart failure. PMID:23028889

  12. Theoretical considerations for mapping activation in human cardiac fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2013-06-01

    Defining mechanisms for cardiac fibrillation is challenging because, in contrast to other arrhythmias, fibrillation exhibits complex non-repeatability in spatiotemporal activation but paradoxically exhibits conserved spatial gradients in rate, dominant frequency, and electrical propagation. Unlike animal models, in which fibrillation can be mapped at high spatial and temporal resolution using optical dyes or arrays of contact electrodes, mapping of cardiac fibrillation in patients is constrained practically to lower resolutions or smaller fields-of-view. In many animal models, atrial fibrillation is maintained by localized electrical rotors and focal sources. However, until recently, few studies had revealed localized sources in human fibrillation, so that the impact of mapping constraints on the ability to identify rotors or focal sources in humans was not described. Here, we determine the minimum spatial and temporal resolutions theoretically required to detect rigidly rotating spiral waves and focal sources, then extend these requirements for spiral waves in computer simulations. Finally, we apply our results to clinical data acquired during human atrial fibrillation using a novel technique termed focal impulse and rotor mapping (FIRM). Our results provide theoretical justification and clinical demonstration that FIRM meets the spatio-temporal resolution requirements to reliably identify rotors and focal sources for human atrial fibrillation.

  13. Group I fibers: pressor reflex and cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Decandia, G F; Decandia, M; Orani, G P

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were performed on cats to see whether stimulation of group I afferent fibers from gastrocnemius-soleus muscles induced changes in cardiac activity, in addition to the increase in systemic arterial pressure already established. The results show that the increase in arterial pressure is accompanied by an increase in systolic left ventricular pressure, without any significant changes in cardiac inotropism and chronotropism. It is concluded that the cardiac innervation is not an important efferent pathway of the pressor reflex evoked by stimulating group I afferent fibers, and that the reflex increase in arterial pressure depends mainly on an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:1742468

  14. Detection and Prevention of Cardiac Arrhythmias During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.; Liszka, Kathy J.; York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    There have been reports suggesting that long-duration space flight might lead to an increased risk of potentially serious heart rhythm disturbances. If space flight does, in fact, significantly decrease cardiac electrical stability, the effects could be catastrophic, potentially leading to sudden cardiac death. It will be important to determine the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in order to prepare for long-term manned lunar and interplanetary missions and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Our hypothesis is that prolonged exposure to microgravity will alter T wave alternans measurements, decrease heart rate variance, increase QT dispersion, decrease heart rate recovery and alter QT restitution curve. A recently published study has shown that long duration spaceflights prolong cardiac conduction and repolarization. They concluded that long duration flight is associated with QT interval prolongation and may increase arrhythmia susceptibility. We propose using computer technology as a noninvasive clinical tool to detect and study clinically significant TWA during standard exercise testing using electrode systems specifically adapted for the purpose of obtaining and measuring TWA. A population of approximately 15 healthy men and 5 healthy women subjects, representative of the astronaut cohort will be asked to voluntarily participate in this study. Their blood pressure and ECG/TWA will be measured pre-flight and in-flight. Prior to flight, subjects will be asked to participate in an orientation session. Still photos will be taken of the skin where the conductive gel is used for the multi-segment sensors. Photos will be recorded preflight, immediately postflight, and several times during the proceeding week until it has been determined that any skin reaction has disappeared or that no rash is present and will not appear.

  15. Ubiquitous health monitoring and real-time cardiac arrhythmias detection: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Haiying; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; De Vaulx, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    As the symptoms and signs of heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmia has attracted great attention. Due to limitations in time and space, traditional approaches to cardiac arrhythmias detection fail to provide a real-time continuous monitoring and testing service applicable in different environmental conditions. Integrated with the latest technologies in ECG (electrocardiograph) analysis and medical care, the pervasive computing technology makes possible the ubiquitous cardiac care services, and thus brings about new technical challenges, especially in the formation of cardiac care architecture and realization of the real-time automatic ECG detection algorithm dedicated to care devices. In this paper, a ubiquitous cardiac care prototype system is presented with its architecture framework well elaborated. This prototype system has been tested and evaluated in all the clinical-/home-/outdoor-care modes with a satisfactory performance in providing real-time continuous cardiac arrhythmias monitoring service unlimitedly adaptable in time and space. PMID:24211993

  16. Ubiquitous health monitoring and real-time cardiac arrhythmias detection: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhou, Haiying; Zuo, Decheng; Hou, Kun-Mean; De Vaulx, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    As the symptoms and signs of heart diseases that cause sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmia has attracted great attention. Due to limitations in time and space, traditional approaches to cardiac arrhythmias detection fail to provide a real-time continuous monitoring and testing service applicable in different environmental conditions. Integrated with the latest technologies in ECG (electrocardiograph) analysis and medical care, the pervasive computing technology makes possible the ubiquitous cardiac care services, and thus brings about new technical challenges, especially in the formation of cardiac care architecture and realization of the real-time automatic ECG detection algorithm dedicated to care devices. In this paper, a ubiquitous cardiac care prototype system is presented with its architecture framework well elaborated. This prototype system has been tested and evaluated in all the clinical-/home-/outdoor-care modes with a satisfactory performance in providing real-time continuous cardiac arrhythmias monitoring service unlimitedly adaptable in time and space.

  17. Noninvasive Cardiac Quantum Spectrum Technology Effectively Detects Myocardial Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Xue, Qiao; Liu, Mohan; Zheng, Xiaoqin; Chen, Rui; Li, Yufeng; Dan, Qing; Fang, Danqun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND A standard resting electrocardiogram (ECG) shows limited sensitivity and specificity for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). Several analytic methods exist to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of resting ECG for diagnosis of CAD. We compared a new computer-enhanced, resting ECG analysis device, the cardiac quantum spectrum (CQS) technique, with coronary angiography in the detection of CAD. MATERIAL AND METHODS A consecutive sample of 93 patients with a history of suspected CAD scheduled for coronary angiography was evaluated with CQS before coronary angiography. The sensitivity and specificity of CQS and standard 12-lead ECG for detecting hemodynamically relevant coronary stenosis were compared, using coronary angiography as the reference standard. Kappa analysis was performed to assess the agreement between CQS severity scores and the level of stenosis determined by coronary angiography. RESULTS The CQS system identified 78 of 82 patients with hemodynamically relevant stenosis (sensitivity, 95.1%; specificity, 63.6%; accuracy, 91.4%; positive predictive value, 95.1%; negative predictive value, 63.6%). Sensitivity and accuracy were much higher for CQS analysis than for the standard ECG. The Kappa value, assessing the level of agreement between CQS and coronary angiography, was 0.376 (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS CQS analysis of resting ECG data detects hemodynamically relevant CAD with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27351755

  18. Noninvasive Cardiac Quantum Spectrum Technology Effectively Detects Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Xue, Qiao; Liu, Mohan; Zheng, Xiaoqin; Chen, Rui; Li, Yufeng; Dan, Qing; Fang, Danqun

    2016-01-01

    Background A standard resting electrocardiogram (ECG) shows limited sensitivity and specificity for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). Several analytic methods exist to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of resting ECG for diagnosis of CAD. We compared a new computer-enhanced, resting ECG analysis device, the cardiac quantum spectrum (CQS) technique, with coronary angiography in the detection of CAD. Material/Methods A consecutive sample of 93 patients with a history of suspected CAD scheduled for coronary angiography was evaluated with CQS before coronary angiography. The sensitivity and specificity of CQS and standard 12-lead ECG for detecting hemodynamically relevant coronary stenosis were compared, using coronary angiography as the reference standard. Kappa analysis was performed to assess the agreement between CQS severity scores and the level of stenosis determined by coronary angiography. Results The CQS system identified 78 of 82 patients with hemodynamically relevant stenosis (sensitivity, 95.1%; specificity, 63.6%; accuracy, 91.4%; positive predictive value, 95.1%; negative predictive value, 63.6%). Sensitivity and accuracy were much higher for CQS analysis than for the standard ECG. The Kappa value, assessing the level of agreement between CQS and coronary angiography, was 0.376 (P<0.001). Conclusions CQS analysis of resting ECG data detects hemodynamically relevant CAD with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27351755

  19. An active contour framework based on the Hermite transform for shape segmentation of cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba-J, Leiner; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of cardiac affections is fundamental to address a correct treatment that allows preserving the patient's life. Since heart disease is one of the main causes of death in most countries, analysis of cardiac images is of great value for cardiac assessment. Cardiac MR has become essential for heart evaluation. In this work we present a segmentation framework for shape analysis in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. The method consists of an active contour model which is guided by the spectral coefficients obtained from the Hermite transform (HT) of the data. The HT is used as model to code image features of the analyzed images. Region and boundary based energies are coded using the zero and first order coefficients. An additional shape constraint based on an elliptical function is used for controlling the active contour deformations. The proposed framework is applied to the segmentation of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of the left ventricle using MR images with short axis view. The segmentation is sequential for both regions: the endocardium is segmented followed by the epicardium. The algorithm is evaluated with several MR images at different phases of the cardiac cycle demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method. Several metrics are used for performance evaluation.

  20. Time delay between cardiac and brain activity during sleep transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B.; Aarts, Ronald M.; Haakma, Reinder; Fonseca, Pedro; Rolink, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Human sleep consists of wake, rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep that includes light and deep sleep stages. This work investigated the time delay between changes of cardiac and brain activity for sleep transitions. Here, the brain activity was quantified by electroencephalographic (EEG) mean frequency and the cardiac parameters included heart rate, standard deviation of heartbeat intervals, and their low- and high-frequency spectral powers. Using a cross-correlation analysis, we found that the cardiac variations during wake-sleep and NREM sleep transitions preceded the EEG changes by 1-3 min but this was not the case for REM sleep transitions. These important findings can be further used to predict the onset and ending of some sleep stages in an early manner.

  1. Small Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-01-01

    Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias and up-regulation of SK channels in heart failure (HF) in animal models and human HF. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both anti-arrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review will provide an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and to serve as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic target in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible pro-arrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations. PMID:25956967

  2. SPR detection of cardiac troponin T for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pawula, Maria; Altintas, Zeynep; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2016-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor developed for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) in serum samples is reported in this work. An extensive optimisation of assay parameters was conducted to achieve optimal detection strategy. Both direct and sandwich immunoassay formats were investigated and optimised. The response obtained was enhanced further by the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated to the anti-cTnT detection antibody. A regeneration method was developed to enable the reuse of the SPR sensor for multiple sample application. The SPR immunosensor showed good reproducibility for cTnT detection in the concentration range of 25-1000 ng mL(-1) and 5-400 ng mL(-1) for the direct and sandwich assays in buffer, respectively. The linear regression analysis was performed and R(2) value was found as 0.99 for both assays. In order to optimise the sensor for serum analysis, nonspecific binding of serum proteins was reduced through the use of additives in the dilution buffer. To achieve greater sensitivity, the performance of the cTnT immunosensor sandwich assay in human serum was evaluated using non-modified and AuNP modified detector antibodies. A detection limit (LOD) for the immunosensor in 50% serum was assessed as 5 ng mL(-1) cTnT for the standard sandwich assay and 0.5 ng mL(-1) cTnT when using AuNP conjugated detector antibodies with a linear dynamic range of 0.5-40 ng mL(-1). The dissociation constant was found as 3.28 × 10(-9) M using Langmuir binding model which indicates high affinity between cTnT and its antibody. The proposed SPR immunosensor has a promising potential to be developed for point-of-care testing for the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This method can also be used for the rapid detection of biomarkers in central nervous system diseases. PMID:26695335

  3. SPR detection of cardiac troponin T for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pawula, Maria; Altintas, Zeynep; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2016-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor developed for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) in serum samples is reported in this work. An extensive optimisation of assay parameters was conducted to achieve optimal detection strategy. Both direct and sandwich immunoassay formats were investigated and optimised. The response obtained was enhanced further by the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated to the anti-cTnT detection antibody. A regeneration method was developed to enable the reuse of the SPR sensor for multiple sample application. The SPR immunosensor showed good reproducibility for cTnT detection in the concentration range of 25-1000 ng mL(-1) and 5-400 ng mL(-1) for the direct and sandwich assays in buffer, respectively. The linear regression analysis was performed and R(2) value was found as 0.99 for both assays. In order to optimise the sensor for serum analysis, nonspecific binding of serum proteins was reduced through the use of additives in the dilution buffer. To achieve greater sensitivity, the performance of the cTnT immunosensor sandwich assay in human serum was evaluated using non-modified and AuNP modified detector antibodies. A detection limit (LOD) for the immunosensor in 50% serum was assessed as 5 ng mL(-1) cTnT for the standard sandwich assay and 0.5 ng mL(-1) cTnT when using AuNP conjugated detector antibodies with a linear dynamic range of 0.5-40 ng mL(-1). The dissociation constant was found as 3.28 × 10(-9) M using Langmuir binding model which indicates high affinity between cTnT and its antibody. The proposed SPR immunosensor has a promising potential to be developed for point-of-care testing for the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This method can also be used for the rapid detection of biomarkers in central nervous system diseases.

  4. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total

  5. A voltage-activated proton current in human cardiac fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    El Chemaly, Antoun; Guinamard, Romain; Demion, Marie; Fares, Nassim; Jebara, Victor; Faivre, Jean-Francois; Bois, Patrick . E-mail: patrick.bois@univ-poitiers.fr

    2006-02-10

    A voltage-activated proton current in human cardiac fibroblasts, measured using the whole-cell recording configuration of the patch-clamp technique, is reported. Increasing the pH of the bathing solution shifted the current activation threshold to more negative potentials and increased both the current amplitude and its rate of activation. Changing the pH gradient by one unit caused a 51 mV shift in the reversal potential of the current, demonstrating a high selectivity for protons of the channel carrying the current. Extracellularly applied Zn{sup 2+} reversibly inhibited the current. Activation of the current contributes to the resting membrane conductance under conditions of intracellular acidosis. It is proposed that this current in cardiac fibroblasts is involved in the regulation of the intracellular pH and the membrane potential under physiological conditions as well as in response to pathological conditions such as ischemia.

  6. Cardiac modeling using active appearance models and morphological operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Bernhard; Hanser, Friedrich; Seger, Michael; Hintermueller, Christoph; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Fischer, Gerald; Muehlthaler, Hannes; Trieb, Thomas; Tilg, Bernhard

    2005-04-01

    We present an approach for fast reconstructing of cardiac myocardium and blood masses of a patient's heart from morphological image data, acquired either MRI or CT, in order to estimate numerically the spread of electrical excitation in the patient's atria and ventricles. The approach can be divided into two main steps. During the first step the ventricular and atrial blood masses are extracted employing Active Appearance Models (AAM). The left and right ventricular blood masses are segmented automatically after providing the positions of the apex cordis and the base of the heart. Because of the complex geometry of the atria the segmentation process of the atrial blood masses requires more information as the ventricular blood mass segmentation process of the ventricles. We divided, for this reason, the left and right atrium into three divisions of appearance. This proved sufficient for the 2D AAM model to extract the target blood masses. The base of the heart, the left upper and left lower pulmonary vein from its first up to its last appearance in the image stack, and the right upper and lower pulmonary vein have to be marked. After separating the volume data into these divisions the 2D AAM search procedure extracts the blood masses which are the main input for the second and last step in the myocardium extraction pipeline. This step uses morphologically-based operations in order to extract the ventricular and atrial myocardium either directly by detecting the myocardium in the volume block or by reconstructing the myocardium using mean model information, in case the algorithm fails to detect the myocardium.

  7. Interactions between cardiac, respiratory, and brain activity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musizza, Bojan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    The electrical activity of the heart (ECG), respiratory function and electric activity of the brain (EEG) were simultaneously recorded in conscious, healthy humans. Instantaneous frequencies of the heart beat, respiration and α-waves were then determined from 30-minutes recordings. The instantaneous cardiac frequency was defined as the inverse value of the time interval between two consecutive R-peaks. The instantaneous respiratory frequency was obtained from recordings of the excursions of thorax by application of the Hilbert transform. To obtain the instantaneous frequency of α-waves, the EEG signal recorded from the forehead was first analysed using the wavelet transform. Then the frequency band corresponding to α-waves was extracted and the Hilbert transform applied. Synchronization analysis was performed and the direction of coupling was ascertained, using pairs of instantaneous frequencies in each case. It is shown that the systems are weakly bidirectionally coupled. It was confirmed that, in conscious healthy humans, respiration drives cardiac activity. We also demonstrate from these analyses that α-activity drives both respiration and cardiac activity.

  8. Moderate intensity of regular exercise improves cardiac SR Ca2+ uptake activity in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Laosiripisan, Jitanan; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee

    2009-10-01

    The impact of regular exercise in protecting cardiac deteriorating results of female sex hormone deprivation was evaluated by measuring changes in intracellular Ca2+ removal activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in ovariectomized rats following 9-wk treadmill running exercise at moderate intensity. Despite induction of cardiac hypertrophy in exercised groups of both sham-operated and ovariectomized rats, exercise training had no effect on SR Ca2+ uptake and SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) in hormone intact rat heart. However, exercise training normalized the suppressed maximum SR Ca2+ uptake and SERCA activity in ovariectomized rat heart. While exercise training normalized the leftward shift in pCa (-log[Ca2+])-SR Ca2+ uptake relation in ovariectomized rats, no effect was detected in exercised sham-operated rats. Similar phenomena were also observed on SERCA and on phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation levels; exercise training in ovariectomized rats enhanced SERCA expression to reach the level as that in sham-operated rats, in which there were no differences in SERCA and phospho-PLB levels between sedentary and exercised groups. In addition, the reduction in phospho-Thr(17) PLB in myocardium of ovariectomized rats was abolished by exercise training. These results showed that regular exercise maintains the molecular activation of cardiac SR Ca2+ uptake under normal physiological conditions and is able to induce a protective impact on cardiac SR Ca2+ uptake in ovarian sex hormone-deprived status.

  9. Detection of Cardiac Quiescence from B-Mode Echocardiography Using a Correlation-Based Frame-to-Frame Deviation Measure

    PubMed Central

    Mcclellan, James H.; Ravichandran, Lakshminarayan; Tridandapani, Srini

    2013-01-01

    Two novel methods for detecting cardiac quiescent phases from B-mode echocardiography using a correlation-based frame-to-frame deviation measure were developed. Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). Synchronous electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography data were obtained from 10 healthy human subjects (four male, six female, 23–45 years) and the interventricular septum (IVS) was observed using the apical four-chamber echocardiographic view. The velocity of the IVS was derived from active contour tracking and verified using tissue Doppler imaging echocardiography methods. In turn, the frame-to-frame deviation methods for identifying quiescence of the IVS were verified using active contour tracking. The timing of the diastolic quiescent phase was found to exhibit both inter- and intra-subject variability, suggesting that the current method of CTCA gating based on the ECG is suboptimal and that gating based on signals derived from cardiac motion are likely more accurate in predicting quiescence for cardiac imaging. Two robust and efficient methods for identifying cardiac quiescent phases from B-mode echocardiographic data were developed and verified. The methods presented in this paper will be used to develop new CTCA gating techniques and quantify the resulting potential improvement in CTCA image quality. PMID:26609501

  10. Influence of the Cardiac Myosin Hinge Region on Contractile Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margossian, Sarkis S.; Krueger, John W.; Sellers, James R.; Cuda, Giovanni; Caulfield, James B.; Norton, Paul; Slayter, Henry S.

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the antihinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  11. Cardiac anisotropy: is it negligible regarding noninvasive activation time imaging?

    PubMed

    Modre, Robert; Seger, Michael; Fischer, Gerald; Hintermüller, Christoph; Hayn, Dieter; Pfeifer, Bernhard; Hanser, Friedrich; Schreier, Günter; Tilg, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of cardiac anisotropy in the activation-based inverse problem of electrocardiography. Differences of the patterns of simulated body surface potential maps for isotropic and anisotropic conditions were investigated with regard to activation time (AT) imaging of ventricular depolarization. AT maps were estimated by solving the nonlinear inverse ill-posed problem employing spatio-temporal regularization. Four different reference AT maps (sinus rhythm, right-ventricular and septal pacing, accessory pathway) were calculated with a bidomain theory based anisotropic finite-element heart model in combination with a cellular automaton. In this heart model a realistic fiber architecture and conduction system was implemented. Although the anisotropy has some effects on forward solutions, effects on inverse solutions are small indicating that cardiac anisotropy might be negligible for some clinical applications (e.g., imaging of focal events) of our AT imaging approach. The main characteristic events of the AT maps were estimated despite neglected electrical anisotropy in the inverse formulation. The worst correlation coefficient of the estimated AT maps was 0.810 in case of sinus rhythm. However, all characteristic events of the activation pattern were found. The results of this study confirm our clinical validation studies of noninvasive AT imaging in which cardiac anisotropy was neglected.

  12. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  13. Local activation of cardiac stem cells for post-myocardial infarction cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhuzhi; Mai, Zun; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Yangxin; Geng, Dengfeng; Zhou, Shuxian; Wang, Jingfeng

    2012-11-01

    The prognosis of patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and resultant chronic heart failure remains extremely poor despite continuous advancements in optimal medical therapy and interventional procedures. Animal experiments and clinical trials using adult stem cell therapy following MI have shown a global improvement of myocardial function. The emergence of stem cell transplantation approaches has recently represented promising alternatives to stimulate myocardial regeneration. Regarding their tissue-specific properties, cardiac stem cells (CSCs) residing within the heart have advantages over other stem cell types to be the best cell source for cell transplantation. However, time-consuming and costly procedures to expanse cells prior to cell transplantation and the reliability of cell culture and expansion may both be major obstacles in the clinical application of CSC-based transplantation therapy after MI. The recognition that the adult heart possesses endogenous CSCs that can regenerate cardiomyocytes and vascular cells has raised the unique therapeutic strategy to reconstitute dead myocardium via activating these cells post-MI. Several strategies, such as growth factors, mircoRNAs and drugs, may be implemented to potentiate endogenous CSCs to repair infarcted heart without cell transplantation. Most molecular and cellular mechanism involved in the process of CSC-based endogenous regeneration after MI is far from understanding. This article reviews current knowledge opening up the possibilities of cardiac repair through CSCs activation in situ in the setting of MI.

  14. Influence of computer work under time pressure on cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Hu, Sijung; Yu, Hongliu

    2015-03-01

    Computer users are often under stress when required to complete computer work within a required time. Work stress has repeatedly been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The present study examined the effects of time pressure workload during computer tasks on cardiac activity in 20 healthy subjects. Heart rate, time domain and frequency domain indices of heart rate variability (HRV) and Poincaré plot parameters were compared among five computer tasks and two rest periods. Faster heart rate and decreased standard deviation of R-R interval were noted in response to computer tasks under time pressure. The Poincaré plot parameters showed significant differences between different levels of time pressure workload during computer tasks, and between computer tasks and the rest periods. In contrast, no significant differences were identified for the frequency domain indices of HRV. The results suggest that the quantitative Poincaré plot analysis used in this study was able to reveal the intrinsic nonlinear nature of the autonomically regulated cardiac rhythm. Specifically, heightened vagal tone occurred during the relaxation computer tasks without time pressure. In contrast, the stressful computer tasks with added time pressure stimulated cardiac sympathetic activity.

  15. Towards Depth-Resolved Optical Imaging of Cardiac Electrical Activity.

    PubMed

    Walton, Richard D; Bernus, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of arrhythmias are likely to be complex three-dimensional phenomena. Yet, the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional imaging techniques, both in the clinic and the experimental lab, limits our ability to better understand the mechanisms of such arrhythmias. Optical mapping using voltage-sensitive dyes is a widely used tool in experimental electrophysiology. It has been known for decades that even in its most basic application, epi-fluorescence, the optical signal contains information from within a certain intramural volume. Understanding of this fundamental property of optical signals has paved the way towards novel three-dimensional optical imaging techniques. Here, we review our current understanding of the three-dimensional nature of optical signals; how penetration depths of cardiac optical imaging can be improved by using novel imaging modalities and finally, we highlight new techniques inspired from optical tomography and aiming at full depth-resolved optical mapping of cardiac electrical activity. PMID:26238062

  16. Cardiac rate detection method based on the beam splitter prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Xiaohua; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Ruirui; Jin, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jingsheng

    2013-09-01

    A new cardiac rate measurement method is proposed. Through the beam splitter prism, the common-path optical system of transmitting and receiving signals is achieved. By the focusing effect of the lens, the small amplitude motion artifact is inhibited and the signal-to-noise is improved. The cardiac rate is obtained based on the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy (PPG). We use LED as the light source and use photoelectric diode as the receiving tube. The LED and the photoelectric diode are on the different sides of the beam splitter prism and they form the optical system. The signal processing and display unit is composed by the signal processing circuit, data acquisition device and computer. The light emitted by the modulated LED is collimated by the lens and irradiates the measurement target through the beam splitter prism. The light reflected by the target is focused on the receiving tube through the beam splitter prism and another lens. The signal received by the photoelectric diode is processed by the analog circuit and obtained by the data acquisition device. Through the filtering and Fast Fourier Transform, the cardiac rate is achieved. We get the real time cardiac rate by the moving average method. We experiment with 30 volunteers, containing different genders and different ages. We compare the signals captured by this method to a conventional PPG signal captured concurrently from a finger. The results of the experiments are all relatively agreeable and the biggest deviation value is about 2bmp.

  17. Optimizing cardiac repair and regeneration through activation of the endogenous cardiac stem cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Georgina M; Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo; Torella, Daniele

    2012-10-01

    Given the aging of the Western World and declining death rates due to acute coronary syndromes, the increasing trends in the magnitude and morbidity of heart failure (HF) are predicted to continue for the foreseeable future. It is imperative to develop effective therapies for the amelioration and prevention of HF. The search for the best cell type to be used in clinical protocols of cardiac regeneration is still on. That the adult mammalian heart harbors endogenous, multipotent cardiac stem/progenitor cells (eCSCs) and that cardiomyocytes are replaced throughout adulthood represent a paradigm shift in cardiovascular biology. The presence of eCSCs supports the view that the heart can repair itself if the eCSCs can be properly stimulated. Pending a better understanding of eCSC biology, it should be possible to replace autologous cell transplantation-based myocardial regeneration protocols with an "off-the-shelf," readily available, and effective regenerative/reparative therapy based on activation of the eCSCs in situ. PMID:22688972

  18. Detecting Cardiac Sarcoidosis with a Right Atrial Mass Using Transthoracic Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Izumi, Chisato; Miyake, Makoto; Nakajima, Seiko; Nishimura, Shunsuke; Kuroda, Maiko; Yoshikawa, Yusuke; Amano, Masashi; Hayama, Yukiko; Imamura, Sari; Onishi, Naoaki; Tamaki, Yodo; Enomoto, Soichiro; Tamura, Toshihiro; Kondo, Hirokazu; Kaitani, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    An asymptomatic 40-year-old woman with a first-degree atrioventricular block presented a right atrial mass in transthoracic echocardiograms. Transesophageal echocardiograms showed abnormally thickened tissue on the interatrial septum, which extended around the aortic annulus. Multimodality examinations demonstrated lesions in the heart, lungs, liver, and spleen, suggesting sarcoidosis. She was diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis after we detected granulomas in a lung specimen. A right atrial mass shrunk following steroid therapy. We should therefore consider the possibility of cardiac sarcoidosis when we see wall thickening and a mass echo in the atrium. These signs may point to an early-phase lesion of cardiac sarcoidosis.

  19. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-01

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  20. Real-Time Cardiac Arrhythmia Detection Using WOLA Filterbank Analysis of EGM Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Hamid; Brennan, Robert L.; So, Simon

    2007-12-01

    Novel methods of cardiac rhythm detection are proposed that are based on time-frequency analysis by a weighted overlap-add (WOLA) oversampled filterbank. Cardiac signals are obtained from intracardiac electrograms and decomposed into the time-frequency domain and analyzed by parallel peak detectors in selected frequency subbands. The coherence (synchrony) of the subband peaks is analyzed and employed to detect an optimal peak sequence representing the beat locations. By further analysis of the synchrony of the subband beats and the periodicity and regularity of the optimal beat, various possible cardiac events (including fibrillation, flutter, and tachycardia) are detected. The Ann Arbor Electrogram Library is used to evaluate the proposed detection method in clean and in additive noise. The evaluation results show that the method never misses any episode of fibrillation or flutter in clean or in noise and is robust to far-field R-wave interference. Furthermore, all other misclassification errors were within the acceptable limits.

  1. Detection of cardiac allograft rejection using radionuclide techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Addonizio, L.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The results of the investigations in the search for a radionuclide technique to detect rejection have, thus far, not found any method that can be applied clinically. Functional studies are not sensitive enough, unless further work on the quantitative volume changes shows consistent correlation. Routine myocardial imaging agents such as {sup 67}Ga, {sup 99}TcPP, or the perfusion agent, {sup 201}Tl are clearly not specific enough to detect rejection until the grafts are nearly lost. Radiolabeled lymphocyte studies show promise, in that lymphocytes are intimately involved in the rejection process. However, there needs to be further research to determine if the specificity of the technique can isolate those patients who require treatment. The data involving labeled antimyosin antibody fragments indicate that they can specifically detect myocyte necrosis that occurs on the microscopic level. However, it may also be too sensitive a technique for transplanted hearts, which are so immunologically active at baseline to determine when treatment is necessary.30 references.

  2. Landmark detection and coupled patch registration for cardiac motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Shi, Wenzhe; Zhuang, Xiahai; Wu, Xianliang; Tung, Kai-Pin; Ourselin, Sebastien; Edwards, Philip; Rueckert, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on the estimation of the deformation of the endocardium to aid the diagnosis of cardiac malfunction. Landmark tracking can provide sparse, anatomically relevant constraints to help establish correspondences between images being tracked or registered. However, landmarks on the endocardium are often characterized by ambiguous appearance in cardiac MR images which makes the extraction and tracking of these landmarks problematic. In this paper we propose an automatic framework to select and track a sparse set of distinctive landmarks in the presence of relatively large deformations in order to capture the endocardial motion in cardiac MR sequences. To achieve this a sparse set of the landmarks is identified using an entropy-based approach. In particular we use singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the search space and localize the landmarks with relatively large deformation across the cardiac cycle. The tracking of the sparse set of landmarks is performed simultaneously by optimizing a two-stage Markov Random Field (MRF) model. The tracking result is further used to initialize registration based dense motion tracking. We have applied this framework to extract a set of landmarks at the endocardial border of the left ventricle in MR image sequences from 51 subjects. Although the left ventricle undergoes a number of different deformations, we show how the radial, longitudinal motion and twisting of the endocardial surface can be captured by the proposed approach. Our experiments demonstrate that motion tracking using sparse landmarks can outperform conventional motion tracking by a substantial amount, with improvements in terms of tracking accuracy of 20:8% and 19:4% respectively.

  3. Tetrandrine reverses human cardiac myofibroblast activation and myocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Teng, Guoqi; Svystonyuk, Daniyil; Mewhort, Holly E M; Turnbull, Jeannine D; Belke, Darrell D; Duff, Henry J; Fedak, Paul W M

    2015-06-15

    Tetrandrine (TTD) is a calcium channel blocker with documented antifibrotic actions. In this study, for the first time, we identified that TTD can directly prevent in vitro human cardiac myofibroblast activation and limit in vivo myocardial fibrosis. In vitro, cardiac myofibroblasts from human atrial biopsies (N = 10) were seeded in three-dimensional collagen matrices. Cell-collagen constructs were exposed to transforming growth factor-β1 (10 ng/ml), with or without TTD (1 and 5 μM) for 48 h. Collagen gel contraction, myofibroblast activation (α-smooth muscle actin expression), expression of profibrotic mRNAs, and rate of collagen protein synthesis were compared. TTD decreased collagen gel contraction (79.7 ± 1.3 vs 60.1 ± 8.9%, P < 0.01), α-smooth muscle actin expression (flow cytometry), collagen synthesis ([(3)H]proline incorporation), and collagen mRNA expression. Cell viability was similar between groups (annexin positive cells: 1.7 vs. 1.4%). TTD inhibited collagen gel contraction in the presence of T-type and L-type calcium channel blockers, and the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM (15 μM), suggesting that the observed effects are not mediated by calcium homeostasis. In vivo, Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats were treated with variable doses of TTD (by intraperitoneal injection over 4 wk) and compared with untreated controls (N = 12). Systemic blood pressure was monitored by tail cuff. Myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular compliance were assessed by histology and passive pressure-volume analysis. Myocardial fibrosis was attenuated compared with untreated controls (%collagen area: 9.4 ± 7.3 vs 2.1 ± 1.0%, P < 0.01). Left ventricular compliance was preserved. In conclusion, TTD reverses human cardiac myofibroblast activation and myocardial fibrosis, independent of calcium channel blockade. PMID:25862829

  4. Passive and active tension in single cardiac myofibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Linke, W A; Popov, V I; Pollack, G H

    1994-01-01

    Single myofibrils were isolated from chemically skinned rabbit heart and mounted in an apparatus described previously (Fearn et al., 1993; Linke et al., 1993). We measured the passive length-tension relation and active isometric force, both normalized to cross sectional area. Myofibrillar cross sectional area was calculated based on measurements of myofibril diameter from both phase-contrast images and electron micrographs. Passive tension values up to sarcomere lengths of approximately 2.2 microns were similar to those reported in larger cardiac muscle specimens. Thus, the element responsible for most, if not all, passive force of cardiac muscle at physiological sarcomere lengths appears to reside within the myofibrils. Above 2.2 microns, passive tension continued to rise, but not as steeply as reported in multicellular preparations. Apparently, structures other than the myofibrils become increasingly important in determining the magnitude of passive tension at these stretched lengths. Knowing the myofibrillar component of passive tension allowed us to infer the stress-strain relation of titin, the polypeptide thought to support passive force in the sarcomere. The elastic modulus of titin is 3.5 x 10(6) dyn cm-2, a value similar to that reported for elastin. Maximum active isometric tension in the single myofibril at sarcomere lengths of 2.1-2.3 microns was 145 +/- 35 mN/mm2 (mean +/- SD; n = 15). This value is comparable with that measured in fixed-end contractions of larger cardiac specimens, when the amount of nonmyofibrillar space in those preparations is considered. However, it is about 4 times lower than the maximum active tension previously measured in single skeletal myofibrils under similar conditions (Bartoo et al., 1993). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 7 PMID:7948691

  5. Dominance in cardiac parasympathetic activity during real recreational SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Chouchou, Florian; Pichot, Vincent; Garet, Martin; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Roche, Frédéric

    2009-06-01

    It was already established that exposure to hyperbaric conditions induces vagal-depended bradycardia but field study on autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity during self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving is lacking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate ANS modifications during real recreational SCUBA diving using heart rate variability analysis (timedomain, frequency-domain and Poincaré plot) in 10 experienced and volunteers recreational divers. Mean RR, root mean square of successive differences of interval (rMSSD), high frequency of spectral analysis and standard deviation 1 of Poincaré Plot increased (P < 0.05) during dive. Low frequency/high frequency ratio decreased during dive (P < 0.05) but increased after (P < 0.05). Recreational SCUBA diving induced a rise in vagal activity and a decrease in cardiac sympathetic activity. Conversely, sympathetic activity increases (P < 0.05) during the recovery.

  6. Measuring Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) Activity in Children

    PubMed Central

    van Eijsden, Manon; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.; de Geus, Eco J.

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls mainly automatic bodily functions that are engaged in homeostasis, like heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, salivation, perspiration and renal function. The ANS has two main branches: the sympathetic nervous system, preparing the human body for action in times of danger and stress, and the parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the resting state of the body. ANS activity can be measured invasively, for instance by radiotracer techniques or microelectrode recording from superficial nerves, or it can be measured non-invasively by using changes in an organ's response as a proxy for changes in ANS activity, for instance of the sweat glands or the heart. Invasive measurements have the highest validity but are very poorly feasible in large scale samples where non-invasive measures are the preferred approach. Autonomic effects on the heart can be reliably quantified by the recording of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in combination with the impedance cardiogram (ICG), which reflects the changes in thorax impedance in response to respiration and the ejection of blood from the ventricle into the aorta. From the respiration and ECG signals, respiratory sinus arrhythmia can be extracted as a measure of cardiac parasympathetic control. From the ECG and the left ventricular ejection signals, the preejection period can be extracted as a measure of cardiac sympathetic control. ECG and ICG recording is mostly done in laboratory settings. However, having the subjects report to a laboratory greatly reduces ecological validity, is not always doable in large scale epidemiological studies, and can be intimidating for young children. An ambulatory device for ECG and ICG simultaneously resolves these three problems. Here, we present a study design for a minimally invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in children, using a validated ambulatory device 1-5, the VU University Ambulatory Monitoring System (VU

  7. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cros, C.; Skinner, M.; Moors, J.; Lainee, P.; Valentin, J.P.

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two

  8. Spiral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nessim; Williams, Ronald B; Yarmozik, June A; Biederman, Robert W W

    2014-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetically determined heart muscle disease; characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Spiral HCM is described as having a counterclockwise rotation pattern of hypertrophy along with variable degrees of fibrosis. A 34-year-old female presented with symptoms suggestive of heart failure. Echocardiography showed concentric LVH with normal contractility. Cardiac MRI showed asymmetric septal hypertrophy with mid-cavity obliteration and a spiral pattern of variably increasing wall thickness. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) demonstrated several areas of abnormal postgadolinium uptake. We report a case of spiral HCM. We should consider cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as the reference standard for diagnosing HCM. PMID:24749165

  9. Cardiac troponin testing in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis-spectrum disorders: biomarkers to distinguish between primary cardiac involvement and low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael; Lilleker, James B; Herrick, Ariane L; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-05-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, an under-recognised manifestation of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc)-spectrum disorders, is associated with significant mortality. Within these two conditions, traditional skeletal muscle enzyme testing may not effectively distinguish between skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement, especially in patients with subclinical cardiac disease. Accurate biomarkers are thus required to screen for cardiac disease, to better inform both therapeutic decision-making and treatment response. The widespread uptake of cardiac troponin testing has revolutionised the management of acute coronary syndromes. While cardiac troponin I (cTnI) appears specific to the myocardium, cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is also expressed by skeletal muscle, including regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There is increasing interest about the role of cardiac troponins as a putative biomarker of primary cardiac involvement in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders. Herewith we discuss subclinical cardiac disease in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders, the respective roles of cTnI and cTnT testing, and the re-expression of cTnT within regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There remains wide variation in access to cardiac troponin testing nationally and internationally. We propose two pragmatic clinical pathways using cardiac troponins, preferably measuring concomitant cTnT followed by confirmatory (cardiac) cTnI to screen patients for subclinical cardiac disease and/or low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity, and also an agenda for future research.

  10. Cardiac Troponin Testing in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies and Systemic Sclerosis-Spectrum Disorders: Biomarkers to Distinguish between Primary Cardiac Involvement and Low Grade Skeletal Muscle Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael; Lilleker, James B; Herrick, Ariane L; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, an under-recognised manifestation of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc)-spectrum disorders, is associated with significant mortality. Within these two conditions, traditional skeletal muscle enzyme testing may not effectively distinguish between skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement, especially in patients with subclinical cardiac disease. Accurate biomarkers are thus required to screen for cardiac disease, to better inform both therapeutic decision-making and treatment response. The widespread uptake of cardiac troponin testing has revolutionised the management of acute coronary syndromes. Whereas cardiac troponin I (cTnI) appears specific to the myocardium, cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is also expressed by skeletal muscle, including regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There is increasing interest about the role of cardiac troponins as a putative biomarker of primary cardiac involvement in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders. Herewith we discuss subclinical cardiac disease in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders, the respective roles of cTnI and cTnT testing, and the re-expression of cTnT within regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There remains wide variation in access to cardiac troponin testing nationally and internationally. We propose two pragmatic clinical pathways using cardiac troponins, preferably measuring concomitant cTnT followed by confirmatory (cardiac) cTnI to screen patients for subclinical cardiac disease and/or low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity, and also an agenda for future research, and also an agenda for future research. PMID:25732174

  11. Detection and Prevention of Cardiac Arrhythmias During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.; Liszka, Kathy J.; York, David W.; Mackin, Michael A.; Lichter, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    There have been reports suggesting that long-duration space flight might lead to an increased risk of potentially serious heart rhythm disturbances. If space flight does, in fact, significantly decrease cardiac electrical stability, the effects could be catastrophic, potentially leading to sudden cardiac death. It will be important to determine the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in order to prepare for long-term manned lunar and interplanetary missions and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Electrical alternans affecting the ST segment and T-wave have been demonstrated to be common among patients at increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias. Subtle electrical alternans on the ECG may serve as a noninvasive marker of vulnerability to ventricular arrhythmias. We are studying indices of electrical instability in the heart for long term space missions by non-invasively measuring microvolt level T-wave alternans in a reduced gravity environment. In this investigation we are using volunteer subjects on the KC-135 aircraft as an initial study of the effect of electrical adaptation of the heart to microgravity. T-wave alternans will be analyzed for heart rate variability and QT restitution curve plotting will be compared for statistical significance.

  12. Active Bleeding after Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Observational Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Bertet, Héléna; Faucanie, Marie; Amour, Julien; Blanloeil, Yvonnick; Lanquetot, Hervé; Ouattara, Alexandre; Picot, Marie Christine

    2016-01-01

    Main Objectives To estimate the incidence of active bleeding after cardiac surgery (AB) based on a definition directly related on blood flow from chest drainage; to describe the AB characteristics and its management; to identify factors of postoperative complications. Methods AB was defined as a blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or in case of reoperation for hemostasis during the first 12 postoperative hours. The definition was applied in a prospective longitudinal observational study involving 29 French centers; all adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included over a 3-month period. Perioperative data (including blood product administration) were collected. To study possible variation in clinical practice among centers, patients were classified into two groups according to the AB incidence of the center compared to the overall incidence: “Low incidence” if incidence is lower and “High incidence” if incidence is equal or greater than overall incidence. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors of postoperative complications. Results Among 4,904 patients, 129 experienced AB (2.6%), among them 52 reoperation. Postoperative bleeding loss was 1,000 [820;1,375] ml and 1,680 [1,280;2,300] ml at 6 and 24 hours respectively. Incidence of AB varied between centers (0 to 16%) but was independent of in-centre cardiac surgical experience. Comparisons between groups according to AB incidence showed differences in postoperative management. Body surface area, preoperative creatinine, emergency surgery, postoperative acidosis and red blood cell transfusion were risk factors of postoperative complication. Conclusions A blood loss > 1.5 ml/kg/h for 6 consecutive hours within the first 24 hours or early reoperation for hemostasis seems a relevant definition of AB. This definition, independent of transfusion, adjusted to body weight, may assess real time bleeding occurring

  13. Activity performance problems of patients with cardiac diseases and their impact on quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Duruturk, Neslihan; Tonga, Eda; Karatas, Metin; Doganozu, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To describe the functional consequences of patients with cardiac diseases and analyze associations between activity limitations and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy subjects (mean age: 60.1±12.0 years) were being treated by Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Cardiology Departments were included in the study. Activity limitations and participation restrictions as perceived by the individual were measured by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale was used to describe limitations in daily living activities. To detect the impact of activity limitations on quality of life the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used. [Results] The subjects described 46 different types of problematic activities. The five most identified problems were walking (45.7%), climbing up the stairs (41.4%), bathing (30%), dressing (28.6%) and outings (27.1%). The associations between COPM performance score with all subgroups of NEADL and NHP; total, energy, physical abilities subgroups, were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Our results showed that patients with cardiac diseases reported problems with a wide range of activities, and that also quality of life may be affected by activities of daily living. COPM can be provided as a patient-focused outcome measure, and it may be a useful tool for identifying those problems. PMID:26311919

  14. A visible light imaging device for cardiac rate detection with reduced effect of body movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaotian; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin

    2014-09-01

    A visible light imaging system to detect human cardiac rate is proposed in this paper. A color camera and several LEDs, acting as lighting source, were used to avoid the interference of ambient light. From people's forehead, the cardiac rate could be acquired based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. The template matching method was used after the capture of video. The video signal was discomposed into three signal channels (RGB) and the region of interest was chosen to take the average gray value. The green channel signal could provide an excellent waveform of pulse wave on the account of green lights' absorptive characteristics of blood. Through the fast Fourier transform, the cardiac rate was exactly achieved. But the research goal was not just to achieve the cardiac rate accurately. With the template matching method, the effects of body movement are reduced to a large extent, therefore the pulse wave can be detected even while people are in the moving state and the waveform is largely optimized. Several experiments are conducted on volunteers, and the results are compared with the ones gained by a finger clamped pulse oximeter. The contrast results between these two ways are exactly agreeable. This method to detect the cardiac rate and the pulse wave largely reduces the effects of body movement and can probably be widely used in the future.

  15. Sudden Cardiac Arrest During Sports Activity in Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Marijon, Eloi; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Reinier, Kyndaron; Teodorescu, Carmen; Narayanan, Kumar; Jouven, Xavier; Gunson, Karen; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sports-associated sudden cardiac arrests (SCAs) occur mostly during middle age. We sought to determine burden, characteristics, and outcomes of SCA during sports among middle aged residents of a large US community. Methods and Results SCA cases aged 35–65 years were identified in a large, prospective, population-based study (2002–2013), with systematic and comprehensive assessment of their lifetime medical history. Of the 1,247 SCA cases, 63 (5%) occurred during sports activities at a mean age of 51.1±8.8 years, yielding an incidence of 21.7 (95%CI 8.1–35.4) per million per year. The incidence varied significantly based on sex, with a higher incidence among men (RR 18.68 95%CI 2.50–139.56) for sports SCA, as compared to all other SCA (RR 2.58, 95%CI 2.12–3.13). Sports SCA was also more likely to be a witnessed event (87 vs. 53%, P<0.001), with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (44 vs. 25%, P=0.001) and ventricular fibrillation (84 vs. 51%, P<0.0001). Survival to hospital discharge was higher for sports-associated SCA (23.2 vs. 13.6%, P=0.04). Sports SCA cases presented with known pre-existing cardiac disease in 16%, ≥1 cardiovascular risk factor in 56%, and overall, 36% of cases had typical cardiovascular symptoms during the week preceding SCA. Conclusions Sports-associated SCA in middle age represents a relatively small proportion of the overall SCA burden, reinforcing the idea of the high benefit-low risk nature of sports activity. Especially in light of current population aging trends, our findings emphasize that targeted education could maximize both safety and acceptance of sports activity in the older athlete. PMID:25847988

  16. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  17. Combined gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy for detection of cardiac lymphoproliferative disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Rapoport, F.; Boucher, C.A.

    1981-10-01

    Two cases are reported in which combined radionuclide imaging using gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy and /sup 67/Ga-citrate scintigraphy aided in evaluating lymphomatous involvement of the heart and distinguishing tumor involvement from other cardiac disorders.

  18. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac hypertrophy by impairing autophagy through the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng; Deng, Yan; Pan, Yue-Ying; Ren, Jie; Jin, Meng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Die; Guo, Xue-Ling; Yuan, Xiao; Shang, Jin; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2016-09-15

    Autophagy is tightly regulated to maintain cardiac homeostasis. Impaired autophagy is closely associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, the relationship between autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is not known. In the present study, we measured autophagy-related genes and autophagosomes during 10 weeks of CIH in rats, and 6 days in H9C2 cardiomyocytes, and showed that autophagy was impaired. This conclusion was confirmed by the autophagy flux assay. We detected significant hypertrophic changes in myocardium with impaired autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy enhancer, attenuated the cardiac hypertrophy induced by CIH. Moreover, silencing autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5) exerted the opposite effect. The role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in regulating autophagy under CIH was confirmed using AICAR to upregulate this enzyme and restore autophagy flux. Restoring autophagy by AICAR or rapamycin significantly reversed the hypertrophic changes in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the mechanism of autophagy impairment, we compared phospho (p)-AMPK, p-Akt, cathepsin D, and NFAT3 levels, along with calcineurin activity, between sham and CIH groups. CIH activated calcineurin, and inhibited AMPK and AMPK-mediated autophagy in an Akt- and NFAT3-independent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrated that impaired autophagy induced by CIH through the AMPK pathway contributed to cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27412517

  19. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac hypertrophy by impairing autophagy through the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Sheng; Deng, Yan; Pan, Yue-Ying; Ren, Jie; Jin, Meng; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Die; Guo, Xue-Ling; Yuan, Xiao; Shang, Jin; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2016-09-15

    Autophagy is tightly regulated to maintain cardiac homeostasis. Impaired autophagy is closely associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, the relationship between autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is not known. In the present study, we measured autophagy-related genes and autophagosomes during 10 weeks of CIH in rats, and 6 days in H9C2 cardiomyocytes, and showed that autophagy was impaired. This conclusion was confirmed by the autophagy flux assay. We detected significant hypertrophic changes in myocardium with impaired autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy enhancer, attenuated the cardiac hypertrophy induced by CIH. Moreover, silencing autophagy-related gene 5 (ATG5) exerted the opposite effect. The role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in regulating autophagy under CIH was confirmed using AICAR to upregulate this enzyme and restore autophagy flux. Restoring autophagy by AICAR or rapamycin significantly reversed the hypertrophic changes in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the mechanism of autophagy impairment, we compared phospho (p)-AMPK, p-Akt, cathepsin D, and NFAT3 levels, along with calcineurin activity, between sham and CIH groups. CIH activated calcineurin, and inhibited AMPK and AMPK-mediated autophagy in an Akt- and NFAT3-independent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrated that impaired autophagy induced by CIH through the AMPK pathway contributed to cardiac hypertrophy.

  20. A viscoplastic model for the active component in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Rubin, M B

    2016-08-01

    The HMK model (Hunter et al. in Prog Biophys Mol Biol 69:289-331, 1998) proposes mechanobiological equations for the influence of intracellular calcium concentration [Formula: see text] on the evolution of bound calcium concentration [Formula: see text] and the tropomyosin kinetics parameter z, which model processes in the active component of the tension in cardiac muscle. The inelastic response due to actin-myosin crossbridge kinetics is modeled in the HMK model with a function Q that depends on the history of the rate of total stretch of the muscle fiber. Here, an alternative model is proposed which models the active component of the muscle fiber as a viscoplastic material. In particular, an evolution equation is proposed for the elastic stretch [Formula: see text] in the active component. Specific forms of the constitutive equations are proposed and used to match experimental data. The proposed viscoplastic formulation allows for separate modeling of three processes: the high rate deactivation of crossbridges causing rapid reduction in active tension; the high but lower rate reactivation of crossbridges causing recovery of active tension; and the low rate relaxation effects characterizing the Hill model of muscles.

  1. Current cardiac imaging techniques for detection of left ventricular mass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of left ventricular (LV) mass has both prognostic and therapeutic value independent of traditional risk factors. Unfortunately, LV mass evaluation has been underestimated in clinical practice. Assessment of LV mass can be performed by a number of imaging modalities. Despite inherent limitations, conventional echocardiography has fundamentally been established as most widely used diagnostic tool. 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is now feasible, fast and accurate for LV mass evaluation. 3DE is also superior to conventional echocardiography in terms of LV mass assessment, especially in patients with abnormal LV geometry. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiovascular computed tomography (CCT) are currently performed for LV mass assessment and also do not depend on cardiac geometry and display 3-dimensional data, as well. Therefore, CMR is being increasingly employed and is at the present standard of reference in the clinical setting. Although each method demonstrates advantages over another, there are also disadvantages to receive attention. Diagnostic accuracy of methods will also be increased with the introduction of more advanced systems. It is also likely that in the coming years new and more accurate diagnostic tests will become available. In particular, CMR and CCT have been intersecting hot topic between cardiology and radiology clinics. Thus, good communication and collaboration between two specialties is required for selection of an appropriate test. PMID:20515461

  2. Bradykinin actively modulates pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index relationships.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, D P; Clougherty, P W; Goll, H M; Murray, P A

    1987-07-01

    Our objectives were to investigate the pulmonary vascular effects of exogenously administered bradykinin at normal and reduced levels of cardiac index in intact conscious dogs and to assess the extent to which the pulmonary vascular response to bradykinin is the result of either cyclooxygenase pathway activation or reflex activation of sympathetic beta-adrenergic and -cholinergic receptors. Multipoint pulmonary vascular pressure-cardiac index (P/Q) plots were constructed during normoxia in conscious dogs by step-wise constriction of the thoracic inferior vena cava to reduce Q. In intact dogs, bradykinin (2 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1 iv) caused systemic vasodilation, i.e., systemic arterial pressure was slightly decreased (P less than 0.05), Q was markedly increased (P less than 0.01), and mixed venous PO2 and oxygen saturation (SO2) were increased (P less than 0.01). Bradykinin decreased (P less than 0.01) the pulmonary vascular pressure gradient (pulmonary arterial pressure-pulmonary capillary wedge pressure) over the entire range of Q studied (140-60 ml X min-1 X kg-1) in intact dogs. During cyclooxygenase pathway inhibition with indomethacin, bradykinin again decreased (P less than 0.05) pulmonary arterial pressure-pulmonary capillary wedge pressure at every level of Q, although the magnitude of the vasodilator response was diminished at lower levels of Q (60 ml X min-1 X kg-1). Following combined administration of sympathetic beta-adrenergic and -cholinergic receptor antagonists, bradykinin still decreased (P less than 0.01) pulmonary arterial pressure-pulmonary capillary wedge pressure over the range of Q from 160 to 60 ml X min-1 X kg-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3114215

  3. Simple hand-held metal detectors are an effective means of detecting cardiac pacemakers in the deceased prior to cremation.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jason Lyle; Williams, John; Fearn, Lesley

    2010-05-01

    The hazard of undetected cardiac pacemakers exploding in crematoria is well described. This short report describes the use of an affordable hand-held metal detector to detect cardiac pacemakers. Over the course of a year, the metal detector located 100% of cardiac pacemakers in a district general hospital mortuary. A simple model using pigskin and fat is also used to demonstrate the effectiveness in vitro. Commercially purchased hand-held metal detectors should be used in all mortuaries responsible for detection and removal of cardiac pacemakers prior to cremation.

  4. Reconstruction of the electrical activity of cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, R E; Noble, D; Tsien, R W

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical activity of Cardiac Purkinje fibres was reconstructed using a mathematical model of the membrane current. The individual components of ionic curent were described by equations which wee based as closely as possible on previous experiments using the voltage clamp technique. 2. Membrane action potentials and pace-maker activity were calculated and compared with time course of underlying changes in two functionally distinct outeard currents, iX1 and iK2. 3. The repolarization of the theoretical action potential is triggered by the onset of iX1, which becomes activated over the plateau range of potentials. iK2 also activates during the plateau but does not play a controlling role in the repolarization. Hwever, iK2 does govern the slow pace-maker depolarization through its subsequent deactivation at negative potentials. 4. The individual phases of the calculated action potential and their 'experimental' modifications were compared with published records. The upstroke is generated by a Hodgkin-Huxley type sodium conductance (gNa), and rises with a maximum rate of 478 V/sec, somewhat less than experimentally observed values ( up to 800 V/sec). The discrepancy is discussed in relation to experimental attempts at measuring gNa. 5. The ole of the transient outward chloride current (called igr) was studied in calculations of the rapid phase of repolarization and 'notch' configuration... PMID:1185607

  5. Noninvasive detection of human cardiac transplant rejection with indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frist, W.; Yasuda, T.; Segall, G.; Khaw, B.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Gold, H.; Stinson, E.; Oyer, P.; Baldwin, J.; Billingham, M.

    1987-11-01

    Diagnosis of rejection after cardiac transplantation is currently made by right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. To evaluate antimyosin imaging as a noninvasive means of detecting human cardiac rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies was labeled with indium-111 and given intravenously to 18 patients (age 45 +/- 12 years) in 20 studies 7 days to 9 years after transplantation. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained at the time of each imaging study. Eight patients had positive scans confirmed by biopsy as rejection, and eight patients had negative scans and no evidence of rejection on biopsy. Discordance was observed in four studies, two with positive scans and no rejection on biopsy and two with negative scans and positive biopsy. The sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy of the technique were each 80%. Imaging with radiolabeled antimyosin antibody Fab fragments may be of value in the noninvasive identification of rejection in the cardiac transplant recipient.

  6. ANGPTL2 activity in cardiac pathologies accelerates heart failure by perturbing cardiac function and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhe; Miyata, Keishi; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Horiguchi, Haruki; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Tohyama, Shugo; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Zhao, Jiabin; Endo, Motoyoshi; Morinaga, Jun; Sato, Michio; Sugizaki, Taichi; Zhu, Shunshun; Terada, Kazutoyo; Sakaguchi, Hisashi; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro; Takeda, Naoki; Araki, Kimi; Manabe, Ichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Otsu, Kinya; Wada, Jun; Murohara, Toyoaki; Mohri, Satoshi; Yamashita, Jun K.; Sano, Motoaki; Oike, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    A cardioprotective response that alters ventricular contractility or promotes cardiomyocyte enlargement occurs with increased workload in conditions such as hypertension. When that response is excessive, pathological cardiac remodelling occurs, which can progress to heart failure, a leading cause of death worldwide. Mechanisms underlying this response are not fully understood. Here, we report that expression of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) increases in pathologically-remodeled hearts of mice and humans, while decreased cardiac ANGPTL2 expression occurs in physiological cardiac remodelling induced by endurance training in mice. Mice overexpressing ANGPTL2 in heart show cardiac dysfunction caused by both inactivation of AKT and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)2a signalling and decreased myocardial energy metabolism. Conversely, Angptl2 knockout mice exhibit increased left ventricular contractility and upregulated AKT-SERCA2a signalling and energy metabolism. Finally, ANGPTL2-knockdown in mice subjected to pressure overload ameliorates cardiac dysfunction. Overall, these studies suggest that therapeutic ANGPTL2 suppression could antagonize development of heart failure. PMID:27677409

  7. Sensory detection thresholds are modulated across the cardiac cycle: evidence that cutaneous sensibility is greatest for systolic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, L; Ring, C; McIntyre, D; Winer, J B; Martin, U

    2009-03-01

    The visceral afferent feedback hypothesis proposes that sensorimotor function is impaired by cortical inhibition associated with increased baroreceptor activation. This study is the first to examine the effects of naturally occurring variations in baroreceptor activity across the cardiac cycle on cutaneous sensory detection thresholds. In each trial, an electrocutaneous stimulus was delivered to the index finger at one of three intervals (0, 300, 600 ms) after the R-wave of the electrocardiogram. Separate interleaving up-down staircases were used to determine the 50% detection threshold for each R-wave to stimulation interval. Cutaneous sensory detection thresholds were lower for stimuli presented at R+300 ms than R+0 ms or R+600 ms. The finding that cutaneous sensibility was greater when stimulated during systole than diastole may be accounted for by a modified afferent feedback hypothesis.

  8. Calcium binding to cardiac myocytes protected from proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bailey, L E; Fawzi, A B

    1985-04-17

    Excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle is dependent on extracellular calcium and calcium bound to the surface of the myocardial cell. In this study, we examined the physical characteristics of calcium binding to adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes disaggregated mechanically in oxygenated tissue culture medium containing a proteinase inhibitor (aprotinin), and separated from cellular debris by Cytodex beads. Cells prepared in this manner excluded Trypan blue and showed no evidence of spontaneous contraction or contracture. Scatchard plots of calcium binding determined by continuous flow equilibrium dialysis revealed a high-affinity, low-capacity pool, Ka = 65 X 10(3) M-1 and Bt = 1.3 nmol X mg-1 and a low-affinity, high-capacity pool, Ka = 141 M-1 and Bt = 138 nmol X mg-1. The low-affinity pool was not detectable after lanthanum, trypsin or collagenase treatment or in cells prepared without aprotinin in the isolation medium. Both neuraminidase and phospholipase C reduced Bt of the low-affinity pool by one half, but only neuraminidase affected the affinity constant of this pool. Ka was increased to 516.7 M-1, similar to the apparent affinity constant for calcium binding estimated from dP/dtmax measured at several extracellular calcium concentrations (470 M-1). The results suggest that calcium bound to sarcolemmal phospholipids represents the superficial calcium involved in excitation-contraction coupling in the heart.

  9. Myocardial remodeling in diabetic cardiomyopathy associated with cardiac mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi Gang; Jin, Qun; Fan, Min; Cong, Xiao Liang; Han, Shu Fang; Gao, Hai; Shan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a specific disease process distinct from coronary artery disease and hypertension. The disease features cardiac remodeling stimulated by hyperglycemia of the left ventricle wall and disrupts contractile functions. Cardiac mast cells may be activated by metabolic byproducts resulted from hyperglycermia and then participate in the remodeling process by releasing a multitude of cytokines and bioactive enzymes. Nedocromil, a pharmacologic stabilizer of mast cells, has been shown to normalize cytokine levels and attenuate cardiac remodeling. In this study, we describe the activation of cardiac mast cells by inducing diabetes in normal mice using streptozotocin (STZ). Next, we treated the diabetic mice with nedocromil for 12 weeks and then examined their hearts for signs of cardiac remodeling and quantified contractile function. We observed significantly impaired heart function in diabetic mice, as well as increased cardiac mast cell density and elevated mast cell secretions that correlated with gene expression and aberrant cytokine levels associated with cardiac remodeling. Nedocromil treatment halted contractile dysfunction in diabetic mice and reduced cardiac mast cell density, which correlated with reduced bioactive enzyme secretions, reduced expression of extracellular matrix remodeling factors and collagen synthesis, and normalized cytokine levels. However, the results showed nedocromil treatments did not return diabetic mice to a normal state. We concluded that manipulation of cardiac mast cell function is sufficient to attenuate cardiomyopathy stimulated by diabetes, but other cellular pathways also contribute to the disease process.

  10. Smart helmet: Monitoring brain, cardiac and respiratory activity.

    PubMed

    von Rosenberg, Wilhelm; Chanwimalueang, Theerasak; Goverdovsky, Valentin; Mandic, Danilo P

    2015-01-01

    The timing of the assessment of the injuries following a road-traffic accident involving motorcyclists is absolutely crucial, particularly in the events with head trauma. Standard apparatus for monitoring cardiac activity is usually attached to the limbs or the torso, while the brain function is routinely measured with a separate unit connected to the head-mounted sensors. In stark contrast to these, we propose an integrated system which incorporates the two functionalities inside an ordinary motorcycle helmet. Multiple fabric electrodes were mounted inside the helmet at positions featuring good contact with the skin at different sections of the head. The experimental results demonstrate that the R-peaks (and therefore the heart rate) can be reliably extracted from potentials measured with electrodes on the mastoids and the lower jaw, while the electrodes on the forehead enable the observation of neural signals. We conclude that various vital sings and brain activity can be readily recorded from the inside of a helmet in a comfortable and inconspicuous way, requiring only a negligible setup effort. PMID:26736636

  11. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  12. Fetal cardiac arrhythmia detection and in utero therapy

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Janette F.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    The human fetal heart develops arrhythmias and conduction disturbances in response to ischemia, inflammation, electrolyte disturbances, altered load states, structural defects, inherited genetic conditions, and many other causes. Yet sinus rhythm is present without altered rate or rhythm in some of the most serious electrophysiological diseases, which makes detection of diseases of the fetal conduction system challenging in the absence of magnetocardiographic or electrocardiographic recording techniques. Life-threatening changes in QRS or QT intervals can be completely unrecognized if heart rate is the only feature to be altered. For many fetal arrhythmias, echocardiography alone can assess important clinical parameters for diagnosis. Appropriate treatment of the fetus requires awareness of arrhythmia characteristics, mechanisms, and potential associations. Criteria to define fetal bradycardia specific to gestational age are now available and may allow detection of ion channelopathies, which are associated with fetal and neonatal bradycardia. Ectopic beats, once thought to be entirely benign, are now recognized to have important pathologic associations. Fetal tachyarrhythmias can now be defined precisely for mechanism-specific therapy and for subsequent monitoring of response. This article reviews the current and future diagnostic techniques and pharmacologic treatments for fetal arrhythmia. PMID:20418904

  13. Moderate Physical Activity in Healthy Adults Is Associated With Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Timothy J.W.; Corden, Ben; Cotter, Sorcha; de Marvao, Antonio; Walsh, Roddy; Ware, James S.; Cook, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Cardiac mass and volumes are often elevated in athletes, but it is not known whether moderate physical activity is also associated with cardiac dilatation and hypertrophy in a healthy adult population. Methods and Results— In total, 1096 adults (54% female, median age 39 years) without cardiovascular disease or cardiomyopathy-associated genetic variants underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to determine biventricular volumes and function. Physical activity was assessed using a validated activity questionnaire. The relationship between cardiac parameters and activity was assessed using multiple linear regression adjusting for age, sex, race, and systolic blood pressure. Logistic regression was performed to determine the effect of activity on the likelihood of subjects having cardiac dilatation or hypertrophy according to standard cardiac magnetic resonance normal ranges. Increasing physical activity was associated with greater left ventricular (LV) mass (β=0.23; P<0.0001) and elevated LV and right ventricular volumes (LV: β=0.26, P<0.0001; right ventricular: β=0.26, P<0.0001). Physical activity had a larger effect on cardiac parameters than systolic blood pressure (0.06≤β≤0.21) and a similar effect to age (−0.20≤β≤−0.31). Increasing physical activity was a risk factor for meeting imaging criteria for LV hypertrophy (adjusted odds ratio 2.1; P<0.0001), LV dilatation (adjusted odds ratio 2.2; P<0.0001), and right ventricular dilatation (adjusted odds ratio 2.2; P<0.0001). Conclusions— Exercise-related cardiac remodeling is not confined to athletes, and there is a risk of overdiagnosing cardiac dilatation or hypertrophy in a proportion of active, healthy adults. PMID:27502059

  14. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production.

    PubMed

    Trent, Chad M; Yu, Shuiqing; Hu, Yunying; Skoller, Nathan; Huggins, Lesley A; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-04-01

    The rodent heart accumulates TGs and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either FFAs liberated from adipose tissue or FAs from lipoprotein-associated TGs via the action of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Because circulating levels of FFAs increase during fasting, it has been assumed that albumin transported FFAs are the source of lipids within heart lipid droplets. We studied mice with three genetic mutations: peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α deficiency, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) deficiency, and heart-specific LpL deletion. All three genetically altered groups of mice had defective accumulation of lipid droplet TGs. Moreover, hearts from mice treated with poloxamer 407, an inhibitor of lipoprotein TG lipolysis, also failed to accumulate TGs, despite increased uptake of FFAs. TG storage did not impair maximal cardiac function as measured by stress echocardiography. Thus, LpL hydrolysis of circulating lipoproteins is required for the accumulation of lipids in the heart of fasting mice.

  15. Lipoprotein lipase activity is required for cardiac lipid droplet production.

    PubMed

    Trent, Chad M; Yu, Shuiqing; Hu, Yunying; Skoller, Nathan; Huggins, Lesley A; Homma, Shunichi; Goldberg, Ira J

    2014-04-01

    The rodent heart accumulates TGs and lipid droplets during fasting. The sources of heart lipids could be either FFAs liberated from adipose tissue or FAs from lipoprotein-associated TGs via the action of lipoprotein lipase (LpL). Because circulating levels of FFAs increase during fasting, it has been assumed that albumin transported FFAs are the source of lipids within heart lipid droplets. We studied mice with three genetic mutations: peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor α deficiency, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) deficiency, and heart-specific LpL deletion. All three genetically altered groups of mice had defective accumulation of lipid droplet TGs. Moreover, hearts from mice treated with poloxamer 407, an inhibitor of lipoprotein TG lipolysis, also failed to accumulate TGs, despite increased uptake of FFAs. TG storage did not impair maximal cardiac function as measured by stress echocardiography. Thus, LpL hydrolysis of circulating lipoproteins is required for the accumulation of lipids in the heart of fasting mice. PMID:24493834

  16. Elenoside, a new cytotoxic drug, with cardiac and extracardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Eduardo; Alonso, Simeona Josefina; Trujillo, Juan; Jorge, Elena; Pérez, Cirilo; Hernández-Calzadilla, Carlos

    2002-08-01

    This paper deals with the effects of elenoside, (3-hidroxymethyl-1-methoxy-5,6-methylene-dioxy-4-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-naftoic acid lactone-beta-D-glucoside) an arylnaphthalene lignan with broad spectrum cytotoxicity in a human tumor cell line panel, isolated from Justicia hyssopifolia (Acanthaceae) grown in the Canary Islands (Spain), on isolated cardiac auricle of rabbits, urinary excretion of rats, and on isolated rat ileum. These effects, using a vehicle (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-Tween 80 (40:10:50:2) as a standard, are presented. Elenoside at concentrations of 3.2x10(-4), 6.4 x 10(-4), and 1.2 x 10(-3) M produced an increase in the contraction force of auricles in a concentration-dependent way. At doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg, an antidiuretic effect and a decrease in sodium excretion were observed. Elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10(-4), 6.4 x 10(-4) and 1.2 x 10(-3) M produced an increase in the contraction force of ileum in a concentration-dependent manner. Elenoside produced the concentration dependent inhibition of 86Rb uptake. These results indicate that elenoside has digitalis-like activity similar to mammalian lignans. Moreover, this lignan has an irritant effect on the gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Dysfunctional Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Ion Channels in Cardiac Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoqi; Gu, Tianxiang

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are reverse voltage-dependent, and their activation depends on the hyperpolarization of the membrane and may be directly or indirectly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or other signal-transduction cascades. The distribution, quantity and activation states of HCN channels differ in tissues throughout the body. Evidence exhibits that HCN channels play critical roles in the generation and conduction of the electrical impulse and the physiopathological process of some cardiac diseases. They may constitute promising drug targets in the treatment of these cardiac diseases. Pharmacological treatment targeting HCN channels is of benefit to these cardiac conditions. PMID:27556324

  18. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging of cardiac tissue to detect collagen deposition after myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheheltani, Rabee; Rosano, Jenna M.; Wang, Bin; Sabri, Abdel Karim; Pleshko, Nancy; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2012-05-01

    Myocardial infarction often leads to an increase in deposition of fibrillar collagen. Detection and characterization of this cardiac fibrosis is of great interest to investigators and clinicians. Motivated by the significant limitations of conventional staining techniques to visualize collagen deposition in cardiac tissue sections, we have developed a Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) methodology for collagen assessment. The infrared absorbance band centered at 1338 cm-1, which arises from collagen amino acid side chain vibrations, was used to map collagen deposition across heart tissue sections of a rat model of myocardial infarction, and was compared to conventional staining techniques. Comparison of the size of the collagen scar in heart tissue sections as measured with this methodology and that of trichrome staining showed a strong correlation (R=0.93). A Pearson correlation model between local intensity values in FT-IRIS and immuno-histochemical staining of collagen type I also showed a strong correlation (R=0.86). We demonstrate that FT-IRIS methodology can be utilized to visualize cardiac collagen deposition. In addition, given that vibrational spectroscopic data on proteins reflect molecular features, it also has the potential to provide additional information about the molecular structure of cardiac extracellular matrix proteins and their alterations.

  19. Robust cardiac event change detection method for long-term healthcare monitoring applications.

    PubMed

    Satija, Udit; Ramkumar, Barathram; Manikandan, M Sabarimalai

    2016-06-01

    A long-term continuous cardiac health monitoring system highly demands more battery power for real-time transmission of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals and increases bandwidth, treatment costs and traffic load of the diagnostic server. In this Letter, the authors present an automated low-complexity robust cardiac event change detection (CECD) method that can continuously detect specific changes in PQRST morphological patterns and heart rhythms and then enable transmission/storing of the recorded ECG signals. The proposed CECD method consists of four stages: ECG signal quality assessment, R-peak detection and beat waveform extraction, temporal and RR interval feature extraction and cardiac event change decision. The proposed method is tested and validated using both normal and abnormal ECG signals including different types of arrhythmia beats, heart rates and signal quality. Results show that the method achieves an average sensitivity of 99.76%, positive predictivity of 94.58% and overall accuracy of 94.32% in determining the changes in heartbeat waveforms of the ECG signals.

  20. Further Studies on Structure-Cardiac Activity Relationships of Diterpenoid Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Tang; Jian, Xi-Xian; Ding, Jia-Yu; Deng, Hong-Ying; Chao, Ruo-Bing; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Chen, Dong-Lin; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2015-12-01

    The cardiac effect of thirty-eight diterpenoid alkaloids was evaluated on the isolated bullfrog heart model. Among them, twelve compounds exhibited appreciable cardiac activity, with compounds 3 and 35 being more active than the reference drug lanatoside. The structure-cardiac activity relationships of the diterpenoid alkaloids were summarized based on our present and previous studies [2]: i) 1α-OMe or 1α-OH, 8-OH, 14-OH, and NH (or NMe) are key structural features important for the cardiac effect of the aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids without any esters. C18-diterpenoid alkaloids, lycoctonine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, and the veatchine- and denudatine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids did not show any cardiac activity; ii) the presence of 3α-OH is beneficial to the cardiac activity; iii) the effect on the cardiac action of 6α-OMe, 13-OH, 15α-OH, and 16-demethoxy or a double bond between C-15 and C-16 depends on the substituent pattern on the nitrogen atom.

  1. Functionalized SnO₂ nanobelt field-effect transistor sensors for label-free detection of cardiac troponin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi; Chen, Kan-Sheng; Meyer, Nancy L; Yuan, Jing; Hirst, Linda S; Chase, P Bryant; Xiong, Peng

    2011-07-15

    Real-time label-free electrical detection of proteins, including cardiac troponin (cTn), is demonstrated using functionalized SnO₂ nanobelt field-effect transistors (FETs) with integrated microfluidics. Selective biomolecular functionalization of the active SnO₂ nanobelt channel and effective passivation of the substrate surface were realized and verified through fluorescence microscopy. The validation/verification of the sensing scheme was initially demonstrated via detection of biotin-streptavidin binding: devices with single biotinylated SnO₂ nanobelts showed pronounced conductance changes in response to streptavidin binding. Importantly, the pH-dependence of the conductance changes was fully consistent with the charged states of streptavidin at different pH. Moreover, the specificity of the sensors' electrical responses was confirmed by co-labeling with quantum dots. Finally, the sensing platform was successfully applied for detection of the cardiac troponin I (cTnI) subunit within cTn, a clinically important protein marker for myocardial infarction. PMID:21652197

  2. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  3. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  4. The effect of tilmicosin on cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities.

    PubMed

    Yazar, E; Altunok, V; Elmas, M; Traş, B; Baş, A L; Ozdemir, V

    2002-05-01

    In this study, the effect of tilmicosin on cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities was investigated. Forty male BALB/c mice were used as material. Ten mice served as a control group, and 30 mice were injected with tilmicosin (25 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously, with a single injection). After drug administration, they were monitored for 3 days. Tilmicosin caused decreases in cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities.

  5. Effects of microgravity on liposome-reconstituted cardiac gap junction channeling activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claassen, D. E.; Spooner, B. S.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of microgravity on cardiac gap junction channeling activity were investigated aboard NASA zero-gravity aircraft. Liposome-reconstituted gap junctions were assayed for channel function during free-fall, and the data were compared with channeling at 1 g. Control experiments tested for 0 g effects on the structural stability of liposomes, and on the enzyme-substrate signalling system of the assay. The results demonstrate that short periods of microgravity do not perturb reconstituted cardiac gap junction channeling activity.

  6. Beat-by-Beat Quantification of Cardiac Cycle Events Detected From Three-Dimensional Precordial Acceleration Signals.

    PubMed

    Paukkunen, Mikko; Parkkila, Petteri; Hurnanen, Tero; Pänkäälä, Mikko; Koivisto, Tero; Nieminen, Tuomo; Kettunen, Raimo; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-03-01

    The vibrations produced by the cardiovascular system that are coupled to the precordium can be noninvasively detected using accelerometers. This technique is called seismocardiography. Although clinical applications have been proposed for seismocardiography, the physiology underlying the signal is still not clear. The relationship of seismocardiograms of on the back-to-front axis and cardiac events is fairly well known. However, the 3-D seismocardiograms detectable with modern accelerometers have not been quantified in terms of cardiac cycle events. A major reason for this might be the degree of intersubject variability observed in 3-D seismocardiograms. We present a method to quantify 3-D seismocardiography in terms of cardiac cycle events. First, cardiac cycle events are identified from the seismocardiograms, and then, assigned a number based on the location in which the corresponding event was found. 396 cardiac cycle events from 9 healthy subjects and 120 cardiac cycle events from patients suffering from atrial flutter were analyzed. Despite the weak intersubject correlation of the waveforms (0.05, 0.27, and 0.15 for the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively), the present method managed to find latent similarities in the seismocardiograms of healthy subjects. We observed that in healthy subjects the distribution of cardiac cycle event coordinates was centered on specific locations. These locations were different in patients with atrial flutter. The results suggest that spatial distribution of seismocardiographic cardiac cycle events might be used to discriminate healthy individuals and those with a failing heart.

  7. Detection of ROSC in Patients with Cardiac Arrest During Chest Compression Using NIRS: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Tsukasa; Nagao, Ken; Kawamorita, Tsuyoshi; Soga, Taketomo; Ishii, Mitsuru; Chiba, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tani, Shigemasa; Yoshino, Atsuo; Hirayama, Atsushi; Sakatani, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during chest compression is generally detected by arterial pulse palpation and end-tidal CO2 monitoring; however, it is necessary to stop chest compression during pulse palpation, and to perform endotracheal intubation for monitoring end-tidal CO2. In the present study, we evaluated whether near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) allows the detection of ROSC during chest compression without interruption. We monitored cerebral blood oxygenation in 19 patients with cardiac arrest using NIRS (NIRO-200NX, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan). On arrival at the emergency room, the attending physicians immediately assessed whether a patient was eligible for this study after conventional advanced life support (ALS) and employed NIRS to measure cerebral blood oxygenation (CBO) in the bilateral frontal lobe in patients. We found cerebral blood flow waveforms in synchrony with chest compressions in all patients. In addition, we observed abrupt increases of oxy-hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygen index (TOI), which were associated with ROSC detected by pulse palpation. The present findings indicate that NIRS can be used to assess the quality of chest compression in patients with cardiac arrest as demonstrated by the detection of synchronous waveforms during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). NIRS appears to be applicable for detection of ROSC without interruption of chest compression and without endotracheal intubation. PMID:26782207

  8. Asphyxia-activated corticocardiac signaling accelerates onset of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duan; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Liu, Tiecheng; Tian, Fangyun; Xu, Gang; Rengifo, Santiago; Choi, Sarah J.; Mathur, Abhay; Crooks, Charles P.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Wang, Michael M.; Ghanbari, Hamid; Borjigin, Jimo

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which the healthy heart and brain die rapidly in the absence of oxygen is not well understood. We performed continuous electrocardiography and electroencephalography in rats undergoing experimental asphyxia and analyzed cortical release of core neurotransmitters, changes in brain and heart electrical activity, and brain–heart connectivity. Asphyxia stimulates a robust and sustained increase of functional and effective cortical connectivity, an immediate increase in cortical release of a large set of neurotransmitters, and a delayed activation of corticocardiac functional and effective connectivity that persists until the onset of ventricular fibrillation. Blocking the brain’s autonomic outflow significantly delayed terminal ventricular fibrillation and lengthened the duration of detectable cortical activities despite the continued absence of oxygen. These results demonstrate that asphyxia activates a brainstorm, which accelerates premature death of the heart and the brain. PMID:25848007

  9. Automatic detection of cardiac contours on MR images using fuzzy logic and dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Lalande, A; Legrand, L; Walker, P M; Jaulent, M C; Guy, F; Cottin, Y; Brunotte, F

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of fuzzy logic and dynamic programming in the detection of cardiac contours in MR Images. The definition of two parameters for each pixel allows the construction of the fuzzy set of the cardiac contour points. The first parameter takes into account the grey level, and the second the presence of an edge. A corresponding fuzzy matrix is derived from the initial image. Finally, a dynamic programming with graph searching is performed on this fuzzy matrix. The method has been tested on several MR images and the results of the contouring were validated by an expert in the domain. This preliminary work clearly demonstrates the interest of this method, although a formal evaluation has to be done.

  10. Cardiac rhythm detection and classification by WOLA filterbank analysis of EGM signals.

    PubMed

    Sheikhzadeh, Hamid; Brennan, Robert L; So, Simon

    2006-01-01

    A method of cardiac rhythm detection based on time-frequency analysis provided by a weighted overlap-add (WOLA) oversampled filterbank is proposed. Cardiac rhythms obtained from intracardiac electrogram signals are decomposed into the time-frequency domain and analyzed by parallel peak detectors in selected frequency subbands. Based on the coherence (synchrony) of the subband peaks, an optimal peak sequence representing the beat locations is obtained. By analyzing the synchrony of the subband beats and the periodicity and regularity of the optimal beat, the electrogram segment is classified into various possible classes including fibrillation, flutter, and tachycardia. This multi-tier method is evaluated using Ann Arbor Electrogram library in clean and in additive noise. The presented results show that in clean and in 15 dB SNR noise, the method never misses fibrillation or flutter. Other misclassification errors were within the acceptable limits. PMID:17945642

  11. Optimisation of Recombinant Production of Active Human Cardiac SERCA2a ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Antaloae, Ana V.; Montigny, Cédric; le Maire, Marc; Watson, Kimberly A.; Sørensen, Thomas L.-M.

    2013-01-01

    Methods for recombinant production of eukaryotic membrane proteins, yielding sufficient quantity and quality of protein for structural biology, remain a challenge. We describe here, expression and purification optimisation of the human SERCA2a cardiac isoform of Ca2+ translocating ATPase, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the heterologous expression system of choice. Two different expression vectors were utilised, allowing expression of C-terminal fusion proteins with a biotinylation domain or a GFP- His8 tag. Solubilised membrane fractions containing the protein of interest were purified onto Streptavidin-Sepharose, Ni-NTA or Talon resin, depending on the fusion tag present. Biotinylated protein was detected using specific antibody directed against SERCA2 and, advantageously, GFP-His8 fusion protein was easily traced during the purification steps using in-gel fluorescence. Importantly, talon resin affinity purification proved more specific than Ni-NTA resin for the GFP-His8 tagged protein, providing better separation of oligomers present, during size exclusion chromatography. The optimised method for expression and purification of human cardiac SERCA2a reported herein, yields purified protein (> 90%) that displays a calcium-dependent thapsigargin-sensitive activity and is suitable for further biophysical, structural and physiological studies. This work provides support for the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a suitable expression system for recombinant production of multi-domain eukaryotic membrane proteins. PMID:23951256

  12. Heart Rate Variability for Early Detection of Cardiac Iron Deposition in Patients with Transfusion-Dependent Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Silvilairat, Suchaya; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Saekho, Suwit; Tantiworawit, Adisak; Phrommintikul, Arintaya; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron overload cardiomyopathy remains the major cause of death in patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia. Cardiac T2* magnetic resonance imaging is costly yet effective in detecting cardiac iron accumulation in the heart. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to evaluate cardiac autonomic function and is depressed in cases of thalassemia. We evaluated whether HRV could be used as an indicator for early identification of cardiac iron deposition. Methods One hundred and one patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia were enrolled in this study. The correlation between recorded HRV and hemoglobin, non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI), serum ferritin and cardiac T2* were evaluated. Results The median age was 18 years (range 8–59 years). The patient group with a 5-year mean serum ferritin >5,000 ng/mL included significantly more homozygous β-thalassemia and splenectomized patients, had lower hemoglobin levels, and had more cardiac iron deposit than all other groups. Anemia strongly influenced all domains of HRV. After adjusting for anemia, neither serum ferritin nor NTBI impacted the HRV. However cardiac T2* was an independent predictor of HRV, even after adjusting for anemia. For receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of cardiac T2* ≤20 ms, only mean ferritin in the last 12 months and the average of the standard deviation of all R-R intervals for all five-minute segments in the 24-hour recording were predictors for cardiac T2* ≤20 ms, with area under the ROC curve of 0.961 (p<0.0001) and 0.701 (p = 0.05), respectively. Conclusions Hemoglobin and cardiac T2* as significant predictors for HRV indicate that anemia and cardiac iron deposition result in cardiac autonomic imbalance. The mean ferritin in the last 12 months could be useful as the best indicator for further evaluation of cardiac risk. The ability of serum ferritin to predict cardiac risk is stronger than observed in other thalassemia cohorts. HRV might be a

  13. The effect of space microgravity on the physiological activity of mammalian resident cardiac stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belostotskaya, Galina; Zakharov, Eugeny

    Prolonged exposure to weightlessness during space flights is known to cause depression of heart function in mammals. The decrease in heart weight and its remodeling under the influence of prolonged weightlessness (or space microgravity) is assumed to be due to both morphological changes of working cardiomyocytes and their progressive loss, as well as to possible depletion of resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) population, or their inability to self-renewal and regeneration of muscle tissue under conditions of weightlessness. We have previously shown that the presence of different maturity clones formed by resident CSCs not only in culture but also in the mammalian myocardium can be used as an indicator of the regenerative activity of myocardial cells [Belostotskaya, et al., 2013: 2014]. In this study, we were interested to investigate whether the 30-day near-Earth space flight on the spacecraft BION-M1 affects the regenerative potential of resident CSCs. Immediately after landing of the spacecraft, we had examined the presence of resident c-kit+, Sca-1+ and Isl1+ CSCs and their development in suspension of freshly isolated myocardial cells of C57BL mice in comparison to controls. Cardiac cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion of the heart [Belostotskaya and Golovanova, 2014]. Immunocytochemically stained preparations of fixed cells were analyzed with confocal microscope Leica TCS SP5 (Germany) in the Resource Center of St-Petersburg State University. CSCs were labeled with appropriate antibodies. CSCs differentiation into mature cardiomyocytes was verified using antibodies to Sarcomeric α-Actinin and Cardiac Troponin T. Antibodies to Connexin43 were used to detect cell-cell contacts. All antibodies were conjugated with Alexa fluorochromes (488, 532, 546, 568, 594 and/or 647 nm), according to Zenon-technology (Invitrogen). It has been shown that, under identical conditions of cell isolation, more complete digestion of heart muscle was observed in

  14. Nicotine enhances presynaptic and postsynaptic glutamatergic neurotransmission to activate cardiac parasympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Neff, R A; Humphrey, J; Mihalevich, M; Mendelowitz, D

    Although peripheral cholinergic neurotransmission has long been known to play a pivotal role in the control of heart rate and blood pressure, recent evidence has suggested that central cholinergic mechanisms may be involved in the genesis of hypertension, anxiety, cardiorespiratory control, and, in particular, the respiratory modulation of heart rate. Yet, the sites, mechanisms, and receptor subtypes involved in the action of nicotine within the central nervous system are controversial. The present study demonstrates that nicotine has at least 3 sites of action to increase the activity of vagal cardiac neurons. Nicotine, but not muscarinic agonists, activates postsynaptic receptors and a depolarizing inward current in vagal cardiac neurons studied with the perforated patch-clamp technique in a visualized brain stem slice. In addition, nicotine acts at different presynaptic and postsynaptic sites to facilitate glutamatergic neurotransmission. Presynaptic nicotinic receptors increase the frequency of transmitter release and are sensitive to block by alpha-bungarotoxin. Nicotine also elicits a previously undescribed augmentation of postsynaptic non-NMDA currents. The presynaptic and postsynaptic receptors may prove to be future targets in the search for agonists to increase vagal cardiac activity and reduce the fatality associated with cardiac hyperexcitability and for antagonists to reduce cardiac vagal activity in pathological conditions associated with abnormally low heart rates and cardiac function such as sudden infant death syndrome.

  15. Improving vagal activity ameliorates cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II: in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Jun; Huang, Ning; Lu, Yi; Zhao, Mei; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Yang, Yang; Yang, Yong-hua; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is characterized by overactivity of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and withdrawal of vagal activity. We hypothesized that improving vagal activity could attenuate cardiac fibrosis induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) in vivo and in vitro. Rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction (AAC) with or without pyridostigmine (PYR) (31 mg/kg/d). After 8 weeks, PYR significantly decreased Ang II level, AT1 protein expression, and collagen deposition in cardiac tissue and improved heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac function, which were abolished by atropine. In vitro, treatment of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) with Ang II (10−7 M) increased cell proliferation, migration, transformation, and secretory properties, which were significantly diminished by acetylcholine (ACh, 10−6 M). Subsequently, Ang II significantly increased collagen type I expression as well as metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression and activity. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression and Smad3 phosphorylation presented a similar trend. Notably, the knockdown of the acetylcholine M2 receptor by siRNA could abolish ACh anti-fibrotic action. These data implicated cholinesterase inhibitor can increase vagal activity and reduce local Ang II level, and ACh inhibit Ang II pro-fibrotic effects. Our findings suggested that the parasympathetic nervous system can serve as a promising target for cardiac remodeling treatment. PMID:26596640

  16. Detection and putative effect of GATA4 gene variants in patients with congenital cardiac septal defects.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzouny, M A; El Ruby, M O; Issa, H A; Behiry, E G; Elsayed, N R; Fayez, A G

    2016-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor GATA4, located on chromosome 8p23.1-p22, has been implicated as a critical regulator of cardiac development during embryogenesis. Mutations of GATA4 appear to be responsible for some cardiac septal defects. The aim of this work was to screen for mutations in the GATA4 gene in sample of Egyptian patients affected by isolated and non-isolated cardiac septal defects. We examined 20 patients with atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricle septal defect (VSD), atrioventricular septal defects (AVSD) and A-V canal disturbance defect and compared with examined 10 unaffected individuals as normal control. The patients were referred from Congenital Heart Disease Clinic of the Clinical Genetics department at the National Research Centre. All patients were subjected to clinical evaluation, echocardiography and karyotyping. Genomic DNA was extracted from all cases and subjected to PCR followed by direct sequencing. The predicted effect of variants was done by a variety of proper prediction tools. We detected six variants in GATA4 gene, two of them are novel variants. Predicted functional analysis of the relevant variants was performed by In silico analysis. Further confirmatory studies on familial segregation and in vitro / in vivo functional analysis are recommended to support our results. PMID:27064867

  17. A new real-time mapping system to detect microscopic cardiac excitation patterns.

    PubMed

    Mohr, G; Hofer, E; Plank, G

    1999-01-01

    A new fast, high-resolution measurement system has been developed to analyze the propagation of cardiac excitation on a microscopic scale. The instrument uses a microsensor array to detect microscopic excitation patterns at the cardiac surface. Ninety-six epicardial signals are recorded simultaneously with 14-bit resolution at 200-kHz samples per second per channel. The system operates like a digital oscilloscope. Preprocessing routines (offset, gain, and triggering) are executed within a sampling interval of 5 microseconds by 48 digital signal processors. Analog-to-digital (A/D) converters are provided with 12 Mb of buffer memory, allowing continuous recording of up to 64-k samples x 96 channels. The recorded dataset is transferred rapidly (8 Mb/sec) to the memory of the integrated computer system via VXIbus. Analysis and visualization of the propagating excitation are computed by custom-designed software. The performance of the system allows recording as well as visualization of the cardiac excitation spread in a beat-to-beat manner.

  18. Advances in acute kidney injury associated with cardiac surgery: the unfolding revolution in early detection.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Tygh; Augoustides, John G T

    2012-04-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is important because it remains common and serious. A major limitation in the management of CSA-AKI has been ongoing delayed diagnosis by standard clinical approaches, including serum creatinine and calculated glomerular filtration rate. Recent advances in the understanding of CSA-AKI have highlighted the utility of novel biomarkers that diagnose CSA-AKI within the first 24 hours. The biomarkers that have been evaluated in clinical trials include neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C, kidney injury molecule 1 and interleukin-18. The biomarker with the greatest clinical promise is NGAL. Although it has multiple advantages over serum creatinine, it is still not the ideal biomarker for CSA-AKI. It is likely that a panel of early biomarkers will be developed to facilitate rapid and reliable detection of CSA-AKI, combining their different characteristics to optimize patient management. Future clinical trials likely will focus on whether these biomarkers predict adverse outcomes independent of serum creatinine fluctuations and whether therapies guided by biomarker profiles improve renal salvage and overall clinical outcomes. Given their clinical utility, these novel biomarkers have been evaluated beyond cardiac surgery for AKI in multiple clinical environments, including the emergency department, the operating room, the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and the intensive care unit. Their integration into clinical practice seems likely in the near future.

  19. 1,25 Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Inhibits TGFβ1-Mediated Primary Human Cardiac Myofibroblast Activation

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Anna; Boroomand, Seti; Carthy, Jon; Luo, Zongshu; McManus, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aims Epidemiological and interventional studies have suggested a protective role for vitamin D in cardiovascular disease, and basic research has implicated vitamin D as a potential inhibitor of fibrosis in a number of organ systems; yet little is known regarding direct effects of vitamin D on human cardiac cells. Given the critical role of fibrotic responses in end stage cardiac disease, we examined the effect of active vitamin D treatment on fibrotic responses in primary human adult ventricular cardiac fibroblasts (HCF-av), and investigated the relationship between circulating vitamin D (25(OH)D3) and cardiac fibrosis in human myocardial samples. Methods and Results Interstitial cardiac fibrosis in end stage HF was evaluated by image analysis of picrosirius red stained myocardial sections. Serum 25(OH)D3 levels were assayed using mass spectrometry. Commercially available HCF-av were treated with transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 to induce activation, in the presence or absence of active vitamin D (1,25(OH)2D3). Functional responses of fibroblasts were analyzed by in vitro collagen gel contraction assay. 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment significantly inhibited TGFβ1-mediated cell contraction, and confocal imaging demonstrated reduced stress fiber formation in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3. Treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 reduced alpha-smooth muscle actin expression to control levels and inhibited SMAD2 phosphorylation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that active vitamin D can prevent TGFβ1-mediated biochemical and functional pro-fibrotic changes in human primary cardiac fibroblasts. An inverse relationship between vitamin D status and cardiac fibrosis in end stage heart failure was observed. Collectively, our data support an inhibitory role for vitamin D in cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26061181

  20. Cardiac biomarkers for detection of myocardial infarction: perspectives from past to present.

    PubMed

    Rosalki, Sidney B; Roberts, Robert; Katus, Hugo A; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Ladenson, Jack H; Apple, Fred S

    2004-11-01

    With great pleasure and anticipation in recognition of Clinical Chemistry's 50th anniversary, I have been able to arm-twist four talented scientists to document their impressive marks on the science of diagnostics in the field of cardiac biomarkers and detection of myocardial infarction. Their exciting discoveries and applications have dramatically influenced the fields of laboratory medicine and cardiology and have greatly influenced the care and management of thousands of patients suffering from coronary artery disease leading to acute myocardial infarction. As a matter of historical record, I owe a great deal of thanks to each one of the coauthors of this special report because each one has personally influenced my scientific career. I met Dr. Rosalki, during my postdoctoral training, at a national AACC meeting, where he kindly answered my numerous queries regarding creatine kinase enzymology and muscle physiology. Dr. Roberts, while serving as Director of the Coronary Care Unit at Washington University in St. Louis, generously allowed this fledgling fellow into his laboratory and shared many of his clinical and experimental findings with me. Dr. Katus, whom I first met at a scientific meeting sponsored by Boehringer Mannheim in 1986 in Bavaria, where I first became fascinated with cardiac troponin T, has remained a friend and colleague. Lastly, Dr. Ladenson, who as mentor, scientific colleague, and close friend remains ultimately responsible for both my professional growth as a clinical chemist (he was my postdoctoral fellowship advisor) and for stimulating and encouraging my goals and aspirations in the field of cardiac biomarkers. With the descriptions of the ground-breaking science described below, I am extremely excited and optimistic that the future of cardiac biomarkers is secure and open to new discoveries by the Rosalkis, Robertses, Katuses, and Ladensons of the future. PMID:15502101

  1. Detectability of perfusion defect in five-dimensional gated-dynamic cardiac SPECT images

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A.; Wernick, Miles N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In previous work, the authors developed and demonstrated the concept of an image reconstruction procedure aimed to unify gated and dynamic nuclear cardiac imaging, which the authors have termed five-dimensional (5D) SPECT. Gated imaging permits the clinician to evaluate wall motion and, through the use of stress and rest scans, allows perfusion defects to be observed. Dynamic imaging depicts kinetics in the myocardium, which can be used to evaluate perfusion, but traditional dynamic images are motionless and do not depict wall motion. In this article, the authors investigate the degree to which perfusion defects can be detected from the dynamic information conveyed by 5D images, a problem that is particularly challenging in the absence of multiple fast camera rotations. Methods: The authors first demonstrate the usefulness of dynamic reconstructed images for perfusion detection by using linear discriminant analyses (Fisher linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis) and a numerical channelized Hotelling observer. The authors then derive three types of discriminant metrics for characterizing the temporal kinetic information in reconstructed dynamic images for differentiating perfusion defects from normal cardiac perfusion, which are the Fisher linear discriminant map, temporal derivative map, and kinetic parametric images. Results: Results are based on the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom with simulation of Tc99m-teboroxime as the imaging agent. The derived metric maps and quantitative contrast-to-noise ratio results demonstrate that the reconstructed dynamic images could yield higher detectability of the perfusion defect than conventional gated reconstruction while providing wall motion information simultaneously. Conclusions: The proposed metrics can be used to produce new types of visualizations, showing wall motion and perfusion information, that may potentially be useful for clinical evaluation. Since 5D imaging permits wall motion

  2. Increased Efferent Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Defective Intrinsic Heart Rate Regulation in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thaung, H P Aye; Baldi, J Chris; Wang, Heng-Yu; Hughes, Gillian; Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Sheard, Phil W; Bahn, Andrew; Jones, Peter P; Schwenke, Daryl O; Lamberts, Regis R

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) coupled with dysregulated β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling is postulated as a major driving force for cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes; however, cardiac SNA has never been assessed directly in diabetes. Our aim was to measure the sympathetic input to and the β-AR responsiveness of the heart in the type 2 diabetic heart. In vivo recording of SNA of the left efferent cardiac sympathetic branch of the stellate ganglion in Zucker diabetic fatty rats revealed an elevated resting cardiac SNA and doubled firing rate compared with nondiabetic rats. Ex vivo, in isolated denervated hearts, the intrinsic heart rate was markedly reduced. Contractile and relaxation responses to β-AR stimulation with dobutamine were compromised in externally paced diabetic hearts, but not in diabetic hearts allowed to regulate their own heart rate. Protein levels of left ventricular β1-AR and Gs (guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory) were reduced, whereas left ventricular and right atrial β2-AR and Gi (guanine nucleotide binding protein inhibitory regulatory) levels were increased. The elevated resting cardiac SNA in type 2 diabetes, combined with the reduced cardiac β-AR responsiveness, suggests that the maintenance of normal cardiovascular function requires elevated cardiac sympathetic input to compensate for changes in the intrinsic properties of the diabetic heart.

  3. Aerobic metabolism and cardiac activity in the descendants of zebrafish exposed to pyrolytic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Julie; Perrichon, Prescilla; Nouhaud, Marine; Audras, Alexandre; Leguen, Isabelle; Lefrancois, Christel

    2014-12-01

    The increase of anthropogenic activities on coastal areas induces discharges of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aquatic ecosystem. PAH effects depend not only on their concentration and the way of contamination but also on the different developmental stages of the organism. Zebrafish were exposed to relevant concentration of pyrolytic PAHs from the first meal (i.e., 5-day post fertilization, dpf) to mature adults. Parental effect of this type of exposure was evaluated through the assessment of aerobic metabolic scope, cardiac frequency, and cardiac mRNA expression on larval and/or embryo progeny of contaminated fish. Our results suggest that cardiac frequency increased in larval descendants of fish exposed to the environmental concentration of pyrolytic PAHs (i.e., 5 ng.g(-1) of food), while a lack of effect on aerobic metabolism in 5 dpf larvae was highlighted. A surexpression of mRNA related to the cardiac calcium transporting ATPase atp2a2a, a protein essential for contraction, is in accordance with this increasing cardiac frequency. Even if cardiac development genes cmlc1 and tnnt2a were not affected at early life stages tested, complementary work on cardiac structure could be interesting to better understand PAHs action.

  4. Fetal loss in threatened abortion after demonstration of fetal cardiac activity in a low socioeconomic population.

    PubMed

    Dede, F S; Ulucay, U; Kose, M F; Dede, H; Dilbaz, S

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the incidence and risk factors of fetal loss in threatened abortion after ultrasonographic detection of fetal cardiac activity in a low socioeconomic population. A total of 202 women with singleton pregnancies who presented with vaginal bleeding in which fetal heart activity was ultrasonographically demonstrated between 5 and 14 weeks' gestation were included. Pregnancies with fetal abnormalities were excluded from the study. All cases were followed-up with respect to pregnancy outcomes. A total of 54 of 202 pregnancies (26.7%) resulted in fetal loss before 20 weeks' gestation. The mean fetal heart rate (FHR) and cervical length values were lower in spontaneous abortions than in viable pregnancies (121.2 +/- 13.3 vs 143.5 +/- 12.4 and 41 +/- 6.0 vs. 34.8 +/- 6.1, respectively; p < 0.001). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.88 for FHR and 0.77 for cervical length. A FHR value <130 b.p.m. was 81.4% sensitive, 85.1% specific and a cervical length value <40 mm was 80.8% sensitive, 54.7% specific for determination of fetal loss before 20 weeks' gestation. Fetal loss was observed in about one-quarter of pregnancies admitted with threatened abortion in a low socioeconomic population. Bradycardia and short cervix were found to be significant risk factors affecting the pregnancy outcome in women presenting with vaginal bleeding, in whom fetal cardiac activity was documented. PMID:20701515

  5. Electrochemical biosensors based on nanofibres for cardiac biomarker detection: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Babak; Ghani, Mozhdeh; Shoushtari, Ahmad Mousavi; Rabiee, Mohammad

    2016-04-15

    The vital importance of early and accurate diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) to prevent the irreversible damage or even death of patients has driven the development of biosensor devices for detection and quantification of cardiac biomarkers. Electrochemical biosensors offer rapid sensing, low cost, portability and ease of use. Over the past few years, nanotechnology has contributed to a tremendous improvement in the sensitivity of biosensors. In this review, the authors summarise the state-of-the-art of the application of one particular type of nanostructured material, i.e. nanofibres, for use in electrochemical biosensors for the ultrasensitive detection of cardiac biomarkers. A new way of classifying the nanofibre-based electrochemical biosensors according to the electrical conductance and the type of nanofibres is presented. Some key data from each article reviewed are highlighted, including the mechanism of detection, experimental conditions and the response range of the biosensor. The primary aim of this review is to emphasise the prospects for nanofibres for the future development of biosensors in diagnosis of CVDs as well as considering how to improve their characteristics for application in medicine.

  6. Label-free Detection of Cardiac Troponin I with a Photonic Crystal Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bailin; Morales, Andres W.; Peterson, Ralph; Tang, Liang; Ye, Jing Yong

    2014-01-01

    A biosensor has been developed with a photonic crystal structure used in a total-internal-reflection (PC-TIR) configuration for label-free detection of a cardiac biomarker: Troponin I (cTnI). In contrast to a conventional optical microcavity that has a closed structure with its cavity layer sandwiched between two high-reflection surfaces, the PC-TIR configuration creates a unique open microcavity, which allows its cavity layer (sensing layer) to be easily functionalized and directly exposed to analyte molecules for bioassays. In this study, a PC-TIR sensor has been used for the label-free measurements of cardiac biomarkers by monitoring the changes in the resonant condition of the cavity due to biomolecular binding processes. Antibodies against cTnI are immobilized on the sensor surface for specific detection of cTnI with a wide range of concentrations. Detection limit of cTnI with a concentration as low as 0.1 ng mL−1 has been achieved. PMID:24632136

  7. Label-free detection of cardiac troponin I with a photonic crystal biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bailin; Morales, Andres W; Peterson, Ralph; Tang, Liang; Ye, Jing Yong

    2014-08-15

    A biosensor has been developed with a photonic crystal structure used in a total-internal-reflection (PC-TIR) configuration for label-free detection of a cardiac biomarker: Troponin I (cTnI). In contrast to a conventional optical microcavity that has a closed structure with its cavity layer sandwiched between two high-reflection surfaces, the PC-TIR configuration creates a unique open microcavity, which allows its cavity layer (sensing layer) to be easily functionalized and directly exposed to analyte molecules for bioassays. In this study, a PC-TIR sensor has been used for the label-free measurements of cardiac biomarkers by monitoring the changes in the resonant condition of the cavity due to biomolecular binding processes. Antibodies against cTnI are immobilized on the sensor surface for specific detection of cTnI with a wide range of concentrations. Detection limit of cTnI with a concentration as low as 0.1ngmL(-1) has been achieved. PMID:24632136

  8. Cardiac arrhythmia detection using combination of heart rate variability analyses and PUCK analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahananto, Faizal; Igasaki, Tomohiko; Murayama, Nobuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents cardiac arrhythmia detection using the combination of a heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and a "potential of unbalanced complex kinetics" (PUCK) analysis. Detection performance was improved by adding features extracted from the PUCK analysis. Initially, R-R interval data were extracted from the original electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings and were cut into small segments and marked as either normal or arrhythmia. HRV analyses then were conducted using the segmented R-R interval data, including a time-domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, and nonlinear analysis. In addition to the HRV analysis, PUCK analysis, which has been implemented successfully in a foreign exchange market series to characterize change, was employed. A decision-tree algorithm was applied to all of the obtained features for classification. The proposed method was tested using the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and had an overall classification accuracy of 91.73%. After combining features obtained from the PUCK analysis, the overall accuracy increased to 92.91%. Therefore, we suggest that the use of a PUCK analysis in conjunction with HRV analysis might improve performance accuracy for the detection of cardiac arrhythmia.

  9. Annexin A7 deficiency potentiates cardiac NFAT activity promoting hypertrophic signaling.

    PubMed

    Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Viereck, Robert; Feger, Martina; Mia, Sobuj; Schönberger, Tanja; Noegel, Angelika A; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2014-02-28

    Annexin A7 (Anxa7) is a cytoskeletal protein interacting with Ca(2+) signaling which in turn is a crucial factor for cardiac remodeling following cardiac injury. The present study explored whether Anxa7 participates in the regulation of cardiac stress signaling. To this end, mice lacking functional Anxa7 (anxa7(-/-)) and wild-type mice (anxa7(+/+)) were investigated following pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). In addition, HL-1 cardiomyocytes were silenced with Anxa7 siRNA and treated with isoproterenol. Transcript levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter assay and protein abundance by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. As a result, TAC treatment increased the mRNA and protein levels of Anxa7 in wild-type mice. Moreover, TAC increased heart weight to body weight ratio and the cardiac mRNA levels of αSka, Nppb, Col1a1, Col3a1 and Rcan1, effects more pronounced in anxa7(-/-) mice than in anxa7(+/+) mice. Silencing of Anxa7 in HL-1 cardiomyocytes significantly increased nuclear localization of Nfatc1. Furthermore, Anxa7 silencing increased NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity as well as αSka, Nppb, and Rcan1 mRNA levels both, under control conditions and following β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. These observations point to an important role of annexin A7 in the regulation of cardiac NFAT activity and hypertrophic response following cardiac stress conditions. PMID:24508799

  10. Effect of long-term physical activity practice after cardiac rehabilitation on some risk factors.

    PubMed

    Freyssin, Céline; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sébastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity indice were measured at the beginning, at the end of the rehabilitation program and at 18.3 ± 5.3 months after. After the cardiac rehabilitation, sedentary patients showed a significant increase in weight and a significant reduction in distance on the 6-min walk test and in the arterial compliance. Active patients did not show any alteration in these parameters. We concluded that, after a cardiac rehabilitation program, the sedentary lifestyle has a negative influence on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance, which are major markers of risk factors. In contrast, the practice of physical activity preserves these parameters.

  11. Effect of Long-Term Physical Activity Practice after Cardiac Rehabilitation on Some Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freyssin, Celine, Jr.; Blanc, Philippe; Verkindt, Chantal; Maunier, Sebastien; Prieur, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term physical activity practice after a cardiac rehabilitation program on weight, physical capacity and arterial compliance. The Dijon Physical Activity Score was used to identify two groups: sedentary and active. Weight, distance at the 6-min walk test and the small artery elasticity…

  12. An ontology-based annotation of cardiac implantable electronic devices to detect therapy changes in a national registry.

    PubMed

    Rosier, Arnaud; Mabo, Philippe; Chauvin, Michel; Burgun, Anita

    2015-05-01

    The patient population benefitting from cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing. This study introduces a device annotation method that supports the consistent description of the functional attributes of cardiac devices and evaluates how this method can detect device changes from a CIED registry. We designed the Cardiac Device Ontology, an ontology of CIEDs and device functions. We annotated 146 cardiac devices with this ontology and used it to detect therapy changes with respect to atrioventricular pacing, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and defibrillation capability in a French national registry of patients with implants (STIDEFIX). We then analyzed a set of 6905 device replacements from the STIDEFIX registry. Ontology-based identification of therapy changes (upgraded, downgraded, or similar) was accurate (6905 cases) and performed better than straightforward analysis of the registry codes (F-measure 1.00 versus 0.75 to 0.97). This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of ontology-based functional annotation of devices in the cardiac domain. Such annotation allowed a better description and in-depth analysis of STIDEFIX. This method was useful for the automatic detection of therapy changes and may be reused for analyzing data from other device registries.

  13. Efficient Generation of Cardiac Purkinje Cells from ESCs by Activating cAMP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Maass, Karen; Lu, Jia; Fishman, Glenn I.; Chen, Shuibing; Evans, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dysfunction of the specialized cardiac conduction system (CCS) is associated with life-threatening arrhythmias. Strategies to derive CCS cells, including rare Purkinje cells (PCs), would facilitate models for mechanistic studies and drug discovery and also provide new cellular materials for regenerative therapies. A high-throughput chemical screen using CCS:lacz and Contactin2:egfp (Cntn2:egfp) reporter embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines was used to discover a small molecule, sodium nitroprusside (SN), that efficiently promotes the generation of cardiac cells that express gene profiles and generate action potentials of PC-like cells. Imaging and mechanistic studies suggest that SN promotes the generation of PCs from cardiac progenitors initially expressing cardiac myosin heavy chain and that it does so by activating cyclic AMP signaling. These findings provide a strategy to derive scalable PCs, along with insight into the ontogeny of CCS development. PMID:26028533

  14. Agrin regulation of alpha3 sodium-potassium ATPase activity modulates cardiac myocyte contraction.

    PubMed

    Hilgenberg, Lutz G W; Pham, Bryan; Ortega, Maria; Walid, Saif; Kemmerly, Thomas; O'Dowd, Diane K; Smith, Martin A

    2009-06-19

    Drugs that inhibit Na,K-ATPases, such as digoxin and ouabain, alter cardiac myocyte contractility. We recently demonstrated that agrin, a protein first identified at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction, binds to and regulates the activity of alpha3 subunit-containing isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase in the mammalian brain. Both agrin and the alpha3 Na,K-ATPase are expressed in heart, but their potential for interaction and effect on cardiac myocyte function was unknown. Here we show that agrin binds to the alpha3 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase in cardiac myocyte membranes, inducing tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibiting activity of the pump. Agrin also triggers a rapid increase in cytoplasmic Na(+) in cardiac myocytes, suggesting a role in cardiac myocyte function. Consistent with this hypothesis, spontaneous contraction frequencies of cultured cardiac myocytes prepared from mice in which agrin expression is blocked by mutation of the Agrn gene are significantly higher than in the wild type. The Agrn mutant phenotype is rescued by acute treatment with recombinant agrin. Furthermore, exposure of wild type myocytes to an agrin antagonist phenocopies the Agrn mutation. These data demonstrate that the basal frequency of myocyte contraction depends on endogenous agrin-alpha3 Na,K-ATPase interaction and suggest that agrin modulation of the alpha3 Na,K-ATPase is important in regulating heart function.

  15. Fetal cardiac activity analysis during twin pregnancy using a multi-channel SQUID system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Monteiro, E.; Schleussner, E.; Kausch, S.; Grimm, B.; Schneider, A.; Hall Barbosa, C.; Haueisen, J.

    2001-05-01

    The use of SQUID magnetometers for non-invasive in utero assessment of cardiac electrical disturbances has already been shown to be a valuable clinical tool. In this way, its applicability also for the complicated case of twin pregnancy, in which the proximity of the cardiac magnetic source of each fetus can hamper the individual analysis of cardiac electrical activity, is of clinical interest. In this paper, we present fetal magnetocardiography performed on a mother pregnant of twins with 26 weeks gestational age, measured inside a magnetically shielded room, by using two identical 31-channel low- Tc SQUID magnetometer systems. Each sensor array has been positioned over one of the fetuses, according to its heart position previously assessed with the aid of ultrasound measurements. The raw data is initially averaged in time and, afterwards, analyzed by means of time plots and isofield maps. The time recordings allow the study of the morphology of each fetus’ cardiac signal and the cardiac time intervals. The resultant equivalent dipole obtained from the isofield maps indicates the position and orientation of each fetus heart. The results agree with the ultrasound analysis performed immediately before the measurements and used to obtain the approximate location of the fetuses’ hearts. Since a distinct analysis of the cardiac electrical activity of each fetus could be achieved, the results indicate the potential of the fetal magnetocardiography in the individual antenatal diagnosis of each one of the fetuses of a twin pregnancy.

  16. Detection of Left Ventricular Regional Dysfunction and Myocardial Abnormalities Using Complementary Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis without Cardiac Symptoms: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Hitomi; T Giles, Jon; Yokoe, Isamu; Hirano, Masaharu; Nakajima, Yasuo; Takei, Masami

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to detect the presence of left ventricular regional dysfunction and myocardial abnormalities in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients without cardiac symptoms using a complementary cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging approach. Methods Consecutive patients with SSc without cardiac symptoms and healthy controls underwent CMR on a 1.5 T scanner. The peak systolic regional function in the circumferential and radial strain (Ecc, % and Err, %) were calculated using a feature tracking analysis on the mid-left ventricular slices obtained with cine MRI. In addition, we investigated the myocardial characteristics by contrast MRI. Pharmacological stress and rest perfusion scans were performed to assess perfusion defect (PD) due to micro- or macrovascular impairment, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were obtained for the assessment of myocarditis and/or fibrosis. Results We compared 15 SSc patients with 10 healthy controls. No statistically significant differences were observed in the baseline characteristics between the patients and healthy controls. The mean peak Err and Ecc of all segments was significantly lower in the patients than the controls (p=0.011 and p=0.003, respectively). Four patients with LGE (28.6%) and seven patients with PD (50.0%) were observed. PD was significantly associated with digital ulcers (p=0.005). Utilizing a linear regression model, the presence of myocardial LGE was significantly associated with the peak Ecc (p=0.024). After adjusting for age, the association between myocardial LGE and the peak Ecc was strengthened. Conclusion A subclinical myocardial involvement, as detected by CMR, was prevalent in the SSc patients without cardiac symptoms. Regional dysfunction might predict the myocardial abnormalities observed in SSc patients without cardiac symptoms.

  17. Mild hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation in a swine model of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Zhao, Hong; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Ziren; Mei, Xue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation has been implicated in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to determine whether mild hypothermia (HT) inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Sixteen minipigs resuscitated from 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation were randomized into two groups: HT group (n=8), treated with HT (33°C) for 12 hours; and normothermia group (n=8), treated similarly as HT group except for cooling. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 6, 12, and 24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The brain cortex was harvested 24 hours after ROSC. Complement and pro-inflammatory markers were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neurologic deficit scores were evaluated 24 hours after ROSC. C1q, Bb, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), C3b, C3a, C5a, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly increased under normothermia within 24 hours after ROSC. However, these increases were significantly reduced by HT. Hypothermia decreased brain C1q, MBL, C3b, and C5a contents 24 hours after ROSC. Hypothermic pigs had a better neurologic outcome than normothermic pigs. In conclusion, complement is activated through classic, alternative, and MBL pathways after ROSC. Hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation, which may provide an additional mechanism of cerebral protection. PMID:25757755

  18. Mild hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation in a swine model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Zhao, Hong; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Ziren; Mei, Xue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chunsheng

    2015-08-01

    Complement activation has been implicated in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to determine whether mild hypothermia (HT) inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Sixteen minipigs resuscitated from 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation were randomized into two groups: HT group (n=8), treated with HT (33°C) for 12 hours; and normothermia group (n=8), treated similarly as HT group except for cooling. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0.5, 6, 12, and 24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The brain cortex was harvested 24 hours after ROSC. Complement and pro-inflammatory markers were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neurologic deficit scores were evaluated 24 hours after ROSC. C1q, Bb, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), C3b, C3a, C5a, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were significantly increased under normothermia within 24 hours after ROSC. However, these increases were significantly reduced by HT. Hypothermia decreased brain C1q, MBL, C3b, and C5a contents 24 hours after ROSC. Hypothermic pigs had a better neurologic outcome than normothermic pigs. In conclusion, complement is activated through classic, alternative, and MBL pathways after ROSC. Hypothermia inhibits systemic and cerebral complement activation, which may provide an additional mechanism of cerebral protection.

  19. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions.

  20. Annexin A7 deficiency potentiates cardiac NFAT activity promoting hypertrophic signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Viereck, Robert; Feger, Martina; Mia, Sobuj; Schönberger, Tanja; Noegel, Angelika A.; Gawaz, Meinrad; Lang, Florian

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • Cardiac Anxa7 expression was up-regulated following TAC. • The hypertrophic response following TAC was augmented in Anxa7-deficient mice. • Silencing of Anxa7 increased indicators of HL-1 cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. • Silencing of Anxa7 induced Nfatc1 nuclear translocation. • Silencing of Anxa7 enhanced NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity. - Abstract: Annexin A7 (Anxa7) is a cytoskeletal protein interacting with Ca{sup 2+} signaling which in turn is a crucial factor for cardiac remodeling following cardiac injury. The present study explored whether Anxa7 participates in the regulation of cardiac stress signaling. To this end, mice lacking functional Anxa7 (anxa7{sup −/−}) and wild-type mice (anxa7{sup +/+}) were investigated following pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). In addition, HL-1 cardiomyocytes were silenced with Anxa7 siRNA and treated with isoproterenol. Transcript levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR, transcriptional activity by luciferase reporter assay and protein abundance by Western blotting and confocal microscopy. As a result, TAC treatment increased the mRNA and protein levels of Anxa7 in wild-type mice. Moreover, TAC increased heart weight to body weight ratio and the cardiac mRNA levels of αSka, Nppb, Col1a1, Col3a1 and Rcan1, effects more pronounced in anxa7{sup −/−} mice than in anxa7{sup +/+} mice. Silencing of Anxa7 in HL-1 cardiomyocytes significantly increased nuclear localization of Nfatc1. Furthermore, Anxa7 silencing increased NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity as well as αSka, Nppb, and Rcan1 mRNA levels both, under control conditions and following β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. These observations point to an important role of annexin A7 in the regulation of cardiac NFAT activity and hypertrophic response following cardiac stress conditions.

  1. Activated c-Kit receptor in the heart promotes cardiac repair and regeneration after injury

    PubMed Central

    Di Siena, S; Gimmelli, R; Nori, S L; Barbagallo, F; Campolo, F; Dolci, S; Rossi, P; Venneri, M A; Giannetta, E; Gianfrilli, D; Feigenbaum, L; Lenzi, A; Naro, F; Cianflone, E; Mancuso, T; Torella, D; Isidori, A M; Pellegrini, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of endogenous c-Kit receptor activation on cardiac cell homeostasis and repair remains largely unexplored. Transgenic mice carrying an activating point mutation (TgD814Y) in the kinase domain of the c-Kit gene were generated. c-KitTgD814Y receptor was expressed in the heart during embryonic development and postnatal life, in a similar timing and expression pattern to that of the endogenous gene, but not in the hematopoietic compartment allowing the study of a cardiac-specific phenotype. c-KitTgD814Y mutation produced a constitutive active c-Kit receptor in cardiac tissue and cells from transgenic mice as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT, which are the main downstream molecular effectors of c-Kit receptor signaling. In adult transgenic hearts, cardiac morphology, size and total c-Kit+ cardiac cell number was not different compared with wt mice. However, when c-KitTgD814Y mice were subjected to transmural necrotic heart damage by cryoinjury (CI), all transgenic survived, compared with half of wt mice. In the sub-acute phase after CI, transgenic and wt mice showed similar heart damage. However, 9 days after CI, transgenic mice exhibited an increased number of c-Kit+CD31+ endothelial progenitor cells surrounding the necrotic area. At later follow-up, a consistent reduction of fibrotic area, increased capillary density and increased cardiomyocyte replenishment rate (as established by BrdU incorporation) were observed in transgenic compared with wt mice. Consistently, CD45−c-Kit+ cardiac stem cells isolated from transgenic c-KitTgD814Y mice showed an enhanced endothelial and cardiomyocyte differentiation potential compared with cells isolated from the wt. Constitutive activation of c-Kit receptor in mice is associated with an increased cardiac myogenic and vasculogenic reparative potential after injury, with a significant improvement of survival. PMID:27468693

  2. Activated c-Kit receptor in the heart promotes cardiac repair and regeneration after injury.

    PubMed

    Di Siena, S; Gimmelli, R; Nori, S L; Barbagallo, F; Campolo, F; Dolci, S; Rossi, P; Venneri, M A; Giannetta, E; Gianfrilli, D; Feigenbaum, L; Lenzi, A; Naro, F; Cianflone, E; Mancuso, T; Torella, D; Isidori, A M; Pellegrini, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of endogenous c-Kit receptor activation on cardiac cell homeostasis and repair remains largely unexplored. Transgenic mice carrying an activating point mutation (TgD814Y) in the kinase domain of the c-Kit gene were generated. c-Kit(TgD814Y) receptor was expressed in the heart during embryonic development and postnatal life, in a similar timing and expression pattern to that of the endogenous gene, but not in the hematopoietic compartment allowing the study of a cardiac-specific phenotype. c-Kit(TgD814Y) mutation produced a constitutive active c-Kit receptor in cardiac tissue and cells from transgenic mice as demonstrated by the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT, which are the main downstream molecular effectors of c-Kit receptor signaling. In adult transgenic hearts, cardiac morphology, size and total c-Kit(+) cardiac cell number was not different compared with wt mice. However, when c-Kit(TgD814Y) mice were subjected to transmural necrotic heart damage by cryoinjury (CI), all transgenic survived, compared with half of wt mice. In the sub-acute phase after CI, transgenic and wt mice showed similar heart damage. However, 9 days after CI, transgenic mice exhibited an increased number of c-Kit(+)CD31(+) endothelial progenitor cells surrounding the necrotic area. At later follow-up, a consistent reduction of fibrotic area, increased capillary density and increased cardiomyocyte replenishment rate (as established by BrdU incorporation) were observed in transgenic compared with wt mice. Consistently, CD45(-)c-Kit(+) cardiac stem cells isolated from transgenic c-Kit(TgD814Y) mice showed an enhanced endothelial and cardiomyocyte differentiation potential compared with cells isolated from the wt. Constitutive activation of c-Kit receptor in mice is associated with an increased cardiac myogenic and vasculogenic reparative potential after injury, with a significant improvement of survival. PMID:27468693

  3. A critical role of cardiac fibroblast-derived exosomes in activating renin angiotensin system in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Linmao; Wang, Hui; Li, Bin; Qin, Qingyun; Qi, Lei; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Janicki, Joseph S; Wang, Xing Li; Cui, Taixing

    2015-12-01

    Chronic activation of the myocardial renin angiotensin system (RAS) elevates the local level of angiotensin II (Ang II) thereby inducing pathological cardiac hypertrophy, which contributes to heart failure. However, the precise underlying mechanisms have not been fully delineated. Herein we report a novel paracrine mechanism between cardiac fibroblasts (CF)s and cardiomyocytes whereby Ang II induces pathological cardiac hypertrophy. In cultured CFs, Ang II treatment enhanced exosome release via the activation of Ang II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R), whereas lipopolysaccharide, insulin, endothelin (ET)-1, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)1 or hydrogen peroxide did not. The CF-derived exosomes upregulated the expression of renin, angiotensinogen, AT1R, and AT2R, downregulated angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, and enhanced Ang II production in cultured cardiomyocytes. In addition, the CF exosome-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was blocked by both AT1R and AT2R antagonists. Exosome inhibitors, GW4869 and dimethyl amiloride (DMA), inhibited CF-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy with little effect on Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Mechanistically, CF exosomes upregulated RAS in cardiomyocytes via the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt. Finally, Ang II-induced exosome release from cardiac fibroblasts and pathological cardiac hypertrophy were dramatically inhibited by GW4869 and DMA in mice. These findings demonstrate that Ang II stimulates CFs to release exosomes, which in turn increase Ang II production and its receptor expression in cardiomyocytes, thereby intensifying Ang II-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Accordingly, specific targeting of Ang II-induced exosome release from CFs may serve as a novel therapeutic approach to treat cardiac pathological hypertrophy and heart failure.

  4. Asiatic Acid Protects against Cardiac Hypertrophy through Activating AMPKα Signalling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen-Guo; Dai, Jia; Wei, Wen-Ying; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Xu, Si-Chi; Liao, Hai-Han; Yang, Zheng; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Background: AMPactivated protein kinase α (AMPKα) is closely involved in the process of cardiac hypertrophy. Asiatic acid (AA), a pentacyclic triterpene, was found to activate AMPKα in our preliminary experiment. However, its effects on the development of cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. The present study was to determine whether AA could protect against cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Mice subjected to aortic banding were orally given AA (10 or 30mg/kg) for 7 weeks. In the inhibitory experiment, Compound C was intraperitoneally injected for 3 weeks after surgery. Results: Our results showed that AA markedly inhibited hypertrophic responses induced by pressure overload or angiotensin II. AA also suppressed cardiac fibrosis in vivo and accumulation of collagen in vitro. The protective effects of AA were mediated by activation of AMPKα and inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in vivo and in vitro. However, AA lost the protective effects after AMPKα inhibition or gene deficiency. Conclusions: AA protects against cardiac hypertrophy by activating AMPKα, and has the potential to be used for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:27313499

  5. UCP3 Regulates Single-Channel Activity of the Cardiac mCa1.

    PubMed

    Motloch, Lukas J; Gebing, Tina; Reda, Sara; Schwaiger, Astrid; Wolny, Martin; Hoppe, Uta C

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake (mCa(2+) uptake) is thought to be mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). UCP2 and UCP3 belong to a superfamily of mitochondrial ion transporters. Both proteins are expressed in the inner mitochondrial membrane of the heart. Recently, UCP2 was reported to modulate the function of the cardiac MCU related channel mCa1. However, the possible role of UCP3 in modulating cardiac mCa(2+) uptake via the MCU remains inconclusive. To understand the role of UCP3, we analyzed cardiac mCa1 single-channel activity in mitoplast-attached single-channel recordings from isolated murine cardiac mitoplasts, from adult wild-type controls (WT), and from UCP3 knockout mice (UCP3(-/-)). Single-channel registrations in UCP3(-/-) confirmed a murine voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel, i.e., mCa1, which was inhibited by Ru360. Compared to WT, mCa1 in UCP3(-/-) revealed similar single-channel characteristics. However, in UCP3(-/-) the channel exhibited decreased single-channel activity, which was insensitive to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) inhibition. Our results suggest that beyond UCP2, UCP3 also exhibits regulatory effects on cardiac mCa1/MCU function. Furthermore, we speculate that UCP3 might modulate previously described inhibitory effects of ATP on mCa1/MCU activity as well.

  6. Endogenous bradykinin activates ischaemically sensitive cardiac visceral afferents through kinin B2 receptors in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Pan, Hui-Lin; Longhurst, John C

    1998-01-01

    Activity of ischaemically sensitive cardiac visceral afferents during myocardial ischaemia induces both angina and cardiovascular reflexes. Increased production of bradykinin (BK) and cyclo-oxygenase products (i.e. prostaglandins (PGs)) occurs during myocardial ischaemia. However, the role of these agents in activation of ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents has not been established. The present study tested the hypothesis that BK produced during ischaemia activates cardiac afferents through kinin B2 receptors. Single-unit activity of cardiac afferents innervating the left ventricle was recorded from the left thoracic sympathetic chain (T1–T4) of anaesthetized cats. Ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents were identified according to their response to 5 min of myocardial ischaemia. The mechanism of BK in activation of ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents was determined by injection of BK (1 μg kg−1 i.a.), des-Arg9-BK (1 μg kg−1 i.a., a specific kinin B1 receptor agonist), kinin B2 receptor antagonists: HOE140 (30 μg kg−1 i.v.) and NPC-17731 (40 μg kg−1 i.v.), cyclo-oxygenase inhibition with indomethacin (5 mg kg−1 i.v.) and NPC-17731 (40 μg kg−1 i.v.) after pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg kg−1 i.v.). We observed that BK increased the discharge rate of all eleven ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents from 0.39 ± 0.12 to 1.47 ± 0.37 impulses s−1 (P < 0.05). Conversely, des-Arg9-BK did not significantly increase the activity of eleven ischaemically sensitive fibres (0.58 ± 0.02 vs. 0.50 ± 0.18 impulses s−1). HOE140 significantly attenuated the response of twelve afferents to ischaemia (0.61 ± 0.22 to 1.85 ± 0.5 vs. 0.53 ± 0.16 to 1.09 ± 0.4 impulses s−1). NPC-17731, another kinin B2 receptor antagonist, had similar inhibitory effects on six other ischaemically sensitive cardiac afferents (0.35 ± 0.14 to 1.19 ± 0.29 vs. 0.22 ± 0.08 to 0.23 ± 0.07 impulses s−1). Indomethacin significantly reduced the

  7. Endogenous acetylcholine and nicotine activation enhances GABAergic and glycinergic inputs to cardiac vagal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jijiang; Wang, Xin; Irnaten, Mustapha; Venkatesan, Priya; Evans, Cory; Baxi, Sunit; Mendelowitz, David

    2003-05-01

    The heart slows during expiration and heart rate increases during inspiration. This cardiorespiratory interaction is thought to occur by increased inhibitory synaptic events to cardiac vagal neurons during inspiration. Since cholinergic receptors have been suggested to be involved in this cardiorespiratory interaction, we tested whether endogenous cholinergic activity modulates GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus, whether nicotine can mimic this facilitation, and we examined the nicotinic receptors involved. Cardiac vagal neurons in the rat were labeled with a retrograde fluorescent tracer and studied in an in vitro slice using patch-clamp techniques. Application of neostigmine (10 microM), an acetylcholinerase inhibitor, significantly increased the frequency of both GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in cardiac vagal neurons. Exogenous application of nicotine increased the frequency and amplitude of both GABAergic and glycinergic IPSCs. The nicotinic facilitation of both GABAergic and glycinergic IPSCs were insensitive to 100 nM alpha-bungarotoxin but were abolished by dihydro-beta-erythrodine (DHbetaE) at a concentration (3 microM) specific for alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors. In the presence of TTX, nicotine increased the frequency of GABAergic and glycinergic miniature synaptic events, which were also abolished by DHbetaE (3 microM). This work demonstrates that there is endogenous cholinergic facilitation of GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic inputs to cardiac vagal neurons, and activation of alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors at presynaptic terminals facilitates GABAergic and glycinergic neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons. Nicotinic facilitation of inhibitory neurotransmission to premotor cardiac parasympathetic neurons may be involved in generating respiratory sinus arrhythmia.

  8. A simple numerical model of calcium spark formation and detection in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G D; Keizer, J E; Stern, M D; Lederer, W J; Cheng, H

    1998-01-01

    The elementary events of excitation-contraction coupling in heart muscle are Ca2+ sparks, which arise from one or more ryanodine receptors in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Here a simple numerical model is constructed to explore Ca2+ spark formation, detection, and interpretation in cardiac myocytes. This model includes Ca2+ release, cytosolic diffusion, resequestration by SR Ca2+-ATPases, and the association and dissociation of Ca2+ with endogenous Ca2+-binding sites and a diffusible indicator dye (fluo-3). Simulations in a homogeneous, isotropic cytosol reproduce the brightness and the time course of a typical cardiac Ca2+ spark, but underestimate its spatial size (approximately 1.1 micron vs. approximately 2.0 micron). Back-calculating [Ca2+]i by assuming equilibrium with indicator fails to provide a good estimate of the free Ca2+ concentration even when using blur-free fluorescence data. A parameter sensitivity study reveals that the mobility, kinetics, and concentration of the indicator are essential determinants of the shape of Ca2+ sparks, whereas the stationary buffers and pumps are less influential. Using a geometrically more complex version of the model, we show that the asymmetric shape of Ca2+ sparks is better explained by anisotropic diffusion of Ca2+ ions and indicator dye rather than by subsarcomeric inhomogeneities of the Ca2+ buffer and transport system. In addition, we examine the contribution of off-center confocal sampling to the variance of spark statistics. PMID:9649364

  9. Label-Free Detection of Cardiac Troponin-I Using Carbon Nanofiber Based Nanoelectrode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Koehne, Jessica Erin; Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. A carbon nanofiber (CNF) multiplexed array has been fabricated with 9 sensing pads, each containing 40,000 carbon nanofibers as nanoelectrodes. Here, we report the use of vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for the detection of cardiac Troponin-I for the early diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Antibody, antitroponin, probe immobilization and subsequent binding to human cardiac troponin-I were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry techniques. Each step of the modification process resulted in changes in electrical capacitance or resistance to charge transfer due to the changes at the electrode surface upon antibody immobilization and binding to the specific antigen. This sensor demonstrates high sensitivity, down to 0.2 ng/mL, and good selectivity making this platform a good candidate for early stage diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  10. Automated detection of the left ventricular region in gated nuclear cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, A E; Arzi, M; Sau, J; Champier, J; Hadj-Moussa, S; Besson, J E; Sappey-Marinier, D; Itti, R; Mallet, J J

    1996-04-01

    An approach to automated outlining the left ventricular contour and its bounded area in gated isotopic ventriculography is proposed. Its purpose is to determine the ejection fraction (EF), an important parameter for measuring cardiac function. The method uses a modified version of the fuzzy C-means (MFCM) algorithm and a labeling technique. The MFCM algorithm is applied to the end diastolic (ED) frame and then the (FCM) is applied to the remaining images in a "box" of interest. The MFCM generates a number of fuzzy clusters. Each cluster is a substructure of the heart (left ventricle,...). A cluster validity index to estimate the optimum clusters number present in image data point is used. This index takes account of the homogeneity in each cluster and is connected to the geometrical property of data set. The labeling is only performed to achieve the detection process in the ED frame. Since the left ventricle (LV) cluster has the greatest area of the cardiac images sequence in ED phase, a framing operation is performed to obtain, automatically, the "box" enclosing the LV cluster. THe EF assessed in 50 patients by the proposed method and a semi-automatic one, routinely used, are presented. A good correlation between the two methods EF values is obtained (R = 0.93). The LV contour found has been judged very satisfactory by a team of trained clinicians. PMID:8626193

  11. [Drug with a high metabolic activity, cocarnit, in the treatment of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Popov, S V; Melekhovets', O K; Demikhova, N V; Vynnychenko, L B

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with diabetes is formed in the absence of atherosclerotic changes as a consequence of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in the early stages of diabetes. Progression of autonomic cardiac neuropathy in cardio-vascular type is associated with the violation of energy supply of cells, protein synthesis, electrolyte exchange, the exchange of trace elements, oxidation reduction processes, oxygen-transport function of blood, so that metabolic therapy is carried out to optimize the processes of formation and energy costs. The drug cocarnit activates processes of aerobic oxidation of glucose, as well as providing regulatory influence on the oxidation of fatty acids. Applying of cocarnit in complex therapy in patients with diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy found improvement of left ventricular diastolic function, and positive dynamics in the efferent activity balance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic control of heart rate variability, which provides the regression of clinical symptoms. PMID:23356142

  12. Follistatin-like 1 promotes cardiac fibroblast activation and protects the heart from rupture.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Sonomi; Nakamura, Kazuto; Papanicolaou, Kyriakos N; Sano, Soichi; Shimizu, Ippei; Asaumi, Yasuhide; van den Hoff, Maurice J; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Recchia, Fabio A; Walsh, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) is a secreted protein that is acutely induced in heart following myocardial infarction (MI). In this study, we investigated cell type-specific regulation of Fstl1 and its function in a murine model of MI Fstl1 was robustly expressed in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the infarcted area compared to cardiac myocytes. The conditional ablation of Fstl1 in S100a4-expressing fibroblast lineage cells (Fstl1-cfKO mice) led to a reduction in injury-induced Fstl1 expression and increased mortality due to cardiac rupture during the acute phase. Cardiac rupture was associated with a diminished number of myofibroblasts and decreased expression of extracellular matrix proteins. The infarcts of Fstl1-cfKO mice displayed weaker birefringence, indicative of thin and loosely packed collagen. Mechanistically, the migratory and proliferative capabilities of cardiac fibroblasts were attenuated by endogenous Fstl1 ablation. The activation of cardiac fibroblasts by Fstl1 was mediated by ERK1/2 but not Smad2/3 signaling. This study reveals that Fstl1 is essential for the acute repair of the infarcted myocardium and that stimulation of early fibroblast activation is a novel function of Fstl1. PMID:27234440

  13. Verification of cardiac mechanics software: benchmark problems and solutions for testing active and passive material behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Gurev, Viatcheslav; Arens, Sander; Augustin, Christoph M.; Baron, Lukas; Blake, Robert; Bradley, Chris; Castro, Sebastian; Crozier, Andrew; Favino, Marco; Fastl, Thomas E.; Fritz, Thomas; Gao, Hao; Gizzi, Alessio; Griffith, Boyce E.; Hurtado, Daniel E.; Krause, Rolf; Luo, Xiaoyu; Nash, Martyn P.; Pezzuto, Simone; Plank, Gernot; Rossi, Simone; Ruprecht, Daniel; Seemann, Gunnar; Smith, Nicolas P.; Sundnes, Joakim; Rice, J. Jeremy; Trayanova, Natalia; Wang, Dafang; Jenny Wang, Zhinuo; Niederer, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Models of cardiac mechanics are increasingly used to investigate cardiac physiology. These models are characterized by a high level of complexity, including the particular anisotropic material properties of biological tissue and the actively contracting material. A large number of independent simulation codes have been developed, but a consistent way of verifying the accuracy and replicability of simulations is lacking. To aid in the verification of current and future cardiac mechanics solvers, this study provides three benchmark problems for cardiac mechanics. These benchmark problems test the ability to accurately simulate pressure-type forces that depend on the deformed objects geometry, anisotropic and spatially varying material properties similar to those seen in the left ventricle and active contractile forces. The benchmark was solved by 11 different groups to generate consensus solutions, with typical differences in higher-resolution solutions at approximately 0.5%, and consistent results between linear, quadratic and cubic finite elements as well as different approaches to simulating incompressible materials. Online tools and solutions are made available to allow these tests to be effectively used in verification of future cardiac mechanics software. PMID:26807042

  14. Speech activity detection using accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Matic, Aleksandar; Osmani, Venet; Mayora, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    The level of social activity is linked to the overall wellbeing and to various disorders, including stress. In this regard, a myriad of automatic solutions for monitoring social interactions have been proposed, usually including audio data analysis. Such approaches often face legal and ethical issues and they may also raise privacy concerns in monitored subjects thus affecting their natural behaviour. In this paper we present an accelerometer-based speech detection which does not require capturing sensitive data while being an easily applicable and a cost-effective solution.

  15. Puerarin prevents cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload through activation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bei; Wu, Zhiye; Li, Yunpeng; Ou, Caiwen; Huang, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jianwu; Liu, Peng; Luo, Chengfeng; Chen, Minsheng

    2015-08-28

    This study aimed to explore the effects of puerarin on autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy. Decreased 5'-adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) activity alone with inhibited autophagy could be detected in rats within 3 weeks after aortic banding (AB). Puerarin treatment for 3 weeks in AB rats significantly restored autophagy. Administration of puerarin for 6 weeks effectively restricted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis. In an in vitro study, similar anti-hypertrophy and anti-apoptosis effects of puerarin on isoprenaline-induced H9c2 cells were also observed. After inhibition of autophagy by pretreatment with 3-methyladenine, the protective effects of puerarin were blocked. Further in vivo study demonstrated that puerarin significantly enabled phosphorylation of 5'-AMPK to be activated, subsequently inhibiting expression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) target proteins S6 ribosomal protein and 4E-binding protein 1. All these data indicate that puerarin exerts protective effects against cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis, partly by restoration of autophagy through AMPK/mTOR-mediated signaling. PMID:26188094

  16. Relationship Between Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index Scores and Subclinical Cardiac Problems

    PubMed Central

    Mirfeizi, Zahra; Poorzand, Hoorak; Javanbakht, Aida; Khajedaluee, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune connective-tissue disease involving multiple organs and systems. Some evidence has demonstrated that disease activity could be associated with increased risk of organ damage. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the association between systemic lupus erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) scores and subclinical cardiac involvement. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 45 SLE patients (88% female; mean age: 31.2 ± 8.2 years) from 2011 to 2013 in Mashhad, Iran. The patients had no clinical signs and symptoms of cardiac problems or risk factors for cardiovascular disease and were selected consecutively. All patients underwent complete echocardiographic examinations (using two dimensional (2D) tissue Doppler and 2D speckle tracking). Disease activity was evaluated by using the SLEDAI. Results Patients with higher SLEDAI scores had higher pulmonary artery pressure rates (r = 0.34; P = 0.024; 95% CI (0.086 to 0.595)) and SLE durations (r = 0.43; P = 0.004; 95% CI (0.165 to 0.664). The correlation between disease duration and left ventricular mass was also significant (r = 0.43; P = 0.009; 95% CI (0.172 to 0.681)), even after adjusting for age (r = 0.405; P = 0.016). There was no correlation between SLEDAI scores or disease duration and the left/right ventricle systolic function parameters. This was true while assessing the right ventricle’s diastolic function. A statistically significant correlation was found between mitral E/E’ as an index of left ventricle diastolic impairment and the SLEDAI scores (r = 0.33; P = 0.037; 95% CI (0.074 to 0.574)) along with disease duration (r = 0.45; P = 0.004; 95% CI (0.130 to 0.662); adjusted for age: r = 0.478; P = 0.002). Conclusions Echocardiography is a useful noninvasive technique for screening subclinical heart problems in SLE patients. Although disease activity in general should suggest a closer follow-up, regular scanning

  17. The Impact of Moderate Intensity Physical Activity on Cardiac Structure and Performance in Older Sedentary Adults

    PubMed Central

    Suboc, Tisha B.; Strath, Scott J.; Dharmashankar, Kodlipet; Harmann, Leanne; Couillard, Allison; Malik, Mobin; Haak, Kristoph; Knabel, Daniel; Widlansky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sedentary aging leads to adverse changes in vascular function and cardiac performance. We published improvements in vascular function with moderate intensity physical activity (PA) in continuous bouts. Whether moderate intensity PA also impacts cardiac structure and cardiovascular performance of the aging left ventricle (LV) is unknown. Methods We recruited and analyzed results from 102 sedentary older adults ages ≥ 50 from a randomized controlled trial with 3 study groups: control (group 1), a pedometer-only intervention (group 2), or a pedometer with an interactive website employing strategies to increase habitual physical activity (PA, group 3) for 12 weeks. Transthoracic echocardiograms were performed prior to and following the 12 week intervention period to assess cardiac morphology, left ventricular (LV) systolic performance, LV diastolic function, arterial and LV ventricular elastance. Step count and PA intensity/distribution were measured by pedometer and accelerometer. Results We found no significant changes in cardiac morphology. Further, we found no improvement in the aforementioned cardiac functional parameters. Comparing those who achieved the following benchmarks to those who did not showed no significant changes in cardiac structure or performance: 1)10,000 steps/day, 2) ≥ 30 minutes/day of moderate intensity physical activity, or 3) moderate intensity PA in bouts ≥ 10 minutes for ≥ 20 minutes/day Conclusions In sedentary older adults, increasing moderate intensity PA to currently recommend levels does not result in favorable changes in LV morphology or performance over 12 weeks. More prolonged exposure, higher PA intensity, or earlier initiation of PA may be necessary to see benefits. PMID:25530947

  18. Honokiol blocks and reverses cardiac hypertrophy in mice by activating mitochondrial SIRT3

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Vinodkumar B.; Samant, Sadhana; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R.; Raghuraman, Hariharasundaram; Kim, Gene; Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Walker, Douglas I.; Jones, Dean P.; Gius, David; Gupta, Mahesh P.

    2015-01-01

    Honokiol (HKL) is a natural biphenolic compound derived from the bark of magnolia trees with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-tumor and neuroprotective properties. Here we show that HKL blocks agonist-induced and pressure overload-mediated, cardiac hypertrophic responses, and ameliorates pre-existing cardiac hypertrophy, in mice. Our data suggest that the anti-hypertrophic effects of HKL depend on activation of the deacetylase SIRT3. We demonstrate that HKL is present in mitochondria, enhances SIRT3 expression nearly two-fold and suggest that HKL may bind to SIRT3 to further increase its activity. Increased SIRT3 activity is associated with reduced acetylation of mitochondrial SIRT3 substrates, MnSOD and OSCP. HKL-treatment increases mitochondrial rate of oxygen consumption and reduces ROS synthesis in wild-type, but not in SIRT3-KO cells. Moreover, HKL-treatment blocks cardiac fibroblast proliferation and differentiation to myofibroblasts in SIRT3-dependent manner. These results suggest that HKL is a pharmacological activator of SIRT3 capable of blocking, and even reversing, the cardiac hypertrophic response. PMID:25871545

  19. Effects of active chronic cocaine use on cardiac sympathetic neuronal function assessed by carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine

    SciTech Connect

    Melon, P.G.; Boyd, C.J.; McVey, S. |

    1997-03-01

    Cardiac toxicity of cocaine has been linked to its inhibitory effect on norepinephrine reuptake by sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine is a positron-emitting tracer that has been validated as a highly specific marker for norepinephrine transporter activity of the sympathetic nerve terminals and thus makes possible in vivo assessment of the effect of cocaine on norepinephrine reuptake and storage in the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals. The aim of the study was to use the catecholamine analog {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine with PET to determine whether active chronic use of cocaine in women modifies the function of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Six normal female volunteers and nine female active chronic cocaine users were studied. Cardiac regional {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine uptake and blood flow, as assessed with {sup 13}N-ammonia, were determined using semi-quantitative polar map analysis of myocardial tracer distribution. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine cardiac retention was quantified using dynamic data acquisition and kinetic analysis of blood and tissue activity. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. ALTERATION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY BY WATER-LEACHABLE COMPONENTS OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of cardiac electrical activity by water-leachable components
    of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)

    Desuo Wang, Yuh-Chin T. Huang*, An Xie, Ting Wang

    *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA
    104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
    Department of Basic ...

  1. [Fibrinolysis activation after cardiac surgery--role of thromboelastography in the diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Drwiła, Rafał; Zietkiewicz, Mirosław; Plicner, Dariusz; Wasowicz, Marcin; Słodowski, Wojciech; Kapelak, Bogusław; Andres, Janusz; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2004-09-01

    Use of cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery strongly influences haemostatic system, activating fibrinolysis as well. The widespread use of antiplatelet and fibrinolytic drugs creates haemostatic disturbances in the perioperative period. Thromboelastography seems to be a useful tool in the assessment of this complex process, particularly in the early postoperative period. PMID:20527429

  2. Small-conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ channels and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Lieu, Deborah K; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2015-08-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+ -activated K+ (SK, KCa2) channels are unique in that they are gated solely by changes in intracellular Ca2+ and, hence, function to integrate intracellular Ca2+ and membrane potentials on a beat-to-beat basis. Recent studies have provided evidence for the existence and functional significance of SK channels in the heart. Indeed, our knowledge of cardiac SK channels has been greatly expanded over the past decade. Interests in cardiac SK channels are further driven by recent studies suggesting the critical roles of SK channels in human atrial fibrillation, the SK channel as a possible novel therapeutic target in atrial arrhythmias, and upregulation of SK channels in heart failure in animal models and in human heart failure. However, there remain critical gaps in our knowledge. Specifically, blockade of SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias has been shown to be both antiarrhythmic and proarrhythmic. This contemporary review provides an overview of the literature on the role of cardiac SK channels in cardiac arrhythmias and serves as a discussion platform for the current clinical perspectives. At the translational level, development of SK channel blockers as a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and the possible proarrhythmic effects merit further considerations and investigations.

  3. Cardiac activity in marine invertebrates in response to pollutants: Automated interpulse duration assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lundebye, A.K.; Curtis, T.; Depledge, M.H.

    1995-12-31

    The updated method of the Computer-Aided Physiological Monitoring (CAPMON) system was used to study the effects of copper exposure on cardiac activity in the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) and the common mussel (Mytilus edulis). This new Automated Interpulse Duration Assessment (AIDA) system measures the time interval between heart beats, and was found to be a more sensitive tool for evaluating cardiac responses to pollutant exposure than other techniques. In addition to information regarding heart rate, also obtained by the CAPMON system (as beats per minute), the new system enables frequency distribution analysis of interpulse duration. An experiment involving C. maenas examined the effects of short term (24 h) and chronic exposure (4 weeks) to copper concentrations 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mgl{sup {minus}1} Cu. Subsequent recovery (6 weeks) of cardiac activity was also examined. In a second experiment mussels were exposed to one of five copper concentrations (in the range of 0--0.1 mgl{sup {minus}1} Cu) and `normal` cardiac activity was compared with activity after copper exposure. A dose-response relationship was established between copper concentration and heart rate in crabs. The control group had the longest mean inter-pulse duration, and mean interpulse duration decreased in a concentration-dependent manner for the copper treatments, reflecting an increase in heart rate. Distribution of interpulse duration changed from a variable, rather wide distribution in control crabs, to a sharp-peaked normal distribution in exposed crabs. Results after 4 weeks exposure were not significantly different from those found after 24 h. Return to normal cardiac activity was evident after a 6 week `recovery` period. Results from the mussel experiment showed burst activity followed by a decline in heart rate in response to copper exposure.

  4. In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: An Update on Pulseless Electrical Activity and Asystole.

    PubMed

    Attin, Mina; Tucker, Rebecca G; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Nonshockable rhythms, including pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole, precede more than 70% of in-hospital cardiac arrests (I-HCA). Compared with shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), nonshockable rhythms have higher mortality and morbidity. Therefore, investigating the underlying mechanisms of these arrhythmias to improve the quality of care and outcome for patients who suffer cardiac arrest is a priority. As the first responders to I-HCA, nurses must have the proper knowledge and training to provide timely and efficient cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. This article provides an overview of nonshockable cardiac arrhythmias preceding I-HCA as a means of addressing the gap between science and clinical practice. PMID:27484665

  5. A polyaniline based ultrasensitive potentiometric immunosensor for cardiac troponin complex detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Prabhu, Alok; San, Avdar; Al-Sharab, Jafar F; Levon, Kalle

    2015-10-15

    An ultrasensitive immunosensor based on potentiometric ELISA for the detection of a cardiac biomarker, troponin I-T-C (Tn I-T-C) complex, was developed. The sensor fabrication involves typical sandwich ELISA procedures, while the final signal readout was achieved using open circuit potentiometry (OCP). Glassy carbon (GC) working electrodes were first coated with emulsion-polymerized polyaniline/dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (PANI/DNNSA) and the coated surface was utilized as a transducer layer on which sandwich ELISA incubation steps were performed. An enzymatic reaction between o-phenylenediamine (OPD) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was catalyzed by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled on the secondary antibodies. The polymer transducer charged state was mediated through electron (e(-)) and charge transfers between the transducer and charged species generated by the same enzymatic reaction. Such a change in the polymer transducer led to potential variations against an Ag/AgCl reference electrode as a function of Tn I-T-C complex concentration during incubations. The sequence of OPD and H2O2 additions, electrochemical properties of the PANI/DNNSA layer and non-specific binding prevention were all crucial factors for the assay performance. Under optimized conditions, the assay has a low limit of detection (LOD) (< 5 pg/mL or 56 fM), a wide dynamic range (> 6 orders of magnitude), high repeatability (coefficient of variance < 8% for all concentrations higher than 5 pg/mL) and a short detection time (< 10 min).

  6. Murine cardiac images obtained with focusing pinhole SPECT are barely influenced by extra-cardiac activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan; van der Have, Frans; Vastenhouw, Brendan; Viergever, Max A.; Beekman, Freek J.

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-high-resolution SPECT images can be obtained with focused multipinhole collimators. Here we investigate the influence of unwanted high tracer uptake outside the scan volume on reconstructed tracer distributions inside the scan volume, for 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scanning in mice. Simulated projections of a digital mouse phantom (MOBY) in a focusing multipinhole SPECT system (U-SPECT-II, MILabs, The Netherlands) were generated. With this system differently sized user-defined scan volumes can be selected, by translating the animal in 3D through the focusing collimators. Scan volume selections were set to (i) a minimal volume containing just the heart, acquired without translating the animal during scanning, (ii) a slightly larger scan volume as is typically applied for the heart, requiring only small XYZ translations during scanning, (iii) same as (ii), but extended further transaxially, and (iv) same as (ii), but extended transaxially to cover the full thorax width (gold standard). Despite an overall negative bias that is significant for the minimal scan volume, all selected volumes resulted in visually similar images. Quantitative differences in the reconstructed myocardium between gold standard and the results from the smaller scan volume selections were small; the 17 standardized myocardial segments of a bull's eye plot, normalized to the myocardial mean of the gold standard, deviated on average 6.0%, 2.5% and 1.9% for respectively the minimal, the typical and the extended scan volume, while maximum absolute deviations were respectively 18.6%, 9.0% and 5.2%. Averaged over ten low-count noisy simulations, the mean absolute deviations were respectively 7.9%, 3.2% and 1.9%. In low-count noisy simulations, the mean and maximum absolute deviations for the minimal scan volume could be reduced to respectively 4.2% and 12.5% by performing a short survey scan of the exterior activity and focusing the remaining scan time at the organ of interest. We

  7. Engineered heart tissue enables study of residual undifferentiated embryonic stem cell activity in a cardiac environment.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Jana; Song, Hannah; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Massé, Stéphane; Wood, Geoffrey A; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Zandstra, Peter W; Radisic, Milica

    2011-03-01

    resulted in a more robust cardiac differentiation than injection of ESC. Our data demonstrate that the model-system developed herein can be used to study the functional effects of candidate stem cells on the host myocardium, as well as to measure the residual activity of undifferentiated cells present in the mixture.

  8. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  9. Nesfatin-1 activates cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus and elicits bradycardia in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A.; Rabinowitz, Joseph E.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Benamar, Khalid; Koch, Walter J.; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Nesfatin-1, a peptide whose receptor is yet to be identified, has been involved in the modulation of feeding, stress and metabolic responses. More recently, increasing evidence supports a modulatory role for nesfatin-1 in autonomic and cardiovascular activity. This study was undertaken to test if the expression of nesfatin-1 in the nucleus ambiguus, a key site for parasympathetic cardiac control, may be correlated with a functional role. Since we have previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1 elicits Ca2+ signaling in hypothalamic neurons, we first assessed the effect of this peptide on cytosolic Ca2+ in cardiac preganglionic neurons of nucleus ambiguus. We provide evidence that nesfatin-1 increases cytosolic Ca2+ concentration via a Gi/o-coupled mechanism. The nesfatin-1-induced Ca2+ rise is critically dependent on Ca2+ influx via P/Q-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. Repeated administration of nesfatin-1 leads to tachyphylaxis. Further, nesfatin produces a dose-dependent depolarization of cardiac vagal neurons via a Gi/o-coupled mechanism. In vivo studies, using telemetric and tail-cuff monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure, indicate that microinjection of nesfatin-1 into the nucleus ambiguus produces bradycardia not accompanied by a change in blood pressure in conscious rats. Taken together, our results identify for the first time that nesfatin-1 decreases heart rate by activating cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus. PMID:23795642

  10. Tonic arterial chemoreceptor activity contributes to cardiac sympathetic activation in mild ovine heart failure.

    PubMed

    Xing, Daniel T; May, Clive N; Booth, Lindsea C; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with a large increase in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA), which has detrimental effects on the heart and promotes arrhythmias and sudden death. There is increasing evidence that arterial chemoreceptor activation plays an important role in stimulating renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in HF. Given that sympathetic nerve activity to individual organs is differentially controlled, we investigated whether tonic arterial chemoreceptor activation contributes to the increased CSNA in HF. We recorded CSNA and RSNA in conscious normal sheep and in sheep with mild HF induced by rapid ventricular pacing (ejection fraction <40%). Tonic arterial chemoreceptor function was evaluated by supplementing room air with 100% intranasal oxygen (2-3 l min(-1)) for 20 min, thereby deactivating chemoreceptors. The effects of hyperoxia on resting levels and baroreflex control of heart rate, CSNA and RSNA were determined. In HF, chemoreceptor deactivation induced by hyperoxia significantly reduced CSNA [90 ± 2 versus 75 ± 5 bursts (100 heart beats)(-1), P < 0.05, n = 10; room air versus hyperoxia] and heart rate (96 ± 4 versus 85 ± 4 beats min(-1), P < 0.001, n = 12). There was no change in RSNA burst incidence [93 ± 4 versus 92 ± 4 bursts (100 heart beats)(-1), n = 7], although due to the bradycardia the RSNA burst frequency was decreased (90 ± 8 versus 77 ± 7 bursts min(-1), P < 0.001). In normal sheep, chemoreceptor deactivation reduced heart rate without a significant effect on CSNA or RSNA. In summary, deactivation of peripheral chemoreceptors during HF reduced the elevated levels of CSNA, indicating that tonic arterial chemoreceptor activation plays a critical role in stimulating the elevated CSNA in HF.

  11. Erbb2 Is Required for Cardiac Atrial Electrical Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Tenin, Gennadiy; Clowes, Christopher; Wolton, Kathryn; Krejci, Eliska; Wright, Jayne A.; Lovell, Simon C.; Sedmera, David; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    The heart is the first organ required to function during embryonic development and is absolutely necessary for embryo survival. Cardiac activity is dependent on both the sinoatrial node (SAN), which is the pacemaker of heart's electrical activity, and the cardiac conduction system which transduces the electrical signal though the heart tissue, leading to heart muscle contractions. Defects in the development of cardiac electrical function may lead to severe heart disorders. The Erbb2 (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) gene encodes a member of the EGF receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The Erbb2 receptor lacks ligand-binding activity but forms heterodimers with other EGF receptors, stabilising their ligand binding and enhancing kinase-mediated activation of downstream signalling pathways. Erbb2 is absolutely necessary in normal embryonic development and homozygous mouse knock-out Erbb2 embryos die at embryonic day (E)10.5 due to severe cardiac defects. We have isolated a mouse line, l11Jus8, from a random chemical mutagenesis screen, which carries a hypomorphic missense mutation in the Erbb2 gene. Homozygous mutant embryos exhibit embryonic lethality by E12.5-13. The l11Jus8 mutants display cardiac haemorrhage and a failure of atrial function due to defects in atrial electrical signal propagation, leading to an atrial-specific conduction block, which does not affect ventricular conduction. The l11Jus8 mutant phenotype is distinct from those reported for Erbb2 knockout mouse mutants. Thus, the l11Jus8 mouse reveals a novel function of Erbb2 during atrial conduction system development, which when disrupted causes death at mid-gestation. PMID:25269082

  12. Early detection of cardiac dysfunction in the type 1 diabetic heart using speckle-tracking based strain imaging.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Danielle L; Nichols, Cody E; Croston, Tara L; McLaughlin, Sarah L; Petrone, Ashley B; Lewis, Sara E; Thapa, Dharendra; Long, Dustin M; Dick, Gregory M; Hollander, John M

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced sensitivity in echocardiographic analyses may allow for early detection of changes in cardiac function beyond the detection limits of conventional echocardiographic analyses, particularly in a small animal model. The goal of this study was to compare conventional echocardiographic measurements and speckle-tracking based strain imaging analyses in a small animal model of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conventional analyses revealed differences in ejection fraction, fractional shortening, cardiac output, and stroke volume in diabetic animals relative to controls at 6-weeks post-diabetic onset. In contrast, when assessing short- and long-axis speckle-tracking based strain analyses, diabetic mice showed changes in average systolic radial strain, radial strain rate, radial displacement, and radial velocity, as well as decreased circumferential and longitudinal strain rate, as early as 1-week post-diabetic onset and persisting throughout the diabetic study. Further, we performed regional analyses for the LV and found that the free wall region was affected in both the short- and long-axis when assessing radial dimension parameters. These changes began 1-week post-diabetic onset and remained throughout the progression of the disease. These findings demonstrate the use of speckle-tracking based strain as an approach to elucidate cardiac dysfunction from a global perspective, identifying left ventricular cardiac regions affected during the progression of type 1 diabetes mellitus earlier than contractile changes detected by conventional echocardiographic measurements.

  13. A nanostructured piezoelectric immunosensor for detection of human cardiac troponin T.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Rosana A S; Ramos-Jesus, Joilson; Kubota, Lauro T; Dutra, Rosa F

    2011-01-01

    A piezoelectric immunosensor based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) co-immobilized on a dithiol-modified surface is proposed for detection of human cardiac troponin T (TnT). Anti-human troponin T (anti-TnT) antibodies were covalently immobilized on the nanostructured electrode surface by thiol-aldehyde linkages. In a homogeneous bulk solution, TnT was captured by anti-TnT immobilized on the QCM electrode. Cyclic voltammetry studies were used to characterize the AuNPs layer on the electrode surface and the anti-TnT immobilization steps. The QCM-flow immunosensor exhibited good reliability, measuring concentrations of TnT from 0.003 to 0.5 ng mL(-1) in human serum with high linearity (r = 0.989; p < 0.01). The immunosensor exhibited a 7% coefficient of variation and 0.0015 ng mL(-1) limit of detection, indicating a high reproducibility and sensitivity. The proposed QCM nanostructured immunosensor is easy to use and has promising potential in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction due to its speed and high sensitivity.

  14. Channelized relevance vector machine as a numerical observer for cardiac perfusion defect detection task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalayeh, Mahdi M.; Marin, Thibault; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Wernick, Miles N.; Yang, Yongyi; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical observer for image quality assessment, aiming to predict human observer accuracy in a cardiac perfusion defect detection task for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In medical imaging, image quality should be assessed by evaluating the human observer accuracy for a specific diagnostic task. This approach is known as task-based assessment. Such evaluations are important for optimizing and testing imaging devices and algorithms. Unfortunately, human observer studies with expert readers are costly and time-demanding. To address this problem, numerical observers have been developed as a surrogate for human readers to predict human diagnostic performance. The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with internal noise model has been found to predict human performance well in some situations, but does not always generalize well to unseen data. We have argued in the past that finding a model to predict human observers could be viewed as a machine learning problem. Following this approach, in this paper we propose a channelized relevance vector machine (CRVM) to predict human diagnostic scores in a detection task. We have previously used channelized support vector machines (CSVM) to predict human scores and have shown that this approach offers better and more robust predictions than the classical CHO method. The comparison of the proposed CRVM with our previously introduced CSVM method suggests that CRVM can achieve similar generalization accuracy, while dramatically reducing model complexity and computation time.

  15. Peptide Functionalized Gold Nanorods for the Sensitive Detection of a Cardiac Biomarker Using Plasmonic Paper Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tadepalli, Sirimuvva; Kuang, Zhifeng; Jiang, Qisheng; Liu, Keng-Ku; Fisher, Marilee A.; Morrissey, Jeremiah J.; Kharasch, Evan D.; Slocik, Joseph M.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Singamaneni, Srikanth

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metal nanostructures to adsorbates lends itself to a powerful class of label-free biosensors. Optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures are dependent on the geometrical features and the local dielectric environment. The exponential decay of the sensitivity from the surface of the plasmonic nanotransducer calls for the careful consideration in its design with particular attention to the size of the recognition and analyte layers. In this study, we demonstrate that short peptides as biorecognition elements (BRE) compared to larger antibodies as target capture agents offer several advantages. Using a bioplasmonic paper device (BPD), we demonstrate the selective and sensitive detection of the cardiac biomarker troponin I (cTnI). The smaller sized peptide provides higher sensitivity and a lower detection limit using a BPD. Furthermore, the excellent shelf-life and thermal stability of peptide-based LSPR sensors, which precludes the need for special storage conditions, makes it ideal for use in resource-limited settings. PMID:26552720

  16. Rapidly detecting disorder in rhythmic biological signals: A spectral entropy measure to identify cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniczenko, Phillip P. A.; Lee, Chiu Fan; Jones, Nick S.

    2009-01-01

    We consider the use of a running measure of power spectrum disorder to distinguish between the normal sinus rhythm of the heart and two forms of cardiac arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. This spectral entropy measure is motivated by characteristic differences in the power spectra of beat timings during the three rhythms. We plot patient data derived from ten-beat windows on a “disorder map” and identify rhythm-defining ranges in the level and variance of spectral entropy values. Employing the spectral entropy within an automatic arrhythmia detection algorithm enables the classification of periods of atrial fibrillation from the time series of patients’ beats. When the algorithm is set to identify abnormal rhythms within 6s , it agrees with 85.7% of the annotations of professional rhythm assessors; for a response time of 30s , this becomes 89.5%, and with 60s , it is 90.3%. The algorithm provides a rapid way to detect atrial fibrillation, demonstrating usable response times as low as 6s . Measures of disorder in the frequency domain have practical significance in a range of biological signals: the techniques described in this paper have potential application for the rapid identification of disorder in other rhythmic signals.

  17. Integration of cardiac myofilament activity and regulation with pathways signaling hypertrophy and failure.

    PubMed

    de Tombe, P P; Solaro, R J

    2000-08-01

    The syndrome of congestive heart failure (CHF) is an entity of ever increasing clinical significance. CHF is characterized by a steady decrease in cardiac pump function, which is eventually lethal. The mechanisms that underlie the decline in cardiac function are incompletely understood. A central theme in solving the mystery of heart failure is the identification of mechanisms by which the myofilament contractile machine of the myocardium is altered in CHF and how these alterations act in concert with pathways that signal cell growth and death. The cardiac myofilaments are a point of confluence of signals that promote the hypertrophic/failure process. Our hypothesis is that a prevailing hemodynamic stress leads to an increased strain on the myocardium. The increased strain in turn leads to miscues of the normal physiological pathway by which heart cells are signaled to match and adapt the intensity and dynamics of their mechanical activity to prevailing hemodynamic demands. These miscues result in a maladaptation to the stressor and failure of the heart to respond to hemodynamic loads at optimal end diastolic volumes. The result is a vicious cycle exacerbating the failure. Cardiac myofilament activity, the ultimate determinant of cellular dynamics and force, is a central player in the integration and regulation of pathways that signal hypertrophy and failure.

  18. Activation of GATA4 gene expression at the early stage of cardiac specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Ayse; Hamilton, Alison; Wang, Yingjian; Mach, Hymn; Lacroix, Natascha; Davis, Darryl; Chen, Jihong; LI, Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Currently, there are no effective treatments to directly repair damaged heart tissue after cardiac injury since existing therapies focus on rescuing or preserving reversibly damaged tissue. Cell-based therapies using cardiomyocytes generated from stem cells present a promising therapeutic approach to directly replace damaged myocardium with new healthy tissue. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the commitment of stem cells into cardiomyocytes are not fully understood and will be critical to guide this new technology into the clinic. Since GATA4 is a critical regulator of cardiac differentiation, we examined the molecular basis underlying the early activation of GATA4 gene expression during cardiac differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Our studies demonstrate the direct involvement of histone acetylation and transcriptional coactivator p300 in the regulation of GATA4 gene expression. More importantly, we show that histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity is important for GATA4 gene expression with the use of curcumin, a HAT inhibitor. In addition, the widely used histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances both histone acetylation and cardiac specification.

  19. Mechanisms underlying the cardiac pacemaker: the role of SK4 calcium-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, David; Khun, Shiraz Haron; Bueno, Hanna; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The proper expression and function of the cardiac pacemaker is a critical feature of heart physiology. The sinoatrial node (SAN) in human right atrium generates an electrical stimulation approximately 70 times per minute, which propagates from a conductive network to the myocardium leading to chamber contractions during the systoles. Although the SAN and other nodal conductive structures were identified more than a century ago, the mechanisms involved in the generation of cardiac automaticity remain highly debated. In this short review, we survey the current data related to the development of the human cardiac conduction system and the various mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie the pacemaker activity. We also present the human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte system, which is used as a model for studying the pacemaker. Finally, we describe our latest characterization of the previously unrecognized role of the SK4 Ca2+-activated K+ channel conductance in pacemaker cells. By exquisitely balancing the inward currents during the diastolic depolarization, the SK4 channels appear to play a crucial role in human cardiac automaticity. PMID:26725737

  20. Using Visual Methods to Understand Physical Activity Maintenance following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have explored the factors associated with long-term maintenance of exercise following cardiac rehabilitation. The present study used auto-photography and interviews to explore the factors that influence motivation and continued participation in physical activity among post cardiac rehabilitation patients. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted alongside participant-selected photographs or drawings with participants that had continued participation in physical activity for at least two years following the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Participants were recruited from circuit training classes in East Sussex in the UK. Thematic content analysis revealed seven main themes: fear of death and ill health avoidance, critical incidents, overcoming aging, social influences, being able to enjoy life, provision of routine and structure, enjoyment and psychological well-being. Fear of death, illness avoidance, overcoming aging, and being able to enjoy life were powerful motives for continued participation in exercise. The social nature of the exercise class was also identified as a key facilitator of continued participation. Group-based exercise suited those that continued exercise participation post cardiac rehabilitation and fostered adherence. PMID:26381147

  1. Nesfatin-1 activates cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus and elicits bradycardia in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Tilley, Douglas G; Benamar, Khalid; Koch, Walter J; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Nesfatin-1, a peptide whose receptor is yet to be identified, has been involved in the modulation of feeding, stress, and metabolic responses. More recently, increasing evidence supports a modulatory role for nesfatin-1 in autonomic and cardiovascular activity. This study was undertaken to test if the expression of nesfatin-1 in the nucleus ambiguus, a key site for parasympathetic cardiac control, may be correlated with a functional role. As we have previously demonstrated that nesfatin-1 elicits Ca²⁺ signaling in hypothalamic neurons, we first assessed the effect of this peptide on cytosolic Ca²⁺ in cardiac pre-ganglionic neurons of nucleus ambiguus. We provide evidence that nesfatin-1 increases cytosolic Ca²⁺ concentration via a Gi/o-coupled mechanism. The nesfatin-1-induced Ca²⁺ rise is critically dependent on Ca²⁺ influx via P/Q-type voltage-activated Ca²⁺ channels. Repeated administration of nesfatin-1 leads to tachyphylaxis. Furthermore, nesfatin-1 produces a dose-dependent depolarization of cardiac vagal neurons via a Gi/o-coupled mechanism. In vivo studies, using telemetric and tail-cuff monitoring of heart rate and blood pressure, indicate that microinjection of nesfatin-1 into the nucleus ambiguus produces bradycardia not accompanied by a change in blood pressure in conscious rats. Taken together, our results identify for the first time that nesfatin-1 decreases heart rate by activating cardiac vagal neurons of nucleus ambiguus. Our results indicate that nesfatin-1, one of the most potent feeding peptides, increases cytosolic Ca²⁺ by promoting Ca²⁺ influx via P/Q channels and depolarizes nucleus ambiguus neurons; both effects are Gi/o-mediated. In vivo studies indicate that microinjection of nesfatin-1 into nucleus ambiguus produces bradycardia in conscious rats. This is the first report that nesfatin-1 increases the parasympathetic cardiac tone.

  2. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, C.D.; Roney, C.H.; Ng, F.S.; Siggers, J.H.; Sherwin, S.J.; Peters, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. PMID:25978869

  3. Influence of Physical Activity on Hypertension and Cardiac Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Sheila M; Solomon, Scott D

    2015-10-01

    The global burden of hypertension is rising and accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality. Lifestyle factors such as diet and physical inactivity contribute to this burden, further highlighting the need for prevention efforts to curb this public health epidemic. Regular physical activity is associated with lower blood pressure, reduced cardiovascular risk, and cardiac remodeling. While exercise and hypertension can both be associated with the development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), the cardiac remodeling from hypertension is pathologic with an associated increase in myocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, and risk of heart failure and mortality, whereas LVH in athletes is generally non-pathologic and lacks the fibrosis seen in hypertension. In hypertensive patients, physical activity has been associated with paradoxical regression or prevention of LVH, suggesting a mechanism by which exercise can benefit hypertensive patients. Further studies are needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying the benefits of physical activity in the hypertensive heart. PMID:26277725

  4. Dictionary-Driven Ischemia Detection From Cardiac Phase-Resolved Myocardial BOLD MRI at Rest.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Marco; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level Dependent (CP-BOLD) MRI provides a unique opportunity to image an ongoing ischemia at rest. However, it requires post-processing to evaluate the extent of ischemia. To address this, here we propose an unsupervised ischemia detection (UID) method which relies on the inherent spatio-temporal correlation between oxygenation and wall motion to formalize a joint learning and detection problem based on dictionary decomposition. Considering input data of a single subject, it treats ischemia as an anomaly and iteratively learns dictionaries to represent only normal observations (corresponding to myocardial territories remote to ischemia). Anomaly detection is based on a modified version of One-class Support Vector Machines (OCSVM) to regulate directly the margins by incorporating the dictionary-based representation errors. A measure of ischemic extent (IE) is estimated, reflecting the relative portion of the myocardium affected by ischemia. For visualization purposes an ischemia likelihood map is created by estimating posterior probabilities from the OCSVM outputs, thus obtaining how likely the classification is correct. UID is evaluated on synthetic data and in a 2D CP-BOLD data set from a canine experimental model emulating acute coronary syndromes. Comparing early ischemic territories identified with UID against infarct territories (after several hours of ischemia), we find that IE, as measured by UID, is highly correlated (Pearson's r=0.84) with respect to infarct size. When advances in automated registration and segmentation of CP-BOLD images and full coverage 3D acquisitions become available, we hope that this method can enable pixel-level assessment of ischemia with this truly non-invasive imaging technique.

  5. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle.

  6. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle. PMID:27087101

  7. Molecular imaging of macrophage enzyme activity in cardiac inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Pulli, Benjamin; Chen, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging is highly advantageous as various insidious inflammatory events can be imaged in a serial and quantitative fashion. Combined with the conventional imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear imaging, it helps us resolve the extent of ongoing pathology, quantify inflammation and predict outcome. Macrophages are increasingly gaining importance as an imaging biomarker in inflammatory cardiovascular diseases. Macrophages, recruited to the site of injury, internalize necrotic or foreign material. Along with phagocytosis, activated macrophages release proteolytic enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins into the extracellular environment. Pro-inflammatory monocytes and macrophages also induce tissue oxidative damage through the inflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). In this review we will highlight recent advances in molecular macrophage imaging. Particular stress will be given to macrophage functional and enzymatic activity imaging which targets phagocytosis, proteolysis and myeloperoxidase activity imaging. PMID:24729833

  8. A coarse-grained model to study calcium activation of the cardiac thin filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is one of the most common heart disease caused by genetic mutations. Cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation involve regulation of crossbridge binding to the cardiac thin filament, which regulates actomyosin interactions through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cardiac troponin (cTn) and tropomyosin (Tm). An atomistic model of cTn complex interacting with Tm has been studied by our group. A more realistic model requires the inclusion of the dynamics of actin filament, which is almost 6 times larger than cTn and Tm in terms of atom numbers, and extensive sampling of the model becomes very resource-demanding. By using physics-based protein united-residue force field, we introduce a coarse-grained model to study the calcium activation of the thin filament resulting from cTn's allosteric regulation of Tm dynamics on actin. The time scale is much longer than that of all-atom molecular dynamics simulation because of the reduction of the degrees of freedom. The coarse-grained model is a good template for studying cardiac thin filament mutations that cause FHC, and reduces the cost of computational resources.

  9. MIBG scintigraphic assessment of cardiac adrenergic activity in response to altitude hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Richalet, J.P.; Merlet, P.; Bourguignon, M.; Le-Trong, J.L.; Keromes, A.; Rathat, C.; Jouve, B.; Hot, M.A.; Castaigne, A.; Syrota, A. )

    1990-01-01

    High altitude hypoxia induces a decrease in the cardiac chronotropic function at maximal exercise or in response to isoproterenol infusion, suggesting an alteration in the cardiac sympathetic activation. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (({sup 123}I)MIBG) was used to map scintigraphically the cardiac sympathetic neuronal function in six male subjects (aged 32 {plus minus} 7 yr) after an exposure to high altitude that created hypoxic conditions. Results obtained just after return to sea level (RSL) were compared with the normal values obtained after 2 or 3 mo of normoxia (N). A static image was created as the sum of the 16-EKG gated images recorded for 10 min in the anterior view of the chest at 20, 60, 120, and 240 min after injection. Regions of interest were located over the heart (H), lungs (L), and mediastinum (M) regions. There was a significant decrease in the H/M and the L/M ratios in RSL compared to N condition. Plasma norepinephrine concentration was elevated during the stay at altitude but not significantly different in RSL compared to N. In conclusion, cardiac ({sup 123}I)MIBG uptake is reduced after an exposure to altitude hypoxia, supporting the hypothesis of an hypoxia-induced reduction of adrenergic neurotransmitter reserve in the myocardium. Furthermore, the observed significant decrease in pulmonary MIBG uptake suggests an alteration of endothelial cell function after exposure to chronic hypoxia.

  10. False alarm reduction in BSN-based cardiac monitoring using signal quality and activity type information.

    PubMed

    Tanantong, Tanatorn; Nantajeewarawat, Ekawit; Thiemjarus, Surapa

    2015-01-01

    False alarms in cardiac monitoring affect the quality of medical care, impacting on both patients and healthcare providers. In continuous cardiac monitoring using wireless Body Sensor Networks (BSNs), the quality of ECG signals can be deteriorated owing to several factors, e.g., noises, low battery power, and network transmission problems, often resulting in high false alarm rates. In addition, body movements occurring from activities of daily living (ADLs) can also create false alarms. This paper presents a two-phase framework for false arrhythmia alarm reduction in continuous cardiac monitoring, using signals from an ECG sensor and a 3D accelerometer. In the first phase, classification models constructed using machine learning algorithms are used for labeling input signals. ECG signals are labeled with heartbeat types and signal quality levels, while 3D acceleration signals are labeled with ADL types. In the second phase, a rule-based expert system is used for combining classification results in order to determine whether arrhythmia alarms should be accepted or suppressed. The proposed framework was validated on datasets acquired using BSNs and the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. For the BSN dataset, acceleration and ECG signals were collected from 10 young and 10 elderly subjects while they were performing ADLs. The framework reduced the false alarm rate from 9.58% to 1.43% in our experimental study, showing that it can potentially assist physicians in diagnosing a vast amount of data acquired from wireless sensors and enhance the performance of continuous cardiac monitoring. PMID:25671512

  11. Crosstalk between mitogen-activated protein kinases and mitochondria in cardiac diseases: therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Agostini, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases cause more mortality and morbidity worldwide than any other diseases. Although many intracellular signaling pathways influence cardiac physiology and pathology, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family has garnered significant attention because of its vast implications in signaling and cross-talk with other signaling networks. The extensively studied MAPKs ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and ERK5, demonstrate unique intracellular signaling mechanisms, responding to a myriad of mitogens and stressors and influencing the signaling of cardiac development, metabolism, performance, and pathogenesis. Definitive relationships between MAPK signaling and cardiac dysfunction remain elusive, despite 30 years of extensive clinical studies and basic research of various animal/cell models, severities of stress, and types of stimuli. Still, several studies have proven the importance of MAPK cross-talk with mitochondria, powerhouses of the cell that provide over 80% of ATP for normal cardiomyocyte function and play a crucial role in cell death. Although many questions remain unanswered, there exists enough evidence to consider the possibility of targeting MAPK-mitochondria interactions in the prevention and treatment of heart disease. The goal of this review is to integrate previous studies into a discussion of MAPKs and MAPK-mitochondria signaling in cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction (ischemia), hypertrophy and heart failure. A comprehensive understanding of relevant molecular mechanisms, as well as challenges for studies in this area, will facilitate the development of new pharmacological agents and genetic manipulations for therapy of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24924700

  12. Crosstalk between mitogen-activated protein kinases and mitochondria in cardiac diseases: therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Agostini, Bryan

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular diseases cause more mortality and morbidity worldwide than any other diseases. Although many intracellular signaling pathways influence cardiac physiology and pathology, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family has garnered significant attention because of its vast implications in signaling and crosstalk with other signaling networks. The extensively studied MAPKs ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and ERK5, demonstrate unique intracellular signaling mechanisms, responding to a myriad of mitogens and stressors and influencing the signaling of cardiac development, metabolism, performance, and pathogenesis. Definitive relationships between MAPK signaling and cardiac dysfunction remain elusive, despite 30 years of extensive clinical studies and basic research of various animal/cell models, severities of stress, and types of stimuli. Still, several studies have proven the importance of MAPK crosstalk with mitochondria, powerhouses of the cell that provide over 80% of ATP for normal cardiomyocyte function and play a crucial role in cell death. Although many questions remain unanswered, there exists enough evidence to consider the possibility of targeting MAPK-mitochondria interactions in the prevention and treatment of heart disease. The goal of this review is to integrate previous studies into a discussion of MAPKs and MAPK-mitochondria signaling in cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction (ischemia), hypertrophy and heart failure. A comprehensive understanding of relevant molecular mechanisms, as well as challenges for studies in this area, will facilitate the development of new pharmacological agents and genetic manipulations for therapy of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Evaluation of cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activity.

    PubMed

    Rossum, A C; Wood, M L; Bishop, S L; Deblock, H; Charles, J B

    1997-04-15

    This study represents the first systematic evaluation of dysrhythmias before, during, and after spaceflight including extravehicular activity (EVA). The data, based on 7 Shuttle crew members, revealed a nonsignificant decrease in ventricular and supraventricular ectopy during EVA, suggesting that the incidence of dysrhythmias is no greater during EVA than with any other phase of a mission or preflight.

  14. Activation of Hypoxia‐Inducible Factor‐2 in Adipocytes Results in Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qun; Huang, Yan; Booth, Carmen J.; Haase, Volker H.; Johnson, Randall S.; Celeste Simon, M.; Giordano, Frank J.; Yun, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity can cause structural and functional abnormalities of the heart via complex but largely undefined mechanisms. Emerging evidence has shown that obesity results in reduced oxygen concentrations, or hypoxia, in adipose tissue. We hypothesized that the adipocyte hypoxia‐signaling pathway plays an essential role in the development of obesity‐associated cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Using a mouse model in which the hypoxia‐inducible factor (HIF) pathway is activated by deletion of the von Hippel–Lindau gene specifically in adipocytes, we found that mice with adipocyte–von Hippel–Lindau deletion developed lethal cardiac hypertrophy. HIF activation in adipocytes results in overexpression of key cardiomyopathy‐associated genes in adipose tissue, increased serum levels of several proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin‐1β and monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, and activation of nuclear factor–κB and nuclear factor of activated T cells in the heart. Interestingly, genetic deletion of Hif2a, but not Hif1a, was able to rescue cardiac hypertrophy and abrogate adipose inflammation. Conclusion We have discovered a previously uncharacterized mechanism underlying a critical and direct role of the adipocyte HIF‐2 transcription factor in the development of adipose inflammation and pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24326162

  15. Cardiorespiratory Coupling: Common Rhythms in Cardiac, Sympathetic, and Respiratory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Baekey, David M.; Galán, Roberto F.; Wehrwein, Erica; Morris, Kendall F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory coupling is an encompassing term describing more than the well-recognized influences of respiration on heart rate and blood pressure. Our data indicate that cardiorespiratory coupling reflects a reciprocal interaction between autonomic and respiratory control systems, and the cardiovascular system modulates the ventilatory pattern as well. For example, cardioventilatory coupling refers to the influence of heart beats and arterial pulse pressure on respiration and is the tendency for the next inspiration to start at a preferred latency after the last heart beat in expiration. Multiple complementary, well-described mechanisms mediate respiration’s influence on cardiovascular function, whereas mechanisms mediating the cardiovascular system’s influence on respiration may only be through the baroreceptors but are just being identified. Our review will describe a differential effect of conditioning rats with either chronic intermittent or sustained hypoxia on sympathetic nerve activity but also on ventilatory pattern variability. Both intermittent and sustained hypoxia increase sympathetic nerve activity after 2 weeks but affect sympatho-respiratory coupling differentially. Intermittent hypoxia enhances sympatho-respiratory coupling, which is associated with low variability in the ventilatory pattern. In contrast, after constant hypobaric hypoxia, 1-to-1 coupling between bursts of sympathetic and phrenic nerve activity is replaced by 2-to-3 coupling. This change in coupling pattern is associated with increased variability of the ventilatory pattern. After baro-denervating hypobaric hypoxic-conditioned rats, splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity becomes tonic (distinct bursts are absent) with decreases during phrenic nerve bursts and ventilatory pattern becomes regular. Thus, conditioning rats to either intermittent or sustained hypoxia accentuates the reciprocal nature of cardiorespiratory coupling. Finally, identifying a compelling physiologic

  16. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Is Critical to Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huang-Jun; Liao, Hai-Han; Yang, Zheng; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which plays a central role in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism. However, accumulating evidence demonstrates that PPARγ agonists have potential to reduce inflammation, influence the balance of immune cells, suppress oxidative stress, and improve endothelial function, which are all involved in the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cardiac fibrosis. Thus, in this review we discuss the role of PPARγ in various cardiovascular conditions associated with cardiac fibrosis, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, ischemia/reperfusion injury, atrial fibrillation, and several other cardiovascular disease (CVD) conditions, and summarize the developmental status of PPARγ agonists for the clinical management of CVD. PMID:27293418

  17. Practical nonlinear method for detection of respiratory and cardiac dysfunction in human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Richard A.; Lawee, Michael S.; Newman, Anthony K.; Weiss, J. Woodrow; Chandra, Shalabh; Grimm, Richard A.; Thomas, James D.

    1995-12-01

    This research applies novel nonlinear signal detection techniques in studies of human subjects with respiratory and cardiac diseases. One of the studies concerns a breathing disorder during sleep, a disease called Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). In a second study we investigate a disease of the heart, Atrial Fibrillation (AF). The former study involves nonlinear processing of the time sequences of sleep apnea recordings (cardio-respirograms) collected from patients with known obstructive sleep apnea, and from a normal control. In the latter study, we apply similar nonlinear metrics to Doppler flow measurements obtained by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). One of our metrics, the 'chaotic radius' is used for tracking the position of points in phase space relative to some reference position. A second metric, the 'differential radius' provides a measure of the separation rate of contiguous (evolving) points in phase space. A third metric, the 'chaotic frequency' gives angular position of the phase space orbit as a function of time. All are useful for identifying change of physiologic condition that is not always apparent using conventional methods.

  18. Neuropeptide F peptides act through unique signaling pathways to affect cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Setzu, M; Biolchini, M; Lilliu, A; Manca, M; Muroni, P; Poddighe, S; Bass, C; Angioy, A M; Nichols, R

    2012-02-01

    Elucidating how neuropeptides affect physiology may result in delineating peptidergic mechanisms and identifying antagonists for application in basic and translational science. Human neuropeptide Y (NPY) regulates cardiac activity; frequently invertebrates contain orthologs of vertebrate peptides. We report invertebrate NPY-like neuropeptide F (NPF) arrested the signal frequency of the slow phase of the cardiac cycle (EC50 = 1 pM); however, signal frequency of the fast phase was affected only minimally. Neuropeptide F decreased the duration of the slow phase by ~70% (EC50 = 0.6 pM), but increased the duration of the fast phase by ~57% (EC50 = 10nM). Short NPF-1 (sNPF-1) decreased the signal frequency of the slow phase by ~70% (EC50 = 9 nM); yet, signal frequency of the fast phase was unaffected. Short NPF-1 decreased the duration of the slow phase ~55% (EC50 ~50 nM), but increased the duration of the fast phase ~20% without dose dependency. Neuropeptide F and sNPF-1 increased isoelectric period duration. This novel report demonstrated NPY-like peptides are cardioactive but functionally unique. These data contribute to understanding how invertebrate orthologs affect cardiovascular activity. Dipteran fast and slow phases may be generated from separate pacemakers in the abdominal heart and in the anterior thoracocephalic aorta, respectively. Thus, our research suggests NPF and sNPF-1 act through different mechanisms to regulate cardiac activity. Invertebrate NPY-like peptides act in olfaction and feeding yet mechanisms which are associated with their cardioactive effects remain unknown; our work may provide evidence linking their roles in sensory response and cardiac activity.

  19. Neuropeptide F peptides act through unique signaling pathways to affect cardiac activity

    PubMed Central

    Setzu, M.; Biolchini, M.; Lilliu, A.; Manca, M.; Muroni, P.; Poddighe, S.; Bass, C.; Angioy, A.M.; Nichols, R.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating how neuropeptides affect physiology may result in delineating peptidergic mechanisms and identifying antagonists for application in basic and translational science. Human neuropeptide Y (NPY) regulates cardiac activity; frequently invertebrates contain orthologs of vertebrate peptides. We report invertebrate NPY-like neuropeptide F (NPF) arrested the signal frequency of the slow phase of the cardiac cycle (EC50 = 1 pM); however, signal frequency of the fast phase was affected only minimally. Neuropeptide F decreased the duration of the slow phase by ~70% (EC50 = 0.6 pM), but increased the duration of the fast phase by ~57% (EC50 = 10 nM). Short NPF-1 (sNPF-1) decreased the signal frequency of the slow phase by ~70% (EC50 = 9 nM); yet, signal frequency of the fast phase was unaffected. Short NPF-1 decreased the duration of the slow phase ~55% (EC50 ~ 50 nM), but increased the duration of the fast phase ~20% without dose dependency. Neuropeptide F and sNPF-1 increased isoelectric period duration. This novel report demonstrated NPY-like peptides are cardioactive but functionally unique. These data contribute to understanding how invertebrate orthologs affect cardiovascular activity. Dipteran fast and slow phases may be generated from separate pacemakers in the abdominal heart and in the anterior thoracocephalic aorta, respectively. Thus, our research suggests NPF and sNPF-1 act through different mechanisms to regulate cardiac activity. Invertebrate NPY-like peptides act in olfaction and feeding yet mechanisms which are associated with their cardioactive effects remain unknown; our work may provide evidence linking their roles in sensory response and cardiac activity. PMID:22289500

  20. Sexually dimorphic adaptation of cardiac function: roles of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Le, Yicong; Froogh, Ghezal; Kandhi, Sharath; Jiang, Houli; Luo, Meng; Sun, Dong; Huang, An

    2016-06-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are cardioprotective mediators metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) to form corresponding diols (DHETs). As a sex-susceptible target, sEH is involved in the sexually dimorphic regulation of cardiovascular function. Thus, we hypothesized that the female sex favors EET-mediated potentiation of cardiac function via downregulation of sEH expression, followed by upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Hearts were isolated from male (M) and female (F) wild-type (WT) and sEH-KO mice, and perfused with constant flow at different preloads. Basal coronary flow required to maintain the perfusion pressure at 100 mmHg was significantly greater in females than males, and sEH-KO than WT mice. All hearts displayed a dose-dependent decrease in coronary resistance and increase in cardiac contractility, represented as developed tension in response to increases in preload. These responses were also significantly greater in females than males, and sEH-KO than WT 14,15-EEZE abolished the sex-induced (F vs. M) and transgenic model-dependent (KO vs. WT) differences in the cardiac contractility, confirming an EET-driven response. Compared with M-WT controls, F-WT hearts expressed downregulation of sEH, associated with increased EETs and reduced DHETs, a pattern comparable to that observed in sEH-KO hearts. Coincidentally, F-WT and sEH-KO hearts exhibited increased PPARα expression, but comparable expression of eNOS, PPARβ, and EET synthases. In conclusion, female-specific downregulation of sEH initiates an EET-dependent adaptation of cardiac function, characterized by increased coronary flow via reduction in vascular resistance, and promotion of cardiac contractility, a response that could be further intensified by PPARα.

  1. Thioredoxin-2 Inhibits Mitochondrial ROS Generation and ASK1 Activity to Maintain Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qunhua; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Zhang, Haifeng; Huang, Yan; Hinojosa-Kirschenbaum, Ford; Fan, Peidong; Yao, Lina; Belardinelli, Luiz; Tellides, George; Giordano, Frank J.; Budas, Grant R.; Min, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2) is a key mitochondrial protein which regulates cellular redox and survival by suppressing mitochondrial ROS generation and by inhibiting apoptosis stress kinase-1 (ASK1)-dependent apoptotic signaling. To date, the role of the mitochondrial Trx2 system in heart failure pathogenesis has not been investigated. Methods and Results Western blot and histological analysis revealed that Trx2 protein expression levels were reduced in hearts from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), with a concomitant increase in increased ASK1 phosphorylation/activity. Cardiac-specific Trx2 knockout mice (Trx2-cKO). Trx2-cKO mice develop spontaneous DCM at 1 month of age with increased heart size, reduced ventricular wall thickness, and a progressive decline in left ventricular (LV) contractile function, resulting in mortality due to heart failure by ~4 months of age. The progressive decline in cardiac function observed in Trx2-cKO mice was accompanied by disruption of mitochondrial ultrastructure, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, increased mitochondrial ROS generation and reduced ATP production, correlating with increased ASK1 signaling and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Chronic administration of a highly selective ASK1 inhibitor improved cardiac phenotype and reduced maladaptive LV remodeling with significant reductions in oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis and cardiac failure. Cellular data from Trx2-deficient cardiomyocytes demonstrated that ASK1 inhibition reduced apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial ROS generation. Conclusions Our data support an essential role for mitochondrial Trx2 in preserving cardiac function by suppressing mitochondrial ROS production and ASK1-dependent apoptosis. Inhibition of ASK1 represents a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:25628390

  2. Alterations in electrodermal activity and cardiac parasympathetic tone during hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Kekecs, Zoltán; Szekely, Anna; Varga, Katalin

    2016-02-01

    Exploring autonomic nervous system (ANS) changes during hypnosis is critical for understanding the nature and extent of the hypnotic phenomenon and for identifying the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypnosis in different medical conditions. To assess ANS changes during hypnosis, electrodermal activity and pulse rate variability (PRV) were measured in 121 young adults. Participants either received hypnotic induction (hypnosis condition) or listened to music (control condition), and both groups were exposed to test suggestions. Blocks of silence and experimental sound stimuli were presented at baseline, after induction, and after de-induction. Skin conductance level (SCL) and high frequency (HF) power of PRV measured at each phase were compared between groups. Hypnosis decreased SCL compared to the control condition; however, there were no group differences in HF power. Furthermore, hypnotic suggestibility did not moderate ANS changes in the hypnosis group. These findings indicate that hypnosis reduces tonic sympathetic nervous system activity, which might explain why hypnosis is effective in the treatment of disorders with strong sympathetic nervous system involvement, such as rheumatoid arthritis, hot flashes, hypertension, and chronic pain. Further studies with different control conditions are required to examine the specificity of the sympathetic effects of hypnosis.

  3. Alterations in electrodermal activity and cardiac parasympathetic tone during hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Kekecs, Zoltán; Szekely, Anna; Varga, Katalin

    2016-02-01

    Exploring autonomic nervous system (ANS) changes during hypnosis is critical for understanding the nature and extent of the hypnotic phenomenon and for identifying the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypnosis in different medical conditions. To assess ANS changes during hypnosis, electrodermal activity and pulse rate variability (PRV) were measured in 121 young adults. Participants either received hypnotic induction (hypnosis condition) or listened to music (control condition), and both groups were exposed to test suggestions. Blocks of silence and experimental sound stimuli were presented at baseline, after induction, and after de-induction. Skin conductance level (SCL) and high frequency (HF) power of PRV measured at each phase were compared between groups. Hypnosis decreased SCL compared to the control condition; however, there were no group differences in HF power. Furthermore, hypnotic suggestibility did not moderate ANS changes in the hypnosis group. These findings indicate that hypnosis reduces tonic sympathetic nervous system activity, which might explain why hypnosis is effective in the treatment of disorders with strong sympathetic nervous system involvement, such as rheumatoid arthritis, hot flashes, hypertension, and chronic pain. Further studies with different control conditions are required to examine the specificity of the sympathetic effects of hypnosis. PMID:26488759

  4. Myofibril ATPase activity of cardiac and skeletal muscle of exhaustively exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, A N; Turcotte, R; Rossiter, M; Secord, D; Maybank, P E

    1984-01-01

    The activation characteristics of Mg-ATP and Ca2+ on cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase activity were studied in rats following a run to exhaustion. In addition, the effect of varying ionic strength was determined on skeletal muscle from exhausted animals. The exhausted group (E) ran at a speed of 25 m min-1 with an 8% incline. Myofibril ATPase activities for control (C) and E were determined with 1, 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP and 1 and 10 microM Ca2+ at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. For control skeletal muscle, at 1 and 10 microM Ca2+, there was an increase in ATPase activity from 1 to 5 mM Mg-ATP (P less than 0.05). For E animals the myofibril ATPase activities at 10 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ the activities at 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP were greater for the E animals (P less than 0.05). Increasing KCl concentrations resulted in greater inhibition for E animals. With cardiac muscle, the myofibril ATPase activities at 1.0 microM free Ca2+ were lower for E at all Mg-ATP levels (P less than 0.05). In contrast, at 10 microM Ca2+, the E group exhibited an elevated myofibril ATPase activity. The results indicate that Mg-ATP and Ca2+ activation of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase is altered with exhaustive exercise. PMID:6230276

  5. Active surveillance of sudden cardiac death in young athletes by periodic Internet searches.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kristal; Pan, Yann Ping; Pock, Michelle; Chang, Ruey-Kang R

    2013-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that prospective, systematic Internet searches could identify occurrences of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes and would be useful for establishing a system of active surveillance. Weekly advanced Google searches of the Internet were conducted for cases of SCD in young athletes during a 12-month period (2007-2008). Athletes ages 11-30 years who collapsed during a game, practice, or within an hour of exercise were included in the study. Individuals with known histories of cardiac issues and events occurring outside the United States were excluded. Verification of SCD was by autopsy reports and death certificates from county coroner offices and vital record agencies. Initially, 71 events were identified. Verification for the cause of death by coroner reports was possible in 45 cases, 43 (96 %) of which were confirmed to be SCDs. A total of 69 individuals 11-30 years of age (mean 17 ± 5 years) died suddenly of cardiovascular causes while participating in 15 different organized sports and a variety of nonorganized physical activities. The most common cause of death was hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (30 %), followed by coronary artery anomalies (9 %), and myocarditis (9 %). The incidence of athlete SCD, the types of sports involved, and the cardiac causes of death in our study were comparable with those of previous reports. Readily available Internet searches have the potential to be a powerful tool for identifying occurrences of athlete SCD. An active surveillance system using Google searches followed by coroner report verification can provide important epidemiologic and clinical information.

  6. Active Surveillance of Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Athletes by Periodic Internet Searches

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kristal; Pan, Yann Ping; Pock, Michelle; Chang, Ruey-Kang R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that prospective, systematic Internet searches could identify occurrences of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in athletes, and would be useful to establish a system of active surveillance. Methods Weekly advanced Google searches of the Internet were conducted for cases of SCD in young athletes over a 12-month period (2007–8). Athletes aged 11 to 30 years who collapsed during a game, practice, or within an hour of exercise were included. Individuals with known histories of cardiac issues and events occurring outside the United States were excluded. Verification of SCD was by autopsy reports and death certificates from county coroner offices and vital record agencies. Results A total of 71 events were initially identified. Verification of the cause of death by coroner reports was possible in 45 cases, of which 43 (96%) were confirmed to be SCDs. Sixty-nine individuals, 11 to 30 years of age (mean 17 ± 5), died suddenly from cardiovascular causes while participating in 15 different organized sports and a variety of non-organized physical activities. The most common cause of death was hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (30%), followed by coronary artery anomalies (9%), and myocarditis (9%). The incidence of athlete SCD, types of sports involved, and cardiac causes of death in our study were comparable to previous reports. Conclusions Readily available Internet searches have the potential to be a powerful tool for identifying occurrences of athlete SCD. An active surveillance system using Google searches followed by coroner report verification can provide important epidemiologic and clinical information. PMID:23681420

  7. Individual-, Family-, Community-, and Policy-Level Impact of a School-Based Cardiovascular Risk Detection Screening Program for Children in Underserved, Rural Areas: The CARDIAC Project

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Lesley; Murphy, Emily; Lilly, Christa L.; Ritchie, Susan K.; Minor, Valerie; Neal, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The Coronary Artery Risk Detection In Appalachian Communities (CARDIAC) Project has screened more than 80,000 children (10–12 years) for cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors over the past 15 years. Simultaneous referral and intervention efforts have also contributed to the overall program impact. In this study, we examined evidence of programmatic impact in the past decade at the individual, family, community, and policy levels from child screening outcomes, referral rates, participation in subsequent services, and policies that embed the activities of the project as a significant element. Within this period of time, fifth-grade overweight and obesity rates were maintained at a time when rates elsewhere increased. 107 children were referred for additional screening and treatment for probable familial hypercholesterolemia (FH); 82 family members were subsequently screened in family-based screening efforts. 58 grants were distributed throughout the state for community-appropriate obesity intervention. A state wellness policy embedded CARDIAC as the method of assessment and national child cholesterol screening guidelines were impacted by CARDIAC findings. The sustainability and successful impact of this school-based program within a largely underserved, rural Appalachian state are also discussed. PMID:23840946

  8. Prediction of drug-related cardiac adverse effects in humans--B: use of QSAR programs for early detection of drug-induced cardiac toxicities.

    PubMed

    Frid, Anna A; Matthews, Edwin J

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the use of three quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) programs to predict drug-related cardiac adverse effects (AEs), BioEpisteme, MC4PC, and Leadscope Predictive Data Miner. QSAR models were constructed for 9 cardiac AE clusters affecting Purkinje nerve fibers (arrhythmia, bradycardia, conduction disorder, electrocardiogram, palpitations, QT prolongation, rate rhythm composite, tachycardia, and Torsades de pointes) and 5 clusters affecting the heart muscle (coronary artery disorders, heart failure, myocardial disorders, myocardial infarction, and valve disorders). The models were based on a database of post-marketing AEs linked to 1632 chemical structures, and identical training data sets were configured for three QSAR programs. Model performance was optimized and shown to be affected by the ratio of the number of active to inactive drugs. Results revealed that the three programs were complementary and predictive performances using any single positive, consensus two positives, or consensus three positives were as follows, respectively: 70.7%, 91.7%, and 98.0% specificity; 74.7%, 47.2%, and 21.0% sensitivity; and 138.2, 206.3, and 144.2 chi(2). In addition, a prospective study using AE data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) MedWatch Program showed 82.4% specificity and 94.3% sensitivity. Furthermore, an external validation study of 18 drugs with serious cardiotoxicity not considered in the models had 88.9% sensitivity. PMID:19941924

  9. Development of a patch type embedded cardiac function monitoring system using dual microprocessor for arrhythmia detection in heart disease patient.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongwon; Noh, Hyung Wook; Lee, I B; Jung, Ji-Wook; Song, Yoonseon; Lee, Sooyeul; Kim, Seunghwan

    2012-01-01

    A patch type embedded cardiac function monitoring system was developed to detect arrhythmias such as PVC (Premature Ventricular Contraction), pause, ventricular fibrillation, and tachy/bradycardia. The overall system is composed of a main module including a dual processor and a Bluetooth telecommunication module. The dual microprocessor strategy minimizes power consumption and size, and guarantees the resources of embedded software programs. The developed software was verified with standard DB, and showed good performance.

  10. Joint influence of transmural heterogeneities and wall deformation on cardiac bioelectrical activity: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Colli Franzone, P; Pavarino, L F; Scacchi, S

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate, by means of numerical simulations, the influence of myocardial deformation due to muscle contraction and relaxation on the cardiac repolarization process in presence of transmural intrinsic action potential duration (APD) heterogeneities. The three-dimensional electromechanical model considered consists of the following four coupled components: the quasi-static transversely isotropic finite elasticity equations for the deformation of the cardiac tissue; the active tension model for the intracellular calcium dynamics and cross-bridge binding; the anisotropic Bidomain model for the electrical current flow through the deforming cardiac tissue; the membrane model of ventricular myocytes, including stretch-activated channels. The numerical simulations are based on our finite element parallel solver, which employs Multilevel Additive Schwarz preconditioners for the solution of the discretized Bidomain equations and Newton-Krylov methods for the solution of the discretized non-linear finite elasticity equations. Our findings show that: (i) the presence of intrinsic transmural cellular APD heterogeneities is not fully masked by electrotonic current flow or by the presence of the mechanical deformation; (ii) despite the presence of transmural APD heterogeneities, the recovery process follows the activation sequence and there is no significant transmural repolarization gradient; (iii) with or without transmural APD heterogeneities, epicardial electrograms always display the same wave shape and discordance between the polarity of QRS complex and T-wave; (iv) the main effects of the mechanical deformation are an increase of the dispersion of repolarization time and APD, when computed over the total cardiac domain and over the endo- and epicardial surfaces, while there is a slight decrease along the transmural direction. PMID:27545966

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 deficiency affects cardiac cardiolipin homeostasis and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Athéa, Yoni; Viollet, Benoît; Mateo, Philippe; Rousseau, Delphine; Novotova, Marta; Garnier, Anne; Vaulont, Sophie; Wilding, James R.; Grynberg, Alain; Veksler, Vladimir; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2007-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important role in controlling energy homeostasis and is envisioned as a promising target to treat metabolic disorders. In the heart, AMPK is involved in short-term regulation and in transcriptional control of proteins involved in energy metabolism. Here, we investigated whether deletion of AMPKα2, the main cardiac catalytic isoform, alters mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Body weight, heart weight and AMPKα1 expression were similar in control littermate and AMPKa2−/− mice. Despite normal oxygen consumption in perfused hearts, maximal oxidative capacity, measured using saponin permeabilized cardiac fibers, was ≈30 % lower in AMPKa2−/− mice with octanoate, pyruvate or glutamate+malate but not with succinate as substrates, showing an impairment at complex-I of the respiratory chain. This effect was associated with a 25% decrease in mitochondrial cardiolipin content, the main mitochondrial membrane phospholipid that is crucial for complex-I activity, and by a 13% decrease in mitochondrial content of linoleic acid, the main fatty acid of cardiolipins. The decrease in cardiolipin content could be explained by mRNA down-regulation of rate limiting enzymes of both cardiolipin synthesis (CDS2) and remodeling (ALCAT1). These data reveal a new role for AMPKα2 subunit in the regulation of cardiac muscle oxidative capacity via cardiolipin homeostasis. PMID:17327449

  12. Thoracic outlet syndrome of pectoralis minor etiology mimicking cardiac symptoms on activity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is the result of compression or irritation of neurovascular bundles as they pass from the lower cervical spine into the arm, via the axilla. If the pectoralis minor muscle is involved the patient may present with chest pain, along with pain and paraesthesia into the arm. These symptoms are also commonly seen in patients with chest pain of a cardiac origin. In this case, a patient presents with a history of left sided chest pain with pain and paraesthesia into the left upper limb, which only occurs whilst running. The symptoms were reproduced on both digital pressure over the pectoralis minor muscle and on provocative testing for thoracic outlet syndrome. The patient’s treatment therefore focused on the pectoralis minor muscle, with a complete resolution of symptoms. This illustrates that not all cases of chest pain with associated arm symptoms that occur on physical activity are of cardiac origin. PMID:23204575

  13. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits cell cycle activity of embryonic cardiac progenitor cells via its NPRA receptor signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Adam; Feridooni, Tiam; Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; McNeil, Kathleen; Chinni, Sarita; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-04-01

    The biological effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs), which can either activate guanylyl cyclase (NPRA and NPRB) or inhibit adenylyl cyclase (NPRC) to modulate intracellular cGMP or cAMP, respectively. During cardiac development, ANP serves as an early maker of differentiating atrial and ventricular chamber myocardium. As development proceeds, expression of ANP persists in the atria but declines in the ventricles. Currently, it is not known whether ANP is secreted or the ANP-NPR signaling system plays any active role in the developing ventricles. Thus the primary aims of this study were to 1) examine biological activity of ANP signaling systems in embryonic ventricular myocardium, and 2) determine whether ANP signaling modulates proliferation/differentiation of undifferentiated cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and/or cardiomyocytes. Here, we provide evidence that ANP synthesized in embryonic day (E)11.5 ventricular myocytes is actively secreted and processed to its biologically active form. Notably, NPRA and NPRC were detected in E11.5 ventricles and exogenous ANP stimulated production of cGMP in ventricular cell cultures. Furthermore, we showed that exogenous ANP significantly decreased cell number and DNA synthesis of CPCs but not cardiomyocytes and this effect could be reversed by pretreatment with the NPRA receptor-specific inhibitor A71915. ANP treatment also led to a robust increase in nuclear p27 levels in CPCs compared with cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data provide evidence that in the developing mammalian ventricles ANP plays a local paracrine role in regulating the balance between CPC proliferation and differentiation via NPRA/cGMP-mediated signaling pathways.

  14. Inpatient detection of cardiac-inherited disease: the impact of improving family history taking

    PubMed Central

    Waddell-Smith, Kathryn E; Donoghue, Tom; Oates, Stephanie; Graham, Amanda; Crawford, Jackie; Stiles, Martin K; Aitken, Andrew; Skinner, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives ‘Idiopathic’ cardiac conditions such as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and resuscitated sudden cardiac death (RSCD) may be familial. We suspected that inpatient cardiology services fail to recognise this. Our objective was to compare diagnostic value of family histories recorded by inpatient cardiology teams with a multigenerational family tree obtained by specially trained allied professionals. Methods 2 experienced cardiology nurses working in 2 tertiary adult cardiac units were trained in cardiac-inherited diseases and family history (FHx) taking, and established as regional coordinators for a National Cardiac Inherited Disease Registry. Over 6 months they sought ‘idiopathic’ cardiology inpatients with conditions with a possible familial basis, reviewed the FHx in the clinical records and pursued a minimum 3-generation family tree for syncope, young sudden death and cardiac disease (full FHx). Results 37 patients (22 males) were selected: mean age 51 years (range 15–79). Admission presentations included (idiopathic) RSCD (14), dyspnoea or heart failure (11), ventricular tachycardia (2), other (10). 3 patients had already volunteered their familial diagnosis to the admitting team. FHx was incompletely elicited in 17 (46%) and absent in 20 (54%). 29 patients (78%) provided a full FHx to the coordinator; 12 of which (41%) were strongly consistent with a diagnosis of a cardiac-inherited disease (DCM 7, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy 3, long QT 1, left ventricular non-compaction 1). Overall, a familial diagnostic rate rose from 3/37(8%) to 12/37 (32%). Conclusions Adult cardiology inpatient teams are poor at recording FHx and need to be reminded of its powerful diagnostic value. PMID:26925241

  15. Label-free electrical detection of cardiac biomarker with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible silicon nanowire sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Chua, Jay Huiyi; Chee, Ru-Ern; Agarwal, Ajay; Wong, She Mein; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2009-08-01

    Arrays of highly ordered silicon nanowire (SiNW) clusters are fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field effect transistor-compatible technology, and the ultrasensitive, label-free, electrical detection of cardiac biomarker in real time using the array sensor is presented. The successful detection of human cardiac troponin-T (cTnT) has been demonstrated in an assay buffer solution of concentration down to 1 fg/mL, as well as in an undiluted human serum environment of concentration as low as 30 fg/mL. The high specificity, selectivity, and swift response time of the SiNWs to the presence of ultralow concentrations of a target protein in a biological analyte solution, even in the presence of a high total protein concentration, paves the way for the development of a medical diagnostic system for point-of-care application that is able to provide an early and accurate indication of cardiac cellular necrosis. PMID:20337397

  16. Cardiac-specific activation of Cre expression at late fetal development

    SciTech Connect

    Opherk, Jan P.; Yampolsky, Peter; Hardt, Stefan E.; Schoels, Wolfgang; Katus, Hugo A.; Koenen, Michael . E-mail: koenen@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de; Zehelein, Joerg

    2007-07-27

    In a first step towards dissecting molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of cardiac diseases, we have generated transgenic mice that express a Cre-GFP fusion protein under the transcriptional control of a 4.3 kb murine cardiac Troponin I gene (cTnI) promoter. Cre-GFP expression, similar in three transgenic lines, is described in one line. In mouse embryos, transgenic for the Cre-GFP and ROSA lacZ reporter allele, first Cre-mediated recombination appeared at 16.5 dpc selectively at the heart. Like the endogenous cTnI gene, transgenic Cre expression showed a slow rise through fetal development that increased neonatally. Bitransgenic hearts, stained at 30 days of age, showed intense signals in ventricular and atrial myocytes while no recombination occurred in other tissues. The delayed onset of Cre activity in cTnI-Cre mice could provide a useful genetic tool to evaluate the function of loxP targeted cardiac genes without interference of recombination during early heart development.

  17. Severe hypoglycemia-induced lethal cardiac arrhythmias are mediated by sympathoadrenal activation.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Chen, Y Stefanie; VanderWeele, Jennifer; Jethi, Krishan; Fisher, Simon J

    2013-10-01

    For people with insulin-treated diabetes, severe hypoglycemia can be lethal, though potential mechanisms involved are poorly understood. To investigate how severe hypoglycemia can be fatal, hyperinsulinemic, severe hypoglycemic (10-15 mg/dL) clamps were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats with simultaneous electrocardiogram monitoring. With goals of reducing hypoglycemia-induced mortality, the hypotheses tested were that: 1) antecedent glycemic control impacts mortality associated with severe hypoglycemia; 2) with limitation of hypokalemia, potassium supplementation could limit hypoglycemia-associated deaths; 3) with prevention of central neuroglycopenia, brain glucose infusion could prevent hypoglycemia-associated arrhythmias and deaths; and 4) with limitation of sympathoadrenal activation, adrenergic blockers could prevent hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmic deaths. Severe hypoglycemia-induced mortality was noted to be worsened by diabetes, but recurrent antecedent hypoglycemia markedly improved the ability to survive an episode of severe hypoglycemia. Potassium supplementation tended to reduce mortality. Severe hypoglycemia caused numerous cardiac arrhythmias including premature ventricular contractions, tachycardia, and high-degree heart block. Intracerebroventricular glucose infusion reduced severe hypoglycemia-induced arrhythmias and overall mortality. β-Adrenergic blockade markedly reduced cardiac arrhythmias and completely abrogated deaths due to severe hypoglycemia. Under conditions studied, sudden deaths caused by insulin-induced severe hypoglycemia were mediated by lethal cardiac arrhythmias triggered by brain neuroglycopenia and the marked sympathoadrenal response.

  18. Conducting polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube based chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Nidhi; Niazi, Asad; Biradar, Ashok M.; Rajesh E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu; Mulchandani, Ashok E-mail: adani@engr.ucr.edu

    2014-10-13

    We report the fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based ultrasensitive label-free chemiresistive biosensor for the detection of human cardiac biomarker, myoglobin (Ag-cMb). Poly(pyrrole-co-pyrrolepropylic acid) with pendant carboxyl groups was electrochemically deposited on electrophoretically aligned SWNT channel, as a conducting linker, for biomolecular immobilization of highly specific cardiac myoglobin antibody. The device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, source-drain current-voltage (I-V), and charge-transfer characteristic studies. The device exhibited a linear response with a change in conductance in SWNT channel towards the target, Ag-cMb, over the concentration range of 1.0 to 1000 ng ml{sup −1} with a sensitivity of ∼118% per decade with high specificity.

  19. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites ("virtual electrodes") in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  20. Imaging cardiac activation sequence during ventricular tachycardia in a canine model of nonischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Han, Chengzong; Pogwizd, Steven M; Yu, Long; Zhou, Zhaoye; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; He, Bin

    2015-01-15

    Noninvasive cardiac activation imaging of ventricular tachycardia (VT) is important in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias in heart failure (HF) patients. This study investigated the ability of the three-dimensional cardiac electrical imaging (3DCEI) technique for characterizing the activation patterns of spontaneously occurring and norepinephrine (NE)-induced VTs in a newly developed arrhythmogenic canine model of nonischemic HF. HF was induced by aortic insufficiency followed by aortic constriction in three canines. Up to 128 body-surface ECGs were measured simultaneously with bipolar recordings from up to 232 intramural sites in a closed-chest condition. Data analysis was performed on the spontaneously occurring VTs (n=4) and the NE-induced nonsustained VTs (n=8) in HF canines. Both spontaneously occurring and NE-induced nonsustained VTs initiated by a focal mechanism primarily from the subendocardium, but occasionally from the subepicardium of left ventricle. Most focal initiation sites were located at apex, right ventricular outflow tract, and left lateral wall. The NE-induced VTs were longer, more rapid, and had more focal sites than the spontaneously occurring VTs. Good correlation was obtained between imaged activation sequence and direct measurements (averaged correlation coefficient of ∼0.70 over 135 VT beats). The reconstructed initiation sites were ∼10 mm from measured initiation sites, suggesting good localization in such a large animal model with cardiac size similar to a human. Both spontaneously occurring and NE-induced nonsustained VTs had focal initiation in this canine model of nonischemic HF. 3DCEI is feasible to image the activation sequence and help define arrhythmia mechanism of nonischemic HF-associated VTs. PMID:25416188

  1. Cardioactive and vasoactive effects of natural wild honey against cardiac malperformance induced by hyperadrenergic activity.

    PubMed

    Rakha, Miran K; Nabil, Zohour I; Hussein, Aida A

    2008-03-01

    Induction of hyperadrenergic activity was experimentally achieved in urethane-anesthetized rats using epinephrine (adrenaline). Acute administration of epinephrine (100 microg/kg) for 2 hours induced several cardiac disorders and vasomotor dysfunction. Pretreatment with natural wild honey (5 g/kg) for 1 hour prior to the injection with epinephrine (100 mug/kg) protected the anesthetized normal rats from the incidence of epinephrine-induced cardiac disorders and vasomotor dysfunction. Moreover, posttreatment with natural wild honey (5 g/kg) following the injection with epinephrine (100 microg/kg) for 1 hour showed several ameliorative outcomes to the electrocardiographic parameters and vasomotor dysfunction of anesthetized stressed rats. Furthermore, natural wild honey preserved the positive inotropic effect of epinephrine in both cases. Also, the total antioxidant capacity (AOC) of natural wild honey was found to be very pronounced. Levels of both reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) were considered relatively high in natural wild honey. Activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was also high, whereas catalase activity was relatively low, especially when compared to the value of SOD activity. It would appear from the results of the present study that natural wild honey may exert its cardioprotective and therapeutic effects against epinephrine-induced cardiac disorders and vasomotor dysfunction directly, via its very pronounced total AOC and its great wealth of both enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants involved in cardiovascular defense mechanisms, besides its substantial quantities of mineral elements such as magnesium, sodium, and chlorine, and/or indirectly, via the enhancement of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor nitric oxide release through the influence of ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

  2. Physical activity in patients with grown-up congenital heart defects after comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Jaworski, Radosław; Chojnicki, Maciej; Szalewska, Dominika; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Bakuła, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The group of grown-up patients with congenital heart defects (grown-up congenital heart – GUCH) complains of a number of specific medical and non-medical problems. The presented program of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR-GUCH), dedicated to the above mentioned group, can potentially improve the physical activity of GUCH patients. Aim The aim of the study was to assess the effect of the comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program on the physical activity of GUCH patients. Material and methods The invitation to take part in the CCR-GUCH program was addressed to a group of 57 patients (mean age: 23.7 ± 4.1 years) who had undergone the surgical correction of ventricular septal defects (VSD) or atrial septal defects (ASD) at least 12 months earlier. The patients were divided into two groups: A – patients undergoing rehabilitation, and B – patients who did not participate in the program. The patients were initially examined using functional and stress tests, and the program of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation was started in group A. After 30 days, the patients from both groups underwent further testing using the same methods as during the initial evaluation. Results After one month of rehabilitation, the physical activity parameters of patients participating in the CCR-GUCH program (group A) were significantly better than those observed among non-participants (group B). Conclusions The introduction of the comprehensive rehabilitation program improves the physical activity and, consequently, the quality of life of GUCH patients. The CCR-GUCH program appears to be a justified supplement to holistic care in the late rehabilitation of patients after the surgical correction of congenital heart defects. PMID:26336469

  3. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites (“virtual electrodes”) in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  4. Significant role of female sex hormones in cardiac myofilament activation in angiotensin II-mediated hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Sulaksana; Woranush, Warunya; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas

    2014-07-01

    Ovariectomy leads to suppression of cardiac myofilament activation in healthy rats implicating the physiological essence of female sex hormones on myocardial contraction. However, the possible function of these hormones during pathologically induced myofilament adaptation is not known. In this study, sham-operated and ovariectomized female rats were chronically exposed to angiotensin II (AII), which has been shown to cause myocardial adaptation. In the shams, AII induced cardiac adaptation by increasing myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Interestingly, this hypersensitivity was further enhanced in AII-infused ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomy increased the phosphorylation levels of cardiac tropomyosin, which may underlie the mechanism of hypersensitivity. On the other hand, AII infusion did not alter maximal tension that was suppressed after ovariectomy. This finding coincided with a comparable increase in β-isoform of myosin heavy chains in both ovariectomized groups. Together, it is conceivable that female sex hormones serve as predominant factors that regulate cardiac myofilament activation. Furthermore, they may prevent stress-induced myofilament maladaptation.

  5. Human cardiac phospholipase D activity is tightly controlled by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Thomas; Kemken, Dorit; Mier, Kenneth; Weber, Isabel; Richardt, Gert

    2004-02-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) plays a central role in receptor-mediated breakdown of choline phospholipids and formation of phosphatidic acid (PA), an important regulator of cardiac function. However, specific mechanisms that regulate myocardial PLD activity remain largely unknown, particularly in the human heart. We hypothesized that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), best known as substrate for phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes, plays a critical role in regulating myocardial PLD activity. We examined the effect of PIP2 on human myocardial PLD activity in vitro by utilizing a fluorescence HPLC assay. PIP2 increased 10-fold the maximal activity of a partially solubilized PLD from human atrial myocardium. PIP2-stimulated PLD activity was accompanied by a consecutive increase in diacylglycerol, indicating dephosphorylation of PA by PA phosphohydrolase. Likewise, phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, which is produced from PIP2 by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, increased PLD activity with about the same potency but with somewhat lower efficacy. In contrast, other phospholipids were ineffective, indicating that the action of PIP2 on PLD is highly specific. Neomycin, a high-affinity ligand of PIP2, inhibited PLD activity in human atrial myocardium, but had no effect on the activity of partially solubilized enzyme. The addition of PIP2 restored the sensitivity of solubilized PLD to neomycin inhibition, indicating that neomycin inhibits PLD activity by binding to endogenous PIP2. Our results demonstrate a critical role for PIP2 in human cardiac PLD activity and suggest that PIP2 synthesis (by phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase) and hydrolysis (by PIP2-specific PLC) could be important determinants in regulating PLD signal transduction in the human heart. PMID:14871550

  6. Inducible Conditional Vascular-Specific Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta/Delta Leads to Rapid Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Vukolic, Ana; Baudouy, Delphine; Michiels, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors which function as ligand-activated transcription factors. Among them, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARβ/δ) is highly expressed in the heart and thought to have cardioprotective functions due to its beneficial effects in metabolic syndrome. As we already showed that PPARβ/δ activation resulted in an enhanced cardiac angiogenesis and growth without impairment of heart function, we were interested to determine the effects of a specific activation of PPARβ/δ in the vasculature on cardiac performance under normal and in chronic ischemic heart disease conditions. We analyzed the effects of a specific PPARβ/δ overexpression in endothelial cells on the heart using an inducible conditional vascular-specific mouse model. We demonstrate that vessel-specific overexpression of PPARβ/δ induces rapid cardiac angiogenesis and growth with an increase in cardiomyocyte size. Upon myocardial infarction, vascular overexpression of PPARβ/δ, despite the enhanced cardiac vessel formation, does not protect against chronic ischemic injury. Our results suggest that the proper balance of PPARβ/δ activation in the different cardiac cell types is required to obtain beneficial effects on the outcome in chronic ischemic heart disease. PMID:27057154

  7. Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex and its implications for sympathetic activation in chronic heart failure and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-W; Xiong, X-Q; Chen, Q; Li, Y-H; Kang, Y-M; Zhu, G-Q

    2015-04-01

    Persistent excessive sympathetic activation greatly contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure (CHF) and hypertension. Cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex (CSAR) is a sympathoexcitatory reflex with positive feedback characteristics. Humoral factors such as bradykinin, adenosine and reactive oxygen species produced in myocardium due to myocardial ischaemia stimulate cardiac sympathetic afferents and thereby reflexly increase sympathetic activity and blood pressure. The CSAR is enhanced in myocardial ischaemia, CHF and hypertension. The enhanced CSAR at least partially contributes to the sympathetic activation and pathogenesis of these diseases. Nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and rostral ventrolateral medulla are the most important central sites involved in the modulation and integration of the CSAR. Angiotensin II, AT1 receptors and NAD(P)H oxidase-derived superoxide anions pathway in the PVN are mainly responsible for the enhanced CSAR in CHF and hypertension. Central angiotensin-(1-7), nitric oxide, endothelin, intermedin, hydrogen peroxide and several other signal molecules are involved in regulating CSAR. Blockade of the CSAR shows beneficial effects in CHF and hypertension. This review focuses on the anatomical and physiological basis of the CSAR, the interaction of CSAR with baroreflex and chemoreflex, and the role of enhanced CSAR in the pathogenesis of CHF and hypertension.

  8. Activation of Cardiac Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 4 Causes Left Ventricular Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Alexander; Amaral, Ansel P; Schramm, Karla; Singh, Saurav; Sloan, Alexis; Yanucil, Christopher; Li, Jihe; Shehadeh, Lina A; Hare, Joshua M; David, Valentin; Martin, Aline; Fornoni, Alessia; Di Marco, Giovana Seno; Kentrup, Dominik; Reuter, Stefan; Mayer, Anna B; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Stypmann, Jörg; Kuhn, Christian; Hille, Susanne; Frey, Norbert; Leifheit-Nestler, Maren; Richter, Beatrice; Haffner, Dieter; Abraham, Reimar; Bange, Johannes; Sperl, Bianca; Ullrich, Axel; Brand, Marcus; Wolf, Myles; Faul, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health threat that increases risk of death due to cardiovascular complications, including left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Novel therapeutic targets are needed to design treatments to alleviate the cardiovascular burden of CKD. Previously, we demonstrated that circulating concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 rise progressively in CKD and induce LVH through an unknown FGF receptor (FGFR)-dependent mechanism. Here, we report that FGF23 exclusively activates FGFR4 on cardiac myocytes to stimulate phospholipase Cγ/calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell signaling. A specific FGFR4-blocking antibody inhibits FGF23-induced hypertrophy of isolated cardiac myocytes and attenuates LVH in rats with CKD. Mice lacking FGFR4 do not develop LVH in response to elevated FGF23, whereas knockin mice carrying an FGFR4 gain-of-function mutation spontaneously develop LVH. Thus, FGF23 promotes LVH by activating FGFR4, thereby establishing FGFR4 as a pharmacological target for reducing cardiovascular risk in CKD.

  9. Architecture design of the multi-functional wavelet-based ECG microprocessor for realtime detection of abnormal cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Fang; Chen, Tung-Chien; Chen, Liang-Gee

    2012-01-01

    Most of the abnormal cardiac events such as myocardial ischemia, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and fatal arrhythmia can be diagnosed through continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis. According to recent clinical research, early detection and alarming of such cardiac events can reduce the time delay to the hospital, and the clinical outcomes of these individuals can be greatly improved. Therefore, it would be helpful if there is a long-term ECG monitoring system with the ability to identify abnormal cardiac events and provide realtime warning for the users. The combination of the wireless body area sensor network (BASN) and the on-sensor ECG processor is a possible solution for this application. In this paper, we aim to design and implement a digital signal processor that is suitable for continuous ECG monitoring and alarming based on the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) through the proposed architectures--using both programmable RISC processor and application specific integrated circuits (ASIC) for performance optimization. According to the implementation results, the power consumption of the proposed processor integrated with an ASIC for CWT computation is only 79.4 mW. Compared with the single-RISC processor, about 91.6% of the power reduction is achieved.

  10. Mechanisms of Electrical Activation and Conduction in the Gastrointestinal System: Lessons from Cardiac Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Lai, Eric Tsz Him; Yeo, Jie Ming; Tse, Vivian; Wong, Sunny Hei

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an electrically excitable organ system containing multiple cell types, which coordinate electrical activity propagating through this tract. Disruption in its normal electrophysiology is observed in a number of GI motility disorders. However, this is not well characterized and the field of GI electrophysiology is much less developed compared to the cardiac field. The aim of this article is to use the established knowledge of cardiac electrophysiology to shed light on the mechanisms of electrical activation and propagation along the GI tract, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to motility disorders and suggest better treatment options based on this improved understanding. In the first part of the article, the ionic contributions to the generation of GI slow wave and the cardiac action potential (AP) are reviewed. Propagation of these electrical signals can be described by the core conductor theory in both systems. However, specifically for the GI tract, the following unique properties are observed: changes in slow wave frequency along its length, periods of quiescence, synchronization in short distances and desynchronization over long distances. These are best described by a coupled oscillator theory. Other differences include the diminished role of gap junctions in mediating this conduction in the GI tract compared to the heart. The electrophysiology of conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroparesis, and functional problems such as irritable bowel syndrome are discussed in detail, with reference to ion channel abnormalities and potential therapeutic targets. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis and physiological mechanisms underlying GI motility disorders will enable the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools and the advancement of this field. PMID:27303305

  11. Voice activity detection for speaker verification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Complex algorithm for speech activity detection was presented in this article. It is based on speech enhancement, features extraction and final detection algorithm. The first one was published in ETSI standard as a module of "Advanced front-end feature extraction algorithm" in distributed speech recognition system. It consists of two main parts, noise estimatiom and Wiener filtering. For the final detection modified linear prediction coefficients and spectral entropy features are extracted form denoised signal.

  12. Plasma cardiac natriuretic peptide determination as a screening test for the detection of patients with mild left ventricular impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Omland, T.; Aakvaag, A.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of measuring the cardiac natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and brain natriuretic peptide, as screening tests for identifying patients with mild left ventricular impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the cardiac natriuretic peptides. SETTING: Cardiac catheterisation unit, Norwegian central hospital. PATIENTS: A consecutive series of 254 patients undergoing diagnostic left-sided cardiac catheterisation. One hundred and twenty eight of these patients had a history of previous myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of normal and impaired left ventricular function, as evaluated by logistic regression analysis and estimation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (an index of overall diagnostic accuracy). Ventricular function was assessed by the measurement of left ventricular end diastolic pressure and angiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that plasma brain natriuretic peptide was the best predictor of increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure (> or = 15 mm Hg) (P < 0.001), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (< or = 45%) (P < 0.001), and the combination of left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 45% and left ventricular end diastolic pressure > or = 15 mm Hg (P < 0.001). The areas under the ROC function for the detection of left ventricular dysfunction were 0.789 for brain natriuretic peptide, 0.665 for atrial natriuretic factor, and 0.610 for N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma brain natriuretic peptide seemed to be a better indicator of left ventricular function than plasma atrial natriuretic factor or N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of circulating atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and

  13. Active change detection by pigeons and humans.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Cook, Robert G

    2013-10-01

    Detecting change is vital to both human and nonhuman animals' interactions with the environment. Using the go/no-go dynamic change detection task, we examined the capacity of four pigeons to detect changes in brightness of an area on a computer display. In contrast to our prior research, we reversed the response contingencies so that the animals had to actively inhibit pecking upon detecting change in brightness rather than its constancy. Testing eight rates of change revealed that this direct report change detection contingency produced results equivalent to the earlier indirect procedure. Corresponding tests with humans suggested that the temporal dynamics of detecting change were similar for both species. The results indicate the mechanisms of change detection in both pigeons and humans are organized in similar ways, although limitations in the operations of working memory may prevent pigeons from integrating information over the same time scale as humans.

  14. Zymographic detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar

    2002-11-01

    The manuscript includes a concise description of a new, fast and simple method for detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity. The method is based on a color shift caused a by pH change and may be an excellent procedure for large screenings of samples from natural sources, as it involves no complex sample processing or purification. The method developed can be used in preliminary approaches to biotransformation processes involving detection of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

  15. Remote detection of mental workload changes using cardiac parameters assessed with a low-cost webcam.

    PubMed

    Bousefsaf, Frédéric; Maaoui, Choubeila; Pruski, Alain

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new framework for detecting mental workload changes using video frames obtained from a low-cost webcam. Image processing in addition to a continuous wavelet transform filtering method were developed and applied to remove major artifacts and trends on raw webcam photoplethysmographic signals. The measurements are performed on human faces. To induce stress, we have employed a computerized and interactive Stroop color word test on a set composed by twelve participants. The electrodermal activity of the participants was recorded and compared to the mental workload curve assessed by merging two parameters derived from the pulse rate variability and photoplethysmographic amplitude fluctuations, which reflect peripheral vasoconstriction changes. The results exhibit strong correlation between the two measurement techniques. This study offers further support for the applicability of mental workload detection by remote and low-cost means, providing an alternative to conventional contact techniques. PMID:25150821

  16. Detecting active comets with SDSS

    SciTech Connect

    Solontoi, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; West, Andrew A.; Claire, Mark; Juric, Mario; Becker, Andrew; Jones, Lynne; Hall, Patrick B.; Kent, Steve; Lupton, Robert H.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

    2010-12-01

    Using a sample of serendipitously discovered active comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we develop well-controlled selection criteria for greatly increasing the efficiency of comet identification in the SDSS catalogs. After follow-up visual inspection of images to reject remaining false positives, the total sample of SDSS comets presented here contains 19 objects, roughly one comet per 10 million other SDSS objects. The good understanding of selection effects allows a study of the population statistics, and we estimate the apparent magnitude distribution to r {approx} 18, the ecliptic latitude distribution, and the comet distribution in SDSS color space. The most surprising results are the extremely narrow range of colors for comets in our sample (e.g. root-mean-square scatter of only {approx}0.06 mag for the g-r color), and the similarity of comet colors to those of jovian Trojans. We discuss the relevance of our results for upcoming deep multi-epoch optical surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and estimate that LSST may produce a sample of about 10,000 comets over its 10-year lifetime.

  17. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Might Complement Two-Dimensional Echocardiography in the Detection of a Reversible Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Madanieh, Raef; Mathew, Shawn; Shah, Pratik; Vatti, Satya K.; Madanieh, Abed; Kosmas, Constantine E.; Vittorio, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of reversible nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy in a male in his 60s who presented with an acute heart failure syndrome. Both conventional two-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) demonstrated severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction; however, both modalities were devoid of significant valvular heart disease as well as the presence of fibrosis, infiltration, inflammation, and scar. After six months of aggressive neurohumoral modulation, there was complete reverse remodeling and normalization of left ventricular function, which highlights the role of cMRI as an adjunct to two-dimensional echocardiography in the detection of a potentially reversible nonischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26740746

  18. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal; Gijsbers, Geert; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 {+-} 0.29, 0.92 {+-} 0.61, and 0.63 {+-} 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 {+-} 0.28, 0.64 {+-} 0.37, and 0.53 {+-} 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99

  19. Xanthine oxidase, but not neutrophils, contributes to activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia in cats

    PubMed Central

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C

    2002-01-01

    Activation of cardiac sympathetic afferents during myocardial ischaemia causes angina and induces important cardiovascular reflex responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important chemical stimuli of cardiac afferents during and after ischaemia. Iron-catalysed Fenton chemistry constitutes one mechanism of production of hydroxyl radicals. Another potential source of these species is xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) also contribute to the production of ROS in some conditions. The present study tested the hypothesis that both xanthine oxidase-catalysed oxidation of purines and neutrophils provide a source of ROS sufficient to activate cardiac afferents during ischaemia. We recorded single-unit activity of cardiac afferents innervating the ventricles recorded from the left thoracic sympathetic chain (T1-5) of anaesthetized cats to identify the afferents' responses to ischaemia. The role of xanthine oxidase in activation of these afferents was determined by infusion of oxypurinol (10 mg kg−1, i.v.), an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. The importance of neutrophils as a potential source of ROS in the activation of cardiac afferents during ischaemia was assessed by the infusion of a polyclonal antibody (3 mg ml−1 kg−1, i.v.) raised in rabbits immunized with cat PMNs. This antibody decreased the number of circulating PMNs and, to a smaller extent, platelets. Since previous data suggest that platelets release serotonin (5-HT), which activates cardiac afferents through a serotonin receptor (subtype 3,5-HT3 receptor) mechanism, before treatment with the antibody in another group, we blocked 5-HT3 receptors on sensory nerve endings with tropisetron (300 μg kg−1, i.v.). We observed that oxypurinol significantly decreased the activity of cardiac afferents during myocardial ischaemia from 1.5 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 impulses s−1. Similarly, the polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the discharge frequency of

  20. Effect of dietary fats on the lipid composition and enzyme activities of rat cardiac sarcolemma.

    PubMed

    Awad, T B; Chattopadhyay, J P

    1983-09-01

    The effect of dietary lipids on the lipid composition and the activities of some enzymes of cardiac sarcolemma were studied. Feeding rats coconut oil--rich diet for 4 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in 5'-nucleotidase, phosphodiesterase I and p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity of cardiac sarcolemma as compared with feeding rats safflower oil. Sarcolemma from animals fed coconut oil diet contained a significantly lower concentration of total polyunsaturated fatty acids and a higher concentration of total monounsaturated fatty acids than that from rats fed safflower oil. Most of the alterations in polyunsaturated fatty acids were found in 20:4, whereas those of the monounsaturates were found in 18:1. Among all the phosphoglycerides, the fatty acid composition of the phosphatidylcholine exhibited the largest alterations as a result of coconut oil feeding. No dietary effect was observed in the sarcolemma content of cholesterol and phospholipid. These studies clearly indicate that manipulation of dietary lipids influences both the fatty acid composition and some functional properties of the sarcolemma membranes.

  1. Perfectionism and Effort-Related Cardiac Activity: Do Perfectionists Try Harder?

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Kelly L.; Eddington, Kari M.; Silvia, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Do perfectionists try harder? Previous research on perfectionism and effort has used self-report items and task performance as indicators of effort. The current study investigated whether individual differences in perfectionism predicted effort-related cardiac activity during a mental effort task. Based on past research that suggests adaptive perfectionism is associated with higher effort, it was hypothesized that self-oriented perfectionism (SOP) would predict increased effort on the task. One hundred and eleven college students completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS) and a self-paced parity task in which they received a small cash reward (3 cents) for each correct response. Impedance cardiography was used to assess autonomic reactivity, and regression models tested whether SOP and socially prescribed perfectionism (SPP) explained autonomic reactivity. Overall, participants showed both sympathetic (faster pre-ejection period; PEP) and parasympathetic activation (elevated high-frequency heart rate variability; HRV) during the task, reflecting higher effort and engagement. Contrary to predictions, individual differences in perfectionism did not moderate cardiac reactivity. These findings draw attention to the importance of assessing physiological components of effort and motivation directly rather than inferring them from task performance or self-reported effort. PMID:27483467

  2. Ising model of cardiac thin filament activation with nearest-neighbor cooperative interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, John Jeremy; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Tu, Yuhai; de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a model of cardiac thin filament activation using an Ising model approach from equilibrium statistical physics. This model explicitly represents nearest-neighbor interactions between 26 troponin/tropomyosin units along a one-dimensional array that represents the cardiac thin filament. With transition rates chosen to match experimental data, the results show that the resulting force-pCa (F-pCa) relations are similar to Hill functions with asymmetries, as seen in experimental data. Specifically, Hill plots showing (log(F/(1-F)) vs. log [Ca]) reveal a steeper slope below the half activation point (Ca(50)) compared with above. Parameter variation studies show interplay of parameters that affect the apparent cooperativity and asymmetry in the F-pCa relations. The model also predicts that Ca binding is uncooperative for low [Ca], becomes steeper near Ca(50), and becomes uncooperative again at higher [Ca]. The steepness near Ca(50) mirrors the steep F-pCa as a result of thermodynamic considerations. The model also predicts that the correlation between troponin/tropomyosin units along the one-dimensional array quickly decays at high and low [Ca], but near Ca(50), high correlation occurs across the whole array. This work provides a simple model that can account for the steepness and shape of F-pCa relations that other models fail to reproduce.

  3. Activation of dehydrogenase activity and cardiac respiration: A sup 31 P-NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, L.A.; Koretsky, A.P.; Balaban, R.S. )

    1988-07-01

    {sup 31}P-NMR studies were performed to determine the tissue phosphate and oxygen consumption effects of known maneuvers on the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase during work jumps in the perfused rat heart. In control studies of the glucose-perfused heart, work jumps, with pacing, resulted in a 32% increase in oxygen consumption ({dot char}Qo{sub 2}) from 1.72 {plus minus} 0.09 to 2.29 {plus minus} 0.12 mmol O{sub 2}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1}{center dot}g dry wt{sup {minus}1}. During this transition no significant change in the high energy phosphates were detected. In contrast, work jumps did cause changes in the phosphates when the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase was blocked with 2.5 {mu}g of ruthenium red per milliliter or maximally stimulated with 11 mM pyruvate before the increase in work. The observed increase in {dot char}Qo{sub 2} and inorganic phosphate and calculated increase in ADP are consistent with these phosphates controlling mitochondrial respiration under these conditions. These results suggest that the activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase and/or other dehydrogenases may be an important step in the orchestration of work and {dot char}Qo{sub 2}.

  4. Lack of association between blood-based detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA and cardiac involvement in a non-endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Norman, F F; Pérez-Ayala, A; Pérez-Molina, J A; Flores-Chavez, M; Cañavate, C; López-Vélez, R

    2011-01-01

    Cases of chronic Chagas disease have been increasing in non-endemic areas due to the growth in immigration. This study examined the association between positive Trypanosoma cruzi-DNA detection in blood by PCR and presence of chagasic cardiac involvement in a cohort of immigrants in a European city. No association was found in this study between the positive T. cruzi blood PCR and cardiac involvement. PMID:22117851

  5. Comparing the accuracy of ES-BC, EIS-GS, and ES Oxi on body composition, autonomic nervous system activity, and cardiac output to standardized assessments

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John E; Tannenbaum, Stacey L; Gao, Jinrun; Melillo, Angelica B; Long, Evan G; Alonso, Yaima; Konefal, Janet; Woolger, Judi M; Leonard, Susanna; Singh, Prabjot K; Chen, Lawrence; Tiozzo, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose The Electro Sensor Complex (ESC) is software that combines three devices using bioelectrical impedance, galvanic skin response, and spectrophotometry: (1) ES-BC (Electro Sensor-Body Composition; LD Technology, Miami, FL) to assess body composition, (2) EIS-GS (Electro Interstitial Scan-Galvanic Skin; LD Technology) to predict autonomic nervous system activity, and (3) ES Oxi (Electro Sensor Oxi; LD Technology) to assess cardiac output. The objective of this study was to compare each to a standardized assessment: ES-BC to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), EIS-GS to heart rate variability, and ES Oxi to BioZ Dx Diagnostic System (BioZ Dx; SonoSite Inc, Bothell, WA). Patients and methods The study was conducted in two waves. Fifty subjects were assessed for body composition and autonomic nervous system activity. Fifty-one subjects were assessed for cardiac output. Results We found adequate relative and absolute agreement between ES-BC and DXA for fat mass (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) with ES-BC overestimating fat mass by 0.1 kg and for body fat percentage (r = 0.92, P < 0.001) with overestimation of fat percentage by 0.4%. For autonomic nervous system activity, we found marginal relative agreement between EIS-GS and heart rate variability by using EIS-GS as the predictor in a linear regression equation (adjusted R2 = 0.56, P = 0.03). For cardiac output, adequate relative and absolute agreement was found between ES Oxi and BioZ Dx at baseline (r = 0.60, P < 0.001), after the first exercise stage (r = 0.79, P < 0.001), and after the second exercise stage (r = 0.86, P < 0.001). Absolute agreement was found at baseline and after both bouts of exercise; ES Oxi overestimated baseline and stage 1 exercise cardiac output by 0.3 L/minute and 0.1 L/minute, respectively, but exactly estimated stage 2 exercise cardiac output. Conclusion ES-BC and ES Oxi accurately assessed body composition and cardiac output compared to standardized instruments, whereas EIS

  6. Adoption of community-based cardiac rehabilitation programs and physical activity following phase III cardiac rehabilitation in Scotland: a prospective and predictive study.

    PubMed

    Sniehotta, Falko F; Gorski, Charlotta; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about levels of physical activity and attendance at phase IV community-based Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) programs following completion of exercise-focussed, hospital-based phase III CR. This study aims to test, compare and combine the predictive utility of the Common-Sense Self-Regulation Model (CS-SRM) and the extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) with action planning for two rehabilitation behaviours: physical activity and phase IV CR attendance. Individuals diagnosed with coronary heart disease (n = 103) completed baseline measures of illness perceptions, intentions, perceived behavioural control (PBC), action planning and past physical activity in the last week of a phase III CR program, and 95 participants completed follow-up measures of physical activity and attended phase IV CR (objectively confirmed) 2 months later. Only one predictor (PBC/cyclical timeline) significantly predicted levels and change of physical activity. While illness perceptions were not predictive of phase IV CR attendance, the extended TPB model showed good predictive power with action planning and intention as the most powerful predictors. Amongst participants who planned when and where to attend phase IV CR at the end of phase III rehabilitation, 65.9% subsequently attended a phase IV CR program compared to only 18.5% of those who had not made a plan. This study adds to our understanding of cardiac rehabilitation behaviour after completion of health service delivered programs. Comparing theoretical models and rehabilitation behaviours contributes to the development of behaviour theory.

  7. Cardiac CT for myocardial ischaemia detection and characterization—comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, A M; De Cecco, C N; Wang, R; Meinel, F G; Binukrishnan, S R; Spearman, J V; Vogl, T J; Ruzsics, B

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of myocardial ischaemia remains one of the most common and challenging clinical scenarios faced by physicians. Current imaging modalities are capable of three-dimensional, functional and anatomical views of the heart and as such offer a unique contribution to understanding and managing the pathology involved. Evidence has accumulated that visual anatomical coronary evaluation does not adequately predict haemodynamic relevance and should be complemented by physiological evaluation, highlighting the importance of functional assessment. Technical advances in CT technology over the past decade have progressively moved cardiac CT imaging into the clinical workflow. In addition to anatomical evaluation, cardiac CT is capable of providing myocardial perfusion parameters. A variety of CT techniques can be used to assess the myocardial perfusion. The single energy first-pass CT and dual energy first-pass CT allow static assessment of myocardial blood pool. Dynamic cardiac CT imaging allows quantification of myocardial perfusion through time-resolved attenuation data. CT-based myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is showing promising diagnostic accuracy compared with the current reference modalities. The aim of this review is to present currently available myocardial perfusion techniques with a focus on CT imaging in light of recent clinical investigations. This article provides a comprehensive overview of currently available CT approaches of static and dynamic MPI and presents the results of corresponding clinical trials. PMID:25135617

  8. Ligand specific variation in cardiac response to stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha in spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Saifudeen; Purushothaman, Sreeja; Harikrishnan, V S; Nair, R Renuka

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiac failure. Reduction of LVH has beneficial effects on the heart. LVH is associated with shift in energy substrate preference from fatty acid to glucose, mediated by down regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α). As long-term dependence on glucose can promote adverse cardiac remodeling, it was hypothesized that, prevention of metabolic shift by averting down regulation of PPAR-α can reduce cardiac remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Cardiac response to stimulation of PPAR-α presumably depends on the type of ligand used. Therefore, the study was carried out in SHR, using two different PPAR-α ligands. SHR were treated with either fenofibrate (100 mg/kg/day) or medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) Tricaprylin (5% of diet) for 4 months. Expression of PPAR-α and medium-chain acylCoA dehydrogenase served as markers, for stimulation of PPAR-α. Both ligands stimulated PPAR-α. Decrease of blood pressure was observed only with fenofibrate. LVH was assessed from heart-weight/body weight ratio, histology and brain natriuretic peptide expression. As oxidative stress is linked with hypertrophy, serum and cardiac malondialdehyde and cardiac 3-nitrotyrosine levels were determined. Compared to untreated SHR, LVH and oxidative stress were lower on supplementation with MCT, but higher on treatment with fenofibrate. The observations indicate that reduction of blood pressure is not essentially accompanied by reduction of LVH, and that, progressive cardiac remodeling can be prevented with decrease in oxidative stress. Contrary to the notion that reactivation of PPAR-α is detrimental; the study substantiates that cardiac response to stimulation of PPAR-α is ligand specific. PMID:25976666

  9. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity. PMID:26471891

  10. Activation of mitochondrial STAT-3 and reduced mitochondria damage during hypothermia treatment for post-cardiac arrest myocardial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hua; Tsai, Min-Shan; Chiang, Chih-Yen; Su, Yu-Jen; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Wei-Tien; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-11-01

    While therapeutic hypothermia improves the outcomes of individuals in cardiac arrest, the hemodynamic responses and mechanisms which underlie hypothermia-induced cardioprotection are not fully understood. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism by which induced hypothermia preserves cardiac function and protects against mitochondrial damage following cardiac arrest. Cardiac arrest was induced in adult male Wistar rats by asphyxiation for 8.5 min. Following resuscitation, the animals were randomly assigned to a hypothermia (32 °C) or normothermia (37 °C) group. Monitoring results showed that cardiac output at the fourth hour after resuscitation was significantly better in rats treated with hypothermia when compared to rats treated with normothermia (P < 0.01). Examinations by transmission electron microscopy showed that mitochondria in the left ventricle of rats in the hypothermia group were significantly less swollen compared to such mitochondria in the normothermia group (P < 0.001). Additionally, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores occurred less frequently in the hypothermic group. While complex I/III activity in the electron transport reaction was damaged after cardiac arrest and resuscitation, the degree of injury was ameliorated by hypothermia treatment (P < 0.05). The amount of STAT-3 phosphorylated at tyrosine 705 and its expression in mitochondria were significantly higher under hypothermia treatment compared to normothermia treatment. In vitro studies showed that inhibition STAT-3 activation abolished the ability of hypothermia to protect H9C2 cardiomyocytes against injury produced by simulated ischemia and reperfusion. Therapeutic hypothermia treatment can ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and help preserve both mitochondrial integrity and electron transport activity.

  11. Resveratrol, an activator of SIRT1, upregulates sarcoplasmic calcium ATPase and improves cardiac function in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, M.; Matta, M. J.; Sunderesan, N. R.; Periasamy, M.; Gupta, M.

    2010-01-01

    Reduced sarcoplasmic calcium ATPase (SERCA2a) expression has been shown to play a significant role in the cardiac dysfunction in diabetic cardiomyopathy. The mechanism of SERCA2a repression is, however, not known. This study was designed to examine the effect of resveratrol (RSV), a potent activator of SIRT1, on cardiac function and SERCA2a expression in chronic type 1 diabetes. Adult male mice were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) and fed with either a regular diet or a diet enriched with RSV. STZ administration produced progressive decline in cardiac function, associated with markedly reduced SERCA2a and SIRT1 protein levels and increased collagen deposition; RSV treatment to these mice had a tremendous beneficial effect both in terms of improving SERCA2a expression and on cardiac function. In cultured cardiomyocytes, RSV restored SERCA2 promoter activity, which was otherwise highly repressed in high-glucose media. Protective effects of RSV were found to be dependent on its ability to activate Silent information regulator (SIRT) 1. In cardiomyocytes, overexpression of SIRT1 was found sufficient to activate SERCA2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, pretreatment of cardiomyocytes with SIRT1 antagonist, splitomycin, blocked these beneficial effects of RSV. In addition, SIRT1 knockout (+/−) mice were also found to be more sensitive to STZ-induced decline in SERCA2a mRNA. The data demonstrate that, in chronic diabetes, 1) the enzymatic activity of cardiac SIRT1 is reduced, which contributes to reduced expression of SERCA2a and 2) through activation of SIRT1, RSV enhances expression of SERCA2a and improves cardiac function. PMID:20008278

  12. Mitogen-activated protein kinases: a new therapeutic target in cardiac pathology.

    PubMed

    Ravingerová, Tána; Barancík, Miroslav; Strnisková, Monika

    2003-05-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to different external stimuli by activation of mechanisms of cell signaling. One of the major systems participating in the transduction of signal from the cell membrane to nuclear and other intracellular targets is the highly conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily. The members of MAPK family are involved in the regulation of a large variety of cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation, development, cell cycle, death and survival. Several MAPK subfamilies, each with apparently unique signaling pathway, have been identified in the mammalian myocardium. These cascades differ in their upstream activation sequence and in downstream substrate specifity. Each pathway follows the same conserved three-kinase module consisting of MAPK, MAPK kinase (MAPKK, MKK or MEK), and MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK, MEKK). The major groups of MAPKs found in cardiac tissue include the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), the stress-activated/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (SAPK/JNKs), p38-MAPK, and ERK5/big MAPK 1 (BMK1). The ERKs are strongly activated by mitogenic and growth factors and by physical stress, whereas SAPK/JNKs and p38-MAPK can be activated by various cell stresses, such as hyperosmotic shock, metabolic stress or protein synthesis inhibitors, UV radiation, heat shock, cytokines, and ischemia. Activation of MAPKs family plays a key role in the pathogenesis of various processes in the heart, e.g. myocardial hypertrophy and its transition to heart failure, in ischemic and reperfusion injury, as well in the cardioprotection conferred by ischemia- or pharmacologically-induced preconditioning. The following approaches are currently utilized to elucidate the role of MAPKs in the myocardium: (i) studies of the effects of myocardial processes on the activity of these kinases; (ii) pharmacological modulations of MAPKs activity and evaluation of their impact on the (patho)physiological processes in the heart; (iii) gene

  13. The Mikamo lecture. Role of higher nervous activity in sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Lown, B

    1990-06-01

    The brain receives and catalogues myriads of information from within and without the organism. These inputs promote neural integration of bodily function through a multiplicity of cybernetic feedback loops. Higher nervous activity shapes the contours of perceived well-being and determines the course and progress of disease. Behavioral and neural factors play an important role in cardiovascular function and are especially relevant to the problem of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Clinical data attesting to the role of biobehavioral factors in SCD derive from a diversity of sources. It has long been known that bereavement increases the prevalence of cardiac fatality. Business failure rates are strongly related to increased mortality among persons aged 55 and over. Recession in economic activity, with increasing unemployment, is associated with augmented death rates from ischemic heart disease. In extensive surveys conducted among London civil servants, Rose and Marmot found not only the level but the type of employment to be a factor determining coronary heart disease mortality. Blue collar workers had a 3.6 times greater chance of dying from heart disease than an age-matched population in the higher ranks of civil service. A man's employment status was a stronger predictor of risk for dying from coronary heart disease than any of the usual risk factors, such as smoking, blood pressure, height-weight ratio, leisure time activities, glucose tolerance, or plasma cholesterol. Operation of behavioral factors is also suggested by the time of occurrence of sudden death. Among 3,983 men followed for more than 30 years, Rabkin and co-workers observed an excess proportion of fatalities on Mondays. No such pattern was noted for cancer mortality. Not only the day of the week but the time of day appears to be a factor. Muller and co-workers found a significant preponderance in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and sudden death from 6:00 AM to noon. They could not implicate

  14. A generalized activating function for predicting virtual electrodes in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Sobie, E A; Susil, R C; Tung, L

    1997-01-01

    To fully understand the mechanisms of defibrillation, it is critical to know how a given electrical stimulus causes membrane polarizations in cardiac tissue. We have extended the concept of the activating function, originally used to describe neuronal stimulation, to derive a new expression that identifies the sources that drive changes in transmembrane potential. Source terms, or virtual electrodes, consist of either second derivatives of extracellular potential weighted by intracellular conductivity or extracellular potential gradients weighted by derivatives of intracellular conductivity. The full response of passive tissue can be considered, in simple cases, to be a convolution of this "generalized activating function" with the impulse response of the tissue. Computer simulations of a two-dimensional sheet of passive myocardium under steady-state conditions demonstrate that this source term is useful for estimating the effects of applied electrical stimuli. The generalized activating function predicts oppositely polarized regions of tissue when unequally anisotropic tissue is point stimulated and a monopolar response when a point stimulus is applied to isotropic tissue. In the bulk of the myocardium, this new expression is helpful for understanding mechanisms by which virtual electrodes can be produced, such as the hypothetical "sawtooth" pattern of polarization, as well as polarization owing to regions of depressed conductivity, missing cells or clefts, changes in fiber diameter, or fiber curvature. In comparing solutions obtained with an assumed extracellular potential distribution to those with fully coupled intra- and extracellular domains, we find that the former provides a reliable estimate of the total solution. Thus the generalized activating function that we have derived provides a useful way of understanding virtual electrode effects in cardiac tissue. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:9284308

  15. Effect of muscle metaboreflex activation on spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, Doreen; Dear, William E; Waterfall, Jessica L; Fisher, James P

    2011-12-15

    We sought to determine whether the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) is a potential mechanism for the decrease in spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (cBRS) during exercise in humans. In protocol 1, 15 male subjects (22 ± 1 years) performed steady-state leg cycling at low (26 ± 4 W) and moderate workloads (105 ± 7 W), under free-flow conditions and with partial flow restriction (bilateral thigh cuff inflation at 100 mmHg) to evoke muscle metaboreflex activation during exercise. In protocol 2, rhythmic handgrip exercise at 35% maximum voluntary contraction was performed with progressive upper arm cuff inflation (0, 80, 100 and 120 mmHg) to elicit graded metaboreflex activation. Both protocols were followed by post-exercise ischaemia (PEI) to isolate the muscle metaboreflex. Leg cycling-induced increases in HR and mean BP were augmented by partial flow restriction (P < 0.05 vs. free flow), while HR and mean BP both remained elevated during PEI (P < 0.05 vs. rest). Leg cycling evoked an intensity-dependent decrease in cBRS (16 ± 2, 7 ± 1 and 2 ± 0.2 ms mmHg(-1) at rest, low and moderate workloads, respectively; P < 0.05), which was further reduced with partial flow restriction (by -2.6 ± 0.8 and -0.4 ± 0.1 ms mmHg(-1) at low and moderate workloads). cBRS remained suppressed during PEI following leg cycling with partial flow restriction (4 ± 1 ms mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 vs. rest). cBRS was unchanged during handgrip under free-flow conditions, handgrip with partial flow restriction and PEI following handgrip (P > 0.05 vs. rest). These data indicate that the activation of metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex) decreases cardiac baroreflex responsiveness during leg cycling exercise in humans.

  16. Active contraction of the cardiac ventricle and distortion of the microstructural architecture.

    PubMed

    Pezzuto, S; Ambrosi, D

    2014-12-01

    The shortening of the myocardial fibers is the microstructural engine that produces the contraction of the cardiac muscle. The complex interplay between fibers shortening and elastic macroscopic strain is functional to the ejection of blood into the pulmonary and arterial networks. Here, we address the contraction of the left ventricle in a finite elasticity framework, adopting the 'prolate ellipsoid' geometry and the invariants-based strain energy proposed by Holzapfel and Ogden, where the mechanical role of fibers and sheets is accounted for. We show that a microstructurally motivated mathematical model of active strain type reproduces the main indicators of normal cardiac function along the whole PV-loop without introduction of any further ad hoc law. The bare-bones mathematical model depends on one measurable parameter only, that is, the shortening ratio of the sarcomere units, which we assume to be nearly independent on the prestretch. Strict enforcement of incompressibility and novel treatment of boundary conditions are shown to be crucial to simulate the correct muscle torsion. PMID:25319381

  17. Porous graphene oxide nanostructure as an excellent scaffold for label-free electrochemical biosensor: Detection of cardiac troponin I.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Sayed Habib; Ghodsi, Elham; Abdollahi, Siamak; Nadri, Samad

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we report the fabrication of a novel label-free impedimetric biosensor employing porous graphene oxide (PrGO) nanostructures for the specific detection of cardiac troponin-I (cTnI) to establish the myocardial infarction (MI). This nano-immunosensor demonstrates an outstanding selectivity and high sensitivity towards the human-cTnI analyte. An excellent detection limit of 0.07ngmL(-1) and dynamic linear range of 0.1-10ngmL(-1) were calculated for anti-cTnI/PrGO/GC. Finally, this biosensor was employed to check the concentration of the MI biomarker in real clinical samples and the results are in good agreement with standard enzyme-linked fluorescence assay (ELFA) method. PMID:27612734

  18. Detection of atrial fibrillation with concurrent holter monitoring and continuous cardiac telemetry following ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Marc A; Krishnan, Kousik; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for recurrent ischemic stroke. We aimed to compare the detection rate of AF using continuous cardiac telemetry (CCT) versus Holter monitoring in hospitalized patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Between June 2007 and December 2008, 133 patients were admitted to an academic institution for ischemic stroke or TIA and underwent concurrent inpatient CCT and Holter monitoring. Rates of AF detection by CCT and Holter monitoring were compared using the McNemar paired proportion test. Among the 133 patients, 8 (6.0%) were diagnosed with new-onset AF. On average, Holter monitoring was performed for 29.8 hours, and CCT was performed for 73.6 hours. The overall rate of AF detection was higher for Holter monitoring compared with CCT (6.0%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9-11.6 vs 0; 95% CI, 0-3.4; P = .008). Holter detection of AF was even higher in specific subgroups (those with an embolic infarct pattern, those age >65 years, and those with coronary artery disease). Holter monitoring detected AF in 6% of hospitalized ischemic stroke and TIA patients, with higher proportions in high-risk subgroups. Compared with CCT, Holter monitoring is significantly more likely to detect arrhythmias.

  19. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    upregulated only during late torpor by 2.4-fold. Protein levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 increased in late torpor as well as during early arousal by as much as 2.8-fold, and MAFbx levels remained elevated during interbout arousal, whereas MuRF1 levels returned to control levels. Discussion. The present results indicate that upregulation and activation of Foxo1 and 3a, in addition to the increase in MyoG levels at late torpor, may be upregulating the expression of MAFbx and MuRF1. These findings suggest that there is activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) as ground squirrels arouse from torpor. Therefore, the signalling pathway involving MyoG, and the E3 ligases MAFbx and MuRF1, plays a significant role in cardiac muscle remodelling during hibernation. These findings provide insights into the regulation of protein degradation and turnover in the cardiac muscle of a hibernator model.

  20. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A.

    2016-01-01

    during late torpor by 2.4-fold. Protein levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 increased in late torpor as well as during early arousal by as much as 2.8-fold, and MAFbx levels remained elevated during interbout arousal, whereas MuRF1 levels returned to control levels. Discussion. The present results indicate that upregulation and activation of Foxo1 and 3a, in addition to the increase in MyoG levels at late torpor, may be upregulating the expression of MAFbx and MuRF1. These findings suggest that there is activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) as ground squirrels arouse from torpor. Therefore, the signalling pathway involving MyoG, and the E3 ligases MAFbx and MuRF1, plays a significant role in cardiac muscle remodelling during hibernation. These findings provide insights into the regulation of protein degradation and turnover in the cardiac muscle of a hibernator model. PMID:27602284

  1. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A.

    2016-01-01

    during late torpor by 2.4-fold. Protein levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 increased in late torpor as well as during early arousal by as much as 2.8-fold, and MAFbx levels remained elevated during interbout arousal, whereas MuRF1 levels returned to control levels. Discussion. The present results indicate that upregulation and activation of Foxo1 and 3a, in addition to the increase in MyoG levels at late torpor, may be upregulating the expression of MAFbx and MuRF1. These findings suggest that there is activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) as ground squirrels arouse from torpor. Therefore, the signalling pathway involving MyoG, and the E3 ligases MAFbx and MuRF1, plays a significant role in cardiac muscle remodelling during hibernation. These findings provide insights into the regulation of protein degradation and turnover in the cardiac muscle of a hibernator model.

  2. Transcriptional activation of muscle atrophy promotes cardiac muscle remodeling during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Aguilar, Oscar A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    upregulated only during late torpor by 2.4-fold. Protein levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 increased in late torpor as well as during early arousal by as much as 2.8-fold, and MAFbx levels remained elevated during interbout arousal, whereas MuRF1 levels returned to control levels. Discussion. The present results indicate that upregulation and activation of Foxo1 and 3a, in addition to the increase in MyoG levels at late torpor, may be upregulating the expression of MAFbx and MuRF1. These findings suggest that there is activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) as ground squirrels arouse from torpor. Therefore, the signalling pathway involving MyoG, and the E3 ligases MAFbx and MuRF1, plays a significant role in cardiac muscle remodelling during hibernation. These findings provide insights into the regulation of protein degradation and turnover in the cardiac muscle of a hibernator model. PMID:27602284

  3. The effects of carbonated water upon gastric and cardiac activities and fullness in healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Shiori; Nagai, Hajime; Mura, Emi; Matsumoto, Takehiro; Moritani, Toshio; Nagai, Narumi

    2012-01-01

    Although previous reports suggested that carbonated water drinking was effective against gastrointestinal symptoms, there is little information about the effects of carbonated water on gastric and appetite sensation. We therefore investigated the effect of carbonated water on short-term fullness with respect to gastric and cardiac responses in 19 healthy young women. Each subject was tested on three separate days at approximately 9 a.m. after an overnight fast. Gastric motility, evaluated by electrogastrography (EGG) and heart rate (HR), was measured for 20 min in the fasting state and 40 min after ingestion of water. Preloads consisted of an equivalent amount (250 mL) of water (W) or carbonated water (CW) and no drinking (blank). Fullness scores were measured using visual analog scales. To determine gastric motility, we assessed the component of bradygastria (1-2 cycles/min [cpm]), normogastria (2-4 cpm), tachygastria (4-9 cpm), and dominant frequency of the EGG power spectrum. After ingestion of CW, significant increases in fullness scores were observed compared with W. All postprandial EGG powers were significantly greater than preprandial, but no group difference was found. However, a dominant frequency tended to shift toward a lower band after ingestion of W. A significantly higher HR was found following consumption of CW as opposed to W. Multiple regression analysis revealed that increased HR was a significant variable contributing to the variances in fullness after ingestion of CW at 40 min. Our data suggest that CW may induce a short-term, but significant, satiating effect through enhanced postprandial gastric and cardiac activities due possibly to the increased sympathetic activity and/or withdrawal of parasympathetic activity.

  4. Parallel activation of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism with increased cardiac energy expenditure is not dependent on fatty acid oxidation in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lufang; Cabrera, Marco E; Huang, Hazel; Yuan, Celvie L; Monika, Duda K; Sharma, Naveen; Bian, Fang; Stanley, William C

    2007-01-01

    Steady state concentrations of ATP and ADP in vivo are similar at low and high cardiac workloads; however, the mechanisms that regulate the activation of substrate metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation that supports this stability are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that (1) there is parallel activation of mitochondrial and cytosolic dehydrogenases in the transition from low to high workload, which increases NADH/NAD+ ratio in both compartments, and (2) this response does not require an increase in fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Anaesthetized pigs were subjected to either sham treatment, or an abrupt increase in cardiac workload for 5 min with dobutamine infusion and aortic constriction. Myocardial oxygen consumption and FAO were increased 3- and 2-fold, respectively, but ATP and ADP concentrations did not change. NADH-generating pathways were rapidly activated in both the cytosol and mitochondria, as seen in a 40% depletion in glycogen stores, a 3.6-fold activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, and a 50% increase in tissue NADH/NAD+. Simulations from a multicompartmental computational model of cardiac energy metabolism predicted that parallel activation of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism results in an increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio in both cytosol and mitochondria. FAO was blocked by 75% in a third group of pigs, and a similar increase in and the NAHD/NAD+ ratio was observed. In conclusion, in the transition to a high cardiac workload there is rapid parallel activation of substrate oxidation that results in an increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio. PMID:17185335

  5. Danshensu alleviates cardiac ischaemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting autophagy and apoptosis via activation of mTOR signalling.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guanwei; Yu, Jiahui; Asare, Patrick Fordjour; Wang, Lingyan; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Boli; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiumei

    2016-10-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Danshensu (DSS) has a protective effect on cardiac ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the DSS action remain undefined. We investigated the potential role of DSS in autophagy and apoptosis using cardiac I/R injury models of cardiomyocytes and isolated rat hearts. Cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were subjected to 6 hrs of hypoxia followed by 18 hrs of reoxygenation to induce cell damage. The isolated rat hearts were used to perform global ischaemia for 30 min., followed by 60 min. reperfusion. Ischaemia/reperfusion injury decreased the haemodynamic parameters on cardiac function, damaged cardiomyocytes or even caused cell death. Pre-treatment of DSS significantly improved cell survival and protected against I/R-induced deterioration of cardiac function. The improved cell survival upon DSS treatment was associated with activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (as manifested by increased phosphorylation of S6K and S6), which was accompanied with attenuated autophagy flux and decreased expression of autophagy- and apoptosis-related proteins (including p62, LC3-II, Beclin-1, Bax, and Caspase-3) at both protein and mRNA levels. These results suggest that alleviation of cardiac I/R injury by pre-treatment with DSS may be attributable to inhibiting excessive autophagy and apoptosis through mTOR activation. PMID:27385290

  6. Physical activity and sudden cardiac death in elders--a Croatian study.

    PubMed

    Duraković, Zijad; Duraković, Marjeta Misigoj; Skavić, Josip; Gojanović, Marija Definis

    2011-03-01

    The paper deals with the sudden cardiac death in elders due to physical activity in Croatia and to compare it to other population groups who practice physical activity. The data are a part of a retrospective study dealing with 59 sudden death due to physical activity in men in Croatia: from January 1, 1988 to December 31, 2008. Fifteen aged 65 to 82 years were recreationally engaged in physical activity: six in swimming, four in tennis, one in driving a bicycle, one in jogging, two in bowling and one died during sexual act. Only one had symptoms of pectoral angina, two suffered from arterial hypertension, and two had congestive heart failure. Eleven were without symptoms before exercise. At forensic autopsy, fourteen had coronary heart disease, seven had critical coronary artery stenosis, three had occluded left descendens anterior coronary artery and four critical coronary stenosis, four had a recent myocardial infarctions, and eleven had myocardial scars due to previous myocardial infarctions. Twelve of them had left ventricular hypertrophy: 15-25 mm. In Croatia, about 7per cent of the entire male population undertake recreational physical activity, while 13 per cent of them are elders. A sudden cardiac death due to recreational physical activity in elders reached 1.71/100 000 yearly, in the entire male population engaged in recreational physical exercise: 0.75/100 000 (p = 0.05730), in the total male population aged 15-40 engaged in sports and recreational physical exercise: 0.57/100.0000 (p = 0.00387), in young athletes: 0.15/100 000 (p = 0.00000). Medical examination of all elderly persons has to be done before starting of recreational physical activity: by clinical examination, searching for risk factors for atherosclerosis, performing ECG at rest, stress ECG, and echocardiography and to repeat the medical examination at least once a year Physical activity should start with a warm-up period and with a gradually increasing load, and usually not to exceed 6

  7. Radiation Detection for Active Interrogation of HEU

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    2004-12-09

    This report briefly describes the neutrons and gamma rays emitted by active interrogation of HEU, briefly discusses measurement methods, briefly discusses sources and detectors relevant to detection of shielded HEU in Sealand containers, and lists the measurement possibilities for the various sources. All but one of the measurement methods detect radiation emitted by induced fission in the HEU; the exception utilizes nuclear resonance fluorescence. The brief descriptions are supplemented by references. This report presents some active interrogation possibilities but the status of understanding is not advanced enough to select particular methods. Additional research is needed to evaluate these possibilities.

  8. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  9. Protein kinase C epsilon activation delays neuronal depolarization during cardiac arrest in the euthermic arctic ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kunjan R; Anthony Defazio, Richard; Raval, Ami P; Dashkin, Oleksandr; Saul, Isabel; Iceman, Kimberly E; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A; Drew, Kelly L

    2009-08-01

    During the pre-hibernation season, arctic ground squirrels (AGS) can tolerate 8 min of asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) without detectable brain pathology. Better understanding of the mechanisms regulating innate ischemia tolerance in AGS has the potential to facilitate the development of novel prophylactic agents to induce ischemic tolerance in patients at risk of stroke or CA. We hypothesized that neuroprotection in AGS involves robust maintenance of ion homeostasis similar to anoxia-tolerant turtles. Ion homeostasis was assessed by monitoring ischemic depolarization (ID) in cerebral cortex during CA in vivo and during oxygen glucose deprivation in vitro in acutely prepared hippocampal slices. In both models, the onset of ID was significantly delayed in AGS compared with rats. The epsilon protein kinase C (epsilonPKC) is a key mediator of neuroprotection and inhibits both Na+/K+-ATPase and voltage-gated sodium channels, primary mediators of the collapse of ion homeostasis during ischemia. The selective peptide inhibitor of epsilonPKC (epsilonV1-2) shortened the time to ID in brain slices from AGS but not in rats despite evidence that epsilonV1-2 decreased activation of epsilonPKC in brain slices from both rats and AGS. These results support the hypothesis that epsilonPKC activation delays the collapse of ion homeostasis during ischemia in AGS.

  10. Development of an automated processing method to detect still timing of cardiac motion for coronary magnetic resonance angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asou, Hiroya; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Imada, Naoyuki; Masuda, Takanori; Satou, Tomoyasu

    2011-03-01

    Whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography (WH-MRA) is useful noninvasive examination. Its signal acquisition is performed during very short still timing in each cardiac motion cycle, and therefore the adequate still timing selection is important to obtain the better image quality. However, since the current available selection method is only manual one using visual comparison of cine MRI images with different phases, the selected timings are often incorrect and their reproducibility is not sufficient. We developed an automated selection method to detect the best still timing for the WH-MRA and compared the automated method with conventional manual one. Cine MRI images were used for the analysis. In order to extract the high-speed cardiac cine image, each phase directional pixel set at each pixel position in all cine images were processed by a high-pass filtering using the Fourie transform. After this process, the cine images with low speed timing became dark, and the optimal timing could be determined by a threshold processing. We took ten volunteers' WH-MRA with the manually and automatically selected timings, and visually assessed image quality of each image on a 5-point scale (1=excellent, 2=very good, 3=good, 4=fair, 5=poor). The mean scores of the manual and automatic methods for right coronary arteries (RCA), LDA left anterior descending arteries (LAD) and LCX left circumflex arteries (LCX) were 4.2+/-0.38, 4.1+/-0.44, 3.9+/-0.52 and 4.1+/-0.42, 4.1+/-0.24, 3.2+/-0.35 respectively. The score were increased by our method in the RCA and LCX, and the LCX was significant (p<0.05). As the results, it was indicated that our automated method could determine the optimal cardiac phase more accurately than or equally to the conventional manual method.

  11. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  12. Cardiac-Activity Measures for Assessing Airport Ramp-Tower Controller's Workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Dulchinos, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) potentially offer objective, continuous, and non-intrusive measures of human-operator's mental workload. Such measurement capability is attractive for workload assessment in complex laboratory simulations or safety-critical field testing. The present study compares mean HR and HRV data with self-reported subjective workload ratings collected during a high-fidelity human-in-the-loop simulation of airport ramp traffic control operations, which involve complex cognitive and coordination tasks. Mean HR was found to be weakly sensitive to the workload ratings, while HRV was not sensitive or even contradictory to the assumptions. Until more knowledge on stress response mechanisms of the autonomic nervous system is obtained, it is recommended that these cardiac-activity measures be used with other workload assessment tools, such as subjective measures.

  13. Complex spiral wave dynamics in a spatially distributed ionic model of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtemanche, Marc

    1996-12-01

    This study presents computations and analysis of the dynamics of reentrant spiral waves in a realistic model of cardiac electrical activity, incorporating the Beeler-Reuter equations into a two-dimensional cable model. In this medium, spiral waves spontaneously break up, but may be stabilized by shortening the excitation pulse duration through an acceleration of the dynamics of the calcium current. We describe the breakup of reentrant waves based on the presence of slow recovery fronts within the medium. This concept is introduced using examples from pulse circulation around a ring and extended to two-dimensional propagation. We define properties of the restitution and dispersion relations that are associated with slow recovery fronts and promote spiral breakup. The role of slow recovery fronts is illustrated with concrete examples from numerical simulations.

  14. Regulation of Cardiac Gene Expression by KLF15, a Repressor of Myocardin Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Joost J.; Wijnen, Wino J.; Hiller, Monika; van der Made, Ingeborg; Lentink, Viola; van Leeuwen, Rick E. W.; Herias, Veronica; Pokharel, Saraswati; Heymans, Stephane; de Windt, Leon J.; Høydal, Morten A.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Creemers, Esther E.

    2010-01-01

    Pathological forms of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) often progress to heart failure. Specific transcription factors have been identified that activate the gene program to induce pathological forms of LVH. It is likely that apart from activating transcriptional inducers of LVH, constitutive transcriptional repressors need to be removed during the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we report that the constitutive presence of Krüppel-like factor 15 (KLF15) is lost in pathological hypertrophy and that this loss precedes progression toward heart failure. We show that transforming growth factor-β-mediated activation of p38 MAPK is necessary and sufficient to decrease KLF15 expression. We further show that KLF15 robustly inhibits myocardin, a potent transcriptional activator. Loss of KLF15 during pathological LVH relieves the inhibitory effects on myocardin and stimulates the expression of serum response factor target genes, such as atrial natriuretic factor. This uncovers a novel mechanism where activated p38 MAPK decreases KLF15, an important constitutive transcriptional repressor whose removal seems a vital step to allow the induction of pathological LVH. PMID:20566642

  15. Cardiac Myocyte-Specific AHR Activation Phenocopies TCDD-Induced Toxicity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lanham, Kevin A.; Plavicki, Jessica; Peterson, Richard E.; Heideman, Warren

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of zebrafish embryos to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) activates the zebrafish aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 (AHR) to produce developmental and cardiovascular toxicity. AHR is found in the heart; however, AHR activation by TCDD is not confined to the heart and occurs throughout the organism. In order to understand the cause of cardiotoxicity, we constructed a constitutively active AHR (caAHR) based on the zebrafish AHR2 and expressed it specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that AHR activation within the cardiomyocytes can account for the heart failure induced by TCDD. Expression of the caAHR within the heart produced cardiac malformations, loss of circulation, and pericardial edema. The heart-specific activation of AHR reproduced several other well-characterized endpoints of TCDD toxicity outside of the cardiovascular system, including defects in swim bladder and craniofacial development. This work identifies a single cellular site of TCDD action, the myocardial cell, that can account for the severe cardiovascular collapse observed following early life stage exposure to TCDD, and contributes to other forms of toxicity. PMID:25037585

  16. Effects of eating on vection-induced motion sickness, cardiac vagal tone, and gastric myoelectric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uijtdehaage, S. H.; Stern, R. M.; Koch, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of food ingestion on motion sickness severity and its physiological mechanisms. Forty-six fasted subjects were assigned either to a meal group or to a no-meal group. Electrogastrographic (EGG) indices (normal 3 cpm activity and abnormal 4-9 cpm tachyarrhythmia) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) were measured before and after a meal and during a subsequent exposure to a rotating drum in which illusory self-motion was induced. The results indicated that food intake enhanced cardiac parasympathetic tone (RSA) and increased gastric 3 cpm activity. Postprandial effects on motion sickness severity remain equivocal due to group differences in RSA baseline levels. During drum rotation, dysrhythmic activity of the stomach (tachyarrhythmia) and vagal withdrawal were observed. Furthermore, high levels of vagal tone prior to drum rotation predicted a low incidence of motion sickness symptoms, and were associated positively with gastric 3 cpm activity and negatively with tachyarrhythmia. These data suggest that enhanced levels of parasympathetic activity can alleviate motion sickness symptoms by suppressing, in part, its dysrhythmic gastric underpinnings.

  17. Physical training induced resting bradycardia and its association with cardiac autonomic nervous activities.

    PubMed

    Alom, M M; Bhuiyan, N I; Hossain, M M; Hoque, M F; Rozario, R J; Nessa, W

    2011-10-01

    Regular physical exercise causes resting bradycardia. This exercise-induced resting bradycardia may be associated with exercise-induced changes in Cardiac autonomic nervous activities (CANA). Power Spectral Analysis (PSA) of Heart rate variability (HRV) is one of the most promising new techniques to quantify CANA. Regular physical exercise induced bradycardia is associated with exercise-induced adaptation in CANA. To observe the HRV parameters by frequency domain method (PSA), in male adolescent athletes in order to find out the influence of regular physical exercise on resting heart rate (HR) and CANA. The cross sectional study was carried out on 62 adolescent male athletes aged 12-18 years (group B), in the Department of Physiology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University from 1st July 2007 to 30th June 2008. For comparison 30 age, sex and socioeconomic condition matched apparently healthy sedentary subjects (group A) were also studied. The study group was selected from the BKSP (Bangladesh Krira Shikka Prothistan, Savar, Dhaka) and the control from a residential school of Dhaka city. HRV parameters were assessed by Polygraph (Polyrite D, version 2.2). For statistical analysis Independent-Samples t-test was done as applicable. Resting mean HR was significantly (p<0.001) lower in the athletes. The mean value of Total (variance), VLF, LF and HF power was significantly (p<0.001) higher in athletes than that of non-athetes. Regular physical exercise-induced resting bradycardia is associated with exercise-induced adaptation in cardiac autonomic nervous activities. PMID:22081187

  18. Cardiomyocyte VEGFR-1 activation by VEGF-B induces compensatory hypertrophy and preserves cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zentilin, Lorena; Puligadda, Uday; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Zacchigna, Serena; Collesi, Chiara; Pattarini, Lucia; Ruozi, Giulia; Camporesi, Silvia; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Pepe, Martino; Recchia, Fabio A; Giacca, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that the function of members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family extends beyond blood vessel formation. Here, we show that the prolonged intramyocardial expression of VEGF-A(165) and VEGF-B(167) on adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery determined a marked improvement in cardiac function after myocardial infarction in rats, by promoting cardiac contractility, preserving viable cardiac tissue, and preventing remodeling of the left ventricle (LV) over time. Consistent with this functional outcome, animals treated with both factors showed diminished fibrosis and increased contractile myocardium, which were more pronounced after expression of the selective VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) ligand VEGF-B, in the absence of significant induction of angiogenesis. We found that cardiomyocytes expressed VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, and neuropilin-1 and that, in particular, VEGFR-1 was specifically up-regulated in hypoxia and on exposure to oxidative stress. VEGF-B exerted powerful antiapoptotic effect in both cultured cardiomyocytes and after myocardial infarction in vivo. Finally, VEGFR-1 activation by VEGF-B was found to elicit a peculiar gene expression profile proper of the compensatory, hypertrophic response, consisting in activation of alphaMHC and repression of betaMHC and skeletal alpha-actin, and an increase in SERCA2a, RYR, PGC1alpha, and cardiac natriuretic peptide transcripts, both in cultured cardiomyocytes and in infarcted hearts. The finding that VEGFR-1 activation by VEGF-B prevents loss of cardiac mass and promotes maintenance of cardiac contractility over time has obvious therapeutic implications.

  19. Design of Raman active nanoparticles for SERS-based detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, Javier T.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2016-03-01

    Timely detection of cardiac biomarkers is needed to diagnose acute myocardial infarction, implement the appropriate early treatment, and significantly reduce the chance of mortality. Ideally, for maximizing patient impact, a point of care device needs to be designed that is fast, sensitive, reliable, and small enough to be used in the ambulance and emergency department. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a sensitive optical technique that can potentially be used to quantify the cardiac biomarkers of interest. In this work, silver nanoparticles were functionalized with a Raman reporter molecule and human cardiac Troponin I (cTnI) as an essential component of binding assays. Aggregated nanoparticles with the Raman reporter molecules were encapsulated in a silica shell to form SERS hotspots. Besides having a specific Raman spectra and binding affinity to cardiac Troponin I antibodies, the nanoparticles were designed to exhibit stability by using silica and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as part of the bioconjugation strategy. The specific narrow peaks from the Raman reporter molecule SERS signal allow for potential multiplexing capabilities as different Raman reporter molecules can be used in functionalized nanoparticles with different cardiac biomarkers. The SERS spectrum of the functionalized nanoparticles was measured to assess its potential to be used in an assay.

  20. Detecting insider activity using enhanced directory virtualization.

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dongwan; Claycomb, William R.

    2010-07-01

    Insider threats often target authentication and access control systems, which are frequently based on directory services. Detecting these threats is challenging, because malicious users with the technical ability to modify these structures often have sufficient knowledge and expertise to conceal unauthorized activity. The use of directory virtualization to monitor various systems across an enterprise can be a valuable tool for detecting insider activity. The addition of a policy engine to directory virtualization services enhances monitoring capabilities by allowing greater flexibility in analyzing changes for malicious intent. The resulting architecture is a system-based approach, where the relationships and dependencies between data sources and directory services are used to detect an insider threat, rather than simply relying on point solutions. This paper presents such an architecture in detail, including a description of implementation results.

  1. Nebivolol Ameliorates Cardiac NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in a Juvenile-Adolescent Animal Model of Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qihai; Wei, Tong; Huang, Chenglin; Liu, Penghao; Sun, Mengwei; Shen, Weili; Gao, Pingjin

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 is involved in obesity-induced cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated whether the cardiac protective effects of nebivolol relied on attenuating NLRP3 activation in a juvenile-adolescent animal model of diet-induced obesity. Weaning male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either a standard chow diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. The obese rats were subsequently subdivided into three groups: 1) HFD control group; 2) HFD with low-dose nebivolol (5 mg/kg/d); 3) HFD with high-dose nebivolol (10 mg/kg/d). Treatment with nebivolol prevented HFD-induced obesity associated excess cardiac lipid accumulation as well as myocardial mitochondrial dysfunction. Nebivolol attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in myocardium of obese rats. In parallel, nebivolol treatment of obese animals increased cardiac β3-AR expression, reversing the reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In vitro, nebivolol treatment of palmitate-incubated H9C2 cells suppressed autophagy, restored mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation, and suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Meanwhile the presence of shRNA against β3-AR or against eNOS deteriorated the protective effects of nebivolol. These data suggest the beneficial effect of nebivolol on myocardial lipotoxicity contributing to inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation possibly via improved mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27686325

  2. Nuclear cardiology in the UK 1994: activity relative to Europe, USA, and British Cardiac Society targets

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, D; Prvulovich, E; Tweddel, A; Caplin, J

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To survey practice in nuclear cardiology in the UK in 1994.
Design—A questionnaire was sent to 219 centres performing nuclear imaging asking for details of current practice in nuclear cardiology. Replies were received from 192 centres (88%).
Main outcome measures—Activity in performance of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV), anticipated changes in activity, differences between regional and district hospitals, technical imaging parameters, and referral sources. 
Results—Of the responding centres, 125 (65%) performed nuclear cardiology procedures. More regional than district hospitals performed nuclear cardiology procedures (85% v 55%, p < 0.0003) and regional centres performed a higher proportion (62% v 24%, p < 0.001) of nuclear cardiology activity. Nuclear cardiology activity was 0.82 scans per 1000 population per year (MPI 0.56, RNV 0.26). There has been a significant increase (24%) in nuclear cardiology since 1988. There has been a pronounced rise in MPI (350%) while RNV has fallen by 47%. Myocardial perfusion activity in the UK remains very low (25% and 5% in regional and district hospitals, respectively) compared with the 1994 figures of 2.2/1000/year for Europe or 10.8/1000/year for the USA.
Conclusions—MPI has increased on average by 23%/annum (compound rate) since 1988, but in 1994 was still only 32% of the British Cardiac Society target of 2.6/1000/year. Proper resources for capital expenditure on new equipment and new staff will be important to maintain momentum in closing the gap. Also important is improved clinical understanding, as already implemented by including nuclear cardiology in guidelines for specialist cardiology training.

 Keywords: survey;  nuclear cardiology;  myocardial perfusion imaging;  radionuclide ventriculography;  guidelines;  British Cardiac Society PMID:9875092

  3. Detection of toluene in a body buried for years with a fatal cardiac contusion.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiko; Sato, Hiroaki; Kasai, Kentaro

    2016-03-01

    This report aimed to present the postmortem finding of toluene in a homicide victim buried under the ground for six years. The bones of the skull and limbs were exposed, and the remainder of the subcutaneous tissues, brain and heart had formed into adipocere. There were numerous fractures in the skull and the anterior side of the ribs. A cardiac contusion extending into the cavity of the right ventricle was also observed. No other obvious injuries were identified on the body. The concentration of toluene in the bone marrow within the head of the humerus was 58.4 μg/g. The cause of death was suspected as heart rupture, possibly from a forceful impact or compression of the anterior chest under toluene intoxication. This report presents a rare case where toluene intake by a human was disclosed by autopsy even after several years of death. PMID:26980257

  4. Effects of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-δ Agonist on Cardiac Healing after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Rang; Ahn, Jong Hwa; Jung, Myeong Hee; Koh, Jin-Sin; Park, Yongwhi; Hwang, Seok-Jae; Jeong, Young-Hoon; Kwak, Choong Hwan; Lee, Young Soo; Seo, Han Geuk; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hwang, Jin-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-δ)-dependent signaling is associated with rapid wound healing in the skin. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effects of PPAR-δ-agonist treatment on cardiac healing in post-myocardial infarction (MI) rats. Animals were assigned to the following groups: sham-operated control group, left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (MI) group, or MI with administration of the PPAR-δ agonist GW610742 group. GW610742 (1 mg/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally after the operation and repeated every 3 days. Echocardiographic data showed no differences between the two groups in terms of cardiac function and remodeling until 4 weeks. However, the degrees of angiogenesis and fibrosis after MI were significantly higher in the GW610742-treated rats than in the untreated MI rats at 1 week following MI, which changes were not different at 2 weeks after MI. Naturally, PPAR-δ expression in infarcted myocardium was highest increased in 3 day after MI and then disappeared in 14 day after MI. GW610742 increased myofibroblast differentiation and transforming growth factor-beta 2 expression in the infarct zone at 7 days after MI. GW610742 also increased bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) recruitment in whole myocardium, and increased serum platelet-derived growth factor B, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 levels at day 3 after MI. PPAR-δ agonists treatment have the temporal effect on early fibrosis of infarcted myocardium, which might not sustain the functional and structural beneficial effect. PMID:26862756

  5. Myocardial regeneration by activation of multipotent cardiac stem cells in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Konrad; Torella, Daniele; Sheikh, Farooq; de Angelis, Antonella; Nurzynska, Daria; Silvestri, Furio; Beltrami, C. Alberto; Bussani, Rossana; Beltrami, Antonio P.; Quaini, Federico; Bolli, Roberto; Leri, Annarosa; Kajstura, Jan; Anversa, Piero

    2005-06-01

    In this study, we tested whether the human heart possesses a cardiac stem cell (CSC) pool that promotes regeneration after infarction. For this purpose, CSC growth and senescence were measured in 20 hearts with acute infarcts, 20 hearts with end-stage postinfarction cardiomyopathy, and 12 control hearts. CSC number increased markedly in acute and, to a lesser extent, in chronic infarcts. CSC growth correlated with the increase in telomerase-competent dividing CSCs from 1.5% in controls to 28% in acute infarcts and 14% in chronic infarcts. The CSC mitotic index increased 29-fold in acute and 14-fold in chronic infarcts. CSCs committed to the myocyte, smooth muscle, and endothelial cell lineages increased 85-fold in acute infarcts and 25-fold in chronic infarcts. However, p16INK4a-p53-positive senescent CSCs also increased and were 10%, 18%, and 40% in controls, acute infarcts, and chronic infarcts, respectively. Old CSCs had short telomeres and apoptosis involved 0.3%, 3.8%, and 9.6% of CSCs in controls, acute infarcts, and chronic infarcts, respectively. These variables reduced the number of functionally competent CSCs from 26,000/cm3 of viable myocardium in acute to 7,000/cm3 in chronic infarcts, respectively. In seven acute infarcts, foci of spontaneous myocardial regeneration that did not involve cell fusion were identified. In conclusion, the human heart possesses a CSC compartment, and CSC activation occurs in response to ischemic injury. The loss of functionally competent CSCs in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy may underlie the progressive functional deterioration and the onset of terminal failure. cardiac progenitor cells | human heart | myocardial infarction

  6. Cardiac Energy Dependence on Glucose Increases Metabolites Related to Glutathione and Activates Metabolic Genes Controlled by Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Pascual, Florencia; Cooper, Daniel E.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Paul, David S.; Willis, Monte S.; Patterson, Cam; Jia, Wei; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long chain acyl‐CoA synthetases (ACSL) catalyze long‐chain fatty acids (FA) conversion to acyl‐CoAs. Temporal ACSL1 inactivation in mouse hearts (Acsl1H−/−) impaired FA oxidation and dramatically increased glucose uptake, glucose oxidation, and mTOR activation, resulting in cardiac hypertrophy. We used unbiased metabolomics and gene expression analyses to elucidate the cardiac cellular response to increased glucose use in a genetic model of inactivated FA oxidation. Methods and Results Metabolomics analysis identified 60 metabolites altered in Acsl1H−/− hearts, including 6 related to glucose metabolism and 11 to cysteine and glutathione pathways. Concurrently, global cardiac transcriptional analysis revealed differential expression of 568 genes in Acsl1H−/− hearts, a subset of which we hypothesized were targets of mTOR; subsequently, we measured the transcriptional response of several genes after chronic mTOR inhibition via rapamycin treatment during the period in which cardiac hypertrophy develops. Hearts from Acsl1H−/− mice increased expression of several Hif1α‐responsive glycolytic genes regulated by mTOR; additionally, expression of Scl7a5, Gsta1/2, Gdf15, and amino acid‐responsive genes, Fgf21, Asns, Trib3, Mthfd2, were strikingly increased by mTOR activation. Conclusions The switch from FA to glucose use causes mTOR‐dependent alterations in cardiac metabolism. We identified cardiac mTOR‐regulated genes not previously identified in other cellular models, suggesting heart‐specific mTOR signaling. Increased glucose use also changed glutathione‐related pathways and compensation by mTOR. The hypertrophy, oxidative stress, and metabolic changes that occur within the heart when glucose supplants FA as a major energy source suggest that substrate switching to glucose is not entirely benign. PMID:25713290

  7. [The effect of a photo-developing solution on respiratory and cardiac activities in rats when orally administered].

    PubMed

    Peti, A; Domahidi, J

    1999-01-01

    The development of cinema art brought about the increase in the number of laboratories which prepare photosensitive materials. In case of laboratories not complying with rules regarding the preparation and handling of the solutions for processing photos, these solutions can penetrate in the organism trough the skin and be accidentally digested. The goal of the experiment is to study the effects of developing solution for white/black Azomureş photographic paper on respiratory and cardiac activity of the Wistar rat (weight = 180-200 g) through oral administration. Three experimental groups (lots) of animals were formed (8 animals/group). The control group was given 1 ml of distilled water; the first (I) group was given 1 ml of 1/10 diluted photo-processing solution and the second (II) group was given 1 ml of the same solution, but 1/4 diluted. The administration of it was made in a single dose with a gastric drill. The respiratory and cardiac (ECG) frequencies were monitored during a 4 hours period, from the onset of administration. When 1/10 diluted developing solution was administrated a decrease in the respiratory frequency was recorded after one hour, but the effect vanished at the end of the experiment (4 hours). Fifteen minutes after 1/4 diluted solution was administered, a decrease in respiratory frequency per minute was determined, this result also disappeared at the end of 4 hours. However, these differences failed to reach significance (p = 0, 54). The effect of developing solution on cardiac activity shows a decrease of cardiac frequency in both experimental (I, II) groups. However, there is a difference in the effect of the diluted solution on the rats. The 1/10 diluted solution decrease the cardiac frequency over an approximate period of 1 hour and a half, but the 1/4 diluted solution showed a decrease in cardiac frequency up until the end of the ECG reading.

  8. Critical temperature ranges of hypothermia-induced platelet activation: possible implications for cooling patients in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Straub, Andreas; Breuer, Melanie; Wendel, Hans P; Peter, Karlheinz; Dietz, Klaus; Ziemer, Gerhard

    2007-04-01

    Cooling of the patient is routinely applied in cardiac surgery to protect organs against ischemia. Hypothermia induces activation of platelets, but the effects of temperatures such as used during cardiac surgery are not well described. To investigate this in an in-vitro study heparinized whole blood was incubated at different temperatures (37 degrees C, 34.5 degrees C, 32 degrees C, 29.5 degrees C, 27 degrees C, 24.5 degrees C, 22 degrees C, 19.5 degrees C and 17 degrees C). The effect of these temperatures on aggregation, P-selectin expression, GP IIb/IIIa activation and platelet microparticle (PMP) formation of unstimulated and ADP-stimulated platelets of 36 subjects was evaluated in flow cytometry. A four-parametric logistic model was fitted to depict the temperature effect on platelet parameters. Lower temperatures increased aggregates, P-selectin expression, and GP IIb/IIIa activation. The number of PMPs decreases with hypothermia. Additional experiments revealed a slight influence of heparin on platelet P-selectin expression but excluded an effect of this anticoagulant on the other evaluated parameters. Threshold temperatures, which mark 5% changes of platelet parameters compared to values at 37 degrees C, were calculated. On ADP-stimulated platelets the thresholds for P-selectin expression and GP IIb/IIa activation are 34.0 degrees C and 36.4 degrees C, respectively, and lie in the temperature range routinely applied in cardiac surgery. Hypothermia-induced platelet activation may develop in most patients undergoing cardiac surgery, possibly resulting in thromboembolic events, coagulation defects, and proinflammatory leukocyte bridging by P-selectin bearing platelets and PMPs. These findings suggest that pharmacological protection of platelets against hypothermia-induced damage may be beneficial during cardiac surgery.

  9. HDAC3-dependent reversible lysine acetylation of cardiac myosin heavy chain isoforms modulates their enzymatic and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Courson, David S; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Rock, Ronald S; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2011-02-18

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, PCAF, associate with cardiac sarcomeres, and a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study, we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to the A band of sarcomeres and was capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the K(m) for the actin-activated ATPase activity of both α- and β-MHC isoforms. By an in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36%, compared to their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli, independent of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms.

  10. Modulation of cardiac activity by tachykinins in the rat substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Andrée; Couture, Réjean

    2001-01-01

    The effects of tachykinin NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptor agonists and antagonists were measured on blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) after bilateral microinjection into the substantia nigra (SN) of awake, unrestrained rats. Increasing doses (25 pmol – 1 nmol) of selective agonists at NK1 ([Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP), NK2 ([β-Ala8]NKA(4 – 10)) and NK3 (senktide) receptors into the SN produced tachycardia which was selectively and reversibly blocked by the prior injection of tachykinin antagonists at NK1 (RP67580, 250 pmol), NK2 (SR48968, 250 pmol) and NK3 (R-820, 500 pmol) receptor. A rapid fall in MAP followed by a pressor response was seen with 1 nmol of [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP. Behavioural activity was elicited by 1 nmol of [Sar9,Met(O211]SP (sniffing>face washing=grooming) and senktide (sniffing>wet dog shake>rearing=locomotion). Tachykinin antagonists had no direct cardiovascular or behavioural effects. The tachycardia produced by 100 pmol of [β-Ala8]NKA(4 – 10) or senktide was abolished by an i.v. treatment with atenolol (β1-adrenoceptor antagonist, 5 mg kg−1) while that evoked by [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP was reduced. A combination of atenolol (5 mg kg−1) and atropine (muscarinic antagonist, 1 mg kg−1) blocked the response evoked by [Sar9,Met(O2)11]SP. These data suggest that the SN is a potential site of modulation of cardiac activity by tachykinins. In addition to the withdrawal of the cardiovagal activity by NK1 receptor, the three tachykinin receptors appear to increase the sympatho/adrenal drive to the heart. This occurs independently of changes in MAP and behaviour. Hence, this study highlights a new central regulatory mechanism of cardiac autonomic activity. PMID:11739252

  11. Using noise to determine cardiac restitution with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shu; Keener, James P.

    2012-06-01

    Variation in cardiac pacing cycles, as seen, for example, in heart rate variability, has been observed for decades. Contemporarily, various mathematical models have been constructed to investigate the electrical activity of paced cardiac cells. Yet there has not been a study of these cardiac models when there is variation in the pacing cycles such as noise. We present a method that uses the stochasticity of pacing cycles to determine approximate models of the dynamics of cardiac cells, and use these models to detect bifurcations to alternans.

  12. PGE2 reduces MMP-14 and increases plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Kamal M; Clevenger, Margarette H; Szandzik, David L; Peterson, Edward; Harding, Pamela

    2014-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated during cardiac injury and we have previously shown that mice lacking the PGE2 EP4 receptor display dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with increased expression of the membrane type matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-14. We thus hypothesized that PGE2 regulates expression of MMP-14 and also affects fibroblast migration. Primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular fibroblasts (NVFs) were used to test the effects of PGE2. Gene and protein expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blot, MMP activity was determined by zymography and migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. PGE2 reduced expression of MMP-14 and these effects were antagonized by an EP4 antagonist. An EP4 agonist mimicked the effect of PGE2. PGE2 also increased mRNA and protein levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of MMP activation. However, PGE2-stimulation of PAI-1 was mediated by the EP1/EP3 receptor and not EP4. Migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. Treatment of NVFs with PGE2 reduced the number of cells migrating toward 10% FCS. Treatment with the EP2 agonist also reduced migration but did not affect MMP-14 expression or PAI-1. Our results suggest that PGE2 utilizes different receptors and mechanisms to ultimately decrease MMP expression and NVF migration.

  13. Cardiac Glycosides Activate the Tumor Suppressor and Viral Restriction Factor Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein (PML)

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Chao, Elizabeth; Dewing, Antimone; Solano, Ricardo; Milan, Loribelle; Barron, Nikki; He, Min; Diaz, Paul W.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C.; Hassig, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides (CGs), inhibitors of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), used clinically to treat heart failure, have garnered recent attention as potential anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. A high-throughput phenotypic screen designed to identify modulators of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation revealed the CG gitoxigenin as a potent activator of PML. We demonstrate that multiple structurally distinct CGs activate the formation of PML NBs and induce PML protein SUMOylation in an NKA-dependent fashion. CG effects on PML occur at the post-transcriptional level, mechanistically distinct from previously described PML activators and are mediated through signaling events downstream of NKA. Curiously, genomic deletion of PML in human cancer cells failed to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of CGs and other apoptotic stimuli such as ceramide and arsenic trioxide that were previously shown to function through PML in mice. These findings suggest that alternative pathways can compensate for PML loss to mediate apoptosis in response to CGs and other apoptotic stimuli. PMID:27031987

  14. Singular Value Decomposition of Optically-Mapped Cardiac Rotors and Fibrillatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitch, A.; Biton, Y.; Braunstein, D.; Friedman, M.; Aviram, I.; Yandrapalli, S.; Pandit, S. V.; Berenfeld, O.

    2015-01-01

    Our progress of understanding how cellular and structural factors contribute to the arrhythmia is hampered in part because of controversies whether a fibrillating heart is driven by a single, several, or multiple number of sources, and whether they are focal or reentrant, and how to localize them. Here we demonstrate how a novel usage of the neutral singular value decomposition (SVD) method enables the extraction of the governing spatial and temporal modes of excitation from a rotor and fibrillatory waves. Those modes highlight patterns and regions of organization in the midst of the otherwise seemingly-randomly propagating excitation waves. We apply the method to experimental models of cardiac fibrillation in rabbit hearts. We show that the SVD analysis is able to enhance the classification of the heart electrical patterns into regions harboring drivers in the form of fast reentrant activity and other regions of by-standing activity. This enhancement is accomplished without any prior assumptions regarding the spatial, temporal or spectral properties of those drivers. The analysis corroborates that the dominant mode has the highest activation rate and further reveals a new feature: A transfer of modes from the driving to the passive regions resulting in a partial reaction of the passive region to the driving region. PMID:26668401

  15. Singular value decomposition of optically-mapped cardiac rotors and fibrillatory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovitch, A.; Biton, Y.; Braunstein, D.; Friedman, M.; Aviram, I.; Yandrapalli, S.; Pandit, S. V.; Berenfeld, O.

    2015-03-01

    Our progress of understanding how cellular and structural factors contribute to arrhythmia is hampered in part because of controversies as to whether a fibrillating heart is driven by a single, several, or multiple number of sources, whether they are focal or reentrant and how to localize them. Here we demonstrate how a novel usage of the neutral singular value decomposition (SVD) method enables the extraction of the governing spatial and temporal modes of excitation from a rotor and fibrillatory waves. Those modes highlight patterns and regions of organization in the midst of the otherwise seemingly random propagating excitation waves. We apply the method to experimental models of cardiac fibrillation in rabbit hearts. We show that SVD analysis is able to enhance the classification of the heart electrical patterns into regions harboring drivers in the form of fast reentrant activity and other regions of by-standing activity. This enhancement is accomplished without any prior assumptions regarding the spatial, temporal or spectral properties of those drivers. The analysis corroborates that the dominant mode has the highest activation rate and further reveals a new feature: a transfer of modes from the driving to passive regions resulting in a partial reaction of the passive region to the driving region.

  16. Cardiac Glycosides Activate the Tumor Suppressor and Viral Restriction Factor Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein (PML).

    PubMed

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Chao, Elizabeth; Dewing, Antimone; Solano, Ricardo; Milan, Loribelle; Barron, Nikki; He, Min; Diaz, Paul W; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C; Hassig, Christian A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides (CGs), inhibitors of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), used clinically to treat heart failure, have garnered recent attention as potential anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. A high-throughput phenotypic screen designed to identify modulators of promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation revealed the CG gitoxigenin as a potent activator of PML. We demonstrate that multiple structurally distinct CGs activate the formation of PML NBs and induce PML protein SUMOylation in an NKA-dependent fashion. CG effects on PML occur at the post-transcriptional level, mechanistically distinct from previously described PML activators and are mediated through signaling events downstream of NKA. Curiously, genomic deletion of PML in human cancer cells failed to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of CGs and other apoptotic stimuli such as ceramide and arsenic trioxide that were previously shown to function through PML in mice. These findings suggest that alternative pathways can compensate for PML loss to mediate apoptosis in response to CGs and other apoptotic stimuli. PMID:27031987

  17. Halogenating activities detected in Antarctic macroalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Laturnus, F.; Adams, F.C.; Gomez, I.; Mehrtens, G.

    1997-03-01

    Halogenating activities were determined in samples of 18 cultivated species of brown, red and green macroalgae from the Antarctic. Activities for the halogenating organic compounds with bromide, iodide and chloride were found. Investigated red algae (rhodophytes) showed higher brominating and iodinating activities compared to brown (phaeophytes) and green (chlorophytes) algae. The highest brominating and iodinating activities were measured in the red algae Plocamium cartilagineum (1.11 {+-} 0.01 U g{sup -1} wet algal weight and 0.18 U g{sup -1} wet algal weight, respectively) and Myriogramme mangini (3.62 {+-} 0.17 U g{sup -1} wet algal weight and 4.5 U g{sup -1} wet algal weight, respectively). Chlorinating activities were detected in the red alga Plocamium cartilagineum only (0.086 U g{sup -1} wet algal weight). 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Automatic Coronary Calcium Scoring in Non-Contrast-Enhanced ECG-Triggered Cardiac CT With Ambiguity Detection.

    PubMed

    Wolterink, Jelmer M; Leiner, Tim; Takx, Richard A P; Viergever, Max A; Isgum, Ivana

    2015-09-01

    The amount of coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular events. We present a system that automatically quantifies total patient and per coronary artery CAC in non-contrast-enhanced, ECG-triggered cardiac CT. The system identifies candidate calcifications that cannot be automatically labeled with high certainty and optionally presents these to an expert for review. Candidates were extracted by intensity-based thresholding and described by location features derived from estimated coronary artery positions, as well as size, shape and intensity features. Next, a two-class classifier distinguished between coronary calcifications and negatives or a multiclass classifier labeled CAC per coronary artery. Candidates that could not be labeled with high certainty were identified by entropy-based ambiguity detection and presented to an expert for review and possible relabeling. The system was evaluated with 530 test images. Using the two-class classifier, the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) between reference and automatically determined total patient CAC volume was 0.95. Using the multiclass classifier, the ICC between reference and automatically determined per artery CAC volume was 0.98 (LAD), 0.69 (LCX), and 0.95 (RCA). In 49% of CTs, no ambiguous candidates were identified, while review of the remaining CTs increased the ICC for total patient CAC volume to 1.00, and per artery CAC volume to 1.00 (LAD), 0.95 (LCX), and 0.99 (RCA). In conclusion, CAC can be automatically identified in non-contrast-enhanced ECG-triggered cardiac CT. Ambiguity detection with expert review may enable the application of automatic CAC scoring in the clinic with a performance comparable to that of a human expert. PMID:25794387

  19. Activation of Retinoid Receptor-Mediated Signaling Ameliorates Diabetes-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction in Zucker Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guleria, Rakeshwar S.; Singh, Amar B.; Nizamutdinova, Irina T.; Souslova, Tatiana; Mohammad, Amin A.; Kendall, Jonathan A.; Baker, Kenneth M.; Pan, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a significant contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Retinoids, through activation of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid×receptor (RXR), have been linked to control of glucose and lipid homeostasis, with effects on obesity and diabetes. However, the functional role of RAR and RXR in the development of DCM remains unclear. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and lean rats were treated with Am580 (RARα agonist) or LGD1069 (RXR agonist) for 16 weeks, and cardiac function and metabolic alterations were determined. Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance were observed in ZDF rats. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was characterized in ZDF rats by increased oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis, inflammation, activation of MAP kinases and NF-κB signaling and diminished Akt phosphorylation, along with decreased glucose transport and increased cardiac lipid accumulation, and ultimately diastolic dysfunction. Am580 and LGD1069 attenuated diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction and the pathological alterations, by improving glucose tolerance and insulin resistance; facilitating Akt activation and glucose utilization, and attenuating oxidative stress and interrelated MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. Am580 inhibited body weight gain, attenuated the increased cardiac fatty acid uptake, β-oxidation and lipid accumulation in the hearts of ZDF rats. However, LGD1069 promoted body weight gain, hyperlipidemia and cardiac lipid accumulation. In conclusion, our data suggest that activation of RAR and RXR may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, further studies are necessary to clarify the role of RAR and RXR in the regulation of lipid metabolism and homeostasis. PMID:23395853

  20. Activation of retinoid receptor-mediated signaling ameliorates diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction in Zucker diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Rakeshwar S; Singh, Amar B; Nizamutdinova, Irina T; Souslova, Tatiana; Mohammad, Amin A; Kendall, Jonathan A; Baker, Kenneth M; Pan, Jing

    2013-04-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a significant contributor to the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Retinoids, through activation of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid x receptor (RXR), have been linked to control glucose and lipid homeostasis, with effects on obesity and diabetes. However, the functional role of RAR and RXR in the development of DCM remains unclear. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and lean rats were treated with Am580 (RARα agonist) or LGD1069 (RXR agonist) for 16 weeks, and cardiac function and metabolic alterations were determined. Hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance were observed in ZDF rats. Diabetic cardiomyopathy was characterized in ZDF rats by increased oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis, inflammation, activation of MAP kinases and NF-κB signaling and diminished Akt phosphorylation, along with decreased glucose transport and increased cardiac lipid accumulation, and ultimately diastolic dysfunction. Am580 and LGD1069 attenuated diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction and the pathological alterations, by improving glucose tolerance and insulin resistance; facilitating Akt activation and glucose utilization, and attenuating oxidative stress and interrelated MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling pathways. Am580 inhibited body weight gain, attenuated the increased cardiac fatty acid uptake, β-oxidation and lipid accumulation in the hearts of ZDF rats. However, LGD1069 promoted body weight gain, hyperlipidemia and cardiac lipid accumulation. In conclusion, our data suggest that activation of RAR and RXR may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, further studies are necessary to clarify the role of RAR and RXR in the regulation of lipid metabolism and homeostasis.

  1. Origin of concurrent ATPase activities in skinned cardiac trabeculae from rat.

    PubMed Central

    Ebus, J P; Stienen, G J

    1996-01-01

    1. To determine the rate of ATP turnover by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pump in cardiac muscle, and to assess the contributions of other ATPase activities to the overall ATP turnover rate, ATPase activity and isometric force production were studied in saponin-skinned trabeculae from rat. ATP hydrolysis was enzymatically coupled to the oxidation of NADH; the concentration of NADH was monitored photometrically. All measurements were performed at 20 +/- 1 degrees C and pH 7.0. Resting sarcomere length was adjusted to 2.1 microns. All solutions contained 5 mM caffeine to ensure continuous release of Ca2+ from the SR. 2. The Ca(2+)-independent ATPase activity, determined in relaxing solution (pCa 9), amounted to 130 +/- 13 microM s-1 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 7) at the beginning of an experiment. During subsequent measurements in relaxing solution, a decrease in ATPase activity was observed, indicative of loss of membrane-bound ATPase activity. The steady-state Ca(2+)-independent (basal) ATPase activity was 83 +/- 5 microM s-1 (n = 66). 3. Treatment of saponin-skinned preparations with Triton X-100 abolished 50 microM s-1 (60%) of the basal ATPase activity. Addition of ouabain (1 mM) suppressed 14 +/- 5% of the basal activity, whereas 8 +/- 3% was suppressed by 20 microM cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). It is argued that 31 microM s-1 of the basal ATPase activity may be associated with MgATPase from the transverse tubular system. 4. The maximal Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity, i.e. the total ATPase activity (determined in activating solution, pCa 4.3) corrected for basal ATPase activity, was found to be 409 +/- 15 microM s-1 (n = 66). Experiments with CPA indicated that at least 9 +/- 6% of the maximal Ca(2+)-activated ATPase activity originates from the sarcoplasmic Ca2+ pump. These experiments indicate that the rate of ATP consumption by the SR Ca2+ transporting ATPase amounts to at least 37 microM s-1. 5. Treatment of preparations with Triton X-100 abolished 15 +/- 3

  2. Testing a Longitudinal Integrated Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination Theory Model for Physical Activity Post-Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Shane N; Fortier, Michelle S; Strachan, Shaelyn M; Blanchard, Chris M; Boulay, Pierre

    2014-01-13

    Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012) have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.'s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109) answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, P<0.001). The overall model retained good fit indices. In conclusion, results diverged from theoretical predictions of physical activity, but self-determination and self-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible. PMID:26973926

  3. Testing a Longitudinal Integrated Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination Theory Model for Physical Activity Post-Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Shane N; Fortier, Michelle S; Strachan, Shaelyn M; Blanchard, Chris M; Boulay, Pierre

    2014-01-13

    Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012) have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.'s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109) answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, P<0.001). The overall model retained good fit indices. In conclusion, results diverged from theoretical predictions of physical activity, but self-determination and self-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible.

  4. Testing a Longitudinal Integrated Self-Efficacy and Self-Determination Theory Model for Physical Activity Post-Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Shane N.; Fortier, Michelle S.; Strachan, Shaelyn M.; Blanchard, Chris M.; Boulay, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory are prominent theories in the physical activity literature, and studies have begun integrating their concepts. Sweet, Fortier, Strachan and Blanchard (2012) have integrated these two theories in a cross-sectional study. Therefore, this study sought to test a longitudinal integrated model to predict physical activity at the end of a 4-month cardiac rehabilitation program based on theory, research and Sweet et al.’s cross-sectional model. Participants from two cardiac rehabilitation programs (N=109) answered validated self-report questionnaires at baseline, two and four months. Data were analyzed using Amos to assess the path analysis and model fit. Prior to integration, perceived competence and self-efficacy were combined, and labeled as confidence. After controlling for 2-month physical activity and cardiac rehabilitation site, no motivational variables significantly predicted residual change in 4-month physical activity. Although confidence at two months did not predict residual change in 4-month physical activity, it had a strong positive relationship with 2-month physical activity (β=0.30, P<0.001). The overall model retained good fit indices. In conclusion, results diverged from theoretical predictions of physical activity, but self-determination and self-efficacy theory were still partially supported. Because the model had good fit, this study demonstrated that theoretical integration is feasible. PMID:26973926

  5. Analyte detection using an active assay

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor; Bailey, Charles L.; Evanskey, Melissa R.

    2010-11-02

    Analytes using an active assay may be detected by introducing an analyte solution containing a plurality of analytes to a lacquered membrane. The lacquered membrane may be a membrane having at least one surface treated with a layer of polymers. The lacquered membrane may be semi-permeable to nonanalytes. The layer of polymers may include cross-linked polymers. A plurality of probe molecules may be arrayed and immobilized on the lacquered membrane. An external force may be applied to the analyte solution to move the analytes towards the lacquered membrane. Movement may cause some or all of the analytes to bind to the lacquered membrane. In cases where probe molecules are presented, some or all of the analytes may bind to probe molecules. The direction of the external force may be reversed to remove unbound or weakly bound analytes. Bound analytes may be detected using known detection types.

  6. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Pooja; Luk, Adriana; Rao, Vivek; Butany, Jagdish

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis. PMID:24447924

  7. Evaluation of a novel integrated sensor system for synchronous measurement of cardiac vibrations and cardiac potentials.

    PubMed

    Chuo, Yindar; Tavakolian, Kouhyar; Kaminska, Bozena

    2011-08-01

    The measurement of human body vibrations as a result of heart beating, simultaneously with cardiac potentials have been demonstrated in past studies to bring additional value to diagnostic cardiology through the detection of irregularities in the mechanical movement of the heart. The equipment currently available to the medical community is either large and bulky or difficult to synchronize. To address this problem, a novel integrated sensor system has been developed to record cardiac vibration and cardiac potential simultaneously and synchronously from a single compact site on the chest. The developed sensor system is lightweight, small in size, and suitable for mounting on active moving patients. The sensor is evaluated for its adequacy in measuring cardiac vibrations and potentials. In this evaluation, 45 independent signal recording are studied from 15 volunteers, and the morphology of the recorded signals are analyzed qualitatively (by visual inspection) and quantitatively (by computational methods) against larger devices used in established cardiac vibration studies (reference devices). It is found that the cardiac vibration signals acquired by the integrated sensor has 92.37% and 81.76% identically identifiable systolic and diastolic cardiac complexes, respectively, when compared to the cardiac vibration signals recorded simultaneously from the reference device. Further, the cardiac potential signals acquired by the integrated sensor show a high correlation coefficient of 0.8912 and a high estimated signal-to-noise-ratio of 22.00 dB when compared to the reference electrocardiograph (non-standard leads) acquired through a common clinical machine. The results suggest that the tiny, wearable, integrated sensor system that synchronously measures cardiac vibrations and cardiac potentials may be practical for use as an alternative or assistive cardiac diagnostic tool.

  8. An incremental double-layer capacitance of a planar nano gap and its application in cardiac-troponin T detection.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2016-05-15

    Surface potential is one of the most important properties at solid-liquid interfaces. It can be modulated by the voltage applied on the electrode or by the surface properties. Hence, surface potential is a good indicator for surface modifications, such as biomolecular bindings. In this work, we proposed a planar nano-gap structure for surface-potential difference monitoring. Based on the proposed architecture, the variance of surface-potential difference can be determined by electrical double layer capacitance (EDLC) between the nano-gap electrodes. Using cyclic voltammetry method, in this work, we demonstrated a relationship between surface potential and EDLC by chemically modifying surface properties. Finally, we also showed the proposed planar nano-gap device provides the capability for cardiac-troponin T (cTnT) measurements with co-existed 10 µg/ml BSA interference. The detection dynamic range is from 100 pg/ml to 1 µg/ml. Based on experimental results and extrapolation, the detection limit is less than 100 pg/ml in diluted PBS buffer (0.01X PBS). These results demonstrated the planar nano-gap architecture having potentials on biomolecular detection through monitoring of surface-potential variation. PMID:26761619

  9. Acute Radiation Effects on Cardiac Function Detected by Strain Rate Imaging in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Katrien; Jurcut, Ruxandra; Weltens, Caroline; Giusca, Sorin; Ector, Joris; Wildiers, Hans; Van den Bogaert, Walter; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the occurrence of early radiation-induced changes in regional cardiac function using strain rate imaging (SRI) by tissue Doppler echocardiography. Methods and Materials: We included 20 left-sided and 10 right-sided breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the breast or chest wall. Standard echocardiography and SRI were performed before RT (baseline), immediately after RT (post-RT), and at 2 months follow-up (FUP) after RT. Regional strain (S) and strain rate (SR) values were obtained from all 18 left ventricular (LV) segments. Data were compared to the regional radiation dose. Results: A reduction in S was observed post-RT and at FUP in left-sided patients (S{sub post-RT}: -17.6 {+-} 1.5%, and S{sub FUP}: -17.4 {+-} 2.3%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -19.5 {+-} 2.1%, p < 0.001) but not in right-sided patients. Within the left-sided patient group, S and SR were significantly reduced after RT in apical LV segments (S{sub post-RT}: -15.3 {+-} 2.5%, and S{sub FUP}: -14.3 {+-} 3.7%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -19.3 {+-} 3.0%, p < 0.01; and SR{sub post-RT}: -1.06 {+-} 0.15 s {sup -1}, and SR{sub FUP}: -1.16 {+-} 0.28 s {sup -1}, vs. SR{sub baseline}: -1.29 {+-} 0.27s {sup -1}, p = 0.01), but not in mid- or basal segments. Furthermore, we observed that segments exposed to more than 3 Gy showed a significant decrease in S after RT (S{sub post-RT}: -16.1 {+-} 1.6%, and S{sub FUP}: -15.8 {+-} 3.4%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -18.9 {+-} 2.6%, p < 0.001). This could not be observed in segments receiving less than 3 Gy. Conclusions: SRI shows a dose-related regional decrease in myocardial function after RT. It might be a useful tool in the evaluation of modern RT techniques, with respect to cardiac toxicity.

  10. Possible mechanism of cardiac depressant activity of Berberis orthobotrys roots in isolated rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Alamgeer; Akhtar, Muhammad Shoaib; Jabeen, Qaiser; Bashir, Sajid; Malik, Muhammad Nasir Hayat; Karim, Sabeha; Mushtaq, Muhammad Naveed; Rasool, Shahid; Latif, Fozia; Tabbasum, Nazia; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Ahsan, Haseeb; Khan, Wasim; Javed, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Berberis orhob, otrvs Bien. ex Aitch. (B.o.) has been reported to have antihypertensive effect in different experimental models. The aim of present study was to evaluate the possible antihypertensive mechanism. Aqueous methanolic extract of B.o. roots and its various fractions namely (ethyl acetate, n-butanol or aqueous) in different concentrations (10 ng/mL, 100 ng/mL, I pg/mL, 10 pg/mL, 100 pg/mL ) were evaluated in isolated perfused rabbit heart to assess their effect on force of contraction, HR and perfusion pressure. The crude extract of B.o. and its fractions exhibited a significant decrease in heart rate, contractility and perfusion pressure of isolated rabbit heart, however, butanolic fraction produced more prominent effect and was selected for further study. The effects of butanol fraction were not blocked by atropine (10' M) in isolated perfused heart. However, butanol fraction significantly blocked the effects of adrenaline (10' M). It is therefore conceivable that cardiac depressant activity of B.o. butanol fraction might be due to the presence of certain 3-blocking agents which might be responsible for antihypertensive effect However, further experiments are required to isolate the active compound(s) and elucidate exact mechanism of action.

  11. Pitx2 promotes heart repair by activating the antioxidant response after cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ge; Kahr, Peter C; Morikawa, Yuka; Zhang, Min; Rahmani, Mahdis; Heallen, Todd R; Li, Lele; Sun, Zhao; Olson, Eric N; Amendt, Brad A; Martin, James F

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction results in compromised myocardial function and heart failure owing to insufficient cardiomyocyte self-renewal. Unlike many vertebrates, mammalian hearts have only a transient neonatal renewal capacity. Reactivating primitive reparative ability in the mature mammalian heart requires knowledge of the mechanisms that promote early heart repair. By testing an established Hippo-deficient heart regeneration mouse model for factors that promote renewal, here we show that the expression of Pitx2 is induced in injured, Hippo-deficient ventricles. Pitx2-deficient neonatal mouse hearts failed to repair after apex resection, whereas adult mouse cardiomyocytes with Pitx2 gain-of-function efficiently regenerated after myocardial infarction. Genomic analyses indicated that Pitx2 activated genes encoding electron transport chain components and reactive oxygen species scavengers. A subset of Pitx2 target genes was cooperatively regulated with the Hippo pathway effector Yap. Furthermore, Nrf2, a regulator of the antioxidant response, directly regulated the expression and subcellular localization of Pitx2. Pitx2 mutant myocardium had increased levels of reactive oxygen species, while antioxidant supplementation suppressed the Pitx2 loss-of-function phenotype. These findings reveal a genetic pathway activated by tissue damage that is essential for cardiac repair. PMID:27251288

  12. [Features of brain oscillatory activity and cardiac defense in treatment arterial hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Aftanas, L I; Brak, I V; Gilinskaia, O M; Pavlov, S V; Reva, N V

    2014-01-01

    Stress reactivity of the motivational system of defense can be assessed with the aid the cardiac defense response (CDR) - the reaction of the cardiovascular system to unexpected aversive unconditioned stimulus. The main objective of the study was revealing putative contribution of oscillatory systems of the brain into central pathogenic mechanisms of enhanced blood pressure (BP) stress-reactivity in naive patients with arterial hypertension (AH) of the 1st-2nd degrees (n = 17) and healthy control (n = 19) subjects. Using dynamic registration "beat-by-beat" arterial pressure, and oscillatory activity related EEG (64 channels) is estimated using the event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERD/ERS). Along with abnormally high blood pressure in patients with hypertension background set significantly lower concentrations of serotonin blood platelets and increased tonic activation of the left hemisphere, reflected in the asymmetric reduction of delta- (2-4 Hz) and theta-1 (4-6 Hz) power in the central and parietal cortex in the hemisphere CDR of the patients are characterized by hyperactivity both short- and long-latency components of blood pressure. According to the dynamic analysis of the concomitant EEG, long-latency BP components may be accounted by, among other mechanisms, weakening of the descending ("top-down") inhibitory control, hypothetically implemented with the high-frequency EEG alpha (10-12 Hz) oscillations from the medial central-parietal cortex of both hemispheres of the brain. PMID:25464727

  13. Automated Detection of Activity Transitions for Prompting

    PubMed Central

    Feuz, Kyle D.; Cook, Diane J.; Rosasco, Cody; Robertson, Kayela; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with cognitive impairment can benefit from intervention strategies like recording important information in a memory notebook. However, training individuals to use the notebook on a regular basis requires a constant delivery of reminders. In this work, we design and evaluate machine learning-based methods for providing automated reminders using a digital memory notebook interface. Specifically, we identify transition periods between activities as times to issue prompts. We consider the problem of detecting activity transitions using supervised and unsupervised machine learning techniques, and find that both techniques show promising results for detecting transition periods. We test the techniques in a scripted setting with 15 individuals. Motion sensors data is recorded and annotated as participants perform a fixed set of activities. We also test the techniques in an unscripted setting with 8 individuals. Motion sensor data is recorded as participants go about their normal daily routine. In both the scripted and unscripted settings a true positive rate of greater than 80% can be achieved while maintaining a false positive rate of less than 15%. On average, this leads to transitions being detected within 1 minute of a true transition for the scripted data and within 2 minutes of a true transition on the unscripted data. PMID:27019791

  14. A novel AMPK activator from Chinese herb medicine and ischemia phosphorylate the cardiac transcription factor FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingying; Ma, Heng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; He, Leilei; Wu, Jianming; Gao, Xiaoping; Ren, Jun; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Oleanolic Acid (OA) is a nature product extracted from Chinese Herb Medicine which is traditionally used as treatment of diabetes and ischemic heart diseases. Mounting evidence showed that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has cardioprotective effect against ischemic injury and the forkhead transcription factor 3 (FOXO3) was recently identified as a downstream target of AMPK. We hypothesize that OA may protect against ischemic dysfunction of cardiomyocytes via activation of AMPK signaling pathway. Male C57BL/6 mice which were subjected to in vivo regional cardiac ischemia stimulated AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation, as well as phosphorylation of downstream FOXO3 (Ser413) and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC). The natural product, OA, significantly stimulated cardiac AMPK activation in cardiomyocyes in time- and dose-dependent manners. The mechanism of AMPK activation by OA may be due to the loss mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) as shown by JC-1 fluorescence assay. Intriguingly, OA as an AMPK activator also triggered FOXO3 (Ser413) phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, OA treatment can protect cardiomyocytes from contractile dysfunction induced by hypoxia. Taken together, the results indicated that both ischemia and OA stimulated cardiac AMPK phosphorylation, as well downstream FOXO3 phosphorylation. The cardioprotective effect of OA maybe associated with activation of AMPK signaling pathways.

  15. Are Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Activity and Perceived Stress Related to Functional Somatic Symptoms in Adolescents? The TRAILS Study

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Karin A. M.; Riese, Harriëtte; Van Roon, Arie M.; Hunfeld, Joke A. M.; Groot, Paul F. C.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stressors have been related to medically insufficiently explained or functional somatic symptoms (FSS). However, the underlying mechanism of this association is largely unclear. In the current study, we examined whether FSS are associated with different perceived stress and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) levels during a standardized stressful situation, and whether these associations are symptom-specific. Methods We examined 715 adolescents (16.1 years, 51.3% girls) from the Dutch cohort study Tracking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Sample during the Groningen Social Stress Test (GSST). FSS were assessed by the Youth Self-Report, and clustered into a cluster of overtiredness, dizziness and musculoskeletal pain and a cluster of headache and gastrointestinal symptoms. Perceived stress levels (i.e. unpleasantness and arousal) were assessed by the Self-Assessment Manikin, and cardiac ANS activity by assessing heart rate variability (HRV-HF) and pre-ejection period (PEP). Perceived stress and cardiac ANS levels before, during, and after the GSST were studied as well as cardiac ANS reactivity. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the associations. Results Perceived arousal levels during (beta = 0.09, p = 0.04) and after (beta = 0.07, p = 0.047) the GSST, and perceived unpleasantness levels before (beta = 0.07, p = 0.048) and during (beta = 0.12, p = 0.001) the GSST were related to FSS during the past couple of months. The association between perceived stress and FSS was stronger for the FSS cluster of overtiredness, dizziness and musculoskeletal pain than for the cluster of headache and gastrointestinal symptoms. Neither ANS activity levels before, during, and after the GSST, nor maximal HF-HRV and PEP reactivity were related to FSS. Conclusions This study suggests that perceived stress levels during social stress are related to FSS, whereas cardiac ANS activity and reactivity are not related to FSS. PMID:27089394

  16. Sex Hormones Promote Opposite Effects on ACE and ACE2 Activity, Hypertrophy and Cardiac Contractility in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dalpiaz, P. L. M.; Lamas, A. Z.; Caliman, I. F.; Ribeiro, R. F.; Abreu, G. R.; Moyses, M. R.; Andrade, T. U.; Gouvea, S. A.; Alves, M. F.; Carmona, A. K.; Bissoli, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in sex differences and RAS components. However, whether gender influences cardiac angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) activity is still unknown. In the present work, we determined the relationship between ACE and ACE2 activity, left ventricular function and gender in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Methodology / Principal Findings Twelve-week-old female (F) and male (M) SHRs were divided into 2 experimental groups (n = 7 in each group): sham (S) and gonadectomized (G). Fifty days after gonadectomy, we measured positive and negative first derivatives (dP/dt maximum left ventricle (LV) and dP/dt minimum LV, respectively), hypertrophy (morphometric analysis) and ACE and ACE2 catalytic activity (fluorimetrically). Expression of calcium handling proteins was measured by western blot. Male rats exhibited higher cardiac ACE and ACE2 activity as well as hypertrophy compared to female rats. Orchiectomy decreased the activity of these enzymes and hypertrophy, while ovariectomy increased hypertrophy and ACE2, but did not change ACE activity. For cardiac function, the male sham group had a lower +dP/dt than the female sham group. After gonadectomy, the +dP/dt increased in males and reduced in females. The male sham group had a lower -dP/dt than the female group. After gonadectomy, the -dP/dt increased in the male and decreased in the female groups when compared to the sham group. No difference was observed among the groups in SERCA2a protein expression. Gonadectomy increased protein expression of PLB (phospholamban) and the PLB to SERCA2a ratio in female rats, but did not change in male rats. Conclusion Ovariectomy leads to increased cardiac hypertrophy, ACE2 activity, PLB expression and PLB to SERCA2a ratio, and worsening of hemodynamic variables, whereas in males the removal of testosterone has the opposite effects on RAS components. PMID:26010093

  17. Object and activity detection from aerial video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Se, Stephen; Shi, Feng; Liu, Xin; Ghazel, Mohsen

    2015-05-01

    Aerial video surveillance has advanced significantly in recent years, as inexpensive high-quality video cameras and airborne platforms are becoming more readily available. Video has become an indispensable part of military operations and is now becoming increasingly valuable in the civil and paramilitary sectors. Such surveillance capabilities are useful for battlefield intelligence and reconnaissance as well as monitoring major events, border control and critical infrastructure. However, monitoring this growing flood of video data requires significant effort from increasingly large numbers of video analysts. We have developed a suite of aerial video exploitation tools that can alleviate mundane monitoring from the analysts, by detecting and alerting objects and activities that require analysts' attention. These tools can be used for both tactical applications and post-mission analytics so that the video data can be exploited more efficiently and timely. A feature-based approach and a pixel-based approach have been developed for Video Moving Target Indicator (VMTI) to detect moving objects at real-time in aerial video. Such moving objects can then be classified by a person detector algorithm which was trained with representative aerial data. We have also developed an activity detection tool that can detect activities of interests in aerial video, such as person-vehicle interaction. We have implemented a flexible framework so that new processing modules can be added easily. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) allows the user to configure the processing pipeline at run-time to evaluate different algorithms and parameters. Promising experimental results have been obtained using these tools and an evaluation has been carried out to characterize their performance.

  18. Peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor can modulate cardiac ryanodine receptor channel activity and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Curtis, Suzanne M; Cengia, Louise; Sakowska, Magdalena; Casarotto, Marco G

    2004-01-01

    We show that peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop alter cardiac RyR (ryanodine receptor) channel activity in a cytoplasmic Ca2+-dependent manner. The peptides were AC (Thr-793-Ala-812 of the cardiac dihydropyridine receptor), AS (Thr-671-Leu-690 of the skeletal dihydropyridine receptor), and a modified AS peptide [AS(D-R18)], with an extended helical structure. The peptides added to the cytoplasmic side of channels in lipid bilayers at > or = 10 nM activated channels when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 100 nM, but either inhibited or did not affect channel activity when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 10 or 100 microM. Both activation and inhibition were independent of bilayer potential. Activation by AS, but not by AC or AS(D-R18), was reduced at peptide concentrations >1 mM in a voltage-dependent manner (at +40 mV). In control experiments, channels were not activated by the scrambled AS sequence (ASS) or skeletal II-III loop peptide (NB). Resting Ca2+ release from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum was not altered by peptide AC, but Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release was depressed. Resting and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release were enhanced by both the native and modified AS peptides. NMR revealed (i) that the structure of peptide AS(D-R18) is not influenced by [Ca2+] and (ii) that peptide AC adopts a helical structure, particularly in the region containing positively charged residues. This is the first report of specific functional interactions between dihydropyridine receptor A region peptides and cardiac RyR ion channels in lipid bilayers. PMID:14678014

  19. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalling in Cancer and Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lipovka, Yulia; Konhilas, John P

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-protein kinase (AMPK) pathway is very versatile as it regulates cellular energetic homeostasis in many different tissue types. An appreciation for the importance of AMPK signalling and regulation in cardiovascular and tumor biology is increasing. Recently, a link has been established between anti-cancer therapy and susceptibility to cardiac disease. It has been shown that some anti-cancer drugs lead to an increased risk of cardiac disease, underlined by de-regulation of AMPK signalling. This review explores the AMPK signalling axis in both cardiac and tumor metabolism. We then examine off-target AMPK inhibition by cancer drugs and how this may translate into increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Finally, we discuss the implication of deregulated AMPK signalling during different stages of cardiac hypertrophy. Better understanding of the molecular pathways behind pathological processes will lead to the development of more effective therapeutics for cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26798768

  20. Poly-2-methoxyethylacrylate-coated bypass circuits reduce activation of coagulation system and inflammatory response in congenital cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Surface-coated cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has been shown to have excellent biocompatibility during cardiac surgery in adults, but there have been only a few reports demonstrating the efficacy of this coating for congenital cardiac surgery. We tested the efficacy of poly-2-methoxyethylacrylate (PMEA) coating for CPB circuits in congenital cardiac surgery. Eleven operative cases of ventricular septal defect were studied: group C (control: no coating, n = 5) and group P (PMEA coating, n = 6). The platelet count and beta-thromboglobulin (beta TG), fibrinogen (FBG), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), and neutrophil elastase levels were measured during the operation. Postoperative chest tube drainage was analyzed and the surface of the artificial lung was observed with an electron microscope. Elevation of TAT and neutrophil elastase was suppressed in group P (P < 0.05). Observation of the artificial lung surface using an electron microscope clearly revealed fewer blood cells were adherent to the surface in group P. The FBG level and postoperative bleeding were relatively lower in group P, but there were no significant differences between groups. The platelet count and beta TG level were the same in both groups. We concluded that the PMEA-coated circuit reduces activation of the coagulation system and the inflammatory reaction in pediatric cardiac surgery.

  1. CMOS-compatible, label-free silicon-nanowire biosensors to detect cardiac troponin I for acute myocardial infarction diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Tao; Su, Ruigong; Zhang, Beibei; Zhang, Qi; Cheng, Guosheng

    2012-04-15

    A label-free biosensor for electrical detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), a highly sensitive and selective biomarker of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), is demonstrated using silicon nanowire (SiNW) based field-effect transistors (FETs). The FET devices were fabricated by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible top-down approach to define the SiNW followed by tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) wet etching. Electrical characterizations of the SiNW FET revealed an ambipolar conduction characteristic with an on/off ratio of 10(5)-10(6). CTnI monoclonal antibodies were then covalently immobilized on the SiNW surfaces. By integrating with a homemade biosensor measurement system, the biosensor exhibited rapid and sensitive response to cTnI proteins. The current response showed a nature of logarithm relationship against the cTnI concentration from 46 ng/mL down to 0.092 ng/mL. Moreover, an anti-interference capability of the fabricated biosensor was also assessed. By utilizing the top-down fabrication method, this work provides an efficient way for the cTnI proteins detection with an enormous potential of mass-production, which definitely facilitate the practical applications.

  2. Cardiac responses to β-adrenoceptor stimulation is partly dependent on mitochondrial calcium uniporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sada, E; Silva-Platas, C; Villegas, C A; Rivero, S L; Willis, B C; García, N; Garza, J R; Oropeza-Almazán, Y; Valverde, C A; Mazzocchi, G; Zazueta, C; Torre-Amione, G; García-Rivas, G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite the importance of mitochondrial Ca2+ to metabolic regulation and cell physiology, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate Ca2+ entry into the mitochondria. Accordingly, we established a system to determine the role of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter in an isolated heart model, at baseline and during increased workload following β-adrenoceptor stimulation. Experimental Approach Cardiac contractility, oxygen consumption and intracellular Ca2+ transients were measured in ex vivo perfused murine hearts. Ru360 and spermine were used to modify mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter activity. Changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ content and energetic phosphate metabolite levels were determined. Key Results The addition of Ru360, a selective inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, induced progressively and sustained negative inotropic effects that were dose-dependent with an EC50 of 7 μM. Treatment with spermine, a uniporter agonist, showed a positive inotropic effect that was blocked by Ru360. Inotropic stimulation with isoprenaline elevated oxygen consumption (2.7-fold), Ca2+-dependent activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (5-fold) and mitochondrial Ca2+ content (2.5-fold). However, in Ru360-treated hearts, this parameter was attenuated. In addition, β-adrenoceptor stimulation in the presence of Ru360 did not affect intracellular Ca2+ handling, PKA or Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent PK signalling. Conclusions and Implications Inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter decreases β-adrenoceptor response, uncoupling between workload and production of energetic metabolites. Our results support the hypothesis that the coupling of workload and energy supply is partly dependent on mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter activity. PMID:24628066

  3. Alterations in cardiac sarcolemmal Ca/sup 2 +/ pump activity during diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Heyliger, C.E.; Prakash, A.; McNeill, J.

    1987-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is frequently associated with a primary cardiomyopathy. The mechanisms responsible for this heart disease are not clear, but an alteration in myocardial Ca/sup 2 +/ transport is believed to be involved in its development. Even though sarcolemma plays a crucial role in cellular Ca/sup 2 +/ transport, little appears to be known about its Ca/sup 2 +/ transporting capability in the diabetic myocardium. In this regard, the authors have examined the status of the cardiac sarcolemmal Ca/sup 2 +/ pump during diabetes mellitus. Purified sarcolemmal membranes were isolated from male Wistar diabetic rat hearts 8 wk after streptozotocin injection. Ca/sup 2 +/ pump activity assessed by measuring its Ca/sup 2 +/-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase and Ca/sup 2 +/-uptake ability in the absence and presence of calmodulin was significantly depressed in the diabetic myocardium relative to controls. These results did not appear to have been influenced by the minimal sarcoplasmic reticular and mitochondrial contamination of this membrane preparation. Hence, it appears that the sarcolemmal Ca/sup 2 +/ pump is defective in the diabetic myocardium and may be involved in the altered Ca/sup 2 +/ transport of the heart during diabetes mellitus.

  4. Fluoroscopy-based method to determine heart geometry for functional imaging of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Raja N.; Ramanathan, Charulatha; Jia, Ping; Rudy, Yoram

    2003-05-01

    A fluoroscopy based method for determining heart surface geometry has been developed and validated in phantom and human studies. Biplane fluoroscopic projections were calibrated independently. The heart contour was segmented in each projection and corresponding contour points were matched using epipolar geometry. Points in 3D were reconstructed from the corresponding contour points using point reconstruction. B-splines were approximated from the reconstructed points and meshed to form the heart surface. The fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart was validated in a phantom and human study by comparison to CT imaging. Mean, minimum, maximum and standard deviation of the absolute distance errors were computed for the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart relative to the CT heart. The mean absolute distance error for the phantom was 4mm. The mean absolute distance error for the human subject was 10 mm. In addition to validating the geometry, we also evaluated in the human subject the feasibility of noninvasive imaging of normal cardiac electrical activity on the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart by comparing the results to those obtained on the CT heart. Noninvasive images on the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart by showed close correlation with those obtained on the CT heart (CC=0.70).

  5. Detection of complement activation by counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE).

    PubMed

    Arroyave, C M; Tan, E M

    1976-01-01

    Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) was used as a method of detecting activation of the third component of the complement system (C3). Highly purified C3, normal human serum (NHS), EDTA-treated plasma and serum activated with aggregated human immunoglobulin (agg-IgG) or inulin were used as sources of C3 and/or C3 split products. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement was assayed in the presence of EGTA (10 mM) and MgCl2 (0.3 mM), conditions which block activation of the classical pathway. When purified native C3, fresh NHS and fresh EDTA-plasma were tested in CIE against either antisera to whole C3 or to C3 split products, only one precipitin line was found, which was identified as native C3. However, when serum activated with agg-IgG or inulin were tested against the same reagents, two precipitin lines were seen. The first, with more cathodal mobility was identical to that of native C3. The second line had a more anodal mobility, was distinctly separated from the first and contained C3c and C3d as shown immunochemically with specific antisera. Native C3 and split products of C3 were identified by this CIE method in patients showing evidence of activated complement by having subnormal total complement (CH50) levels. When C3 split products were identified, the C3c-C3d precipitin line could always be distinguished from native C3 by its different electrophoretic mobility, even when C3 concentrations in serum varied from 0.25 mg/ml to 1.5 mg/ml. The sensitivity of CIE was compared to that of CH50 by asssaying at different time intervals after agg-IgG was added to fresh NHS. C3c-C3d split products were detected by CIE before any fall in CH50 and at all times when a significant decrease in CH50 was present. This study shows that the CIE technique is a highly sensitive, specific and rapid method for detecting activation of the complement system via classical or alternative pathways in human disease.

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary artery disease - cardiac rehab; Angina - cardiac rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab ... have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery ...

  7. The secretome of myocardial telocytes modulates the activity of cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Albulescu, Radu; Tanase, Cristiana; Codrici, Elena; Popescu, Daniela I; Cretoiu, Sanda M; Popescu, Laurentiu M

    2015-08-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are interstitial cells that are present in numerous organs, including the heart interstitial space and cardiac stem cell niche. TCs are completely different from fibroblasts. TCs release extracellular vesicles that may interact with cardiac stem cells (CSCs) via paracrine effects. Data on the secretory profile of TCs and the bidirectional shuttle vesicular signalling mechanism between TCs and CSCs are scarce. We aimed to characterize and understand the in vitro effect of the TC secretome on CSC fate. Therefore, we studied the protein secretory profile using supernatants from mouse cultured cardiac TCs. We also performed a comparative secretome analysis using supernatants from rat cultured cardiac TCs, a pure CSC line and TCs-CSCs in co-culture using (i) high-sensitivity on-chip electrophoresis, (ii) surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and (iii) multiplex analysis by Luminex-xMAP. We identified several highly expressed molecules in the mouse cardiac TC secretory profile: interleukin (IL)-6, VEGF, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-2 and MCP-1, which are also present in the proteome of rat cardiac TCs. In addition, rat cardiac TCs secrete a slightly greater number of cytokines, IL-2, IL-10, IL-13 and some chemokines like, GRO-KC. We found that VEGF, IL-6 and some chemokines (all stimulated by IL-6 signalling) are secreted by cardiac TCs and overexpressed in co-cultures with CSCs. The expression levels of MIP-2 and MIP-1α increased twofold and fourfold, respectively, when TCs were co-cultured with CSCs, while the expression of IL-2 did not significantly differ between TCs and CSCs in mono culture and significantly decreased (twofold) in the co-culture system. These data suggest that the TC secretome plays a modulatory role in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:26176909

  8. The secretome of myocardial telocytes modulates the activity of cardiac stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Albulescu, Radu; Tanase, Cristiana; Codrici, Elena; Popescu, Daniela I; Cretoiu, Sanda M; Popescu, Laurentiu M

    2015-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are interstitial cells that are present in numerous organs, including the heart interstitial space and cardiac stem cell niche. TCs are completely different from fibroblasts. TCs release extracellular vesicles that may interact with cardiac stem cells (CSCs) via paracrine effects. Data on the secretory profile of TCs and the bidirectional shuttle vesicular signalling mechanism between TCs and CSCs are scarce. We aimed to characterize and understand the in vitro effect of the TC secretome on CSC fate. Therefore, we studied the protein secretory profile using supernatants from mouse cultured cardiac TCs. We also performed a comparative secretome analysis using supernatants from rat cultured cardiac TCs, a pure CSC line and TCs-CSCs in co-culture using (i) high-sensitivity on-chip electrophoresis, (ii) surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and (iii) multiplex analysis by Luminex-xMAP. We identified several highly expressed molecules in the mouse cardiac TC secretory profile: interleukin (IL)-6, VEGF, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), MIP-2 and MCP-1, which are also present in the proteome of rat cardiac TCs. In addition, rat cardiac TCs secrete a slightly greater number of cytokines, IL-2, IL-10, IL-13 and some chemokines like, GRO-KC. We found that VEGF, IL-6 and some chemokines (all stimulated by IL-6 signalling) are secreted by cardiac TCs and overexpressed in co-cultures with CSCs. The expression levels of MIP-2 and MIP-1α increased twofold and fourfold, respectively, when TCs were co-cultured with CSCs, while the expression of IL-2 did not significantly differ between TCs and CSCs in mono culture and significantly decreased (twofold) in the co-culture system. These data suggest that the TC secretome plays a modulatory role in stem cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:26176909

  9. The selective activation of the cardiac sarcolemmal sodium-calcium exchanger by plasmalogenic phosphatidic acid produced by phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Hale, C C; Ebeling, E G; Hsu, F F; Ford, D A

    1998-01-30

    Since plasmalogens are the predominant phospholipid of cardiac sarcolemma, the activation of the sodium-calcium exchanger by either plasmenylethanolamine or plasmalogenic phosphatidic acid generated by phospholipase D was explored. Sodium-calcium exchange activity was 7-fold greater in proteoliposomes comprised of plasmenylethanolamine compared to proteoliposomes comprised of only plasmenylcholine. Phospholipase D treatment of proteoliposomes resulted in 1 mol % conversion of plasmenylcholine or phosphatidylcholine to their respective phosphatidic acid molecular species with a concomitant 8-fold or 2-fold activation of sodium-calcium exchange activity, respectfully. Thus, phospholipase D-mediated hydrolysis of plasmalogens to phosphatidic acid may be an important mechanism for the regulation of the sodium-calcium exchanger.

  10. Detection of telomerase activity using microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Koji; Arakawa, Hidetoshi

    2015-07-01

    Telomerase participates in malignant transformation or immortalization of cells and thus has attracted attention as an anticancer drug target and diagnostic tumor marker. The telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) and improved TRAP methods (TRAP-fluorescence, TRAP-hybridization, etc.) are widely used forms of this telomerase assay. However, these approaches generally employ acrylamide gel electrophoresis after amplification of telomeric repeats by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), making these TRAP methods time consuming and technically demanding. In this study we developed a novel telomerase assay using microchip electrophoresis for rapid and highly sensitive detection of telomerase activity in cancer cells. The mixed gel of 0.8% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and 0.3% polyethylene oxide (PEO) with SYBR Gold (fluorescent reagent) was used for microchip electrophoresis. As a result, the product amplified by a telomerase-positive cell could be measured in one cell per assay and detected with high reproducibility (CV=0.67%) in the short time of 100s.

  11. Regulation of cardiac hypertrophy in vivo by the stress-activated protein kinases/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases

    PubMed Central

    Choukroun, Gabriel; Hajjar, Roger; Fry, Stefanie; del Monte, Federica; Haq, Syed; Guerrero, J. Luis; Picard, Michael; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Force, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy often presages the development of heart failure. Numerous cytosolic signaling pathways have been implicated in the hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes in culture, but their roles in the hypertrophic response to physiologically relevant stimuli in vivo is unclear. We previously reported that adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of SEK-1(KR), a dominant inhibitory mutant of the immediate upstream activator of the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), abrogates the hypertrophic response of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to endothelin-1 in culture. We now report that gene transfer of SEK-1(KR) to the adult rat heart blocks SAPK activation by pressure overload, demonstrating that the activity of cytosolic signaling pathways can be inhibited by gene transfer of loss-of-function mutants in vivo. Furthermore, gene transfer of SEK-1(KR) inhibited pressure overload–induced cardiac hypertrophy, as determined by echocardiography and several postmortem measures including left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, the ratio of LV weight to body weight, cardiomyocyte diameter, and inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor expression. Our data suggest that the SAPKs are critical regulators of cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, and therefore may serve as novel drug targets in the treatment of hypertrophy and heart failure. J. Clin. Invest. 104:391–398 (1999). PMID:10449431

  12. MicroECG: An Integrated Platform for the Cardiac Arrythmia Detection and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Bruno; Batista, Arnaldo; Alves, Luis Brandão; Ortigueira, Manuel; Rato, Raul

    A software tool for the analysis of the High-Resolution Electrocardiogram (HR-ECG) for Arrhythmia detection is introduced. New algorithms based on Wavelet analysis are presented and compared with the classic Simson protocol over the P and QRS segments of the Electrocardiogram (EEG). A novel procedure based on a two step wavelet analysis and synthesis is performed in order to obtain a frequency description of the P, T or QRS segments. This frequency "signature" is useful for the detection of otherwise asymptomatic Arrhythmia patients. The tool has been developed in Matlab, and deployed for a standalone C application.

  13. Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiratory Dysfunction and Tissue Damage in Chronic Hyperglycemia Correlate with Reduced Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Mandar; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Xu, Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Palaniyandi, Suresh S.

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 is a mitochondrial isozyme of the heart involved in the metabolism of toxic aldehydes produced from oxidative stress. We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-mediated decrease in ALDH2 activity may impair mitochondrial respiration and ultimately result in cardiac damage. A single dose (65 mg/kg; i.p.) streptozotocin injection to rats resulted in hyperglycemia with blood glucose levels of 443 ± 9 mg/dl versus 121 ± 7 mg/dl in control animals, p<0.0001, N = 7–11. After 6 months of diabetes mellitus (DM) induction, the rats were sacrificed after recording the functionality of their hearts. Increase in the cardiomyocyte cross sectional area (446 ± 32 μm2 Vs 221 ± 10 μm2; p<0.0001) indicated cardiac hypertrophy in DM rats. Both diastolic and systolic dysfunctions were observed with DM rats compared to controls. Most importantly, myocardial ALDH2 activity and levels were reduced, and immunostaining for 4HNE protein adducts was increased in DM hearts compared to controls. The mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR), an index of mitochondrial respiration, was decreased in mitochondria isolated from DM hearts compared to controls (p<0.0001). Furthermore, the rate of mitochondrial respiration and the increase in carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP)-induced maximal respiration were also decreased with chronic hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia reduced mitochondrial OXPHOS proteins. Reduced ALDH2 activity was correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction, pathological remodeling and cardiac dysfunction, respectively. Our results suggest that chronic hyperglycemia reduces ALDH2 activity, leading to mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction and consequently cardiac damage and dysfunction. PMID:27736868

  14. Blood neutrophil bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Honoré, Stéphanie; Kirsch, Matthias; Plonquet, Anne; Fernandez, Eric; Touqui, Lhousseine; Farcet, Jean-Pierre; Soussy, Claude-James; Loisance, Daniel; Delclaux, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    Whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) constitutes per se an independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality after surgery as compared with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) remains a subject of debate. The aim of this study was to assess whether innate defenses against MRSA and MSSA strains are similarly impaired after cardiac surgery. Both intracellular (isolated neutrophil functions) and extracellular (plasma) defenses of 12 patients undergoing scheduled cardiac surgery were evaluated preoperatively (day 0) and postoperatively (day 3) against two MSSA strains with a low level of catalase secretion and two MRSA strains with a high level of catalase secretion, inasmuch as SA killing by neutrophils relies on oxygen-dependent mechanisms. After surgery, an increase in plasma concentration of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine able to inhibit reactive oxygen species secretion and bactericidal activity of neutrophils, was evidenced. Despite the fact that univariate analysis suggested a specific impairment of neutrophil functions against MRSA strains, two-way repeated-measures ANOVA failed to demonstrate that the effect of S. aureus phenotype was significant. On the other hand, an increase in type-II secretory phospholipase A2 activity, a circulating enzyme involved in SA lysis, was evidenced and was associated with an enhancement of extracellular defenses (bactericidal activity of plasma) against MRSA. Overall, cardiac surgery and S. aureus phenotype had a significant effect on plasma bactericidal activity. Cardiac surgery was characterized by enhanced antibacterial defenses of plasma, whereas neutrophil killing properties were reduced. The overall effect of S. aureus phenotype on neutrophil functions did not seem significant.

  15. Natriuretic Peptide-Induced Catecholamine Release from Cardiac Sympathetic Neurons: Inhibition by Histamine H3 and H4 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Robador, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that natriuretic peptides, including brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), promote norepinephrine release from cardiac sympathetic nerves and dopamine release from differentiated pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. These proexocytotic effects are mediated by an increase in intracellular calcium secondary to cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) activation caused by a protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 3 (PDE3). The purpose of the present study was to search for novel means to prevent the proadrenergic effects of natriuretic peptides. For this, we focused our attention on neuronal inhibitory Gαi/o-coupled histamine H3 and H4 receptors. Our findings show that activation of neuronal H3 and H4 receptors inhibits the release of catecholamines elicited by BNP in cardiac synaptosomes and differentiated PC12 cells. This effect results from a decrease in intracellular Ca2+ due to reduced intracellular cAMP/PKA activity, caused by H3 and H4 receptor-mediated PKG inhibition and consequent PDE3-induced increase in cAMP metabolism. Indeed, selective H3 and H4 receptor agonists each synergized with a PKG inhibitor and a PDE3 activator in attenuating BNP-induced norepinephrine release from cardiac sympathetic nerve endings. This indicates that PKG inhibition and PDE3 stimulation are pivotal for the H3 and H4 receptor-mediated attenuation of BNP-induced catecholamine release. Cardiac sympathetic overstimulation is characteristic of advanced heart failure, which was recently found not to be improved by the administration of recombinant BNP (nesiritide), despite the predicated beneficial effects of natriuretic peptides. Because excessive catecholamine release is likely to offset the desirable effects of natriuretic peptides, our findings suggest novel means to alleviate their adverse effects and improve their therapeutic potential. PMID:22923736

  16. Microarray analysis of active cardiac remodeling genes in a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model rescued by a phospholamban knockout

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudarsan; Pena, James R.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wolska, Beata M.

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and aberrant systolic and/or diastolic function. Our laboratories have previously developed two mouse models that affect cardiac performance. One mouse model encodes an FHC-associated mutation in α-tropomyosin: Glu → Gly at amino acid 180, designated as Tm180. These mice display a phenotype that is characteristic of FHC, including severe cardiac hypertrophy with fibrosis and impaired physiological performance. The other model was a gene knockout of phospholamban (PLN KO), a regulator of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes; these hearts exhibit hypercontractility with no pathological abnormalities. Previous work in our laboratories shows that when mice were genetically crossed between the PLN KO and Tm180, the progeny (PLN KO/Tm180) display a rescued hypertrophic phenotype with improved morphology and cardiac function. To understand the changes in gene expression that occur in these models undergoing cardiac remodeling (Tm180, PLN KO, PLN KO/Tm180, and nontransgenic control mice), we conducted microarray analyses of left ventricular tissue at 4 and 12 mo of age. Expression profiling reveals that 1,187 genes changed expression in direct response to the three genetic models. With these 1,187 genes, 11 clusters emerged showing normalization of transcript expression in the PLN KO/Tm180 hearts. In addition, 62 transcripts are highly involved in suppression of the hypertrophic phenotype. Confirmation of the microarray analysis was conducted by quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide insight into genes that alter expression during cardiac remodeling and are active during modulation of the cardiomyopathic phenotype. PMID:23800848

  17. Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: physical activity counselling and exercise training: key components of the position paper from the Cardiac Rehabilitation Section of the European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Corrà, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Carré, François; Heuschmann, Peter; Hoffmann, Uwe; Verschuren, Monique; Halcox, Julian; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Saner, Hugo; Wood, David; Piepoli, Massimo F; Corrà, Ugo; Benzer, Werner; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Dendale, Paul; Gaita, Dan; McGee, Hannah; Mendes, Miguel; Niebauer, Josef; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2010-08-01

    Cardiac patients after an acute event and/or with chronic heart disease deserve special attention to restore their quality of life and to maintain or improve functional capacity. They require counselling to avoid recurrence through a combination of adherence to a medication plan and adoption of a healthy lifestyle. These secondary prevention targets are included in the overall goal of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Cardiac rehabilitation can be viewed as the clinical application of preventive care by means of a professional multi-disciplinary integrated approach for comprehensive risk reduction and global long-term care of cardiac patients. The CR approach is delivered in tandem with a flexible follow-up strategy and easy access to a specialized team. To promote implementation of cardiac prevention and rehabilitation, the CR Section of the EACPR (European Association of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation) has recently completed a Position Paper, entitled 'Secondary prevention through cardiac rehabilitation: A condition-oriented approach'. Components of multidisciplinary CR for seven clinical presentations have been addressed. Components include patient assessment, physical activity counselling, exercise training, diet/nutritional counselling, weight control management, lipid management, blood pressure monitoring, smoking cessation, and psychosocial management. Cardiac rehabilitation services are by definition multi-factorial and comprehensive, with physical activity counselling and exercise training as central components in all rehabilitation and preventive interventions. Many of the risk factor improvements occurring in CR can be mediated through exercise training programmes. This call-for-action paper presents the key components of a CR programme: physical activity counselling and exercise training. It summarizes current evidence-based best practice for the wide range of patient presentations of interest to the general cardiology community.

  18. Serum Biomarkers for the Detection of Cardiac Toxicity after Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Sibo; Hirshfield, Kim M.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Toppmeyer, Deborah; Haffty, Bruce G.; Khan, Atif J.; Goyal, Sharad

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modality cancer treatments that include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted agents are highly effective therapies. Their use, especially in combination, is limited by the risk of significant cardiac toxicity. The current paradigm for minimizing cardiac morbidity, based on serial cardiac function monitoring, is suboptimal. An alternative approach based on biomarker testing, has emerged as a promising adjunct and a potential substitute to routine echocardiography. Biomarkers, most prominently cardiac troponins and natriuretic peptides, have been evaluated for their ability to describe the risk of potential cardiac dysfunction in clinically asymptomatic patients. Early rises in cardiac troponin concentrations have consistently predicted the risk and severity of significant cardiac events in patients treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Biomarkers represent a novel, efficient, and robust clinical decision tool for the management of cancer therapy-induced cardiotoxicity. This article aims to review the clinical evidence that supports the use of established biomarkers such as cardiac troponins and natriuretic peptides, as well as emerging data on proposed biomarkers. PMID:25346912

  19. C-reactive protein and cardiac vagal activity following resistance exercise training in young African-American and white men.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Jae, Sae Young; Vieira, Victoria J; Iwamoto, Gary A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Woods, Jeffrey A; Fernhall, Bo

    2009-04-01

    African Americans have a greater prevalence of hypertension and diabetes compared with white Americans, and both autonomic dysregulation and inflammation have been implicated in the etiology of these disease states. The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiac autonomic and systemic inflammatory response to resistance training in young African-American and white men. Linear (time and frequency domain) and nonlinear (sample entropy) heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, tonic and reflex vagal activity, and postexercise heart rate recovery were used to assess cardiac vagal modulation. C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count were used as inflammatory markers. Twenty two white and 19 African-American men completed 6 wk of resistance training followed by 4 wk of exercise detraining (Post 2). Sample entropy, tonic and reflex vagal activity, and heart rate recovery were increased in white and African-American men following resistance training (P < 0.05). Following detraining (Post 2), sample entropy, tonic and reflex vagal activity, and heart rate recovery returned to baseline values in white men but remained above baseline in African-American men. While there were no changes in white blood cell count or CRP in white men, these inflammatory markers decreased in African-American men following resistance training, with reductions being maintained following detraining (P < 0.05). In conclusion, resistance training improves cardiac autonomic function and reduces inflammation in African-American men, and these adaptations remained after the cessation of training. Resistance training may be an important lifestyle modification for improving cardiac autonomic health and reducing inflammation in young African-American men.

  20. Frontal midline theta rhythm is correlated with cardiac autonomic activities during the performance of an attention demanding meditation procedure.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Sato, W; Toichi, M; Murai, T; Okada, T; Hayashi, A; Sengoku, A

    2001-04-01

    Frontal midline theta rhythm (Fm theta), recognized as distinct theta activity on EEG in the frontal midline area, reflects mental concentration as well as meditative state or relief from anxiety. Attentional network in anterior frontal lobes including anterior cingulate cortex is suspected to be the generator of this activity, and the regulative function of the frontal neural network over autonomic nervous system (ANS) during cognitive process is suggested. However no studies have examined peripheral autonomic activities during Fm theta induction, and interaction of central and peripheral mechanism associated with Fm theta remains unclear. In the present study, a standard procedure of Zen meditation requiring sustained attention and breath control was employed as the task to provoke Fm theta, and simultaneous EEG and ECG recordings were performed. For the subjects in which Fm theta activities were provoked (six men, six women, 48% of the total subjects), peripheral autonomic activities were evaluated during the appearance of Fm theta as well as during control periods. Successive inter-beat intervals were measured from the ECG, and a recently developed method of analysis by Toichi et al. (J. Auton. Nerv. Syst. 62 (1997) 79-84) based on heart rate variability was used to assess cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic functions separately. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic indices were increased during the appearance of Fm theta compared with control periods. Theta band activities in the frontal area were correlated negatively with sympathetic activation. The results suggest a close relationship between cardiac autonomic function and activity of medial frontal neural circuitry.

  1. An Interactive Computer Session to Initiate Physical Activity in Sedentary Cardiac Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Ray, Renae L; Dzewaltowski, David A; Glasgow, Russell E; Lee, Rebecca E; Thomas, Deborah SK; Xu, Stanley; Estabrooks, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) improves many facets of health. Despite this, the majority of American adults are insufficiently active. Adults who visit a physician complaining of chest pain and related cardiovascular symptoms are often referred for further testing. However, when this testing does not reveal an underlying disease or pathology, patients typically receive no additional standard care services. A PA intervention delivered within the clinic setting may be an effective strategy for improving the health of this population at a time when they may be motivated to take preventive action. Objective Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of a tailored, computer-based, interactive personal action planning session to initiate PA among a group of sedentary cardiac patients following exercise treadmill testing (ETT). Methods This study was part of a larger 2x2 randomized controlled trial to determine the impact of environmental and social-cognitive intervention approaches on the initiation and maintenance of weekly PA for patients post ETT. Participants who were referred to an ETT center but had a negative-test (ie, stress tests results indicated no apparent cardiac issues) were randomized to one of four treatment arms: (1) increased environmental accessibility to PA resources via the provision of a free voucher to a fitness facility in close proximity to their home or workplace (ENV), (2) a tailored social cognitive intervention (SC) using a “5 As”-based (ask, advise, assess, assist, and arrange) personal action planning tool, (3) combined intervention of both ENV and SC approaches (COMBO), or (4) a matched contact nutrition control (CON). Each intervention was delivered using a computer-based interactive session. A general linear model for repeated measures was conducted with change in PA behavior from baseline to 1-month post interactive computer session as the primary outcome. Results Sedentary participants (n=452; 34.7% participation rate) without

  2. A High-Performance Fluorescence Immunoassay Based on the Relaxation of Quenching, Exemplified by Detection of Cardiac Troponin I

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Wan; Cho, Il-Hoon; Park, Ji-Na; Seo, Sung-Min; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular fluorescence self-quenching phenomenon is a major drawback in developing high-performance fluorometric biosensors which use common fluorophores as signal generators. We propose two strategies involving liberation of the fluorescent molecules by means of enzymatic fragmentation of protein or dehybridization of double-stranded DNA. In the former, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was coupled with the fluorescent BODIPY dye (Red BSA), and then immobilized on a solid surface. When the insolubilized Red BSA was treated with proteinase K (10 units/mL) for 30 min, the fluorescent signal was significantly increased (3.5-fold) compared to the untreated control. In the second case, fluorophore-tagged DNA probes were linked to gold nanoparticles by hybridization with capture DNA strands densely immobilized on the surface. The quenched fluorescence signal was recovered (3.7-fold) by thermal dehybridization, which was induced with light of a specific wavelength (e.g., 530 nm) for less than 1 min. We next applied the Red BSA self-quenching relaxation technique employing enzymatic fragmentation to a high-performance immunoassay of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in a microtiter plate format. The detection limit was 0.19 ng/mL cTnI, and the fluorescent signal was enhanced approximately 4.1-fold compared with the conventional method of direct measurement of the fluorescent signal from a non-fragmented fluorophore-labeled antibody. PMID:27171097

  3. A High-Performance Fluorescence Immunoassay Based on the Relaxation of Quenching, Exemplified by Detection of Cardiac Troponin I.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Wan; Cho, Il-Hoon; Park, Ji-Na; Seo, Sung-Min; Paek, Se-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular fluorescence self-quenching phenomenon is a major drawback in developing high-performance fluorometric biosensors which use common fluorophores as signal generators. We propose two strategies involving liberation of the fluorescent molecules by means of enzymatic fragmentation of protein or dehybridization of double-stranded DNA. In the former, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was coupled with the fluorescent BODIPY dye (Red BSA), and then immobilized on a solid surface. When the insolubilized Red BSA was treated with proteinase K (10 units/mL) for 30 min, the fluorescent signal was significantly increased (3.5-fold) compared to the untreated control. In the second case, fluorophore-tagged DNA probes were linked to gold nanoparticles by hybridization with capture DNA strands densely immobilized on the surface. The quenched fluorescence signal was recovered (3.7-fold) by thermal dehybridization, which was induced with light of a specific wavelength (e.g., 530 nm) for less than 1 min. We next applied the Red BSA self-quenching relaxation technique employing enzymatic fragmentation to a high-performance immunoassay of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in a microtiter plate format. The detection limit was 0.19 ng/mL cTnI, and the fluorescent signal was enhanced approximately 4.1-fold compared with the conventional method of direct measurement of the fluorescent signal from a non-fragmented fluorophore-labeled antibody.

  4. Detection and display of acoustic window for guiding and training cardiac ultrasound users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Wen; Radulescu, Emil; Wang, Shougang; Thiele, Karl; Prater, David; Maxwell, Douglas; Rafter, Patrick; Dupuy, Clement; Drysdale, Jeremy; Erkamp, Ramon

    2014-03-01

    Successful ultrasound data collection strongly relies on the skills of the operator. Among different scans, echocardiography is especially challenging as the heart is surrounded by ribs and lung tissue. Less experienced users might acquire compromised images because of suboptimal hand-eye coordination and less awareness of artifacts. Clearly, there is a need for a tool that can guide and train less experienced users to position the probe optimally. We propose to help users with hand-eye coordination by displaying lines overlaid on B-mode images. The lines indicate the edges of blockages (e.g., ribs) and are updated in real time according to movement of the probe relative to the blockages. They provide information about how probe positioning can be improved. To distinguish between blockage and acoustic window, we use coherence, an indicator of channel data similarity after applying focusing delays. Specialized beamforming was developed to estimate coherence. Image processing is applied to coherence maps to detect unblocked beams and the angle of the lines for display. We built a demonstrator based on a Philips iE33 scanner, from which beamsummed RF data and video output are transferred to a workstation for processing. The detected lines are overlaid on B-mode images and fed back to the scanner display to provide users real-time guidance. Using such information in addition to B-mode images, users will be able to quickly find a suitable acoustic window for optimal image quality, and improve their skill.

  5. Automated detection of perturbed cardiac physiology during oral food allergen challenge in children.

    PubMed

    Twomey, N; Temko, A; Hourihane, J O'B; Marnane, W P

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates the fully automated computer-based detection of allergic reaction in oral food challenges using pediatric ECG signals. Nonallergic background is modeled using a mixture of Gaussians during oral food challenges, and the model likelihoods are used to determine whether a subject is allergic to a food type. The system performance is assessed on the dataset of 24 children (15 allergic and 9 nonallergic) totaling 34 h of data. The proposed detector correctly classified all nonallergic subjects (100% specificity) and 12 allergic subjects (80% sensitivity) and is capable of detecting allergy on average 17 min earlier than trained clinicians during oral food challenges, the gold standard of allergy diagnosis. Inclusion of the developed allergy classification platform during oral food challenges recorded would result in a 30% reduction of doses administered to allergic subjects. The results of study introduce the possibility to halt challenges earlier which can safely advance the state of clinical art of allergy diagnosis by reducing the overall exposure to the allergens.

  6. Measuring Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) Activity in Toddlers - Resting and Developmental Challenges.

    PubMed

    Bush, Nicole R; Caron, Zoe K; Blackburn, Katherine S; Alkon, Abbey

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) consists of two branches, the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, and controls the function of internal organs (e.g., heart rate, respiration, digestion) and responds to everyday and adverse experiences (1). ANS measures in children have been found to be related to behavior problems, emotion regulation, and health (2-7). Therefore, understanding the factors that affect ANS development during early childhood is important. Both branches of the ANS affect young children's cardiovascular responses to stimuli and have been measured noninvasively, via external monitoring equipment, using valid and reliable measures of physiological change (8-11). However, there are few studies of very young children with simultaneous measures of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, which limits understanding of the integrated functioning of the two systems. In addition, the majority of existing studies of young children report on infants' resting ANS measures or their reactivity to commonly used mother-child interaction paradigms, and less is known about ANS reactivity to other challenging conditions. We present a study design and standardized protocol for a non-invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in 18 month old children. We describe methods for continuous monitoring of the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the ANS under resting and challenge conditions during a home or laboratory visit and provide descriptive findings from our sample of 140 ethnically diverse toddlers using validated equipment and scoring software. Results revealed that this protocol can produce a range of physiological responses to both resting and developmentally challenging conditions, as indicated by changes in heart rate and indices of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. Individuals demonstrated variability in resting levels, responses to challenges, and challenge reactivity, which provides additional evidence

  7. Stress response and cardiac activity of term and preterm calves in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Christina; Aurich, Jörg; Trenk, Lisa; Ille, Natascha; Drillich, Marc; Pohl, Werner; Aurich, Christine

    2016-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis of gestational age affecting fetal cardiac activity and the stress response at birth. Heart rate (HR), heart rate variability variables, SD of the beat-to-beat interval and root mean square of successive beat-to-beat differences, and postnatal salivary cortisol concentration were studied in calves born at term (Term, n = 7, gestation length 286.3 ± 2.1 days) or after induction of parturition (Preterm, n = 7, gestation length 279.6 ± 0.2 days). Observation periods covered the last month of gestation (phase A), the last hours before birth including the first stage of labor (phase B), and the neonatal period (phase C). Fetal HR decreased in phase A (P < 0.001) and did not differ between groups. During phase B, HR increased (P < 0.05) and was higher in Preterm than in Term calves in phases B (P < 0.05) and C (P < 0.01). In Term calves, heart rate variability increased from Day 6 until birth (P < 0.05). At birth, SD of the beat-to-beat interval was higher in Term than in Preterm calves (P < 0.01). On Day 1 after birth (phase C), HR accelerations were more frequent in Term than Preterm calves (P < 0.01), whereas decelerations were more frequent in Preterm calves (P < 0.05). Cortisol concentration increased postnatally (P < 0.001) and was correlated with gestation length (r ≥ 0.68, P < 0.01). Because of a certain degree of immaturity, the ability to cope with the stress of birth may be impaired in calves born 1 week before term. PMID:27312949

  8. Inhibition of microglial activation contributes to propofol-induced protection against post-cardiac arrest brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Rui; Feng, Da-Yun; Liang, Li-Rong; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Hui

    2015-09-01

    It has been suggested that propofol can modulate microglial activity and hence may have potential roles against neuroinflammation following brain ischemic insult. However, whether and how propofol can inhibit post-cardiac arrest brain injury via inhibition of microglia activation remains unclear. A rat model of asphyxia cardiac arrest (CA) was created followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation. CA induced marked microglial activation in the hippocampal CA1 region, revealed by increased OX42 and P2 class of purinoceptor 7 (P2X7R) expression, as well as p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Morris water maze showed that learning and memory deficits following CA could be inhibited or alleviated by pre-treatment with the microglial inhibitor minocycline or propofol. Microglial activation was significantly suppressed likely via the P2X7R/p-p38 pathway by propofol. Moreover, hippocampal neuronal injuries after CA were remarkably attenuated by propofol. In vitro experiment showed that propofol pre-treatment inhibited ATP-induced microglial activation and release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. In addition, propofol protected neurons from injury when co-culturing with ATP-treated microglia. Our data suggest that propofol pre-treatment inhibits CA-induced microglial activation and neuronal injury in the hippocampus and ultimately improves cognitive function. We proposed a possible mechanism of propofol-mediated brain protection after cardiac arrest (CA). CA induces P2X7R upregulation and p38 phosphorylation in microglia, which induces release of TNF-α and IL-1β and consequent neuronal injury. Propofol could inhibit microglial activation and alleviate neuronal damage. Our results suggest propofol-induced anti-inflammatory treatment as a plausible strategy for therapeutic intervention in post-CA brain injury.

  9. HIF-1α and PPARγ during physiological cardiac hypertrophy induced by pregnancy: Transcriptional activities and effects on target genes.

    PubMed

    Soñanez-Organis, José G; Godoy-Lugo, José A; Hernández-Palomares, Magally L E; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Rosas-Rodríguez, Jesús A; González-Ochoa, Guadalupe; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2016-10-15

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) are transcription factors that activate genes involved in cellular metabolism. Physiological cardiac hypertrophy induced by pregnancy initiates compensatory changes in metabolism. However, the contributions of HIF-1α and PPARγ to this physiological status and to its reversible, metabolic process (postpartum) in the heart are not well-defined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the transcriptional activities of HIF-1α and PPARγ in the left ventricle of rats before, during, and after pregnancy. Furthermore, the effects of pregnancy on target genes of glycolysis and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis, key regulatory enzymes, and metabolic intermediates were evaluated. The activities of HIF-1α and PPARγ increased 1.2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, during pregnancy, and decreased to basal levels during postpartum. Expressions of mRNA for glucose transport 1 (GLUT1), enzymes of glycolysis (HK2, PFKM, and GAPDH) and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis (GPAT and GPD1) increased 1.6- to 14-fold during pregnancy and returned to basal levels postpartum. The increase in GPD1 expression translated to an increase in its activity, but such was not the case for GAPDH suggesting that post-translational regulation of these proteins is differential during pregnancy. Glycolytic (glucose, lactate, and DHAP) and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis (G3P and FFA) intermediates increased with pregnancy and were maintained postpartum. The results demonstrate that pregnancy-induced, physiological cardiac hypertrophy activates the expression of genes involved in glycolytic and glycerol-lipid biosynthesis suggesting that the shift in cardiac metabolism is mediated by the activation of HIF-1α and PPARγ.

  10. Gallic acid prevents isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis through regulation of JNK2 signaling and Smad3 binding activity

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yuhee; Jin, Li; Kee, Hae Jin; Piao, Zhe Hao; Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Gwi Ran; Choi, Sin Young; Lin, Ming Quan; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gallic acid, a type of phenolic acid, has been shown to have beneficial effects in inflammation, vascular calcification, and metabolic diseases. The present study was aimed at determining the effect and regulatory mechanism of gallic acid in cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by isoproterenol (ISP) in mice and primary neonatal cardiomyocytes. Gallic acid pretreatment attenuated concentric cardiac hypertrophy. It downregulated the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide, and beta-myosin heavy chain in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, it prevented interstitial collagen deposition and expression of fibrosis-associated genes. Upregulation of collagen type I by Smad3 overexpression was observed in cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells but not in cardiac fibroblasts. Gallic acid reduced the DNA binding activity of phosphorylated Smad3 in Smad binding sites of collagen type I promoter in rat cardiac fibroblasts. Furthermore, it decreased the ISP-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) protein in mice. JNK2 overexpression reduced collagen type I and Smad3 expression as well as GATA4 expression in H9c2 cells and cardiac fibroblasts. Gallic acid might be a novel therapeutic agent for the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis by regulating the JNK2 and Smad3 signaling pathway. PMID:27703224

  11. The relationship between cardiac output, cerebral electrical activity, cerebral fractional oxygen extraction and peripheral blood flow in premature newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Victor, Suresh; Appleton, Richard E; Beirne, Margaret; Marson, Anthony G; Weindling, A Michael

    2006-10-01

    Cardiac output is a determinant of systemic blood flow and its measurement may therefore be a useful indicator of abnormal hemodynamics and tissue oxygen delivery. The purpose of this study was to investigate in very premature newborn infants the relationships between cardiac output (left and right ventricular outputs), systemic blood pressure, peripheral blood flow (PBF) and two indicators of cerebral oxygen delivery (cerebral electrical activity and cerebral fractional oxygen extraction (CFOE)). This was a prospective observational study performed on 40 infants of less than 30 wk gestation. Digital electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded for one hour every day during the first four days after birth and subjected to qualitative and quantitative analysis. Left and right ventricular outputs, mean blood pressure (MBP), CFOE, PBF and arterial blood gases were measured at the same time. Within the ranges studied, there was no apparent relationship between left or right ventricular output (RVO), PBF and indicators of cerebral perfusion (cerebral electrical activity and CFOE). The EEG was normal in infants with low left and right ventricular outputs (<150 mL/kg/min) and MBP > 30 mm Hg. Infants with low cardiac output and normal MBP seem able to maintain cerebral perfusion, possibly through vasodilatation of the cerebral microvasculature. PMID:16940235

  12. Cardiac peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression is modulated by oxidative stress in acutely infrasound-exposed cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhaohui; Meng, Rongsen; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yiqiao; Liu, Fangpeng; Zhu, Miao-Zhang; Li, Ruiman

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of acute infrasound exposure on oxidative damage and investigate the underlying mechanisms in rat cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were cultured and exposed to infrasound for several days. In the study, the expression of CAT, GPx, SOD1, and SOD2 and their activities in rat cardiomyocytes in infrasound exposure groups were significantly decreased compared to those in the various time controls, along with significantly higher levels of O2 (-) and H2O2. Decreased cardiac cell viability was not observed in various time controls. A significant reduction in cardiac cell viability was observed in the infrasound group compared to the control, while significantly increased cardiac cell viability was observed in the infrasound exposure and rosiglitazone pretreatment group. Compared to the control, rosiglitazone significantly upregulated CAT, GPx, SOD1, and SOD2 expression and their activities in rat cardiomyocytes exposed to infrasound, while the levels of O2 (-) or H2O2 were significantly decreased. A potential link between a significant downregulation of PPAR-γ expression in rat cardiomyocytes in the infrasound group was compared to the control and infrasound-induced oxidative stress. These findings indicate that infrasound can induce oxidative damage in rat cardiomyocytes by inactivating PPAR-γ. PMID:23632742

  13. Resveratrol protects ROS-induced cell death by activating AMPK in H9c2 cardiac muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Taek; Kwon, Dae Young; Park, Ock Jin

    2007-01-01

    Resveratrol, one of polyphenols derived from red wine, has been shown to protect against cell death, possibly through the association with several signaling pathways. Currently numerous studies indicate that cardiovascular diseases are linked to the release of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) often generated in states such as ischemia/reperfusion injury. In the present study, we investigated whether resveratrol has the capability to control intracellular survival signaling cascades involving AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in the inhibitory process of cardiac injury. We hypothesized that resveratrol may exert a protective effect on damage to heart muscle through modulating of the AMPK signaling pathway. We mimicked ischemic conditions by inducing cell death with H2O2 in H9c2 muscle cells. In this experiment, resveratrol induced strong activation of AMPK and inhibited the occurrence of cell death caused by treatment with H2O2. Under the same conditions, inhibition of AMPK using dominant negative AMPK constructs dramatically abolished the effect of resveratrol on cell survival in H2O2-treated cardiac muscle cells. These results indicate that resveratrol-induced cell survival is mediated by AMPK in H9c2 cells and may exert a novel therapeutic effect on oxidative stress induced in cardiac disorders. PMID:18850225

  14. Design optimization of multi-pinhole micro-SPECT configurations by signal detection tasks and system performance evaluations for mouse cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, M-W; Lin, W-T; Chen, Y-C

    2015-01-21

    An optimized configuration of multi-pinhole aperture can improve the spatial resolution and the sensitivity of pinhole SPECT simultaneously. In this study, an optimization strategy of the multi-pinhole configuration with a small detector is proposed for mouse cardiac imaging. A 14 mm-diameter spherical field-of-view (FOV) is used to accommodate the mouse heart. To accelerate the optimization process, the analytic models are applied to rapidly obtain the projection areas of the FOV, the sensitivities and the spatial resolutions of numerous system designs. The candidates of optimal multi-pinhole configuration are then decided by the preliminary evaluations with the analytic models. Subsequently, the pinhole SPECT systems equipped with the designed multi-pinhole apertures are modeled in GATE to generate the imaging system matrices (H matrices) for the system performance assessments. The area under the ROC curves (AUC) of the designed systems is evaluated by signal-known-exactly/background-known-statistically detection tasks with their corresponding H matrices. In addition, the spatial resolutions are estimated by the Fourier crosstalk approach, and the sensitivities are calculated with the H matrices of designed systems, respectively. Furthermore, a series of OSEM reconstruction images of synthetic phantoms, including the hot-rod phantom, mouse heart phantom and Defrise phantom, are reconstructed with the H matrices of designed systems. To quantify the sensitivity and resolution competition in the optimization process, the AUC from the detection tasks and the resolution estimated by the Fourier crosstalk are used as the figure of merits. A trade-off function of AUC and resolution is introduced to find the optimal multi-pinhole configuration. According to the examining results, a 22.5° rotated detector plus a 4-pinhole aperture with 22.5° rotation, 20% multiplexing and 1.52X magnification is the optimized multi-pinhole configuration for the micro pinhole

  15. Design optimization of multi-pinhole micro-SPECT configurations by signal detection tasks and system performance evaluations for mouse cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.-W.; Lin, W.-T.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2015-01-01

    An optimized configuration of multi-pinhole aperture can improve the spatial resolution and the sensitivity of pinhole SPECT simultaneously. In this study, an optimization strategy of the multi-pinhole configuration with a small detector is proposed for mouse cardiac imaging. A 14 mm-diameter spherical field-of-view (FOV) is used to accommodate the mouse heart. To accelerate the optimization process, the analytic models are applied to rapidly obtain the projection areas of the FOV, the sensitivities and the spatial resolutions of numerous system designs. The candidates of optimal multi-pinhole configuration are then decided by the preliminary evaluations with the analytic models. Subsequently, the pinhole SPECT systems equipped with the designed multi-pinhole apertures are modeled in GATE to generate the imaging system matrices (H matrices) for the system performance assessments. The area under the ROC curves (AUC) of the designed systems is evaluated by signal-known-exactly/background-known-statistically detection tasks with their corresponding H matrices. In addition, the spatial resolutions are estimated by the Fourier crosstalk approach, and the sensitivities are calculated with the H matrices of designed systems, respectively. Furthermore, a series of OSEM reconstruction images of synthetic phantoms, including the hot-rod phantom, mouse heart phantom and Defrise phantom, are reconstructed with the H matrices of designed systems. To quantify the sensitivity and resolution competition in the optimization process, the AUC from the detection tasks and the resolution estimated by the Fourier crosstalk are used as the figure of merits. A trade-off function of AUC and resolution is introduced to find the optimal multi-pinhole configuration. According to the examining results, a 22.5° rotated detector plus a 4-pinhole aperture with 22.5° rotation, 20% multiplexing and 1.52X magnification is the optimized multi-pinhole configuration for the micro pinhole

  16. Robust algorithmic detection of the developed cardiac pathologies and emerging or transient abnormalities from short periods of RR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy V.; Senyukova, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Numerous research efforts and clinical testing have confirmed validity of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis as one of the cardiac diagnostics modalities. The majority of HRV analysis tools currently used in practice are based on linear indicators. Methods from nonlinear dynamics (NLD) provide more natural modeling framework for adaptive biological systems with multiple feedback loops. Compared to linear indicators, many NLD-based measures are much less sensitive to data artifacts and non-stationarity. However, majority of NLD measures require long time series for stable calculation. Similar restrictions also apply for linear indicators. Such requirements could drastically limit practical usability of HRV analysis in many applications, including express diagnostics, early indication of subtle directional changes during personalization of medical treatment, and robust detection of emerging or transient abnormalities. Recently we have illustrated that these challenges could be overcome by using classification framework based on boosting-like ensemble learning techniques that are capable of discovering robust meta-indicators from existing HRV measures and other incomplete empirical knowledge. In this paper we demonstrate universality of such meta-indicators and discuss operational details of their practical usage. Using such pathology examples as congestive heart failure (CHF) and arrhythmias, we show that classifiers trained on short RR segments (down to several minutes) could achieve reasonable classification accuracy (˜80-85% and higher). These indicators calculated from longer RR segments could be applicable for accurate diagnostics with classification accuracy approaching 100%. In addition, it is feasible to discover single "normal-abnormal" meta-classifier capable of detecting multiple abnormalities.

  17. Using Lorenz plot and Cardiac Sympathetic Index of heart rate variability for detecting seizures for patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sandor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Tachycardia is often seen during epileptic seizures, but it also occurs during physical exercise. In order to assess whether focal epileptic seizures can be detected by short term moving window Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis, we modified the geometric HRV method, Lorenz plot, to consist of only 30, 50 or 100 R-R intervals per analyzed window. From each window we calculated the longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) variability of Lorenz plot to retrieve the Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) as (L/T) and "Modified CSI" (described in methods), and compared the maximum during the patient's epileptic seizures with that during the patient's own exercise and non-seizure sessions as control. All five analyzed patients had complex partial seizures (CPS) originating in the temporal lobe (11 seizures) during their 1-5 days long term video-EEG monitoring. All CPS with electroencephalographic correlation were selected for the HRV analysis. The CSI and Modified CSI were correspondently calculated after each heart beat depicting the prior 30, 50 and 100 R-R intervals at the time. CSI (30, 50 and 100) and Modified CSI (100) showed a higher maximum peak during seizures than exercise/non-seizure (121-296%) for 4 of the 5 patients within 4 seconds before till 60 seconds after seizure onset time even though exercise maximum HR exceeded that of the seizures. The results indicate a detectable, sudden and inordinate shift towards sympathetic overdrive in the sympathovagal balance of the autonomic nervous system just around seizure-onset for certain patients. This new modified moving window Lorenz plot method seems promising way of constructing a portable ECG-based epilepsy alarm for certain patients with epilepsy who needs aid during seizure.

  18. Detection of telomerase activity using microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Koji; Arakawa, Hidetoshi

    2015-07-01

    Telomerase participates in malignant transformation or immortalization of cells and thus has attracted attention as an anticancer drug target and diagnostic tumor marker. The telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) and improved TRAP methods (TRAP-fluorescence, TRAP-hybridization, etc.) are widely used forms of this telomerase assay. However, these approaches generally employ acrylamide gel electrophoresis after amplification of telomeric repeats by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), making these TRAP methods time consuming and technically demanding. In this study we developed a novel telomerase assay using microchip electrophoresis for rapid and highly sensitive detection of telomerase activity in cancer cells. The mixed gel of 0.8% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and 0.3% polyethylene oxide (PEO) with SYBR Gold (fluorescent reagent) was used for microchip electrophoresis. As a result, the product amplified by a telomerase-positive cell could be measured in one cell per assay and detected with high reproducibility (CV=0.67%) in the short time of 100s. PMID:25980765

  19. Graphene microelectrode arrays for neural activity detection.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaowei; Wu, Lei; Cheng, Ji; Huang, Shanluo; Cai, Qi; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a method to fabricate graphene microelectrode arrays (MEAs) using a simple and inexpensive method to solve the problem of opaque electrode positions in traditional MEAs, while keeping good biocompatibility. To study the interface differences between graphene-electrolyte and gold-electrolyte, graphene and gold electrodes with a large area were fabricated. According to the simulation results of electrochemical impedances, the gold-electrolyte interface can be described as a classical double-layer structure, while the graphene-electrolyte interface can be explained by a modified double-layer theory. Furthermore, using graphene MEAs, we detected the neural activities of neurons dissociated from Wistar rats (embryonic day 18). The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected signal was 10.31 ± 1.2, which is comparable to those of MEAs made with other materials. The long-term stability of the MEAs is demonstrated by comparing differences in Bode diagrams taken before and after cell culturing. PMID:25712492

  20. Cardiac-induced localized thoracic motion detected by a fiber optic sensing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, Thomas; Lloyd, Glynn; Bhamber, Ranjeet S.; Hadzievski, Ljupco; Halliday, Michael; Webb, David J.; Bennion, Ian

    2014-11-01

    The cardiovascular health of the human population is a major concern for medical clinicians, with cardiovascular diseases responsible for 48% of all deaths worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. The development of new diagnostic tools that are practicable and economical to scrutinize the cardiovascular health of humans is a major driver for clinicians. We offer a new technique to obtain seismocardiographic signals up to 54 Hz covering both ballistocardiography (below 20 Hz) and audible heart sounds (20 Hz upward), using a system based on curvature sensors formed from fiber optic long period gratings. This system can visualize the real-time three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical motion of the heart by using the data from the sensing array in conjunction with a bespoke 3-D shape reconstruction algorithm. Visualization is demonstrated by adhering three to four sensors on the outside of the thorax and in close proximity to the apex of the heart; the sensing scheme revealed a complex motion of the heart wall next to the apex region of the heart. The detection scheme is low-cost, portable, easily operated and has the potential for ambulatory applications.

  1. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Phosphorylation Modulates Myofilament Length-Dependent Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S.; Verma, Sujeet; Stelzer, Julian E.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation is an important regulator of contractile function, however, its contributions to length-dependent changes in cross-bridge (XB) kinetics is unknown. Therefore, we performed mechanical experiments to quantify contractile function in detergent-skinned ventricular preparations isolated from wild-type (WT) hearts, and hearts expressing non-phosphorylatable cMyBP-C [Ser to Ala substitutions at residues Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302 (i.e., 3SA)], at sarcomere length (SL) 1.9 μm or 2.1μm, prior and following protein kinase A (PKA) treatment. Steady-state force generation measurements revealed a blunting in the length-dependent increase in myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity of force generation (pCa50) following an increase in SL in 3SA skinned myocardium compared to WT skinned myocardium. Dynamic XB behavior was assessed at submaximal Ca2+-activations by imposing an acute rapid stretch of 2% of initial muscle length, and measuring both the magnitudes and rates of resultant phases of force decay due to strain-induced XB detachment and delayed force rise due to recruitment of additional XBs with increased SL (i.e., stretch activation). The magnitude (P2) and rate of XB detachment (krel) following stretch was significantly reduced in 3SA skinned myocardium compared to WT skinned myocardium at short and long SL, and prior to and following PKA treatment. Furthermore, the length-dependent acceleration of krel due to decreased SL that was observed in WT skinned myocardium was abolished in 3SA skinned myocardium. PKA treatment accelerated the rate of XB recruitment (kdf) following stretch at both SL's in WT but not in 3SA skinned myocardium. The amplitude of the enhancement in force generation above initial pre-stretch steady-state levels (P3) was not different between WT and 3SA skinned myocardium at any condition measured. However, the magnitude of the entire delayed force phase which can dip below initial pre-stretch steady

  2. Clinical Cosmobiology - Sudden Cardiac Death and Daily / Monthly Geomagnetic, Cosmic Ray and Solar Activity - the Baku Study (2003-2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupel, E.; Babayev, E. S.; Mustafa, F. R.; Abramson, E.; Israelevich, P.; Sulkes, J.

    2006-12-01

    Part of results of collaborative studies for revealing an influence of the periodical changes of solar, geomagnetic and cosmic ray activities on the sudden cardiac death (SCD) mortality is described in this paper. The data covering daily and monthly temporal distribution of SCD (788 patients in 36 months in 2003-2005), taken from all of emergency and first medical aid stations of grand Baku area, were analyzed and compared with certain cosmophysical parameters. It was obtained that SCD is higher on the highest and lowest daily levels of geomagnetic activity. Days with SCD are accompanied by higher cosmic ray (neutron) activity. The monthly number of SCD was inversely related to solar and geomagnetic activities while was positively linked with cosmic ray activity level. It was concluded that cosmic ray activity could be considered as one of regulating external/environmental factors in human homeostasis.

  3. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  4. [The characteristics of the cardiac bioelectrical activity in patients after mild craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Mironenko, T V

    1999-09-01

    In a 4- to 12-month clinical and instrumental examination of 166 patients aged 20-30 years having sustained light craniocerebral injury, functional disturbances were disclosed in cardiac performance presenting as early ventricular repolarization syndrome, high incidence of systolic noise of functional genesis, that were associated with other signs of dysfunction of the vegetative nervous system.

  5. Survival following blunt chest impact-induced cardiac arrest during sports activities in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Maron, B J; Strasburger, J F; Kugler, J D; Bell, B M; Brodkey, F D; Poliac, L C

    1997-03-15

    Blunt chest impact-induced cardiac arrest on the athletic field (commotio cordis) is not necessarily fatal. The 3 survivors reported here emphasize the importance of recognizing this syndrome so that emergency resuscitative measures are more likely to be implemented promptly, and such catastrophes avoided.

  6. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Donald A; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T; Stock, Ann M

    2015-08-06

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  7. Cardiac-Specific SOCS3 Deletion Prevents In Vivo Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury through Sustained Activation of Cardioprotective Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Takanobu; Yasukawa, Hideo; Kyogoku, Sachiko; Oba, Toyoharu; Takahashi, Jinya; Nohara, Shoichiro; Minami, Tomoko; Mawatari, Kazutoshi; Sugi, Yusuke; Shimozono, Koutatsu; Pradervand, Sylvain; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Aoki, Hiroki; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) adversely affects cardiac performance and the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Although myocardial signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is potently cardioprotective during IRI, the inhibitory mechanism responsible for its activation is largely unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the role of the myocardial suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3, an intrinsic negative feedback regulator of the Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT signaling pathway, in the development of myocardial IRI. Myocardial IRI was induced in mice by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery for 1 h, followed by different reperfusion times. One hour after reperfusion, the rapid expression of JAK-STAT–activating cytokines was observed. We precisely evaluated the phosphorylation of cardioprotective signaling molecules and the expression of SOCS3 during IRI and then induced myocardial IRI in wild-type and cardiac-specific SOCS3 knockout mice (SOCS3-CKO). The activation of STAT3, AKT, and ERK1/2 rapidly peaked and promptly decreased during IRI. This decrease correlated with the induction of SOCS3 expression up to 24 h after IRI in wild-type mice. The infarct size 24 h after reperfusion was significantly reduced in SOCS3-CKO compared with wild-type mice. In SOCS3-CKO mice, STAT3, AKT, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was sustained, myocardial apoptosis was prevented, and the expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) was augmented. Cardiac-specific SOCS3 deletion led to the sustained activation of cardioprotective signaling molecules including and prevented myocardial apoptosis and injury during IRI. Our findings suggest that SOCS3 may represent a key factor that exacerbates the development of myocardial IRI. PMID:26010537

  8. Goal striving strategies and effort mobilization: When implementation intentions reduce effort-related cardiac activity during task performance.

    PubMed

    Freydefont, Laure; Gollwitzer, Peter M; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments investigate the influence of goal and implementation intentions on effort mobilization during task performance. Although numerous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of setting goals and making plans on performance, the effects of goals and plans on effort-related cardiac activity and especially the cardiac preejection period (PEP) during goal striving have not yet been addressed. According to the Motivational Intensity Theory, participants should increase effort mobilization proportionally to task difficulty as long as success is possible and justified. Forming goals and making plans should allow for reduced effort mobilization when participants perform an easy task. However, when the task is difficult, goals and plans should differ in their effect on effort mobilization. Participants who set goals should disengage, whereas participants who made if-then plans should stay in the field showing high effort mobilization during task performance. As expected, using an easy task in Experiment 1, we observed a lower cardiac PEP in both the implementation intention and the goal intention condition than in the control condition. In Experiment 2, we varied task difficulty and demonstrated that while participants with a mere goal intention disengaged from difficult tasks, participants with an implementation intention increased effort mobilization proportionally with task difficulty. These findings demonstrate the influence of goal striving strategies (i.e., mere goals vs. if-then plans) on effort mobilization during task performance.

  9. Multiple mechanisms of spiral wave breakup in a model of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Hastings, Harold M.; Evans, Steven J.

    2002-09-01

    It has become widely accepted that the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias are due to reentrant waves, i.e., electrical wave(s) that recirculate repeatedly throughout the tissue at a higher frequency than the waves produced by the heart's natural pacemaker (sinoatrial node). However, the complicated structure of cardiac tissue, as well as the complex ionic currents in the cell, have made it extremely difficult to pinpoint the detailed dynamics of these life-threatening reentrant arrhythmias. A simplified ionic model of the cardiac action potential (AP), which can be fitted to a wide variety of experimentally and numerically obtained mesoscopic characteristics of cardiac tissue such as AP shape and restitution of AP duration and conduction velocity, is used to explain many different mechanisms of spiral wave breakup which in principle can occur in cardiac tissue. Some, but not all, of these mechanisms have been observed before using other models; therefore, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate them using just one framework model and to explain the different parameter regimes or physiological properties necessary for each mechanism (such as high or low excitability, corresponding to normal or ischemic tissue, spiral tip trajectory types, and tissue structures such as rotational anisotropy and periodic boundary conditions). Each mechanism is compared with data from other ionic models or experiments to illustrate that they are not model-specific phenomena. Movies showing all the breakup mechanisms are available at http://arrhythmia.hofstra.edu/breakup and at ftp://ftp.aip.org/epaps/chaos/E-CHAOEH-12-039203/ INDEX.html. The fact that many different breakup mechanisms exist has important implications for antiarrhythmic drug design and for comparisons of fibrillation experiments using different species, electromechanical uncoupling drugs, and initiation protocols.

  10. Methylene blue counteracts H2S toxicity-induced cardiac depression by restoring L-type Ca channel activity.

    PubMed

    Judenherc-Haouzi, Annick; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Sonobe, Takashi; Song, Jianliang; Rannals, Matthew D; Wang, JuFang; Tubbs, Nicole; Cheung, Joseph Y; Haouzi, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    We have previously reported that methylene blue (MB) can counteract hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intoxication-induced circulatory failure. Because of the multifarious effects of high concentrations of H2S on cardiac function, as well as the numerous properties of MB, the nature of this interaction, if any, remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to clarify 1) the effects of MB on H2S-induced cardiac toxicity and 2) whether L-type Ca(2+) channels, one of the targets of H2S, could transduce some of the counteracting effects of MB. In sedated rats, H2S infused at a rate that would be lethal within 5 min (24 μM·kg(-1)·min(-1)), produced a rapid fall in left ventricle ejection fraction, determined by echocardiography, leading to a pulseless electrical activity. Blood concentrations of gaseous H2S reached 7.09 ± 3.53 μM when cardiac contractility started to decrease. Two to three injections of MB (4 mg/kg) transiently restored cardiac contractility, blood pressure, and V̇o2, allowing the animals to stay alive until the end of H2S infusion. MB also delayed PEA by several minutes following H2S-induced coma and shock in unsedated rats. Applying a solution containing lethal levels of H2S (100 μM) on isolated mouse cardiomyocytes significantly reduced cell contractility, intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) transient amplitudes, and L-type Ca(2+) currents (ICa) within 3 min of exposure. MB (20 mg/l) restored the cardiomyocyte function, ([Ca(2+)]i) transient, and ICa The present results offer a new approach for counteracting H2S toxicity and potentially other conditions associated with acute inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels. PMID:26962024

  11. [Preoperative cardiac assessment before non-cardiac surgery: cardiac risk stratification].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, J F; Sierro, C; Aebischer, N; Vogt, P; Eeckhout, E

    2010-06-01

    Perioperative cardiac events occurring in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery are a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines recommend an individualized approach to preoperative cardiac risk stratification prior to non-cardiac surgery, integrating risk factors both for the patient (active cardiac conditions, clinical risk factors, functional capacity) and for the planned surgery. Preoperative cardiac investigations are currently limited to high-risk patients in whom they may contribute to modify the perioperative management. A multidisciplinary approach to such patients, integrating the general practitioner, is recommended in order to define an individualized peri-operative strategy.

  12. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and NADPH Redox Regulates Cardiac Myocyte L-Type Calcium Channel Activity and Myocardial Contractile Function

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Dhwajbahadur K.; Hecker, Peter; Watanabe, Makino; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Levy, Richard J.; Okada, Takao; Edwards, John G.; Gupte, Sachin A.

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that a 17-ketosteroid, epiandrosterone, attenuates L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa-L) in cardiac myocytes and inhibits myocardial contractility. Because 17-ketosteroids are known to inhibit glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the rate-limiting enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, and to reduce intracellular NADPH levels, we hypothesized that inhibition of G6PD could be a novel signaling mechanism which inhibit ICa-L and, therefore, cardiac contractile function. We tested this idea by examining myocardial function in isolated hearts and Ca2+ channel activity in isolated cardiac myocytes. Myocardial function was tested in Langendorff perfused hearts and ICa-L were recorded in the whole-cell patch configuration by applying double pulses from a holding potential of −80 mV and then normalized to the peak amplitudes of control currents. 6-Aminonicotinamide, a competitive inhibitor of G6PD, increased pCO2 and decreased pH. Additionally, 6-aminonicotinamide inhibited G6PD activity, reduced NADPH levels, attenuated peak ICa-L amplitudes, and decreased left ventricular developed pressure and ±dp/dt. Finally, dialyzing NADPH into cells from the patch pipette solution attenuated the suppression of ICa-L by 6-aminonicotinamide. Likewise, in G6PD-deficient mice, G6PD insufficiency in the heart decreased GSH-to-GSSG ratio, superoxide, cholesterol and acetyl CoA. In these mice, M-mode echocardiographic findings showed increased diastolic volume and end-diastolic diameter without changes in the fraction shortening. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibiting G6PD activity and reducing NADPH levels alters metabolism and leads to inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channel activity. Notably, this pathway may be involved in modulating myocardial contractility under physiological and pathophysiological conditions during which the pentose phosphate pathway-derived NADPH redox is modulated (e.g., ischemia-reperfusion and heart failure). PMID:23071515

  13. Utility of 3-dimensional echocardiography, global longitudinal strain, and exercise stress echocardiography to detect cardiac dysfunction in breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin-containing adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khouri, Michel G.; Hornsby, Whitney E.; Risum, Niels; Velazquez, Eric J.; Thomas, Samantha; Lane, Amy; Scott, Jessica M.; Koelwyn, Graeme J.; Herndon, James E.; Mackey, John R.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional resting left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) assessments have limitations for detecting doxorubicin (DOX)-related cardiac dysfunction. Novel resting echocardiographic parameters, including 3-dimen-sional echocardiography (3DE) and global longitudinal strain (GLS), have potential for early identification of chemotherapy-related myocardial injury. Exercise “stress” is an established method to uncover impairments in cardiac function but has received limited attention in the adult oncology setting. We evaluated the utility of an integrated approach using 3DE, GLS, and exercise stress echocardiography for detecting subclinical cardiac dysfunction in early breast cancer patients treated with DOX-containing chemotherapy. Fifty-seven asymptomatic women with early breast cancer (mean 26 ± 22 months post-chemotherapy) and 20 sex-matched controls were studied. Resting left ventricular (LV) function was assessed by LVEF using 2-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) and 3DE and by GLS using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D-STE). After resting assessments, subjects completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing with stress 2DE. Resting LVEF was lower in patients than controls by 3DE (55 ± 4 vs. 59 ± 5 %; p = 0.005) but not 2DE (56 ± 4 vs. 58 ± 3 %; p = 0.169). 10 of 51 (20 %) patients had GLS greater than or equal to −17 %, which was below the calculated lower limit of normal (control mean 2SD); this patient subgroup had a mean 20 % impairment in GLS (−16.1 ± 0.9 vs. −20.1 ± 1.5 %; p < 0.001), despite similar LVEF by 2DE and 3DE compared to controls (p > 0.05). Cardiopulmonary function (VO2peak) was 20 % lower in patients than controls (p < 0.001). Exercise stress 2DE assessments of stroke volume (61 ± 11 vs. 69 ± 15 ml; p = 0.018) and cardiac index (2.3 ± 0.9 vs. 3.1 ± 0.8 1 min−1 m−2 mean increase; p = 0.003) were lower in patients than controls. Post-exercise increase in cardiac index predicted VO2peak (r = 0.429, p = 0

  14. Cardiac and Sympathetic Activation are Reduced in Children with Down Syndrome and Sleep Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Denise M.; Horne, Rosemary S.C.; Davey, Margot J.; Hope, Sarah A.; Anderson, Vicki; Trinder, John; Walker, Adrian M.; Nixon, Gillian M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) occurs at an increased incidence in children with Down Syndrome (DS) compared to the general pediatric population. We hypothesized that, compared with typically developing (TD) children with SDB, children with DS have a reduced cardiovascular response with delayed reoxygenation after obstructive respiratory events, and reduced sympathetic drive, providing a potential explanation for their increased risk of pulmonary hypertension. Design: Beat-by-beat heart rate (HR) was analyzed over the course of obstructive events (pre, early, late, post-event) and compared between groups. Also compared were the time for oxygen resaturation post-event and overnight urinary catecholamines. Setting: Pediatric sleep laboratory. Patients: Sixty-four children aged 2-17 y referred for investigation of SDB (32 DS; 32 TD) matched for age and obstructive apnea/hypopnea index. Measurement and Results: Children underwent overnight polysomnography with overnight urine collection. Compared to TD children, those with DS had significantly reduced HR changes post-event during NREM (DS: 21.4% ± 1.8%, TD: 26.6% ± 1.6%, change from late to post-event, P < 0.05). The time to resaturation post-event was significantly increased in the DS group (P < 0.05 for both NREM and REM sleep). Children with DS had significantly reduced overnight urinary noradrenaline (P < 0.01), adrenaline (P < 0.05) and dopamine levels (P < 0.01) compared with TD children. Conclusion: Children with DS and SDB exhibit a compromised acute cardio-respiratory response and dampened sympathetic response to SDB compared with TD children with SDB. These data may reflect autonomic dysfunction in children with DS that may place them at increased risk for cardiovascular complications such as pulmonary hypertension. Citation: O’Driscoll DM; Horne RSC; Davey MJ; Hope SA; Anderson V; Trinder J; Walker AM; Nixon GM. Cardiac and sympathetic activation are reduced in children with down

  15. Optimisation of a generic ionic model of cardiac myocyte electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tianruo; Al Abed, Amr; Lovell, Nigel H; Dokos, Socrates

    2013-01-01

    A generic cardiomyocyte ionic model, whose complexity lies between a simple phenomenological formulation and a biophysically detailed ionic membrane current description, is presented. The model provides a user-defined number of ionic currents, employing two-gate Hodgkin-Huxley type kinetics. Its generic nature allows accurate reconstruction of action potential waveforms recorded experimentally from a range of cardiac myocytes. Using a multiobjective optimisation approach, the generic ionic model was optimised to accurately reproduce multiple action potential waveforms recorded from central and peripheral sinoatrial nodes and right atrial and left atrial myocytes from rabbit cardiac tissue preparations, under different electrical stimulus protocols and pharmacological conditions. When fitted simultaneously to multiple datasets, the time course of several physiologically realistic ionic currents could be reconstructed. Model behaviours tend to be well identified when extra experimental information is incorporated into the optimisation.

  16. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  17. Curvature effects on activation speed and repolarization in an ionic model of cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtois, P.; Vinet, A.

    1999-10-01

    Reentry is a major mechanism underlying the initiation and perpetuation of many cardiac arrhythmias 12345. Stimulated ventricular myocytes give action potential characterized by a fast upstroke, a long-lasting plateau, and a late repolarization phase. The plateau phase determines the action potential duration (APD) during which the system remains refractory, a property essential to the synchronization of the heart cycle. The APD varies much with prematurity and this change has been shown to be the main determinant of the dynamics in models of paced cells and cable, and during reentry in the one-dimensional loop. Curvature has also been shown to be an important factor for propagation in experimental and theoretical cardiac extended tissue. The objective of this paper is to combine both curvature and prematurity effects in a kinematical model of propagation in cardiac tissue. First, an approximation of the ionic model is used to obtain the effects of curvature and prematurity on the speed of propagation, the APD, and the absolute refractory period. Two versions of the ionic model are studied that differ in their rate of excitability recovery. The functions are used in a kinematical model describing the propagation of period-1 solutions around an annulus.

  18. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore–Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  19. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators.

  20. Cardiac activation heat remains inversely dependent on temperature over the range 27-37°C.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Callum M; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Taberner, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    The relation between heat output and stress production (force per cross-sectional area) of isolated cardiac tissue is a key metric that provides insight into muscle energetic performance. The heat intercept of the relation, termed "activation heat," reflects the metabolic cost of restoring transmembrane gradients of Na(+) and K(+) following electrical excitation, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration following its release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At subphysiological temperatures, activation heat is inversely dependent on temperature. Thus one may presume that activation heat would decrease even further at body temperature. However, this assumption is prima facie inconsistent with a study, using intact hearts, which revealed no apparent change in the combination of activation and basal metabolism between 27 and 37°C. It is thus desired to directly determine the change in activation heat between 27 and 37°C. In this study, we use our recently constructed high-thermal resolution muscle calorimeter to determine the first heat-stress relation of isolated cardiac muscle at 37°C. We compare the relation at 37°C to that at 27°C to examine whether the inverse temperature dependence of activation heat, observed under hypothermic conditions, prevails at body temperature. Our results show that activation heat was reduced (from 3.5 ± 0.3 to 2.3 ± 0.3 kJ/m(3)) at the higher temperature. This leads us to conclude that activation metabolism continues to decline as temperature is increased from hypothermia to normothermia and allows us to comment on results obtained from the intact heart by previous investigators. PMID:27016583

  1. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  2. Profound regulation of Na/K pump activity by transient elevations of cytoplasmic calcium in murine cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang-Min; Deisl, Christine; Hilgemann, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Small changes of Na/K pump activity regulate internal Ca release in cardiac myocytes via Na/Ca exchange. We now show conversely that transient elevations of cytoplasmic Ca strongly regulate cardiac Na/K pumps. When cytoplasmic Na is submaximal, Na/K pump currents decay rapidly during extracellular K application and multiple results suggest that an inactivation mechanism is involved. Brief activation of Ca influx by reverse Na/Ca exchange enhances pump currents and attenuates current decay, while repeated Ca elevations suppress pump currents. Pump current enhancement reverses over 3 min, and results are similar in myocytes lacking the regulatory protein, phospholemman. Classical signaling mechanisms, including Ca-activated protein kinases and reactive oxygen, are evidently not involved. Electrogenic signals mediated by intramembrane movement of hydrophobic ions, such as hexyltriphenylphosphonium (C6TPP), increase and decrease in parallel with pump currents. Thus, transient Ca elevation and Na/K pump inactivation cause opposing sarcolemma changes that may affect diverse membrane processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19267.001 PMID:27627745

  3. Variations in local calcium signaling in adjacent cardiac myocytes of the intact mouse heart detected with two-dimensional confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Karin P.; Hohendanner, Felix; Blatter, Lothar A.; Pieske, Burkert M.; Heinzel, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Dyssynchronous local Ca release within individual cardiac myocytes has been linked to cellular contractile dysfunction. Differences in Ca kinetics in adjacent cells may also provide a substrate for inefficient contraction and arrhythmias. In a new approach we quantify variation in local Ca transients between adjacent myocytes in the whole heart. Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts were loaded with Fluo-8 AM to detect Ca and Di-4-ANEPPS to visualize cell membranes. A spinning disc confocal microscope with a fast camera allowed us to record Ca signals within an area of 465 μm by 315 μm with an acquisition speed of 55 fps. Images from multiple transients recorded at steady state were registered to their time point in the cardiac cycle to restore averaged local Ca transients with a higher temporal resolution. Local Ca transients within and between adjacent myocytes were compared with regard to amplitude, time to peak and decay at steady state stimulation (250 ms cycle length). Image registration from multiple sequential Ca transients allowed reconstruction of high temporal resolution (2.4 ± 1.3 ms) local CaT in 2D image sets (N = 4 hearts, n = 8 regions). During steady state stimulation, spatial Ca gradients were homogeneous within cells in both directions and independent of distance between measured points. Variation in CaT amplitudes was similar across the short and the long side of neighboring cells. Variations in TAU and TTP were similar in both directions. Isoproterenol enhanced the CaT but not the overall pattern of spatial heterogeneities. Here we detected and analyzed local Ca signals in intact mouse hearts with high temporal and spatial resolution, taking into account 2D arrangement of the cells. We observed significant differences in the variation of CaT amplitude along the long and short axis of cardiac myocytes. Variations of Ca signals between neighboring cells may contribute to the substrate of cardiac remodeling. PMID:25628569

  4. FKBP12 activates the cardiac ryanodine receptor Ca2+-release channel and is antagonised by FKBP12.6.

    PubMed

    Galfré, Elena; Pitt, Samantha J; Venturi, Elisa; Sitsapesan, Mano; Zaccai, Nathan R; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; O'Neill, Stephen; Sitsapesan, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Changes in FKBP12.6 binding to cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2) are implicated in mediating disturbances in Ca(2+)-homeostasis in heart failure but there is controversy over the functional effects of FKBP12.6 on RyR2 channel gating. We have therefore investigated the effects of FKBP12.6 and another structurally similar molecule, FKBP12, which is far more abundant in heart, on the gating of single sheep RyR2 channels incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers and on spontaneous waves of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release in rat isolated permeabilised cardiac cells. We demonstrate that FKBP12 is a high affinity activator of RyR2, sensitising the channel to cytosolic Ca(2+), whereas FKBP12.6 has very low efficacy, but can antagonise the effects of FKBP12. Mathematical modelling of the data shows the importance of the relative concentrations of FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 in determining RyR2 activity. Consistent with the single-channel results, physiological concentrations of FKBP12 (3 µM) increased Ca(2+)-wave frequency and decreased the SR Ca(2+)-content in cardiac cells. FKBP12.6, itself, had no effect on wave frequency but antagonised the effects of FKBP12.We provide a biophysical analysis of the mechanisms by which FK-binding proteins can regulate RyR2 single-channel gating. Our data indicate that FKBP12, in addition to FKBP12.6, may be important in regulating RyR2 function in the heart. In heart failure, it is possible that an alteration in the dual regulation of RyR2 by FKBP12 and FKBP12.6 may occur. This could contribute towards a higher RyR2 open probability, 'leaky' RyR2 channels and Ca(2+)-dependent arrhythmias. PMID:22363773

  5. Adiponectin ameliorates hyperglycemia-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction by concomitantly activating Nrf2 and Brg1.

    PubMed

    Li, Haobo; Yao, Weifeng; Irwin, Michael G; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Liangqing; Xia, Zhengyuan

    2015-07-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress is implicated in the development of cardiomyopathy in diabetes that is associated with reduced adiponectin (APN) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1) assists nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) to activate HO-1 to increase myocardial antioxidant capacity in response to oxidative stress. We hypothesized that reduced adiponectin (APN) impairs HO-1 induction which contributes to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy, and that supplementation of APN may ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy by activating HO-1 through Nrf2 and Brg1 in diabetes. Control (C) and streptozotocin-induced diabetic (D) rats were untreated or treated with APN adenovirus (1×10(9) pfu) 3 weeks after diabetes induction and examined and terminated 1 week afterward. Rat left ventricular functions were assessed by a pressure-volume conductance system, before the rat hearts were removed to perform histological and biochemical assays. Four weeks after diabetes induction, D rats developed cardiac hypertrophy evidenced as increased ratio of heart weight to body weight, elevated myocardial collagen I content, and larger cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area (all P<0.05 vs C). Diabetes elevated cardiac oxidative stress (increased 15-F2t-isoprostane, 4-hydroxynonenal generation, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and superoxide anion generation), increased myocardial apoptosis, and impaired cardiac function (all P<0.05 vs C). In D rats, myocardial HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were reduced which was associated with reduced Brg1 and nuclear Nrf2 protein expression. All these changes were either attenuated or prevented by APN. In primarily cultured cardiomyocytes (CMs) isolated from D rats or in the embryonic rat cardiomyocytes cell line H9C2 cells incubated with high glucose (HG, 25 mM), supplementation of recombined globular APN (gAd, 2μg/mL) reversed HG-induced reductions of HO-1, Brg1, and nuclear Nrf2 protein expression and

  6. Wheat Germ Agglutinin Staining as a Suitable Method for Detection and Quantification of Fibrosis in Cardiac Tissue after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Emde, B.; Heinen, A.; Gödecke, A.; Bottermann, K.

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of fibrotic tissue is an important task in the analysis of cardiac remodeling. The use of established fibrosis staining techniques is limited on frozen cardiac tissue sections due to a reduced color contrast compared to paraffin embedded sections. We therefore used FITC-labeled wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), which marks fibrotic tissue in comparable quality as the established picrosirius red (SR) staining, for the staining of post myocardial infarction scar tissue. The fibrosis amount was quantified in a histogram-based approach using the non-commercial image processing program ImageJ. Our results clearly demonstrate that WGA-FITC is a suitable marker for cardiac fibrosis in frozen tissue sections. In combination with the histogram-based analysis, this new quantification approach is i) easy and fast to perform; ii) suitable for raw frozen tissue sections; and iii) allows the use of additional antibodies in co-immunostaining. PMID:25578975

  7. [A case of cerebral embolism due to cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebral microaneurysms detected on first MRI scans].

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Saji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old man developed right arm weakness and dysarthria, and was admitted to our hospital. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a high intensity area in the frontal lobe. T2*-weighted images showed multiple spotty low intensity lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres, mimicking cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral angiography showed multiple aneurysms in the anterior, middle, posterior cerebral arteries and cerebellar arteries. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a floating structure in the left atrial chamber, indicating cardiac myxoma. We diagnosed cardioembolic ischemic stroke due to left atrial myxoma. Cardiac surgery for excision of a left atrial myxoma was performed on the 3rd hospital day. Multiple aneurysms should be taken into account for differential diagnosis in patients with cardiac myxoma and with atypical spotty low intensity on T2*-weighted images. PMID:26797485

  8. High glucose induces Smad activation via the transcriptional coregulator p300 and contributes to cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, mortality remains high, particularly in individuals with diabetes. Activated transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) contributes to the pathogenesis of the fibrotic interstitium observed in diabetic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that high glucose enhances the activity of the transcriptional co-activator p300, leading to the activation of TGF-β via acetylation of Smad2; and that by inhibiting p300, TGF-β activity will be reduced and heart failure prevented in a clinically relevant animal model of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods p300 activity was assessed in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts under normal glucose (5.6 mmol/L—NG) and high glucose (25 mmol/L—HG) conditions. 3H-proline incorporation in cardiac fibroblasts was also assessed as a marker of collagen synthesis. The role of p300 activity in modifying TGF-β activity was investigated with a known p300 inhibitor, curcumin or p300 siRNA in vitro, and the functional effects of p300 inhibition were assessed using curcumin in a hemodynamically validated model of diabetic cardiomyopathy – the diabetic TG m(Ren-2)27 rat. Results In vitro, H9c2 cells exposed to HG demonstrated increased p300 activity, Smad2 acetylation and increased TGF-β activity as assessed by Smad7 induction (all p < 0.05 c/w NG). Furthermore, HG induced 3H-proline incorporation as a marker of collagen synthesis (p < 0.05 c/w NG). p300 inhibition, using either siRNA or curcumin reduced p300 activity, Smad acetylation and TGF-β activity (all p < 0.05 c/w vehicle or scrambled siRNA). Furthermore, curcumin therapy reduced 3H-proline incorporation in HG and TGF-β stimulated fibroblasts (p < 0.05 c/w NG). To determine the functional significance of p300 inhibition, diabetic Ren-2 rats were randomized to receive curcumin or vehicle for 6 weeks. Curcumin treatment reduced cardiac hypertrophy, improved diastolic function and reduced extracellular matrix production, without

  9. Pulse pressure monitoring through non-contact cardiac motion detection using 2.45 GHz microwave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The use of a Continuous Wave (CW) quadrature Doppler radar is proposed here for continuous non-invasive Pulse Pressure monitoring. A correspondence between the variation in systemic pulse and variation in the displacement of the chest due to heart is demonstrated, establishing feasibility for the approach. Arctangent demodulation technique was used to process baseband data from radar measurements on two test subjects, in order to determine the absolute cardiac motion. An Omron digital Blood pressure cuff was used to measure the systolic and diastolic blood pressures from which the pulse pressure was calculated. Correlation between pulse pressure and cardiac motion was observed through changes induced due to different postures of the body.

  10. Increased mitochondrial emission of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation are required for doxorubicin-induced cardiac and skeletal muscle myopathy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kisuk; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Smuder, Ashley J; Wiggs, Michael P; Sollanek, Kurt J; Christou, Demetra D; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Szeto, Hazel H; Kavazis, Andreas N; Powers, Scott K

    2015-04-15

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-tumour agent used to treat a variety of cancers, DOX administration is associated with significant side effects, including myopathy of both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The mechanisms responsible for DOX-mediated myopathy remain a topic of debate. We tested the hypothesis that both increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) emission and activation of the cysteine protease calpain are required for DOX-induced myopathy in rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. Cause and effect was determined by administering a novel mitochondrial-targeted anti-oxidant to prevent DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission, whereas a highly-selective pharmacological inhibitor was exploited to inhibit calpain activity. Our findings reveal that mitochondria are a major site of DOX-mediated ROS production in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres and the prevention of DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission protects against fibre atrophy and contractile dysfunction in both cardiac and skeletal muscles. Furthermore, our results indicate that DOX-induced increases in mitochondrial ROS emission are required to activate calpain in heart and skeletal muscles and, importantly, calpain activation is a major contributor to DOX-induced myopathy. Taken together, these findings show that increased mitochondrial ROS production and calpain activation are significant contributors to the development of DOX-induced myopathy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle fibres.

  11. The effects of chewing versus caffeine on alertness, cognitive performance and cardiac autonomic activity during sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Mark; Pavy, Alan; van den Heuvel, Cameron

    2006-12-01

    Chewing has been shown to alleviate feelings of sleepiness and improve cognitive performance during the day. This study investigated the effect of chewing on alertness and cognitive performance across one night without sleep as well as the possible mediating role of cardiac autonomic activity. Fourteen adults participated in a randomized, counterbalanced protocol employing a chewing, placebo and caffeine condition. Participants completed tasks assessing psychomotor vigilance, tracking, grammatical reasoning, alertness and sleepiness each hour across the night. All participants received either placebo or caffeine (200 mg), while the chewing condition also chewed on a tasteless and odorless substance for 15 min each hour. Heart rate (HR), root mean square of the successive differences in R-R intervals on the ECG (RMSSD), and preejection period (PEP) were simultaneously recorded. Alertness and cognitive performance amongst the chewing condition did not differ or were in fact worse when compared with placebo. Similarly, measures of HR and RMSSD remained the same between these two conditions; however, PEP was reduced in the later part of the night in the chewing condition compared with a relative increase for placebo. Caffeine led to improved speed and accuracy on cognitive tasks and increased alertness when compared with chewing. Relative increases in RMSSD and reductions in HR were demonstrated following caffeine; however, no change in PEP was seen. Strong associations between cardiac parasympathetic activity and complex cognitive tasks, as well as between subjective alertness and simpler cognitive tasks, suggest a differential process mediating complex versus simple cognitive performance during sleep deprivation.

  12. Exercise training associated with diet improves heart rate recovery and cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in obese children.

    PubMed

    Prado, D M; Silva, A G; Trombetta, I C; Ribeiro, M M; Guazzelli, I C; Matos, L N; Santos, M S; Nicolau, C M; Negrão, C E; Villares, S M

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that in obese children: 1) hypocaloric diet (D) improves both heart rate recovery at 1 min (Δ HRR1) cfter an exercise test, and cardiac autonomic nervous system activity (CANSA) in obese children; 2) Diet and exercise training (DET) combined leads to greater improvement in both Δ HRR1 after an exercise test and in CANSA, than D alone. Moreover, we examined the relationships among Δ HRR1, CANSA, cardiorespiratory fitness and anthropometric variables (AV) in obese children submitted to D and to DET. 33 obese children (10 ± 0.2 years; body mass index (BMI) >95 (th) percentile) were divided into 2 groups: D (n=15; BMI=31 ± 1 kg/m²)) and DET (n=18; 29 ± 1 kg/m²). All children performed a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a treadmill. The Δ HRR1 or LF/HF ratio (P>0.05). In contrast, the DET group showed increased peak VO₂ ( P=0.01) and improved Δ HRR1 (Δ HRR1=37.3 ± 2.6; P=0.01) and LF/HF ratio ( P=0.001). The DET group demonstrated significant relationships among Δ HRR1, peak VO₂ and CANSA (P<0.05). In conclusion, DET, in contrast to D, promoted improved ÄΔ HRR1 and CANSA in obese children, suggesting a positive influence of increased levels of cardiorespiratory fitness by exercise training on cardiac autonomic activity.

  13. CYP2J2 and its metabolites (epoxyeicosatrienoic acids) attenuate cardiac hypertrophy by activating AMPKα2 and enhancing nuclear translocation of Akt1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Zeng, Hesong; Wen, Zheng; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 epoyxgenase 2J2 and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are known to protect against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, which involve the activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Akt. Although the functional roles of AMPK and Akt are well established, the significance of cross talk between them in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and antihypertrophy of CYP2J2 and EETs remains unclear. We investigated whether CYP2J2 and its metabolites EETs protected against cardiac hypertrophy by activating AMPKα2 and Akt1. Moreover, we tested whether EETs enhanced cross talk between AMPKα2 and phosphorylated Akt1 (p-Akt1), and stimulated nuclear translocation of p-Akt1, to exert their antihypertrophic effects. AMPKα2(-/-) mice that overexpressed CYP2J2 in heart were treated with Ang II for 2 weeks. Interestingly, overexpression of CYP2J2 suppressed cardiac hypertrophy and increased levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in the heart tissue and plasma of wild-type mice but not AMPKα2(-/-) mice. The CYP2J2 metabolites, 11,12-EET, activated AMPKα2 to induce nuclear translocation of p-Akt1 selectively, which increased the production of ANP and therefore inhibited the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, by co-immunoprecipitation analysis, we found that AMPKα2β2γ1 and p-Akt1 interact through the direct binding of the AMPKγ1 subunit to the Akt1 protein kinase domain. This interaction was enhanced by 11,12-EET. Our studies reveal a novel mechanism in which CYP2J2 and EETs enhanced Akt1 nuclear translocation through interaction with AMPKα2β2γ1 and protect against cardiac hypertrophy and suggest that overexpression of CYP2J2 might have clinical potential to suppress cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  14. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  15. G alpha(q)-mediated activation of GRK2 by mechanical stretch in cardiac myocytes: the role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Ricky; D'Souza, Karen M; Staron, Michelle L; Birukov, Konstantin G; Bodi, Ilona; Akhter, Shahab A

    2010-04-30

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) is a critical regulator of beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) signaling and cardiac function. We studied the effects of mechanical stretch, a potent stimulus for cardiac myocyte hypertrophy, on GRK2 activity and beta-AR signaling. To eliminate neurohormonal influences, neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were subjected to cyclical equi-biaxial stretch. A hypertrophic response was confirmed by "fetal" gene up-regulation. GRK2 activity in cardiac myocytes was increased 4.2-fold at 48 h of stretch versus unstretched controls. Adenylyl cyclase activity was blunted in sarcolemmal membranes after stretch, demonstrating beta-AR desensitization. The hypertrophic response to mechanical stretch is mediated primarily through the G alpha(q)-coupled angiotensin II AT(1) receptor leading to activation of protein kinase C (PKC). PKC is known to phosphorylate GRK2 at the N-terminal serine 29 residue, leading to kinase activation. Overexpression of a mini-gene that inhibits receptor-G alpha(q) coupling blunted stretch-induced hypertrophy and GRK2 activation. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of PKC alpha also significantly attenuated stretch-induced GRK2 activation. Overexpression of a GRK2 mutant (S29A) in cardiac myocytes inhibited phosphorylation of GRK2 by PKC, abolished stretch-induced GRK2 activation, and restored adenylyl cyclase activity. Cardiac-specific activation of PKC alpha in transgenic mice led to impaired beta-agonist-stimulated ventricular function, blunted cyclase activity, and increased GRK2 phosphorylation and activity. Phosphorylation of GRK2 by PKC appears to be the primary mechanism of increased GRK2 activity and impaired beta-AR signaling after mechanical stretch. Cross-talk between hypertrophic signaling at the level of PKC and beta-AR signaling regulated by GRK2 may be an important mechanism in the transition from compensatory ventricular hypertrophy to heart failure.

  16. A conserved CATTCCT motif is required for skeletal muscle-specific activity of the cardiac troponin T gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Mar, J H; Ordahl, C P

    1988-01-01

    Transcription of the cardiac troponin T (cTNT) gene is restricted to cardiac and embryonic skeletal muscle tissue. A DNA segment containing 129 nucleotides upstream from the cTNT transcription initiation site (cTNT-129) directs expression of a heterologous marker gene in transfected embryonic skeletal muscle cells but is inactive in embryonic cardiac or fibroblast cells. By using chimeric promoter constructions, in which distal and proximal segments of cTNT-129 are fused to reciprocal segments of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV tk) gene promoter, the DNA segment responsible for this cell specificity can be localized to the cTNT distal promoter region, located between 50 and 129 nucleotides upstream of the transcription initiation site. The ability of the cTNT distal promoter region to confer skeletal muscle-specific activity upon a heterologous promoter is abolished when it is displaced 60 nucleotides upstream, indicating that its ability to direct skeletal muscle-specific transcription probably requires proximity to other components of the transcription initiation region. Two copies of the heptamer, CATTCCT ("muscle-CAT" or "M-CAT" motif), reside within the 80-nucleotide cTNT distal promoter region. A 3-nucleotide mutation in one of these copies inactivates the cTNT promoter in skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, the M-CAT motif is a distal promoter element required for expression of the cTNT promoter in embryonic skeletal muscle cells. Since the M-CAT motif is found in other contractile protein gene promoters, it may represent one example of a muscle-specific promoter element. Images PMID:3413104

  17. Acrolein inhalation causes myocardial strain delay and decreased cardiac performance as detected by high-frequency echocardiography in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acrolein, an unsaturated aldehyde found in air pollution, impairs Ca2+ flux and contraction in cardiomyocytes in vitro. To better define direct and delayed functional cardiac effects, we hypothesized that a single exposure to acrolein would modify myocardial strain and performanc...

  18. Pulse contour analysis: Is it able to reliably detect changes in cardiac output in the haemodynamically unstable patient?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Three pulse contour systems for monitoring cardiac output - LiDCO Plus™, PiCCO Plus™ and FloTrac™ - were compared in postcardiac surgery patients. None of the three methods demonstrated good trending ability according to concordance analysis. Pulse contour systems remain unreliable in the haemodynamically unstable patient. PMID:21349140

  19. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  20. Cardiac supporting device using artificial rubber muscle: preliminary study to active dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Goto, Takeshi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty is a surgical treatment that utilizes the patient's skeletal muscle to support circulation. To overcome the limitations of autologous skeletal muscles in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, we studied the use of a wrapped-type cardiac supporting device using pneumatic muscles. Four straight rubber muscles (Fluidic Muscle, FESTO, Esslingen, Germany) were used and connected to pressure sensors, solenoid valves, a controller and an air compressor. The driving force was compressed air. A proportional-integral-derivative system was employed to control the device movement. An overflow-type mock circulation system was used to analyze the power and the controllability of this new device. The device worked powerfully with pumped flow against afterload of 88 mmHg, and the beating rate and contraction/dilatation time were properly controlled using simple software. Maximum pressure inside the ventricle and maximum output were 187 mmHg and 546.5 ml/min, respectively, in the setting of 50 beats per minute, a contraction/dilatation ratio of 1:2, a preload of 18 mmHg, and an afterload of 88 mmHg. By changing proportional gain, contraction speed could be modulated. This study showed the efficacy and feasibility of a pneumatic muscle for use in a cardiac supporting device.

  1. Direct Mechanical Stimulation of Stem Cells: A Beating Electromechanically Active Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Gelmi, Amy; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; de Muinck, Ebo; Los, Marek; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W H

    2016-06-01

    The combination of stem cell therapy with a supportive scaffold is a promising approach to improving cardiac tissue engineering. Stem cell therapy can be used to repair nonfunctioning heart tissue and achieve myocardial regeneration, and scaffold materials can be utilized in order to successfully deliver and support stem cells in vivo. Current research describes passive scaffold materials; here an electroactive scaffold that provides electrical, mechanical, and topographical cues to induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPS) is presented. The poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber scaffold coated with conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) is capable of delivering direct electrical and mechanical stimulation to the iPS. The electroactive scaffolds demonstrate no cytotoxic effects on the iPS as well as an increased expression of cardiac markers for both stimulated and unstimulated protocols. This study demonstrates the first application of PPy as a supportive electroactive material for iPS and the first development of a fiber scaffold capable of dynamic mechanical actuation.

  2. Cardiovascular leaders moving beyond logic: an active strategy for advancing cardiac services.

    PubMed

    Greisler, D S; Stupak, R J

    1997-01-01

    Cardiac leaders need to put forth cogent, well-articulated, conceptually sound reasons for pursuing issues that they consider to be significant to the future of their service. Logic, rationality, and quantification of issues are "givens"--they are the price of admission that one pays to have an issue contested in the organizational arena. Understanding the larger sphere in which CV issues reside by contextualizing logic and rationality in terms of organizational culture, power, politics, group dynamics, and ego improves the chance that the cardiac agenda will receive thoughtful consideration and support by organizational decision-makers. Clearly, optimal CV performance can only be attained through the process of sophisticated interdependence. Accordingly, by understanding and using the Iceberg in its entirety, CV leaders will manifest the power of it to bring about constructive change and market viability. The completed model appears in Figure 6. As your cardiovascular team advocates for the CV agenda, take care to "be as wary as snakes but as harmless as doves.

  3. Disseminated Skeletal Muscle and Cardiac Metastasis from Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Detected with FDG and FLT PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Rayamajhi, Sampanna Jung; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Dheeraj; Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading cancers all over the world. Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F FDG) is useful for staging of the disease and decide the appropriate management. 3’-deoxy-3’-18 F-fluorothymidine (18F FLT) is a tracer being extensively evaluated currently and is said to represent tumor proliferation. Common sites of metastases from lung cancer include adrenal glands, bone, and brain. Muscle metastasis and cardiac metastasis are uncommon findings. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung with metastases to multiple skeletal muscles and myocardium detected with both FDG and FLT PET/computed tomography (CT).

  4. Disseminated Skeletal Muscle and Cardiac Metastasis from Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Detected with FDG and FLT PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Rayamajhi, Sampanna Jung; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Dheeraj; Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading cancers all over the world. Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (18F FDG) is useful for staging of the disease and decide the appropriate management. 3'-deoxy-3'-18 F-fluorothymidine (18F FLT) is a tracer being extensively evaluated currently and is said to represent tumor proliferation. Common sites of metastases from lung cancer include adrenal glands, bone, and brain. Muscle metastasis and cardiac metastasis are uncommon findings. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the lung with metastases to multiple skeletal muscles and myocardium detected with both FDG and FLT PET/computed tomography (CT). PMID:27651747

  5. Identifying Model Inaccuracies and Solution Uncertainties in Non-Invasive Activation-Based Imaging of Cardiac Excitation using Convex Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Erem, Burak; van Dam, Peter M.; Brooks, Dana H.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cardiac electrical function has begun to move towards clinical adoption. Here we consider one common formulation of the problem, in which the goal is to estimate the spatial distribution of electrical activation times during a cardiac cycle. We address the challenge of understanding the robustness and uncertainty of solutions to this formulation. This formulation poses a non-convex, non-linear least squares optimization problem. We show that it can be relaxed to be convex, at the cost of some degree of physiological realism of the solution set, and that this relaxation can be used as a framework to study model inaccuracy and solution uncertainty. We present two examples, one using data from a healthy human subject and the other synthesized with the ECGSIM software package. In the first case, we consider uncertainty in the initial guess and regularization parameter. In the second case, we mimic the presence of an ischemic zone in the heart in a way which violates a model assumption. We show that the convex relaxation allows understanding of spatial distribution of parameter sensitivity in the first case, and identification of model violation in the second. PMID:24710159

  6. Detection system ensures positive alarm activation in digital message loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokros, P.; Burstein, A.; Hewitt, E. D.

    1966-01-01

    Lost Word Detection System /LOWDS/ provides special identification for each error detection message transmitted from receiver to transmitter. The message is identified as an original message or an n-times retransmitted message so the receiver can detect where a retransmission request was not fulfilled and activate an alarm.

  7. Pioglitazone reverses down-regulation of cardiac PPAR{gamma} expression in Zucker diabetic fatty rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Theo . E-mail: pelzer_t@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Arias-Loza, Paula Anahi; Segerer, Stephan; Lichtenwald, Margit; Law, Marilyn P.; Schaefers, Michael; Ertl, Georg; Neyses, Ludwig

    2005-04-08

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) plays a critical role in peripheral glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism, and inhibits cardiac hypertrophy in non-diabetic animal models. The functional role of PPAR{gamma} in the diabetic heart, however, is not fully understood. Therefore, we analyzed cardiac gene expression, metabolic control, and cardiac glucose uptake in male Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF fa/fa) and lean ZDF rats (+/+) treated with the high affinity PPAR{gamma} agonist pioglitazone or placebo from 12 to 24 weeks of age. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia as well as lower cardiac PPAR{gamma}, glucose transporter-4 and {alpha}-myosin heavy chain expression levels were detected in diabetic ZDF rats compared to lean animals. Pioglitazone increased body weight and improved metabolic control, cardiac PPAR{gamma}, glut-4, and {alpha}-MHC expression levels in diabetic ZDF rats. Cardiac [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake was not detectable by micro-PET studies in untreated and pioglitazone treated ZDF fa/fa rats but was observed after administration of insulin to pioglitazone treated ZDF fa/fa rats. PPAR{gamma} agonists favorably affect cardiac gene expression in type-2 diabetic rats via activation and up-regulation of cardiac PPAR{gamma} expression whereas improvement of impaired cardiac glucose uptake in advanced type-2 diabetes requires co-administration of insulin.

  8. Trends in cardiac metastasis.

    PubMed

    Karwinski, B; Svendsen, E

    1989-11-01

    A review of 8571 autopsies disclosed 2833 patients with malignant tumours from 1975 to 1984 at the Department of Pathology, The Gade Institute. Cardiac metastases were found in 130 cases. An increase of cardiac involvement was shown in the autopsy material from 1.2% in 1975-1979 to 1.8% in 1980-1984. The same trend was seen if cardiac metastases were related to malignant tumours. Numerically, lung cancer accounted for most of the metastases seen, but the increase was made up by other tumours than lung cancer. especially malignant melanoma, mesothelioma, breast cancer and sarcomas. These tumours have a high frequency of heart metastases and the increased incidence of these cancers in the material explains the rise of cardiac metastases. Cardiac metastases increased with rising number of distant metastases. This study shows that mesotheliomas have the highest percentage of cardiac spread. The importance of autopsy for detecting metastatic spread in sites that are difficult to detect clinically is emphasized.

  9. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  10. TNF, acting through inducibly expressed TNFR2, drives activation and cell cycle entry of c-Kit+ cardiac stem cells in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Lu, Wanhua; Wang, Jun; Yang, Jun; Sargeant, Timothy J; Wells, Richard; Suo, Chenqu; Wright, Penny; Goddard, Martin; Huang, Qunhua; Lebastchi, Amir H; Tellides, George; Huang, Yingqun; Min, Wang; Pober, Jordan S; Bradley, John R

    2013-09-01

    TNF, signaling through TNFR2, has been implicated in tissue repair, a process that in the heart may be mediated by activated resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs). The objective of our study is to determine whether ligation of TNFR2 can induce activation of resident CSCs in the setting of ischemic cardiac injury. We show that in human cardiac tissue affected by ischemia heart disease (IHD), TNFR2 is expressed on intrinsic CSCs, identified as c-kit(+)/CD45(-)/VEGFR2(-) interstitial round cells, which are activated as determined by entry to cell cycle and expression of Lin-28. Wild-type mouse heart organ cultures subjected to hypoxic conditions both increase cardiac TNF expression and show induced TNFR2 and Lin-28 expression in c-kit(+) CSCs that have entered cell cycle. These CSC responses are enhanced by exogenous TNF. TNFR2(-/-) mouse heart organ cultures subjected to hypoxia increase cardiac TNF but fail to induce CSC activation. Similarly, c-kit(+) CSCs isolated from mouse hearts exposed to hypoxia or TNF show induction of Lin-28, TNFR2, cell cycle entry, and cardiogenic marker, α-sarcomeric actin (α-SA), responses more pronounced by hypoxia in combination with TNF. Knockdown of Lin-28 by siRNA results in reduced levels of TNFR2 expression, cell cycle entry, and diminished expression of α-SA. We conclude that hypoxia-induced c-kit(+) CSC activation is mediated by TNF/TNFR2/Lin-28 signaling. These observations suggest that TNFR2 signaling in resident c-kit(+) CSCs induces cardiac repair, findings which provide further understanding of the unanticipated harmful effects of TNF blockade in human IHD.

  11. TGF-β1 prevents simulated ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiac fibroblast apoptosis by activation of both canonical and non-canonical signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Raúl; Humeres, Claudio; Ayala, Pedro; Olmedo, Ivonne; Catalán, Mabel; García, Lorena; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury is a major cause of myocardial death. In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts play a critical role in healing post myocardial infarction. TGF-β1 has shown cardioprotective effects in cardiac damage; however, if TGF-β1 can prevent cardiac fibroblast death triggered by ischemia/reperfusion is unknown. Therefore, we test this hypothesis, and whether the canonical and/or non-canonical TGF-β1 signaling pathways are involved in this protective effect. Cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts were subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion. Cell viability was analyzed by trypan blue exclusion and propidium iodide by flow cytometry. The processing of procaspases 8, 9 and 3 to their active forms was assessed by Western blot, whereas subG1 population was evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of total and phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad2/3 were determined by Western blot. The role of these signaling pathways on the protective effect of TGF-β1 was studied using specific chemical inhibitors. Simulated ischemia over 8h triggers a significant cardiac fibroblast death, which increased by reperfusion, with apoptosis actively involved. These effects were only prevented by the addition of TGF-β1 during reperfusion. TGF-β1 pretreatment increased the levels of phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad2/3. The inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad3 also blocked the preventive effects of TGF-β1 on cardiac fibroblast apoptosis induced by simulated ischemia/reperfusion. Overall, our data suggest that TGF-β1 prevents cardiac fibroblast apoptosis induced by simulated ischemia-reperfusion through the canonical (Smad3) and non canonical (ERK1/2 and Akt) signaling pathways.

  12. TGF-β1 prevents simulated ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiac fibroblast apoptosis by activation of both canonical and non-canonical signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Raúl; Humeres, Claudio; Ayala, Pedro; Olmedo, Ivonne; Catalán, Mabel; García, Lorena; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury is a major cause of myocardial death. In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts play a critical role in healing post myocardial infarction. TGF-β1 has shown cardioprotective effects in cardiac damage; however, if TGF-β1 can prevent cardiac fibroblast death triggered by ischemia/reperfusion is unknown. Therefore, we test this hypothesis, and whether the canonical and/or non-canonical TGF-β1 signaling pathways are involved in this protective effect. Cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts were subjected to simulated ischemia/reperfusion. Cell viability was analyzed by trypan blue exclusion and propidium iodide by flow cytometry. The processing of procaspases 8, 9 and 3 to their active forms was assessed by Western blot, whereas subG1 population was evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of total and phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad2/3 were determined by Western blot. The role of these signaling pathways on the protective effect of TGF-β1 was studied using specific chemical inhibitors. Simulated ischemia over 8h triggers a significant cardiac fibroblast death, which increased by reperfusion, with apoptosis actively involved. These effects were only prevented by the addition of TGF-β1 during reperfusion. TGF-β1 pretreatment increased the levels of phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad2/3. The inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt and Smad3 also blocked the preventive effects of TGF-β1 on cardiac fibroblast apoptosis induced by simulated ischemia/reperfusion. Overall, our data suggest that TGF-β1 prevents cardiac fibroblast apoptosis induced by simulated ischemia-reperfusion through the canonical (Smad3) and non canonical (ERK1/2 and Akt) signaling pathways. PMID:23416528

  13. Activation of cardiac progenitor cells through paracrine effects of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Chiaki; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Yamahara, Kenichi; Hagino, Ikuo; Mori, Hidezo; Sawa, Yoshiki; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro; Nagaya, Noritoshi

    2008-09-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) transplantation has been proved to be promising strategy to treat the failing heart. The effect of MSC transplantation is thought to be mediated mainly in a paracrine manner. Recent reports have suggested that cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) reside in the heart. In this study, we investigated whether MSC had paracrine effects on CPC in vitro. CPC were isolated from the neonatal rat heart using an explant method. MSC were isolated from the adult rat bone marrow. MSC-derived conditioned medium promoted proliferation of CPC and inhibited apoptosis of CPC induced by hypoxia and serum starvation. Chemotaxis chamber assay demonstrated that MSC-derived conditioned medium enhanced migration of CPC. Furthermore, MSC-derived conditioned medium upregulated expression of cardiomyocyte-related genes in CPC such as {beta}-myosin heavy chain ({beta}-MHC) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). In conclusion, MSC-derived conditioned medium had protective effects on CPC and enhanced their migration and differentiation.

  14. ADP-stimulated contraction: A predictor of thin-filament activation in cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Vasco; Najafi, Aref; Wijnker, Paul J. M.; Michels, Michelle; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is general to all idiopathic dilated (IDCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. Relaxation deficits may result from increased actin–myosin formation during diastole due to altered tropomyosin position, which blocks myosin binding to actin in the absence of Ca2+. We investigated whether ADP-stimulated force development (without Ca2+) can be used to reveal changes in actin–myosin blockade in human cardiomyopathy cardiomyocytes. Cardiac samples from HCM patients, harboring thick-filament (MYH7mut, MYBPC3mut) and thin-filament (TNNT2mut, TNNI3mut) mutations, and IDCM were compared with sarcomere mutation-negative HCM (HCMsmn) and nonfailing donors. Myofilament ADP sensitivity was higher in IDCM and HCM compared with donors, whereas it was lower for MYBPC3. Increased ADP sensitivity in IDCM, HCMsmn, and MYH7mut was caused by low phosphorylation of myofilament proteins, as it was normalized to donors by protein kinase A (PKA) treatment. Troponin exchange experiments in a TNNT2mut sample corrected the abnormal actin–myosin blockade. In MYBPC3trunc samples, ADP sensitivity highly correlated with cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) protein level. Incubation of cardiomyocytes with cMyBP-C antibody against the actin-binding N-terminal region reduced ADP sensitivity, indicative of cMyBP-C’s role in actin–myosin regulation. In the presence of Ca2+, ADP increased myofilament force development and sarcomere stiffness. Enhanced sarcomere stiffness in sarcomere mutation-positive HCM samples was irrespective of the phosphorylation background. In conclusion, ADP-stimulated contraction can be used as a tool to study how protein phosphorylation and mutant proteins alter accessibility of myosin binding on actin. In the presence of Ca2+, pathologic [ADP] and low PKA-phosphorylation, high actin–myosin formation could contribute to the impaired myocardial relaxation observed in cardiomyopathies. PMID:26621701

  15. Pulse pressure monitoring through non-contact cardiac motion detection using 2.45 GHz microwave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The use of a Continuous Wave (CW) quadrature Doppler radar is proposed here for continuous non-invasive Pulse Pressure monitoring. A correspondence between the variation in systemic pulse and variation in the displacement of the chest due to heart is demonstrated, establishing feasibility for the approach. Arctangent demodulation technique was used to process baseband data from radar measurements on two test subjects, in order to determine the absolute cardiac motion. An Omron digital Blood pressure cuff was used to measure the systolic and diastolic blood pressures from which the pulse pressure was calculated. Correlation between pulse pressure and cardiac motion was observed through changes induced due to different postures of the body. PMID:22255299

  16. Improved cardiac motion detection from ultrasound images using TDIOF: a combined B-mode/ tissue Doppler approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Stoddard, Marcus F.; Amini, Amir A.

    2013-03-01

    Quantitative motion analysis of echocardiographic images helps clinicians with the diagnosis and therapy of patients suffering from cardiac disease. Quantitative analysis is usually based on TDI (Tissue Doppler Imaging) or speckle tracking. These methods are based on two independent techniques - the Doppler Effect and image registration, respectively. In order to increase the accuracy of the speckle tracking technique and cope with the angle dependency of TDI, herein, a combined approach dubbed TDIOF (Tissue Doppler Imaging Optical Flow) is proposed. TDIOF is formulated based on the combination of B-mode and Doppler energy terms in an optical flow framework and minimized using algebraic equations. In this paper, we report on validations with simulated, physical cardiac phantom, and in-vivo patient data. It is shown that the additional Doppler term is able to increase the accuracy of speckle tracking, the basis for several commercially available echocardiography analysis techniques.

  17. Pilocarpine modulates the cellular electrical properties of mammalian hearts by activating a cardiac M3 receptor and a K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huizhen; Shi, Hong; Lu, Yanjie; Yang, Baofeng; Wang, Zhiguo

    1999-01-01

    Pilocarpine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist, is widely used for treatment of xerostomia and glaucoma. It can also cause many other cellular responses by activating different subtypes of mAChRs in different tissues. However, the potential role of pilocarpine in modulating cardiac function remained unstudied.We found that pilocarpine produced concentration-dependent (0.1–10 μM) decrease in sinus rhythm and action potential duration, and hyperpolarization of membrane potential in guinea-pig hearts. The effects were nearly completely reversed by 1 μM atropine or 2 nM 4DAMP methiodide (an M3-selective antagonist).Patch-clamp recordings in dispersed myocytes from guinea-pig and canine atria revealed that pilocarpine induces a novel K+ current with delayed rectifying properties. The current was suppressed by low concentrations of M3-selective antagonists 4DAMP methiodide (2–10 nM), 4DAMP mustard (4–20 nM, an ackylating agent) and p-F-HHSiD (20–200 nM). Antagonists towards other subtypes (M1, M2 or M4) all failed to alter the current.The affinity of pilocarpine (KD) at mAChRs derived from displacement binding of [3H]-NMS in the homogenates from dog atria was 2.2 μM (65% of the total binding) and that of 4DAMP methiodide was 2.8 nM (70% of total binding), consistent with the concentration of pilocarpine needed for the current induction and for the modulation of the cardiac electrical activity and the concentration of 4DAMP to block pilocarpine effects.Our data indicate, for the first time, that pilocarpine modulates the cellular electrical properties of the hearts, likely by activating a K+ current mediated by M3 receptors. PMID:10372814

  18. Activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by a vanadium compound ameliorates pressure overload-induced cardiac injury in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; Shioda, Norifumi; Shibuya, Masatoshi; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2009-01-01

    We here investigated the effect of bis(1-oxy-2-pyridinethiolato) oxovanadium (IV), [VO(OPT)], against myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac functional recovery in pressure overload-induced hypertrophy in ovariectomized female rats and defined mechanisms underlying its cardioprotective action. Wistar rats subjected to bilateral ovariectomy were further treated with abdominal aortic stenosis. VO(OPT) (containing 1.25 and 2.50 mg of vanadium per kg) was administered orally once a day for 14 days starting from 2 weeks after aortic banding. Treatment with VO(OPT) significantly inhibited pressure overload-induced increase both in the heart weight:body weight ratio and the lung weight:body weight ratio. VO(OPT) also attenuated hypertrophy-induced impaired left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, left ventricular developed pressure, and left ventricular contractility (+/-dp/dt(max)). VO(OPT) treatment significantly restored pressure overload-induced impaired endothelial NO synthase activity with concomitant increased phosphorylation of endothelial NO synthase (Ser1179). Moreover, VO(OPT) treatment significantly restored pressure overload-induced reduced Akt activity, as indicated by increased phosphorylation at Ser473 and at Thr308. Treatment with VO(OPT) also secondarily inhibited calpastatin and dystrophin breakdown and decreased myosin light chain phosphorylation. Finally, VO(OPT) treatment significantly attenuated mortality after repeated isoproterenol administration in pressure overloaded-ovariectomized rats. Taken together, VO(OPT) attenuates cardiac myocytes hypertrophy in vivo in pressure overload-induced hypertrophy in ovariectomized rats and prevents the process from hypertrophy to heart failure. These effects are mediated by inhibition of calpastatin and dystrophin breakdown in addition to increased Akt and endothelial NO synthase activities.

  19. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, drastically depresses Ca2+ channel activity and uncouples excitation from contraction in cardiac cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, J F; Schmid, A; Romey, G; Nano, J L; Lazdunski, M

    1986-01-01

    Mevinolin (MK803), a potent inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) (Ki, 30 X 10(-9) M), depressed de novo synthesis of cholesterol in 11-day chicken embryonic cardiac cells cultured in lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS). Cardiac cells exposed to different concentrations of mevinolin for 1-3 days presented different electrophysiological and mechanical properties: The resting membrane potential, the rate of increase, and the shape of the action potential and contractile properties were changed at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM mevinolin. At a concentration of 1 microM mevinolin, the cardiac cells became quiescent and electrical stimulation induced action potentials of short duration without contraction. Isoproterenol and Bay K8644 were unable to restore excitability and contraction. Although the number of receptors for the tritiated Ca2+ channel blocker nitrendipine was the same in control and in mevinolin-treated cells, voltage-clamp data on isolated cardiac cells and 45Ca2+ flux experiments on monolayers showed that most of the slow Ca2+ channel activity was lost in mevinolin-treated cells. These results suggest that the disappearance of Ca2+ channel activity is most probably at the origin of the loss of cardiac contractility. PMID:2429325

  20. Cardiac applications of PET.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-10-01

    Routine use of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) applications has been increasing but has not replaced cardiac single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies yet. The majority of cardiac PET tracers, with the exception of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), are not widely available, as they require either an onsite cyclotron or a costly generator for their production. 18F-FDG PET imaging has high sensitivity for the detection of hibernating/viable myocardium and has replaced Tl-201 SPECT imaging in centers equipped with a PET/CT camera. PET myocardial perfusion imaging with various tracers such as Rb-82, N-13 ammonia, and O-15 H2O has higher sensitivity and specificity than myocardial perfusion SPECT for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). In particular, quantitative PET measurements of myocardial perfusion help identify subclinical coronary stenosis, better define the extent and severity of CAD, and detect ischemia when there is balanced reduction in myocardial perfusion due to three-vessel or main stem CAD. Fusion images of PET perfusion and CT coronary artery calcium scoring or CT coronary angiography provide additional complementary information and improve the detection of CAD. PET studies with novel 18F-labeled perfusion tracers such as 18F-flurpiridaz and 18F-FBnTP have yielded high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CAD. These tracers are still being tested in humans, and, if approved for clinical use, they will be commercially and widely available. In addition to viability studies, 18F-FDG PET can also be utilized to detect inflammation/infection in various conditions such as endocarditis, sarcoidosis, and atherosclerosis. Some recent series have obtained encouraging results for the detection of endocarditis in patients with intracardiac devices and prosthetic valves. PET tracers for cardiac neuronal imaging, such as C-11 HED, help assess the severity of heart failure and post-transplant cardiac

  1. Bipart: Learning Block Structure for Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Lo, Henry Z.; Ding, Wei; Amaral, Kevin; Crouter, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity consists complex behavior, typically structured in bouts which can consist of one continuous movement (e.g. exercise) or many sporadic movements (e.g. household chores). Each bout can be represented as a block of feature vectors corresponding to the same activity type. This paper introduces a general distance metric technique to use this block representation to first predict activity type, and then uses the predicted activity to estimate energy expenditure within a novel framework. This distance metric, dubbed Bipart, learns block-level information from both training and test sets, combining both to form a projection space which materializes block-level constraints. Thus, Bipart provides a space which can improve the bout classification performance of all classifiers. We also propose an energy expenditure estimation framework which leverages activity classification in order to improve estimates. Comprehensive experiments on waist-mounted accelerometer data, comparing Bipart against many similar methods as well as other classifiers, demonstrate the superior activity recognition of Bipart, especially in low-information experimental settings. PMID:25328361

  2. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function.

  3. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  4. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  5. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  6. In Situ Time-Resolved FRET Reveals Effects of Sarcomere Length on Cardiac Thin-Filament Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, King-Lun; Rieck, Daniel; Solaro, R. John; Dong, Wenji

    2014-01-01

    During cardiac thin-filament activation, the N-domain of cardiac troponin C (N-cTnC) binds to Ca2+ and interacts with the actomyosin inhibitory troponin I (cTnI). The interaction between N-cTnC and cTnI stabilizes the Ca2+-induced opening of N-cTnC and is presumed to also destabilize cTnI–actin interactions that work together with steric effects of tropomyosin to inhibit force generation. Recently, our in situ steady-state FRET measurements based on N-cTnC opening suggested that at long sarcomere length, strongly bound cross-bridges indirectly stabilize this Ca2+-sensitizing N-cTnC–cTnI interaction through structural effects on tropomyosin and cTnI. However, the method previously used was unable to determine whether N-cTnC opening depends on sarcomere length. In this study, we used time-resolved FRET to monitor the effects of cross-bridge state and sarcomere length on the Ca2+-dependent conformational behavior of N-cTnC in skinned cardiac muscle fibers. FRET donor (AEDANS) and acceptor (DDPM)-labeled double-cysteine mutant cTnC(T13C/N51C)AEDANS-DDPM was incorporated into skinned muscle fibers to monitor N-cTnC opening. To study the structural effects of sarcomere length on N-cTnC, we monitored N-cTnC opening at relaxing and saturating levels of Ca2+ and 1.80 and 2.2-μm sarcomere length. Mg2+-ADP and orthovanadate were used to examine the structural effects of noncycling strong-binding and weak-binding cross-bridges, respectively. We found that the stabilizing effect of strongly bound cross-bridges on N-cTnC opening (which we interpret as transmitted through related changes in cTnI and tropomyosin) become diminished by decreases in sarcomere length. Additionally, orthovanadate blunted the effect of sarcomere length on N-cTnC conformational behavior such that weak-binding cross-bridges had no effect on N-cTnC opening at any tested [Ca2+] or sarcomere length. Based on our findings, we conclude that the observed sarcomere length-dependent positive feedback

  7. SNM detection by active muon interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, Andrew J; Miyadera, Haruo; Turchi, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Muons are charged particles with mass between the electron and proton and can be produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged-particle beam with a target. There are several distinct features of the muon interaction with matter attractive as a probe for detection of SNM at moderate ranges. These include muon penetration of virtually any amount of material without significant nuclear interaction until stopped by ionization loss in a short distance. When stopped, high-energy penetrating x-rays (in the range of 6 MeV for uranium,) unique to isotopic composition are emitted in the capture process. The subsequent interaction with the nucleus produces additional radiation useful in assessing SNM presence. A focused muon beam can be transported through the atmosphere, at a range limited mainly by beam-size growth through scattering. A muonbeam intensity of > 10{sup 9} /second is required for efficient interrogation and, as in any other technique, dose limits are to be respected. To produce sufficient muons a high-energy (threshold {approx}140 MeV) high-intensity (<1 mA) proton or electron beam is needed implying the use of a linear accelerator to bombard a refractory target. The muon yield is fractionally small, with large angle and energy dispersion, so that efficient collection is necessary in all dimensions of phase space. To accomplish this Los Alamos has proposed a magnetic collection system followed by a unique linear accelerator that provides the requisite phase-space bunching and allows an energy sweep to successively stop muons throughout a large structure such as a sea-going vessel. A possible maritime application would entail fitting the high-gradient accelerators on a large ship with a helicopter-borne detection system. We will describe our experimental results for muon effects and particle collection along with our current design and program for a muon detection system.

  8. Metabolically Active Brown Fat Mimicking Pericardial Metastasis on PET/CT: The Discriminating Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Maude; Quarto, Cesare; Mancuso, Enrico; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2016-08-01

    Metabolically active mediastinal brown adipose tissue may be mistakenly diagnosed as a malignancy on 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)/positron emission tomography (PET). We report the case of a patient with locally recurrent breast carcinoma in which staging PET/CT revealed a suspicious pericardial lesion for which the patient was referred to our centre. The novelty of this case resides in the fact that by tissue characterization, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging allowed the determination that the lesion corresponded to brown fat, a reassuring finding with important impact on management, because the presence of pericardial metastasis would have disqualified this patient for curative resection of her cancer recurrence. PMID:26860773

  9. [The regulation of human cardiac activity during the cyclical change of barometric pressure under sealed-cabin conditions].

    PubMed

    Novikov, V S; Myznikov, I L; Bortnovskiĭ, V N

    1992-01-01

    A cyclic change of barometric pressure from 790 to 720 mm Hg once a day to twice within 3 days under sealed conditions results in a functional rearrangement of the mechanisms to control cardiac activity which cause the predominance of vagotonic responses determined by a decrease of the body reserves and its asthenization. At the beginning of staying under pressurized conditions (2nd week) it appears as an occurrence of meteorotropic responses (in 13% of subjects tested) and at the end of living in pressurized conditions (9th week) as a significant decline with a change ("removal") in: pressure, index of strain, vegetative index of rhythm, index of regulation processes, index of vegetative equilibrium and as an increase in the number of individuals responding to a cyclic change of barometric pressure up to 44% which is indicative of a moderate relationship between manifestation rate of these sensations and an effect duration of a given factor.

  10. Activity Tracking for Pilot Error Detection from Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Ashford, Rose (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report presents an application of activity tracking for pilot error detection from flight data, and describes issues surrounding such an application. It first describes the Crew Activity Tracking System (CATS), in-flight data collected from the NASA Langley Boeing 757 Airborne Research Integrated Experiment System aircraft, and a model of B757 flight crew activities. It then presents an example of CATS detecting actual in-flight crew errors.

  11. Anti-MHC Class I Antibody Activation of Proliferation and Survival Signaling in Murine Cardiac Allografts1

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Peter T.; Hsueh, Aileen; Hong, Longshen; Gjertson, David; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Dang, Julie; Mischel, Paul S.; Baldwin, William M.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-MHC class I alloantibodies have been implicated in the process of acute and chronic rejection because these Abs can bind to endothelial cells and transduce signals leading to the activation of cell survival and proliferation pathways. To characterize the role of the MHC class I-signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of Ab-mediated rejection, we developed a mouse vascularized heterotopic cardiac allograft model in which B6.RAG1 KO hosts (H-2Kb/Db) received a fully MHC-incompatible BALB/c (H-2Kd/Dd) heart transplant and were passively transfused with anti-donor MHC class I Ab. We demonstrate that cardiac allografts of mice treated with anti-MHC class I Abs show characteristic features of Ab-mediated rejection including microvascular changes accompanied by C4d deposition. Phosphoproteomic analysis of signaling molecules involved in the MHC class I cell proliferation and survival pathways were elevated in anti-class I-treated mice compared with the isotype control-treated group. Pairwise correlations, hierarchical clustering, and multidimensional scaling algorithms were used to dissect the class I-signaling pathway in vivo. Treatment with anti-H-2Kd Ab was highly correlated with the activation of Akt and p70S6Kinase (S6K). When measuring distance as a marker of interrelatedness, multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a close association between members of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway including mammalian target of rapamycin, S6K, and S6 ribosomal protein. These results provide the first analysis of the interrelationships between these signaling molecules in vivo that reflects our knowledge of the signaling pathway derived from in vitro experiments. PMID:18250428

  12. Central command: control of cardiac sympathetic and vagal efferent nerve activity and the arterial baroreflex during spontaneous motor behaviour in animals.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji

    2012-01-01

    Feedforward control by higher brain centres (termed central command) plays a role in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system during exercise. Over the past 20 years, workers in our laboratory have used the precollicular-premammillary decerebrate animal model to identify the neural circuitry involved in the CNS control of cardiac autonomic outflow and arterial baroreflex function. Contrary to the traditional idea that vagal withdrawal at the onset of exercise causes the increase in heart rate, central command did not decrease cardiac vagal efferent nerve activity but did allow cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve activity to produce cardiac acceleration. In addition, central command-evoked inhibition of the aortic baroreceptor-heart rate reflex blunted the baroreflex-mediated bradycardia elicited by aortic nerve stimulation, further increasing the heart rate at the onset of exercise. Spontaneous motor activity and associated cardiovascular responses disappeared in animals decerebrated at the midcollicular level. These findings indicate that the brain region including the caudal diencephalon and extending to the rostral mesencephalon may play a role in generating central command. Bicuculline microinjected into the midbrain ventral tegmental area of decerebrate rats produced a long-lasting repetitive activation of renal sympathetic nerve activity that was synchronized with the motor nerve discharge. When lidocaine was microinjected into the ventral tegmental area, the spontaneous motor activity and associated cardiovascular responses ceased. From these findings, we conclude that cerebral cortical outputs trigger activation of neural circuits within the caudal brain, including the ventral tegmental area, which causes central command to augment cardiac sympathetic outflow at the onset of exercise in decerebrate animal models. PMID:21984731

  13. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2013-10-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management. This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  14. Intensive Hemodialysis Preserved Cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher T; Li, Guo Hua; Valaperti, Alan; Liu, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac injury triggers cellular responses involving both cardiomyocytes and nonmuscle cells to process cardiac structural remodeling. End-stage renal disease (ESRD), despite conventional dialysis, is associated with adverse cardiac remodeling and increased cardiovascular events. Intensification of hemodialysis with nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHD; five sessions per week; 6-8 hours per treatment) was associated with regression of left ventricular hypertrophy and downregulation of genes in apoptosis and fibrosis. In this pilot study, we hypothesize that NHD achieves its cardiac effects in part through attenuation of innate immune activation resulting in amelioration of cardiomyocytes apoptosis and fibrosis. Eight patients (4M:4F; age, 59 ± 9 years) with ESRD were studied. Half of the cohort was converted to NHD, whereas the rest of the patients were maintained on conventional hemodialysis (CHD). At baseline, CHD was associated with an increase in cardiomyocyte apoptosis detected by flow cytometry using Annexin V (mean fluorescence index in CHD and in normal control is 1.00 ± 0.05 vs. 0.66 ± 0.01, p < 0.05). After conversion to NHD, cardiomyocyte apoptosis was reduced compared with baseline CHD situation (p < 0.05) and approached that of normal control (0.59 ± 0.09 vs. 0.66 ± 0.01, p > 0.05). The CHD serum was associated with a coordinated augmentation innate immunity pathway, significantly increasing myeloid differentiation factor-88 and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4; NHD was able to reduce their levels. Heat shock protein 60 was augmented during CHD condition and fell after NHD. In addition, CHD increased fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast transformation. Uremia is associated with activation of common innate immune signaling pathways leading to fibrosis and apoptosis. Amelioration of uremic clearance by NHD may attenuate this pathological signaling cascade. PMID:26164598

  15. Noninvasive Three-dimensional Cardiac Activation Imaging from Body Surface Potential Maps: A Computational and Experimental Study on a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chengzong; Liu, Zhongming; Zhang, Xin; Pogwizd, Steven; He, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cardiac activation imaging (3-DCAI) is a recently developed technique that aims at imaging the activation sequence throughout the 3-D volume of myocardium. 3-DCAI entails the modeling and estimation of the cardiac equivalent current density (ECD) distribution from which the local activation time within myocardium is determined as the time point with the peak amplitude of local ECD estimates. In this paper, we report, for the first time, an experimental study of the performance and applicability of 3-DCAI as judged by measured 3-D cardiac activation sequence using 3-D intra-cardiac mapping, in a group of 4 healthy rabbits during ventricular pacing. During the experiments, the body surface potentials and the intramural bipolar electrical recordings were simultaneously measured in a closed-chest condition to allow for a rigorous evaluation of the noninvasive 3-DCAI algorithm using the intra-cardiac mapping. The ventricular activation sequence non-invasively imaged from the body surface measurements by using 3-DCAI was generally in agreement with that obtained from the invasive intra-cardiac recordings. The overall difference between them, quantified as the root mean square (RMS) error, was 7.42±0.61 ms, and the normalized difference, quantified as the relative error (RE), was 0.24±0.03. The distance from the reconstructed site of initial activation to the actual pacing site, defined as the localization error (LE), was 5.47±1.57 mm. In addition, computer simulations were conducted to provide additional assessment of the performance of the 3-DCAI algorithm using a realistic-geometry rabbit heart-torso model. Averaged over 9 pacing sites, the RE and LE were 0.20±0.07 and 4.56±1.12 mm, respectively, for single-pacing, when 20 μV Gaussian white noise was added to the body surface potentials at 53 body surface locations. Averaged over 8 pairs of dual pacing, the RE was 0.25±0.06 for 20 μV additive noise. The present results obtained through

  16. Lower arm electromyography (EMG) activity detection using local binary patterns.

    PubMed

    McCool, Paul; Chatlani, Navin; Petropoulakis, Lykourgos; Soraghan, John J; Menon, Radhika; Lakany, Heba

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new electromyography activity detection technique in which 1-D local binary pattern histograms are used to distinguish between periods of activity and inactivity in myoelectric signals. The algorithm is tested on forearm surface myoelectric signals occurring due to hand gestures. The novel features of the presented method are that: 1) activity detection is performed across multiple channels using few parameters and without the need for majority vote mechanisms, 2) there are no per-channel thresholds to be tuned, which makes the process of activity detection easier and simpler to implement and less prone to errors, 3) it is not necessary to measure the properties of the signal during a quiescent period before using the algorithm. The algorithm is compared to other offline single- and double-threshold activity detection methods and, for the data sets tested, it is shown to have a better overall performance with greater tolerance to the noise in the real data set used.

  17. Long-term secondary prevention programs after cardiac rehabilitation for the reduction of future cardiovascular events: focus on regular physical activity.

    PubMed

    Scrutinio, Domenico; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Passantino, Andrea; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2009-05-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs are recognized as integral to the comprehensive care of patients with coronary heart disease, and as such are recommended in most contemporary clinical practice guidelines. The interventions are aimed at reducing disability, optimizing cardiovascular risk reduction by drug therapy and promoting healthy behavior. Healthy lifestyle habits must be recognized as capable of substantially reducing the risk for cardiovascular events in patients with coronary heart disease. This review highlights the recommended components of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs, with special emphasis on regular physical activity.

  18. Optimal Placement of Accelerometers for the Detection of Everyday Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Ian; Kikhia, Basel; Nugent, Chris; Boytsov, Andrey; Hallberg, Josef; Synnes, Kåre; McClean, Sally; Finlay, Dewar

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an investigation to determine the optimal placement of accelerometers for the purpose of detecting a range of everyday activities. The paper investigates the effect of combining data from accelerometers placed at various bodily locations on the accuracy of activity detection. Eight healthy males participated within the study. Data were collected from six wireless tri-axial accelerometers placed at the chest, wrist, lower back, hip, thigh and foot. Activities included walking, running on a motorized treadmill, sitting, lying, standing and walking up and down stairs. The Support Vector Machine provided the most accurate detection of activities of all the machine learning algorithms investigated. Although data from all locations provided similar levels of accuracy, the hip was the best single location to record data for activity detection using a Support Vector Machine, providing small but significantly better accuracy than the other investigated locations. Increasing the number of sensing locations from one to two or more statistically increased the accuracy of classification. There was no significant difference in accuracy when using two or more sensors. It was noted, however, that the difference in activity detection using single or multiple accelerometers may be more pronounced when trying to detect finer grain activities. Future work shall therefore investigate the effects of accelerometer placement on a larger range of these activities. PMID:23867744

  19. A New Transgenic Mouse Model of Heart Failure and Cardiac Cachexia Raised by Sustained Activation of Met Tyrosine Kinase in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Valentina; Gatti, Stefano; Gallo, Simona; Medico, Enzo; Cantarella, Daniela; Cimino, James; Ponzetto, Antonio; Crepaldi, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Among other diseases characterized by the onset of cachexia, congestive heart failure takes a place of relevance, considering the high prevalence of this pathology in most European countries and in the United States, and is undergoing a rapid increase in developing countries. Actually, only few models of cardiac cachexia exist. Difficulties in the recruitment and follow-up of clinical trials implicate that new reproducible and well-characterized animal models are pivotal in developing therapeutic strategies for cachexia. We generated a new model of cardiac cachexia: a transgenic mouse expressing Tpr-Met receptor, the activated form of c-Met receptor of hepatocyte growth factor, specifically in the heart. We showed that the cardiac-specific induction of Tpr-Met raises a cardiac hypertrophic remodelling, which progresses into concentric hypertrophy with concomitant increase in Gdf15 mRNA levels. Hypertrophy progresses to congestive heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, characterized by reduced body weight gain and food intake and skeletal muscle wasting. Prevention trial by suppressing Tpr-Met showed that loss of body weight could be prevented. Skeletal muscle wasting was also associated with altered gene expression profiling. We propose transgenic Tpr-Met mice as a new model of cardiac cachexia, which will constitute a powerful tool to understand such complex pathology and test new drugs/approaches at the preclinical level. PMID:27298830

  20. Cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shanewise, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a proven, accepted mode of therapy for selected patients with end-stage heart failure, but the inadequate number of suitable donor hearts available ultimately limits its application. This chapter reviews adult cardiac transplantation, with an emphasis on the anesthetic considerations of the heart transplant operation itself.

  1. Rapid Automated Treatment Planning Process to Select Breast Cancer Patients for Active Breathing Control to Achieve Cardiac Dose Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Wei; Purdie, Thomas G.; Rahman, Mohammad; Marshall, Andrea; Liu Feifei; Fyles, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a rapid automated treatment planning process for the selection of patients with left-sided breast cancer for a moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) technique using active breathing control (ABC); and to determine the dose reduction to the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and the heart using mDIBH. Method and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using an automated method for patients undergoing left-sided breast radiotherapy (n = 53) with two-field tangential intensity-modulated radiotherapy. All patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, defined as having >10 cm{sup 3} of the heart receiving 50% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 50}) on the free-breathing automated treatment plan, underwent repeat scanning on a protocol using a mDIBH technique and ABC. The doses to the LAD and heart were compared between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans. Results: The automated planning process required approximately 9 min to generate a breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan. Using the dose-volume criteria, 20 of the 53 patients were selected for ABC. Significant differences were found between the free-breathing and mDIBH plans for the heart V{sub 50} (29.9 vs. 3.7 cm{sup 3}), mean heart dose (317 vs. 132 cGy), mean LAD dose (2,047 vs. 594 cGy), and maximal dose to 0.2 cm{sup 3} of the LAD (4,155 vs. 1,507 cGy, all p <.001). Of the 17 patients who had a breath-hold threshold of {>=}0.8 L, 14 achieved a {>=}90% reduction in the heart V{sub 50} using the mDIBH technique. The 3 patients who had had a breath-hold threshold <0.8 L achieved a lower, but still significant, reduction in the heart V{sub 50}. Conclusions: A rapid automated treatment planning process can be used to select patients who will benefit most from mDIBH. For selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, the mDIBH technique using ABC can significantly reduce the dose to the LAD and heart, potentially reducing the cardiac risks.

  2. A recurrent activating PLCG1 mutation in cardiac angiosarcomas increases apoptosis resistance and invasiveness of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Kristin; Spieker, Tilmann; Gamerdinger, Ulrike; Nau, Kerstin; Berger, Johannes; Dreyer, Thomas; Sindermann, Jürgen R; Hoffmeier, Andreas; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Bräuninger, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Primary cardiac angiosarcomas are rare tumors with unfavorable prognosis. Pathogenic driver mutations are largely unknown. We therefore analyzed a collection of cases for genomic aberrations using SNP arrays and targeted next-generation sequencing (tNGS) of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes. Recurrent gains of chromosome 1q and a small region of chromosome 4 encompassing KDR and KIT were identified by SNP array analysis. Repeatedly mutated genes identified by tNGS were KDR with different nonsynonymous mutations, MLL2 with different nonsense mutations, and PLCG1 with a recurrent nonsynonymous mutation (R707Q) in the highly conserved autoinhibitory SH2 domain in three of 10 cases. PLCγ1 is usually activated by Y783 phosphorylation and activates protein kinase C and Ca(2+)-dependent second messengers, with effects on cellular proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. Ectopic expression of the PLCγ1-R707Q mutant in endothelial cells revealed reduced PLCγ1-Y783 phosphorylation with concomitant increased c-RAF/MEK/ERK1/2 phosphorylation, increased IP3 amounts, and increased Ca(2+)-dependent calcineurin activation compared with ectopic expressed PLCγ1-wild-type. Furthermore, cofilin, whose activation is associated with actin skeleton reorganization, showed decreased phosphorylation, and thus activation after expression of PLCγ1-R707Q compared with PLCγ1-wild-type. At the cellular level, expression of PLCγ1-R707Q in endothelial cells had no influence on proliferation rate, but increased apoptosis resistance and migration and invasiveness in in vitro assays. Together, these findings indicate that the PLCγ1-R707Q mutation causes constitutive activation of PLCγ1 and may represent an alternative way of activation of KDR/PLCγ1 signaling besides KDR activation in angiosarcomas, with implications for VEGF/KDR targeted therapies. PMID:25252913

  3. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  4. Exploiting Complexity Information for Brain Activation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Jiali; Lin, Qiang; Hu, Zhenghui

    2016-01-01

    We present a complexity-based approach for the analysis of fMRI time series, in which sample entropy (SampEn) is introduced as a quantification of the voxel complexity. Under this hypothesis the voxel complexity could be modulated in pertinent cognitive tasks, and it changes through experimental paradigms. We calculate the complexity of sequential fMRI data for each voxel in two distinct experimental paradigms and use a nonparametric statistical strategy, the Wilcoxon signed rank test, to evaluate the difference in complexity between them. The results are compared with the well known general linear model based Statistical Parametric Mapping package (SPM12), where a decided difference has been observed. This is because SampEn method detects brain complexity changes in two experiments of different conditions and the data-driven method SampEn evaluates just the complexity of specific sequential fMRI data. Also, the larger and smaller SampEn values correspond to different meanings, and the neutral-blank design produces higher predictability than threat-neutral. Complexity information can be considered as a complementary method to the existing fMRI analysis strategies, and it may help improving the understanding of human brain functions from a different perspective. PMID:27045838

  5. Single-channel basis for the slow activation of the repolarizing cardiac potassium current, I(Ks).

    PubMed

    Werry, Daniel; Eldstrom, Jodene; Wang, Zhuren; Fedida, David

    2013-03-12

    Coassembly of potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1) with potassium voltage-gated channel, Isk-related family, member 1 (KCNE1) the delayed rectifier potassium channel I(Ks). Its slow activation is critically important for membrane repolarization and for abbreviating the cardiac action potential, especially during sympathetic activation and at high heart rates. Mutations in either gene can cause long QT syndrome, which can lead to fatal arrhythmias. To understand better the elementary behavior of this slowly activating channel complex, we quantitatively analyzed direct measurements of single-channel I(Ks). Single-channel recordings from transiently transfected mouse ltk(-) cells confirm a channel that has long latency periods to opening (1.67 ± 0.073 s at +60 mV) but that flickers rapidly between multiple open and closed states in non-deactivating bursts at positive membrane potentials. Channel activity is cyclic with periods of high activity followed by quiescence, leading to an overall open probability of only ∼0.15 after 4 s under our recording conditions. The mean single-channel conductance was determined to be 3.2 pS, but unlike any other known wild-type human potassium channel, long-lived subconductance levels coupled to activation are a key feature of both the activation and deactivation time courses of the conducting channel complex. Up to five conducting levels ranging from 0.13 to 0.66 pA could be identified in single-channel recordings at 60 mV. Fast closings and overt subconductance behavior of the wild-type I(Ks) channel required modification of existing Markov models to include these features of channel behavior. PMID:23431135

  6. Hypoxia/ischemia promotes CXCL10 expression in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells by NFkB activation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing-Bo; Liu, Guang-Hui; Chen, Zhuo-Ying; Mao, Cheng-Zhou; Zhou, Deng-Cheng; Wu, Hai-Yan; Park, Kyu-Sang; Zhao, Hui; Kim, Soo-Ki; Cai, Dong-Qing; Qi, Xu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    CXCL10, the chemokine with potent chemotactic activity on immune cells and other non-immune cells expressing its receptor CXCR3, has been demonstrated to involve in myocardial infarction, which was resulted from hypoxia/ischemia. The cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) are the first cell type which is implicated by hypoxia/ischemia. However, the potential molecular mechanism by which hypoxia/ischemia regulates the expression of CXCL10 in CMECs remains unclear. In the present study, the expression of CXCL10 was firstly examined by real-time PCR and ELISA analysis. Several potential binding sites (BS) for transcription factors including NF-kappaB (NFkB), HIF1 alpha (HIF1α) and FoxO3a were identified in the promoter region of CXCL10 gene from -2000 bp to -1 bp using bioinformatics software. Luciferase reporter gene vectors for CXCL10 promoter and for activation of above transcription factors were constructed. The activation of NFkB, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and FoxO3a was also analyzed by Western blotting. It was shown that the production of CXCL10 in CMECs was significantly increased by hypoxia/ischemia treatment, in parallel with the activation of CXCL10 promoter examined by reporter gene vector system. Furthermore, transcription factors including NFkB, HIF1α and FoxO3a were activated by hypoxia/ischemia in CMECs. However, over-expression of NFkB, but not that of HIF1α or FoxO3a, significantly promoted the activation of CXCL10 promoter reporter gene. These findings indicated that CXCL10 production in CMECs was significantly increased by hypoxia/ischemia, at least in part, through activation of NFkB pathway and subsequently binding to CXCL10 promoter, finally promoted the transcription of CXCL10 gene.

  7. Histone Deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2015-06-19

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor, associate with cardiac sarcomeres and that a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to A-band of sarcomeres and capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of MHC isoforms. By in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin-sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36% compared with their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli independently of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms.

  8. Investigation of chloramine-T impact on crayfish Astacus leptodactylus (Esch., 1823) cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Kuklina, Iryna; Sladkova, Svetlana; Kouba, Antonín; Kholodkevich, Sergey; Kozák, Pavel

    2014-09-01

    The crayfish play an essential role in the biomonitoring and may reflect ambient water quality through the biochemical, behavioural and physiological reactions. To assess whether narrow-clawed crayfish Astacus leptodactylus can respond by heart rate changes to presence in water of such biocide as chloramine-T, adult males were exposed to its low (2 and 5 mg L(-1)), moderate (10 mg L(-1), commonly used in industry and aquaculture) and exceeded (20 and 50 mg L(-1)) concentrations. In addition, a physical stress test evaluated energy expenditure following the chemical trials. Three key reactions (cardiac initial, first-hour and daily prolonged exposure) were discussed with particular focus on crayfish initial reaction as the most meaningful in on-line water quality biomonitoring. After short-term exposure to both chloramine-T concentrations, crayfish were found to respond rapidly, within 2-5 min. According to heart rate changes, the 1-h exposure did not adversely affect crayfish at either concentration, as well as during daily exposure to 10 mg L(-1). As assessed by the heart rate, the 24-h exposure to 50 mg L(-1) of chloramine-T was toxic for crayfish and led to substantial loss of energy that became apparent during subsequently conducted physical stress. The results supported a hypothesis that crayfish vital functions are connected with environment they inhabit closely enough to serve as biological monitors. Crayfish were tolerant to short-term chloramine-T exposure, while rapid crayfish reaction to an increased chemical level indicated their high sensitivity, an essential attribute of real-time environmental assessment.

  9. Active cavitation detection of asymmetrical inertial cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2001-05-01

    The active cavitation detector (ACD) developed in Bob Apfel's laboratory has often been employed to quantify pressure thresholds for inception of symmetrical inertial cavitation of microbubbles. In the current application, however, a 30-MHz ACD interrogates individual echo-contrast agent bubbles adhering to a Mylar(TM) sheet that are driven into asymmetrical (jet-producing) collapse by a 1-MHz toneburst (>1 MPa pp). The resulting ACD output suggests that asymmetrical bubble collapse is slower than symmetrical collapse, producing less total radiated acoustic power. ACD output mixed with reference sinusoids at 30 MHz and low pass filtered yields Doppler signals that may be useful in quantifying asymmetrical collapses under biomedically relevant conditions, such as on endothelial walls.

  10. Sensitive bioassay for detection of biologically active ricin in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of ricin as an agent of biological warfare highlights the need to develop fast and effective methods to detect biologically active ricin. The current “gold standard” for ricin detection is an in vivo mouse bioassay; however, this method is not practical to test on a large number of...

  11. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  12. Effort Deficits and Depression: The Influence of Anhedonic Depressive Symptoms on Cardiac Autonomic Activity During a Mental Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Silvia, Paul J.; Nusbaum, Emily C.; Eddington, Kari M.; Beaty, Roger E.; Kwapil, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Motivational approaches to depression emphasize the role of dysfunctional motivational dynamics, particularly diminished reward and incentive processes associated with anhedonia. A study examined how anhedonic depressive symptoms, measured continuously across a wide range of severity, influenced the physiological mobilization of effort during a cognitive task. Using motivational intensity theory as a guide, we expected that the diminished incentive value associated with anhedonic depressive symptoms would reduce effort during a “do your best” challenge (also known as an unfixed or self-paced challenge), in which effort is a function of the value of achieving the task’s goal. Using impedance cardiography, two cardiac autonomic responses were assessed: pre-ejection period (PEP), a measure of sympathetic activity and our primary measure of interest, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of parasympathetic activity. As expected, PEP slowed from baseline to task as anhedonic depressive symptoms increased (as measured with the DASS Depression scale), indicating diminished effort-related sympathetic activity. No significant effects appeared for RSA. The findings support motivational intensity theory as a translational model of effort processes in depression and clarify some inconsistent effects of depressive symptoms on effort-related physiology found in past work. PMID:25431505

  13. Detection of optimal PEEP for equal distribution of tidal volume by volumetric capnography and electrical impedance tomography during decreasing levels of PEEP in post cardiac-surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Blankman, P.; Shono, A.; Hermans, B. J. M.; Wesselius, T.; Hasan, D.; Gommers, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Homogeneous ventilation is important for prevention of ventilator-induced lung injury. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has been used to identify optimal PEEP by detection of homogenous ventilation in non-dependent and dependent lung regions. We aimed to compare the ability of volumetric capnography and EIT in detecting homogenous ventilation between these lung regions. Methods Fifteen mechanically-ventilated patients after cardiac surgery were studied. Ventilator settings were adjusted to volume-controlled mode with a fixed tidal volume (Vt) of 6–8 ml kg−1 predicted body weight. Different PEEP levels were applied (14 to 0 cm H2O, in steps of 2 cm H2O) and blood gases, Vcap and EIT were measured. Results Tidal impedance variation of the non-dependent region was highest at 6 cm H2O PEEP, and decreased significantly at 14 cm H2O PEEP indicating decrease in the fraction of Vt in this region. At 12 cm H2O PEEP, homogenous ventilation was seen between both lung regions. Bohr and Enghoff dead space calculations decreased from a PEEP of 10 cm H2O. Alveolar dead space divided by alveolar Vt decreased at PEEP levels ≤6 cm H2O. The normalized slope of phase III significantly changed at PEEP levels ≤4 cm H2O. Airway dead space was higher at higher PEEP levels and decreased at the lower PEEP levels. Conclusions In postoperative cardiac patients, calculated dead space agreed well with EIT to detect the optimal PEEP for an equal distribution of inspired volume, amongst non-dependent and dependent lung regions. Airway dead space reduces at decreasing PEEP levels. PMID:27199318

  14. Assessment of cardiac parameters in evaluation of cardiac functions in patients with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Oztarhan, Kazim; Delibas, Yavuz; Salcioglu, Zafer; Kaya, Guldemet; Bakari, Suleyman; Bornaun, Helen; Aydogan, Gonul

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac function and early cardiac dysfunction of patients followed as thalassemia major. In this study, the authors compared 100 patients, diagnosed as thalassemia major with mean age 11.84 ± 4.35, with 60 healthy control subjects at the same age between 2008 and 2011. Early diagnosis of iron overload that may occur after repeated transfusions is important in this patient group. To detect early iron accumulation, the authors compared ferritin with the echo findings, the 24-hour Holter, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2* values in the patients of same age and sex, treated with chelators, without heart failure, nonsplenectomized, and do not differ in the presence of hepatitis C. Ferritin levels, left ventricular systolic functions (ejection fraction [EF], shortening fraction [SF]), left ventricular measurements, left ventricular diastolic functions, T2* image on cardiac magnetic resonance, heart rate variables in 24 hours, and Holter rhythm were evaluated to show the early failure of cardiac functions. In this study the authors confirmed that iron-related cardiac toxicity damages electrical activity earlier than myocardial contractility. Left ventricular diastolic diameter (LVDd), left ventricular mass (LVM), and LV systolic diameter (LVDs) levels were significantly higher in the patient group with ectopia. Patients with ectopia are the ones in whom LVM and LVDd are increased. In thalassemia major patients with ectopia, LF/HF ratio was markedly increased, QTc dispersion was clearly found higher in patients with ectopia rather than nonectopic patients. The standard deviation all normal RR interval series (SDNN) was found clearly lower in thalassemia major group with ectopia than control group because it is assumed that increase in cardiac sympathetic neuronal activity is related to exposure to chronic diastolic and systolic failure.

  15. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase 1A is highly expressed in rabbit cardiac sinoatrial nodal cells and regulates pacemaker function.

    PubMed

    Lukyanenko, Yevgeniya O; Younes, Antoine; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Tarasov, Kirill V; Riordon, Daniel R; Lee, Joonho; Sirenko, Syevda G; Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Ziman, Bruce; Tarasova, Yelena S; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J; Graham, David R; Lakatta, Edward G

    2016-09-01

    Constitutive Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-activation of adenylyl cyclases (ACs) types 1 and 8 in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANC) generates cAMP within lipid-raft-rich microdomains to initiate cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, that regulates basal state rhythmic action potential firing of these cells. Mounting evidence in other cell types points to a