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Sample records for cardiac autonomic regulation

  1. Auditory stimulation and cardiac autonomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Vitor E.; Guida, Heraldo L.; Frizzo, Ana C. F.; Cardoso, Ana C. V.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have already demonstrated that auditory stimulation with music influences the cardiovascular system. In this study, we described the relationship between musical auditory stimulation and heart rate variability. Searches were performed with the Medline, SciELO, Lilacs and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: “auditory stimulation”, “autonomic nervous system”, “music” and “heart rate variability”. The selected studies indicated that there is a strong correlation between noise intensity and vagal-sympathetic balance. Additionally, it was reported that music therapy improved heart rate variability in anthracycline-treated breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that dopamine release in the striatal system induced by pleasurable songs is involved in cardiac autonomic regulation. Musical auditory stimulation influences heart rate variability through a neural mechanism that is not well understood. Further studies are necessary to develop new therapies to treat cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22948465

  2. Association between central auditory processing mechanism and cardiac autonomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to describe the association between central auditory processing mechanism and the cardiac autonomic regulation. Methods It was researched papers on the topic addressed in this study considering the following data bases: Medline, Pubmed, Lilacs, Scopus and Cochrane. The key words were: “auditory stimulation, heart rate, autonomic nervous system and P300”. Results The findings in the literature demonstrated that auditory stimulation influences the autonomic nervous system and has been used in conjunction with other methods. It is considered a promising step in the investigation of therapeutic procedures for rehabilitation and quality of life of several pathologies. Conclusion The association between auditory stimulation and the level of the cardiac autonomic nervous system has received significant contributions in relation to musical stimuli. PMID:24834128

  3. Cardiac autonomic regulation and anger coping in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Vögele, Claus; Sorg, Sonja; Studtmann, Markus; Weber, Hannelore

    2010-12-01

    The current study investigated spontaneous anger coping, cardiac autonomic regulation and phasic heart rate responses to anger provocation. Forty-five adolescents (27 female, mean age 14.7 years) attended the single experimental session, which included monitoring of continuous heart rate and blood pressure responses to anger provocation (receiving an unfair offer) using a modified version of the Ultimatum Game (UG). Vagal activation was operationalized as high frequency component of heart rate variability during rest periods, and spontaneous baroreflex-sensitivity (SBR) during the UG. Adolescents employing cognitive reappraisal showed higher vagal activity under resting conditions and attenuated heart rate deceleration after receiving the unfair offer compared with participants who tended to ruminate about their anger and experienced injustice. Results from SBR suggested vagal withdrawal in anger ruminators during contemplation of the unfair offer. These results provide further support for the specificity and sensitivity of vagal responses to higher cortical functions such as emotion regulation.

  4. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these “non-classical” cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  5. Effects of paraplegia on cardiac autonomic regulation during static exercise.

    PubMed

    Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Heffernan, Kevin S; Jae, Sae Young; Ranadive, Sushant M; Lee, Miyoung; Mojtahedi, Mina C; Fernhall, Bo

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether autonomic modulation of heart rate as measured by heart rate variability and heart rate complexity at rest and during static handgrip exercise differs between individuals with and without paraplegia. This study also examined the relationships between heart rate complexity and heart rate variability parameters. Heart rate variability and complexity were evaluated in 20 individuals with paraplegia and in 20 individuals without paraplegia during 3 mins of rest and 2 mins of static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximum isometric strength. Spectral decomposition of heart rate variability was used to obtain total power, power in low-frequency and high-frequency ranges, and the ratio of low- to high-frequency power. Heart rate complexity was quantified with sample entropy, a measure of irregularity of the beat-to-beat time series. Sample entropy was lower (P < 0.05) at rest and during exercise in participants with paraplegia. Total, high-, and low-frequency powers as well as the ratio of low- to high-frequency power did not differ between groups. Sample entropy did not significantly correlate with low- and high-frequency powers or their ratio. Individuals with paraplegia show lower heart rate complexity at rest and during static exercise. This finding may have implications for cardiovascular morbidity in persons with paraplegia. Heart rate complexity may provide unique information regarding cardiac autonomic modulation, different from that provided by traditional heart rate variability measures.

  6. Spirituality and Autonomic Cardiac Control

    PubMed Central

    Berntson, Gary G.; Norman, Greg J.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirituality has been suggested to be associated with positive health, but potential biological mediators have not been well characterized. Purpose and Methods The present study examined, in a population based sample of middle-aged and older adults, the potential relationship between spirituality and patterns of cardiac autonomic control, which may have health significance. Measures of parasympathetic (high-frequency heart rate variability) and sympathetic (pre-ejection period) cardiac control were obtained from a representative sample of 229 participants. Participants completed questionnaires to assess spirituality (closeness to and satisfactory relation with God). Personality, demographic, anthropometric, health behavior, and health status information was also obtained. A series of multivariate regression models was used to examine the relations between spirituality, the autonomic measures, and two derived indexes-- cardiac autonomic balance (CAB, reflecting parasympathetic to sympathetic balance) and cardiac autonomic regulation (CAR, reflecting total autonomic control). Results Spirituality, net of demographics or other variables, was found to be associated with enhanced parasympathetic as well as sympathetic cardiac control (yielding a higher CAR); but was not associated with CAB. Although the number of cases was small (N=11), both spirituality and CAR were significant negative predictors of the prior occurrence of a myocardial infarction. Conclusions In a population based sample, spirituality appears to be associated with a specific pattern of cardiac autonomic regulation, characterized by a high level of cardiac autonomic control, irrespective of the relative contribution of the two autonomic branches. This pattern of autonomic control may have health significance. PMID:18357497

  7. Self-reported dieting success is associated with cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters.

    PubMed

    Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika; Vögele, Claus; Kübler, Andrea

    2012-10-01

    Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students (N=50) indicated if they were currently trying to control their weight and completed the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS). Heart beat intervals were recorded during two 10 min relaxation periods from which parameters of vagal-cardiac control (high frequency power in normalized units, HF n.u.) and sympathovagal balance (ratio of low and high frequency power, LF/HF) were calculated. In current dieters, self-reported dieting success was positively associated with HF and negatively associated with LF/HF. These associations were independent of current body-mass and food deprivation (i.e. hours since the last meal). We conclude that vagal-cardiac control reflects self-regulatory strength, rather than nutritional status, in current dieters.

  8. [Progress of studies on mechanisms of acupuncture underlying regulation of cardiac function via autonomic nervous system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Li; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Acupuncture therapy has been confirmed to be effective in treating cardiovascular diseases in clinical practice. Acupuncture-induced balance of the autonomic nervous system activities is one of its key mechanisms. In the present paper, the authors review progress of studies on acupuncture treatment of cardiovascular diseases from 1) regulating cardiac sympathetic-beta-adrenergic receptor activity and myocardial intracellular GTP-binding protein (Gs)-adenylylcyclase (AC)-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase (PKA) signaling, and 2) balancing cardiac sympathetic and vagal nerve activities. Due to limited experimental conditions, in-depth studies about the mechanisms of acupuncture intervention underlying improvement of cardiovascular functions are relatively fewer up to now. Along with the further development of modern biology, the mechanism of acupuncture intervention underlying regulation of cardiac function via autonomic nerve system will be revealed in detail.

  9. Effects of Emotion Regulation Difficulties on the Tonic and Phasic Cardiac Autonomic Response

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Guillaume; Ott, Laurent; Nandrino, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background Emotion regulation theory aims to explain the interactions between individuals and the environment. In this context, Emotion Regulation Difficulties (ERD) disrupt the physiological component of emotions through the autonomic nervous system and are involved in several psychopathological states. Objective We were interested in comparing the influence of a film-elicited emotion procedure on the autonomic nervous system activity of two groups with different levels of emotion regulation difficulties. Methods A total of 63 women (undergraduate students) ranging from 18 to 27 (20.7±1.99) years old were included. Using the upper and lower quartile of a questionnaire assessing the daily difficulties in regulating emotions, two groups, one with low (LERD) and one with high (HERD) levels of emotion regulation difficulties, were constituted and studied during a film-elicited emotion procedure. Cardiac vagal activity (HF-HRV) was analyzed during three periods: baseline, film-elicited emotion, and recovery. Results The cardiovascular results showed a decrease in HF-HRV from baseline to elicitation for both groups. Then, from elicitation to recovery, HF-HRV increased for the LERD group, whereas a low HF-HRV level persisted for the HERD group. Conclusions The HERD group exhibited inappropriate cardiac vagal recovery after a negative emotion elicitation had ended. Cardiac vagal tone took longer to return to its initial state in the HERD group than in the LERD group. Prolonged cardiac vagal suppression might constitute an early marker of emotion regulation difficulties leading to lower cardiac vagal tone. PMID:25054913

  10. Effects of Effortful Swallow on Cardiac Autonomic Regulation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Lívia M S; Silva, Roberta G; Melo, Monique; Silva, Nayra N; Vanderlei, Franciele M; Garner, David M; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E

    2016-04-01

    Swallowing-induced changes in heart rate have been recently reported. However, it is not apparent the responses of heart rate variability (HRV) elicited by effortful swallow maneuver. We investigated the acute effects of effortful swallowing maneuver on HRV. This study was performed on 34 healthy women between 18 and 35 years old. We assessed heart rate variability in the time (SDNN, RMSSD, and pNN50) and frequency (HF, LF, and LF/HF ratio) domains and, visual analysis through the Poincaré plot. The subjects remained at rest for 5 min during spontaneous swallowing and then performed effortful swallowing for 5 min. HRV was analyzed during spontaneous and effortful swallowing. We found no significant differences for SDNN, pNN50, RMSSD, HF in absolute units (ms(2)). There is a trend for increase of LF in absolute (p = 0.05) and normalized (p = 0.08) units during effortful swallowing. HF in normalized units reduced (p = 0.02) during effortful swallowing and LF/HF ratio (p = 0.03) increased during effortful swallowing. In conclusion effortful swallow maneuver in healthy women increased sympathetic cardiac modulation, indicating a cardiac overload.

  11. Executive function and cardiac autonomic regulation in depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Alexandra; Ettinger, Ulrich; Reyes Del Paso, Gustavo A; Duschek, Stefan

    2017-08-18

    Executive function impairments have been frequently observed in depressive disorders. Moreover, reduced heart rate variability (HRV) has repeatedly been described, especially in the high frequency band (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA), suggesting lower vagal cardiac outflow. The study tested the hypothesis of involvement of low vagal tone in executive dysfunction in depression. In addition to RSA, HRV in the low frequency (LF) band was assessed. In 36 patients with depression and 36 healthy subjects, electrocardiography recordings were accomplished at rest and during performance of five executive function tasks (number-letter task, n-back task, continuous performance test, flanker task, and antisaccade task). Patients displayed increased error rates and longer reaction times in the task-switching condition of the number-letter task, in addition to increased error rates in the n-back task and the final of two blocks of the antisaccade task. In patients, both HRV parameters were lower during all experimental phases. RSA correlated negatively with reaction time during task-switching. This finding confirms reduced performance across different executive functions in depression and suggests that, in addition to RSA, LF HRV is also diminished. However, the hypothesis of involvement of low parasympathetic tone in executive dysfunction related to depression received only limited support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of an aerobic exercise intervention on cardiac autonomic regulation: A worksite RCT among cleaners.

    PubMed

    Hallman, David M; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen; Krustrup, Peter; Kristiansen, Jesper; Korshøj, Mette

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to determine whether aerobic exercise during work hours affects cardiac autonomic regulation in cleaners characterized by high levels of occupational physical activity and poor cardiorespiratory fitness. Eligible cleaners (n=116) were randomized to an aerobic exercise group (n=59) or a reference group (n=57) with lectures. The intervention group received two 30-min sessions per week of supervised aerobic exercise over 4months. Diurnal measurements of heart rate variability (HRV) and physical activity (accelerometry) were obtained at baseline and at 4-month follow-up. Time and frequency domain indices of HRV were derived during work, leisure time and sleep to evaluate cardiac autonomic regulation. Linear mixed models were used to determine the effect of the intervention on HRV indices, with adjustment for age, gender and daily use of antihypertensive and/or heart medication. Compared with the reference group, the exercise group increased all HRV indices apart from a reduction in LF/HF ratio from baseline to follow-up both during work (p<0.05) and leisure (p<0.05). In contrast, during sleep, the HRV indices tended to decrease in the exercise group compared with the reference group from baseline to follow-up, being significant for the HF spectral component (p=0.03). Among cleaners, a worksite aerobic exercise intervention improved cardiac autonomic regulation during work and leisure, but not during sleep. The health effect of this contrasting change in autonomic regulation needs further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors influencing the role of cardiac autonomic regulation in the service of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Capuana, Lesley J; Dywan, Jane; Tays, William J; Elmers, Jamie L; Witherspoon, Richelle; Segalowitz, Sidney J

    2014-10-01

    Working from a model of neurovisceral integration, we examined whether adding response contingencies and motivational involvement would increase the need for cardiac autonomic regulation in maintaining effective cognitive control. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was recorded during variants of the Stroop color-word task. The Basic task involved "accepting" congruent items and "rejecting" words printed in incongruent colors (BLUE in red font); an added contingency involved rejecting a particular congruent word (e.g., RED in red font), or a congruent word repeated on an immediately subsequent trial. Motivation was increased by adding a financial incentive phase. Results indicate that pre-task RSA predicted accuracy best when response contingencies required the maintenance of a specific item in memory or on the Basic Stroop task when errors resulted in financial loss. Overall, RSA appeared to be most relevant to performance when the task encouraged a more proactive style of cognitive control, a control strategy thought to be more metabolically costly, and hence, more reliant on flexible cardiac autonomic regulation.

  14. Cardiac autonomic regulation is disturbed in children with euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ayhan; Gulgun, Mustafa; Tascilar, Mehmet Emre; Sari, Erkan; Yokusoglu, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (chronic autoimmune thyroiditis) is the most common form of thyroiditis in childhood. Previous studies have found autonomic dysfunction of varying magnitude in patients with autoimmune diseases, which is considered a cardiovascular risk factor. We aimed to evaluate the heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of cardiac autonomic modulation, in children with euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis (eHT). The study included 32 patients with eHT (27 girls and 5 boys; mean age 11 ± 4.1 years, range 8-16; body mass index 0.47 ± 0.69 kg/m(2)), as judged by normal or minimally elevated serum TSH levels (normal range: 0.34-5.6 mIU/l) and normal levels of free thyroid hormones (FT4 and FT3) and 38 euthyroid age-matched controls. Patients with eHT and control subjects underwent physical examination and 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitoring. Time-domain parameters of HRV were evaluated for cardiac autonomic functions. Children with eHT displayed significantly lower values of time-domain parameters of SDANN (standard deviation of the averages of NN intervals), RMSSD (square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals), NN50 counts (number of pairs of adjacent NN intervals differing by more than 50 ms) and PNN50 (NN50 count divided by the total number of all NN intervals) for each 5-min interval, compared to healthy controls (p < 0.05 for each), indicating the decreased beat-to-beat variation of heart rate. In conclusion, eHT is associated with disturbed autonomic regulation of heart rate. Hence, the children with eHT are at higher risk for developing cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Cardiac Autonomic Regulation During Sleep in Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranchi, Paola A.; Fradette, Lorraine; Gagnon, Jean-François; Colombo, Roberto; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess cardiac autonomic and respiratory changes from stage 2 non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in subjects with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and controls. We tested the hypothesis that REM-related cardiorespiratory activation is altered in subjects with RBD. Design: Retrospective case-control study. Setting: University hospital-based sleep research laboratory. Patients: Ten subjects with idiopathic RBD (2 women, mean age 63.4 ± 6.2 years) and 10 sex- and age-matched controls (mean age 63.9 ± 6.3 years). Intervention: One-night polysomnography was used to assess R-R variability during NREM and REM sleep. Measurements and Results: Spectral analysis of R-R interval and respiration were performed. Mean R-R interval, low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components in both absolute and normalized units (LFnu and HFnu), and the LF/HF ratio were obtained from 5-minute electrocardiogram segments selected during NREM and REM sleep under stable conditions (stable breathing pattern, no microarousals or leg movements). Respiratory frequency was also assessed. Values obtained were then averaged for each stage and analyzed by 2 × 2 analysis of variance with group (RBD subjects and controls) as factor and state (NREM and REM) as repeated measures. RR interval, HF, and HFnu components decreased from NREM to REM in controls but did not change in RBD subjects (Interaction P < 0.05). LFnu (interaction P < 0. 001), LF/HF (interaction P < 0. 001), and respiratory frequency (interaction P < 0. 05) increased from NREM to REM sleep in controls but remained stable in RBD subjects. Conclusion: REM-related cardiac and respiratory responses are absent in subjects with idiopathic RBD. Citation: Lanfranchi PA; Fradette L; Gagnon JF; Colombo R; Montplaisir J. Cardiac autonomic regulation during sleep in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder. SLEEP 2007;30(8):1019–1025. PMID:17702272

  16. Autonomic regulation of circulation and cardiac contractility during a 14-month space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Moser, M.; Nikulina, G. A.; Polyakov, V. V.; Funtova, I. I.; Chernikova, A. G.

    The space flight of physician cosmonaut V.V. Polyakov, the longest to date (438 days), has yielded new data about human adaptation to long-term weightlessness. Autonomic regulation of circulation and cardiac contractility were evaluated in three experiments entitled Pulstrans, Night, and Holter. In the Pulstrans experiment electrocardiographic (ECG), ballistocardiographic (BCG), seismocardiographic (SCG), and some other parameters were recorded. In the Night experiment, only the ballistocardiogram was recorded, but a special feature of this experiment is that the BCG records were obtained with a contactless method. This method has several advantages, the most important of which are the possibility of studying slow-wave variations in physiologic parameters (ultradian rhythms) on the basis of recordings made under standard conditions over a prolonged period. The Holter experiment (24-hour electrocardiographic monitoring) used a portable cardiorecorder (Spacelab, USA). The obtained electrocardiographic data were used to analyze heart rate variability. In the first 6 months of the 14-month flight, the dynamics of cardiovascular parameters in V.V.Polyakov was virtually the same as in the other cosmonauts. The data obtained after the first 6 months of Polyakov's sojourn in space are unique and mention should be made of at least three important aspects: (1) activation of a new, additional adaptive mechanism in the 8th-9th months of flight, as is evidenced by alterations in the periodicity and power of superslow wave oscillations (ultradian rhythms) reflecting the activity of the subcortical cardiovascular centers and of the higher levels of autonomic regulation; (2) growth of cardiac contractility accompanied by a decrease in heart rate during the last few months of flight; (3) a considerable increase in the daily average values of absolute power of heart rate's variability MF component, which reflects the activity of the vasomotor center. Specific mechanisms of

  17. Acute Auditory Stimulation with Different Styles of Music Influences Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Men

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Sheila Ap. F.; Guida, Heraldo L.; dos Santos Antonio, Ana Marcia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Monteiro, Carlos B. M.; Ferreira, Celso; Ribeiro, Vivian F.; Barnabe, Viviani; Silva, Sidney B.; Fonseca, Fernando L. A.; Adami, Fernando; Petenusso, Marcio; Raimundo, Rodrigo D.; Valenti, Vitor E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: No clear evidence is available in the literature regarding the acute effect of different styles of music on cardiac autonomic control. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the acute effects of classical baroque and heavy metal musical auditory stimulation on Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in healthy men. Patients and Methods: In this study, HRV was analyzed regarding time (SDNN, RMSSD, NN50, and pNN50) and frequency domain (LF, HF, and LF / HF) in 12 healthy men. HRV was recorded at seated rest for 10 minutes. Subsequently, the participants were exposed to classical baroque or heavy metal music for five minutes through an earphone at seated rest. After exposure to the first song, they remained at rest for five minutes and they were again exposed to classical baroque or heavy metal music. The music sequence was random for each individual. Standard statistical methods were used for calculation of means and standard deviations. Besides, ANOVA and Friedman test were used for parametric and non-parametric distributions, respectively. Results: While listening to heavy metal music, SDNN was reduced compared to the baseline (P = 0.023). In addition, the LF index (ms2 and nu) was reduced during exposure to both heavy metal and classical baroque musical auditory stimulation compared to the control condition (P = 0.010 and P = 0.048, respectively). However, the HF index (ms2) was reduced only during auditory stimulation with music heavy metal (P = 0.01). The LF/HF ratio on the other hand decreased during auditory stimulation with classical baroque music (P = 0.019). Conclusions: Acute auditory stimulation with the selected heavy metal musical auditory stimulation decreased the sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation on the heart, while exposure to a selected classical baroque music reduced sympathetic regulation on the heart. PMID:25177673

  18. The effects of different styles of musical auditory stimulation on cardiac autonomic regulation in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Roque, Adriano L; Valenti, Vitor E; Guida, Heraldo L; Campos, Mônica F; Knap, André; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Ferreira, Celso; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The literature investigated the effects of chronic baroque music auditory stimulation on the cardiovascular system. However, it lacks in the literature the acute effects of different styles of music on cardiac autonomic regulation. To evaluate the acute effects of baroque and heavy metal music on heart rate variability (HRV) in women. The study was performed in 21 healthy women between 18 and 30 years old. We excluded persons with previous experience with music instrument and those who had affinity with the song styles. All procedures were performed in the same sound-proof room. We analyzed HRV in the time (standard deviation of normal-to-normal respiratory rate (RR) intervals, root-mean square of differences between adjacent normal RR intervals in a time interval, and the percentage of adjacent RR intervals with a difference of duration greater than 50 ms) and frequency (low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF], and LF/HF ratio) domains. HRV was recorded at rest for 10 min. Subsequently they were exposed to baroque or heavy metal music for 5 min through an earphone. After the first music exposure they remained at rest for more 5 min and them they were exposed again to baroque or heavy metal music. The sequence of songs was randomized for each individual. The power analysis provided a minimal number of 18 subjects. Shapiro-Wilk to verify normality of data and analysis of variance for repeated measures followed by the Bonferroni test for parametric variables and Friedman's followed by the Dunn's post-test for non-parametric distributions. During the analysis of the time-domain indices were not changed. In the frequency-domain analysis, the LF in absolute units was reduced during the heavy metal music stimulation compared to control. Acute exposure to heavy metal music affected the sympathetic activity in healthy women.

  19. Autonomic cardiac innervation: development and adult plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these "non-classical" cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  20. Cardiac autonomic regulation during exposure to auditory stimulation with classical baroque or heavy metal music of different intensities.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Joice A T; Nogueira, Marcela L; Roque, Adriano L; Guida, Heraldo L; De Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Raimundo, Rodrigo Daminello; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Ribeiro, Vivian L; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-03-01

    The effects of chronic music auditory stimulation on the cardiovascular system have been investigated in the literature. However, data regarding the acute effects of different styles of music on cardiac autonomic regulation are lacking. The literature has indicated that auditory stimulation with white noise above 50 dB induces cardiac responses. We aimed to evaluate the acute effects of classical baroque and heavy metal music of different intensities on cardiac autonomic regulation. The study was performed in 16 healthy men aged 18-25 years. All procedures were performed in the same soundproof room. We analyzed heart rate variability (HRV) in time (standard deviation of normal-to-normal R-R intervals [SDNN], root-mean square of differences [RMSSD] and percentage of adjacent NN intervals with a difference of duration greater than 50 ms [pNN50]) and frequency (low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF] and LF/HF ratio) domains. HRV was recorded at rest for 10 minutes. Subsequently, the volunteers were exposed to one of the two musical styles (classical baroque or heavy metal music) for five minutes through an earphone, followed by a five-minute period of rest, and then they were exposed to the other style for another five minutes. The subjects were exposed to three equivalent sound levels (60-70dB, 70-80dB and 80-90dB). The sequence of songs was randomized for each individual. Auditory stimulation with heavy metal music did not influence HRV indices in the time and frequency domains in the three equivalent sound level ranges. The same was observed with classical baroque musical auditory stimulation with the three equivalent sound level ranges. Musical auditory stimulation of different intensities did not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men.

  1. Regulation of Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Control across Frailty Status: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Parvaneh, Saman; Howe, Carol L.; Toosizadeh, Nima; Honarvar, Bahareh; Slepian, Marvin J.; Fain, Mindy; Mohler, Jane; Najafi, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is a geriatric syndrome that leads to impairment in interrelated physiological systems and progressive homeostatic dysregulation in physiological systems. Objective The focus of the present systematic review was to study the association between the activity of the cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) and frailty. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in multiple databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL and ClinicalTrials.gov; the last search was performed in March 2015. Inclusion criteria included: 1) the studied population was classified for frailty according to a standard definition, such as the Fried’s criteria; 2) had a non-frail control group; 3) heart rate (HR) and/or heart rate variability (HRV) were parameters of interest in the study. Results Of the 1544 articles screened, 54 were selected for full text review and six studies met inclusion criteria. Assessment of HRV using different standard time-domain, frequency-domain, and non-linear domain approaches confirmed the presence of an impaired cardiac ANS function in frail compared to non-frail participants. Furthermore, HR changes while performing a clinical test (e.g., seated step and lying to standing tests) were decreased in the frail group compared to the non-frail group. Conclusions The current systematic review provides evidence that the cardiac ANS is impaired in frail, compared to non-frail, older adults as indicated by a reduction in the complexity of HR dynamics, reduced HRV, and reduced HR changes in response to daily activities. Four out of six included articles recruited only female participants and in the other two articles the effect of gender on impairment of cardiac ANS was insufficiently investigated. Therefore, further studies are required to study the association between cardiac ANS impairments and frailty in males. Furthermore, HRV was studied only during static postures such as sitting, or without considering the

  2. [Significance of adreno- and cholino-inhibitors in cardiac rhythm autonomic regulation during different weather types].

    PubMed

    Denefil', O V

    2011-01-01

    In the experiments of 4.5-5 months old rats, we studied the influences of adrenal and cholinoblockators on the autonomic balance of cardiac rhythm during the I, II and III types of weather. Blockade of beta-adrenoreceptors and M-cholinoreceptors was evoked by anapriline (1.5 mg/kg) and atropine sulfate (1.0 mg/kg), respectively. Electrocardiograms for further analysis were registered in control and 30 minutes after injections of the blockers. It was shown that male rats have the highest activity of sympathetic nervous system under weather type I. High reactivity of beta-adrenoreceptors was determined under all weather types in males and females. In males, atropine blocks the autonomic M-cholinoreceptors under weather types II and III, while in females this effect is detected under all weather types. Furthermore, in males we detected a compensatory increase of sympathetic nervous system during all weather types, while in females such an increase was detected during weather types I and II. Collectively, we determined sex differences in adaptation to weather type changes which are connected to different reactivity of adreno- and cholinoreceptors.

  3. Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Autism and Fragile X Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Klusek, Jessica; Roberts, Jane E.; Losh, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significance of efforts to understand the biological basis of autism, progress in this area has been hindered, in part, by the considerable heterogeneity in the disorder. Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a monogenic condition associated with high risk for autism, may pave the way for the dissection of biological heterogeneity within idiopathic autism. This paper adopts a cross-syndrome biomarker approach to evaluate potentially overlapping profiles of cardiac arousal dysregulation (and broader autonomic dysfunction) in autism and FXS. Approaches such as this, aimed at delineating shared mechanisms across genetic syndromes, hold great potential for improving diagnostic precision, promoting earlier identification, and uncovering key systems that can be targeted in pharmaceutical/behavioral interventions. Biomarker approaches may be vital to deconstructing complex psychiatric disorders, and are currently promoted as such by major research initiatives such as the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC). Evidence reviewed here supports physiological dysregulation in a subset of individuals with autism, as evidenced by patterns of hyperarousal and dampened parasympathetic vagal tone, which overlap with the well-documented physiological profile of FXS. Moreover, there is growing support for a link between aberrant cardiac activity and core deficits associated with autism, such as communication and social impairment. The delineation of physiological mechanisms common to autism and FXS could lend insight into relationships between genetic etiology and behavioral endstates, highlighting FMR1 as a potential candidate gene. Research gaps and potential pitfalls are discussed to inform timely, well-controlled biomarker research that will ultimately promote better diagnosis and treatment of autism and associated conditions. PMID:25420222

  4. Cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quan; Chen, Dongmei; Wang, Yonggang; Zhao, Xin; Zheng, Yang

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the distribution characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves and to explore the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed for papers examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerves, using heart, autonomic nerve, sympathetic nerve, vagus nerve, nerve distribution, rhythm and atrial fibrillation as the key words. SELECTION CRITERIA: A total of 165 studies examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerve were screened, and 46 of them were eventually included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The distribution and characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves were observed, and immunohistochemical staining was applied to determine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase (main markers of cardiac autonomic nerve distribution). In addition, the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and cardiac arrhythmia was investigated. RESULTS: Cardiac autonomic nerves were reported to exhibit a disordered distribution in different sites, mainly at the surface of the cardiac atrium and pulmonary vein, forming a ganglia plexus. The distribution of the pulmonary vein autonomic nerve was prominent at the proximal end rather than the distal end, at the upper left rather than the lower right, at the epicardial membrane rather than the endocardial membrane, at the left atrium rather than the right atrium, and at the posterior wall rather than the anterior wall. The main markers used for cardiac autonomic nerves were tyrosine hydroxylase and acetylcholine transferase. Protein gene product 9.5 was used to label the immunoreactive nerve distribution, and the distribution density of autonomic nerves was determined using a computer-aided morphometric analysis system. CONCLUSION: The uneven distribution of the cardiac autonomic nerves is the leading cause of the occurrence of arrhythmia, and the cardiac autonomic nerves play an important role in

  5. Cardiac coherence, self-regulation, autonomic stability, and psychosocial well-being

    PubMed Central

    McCraty, Rollin; Zayas, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to alter one’s emotional responses is central to overall well-being and to effectively meeting the demands of life. One of the chief symptoms of events such as trauma, that overwhelm our capacities to successfully handle and adapt to them, is a shift in our internal baseline reference such that there ensues a repetitive activation of the traumatic event. This can result in high vigilance and over-sensitivity to environmental signals which are reflected in inappropriate emotional responses and autonomic nervous system dynamics. In this article we discuss the perspective that one’s ability to self-regulate the quality of feeling and emotion of one’s moment-to-moment experience is intimately tied to our physiology, and the reciprocal interactions among physiological, cognitive, and emotional systems. These interactions form the basis of information processing networks in which communication between systems occurs through the generation and transmission of rhythms and patterns of activity. Our discussion emphasizes the communication pathways between the heart and brain, as well as how these are related to cognitive and emotional function and self-regulatory capacity. We discuss the hypothesis that self-induced positive emotions increase the coherence in bodily processes, which is reflected in the pattern of the heart’s rhythm. This shift in the heart rhythm in turn plays an important role in facilitating higher cognitive functions, creating emotional stability and facilitating states of calm. Over time, this establishes a new inner-baseline reference, a type of implicit memory that organizes perception, feelings, and behavior. Without establishing a new baseline reference, people are at risk of getting “stuck” in familiar, yet unhealthy emotional and behavioral patterns and living their lives through the automatic filters of past familiar or traumatic experience. PMID:25324802

  6. Linking an Anxiety-Related Personality Trait to Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Well-Defined Healthy Adults: Harm Avoidance and Resting Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Lien-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry B. J.; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anxiety trait, anxiety and depression states have all been reported to increase risks for cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly through altering cardiac autonomic regulation. Our aim was to investigate whether the relationship between harm avoidance (HA, an anxiety-related personality trait) and cardiac autonomic regulation is independent of anxiety and depression states in healthy adults. Methods We recruited 535 physically and mentally healthy volunteers. Participants completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Tri-dimensional Personality Questionnaire. Participants were divided into high or low HA groups as discriminated by the quartile value. Cardiac autonomic function was evaluated by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). We obtained the time and frequency-domain indices of HRV including variance (total HRV), the low-frequency power (LF; 0.05–0.15 Hz), which may reflect baroreflex function, the high-frequency power (HF; 0.15–0.40 Hz), which reflects cardiac parasympathetic activity, as well as the LF/HF ratio. Results The BDI and HA scores showed associations with HRV parameters. After adjustment for the BDI scores and other control variables, HA is still associated with reduced variance, LF and HF power. Compared with the participants with low HA, those with high HA displayed significant reductions in variance, LF and HF power and a significant increase in their LF/HF ratio. Conclusion This study highlights the independent role of HA in contributing to decreased autonomic cardiac regulation in healthy adults and provides a potential underlying mechanism for anxiety trait to confer increased risk for CVD. PMID:27482240

  7. Cardiac Repolarization and Autonomic Regulation during Short-Term Cold Exposure in Hypertensive Men: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Hintsala, Heidi; Kenttä, Tuomas V.; Tulppo, Mikko; Kiviniemi, Antti; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Mäntysaari, Matti; Keinänen-Kiukaannemi, Sirkka; Bloigu, Risto; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Antikainen, Riitta; Rintamäki, Hannu; Jaakkola, Jouni J. K.; Ikäheimo, Tiina M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of our study was to assess the effect of short-term cold exposure, typical in subarctic climate, on cardiac electrical function among untreated middle-aged hypertensive men. Methods We conducted a population-based recruitment of 51 hypertensive men and a control group of 32 men without hypertension (age 55–65 years) who underwent whole-body cold exposure (15 min exposure to temperature −10°C, wind 3 m/s, winter clothes). Conduction times and amplitudes, vectorcardiography, arrhythmias, and heart rate variability (autonomic nervous function) were assessed. Results Short-term cold exposure increased T-peak to T-end interval from 67 to 72 ms (p<0.001) and 71 to 75 ms (p<0.001) and T-wave amplitude from 0.12 to 0.14 mV (p<0.001) and from 0.17 to 0.21 mV (p<0.001), while QTc interval was shortened from 408 to 398 ms (p<0.001) and from 410 to 401 ms (p<0.001) among hypertensive men and controls, respectively. Cold exposure increased both low (from 390 to 630 ms2 (p<0.001) and 380 to 700 ms2 (p<0.001), respectively) and high frequency heart rate variability (from 90 to 190 ms2 (p<0.001) and 150 to 300 ms2 (p<0.001), respectively), while low-to-high frequency-ratio was reduced. In addition, the frequency of ventricular ectopic beats increased slightly during cold exposure. The cold induced changes were similar between untreated hypertensive men and controls. Conclusions Short-term cold exposure with moderate facial and mild whole body cooling resulted in prolongation of T-peak to T-end interval and higher T-wave amplitude while QTc interval was shortened. These changes of ventricular repolarization may have resulted from altered cardiac autonomic regulation and were unaffected by untreated hypertension. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02007031 PMID:24983379

  8. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in anabolic steroid users.

    PubMed

    Maior, A S; Carvalho, A R; Marques-Neto, S R; Menezes, P; Soares, P P; Nascimento, J H M

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) abuse may induce cardiac autonomic dysfunction in recreational trained subjects. Twenty-two men were volunteered for the study. The AAS group (n = 11) utilized AAS at mean dosage of 410 ± 78.6 mg/week. All of them were submitted to submaximal exercise testing using an Astrand-Rhyming protocol. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and respired gas analysis were monitored at rest, during, and post-effort. Mean values of VO2 , VCO2 , and VE were higher in AAS group only at rest. The heart rate variability variables were calculated from ECG using MATLAB-based algorithms. At rest, AAS group showed lower values of the standard deviation of R-R intervals, the proportion of adjacent R-R intervals differing by more than 50 ms (pNN50), the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), and the total, the low-frequency (LF) and the high-frequency (HF) spectral power, as compared to Control group. After submaximal exercise testing, pNN50, RMSSD, and HF were lower, and the LF/HF ratio was higher in AAS group when compared to control group. Thus, the use of supraphysiological doses of AAS seems to induce dysfunction in tonic cardiac autonomic regulation in recreational trained subjects.

  9. The Effect of Head Massage on the Regulation of the Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System: A Pilot Randomized Crossover Trial.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Mir Sohail; Pourrahmat, Mir-Masoud; Liu, Mailan; Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a single 10-minute session of Chinese head massage on the activity of the cardiac autonomic nervous system via measurement of heart rate variability (HRV). In this pilot randomized crossover trial, each participant received both head massage and the control intervention in a randomized fashion. The study was conducted at Children's & Women's Health Centre of British Columbia between June and November 2014. Ten otherwise healthy adults (6 men and 4 women) were enrolled in this study. The intervention comprised 10 minutes of head massage therapy (HMT) in a seated position compared with a control intervention of sitting quietly on the same chair with eyes closed for an equal amount of time (no HMT). The primary outcome measures were the main parameters of HRV, including total power (TP), high frequency (HF), HF as a normalized unit, pre-ejection period, and heart rate (HR). A single short session (10 minutes) of head massage demonstrated an increase in TP continuing up to 20 minutes after massage and reaching statistical significance at 10 minutes after massage (relative change from baseline, 66% for HMT versus -6.6% for no HMT; p = 0.017). The effect on HF also peaked up to 10 minutes after massage (59.4% for HMT versus 4% for no HMT; p = 0.139). Receiving head massage also decreased HR by more than three-fold compared to the control intervention. This study shows the potential benefits of head massage by modulating the cardiac autonomic nervous system through an increase in the total variability and a shift toward higher parasympathetic nervous system activity. Randomized controlled trials with larger sample size and multiple sessions of massage are needed to substantiate these findings.

  10. Low-level Pb and cardiovascular responses to acute stress in children: the role of cardiac autonomic regulation.

    PubMed

    Gump, Brooks B; Mackenzie, James A; Bendinskas, Kestutis; Morgan, Robert; Dumas, Amy K; Palmer, Christopher D; Parsons, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies suggest that Pb exposure increases cardiovascular disease risk in humans. As a potential mechanism for this effect, we recently reported a significant association between early childhood Pb levels and cardiovascular response to acute stress. The current study considers the association between current Pb levels and the autonomic nervous system activation pattern underlying the cardiovascular response to stress in a new cohort of children. We assessed blood Pb levels as well as cardiovascular responses to acute stress in 9-11 year old children (N=140). Sympathetic activation (measured with pre-ejection period) and parasympathetic activation (measured with high frequency heart rate variability) were also assessed. In a sample with very low levels of blood Pb (M=1.0 μg/dL), we found that increasing blood Pb was associated with coinhibition of sympathetic and parasympathetic activation in response to acute stress. In addition, increasing Pb levels were associated with the hemodynamic stress response pattern typical of coinhibition--significantly greater vascular resistance and reduced stroke volume and cardiac output. Blood Pb levels were associated with significant autonomic and cardiovascular dysregulation in response to acute psychological stress in children. Moreover, these effects were significant at Pb levels considered to be very low and notably well below the 10 μg/dL, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of an elevated blood Pb level. The potential for autonomic dysregulation at levels of Pb typical for many US children would suggest potentially broad public health ramifications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-level Pb and Cardiovascular Responses to Acute Stress in Children: The Role of Cardiac Autonomic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gump, Brooks B.; MacKenzie, James A.; Bendinskas, Kestutis; Morgan, Robert; Dumas, Amy K.; Palmer, Christopher D.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective A number of studies suggest that Pb exposure increases cardiovascular disease risk in humans. As a potential mechanism for this effect, we recently reported a significant association between early childhood Pb levels and cardiovascular response to acute stress. The current study considers the association between current Pb levels and the autonomic nervous system activation pattern underlying the cardiovascular response to stress in a new cohort of children. Methods We assessed blood Pb levels as well as cardiovascular responses to acute stress in 9–11 year old children (N = 140). Sympathetic activation (measured with pre-ejection period) and parasympathetic activation (measured with high frequency heart rate variability) were also assessed. Results In a sample with very low levels of blood Pb (M = 1.01 μg/dL), we found that increasing blood Pb was associated with coinhibition of sympathetic and parasympathetic activation in response to acute stress. In addition, increasing Pb levels were associated with the hemodynamic stress response pattern typical of coinhibition – significantly greater vascular resistance and reduced stroke volume and cardiac output. Conclusions Blood Pb levels were associated with significant autonomic and cardiovascular dysregulation in response to acute psychological stress in children. Moreover, these effects were significant at Pb levels considered to be very low and notably well below the 10 μg/dL the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition of an elevated blood Pb level. The potential for autonomic dysregulation at levels of Pb typical for many US children would suggest potentially broad public health ramifications. PMID:20934510

  12. Cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in obesity.

    PubMed

    Liatis, Stavros; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Katsilambros, Nikolaos

    2004-08-01

    The development of obesity is caused by a disturbance of energy balance, with energy intake exceeding energy expenditure. As the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has a role in the regulation of both these variables, it has become a major focus of investigation in the fields of obesity pathogenesis. The enhanced cardiac sympathetic drive shown in most of the studies in obese persons might be due to an increase in their levels of circulating insulin. The role of leptin needs further investigation with studies in humans. There is a blunted response of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in obese subjects after consumption of a carbohydrate-rich meal as well as after insulin administration. This might be due to insulin resistance. It is speculated that increased SNS activity in obesity may contribute to the development of hypertension in genetically susceptible individuals. It is also speculated that the increase in cardiac SNS activity under fasting conditions in obesity may be associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  13. Can a Canine Companion Modify Cardiac Autonomic Reactivity and Tone in PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Animal Training Intervention program at the VAPAHCS-Trauma Recovery Program to achieve rehabilitative impacts highly relevant to PTSD as suggested by...the civilian literature. These are reductions in cardiac autonomic tone and reactivity and improvements in social experience and function. A second... animal -assisted therapy, autonomic regulation, autonomic reactivity, mood, sociality, social cognition, sleep, ambulatory monitoring, defense response

  14. Cardiac autonomic neural remodeling and susceptibility to sudden cardiac death: effect of endurance exercise training.

    PubMed

    Billman, George E

    2009-10-01

    Sudden cardiac death resulting from ventricular tachyarrhythmias remains the leading cause of death in industrially developed countries, accounting for between 300,000 and 500,000 deaths each year in the United States. Yet, despite the enormity of this problem, both the identification of factors contributing to ventricular fibrillation as well as the development of safe and effective antiarrhythmic agents remain elusive. Subnormal cardiac parasympathetic regulation coupled with an elevated cardiac sympathetic activation may allow for the formation of malignant ventricular arrhythmias. In particular, myocardial infarction can reduce cardiac parasympathetic regulation and alter beta-adrenoceptor subtype expression enhancing beta(2)-adrenoceptor sensitivity that can lead to intracellular calcium dysregulation and arrhythmias. As such, myocardial infarction can induce a remodeling of cardiac autonomic regulation that may be required to maintain cardiac pump function. If alterations in cardiac autonomic regulation play an important role in the genesis of life-threatening arrhythmias, then one would predict that interventions designed to either augment parasympathetic activity and/or reduce cardiac adrenergic activity would also protect against ventricular fibrillation. Recently, studies using a canine model of sudden death demonstrate that endurance exercise training (treadmill running) enhanced cardiac parasympathetic regulation (increased heart rate variability), restored a more normal beta-adrenoceptor balance (i.e., reduced beta(2)-adrenoceptor sensitivity and expression), and protected against ventricular fibrillation induced by acute myocardial ischemia. Thus exercise training may reverse the autonomic neural remodeling induced by myocardial infarction and thereby enhance the electrical stability of the heart in individuals shown to be at an increased risk for sudden cardiac death.

  15. Autonomic Regulation Therapy in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Una; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Ardell, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic Regulation Therapy (ART) is a rapidly emerging therapy in the management of congestive heart failure secondary to systolic dysfunction. Modulation of the cardiac neuronal hierarchy can be achieved with bioelectronics modulation of the spinal cord, cervical vagus, baroreceptor, or renal nerve ablation. This review will discuss relevant preclinical and clinical research in ART for systolic heart failure. Understanding mechanistically what is being stimulated within the autonomic nervous system by such device-based therapy and how the system reacts to such stimuli is essential for optimizing stimulation parameters and for the future development of effective ART. PMID:26054327

  16. Altered cardiac autonomic nervous function in depression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Autonomic instability may play a mediating or moderating role in this relationship; however this is not well understood. The objective of this study was to explore cardiac autonomic function and cardiac arrhythmia in depression, the correlation between depression severity and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) related indices, and the prevalence of arrhythmia. Methods Individuals (n = 53) with major depression as assessed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, who had a Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) score ≥20 and a Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale score > 53 were compared to 53 healthy individuals, matched for age and gender. Multichannel Electrocardiograph ECG-92C data were collected over 24 hours. Long-term changes in HRV were used to assess the following vagally mediated changes in autonomic tone, expressed as time domain indices: Standard deviation of the NN intervals (SDNN), standard deviation of 5 min averaged NN intervals (SDANN), Root Mean Square of the Successive Differences (RMSSD) and percentage of NN intervals > 50 ms different from preceding interval (pNN50). Pearson’s correlations were conducted to explore the strength of the association between depression severity (using the SDS and HRV related indices, specifically SDNN and low frequency domain / high frequency domain (LF/HF)). Results The values of SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, PNN50 and HF were lower in the depression group compared to the control group (P<.05). The mean value of the LF in the depression group was higher than the in control group (P<.05). Furthermore the ratio of LF/HF was higher among the depression group than the control group (P<.05). A linear relationship was shown to exist between the severity of the depression and HRV indices. In the depression group, the prevalence of arrhythmia was significantly higher than in the control group (P<.05), particularly

  17. Measuring cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity in children.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Aimée E; van Lien, René; van Eijsden, Manon; Gemke, Reinoud J B J; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; de Geus, Eco J

    2013-04-29

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) controls mainly automatic bodily functions that are engaged in homeostasis, like heart rate, digestion, respiratory rate, salivation, perspiration and renal function. The ANS has two main branches: the sympathetic nervous system, preparing the human body for action in times of danger and stress, and the parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the resting state of the body. ANS activity can be measured invasively, for instance by radiotracer techniques or microelectrode recording from superficial nerves, or it can be measured non-invasively by using changes in an organ's response as a proxy for changes in ANS activity, for instance of the sweat glands or the heart. Invasive measurements have the highest validity but are very poorly feasible in large scale samples where non-invasive measures are the preferred approach. Autonomic effects on the heart can be reliably quantified by the recording of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in combination with the impedance cardiogram (ICG), which reflects the changes in thorax impedance in response to respiration and the ejection of blood from the ventricle into the aorta. From the respiration and ECG signals, respiratory sinus arrhythmia can be extracted as a measure of cardiac parasympathetic control. From the ECG and the left ventricular ejection signals, the preejection period can be extracted as a measure of cardiac sympathetic control. ECG and ICG recording is mostly done in laboratory settings. However, having the subjects report to a laboratory greatly reduces ecological validity, is not always doable in large scale epidemiological studies, and can be intimidating for young children. An ambulatory device for ECG and ICG simultaneously resolves these three problems. Here, we present a study design for a minimally invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in children, using a validated ambulatory device (1-5), the VU University Ambulatory Monitoring System (VU

  18. Cardiac Autonomic Control in Individuals With Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulopoulou, Styliani; Baynard, Tracy; Collier, Scott; Giannopoulou, Ifigenia; Figueroa, Arturo; Beets, Michael; Pitetti, Kenneth; Fernhall, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to compare cardiac autonomic control at rest between 50 individuals with Down syndrome and 24 control participants without disabilities. Resting autonomic function was assessed using analysis of heart rate variability. Participants with Down syndrome had reduced total heart rate variability, which indicates possible…

  19. Cardiac Autonomic Control in Individuals With Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulopoulou, Styliani; Baynard, Tracy; Collier, Scott; Giannopoulou, Ifigenia; Figueroa, Arturo; Beets, Michael; Pitetti, Kenneth; Fernhall, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to compare cardiac autonomic control at rest between 50 individuals with Down syndrome and 24 control participants without disabilities. Resting autonomic function was assessed using analysis of heart rate variability. Participants with Down syndrome had reduced total heart rate variability, which indicates possible…

  20. Alterations in cardiac autonomic control in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Liu, Nan; Malmqvist, Lasse; Wecht, Jill Maria; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2017-02-15

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) interferes with the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The effect on the cardiovascular system will depend on the extent of damage to the spinal/central component of ANS. The cardiac changes are caused by loss of supraspinal sympathetic control and relatively increased parasympathetic cardiac control. Decreases in sympathetic activity result in heart rate and the arterial blood pressure changes, and may cause arrhythmias, in particular bradycardia, with the risk of cardiac arrest in those with cervical or high thoracic injuries. The objective of this review is to give an update of the current knowledge related to the alterations in cardiac autonomic control following SCI. With this purpose the review includes the following subheadings: 2. Neuro-anatomical plasticity and cardiac control 2.1 Autonomic nervous system and the heart 2.2 Alteration in autonomic control of the heart following spinal cord injury 3. Spinal shock and neurogenic shock 3.1 Pathophysiology of spinal shock 3.2 Pathophysiology of neurogenic shock 4. Autonomic dysreflexia 4.1 Pathophysiology of autonomic dysreflexia 4.2 Diagnosis of autonomic dysreflexia 5. Heart rate/electrocardiography following spinal cord injury 5.1 Acute phase 5.2 Chronic phase 6. Heart rate variability 6.1 Time domain analysis 6.2 Frequency domain analysis 6.3 QT-variability index 6.4 Nonlinear (fractal) indexes 7. Echocardiography 7.1 Changes in cardiac structure following spinal cord injury 7.2 Changes in cardiac function following spinal cord injury 8. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular basic data set and international standards to document the remaining autonomic function in spinal cord injury.

  1. Role of the autonomic nervous system in modulating cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mark J; Zipes, Douglas P

    2014-03-14

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the modulation of cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis. Decades of research has contributed to a better understanding of the anatomy and physiology of cardiac autonomic nervous system and provided evidence supporting the relationship of autonomic tone to clinically significant arrhythmias. The mechanisms by which autonomic activation is arrhythmogenic or antiarrhythmic are complex and different for specific arrhythmias. In atrial fibrillation, simultaneous sympathetic and parasympathetic activations are the most common trigger. In contrast, in ventricular fibrillation in the setting of cardiac ischemia, sympathetic activation is proarrhythmic, whereas parasympathetic activation is antiarrhythmic. In inherited arrhythmia syndromes, sympathetic stimulation precipitates ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death except in Brugada and J-wave syndromes where it can prevent them. The identification of specific autonomic triggers in different arrhythmias has brought the idea of modulating autonomic activities for both preventing and treating these arrhythmias. This has been achieved by either neural ablation or stimulation. Neural modulation as a treatment for arrhythmias has been well established in certain diseases, such as long QT syndrome. However, in most other arrhythmia diseases, it is still an emerging modality and under investigation. Recent preliminary trials have yielded encouraging results. Further larger-scale clinical studies are necessary before widespread application can be recommended.

  2. A role for autonomic cardiac control in the effects of oxytocin on social behavior and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Daniel S.; Kemp, Andrew H.; Alvares, Gail A.; Guastella, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Cumulative evidence over the last decade indicates that intranasally administered oxytocin (OT) has a major impact on social behavior and cognition. In parallel, researchers have also highlighted the effects of OT on cardiovascular (CV) and autonomic nervous system (ANS) regulation. Taken at face value, these two streams of research appear largely unrelated. However, another line of evidence highlights a key role for autonomic cardiac control in social behavior and cognition. In this review, we suggest that autonomic cardiac control may moderate the relationship between OT and social behavior. We also highlight the importance of autonomic cardiac control in psychiatric disorders of social dysfunction and suggest that heart rate variability (HRV)—an index of autonomic cardiac control—may play a key role in patient response in treatment trials of OT. PMID:23565075

  3. The ECG vertigo in diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  4. Regular Football Practice Improves Autonomic Cardiac Function in Male Children

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luis; Oliveira, Jose; Soares-Miranda, Luisa; Rebelo, Antonio; Brito, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in the cardiovascular regulation is of primal importance. Since it has been associated with adverse conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, sleep disorders, hypertension and obesity. Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the impact of recreational football practice on the autonomic cardiac function of male children, as measured by heart rate variability. Patients and Methods: Forty-seven male children aged 9 - 12 years were selected according to their engagement with football oriented practice outside school context. The children were divided into a football group (FG; n = 22) and a control group (CG; n = 25). The FG had regular football practices, with 2 weekly training sessions and occasional weekend matches. The CG was not engaged with any physical activity other than complementary school-based physical education classes. Data from physical activity, physical fitness, and heart rate variability measured in time and frequency domains were obtained. Results: The anthropometric and body composition characteristics were similar in both groups (P > 0.05). The groups were also similar in time spent daily on moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (FG vs. CG: 114 ± 64 vs. 87 ± 55 minutes; P > 0.05). However, the FG performed better (P < 0.05) in Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (1394 ± 558 vs. 778 ± 408 m) and 15-m sprint test (3.06 ± 0.17 vs. 3.20 ± 0.23 s). Also, the FG presented enhanced autonomic function. Significant differences were detected (P < 0.05) between groups for low frequency normalized units (38.0 ± 15.2 vs. 47.3 ± 14.2 n.u (normalized units)), high frequency normalized units (62.1 ± 15.2 vs. 52.8 ± 14.2 n.u.), and LF:HF ratio (0.7 ± 0.4 vs. 1.1 ± 0.6 ms2). Conclusions: Children engaged with regular football practice presented enhanced physical fitness and autonomic function, by increasing vagal tone at rest. PMID:26448848

  5. Evaluation of autonomic reserves in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Alain; Denault, André; Rochon, Antoine; Cogan, Jennifer; Pagé, Pierre; D'Antono, Bianca

    2013-06-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is a well-recognized but rarely evaluated risk factor for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. By measuring autonomic reserves in patients scheduled for cardiac surgery, the authors aimed to identify those with autonomic dysfunction and to evaluate their risk of perioperative complications. This was a prospective, observational study. The study was conducted in a single academic center. Sixty-seven patients completed the study. Autonomic reserves were evaluated using analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) after a Valsalva maneuver. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on their response to the autonomic challenge, a group with autonomic reserves (AR, n = 38) and a group with negligible autonomic reserves (NAR, n = 29). The groups were compared for baseline psychologic distress, demographic and medical profiles, autonomic response to morphine premedication and the induction of anesthesia, hemodynamic instability, the occurrence of decreases in cerebral oxygen saturation, and postoperative complications. Patients in the NAR group had significantly higher psychologic distress scores (p < 0.001), a higher baseline parasympathetic tone (p = 0.003), were unable to increase parasympathetic tone with morphine premedication, had more severe hypotension at the induction of anesthesia (p < 0.001), more episodes of decreases in cerebral saturation (p = 0.0485), and a higher overall complication rate (p = 0.0388) independent of other variables studied. Patients with diminished autonomic reserves can be identified before cardiac surgery using analysis of HRV and BPV of the response to the Valsalva maneuver, and some evidence suggests that they may be at increased risk of perioperative complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS. The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G). Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0–0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters. AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  7. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Paul M.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Harper, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    regions mediating postural and motoric actions, including respiration, and cardiac output. The study of pathological processes associated with autonomic disruption shows susceptibilities of different brain structures to altered timing of neural function, notably in sleep disordered breathing, such as obstructive sleep apnea and congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. The cerebellum, in particular, serves coordination roles for vestibular stimuli and blood pressure changes, and shows both injury and substantially altered timing of responses to pressor challenges in sleep-disordered breathing conditions. The insights into central autonomic processing provided by neuroimaging have assisted understanding of such regulation, and may lead to new treatment options for conditions with disrupted autonomic function. PMID:26858595

  8. Exercise improves cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Voulgari, Christina; Pagoni, Stamatina; Vinik, Aaron; Poirier, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Physical activity is a key element in the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes. Regular physical activity efficiently supports diet-induced weight loss, improves glycemic control, and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Furthermore, physical activity positively affects lipid profile, blood pressure, reduces the rate of cardiovascular events and associated mortality, and restores the quality of life in type 2 diabetes. However, recent studies have documented that a high percentage of the cardiovascular benefits of exercise cannot be attributed solely to enhanced cardiovascular risk factor modulation. Obesity in concert with diabetes is characterized by sympathetic overactivity and the progressive loss of cardiac parasympathetic influx. These are manifested via different pathogenetic mechanisms, including hyperinsulinemia, visceral obesity, subclinical inflammation and increased thrombosis. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy is an underestimated risk factor for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and diabetes. The same is true for the role of physical exercise in the restoration of the heart cardioprotective autonomic modulation in these individuals. This review addresses the interplay of cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes, and focuses on the importance of exercise in improving cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Guizhi Decoction ([symbols; see text]) on heart rate variability and regulation of cardiac autonomic nervous imbalance in diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Jiang, Yue-hua; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Jin-long; Ma, Du-fang; Yang, Chuan-hua

    2014-07-01

    To observe abnormalities in heart rate variability (HRV) in diabetic rats and to explore the effects of treatment with Guizhi Decoction ([symbols; see text]) on cardiac autonomic nervous (CAN) imbalance. A radio-telemetry system for monitoring physiological parameters was implanted into rats to record electrocardiac signals and all indictors of HRV [time domain measures: standard deviation of all RR intervals in 24 h (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), percentage of differences between adjacent RR intervals greater than 50 ms (PNN50), and standard deviation of the averages of RR intervals (SDANN); frequency domain measures: low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), total power (TP), and LF/HF ratio]. The normal group was randomly selected, and the remaining rats were used to establish streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic model. After 4 weeks, the model rats were divided into the model group, the methycobal group, and the Guizhi Decoction group, 9 rats in each group. Four weeks after intragastric administration of the corresponding drugs, the right atria of the rats were collected for immunohistochemical staining of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) to observe the distribution of the sympathetic and vagus nerves in the right atrium. The myocardial homogenate from the interventricular septum and the left ventricle was used for determination of TH, CHAT, growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43), nerve growth factor (NGF), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) levels using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. (1) STZ rats had elevated blood glucose levels, reduced body weight, and decreased heart rate; there was no difference between the model group and the drug treated groups. (2) Compared with the model group, only RMSSD and TP increased in the methycobal group significantly (P<0.05); SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50, LF, HF, and TP increased, LF/HF decreased (P<0.05), and SDANN just showed a decreasing trend in the Guizhi

  10. Dysregulation of cardiac autonomic function in offspring exposed to alcohol during antenatal period.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sajish; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Murthy, Pratima; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2015-10-01

    Several lines of investigations have shown the deleterious effect of an alcohol on the autonomic nervous system. Recent evidence shows that infants exposed to alcohol during the antenatal period displayed aberration in the cardiac autonomic function after the birth. However, there is dearth of literature on the long term influence of antenatal alcohol exposure. In this study we measured the cardiac autonomic functions in children who were exposed to alcohol in the antenatal period and compared them with non-exposed control children. Twenty eight children (age: 9±2 years) in the antenatal alcohol exposed group and age, gender matched 30 non exposed healthy volunteers as a control (age: 10±2 years) were recruited. Electrocardiogram was recorded in all subjects at rest in the supine position. HRV parameters were analyzed in the time and frequency domains using customized software. The average heart rate was similar between both the groups. There was no statistical significant difference in the time domain measures between the groups. However, the low frequency power, normalized units and low frequency to high frequency ratio were significantly higher in the antenatal alcohol exposed children compared to the controls. This suggests sympathetic predominance in children who were exposed to alcohol in the antenatal period. In this study we provide evidence for the deleterious long lasting effect of antenatal exposure of alcohol on cardiac autonomic regulation. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm the causal relationship between antenatal alcohol exposure and autonomic dysregulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Association between depression severity and cardiac autonomic modulation.

    PubMed

    Tolentino, J C; Schmidt, S L

    2016-06-01

    Changes in autonomic modulation are found in depressive patients. QT dispersion is a convenient measure of cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM). As both QT dispersion and depression are related to changes in CAM, this study aimed to examine if there was an association between depression severity and QT dispersion. The selected sample (n=60) derived from 236 women who were recruited via a campaign for breast cancer prevention. The women selected to participate were all non-smokers and were not taking any drug that could interfere with the results. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 60 women were selected. QT dispersion (QTd) and rate-corrected QTd (QTcD) were calculated in 37 physically and mentally healthy women and 23 nontreated depressive women. Univariate ANOVA(s) were used to test group differences. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS17) was scored to measure depression severity. The relationship between depression severity and cardiac autonomic modulation was analyzed by the best curve that fit the raw data of the HDRS17 scores and the QT dispersion variables. The QTd and QTcD were significantly smaller in non-depressed in relation to the depressed women. The best curve that fit the raw data of depression severity (HDRS17) and the two measurements of cardiac autonomic modulation (QTd and QTcD) was a cubic equation for both QTd and QTcD. An increase in QTd and QTcD were observed until the HDRS17 score reached 20 points. There is a significant positive relationship between depression severity and cardiac autonomic modulation in mild and moderate depression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Cardiac Autonomic Functions in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Taşçılar, Mehmet Emre; Yokuşoğlu, Mehmet; Boyraz, Mehmet; Baysan, Oben; Köz, Cem; Dündaröz, Ruşen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The autonomic nervous system is assumed to have a role in the pathophysiology of obesity. In this study, we evaluated the autonomic system by measuring heart rate variability (HRV) in obese children. Methods: Thirty-two obese and 30 healthy children (mean ages: 11.6±2.0 years and 11.0±2.9 years, respectively) were enrolled in the study. Obesity was defined as a body mass index higher than 97th percentile for age- and gender-specific reference values. All participants were free of any disease and none of them was receiving any medication. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings were obtained and the time-domain and frequency-domain indices of HRV were analyzed. The study group was evaluated with respect to insulin resistance by HOMA-IR values. Results: A significant decrease in calculated HRV variables was observed in obese children as compared to controls. The HRV alteration was found in both time-domain and frequency-domain parameters. The subgroup analysis of the study group revealed a significant decrease in all investigated HRV parameters in the insulin-resistant obese children compared to the non-insulin-resistant obese ones. Conclusions: Our results indicate that HRV is decreased in obese children, which implies parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic predominance. A marked decrease in HRV was observed in insulin-resistant obese children compared to their non-insulin-resistant counterparts. We propose that autonomic imbalance pertaining especially to insulin resistance may be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity in pediatric patients Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21750633

  13. Cardiac autonomic functions in children with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Murat; Kır, Mustafa; Makay, Balahan; Keskinoğlu, Pembe; Bora, Elçin; Ünsal, Erbil; Ünal, Nurettin

    2016-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common inherited autoinflammatory disease in the world. The long-term effects of subclinical inflammation in FMF are not well recognized. Some studies have suggested that FMF is associated with cardiac autonomic dysfunction in adult FMF patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the cardiac autonomic functions in pediatric FMF patients by using several autonomic tests. Thirty-five patients with FMF and 35 healthy controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Demographic data, disease-specific data, and orthostatic symptoms were recorded. In all participants, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG), 24 h ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, transthoracic echocardiography, treadmill exercise test, and head upright tilt-table (HUTT) test were performed. The heart rate recovery (HRR) indices of the two groups were similar. Also, chronotropic response was similar in both groups. The time-domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV) were similar in both groups, except mean RR (p = 0.024). Frequencies of ventricular and supraventricular ectopic stimuli were similar in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in average QT and average corrected QT interval length, average QT interval dispersion, and average QT corrected dispersion. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the ratio of clinical dysautonomic reactions on HUTT. However, we observed a significantly higher rate of dysautonomic reactions on HUTT in patients with exertional leg pain than that in patients without (p = 0.013). When the fractal dimension of time curves were compared, FMF patients exhibited significantly lower diastolic blood pressure parameters than controls in response to HUTT. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in children with FMF is not prominent. Particularly, patients with exertional leg pain are more prone to have dysautonomic features

  14. Effects of short-term food deprivation on interoceptive awareness, feelings and autonomic cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Beate M; Herbert, Cornelia; Pollatos, Olga; Weimer, Katja; Enck, Paul; Sauer, Helene; Zipfel, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The perception of internal bodily signals (interoception) plays a relevant role for emotion processing and feelings. This study investigated changes of interoceptive awareness and cardiac autonomic activity induced by short-term food deprivation and its relationship to hunger and affective experience. 20 healthy women were exposed to 24h of food deprivation in a controlled setting. Interoceptive awareness was assessed by using a heartbeat tracking task. Felt hunger, cardiac autonomic activity, mood and subjective appraisal of interoceptive sensations were assessed before and after fasting. Results show that short-term fasting intensifies interoceptive awareness, not restricted to food cues, via changes of autonomic cardiac and/or cardiodynamic activity. The increase of interoceptive awareness was positively related to felt hunger. Additionally, the results demonstrate the role of cardiac vagal activity as a potential index of emotion related self-regulation, for hunger, mood and the affective appraisal of interoceptive signals during acute fasting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Clinical manifestations, cardiovascular consequences, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Balcıoğlu, Akif Serhat; Müderrisoğlu, Haldun

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a frequent chronic complication of diabetes mellitus with potentially life-threatening outcomes. CAN is caused by the impairment of the autonomic nerve fibers regulating heart rate, cardiac output, myocardial contractility, cardiac electrophysiology and blood vessel constriction and dilatation. It causes a wide range of cardiac disorders, including resting tachycardia, arrhythmias, intraoperative cardiovascular instability, asymptomatic myocardial ischemia and infarction and increased rate of mortality after myocardial infarction. Etiological factors associated with autonomic neuropathy include insufficient glycemic control, a longer period since the onset of diabetes, increased age, female sex and greater body mass index. The most commonly used methods for the diagnosis of CAN are based upon the assessment of heart rate variability (the physiological variation in the time interval between heartbeats), as it is one of the first findings in both clinically asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Clinical symptoms associated with CAN generally occur late in the disease process and include early fatigue and exhaustion during exercise, orthostatic hypotension, dizziness, presyncope and syncope. Treatment is based on early diagnosis, life style changes, optimization of glycemic control and management of cardiovascular risk factors. Medical therapies, including aldose reductase inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, prostoglandin analogs and alpha-lipoic acid, have been found to be effective in randomized controlled trials. The following article includes the epidemiology, clinical findings and cardiovascular consequences, diagnosis, and approaches to prevention and treatment of CAN. PMID:25685280

  16. Preserved cardiac autonomic dynamics during sleep in subjects with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Proserpio, Paola; Sambusida, Katrina; Lanza, Andrea; Redaelli, Tiziana; Frigerio, Pamela; Fratticci, Lara; Rosa, Silvia; Casali, Karina R; Somers, Virend K; Nobili, Lino; Montano, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) are associated with altered cardiovascular autonomic control (CAC). Sleep is characterized by modifications of autonomic control across sleep stages; however, no data are available in SCI subjects on CAC during sleep. We aim to assess cardiac autonomic modulation during sleep in subjects with SCI. 27 participants with a neurological and radiological diagnosis of cervical (Cerv, n = 12, ie, tetraplegic) and thoracic SCI (Thor, n = 15, ie, paraplegic) and healthy subjects (Controls) were enrolled. Overnight polysomnographic (PSG) recordings were obtained in all participants. Electrocardiography and respiration were extracted from PSG, divided into sleep stages [wakefulness (W), non-REM sleep (NREM) and REM] for assessment of CAC, using symbolic analysis (SA) and corrected conditional entropy (CCE). SA identified indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation and CCE evaluated the degree of complexity of the heart period time series. SA revealed a reduction of sympathetic and predominant parasympathetic control during NREM compared to W and REM in SCI patients, independent of the level of the lesion, similar to the Controls. In all three groups, complexity of autonomic regulation was higher in NREM compared to W and REM. In subjects with SCI, cardiac autonomic control changed across sleep stages, with a reduction of sympathetic and an increase of parasympathetic modulation during NREM compared to W and REM, and a parallel increase of complexity during NREM, which was similar to the Controls. Cardiac autonomic dynamics during sleep are maintained in SCI, independent of the level of the lesion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  18. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  19. Cardiac regulation in the socially monogamous prairie vole

    PubMed Central

    Grippo, Angela J.; Lamb, Damon G.; Carter, C. Sue; Porges, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Social experiences, both positive and negative, may influence cardiovascular regulation. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are socially monogamous rodents that form social bonds similar to those seen in primates, and this species may provide a useful model for investigating neural and social regulation of cardiac function. Cardiac regulation has not been studied previously in the prairie vole. Radiotelemetry transmitters were implanted into adult female prairie voles under anesthesia, and electrocardiographic parameters were recorded. Autonomic blockade was performed using atenolol (8 mg/kg ip) and atropine methyl nitrate (4 mg/kg ip). Several variables were evaluated, including heart rate (HR), HR variability and the amplitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Sympathetic blockade significantly reduced HR. Parasympathetic blockade significantly increased HR, and reduced HR variability and the amplitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Combined autonomic blockade significantly increased HR, and reduced HR variability and respiratory sinus arrhythmia amplitude. The data indicate that autonomic function in prairie voles shares similarities with primates, with a predominant vagal influence on cardiac regulation. The current results provide a foundation for studying neural and social regulation of cardiac function during different behavioral states in this socially monogamous rodent model. PMID:17107695

  20. Molecular mechanisms autonomic dysfunction and impaired cardiac contractility in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Ackland, Gareth L.; Whittle, John; Toner, Andrew; Machhada, Asif; Gutierrez Del Arroyo, Ana; Sciuso, Alberto; Jenkins, Nicholas; Dyson, Alex; Struthers, Richard; Sneyd, Robert; Minto, Gary; Singer, Mervyn; Shah, Ajay M.; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Molecular mechanisms linking autonomic dysfunction with poorer clinical outcomes in critical illness remain unclear. We hypothesized that baroreflex dysfunction alone is sufficient to cause cardiac impairment through neurohormonal activation of (NADPH oxidase-dependent) oxidative stress resulting in increased expression of G-protein coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-2, a key negative regulator of cardiac function. Design: Laboratory/clinical investigations. Setting: University laboratory/medical centers. Subjects: Adult rats; wild-type/NAPDH oxidase subunit-2 (NOX-2) deficient mice; elective surgical patients. Interventions: Cardiac performance was assessed by transthoracic echocardiography following experimental baroreflex dysfunction (BD, sino-aortic denervation) in rats and mice. Immunoblots assessed GPCR recycling proteins expression in rodent cardiomyocytes and patient mononuclear leukocytes. In surgical patients, heart rate recovery after cardio-pulmonary exercise testing, time/frequency measures of parasympathetic parameters were related to the presence/absence of BD (defined by spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity of <6ms.mmHg-1). The associations of BD with intraoperative cardiac function and outcomes were assessed. Measurements and Main Results: Experimental BD in rats and mice resulted in impaired cardiac contractility and upregulation of GRK-2 expression. In mice, genetic deficiency of gp91 NADPH-oxidase (NOX-2) subunit prevented upregulation of GRK-2 expression in conditions of BD and preserved cardiac function. BD was present in 81/249 (32.5%) patients, and was characterized by lower parasympathetic tone and increased GRK-2 expression in mononuclear leukocytes. BD in patients was also associated with impaired intraoperative cardiac contractility. Critical illness and mortality were more frequent in surgical patients with BD (relative risk: 1.66 [95%CI:1.16-2.39]; p=0.006). Conclusions: Reduced baroreflex sensitivity is associated with NOX-2

  1. Autonomic regulation in Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heilman, Keri J.; Harden, Emily R.; Zageris, Danielle M.; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Porges, Stephen W.

    2011-01-01

    Autonomic reactivity was studied in individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a genetic disorder partially characterized by abnormal social behavior. Relative to age-matched controls, the FXS group had faster baseline heart rate and lower amplitude respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). In contrast to the typically developing controls, there was a decrease in RSA with age within the FXS group. Moreover, within the FXS group heart rate did not slow with age. The FXS group also responded with an atypical increase in RSA to the social challenge, while the control group reduced RSA. In a subset of the FXS group, the autonomic profile did not change following 2 months and 1 year of lithium treatment. The observed indices of atypical autonomic regulation, consistent with the Polyvagal Theory, may contribute to the deficits in social behavior and social communication observed in FXS. PMID:21547900

  2. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) syndrome following cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Dheeraj; Singla, Deepak; Singh, Jasveer; Jindal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) appears to be a unique syndrome following brain injury. It can echo many life-threatening conditions, making its early recognition and management a challenge for intensivists. A delay in early recognition and subsequent management may result in increased morbidity, which is preventable in affected patients. Herein, we report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with PAID syndrome following prolonged cardiac arrest, and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and management of this rare and under-recognised clinical entity. PMID:25189311

  3. Recurrent myocardial infarction: Mechanisms of free-floating adaptation and autonomic derangement in networked cardiac neural control

    PubMed Central

    Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Armour, J. Andrew

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac nervous system continuously controls cardiac function whether or not pathology is present. While myocardial infarction typically has a major and catastrophic impact, population studies have shown that longer-term risk for recurrent myocardial infarction and the related potential for sudden cardiac death depends mainly upon standard atherosclerotic variables and autonomic nervous system maladaptations. Investigative neurocardiology has demonstrated that autonomic control of cardiac function includes local circuit neurons for networked control within the peripheral nervous system. The structural and adaptive characteristics of such networked interactions define the dynamics and a new normal for cardiac control that results in the aftermath of recurrent myocardial infarction and/or unstable angina that may or may not precipitate autonomic derangement. These features are explored here via a mathematical model of cardiac regulation. A main observation is that the control environment during pathology is an extrapolation to a setting outside prior experience. Although global bounds guarantee stability, the resulting closed-loop dynamics exhibited while the network adapts during pathology are aptly described as ‘free-floating’ in order to emphasize their dependence upon details of the network structure. The totality of the results provide a mechanistic reasoning that validates the clinical practice of reducing sympathetic efferent neuronal tone while aggressively targeting autonomic derangement in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:28692680

  4. Physical exercise and cardiac autonomic activity in healthy adult men.

    PubMed

    Panda, Kaninika; Krishna, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity is an important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Regular exercise is known to improve health and maintain physical fitness. The heart rate response to exercise reflects autonomic control of heart and has shown to predict cardiovascular prognosis. Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is known as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. The objective of this study was to study the effect of exercise on cardiac autonomic activity. Thirty two healthy adult men in the age group of 18-25 years with normal body mass index (BMI) were recruited from different physical fitness centers, who were undergoing regular exercise for past 3 months. Resting ECG was recorded for 5 minutes and analyzed for frequency analysis of HRV. HRV parameters of the subjects were compared with fifty age and BMI matched subjects who were not undergoing any exercise program. Physical activity level of all subjects was assessed by using Global Physical Activity Questionnaire. The exercising (E) subjects were found to have a lesser heart rate (73.27 ± 8.6 vs 74.41 ± 8.59) compared to non-exercising (NE) group, which was not significant. No significant difference was found in frequency domain parameters of HRV between exercising and non-exercising group with LF (47.12 ± 19.17 vs 43.55 ± 16.66), HF (41.03 ± 17.65 vs 46.03 ± 15.89) and LF/HF (1.61 ± 1.16 vs 1.22 ± 0.93) respectively. Physical activity level was significantly different between the two groups (4175 ± 1481.53 vs 1176.4?1103.83, p<0.001). This study showed 3 months of exercise did not have any effect on cardiac autonomic activity despite the difference in physical activity.

  5. HRVanalysis: A Free Software for Analyzing Cardiac Autonomic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Vincent; Roche, Frédéric; Celle, Sébastien; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Chouchou, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering studies of the 1960s, heart rate variability (HRV) has become an increasingly used non-invasive tool for examining cardiac autonomic functions and dysfunctions in various populations and conditions. Many calculation methods have been developed to address these issues, each with their strengths and weaknesses. Although, its interpretation may remain difficult, this technique provides, from a non-invasive approach, reliable physiological information that was previously inaccessible, in many fields including death and health prediction, training and overtraining, cardiac and respiratory rehabilitation, sleep-disordered breathing, large cohort follow-ups, children's autonomic status, anesthesia, or neurophysiological studies. In this context, we developed HRVanalysis, a software to analyse HRV, used and improved for over 20 years and, thus, designed to meet laboratory requirements. The main strength of HRVanalysis is its wide application scope. In addition to standard analysis over short and long periods of RR intervals, the software allows time-frequency analysis using wavelet transform as well as analysis of autonomic nervous system status on surrounding scored events and on preselected labeled areas. Moreover, the interface is designed for easy study of large cohorts, including batch mode signal processing to avoid running repetitive operations. Results are displayed as figures or saved in TXT files directly employable in statistical softwares. Recordings can arise from RR or EKG files of different types such as cardiofrequencemeters, holters EKG, polygraphs, and data acquisition systems. HRVanalysis can be downloaded freely from the Web page at: https://anslabtools.univ-st-etienne.fr HRVanalysis is meticulously maintained and developed for in-house laboratory use. In this article, after a brief description of the context, we present an overall view of HRV analysis and we describe the methodological approach of the different techniques provided

  6. HRVanalysis: A Free Software for Analyzing Cardiac Autonomic Activity.

    PubMed

    Pichot, Vincent; Roche, Frédéric; Celle, Sébastien; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Chouchou, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering studies of the 1960s, heart rate variability (HRV) has become an increasingly used non-invasive tool for examining cardiac autonomic functions and dysfunctions in various populations and conditions. Many calculation methods have been developed to address these issues, each with their strengths and weaknesses. Although, its interpretation may remain difficult, this technique provides, from a non-invasive approach, reliable physiological information that was previously inaccessible, in many fields including death and health prediction, training and overtraining, cardiac and respiratory rehabilitation, sleep-disordered breathing, large cohort follow-ups, children's autonomic status, anesthesia, or neurophysiological studies. In this context, we developed HRVanalysis, a software to analyse HRV, used and improved for over 20 years and, thus, designed to meet laboratory requirements. The main strength of HRVanalysis is its wide application scope. In addition to standard analysis over short and long periods of RR intervals, the software allows time-frequency analysis using wavelet transform as well as analysis of autonomic nervous system status on surrounding scored events and on preselected labeled areas. Moreover, the interface is designed for easy study of large cohorts, including batch mode signal processing to avoid running repetitive operations. Results are displayed as figures or saved in TXT files directly employable in statistical softwares. Recordings can arise from RR or EKG files of different types such as cardiofrequencemeters, holters EKG, polygraphs, and data acquisition systems. HRVanalysis can be downloaded freely from the Web page at: https://anslabtools.univ-st-etienne.fr HRVanalysis is meticulously maintained and developed for in-house laboratory use. In this article, after a brief description of the context, we present an overall view of HRV analysis and we describe the methodological approach of the different techniques provided

  7. Cardiac autonomic function and oesophageal acid sensitivity in patients with non-cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, G; Spaziani, R; Hollerbach, S; Djuric, V; Pang, C; Upton, A; Fallen, E; Kamath, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acid reflux can elicit non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), possibly through altered visceral sensory or autonomic function. The interactions between symptoms, autonomic function, and acid exposure are poorly understood.
AIM—To examine autonomic function in NCCP patients during exposure to oesophageal acid infusion.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—Autonomic activity was assessed using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (PSHRV), before and during oesophageal acidification (0.1 N HCl), in 28 NCCP patients (40.5 (10) years; 13 females) and in 10 matched healthy controls. Measured PSHRV indices included high frequency (HF) (0.15-0.5 Hz) and low frequency (LF) (0.06-0.15 Hz) power to assess vagal and sympathetic activity, respectively.
RESULTS—A total of 19/28 patients had angina-like symptoms elicited by acid. There were no significant manometric changes observed in either acid sensitive or insensitive patients. Acid sensitive patients had a higher baseline heart rate (82.9 (3.1) v 66.7 (3.5) beats/min; p<0.005) and lower baseline vagal activity (HF normalised area: 31.1 (1.9)% v 38.9 (2.3)%; p< 0.03) than acid insensitive patients. During acid infusion, vagal cardiac outflow increased (p<0.03) in acid sensitive but not in acid insensitive patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Patients with angina-like pain during acid infusion have decreased resting vagal activity. The symptoms elicited by perception of acid are further associated with a simultaneous increase in vagal activity in keeping with a vagally mediated pseudoaffective response.


Keywords: reflux disease; non-cardiac chest pain; acid reflux; autonomic nervous system; vagal response; sympathetic activity; heart rate variability; power spectrum analysis PMID:11600476

  8. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in obese normotensive children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Isabelle Magalhães G.; Miranda, Josiane Aparecida; Mira, Pedro Augusto C.; Lanna, Carla Marcia M.; Lima, Jorge Roberto P.; Laterza, Mateus Camaroti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that obese normotensive children and adolescents present impaired cardiac autonomic control compared to non-obese normotensive ones. METHODS: For this cross-sectional study, 66 children and adolescents were divided into the following groups: Obese (n=31, 12±3 years old) and Non-Obese (n=35, 13±3 years old). Obesity was defined as body mass index greater than the 95th percentile for age and gender. Blood pressure was measured by oscillometric method after 15 minutes of rest in supine position. The heart rate was continuously registered during ten minutes in the supine position with spontaneous breathing. The cardiac autonomic control was assessed by heart rate variability, which was calculated from the five-minute minor variance of the signal. The derivations were the index that indicates the proportion of the number of times in which normal adjacent R-R intervals present differences >50 miliseconds (pNN50), for the time domain, and, for the spectral analysis, low (LF) and high frequency (HF) bands, besides the low and high frequencies ratio (LF/HF). The results were expressed as mean±standard deviation and compared by Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney's U-test. RESULTS: Systolic blood pressure (116±14 versus 114±13mmHg, p=0.693) and diastolic blood pressure (59±8 versus 60±11mmHg, p=0.458) were similar between the Obese and Non-Obese groups. The pNN50 index (29±21 versus 43±23, p=0.015) and HF band (54±20 versus 64±14 normalized units - n.u., p=0.023) were lower in the Obese Group. The LF band (46±20 versus 36±14 n.u., p=0.023) and LF/HF ratio (1.3±1.6 versus 0.7±0.4, p=0.044) were higher in Obese Group. CONCLUSIONS: Obese normotensive children and adolescents present impairment of cardiac autonomic control. PMID:25119757

  9. Impaired regulation of cardiac function in sepsis, SIRS, and MODS.

    PubMed

    Werdan, Karl; Schmidt, Hendrik; Ebelt, Henning; Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Koidl, Bernd; Hoke, Robert Sebastian; Heinroth, Konstantin; Müller-Werdan, Ursula

    2009-04-01

    In sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS), a severe prognostically relevant cardiac autonomic dysfunction exists, as manifested by a strong attenuation of sympathetically and vagally mediated heart rate variability (HRV). The mechanisms underlying this attenuation are not limited to the nervous system. They also include alterations of the cardiac pacemaker cells on a cellular level. As shown in human atrial cardiomyocytes, endotoxin interacts with cardiac hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels, which mediate the pacemaker current If and play an important role in transmitting sympathetic and vagal signals on heart rate and HRV. Moreover, endotoxin sensitizes cardiac HCN channels to sympathetic signals. These findings identify endotoxin as a pertinent modulator of the autonomic nervous regulation of heart function. In MODS, the vagal pathway of the autonomic nervous system is particularly compromised, leading to an attenuation of the cholinergic antiinflammatory reflex. An amelioration of the blunted vagal activity appears to be a promising novel therapeutic target to achieve a suppression of the inflammatory state and thereby an improvement of prognosis in MODS patients. Preliminary data revealed therapeutic benefits (increased survival rates and improvements of the depressed vagal activity) of the administration of statins, beta-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in patients with MODS.

  10. Diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy: insights from animal models.

    PubMed

    Stables, Catherine L; Glasser, Rebecca L; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a relatively common and often devastating complication of diabetes. The major clinical signs are tachycardia, exercise intolerance, and orthostatic hypotension, but the most severe aspects of this complication are high rates of cardiac events and mortality. One of the earliest manifestations of CAN is reduced heart rate variability, and detection of this, along with abnormal results in postural blood pressure testing and/or the Valsalva maneuver, are central to diagnosis of the disease. The treatment options for CAN, beyond glycemic control, are extremely limited and lack evidence of efficacy. The underlying molecular mechanisms are also poorly understood. Thus, CAN is associated with a poor prognosis and there is a compelling need for research to understand, prevent, and reverse CAN. In this review of the literature we examine the use and usefulness of animal models of CAN in diabetes. Compared to other diabetic complications, the number of animal studies of CAN is very low. The published studies range across a variety of species, methods of inducing diabetes, and timescales examined, leading to high variability in study outcomes. The lack of well-characterized animal models makes it difficult to judge the relevance of these models to the human disease. One major advantage of animal studies is the ability to probe underlying molecular mechanisms, and the limited numbers of mechanistic studies conducted to date are outlined. Thus, while animal models of CAN in diabetes are crucial to better understanding and development of therapies, they are currently under-used.

  11. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulos, Gerasimos; Tahrani, Abd A; Stevens, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is an often overlooked and common complication of diabetes mellitus. CAN is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of CAN is complex and involves a cascade of pathways activated by hyperglycaemia resulting in neuronal ischaemia and cellular death. In addition, autoimmune and genetic factors are involved in the development of CAN. CAN might be subclinical for several years until the patient develops resting tachycardia, exercise intolerance, postural hypotension, cardiac dysfunction and diabetic cardiomyopathy. During its sub-clinical phase, heart rate variability that is influenced by the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic tones can help in detecting CAN before the disease is symptomatic. Newer imaging techniques (such as scintigraphy) have allowed earlier detection of CAN in the pre-clinical phase and allowed better assessment of the sympathetic nervous system. One of the main difficulties in CAN research is the lack of a universally accepted definition of CAN; however, the Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy has recently issued guidance for the diagnosis and staging of CAN, and also proposed screening for CAN in patients with diabetes mellitus. A major challenge, however, is the lack of specific treatment to slow the progression or prevent the development of CAN. Lifestyle changes, improved metabolic control might prevent or slow the progression of CAN. Reversal will require combination of these treatments with new targeted therapeutic approaches. The aim of this article is to review the latest evidence regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment for CAN. PMID:24567799

  12. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Gerasimos; Tahrani, Abd A; Stevens, Martin J

    2014-02-15

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is an often overlooked and common complication of diabetes mellitus. CAN is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of CAN is complex and involves a cascade of pathways activated by hyperglycaemia resulting in neuronal ischaemia and cellular death. In addition, autoimmune and genetic factors are involved in the development of CAN. CAN might be subclinical for several years until the patient develops resting tachycardia, exercise intolerance, postural hypotension, cardiac dysfunction and diabetic cardiomyopathy. During its sub-clinical phase, heart rate variability that is influenced by the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic tones can help in detecting CAN before the disease is symptomatic. Newer imaging techniques (such as scintigraphy) have allowed earlier detection of CAN in the pre-clinical phase and allowed better assessment of the sympathetic nervous system. One of the main difficulties in CAN research is the lack of a universally accepted definition of CAN; however, the Toronto Consensus Panel on Diabetic Neuropathy has recently issued guidance for the diagnosis and staging of CAN, and also proposed screening for CAN in patients with diabetes mellitus. A major challenge, however, is the lack of specific treatment to slow the progression or prevent the development of CAN. Lifestyle changes, improved metabolic control might prevent or slow the progression of CAN. Reversal will require combination of these treatments with new targeted therapeutic approaches. The aim of this article is to review the latest evidence regarding the epidemiology, pathogenesis, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment for CAN.

  13. Severely impaired cardiac autonomic nervous activity after the Fontan operation.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, H; Hasegawa, S; Yasuda, K; Yamada, O; Ono, Y; Echigo, S

    2001-09-25

    Elevated neurohumoral activity and an abnormal cardiopulmonary response to exercise are well-established characteristics in patients after the Fontan operation. However, there have been few studies addressing cardiac autonomic nervous activity (CANA) in these patients. We evaluated CANA in 63 post-Fontan patients and 44 controls. Cardiac parasympathetic nervous activity (PSNA) was estimated by heart rate (HR) changes after cholinergic blockade, HR variability, and arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Cardiac sympathetic nervous activity was estimated by the heart to mediastinum [(123)I]metaiodobenzylguanidine activity ratio (H/M) and the HR increase (DeltaHR) after isoproterenol infusion (beta). DeltaHR and peak oxygen uptake (VO(2)) were measured by exercise test. There was no difference in beta between the Fontan group and controls. PSNA and H/M were markedly lower than in controls (P<0.001). PSNA and beta were related to DeltaHR (P<0.05); however, peak VO(2) was not correlated with DeltaHR. Neither PSNA nor H/M was associated with clinical features, including hemodynamics, type of repair, number of surgical procedures, age at Fontan operation, or follow-up period, and administration of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor did not improve the impaired CANA in these patients. After the Fontan procedure, postsynaptic beta-sensitivity is maintained and is important in DeltaHR during exercise as is PSNA, although DeltaHR does not determine exercise capacity. The lack of a relationship between CANA and clinical features implies that, in addition to surgical damage, the Fontan circulation per se may impair CANA. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor administration does not change this abnormality.

  14. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This symposium report summarizes autonomic, cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormalities in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient mice (Sgcd-/-), a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with emphasis on the roles of autonomic dysregulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin system at a young age. What advances does it highlight? The contributions of the autonomic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy are highlighted. Results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts later development of cardiac dysfunction in Sgcd-/- mice and that treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan or with angiotensin-(1-7) abrogates the autonomic dysregulation, attenuates skeletal muscle pathology and increases spontaneous locomotor activity. Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice deficient in the sarcoglycan-δ (Sgcd) gene at a young age and that this early autonomic dysfunction contributes to the later development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and increased mortality. We demonstrated that young Sgcd-/- mice exhibit histopathological features of skeletal muscle dystrophy, decreased locomotor activity and severe autonomic dysregulation, but normal LV function. Autonomic regulation continued to deteriorate in Sgcd-/- mice with age and was accompanied by LV dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy at older ages. Autonomic dysregulation at a young age predicted later development of

  15. Analysis of cardiac autonomic modulation in obese and eutrophic children

    PubMed Central

    Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; Júnior, Ismael Forte Freitas; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity causes alterations in cardiac autonomic function. However, there are scarce and conflicting data on this function with regard to heart rate variability in obese children. OBJECTIVE: To compare the autonomic function of obese and eutrophic children by analyzing heart rate variability. METHODS: One hundred twenty-one children (57 male and 64 female) aged 8 to 12 years were distributed into two groups based on nutritional status [obese (n  =  56) and eutrophic (ideal weight range; n  =  65) according to the body mass index reference for gender and age]. For the analysis of heart rate variability, heart rates were recorded beat by beat as the children rested in the dorsal (prone) position for 20 minutes. Heart rate variability analysis was carried out using linear approaches in the domains of frequency and time. Either Student's t-test or the Mann-Whitney U-test was applied to compare variables between groups. Statistical significance was set at 5%. RESULTS: The SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50, SD1, SD2, LF and HF indices in milliseconds squared were lower among the obese children when compared to the eutrophic group. There were no alterations in the SD1/SD2 ratio, LF/HF ratio, LF index or HF index in normalized units. There was a significant difference between groups in the RR interval (R-to-R EKG interval). CONCLUSION: The obese children exhibited modifications in heart rate variability, characterized by a reduction in both sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. These findings stress the need for the early holistic care of obese children to avoid future complications. PMID:20835556

  16. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; McKinsey, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is defined as excess deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), resulting in tissue scarring and organ dysfunction. In the heart, fibrosis may be reparative, replacing areas of myocyte loss with a structural scar following infarction, or reactive, which is triggered in the absence of cell death and involves interstitial ECM deposition in response to long-lasting stress. Interstitial fibrosis can increase the passive stiffness of the myocardium, resulting in impaired relaxation and diastolic dysfunction. Additionally, fibrosis can lead to disruption of electrical conduction in the heart, causing arrhythmias, and can limit myocyte oxygen availability and thus exacerbate myocardial ischemia. Here, we review recent studies that have illustrated key roles for epigenetic events in the control of pro-fibrotic gene expression, and highlight the potential of small molecules that target epigenetic regulators as a means of treating fibrotic cardiac diseases. PMID:26876451

  17. Cardiac Vagal Regulation and Early Peer Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Keane, Susan P.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 341 5 1/2-year-old children participating in an ongoing longitudinal study was the focus of a study on the relation between cardiac vagal regulation and peer status. To assess cardiac vagal regulation, resting measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change (suppression) to 3 cognitively and emotionally challenging tasks…

  18. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction from Occupational Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Sun; Magari, Shannon; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposures have been associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and cardiovascular events. This study investigated the association between a biological marker of PAHs exposure, assessed by urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), and heart rate variability (HRV) in an occupational cohort of boilermakers. Methods Continuous 24-hour monitoring of the ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) and pre and post shift urinary 1-OHP were repeated over extended periods of the work week. Mixed effects models were fit for the 5-minute standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) in relation to urinary 1-OHP levels pre and post workshift on the day they wore the monitor, controlling for potential confounders. Results We found a significant decrease in 5-min SDNN during work of −13.6% (95% confidence interval, −17.2% to −9.8%) for every standard deviation (0.53 microgram/gram [μg/g] creatinine) increase in the next-morning pre-shift 1-OHP levels. The magnitude of reduction in 5-min SDNN were largest during the late night period after work and increased with every standard deviation (0.46 μg/g creatinine) increase in post-shift 1-OHP levels. Conclusion This is the first report providing evidence that occupational exposure to PAHs is associated with altered cardiac autonomic function. Acute exposure to PAHs may be an important predictor of cardiovascular disease risk in the work environment. PMID:21172795

  19. Diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy: Do we have any treatment perspectives?

    PubMed Central

    Serhiyenko, Victoria A; Serhiyenko, Alexandr A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). Despite its relationship to an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and its association with multiple symptoms and impairments, the significance of CAN has not been fully appreciated. CAN among DM patients is characterized review the latest evidence and own data regarding the treatment and the treatment perspectives for diabetic CAN. Lifestyle modification, intensive glycemic control might prevent development or progression of CAN. Pathogenetic treatment of CAN includes: balanced diet and physical activity; optimization of glycemic control; treatment of dyslipoproteinemia; correction of metabolic abnormalities in myocardium; prevention and treatment of thrombosis; use of aldose reductase inhibitors; dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA), acetyl-L-carnitine, antioxidants, first of all α-lipoic acid (α-LA), use of long-chain ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs), vasodilators, fat-soluble vitamin B1, aminoguanidine; substitutive therapy of growth factors, in severe cases-treatment of orthostatic hypotension. The promising methods include research and use of tools that increase blood flow through the vasa vasorum, including prostacyclin analogues, thromboxane A2 blockers and drugs that contribute into strengthening and/or normalization of Na+, K+-ATPase (phosphodiesterase inhibitor), α-LA, DGLA, ω-3 PUFAs, and the simultaneous prescription of α-LA, ω-3 PUFA and DGLA. PMID:25789106

  20. Autonomous regulation of growth cone filopodia.

    PubMed

    Rehder, V; Cheng, S

    1998-02-05

    The fan-shaped array of filopodia is the first site of contact of a neuronal growth cone with molecules encountered during neuronal pathfinding. Filopodia are highly dynamic structures, and the "action radius" of a growth cone is strongly determined by the length and number of its filopodia. Since interactions of filopodia with instructive cues in the vicinity of the growth cone can have effects on growth cone morphology within minutes, it has to be assumed that a large part of the signaling underlying such morphological changes resides locally within the growth cone proper. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that two important growth cone parameters-namely, the length and number of its filopodia-are regulated autonomously in the growth cone. We previously demonstrated in identified neurons from the snail Helisoma trivolvis that filopodial length and number are regulated by intracellular calcium. Here, we investigated filopodial dynamics and their regulation by the second-messenger calcium in growth cones which were physically isolated from their parent neuron by neurite transection. Our results show that isolated growth cones have longer but fewer filopodia than growth cones attached to their parent cell. These isolated growth cones, however, are fully capable of undergoing calcium-induced cytoskeletal changes, suggesting that the machinery necessary to perform changes in filopodial length and number is fully intrinsic to the growth cone proper.

  1. Autonomic dysfunction, immune regulation, and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2016-02-01

    To review existing evidence regarding interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system functions in multiple sclerosis. We reviewed the literature regarding new insights linking autonomic dysfunction to immune deregulation in multiple sclerosis, with particular focus on the specific influence of sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction on inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. Autonomic dysfunction is common in multiple sclerosis, representing a significant cause of disability. Several connections between pathologic immune pathways and the autonomic nervous system function were found. Autonomic dysfunction may enhance inflammatory and neurodegenerative pathways that are of major importance in multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction can present with highly variable manifestations. Sympathetic and parasympathetic dysfunction displays different patterns in multiple sclerosis, with specific impact on inflammation and neurodegeneration.

  2. Relationship between duration of illness and cardiac autonomic nervous activity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Yoshikatsu; Fujita, Masatoshi; Nin, Kazuko; Noma, Shun'ichi; Teramukai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The mortality rate associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) is high, and death is mainly attributable to cardiac events. A wide range of autonomic nervous system disturbances may be mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular mortality and sudden death of patients with AN. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been proven to be a reliable noninvasive method for quantitative assessment of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of heart rate (HR). The longer the duration of illness of AN patients, the higher the mortality rate. However, there have been few reports on the relationship between the duration of illness and HRV in AN. Hence, the aims of this study were to compare the cardiac autonomic nervous activity (CANA) of female patients with AN and age-matched female controls and to evaluate the relationship between the duration of illness and the CANA of the AN patients. We studied 14 female patients with AN and 22 age-matched healthy women. Beat-to-beat heart rate variability, recorded in a supine position, was investigated using power spectral analysis. Mean heart rate was positively correlated with normalized high-frequency (HF: 0.15 to 0.40 Hz) power and negatively correlated with the low-frequency (LF: 0.04 to 0.15 Hz)/HF power (LF/HF) ratio of the controls. On the other hand, duration of illness was negatively correlated with normalized HF power and positively correlated with the LF/HF ratio of the AN patients. These results suggest that, given that the LF/HF ratio is an estimate of cardiac sympathovagal balance, anorectic patients with a long illness duration display lower vagal tone (parasympathetic withdrawal) and high sympathetic tone.

  3. Cardiac autonomic responses after resistance exercise in treated hypertensive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Trevizani, Gabriela A.; Peçanha, Tiago; Nasario-Junior, Olivassé; Vianna, Jeferson M.; Silva, Lilian P.; Nadal, Jurandir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and to compare heart rate variability (HRV) after resistance exercise (RE) in treated hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Nine hypertensive men [HT: 58.0 ± 7.7 years, systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 133.6 ± 6.5 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 87.3 ± 8.1 mmHg; under antihypertensive treatment] and 11 normotensive men (NT: 57.1 ± 6.0 years, SBP = 127 ± 8.5 mmHg, DBP = 82.7 ± 5.5 mmHg) performed a single session of RE (2 sets of 15–20 repetitions, 50% of 1 RM, 120 s interval between sets/exercise) for the following exercises: leg extension, leg press, leg curl, bench press, seated row, triceps push-down, seated calf flexion, seated arm curl. HRV was assessed at resting and during 10 min of recovery period by calculating time (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domain (LF, HF, LF/HF) indices. Mean values of HRV indices were reduced in the post-exercise period compared to the resting period (HT: lnHF: 4.7 ± 1.4 vs. 2.4 ± 1.2 ms2; NT: lnHF: 4.8 ± 1.5 vs. 2.2 ± 1.1 ms2, p < 0.01). However, there was no group vs. time interaction in this response (p = 0.8). The results indicate that HRV is equally suppressed after RE in normotensive and hypertensive individuals. These findings suggest that a single session of RE does not bring additional cardiac autonomic stress to treated hypertensive subjects. PMID:26441677

  4. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  5. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J.; Brown, T. E.; Beightol, L. A.; Ha, C. Y.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  6. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy and Early Progressive Renal Decline in Patients with Nonmacroalbuminuric Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Orlov, Steven; Cherney, David Z.I.; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lovblom, Leif E.; Ficociello, Linda H.; Smiles, Adam M.; Warram, James H.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Cardiac autonomic neuropathy predicts future adverse renal outcomes in the general population. This study sought to determine its relationship with early progressive renal decline in type 1 diabetes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A subset of participants with normoalbuminuria (n=204) or microalbuminuria (n=166) from the First Joslin Kidney Study underwent assessment for cardiac autonomic neuropathy using heart rate variability during baseline visits performed from January 1991 to April 1992. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was defined as an R-R variation (mean circular resultant) <20. Participants also had baseline and follow-up measurement of eGFR. Early progressive renal decline was evaluated according to two definitions: early GFR loss (slope of eGFR estimated by cystatin C <−3.3%/year) and incident advanced CKD (stage ≥3, defined by eGFR [calculated by Modification of Diet in Renal Disease method] <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2). Association with baseline cardiac autonomic neuropathy was assessed by adjusted logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards. Results Among the 370 participants, 47 (13%) had baseline cardiac autonomic neuropathy, 51 (14%) had early GFR loss, and 68 (18%) had incident advanced CKD over a median 14-year follow-up. Early GFR loss occurred in 15 (32%) of the 47 patients with baseline autonomic neuropathy and in 32 (10%) of the 323 without baseline autonomic neuropathy (P<0.001). Baseline autonomic neuropathy was strongly associated with odds of early GFR loss (adjusted odds ratio, 4.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.65 to 10.12; P=0.002). Incident advanced CKD was observed in 22 (47%) of those with baseline autonomic neuropathy and 46 (14%) of those without baseline autonomic neuropathy (P<0.001). Autonomic neuropathy was independently associated with incident advanced CKD (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.44 to 5.30; P=0.002). Conclusions Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was a strong

  7. Anxiety Level and Cardiac Autonomic Modulations in Coronary Artery Disease and Cardiac Syndrome X Patients.

    PubMed

    Lutfi, Mohamed Faisal

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety and cardiac autonomic modulations (CAM) were thoroughly investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiac syndrome X (CSX) patients worldwide, but not among Sudanese with similar pathology. To compare levels of anxiety and CAM between Sudanese patients with CSX and CAD. Anxiety was evaluated in 51 CAD and 26 CSX patients using Taylor Manifest anxiety score (TMAS) questionnaire while heart rate variability derived indices were used to assess CAM, namely natural logarithm of low frequency (LnLF), high frequency (LnHF) and LF/HF ratio (LnLF/HF). Low anxiety levels were achieved by 6 (23.1%) and 9 (17.6%) patients with CSX and CAD respectively. High anxiety level was achieved by only one (3.8%) patient, who was suffering from CSX. TMAS was significantly higher in CSX (31.27 (21.97)) compared to CAD (21.86 (12.97), P = 0.021). However, abnormally increased anxiety was not associated with higher risk of CSX. LnLF, LnHF and LnLF/HF were comparable in CAD and CSX patients. CSX and CAD patients showed comparable CAM. Although anxiety levels were higher in CSX compared to CAD, TMAS ≥ 35 failed to show significant association with CSX.

  8. Anxiety Level and Cardiac Autonomic Modulations in Coronary Artery Disease and Cardiac Syndrome X Patients

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Anxiety and cardiac autonomic modulations (CAM) were thoroughly investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiac syndrome X (CSX) patients worldwide, but not among Sudanese with similar pathology. Aims To compare levels of anxiety and CAM between Sudanese patients with CSX and CAD. Materials and Methods Anxiety was evaluated in 51 CAD and 26 CSX patients using Taylor Manifest anxiety score (TMAS) questionnaire while heart rate variability derived indices were used to assess CAM, namely natural logarithm of low frequency (LnLF), high frequency (LnHF) and LF/HF ratio (LnLF/HF). Results Low anxiety levels were achieved by 6 (23.1%) and 9 (17.6%) patients with CSX and CAD respectively. High anxiety level was achieved by only one (3.8%) patient, who was suffering from CSX. TMAS was significantly higher in CSX (31.27 (21.97)) compared to CAD (21.86 (12.97), P = 0.021). However, abnormally increased anxiety was not associated with higher risk of CSX. LnLF, LnHF and LnLF/HF were comparable in CAD and CSX patients. Conclusion CSX and CAD patients showed comparable CAM. Although anxiety levels were higher in CSX compared to CAD, TMAS ≥ 35 failed to show significant association with CSX. PMID:28068419

  9. A shorter set reduces the loss of cardiac autonomic and baroreflex control after resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Xián; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Carballeira-Fernández, Eduardo; Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    Set configuration may affect the recovery pattern of cardiac vagal autonomic and reflex modulation after a resistance exercise, since it is closely associated with intensity and volume and determines the metabolic involvement of the session. We tested the hypothesis that longer set configurations have a higher impact on cardiac autonomic control and baroreflex sensitivity compared with shorter set configurations. We studied the effects of three set configurations with the same components of work on the cardiac autonomic control and baroreflex sensitivity. Seventeen subjects performed one control session and three experimental sessions of a leg-press exercise with the same volume (40 repetitions), resting time (720 s) and intensity (10RM load): (a) 5 sets of 8 repetitions with 3 min of rest between sets (8S), (b) 10 sets of 4 repetitions with 80 s of rest between sets (4S) and (c) 40 sets of 1 repetition with 18.5 s of rest between each repetition (1S). Longer set configurations (8S and 4S) induced greater reductions of the vagal cardiac autonomic control and baroreflex sensitivity (p ≤ .001) compared with a shorter set configuration (1S). Also, 1S had non-significant reductions versus the control session (p > .05). These findings suggest that a shorter set configuration can reduce the impact of resistance exercise on the post-exercise cardiac vagal autonomic control and baroreflex sensitivity.

  10. Autonomic Regulation and Auditory Hallucinations in Individuals With Schizophrenia: An Experience Sampling Study.

    PubMed

    Kimhy, David; Wall, Melanie M; Hansen, Marie C; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Choi, C Jean; Delespaul, Philippe; Tarrier, Nicholas; Sloan, Richard P; Malaspina, Dolores

    2017-02-08

    Auditory Hallucinations (AH) cause substantial suffering and dysfunction, yet remain poorly understood and modeled. Previous reports have linked AH to increases in negative emotions, suggesting a role for the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in underlying this link. Employing an Experience Sampling Method (ESM) approach, 40 individuals with schizophrenia completed a 36-hour ambulatory assessment of AH and cardiac autonomic regulation. Participants carried mobile electronic devices that prompted them to report 10 times/d the severity of their momentary AH, along with a Holter monitor that continuously recorded their cardiac autonomic regulation. The clocks of the devices and monitors were synchronized, allowing for high time-resolution temporal linking of the AH and concurrent autonomic data. Power spectral analysis was used to determine the relative vagal (parasympathetic) contribution to autonomic regulation during 5 minutes prior to each experience sample. The participants also completed interview-based measures of AH (SAPS; PSYRATS). The ESM-measured severity of AH was significantly correlated with the overall SAPS-indexed AH severity, along with the PSYRATS-indexed AH frequency, duration, loudness, degree of negative content, and associated distress. A mixed-effect regression model indicated that momentary increases in autonomic arousal, characterized by decreases in vagal input, significantly predicted increases in ESM-measured AH severity. Vagal input averaged over the 36-hour assessment displayed a small but significant inverse correlation with the SAPS-indexed AH. The results provide preliminary support for a link between ANS regulation and AH. The findings also underscore the highly dynamic nature of AH and the need to utilize high time-resolution methodologies to investigate AH. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  12. Cardiac autonomic profile in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, M; Yazisiz, V; Basarici, I; Avci, A B; Erbasan, F; Belgi, A; Terzioglu, E

    2010-03-01

    Neurological involvement is a well-documented issue in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, little is known about the involvement of the autonomic nervous system. This study was conducted to investigate autonomic nervous system dysfunction in patients with RA and SLE. Twenty-six RA patients, 38 SLE patients and 40 healthy controls were recruited from our in- and out-patient departments. Heart rate variability (HRV) parameters (the power of the high- [HF] and low-frequency [LF] band of haemodynamic time series, the ratio between low- and high-frequency components [LF/HF ratio], the power spectral density), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and beat-to-beat blood pressures were assessed by a novel non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring tool (Task Force Monitor [TFM], CNSystems Medizintechnik GmbH, Graz, Austria). Autonomic nervous system dysfunction was determined according to classical Ewing autonomic test battery. Furthermore, we implemented a secondary autonomic test score by modifying the Ewing test battery with additional criteria. Both the classical and modified Ewing test batteries have revealed that the frequencies of autonomic neuropathy were significantly higher in patient groups compared with controls (p < 0.001). Evaluation by TFM revealed that deterioration of sophisticated autonomic parameters (such as HRV and BRS) were more pronounced in the patient groups compared with controls. There was a significant association between BRS and Ewing test scores and abnormal BRS results were more frequent in patients with autonomic dysfunction according to Ewing test batteries. No relation was found between autonomic neuropathy and disease duration, disease activity and autoantibody positivity. Consequently, we believe that further large-scale studies investigating cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in rheumatic diseases should be carried out to verify our findings and manifest clinical consequences beyond these results.

  13. Human autonomic rhythms: vagal cardiac mechanisms in tetraplegic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, J; Brown, T E; Beightol, L A; Ha, C Y; Eckberg, D L

    1994-01-01

    1. We studied eight young men (age range: 20-37 years) with chronic, clinically complete high cervical spinal cord injuries and ten age-matched healthy men to determine how interruption of connections between the central nervous system and spinal sympathetic motoneurones affects autonomic cardiovascular control. 2. Baseline diastolic pressures and R-R intervals (heart periods) were similar in the two groups. Slopes of R-R interval responses to brief neck pressure changes were significantly lower in tetraplegic than in healthy subjects, but slopes of R-R interval responses to steady-state arterial pressure reductions and increases were comparable. Plasma noradrenaline levels did not change significantly during steady-state arterial pressure reductions in tetraplegic patients, but rose sharply in healthy subjects. The range of arterial pressure and R-R interval responses to vasoactive drugs (nitroprusside and phenylephrine) was significantly greater in tetraplegic than healthy subjects. 3. Resting R-R interval spectral power at respiratory and low frequencies was similar in the two groups. During infusions of vasoactive drugs, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power was directly proportional to arterial pressure in tetraplegic patients, but was unrelated to arterial pressure in healthy subjects. Vagolytic doses of atropine nearly abolished both low- and respiratory-frequency R-R interval spectral power in both groups. 4. Our conclusions are as follows. First, since tetraplegic patients have significant levels of low-frequency arterial pressure and R-R interval spectral power, human Mayer arterial pressure waves may result from mechanisms that do not involve stimulation of spinal sympathetic motoneurones by brainstem neurones. Second, since in tetraplegic patients, low-frequency R-R interval spectral power is proportional to arterial pressure, it is likely to be mediated by a baroreflex mechanism. Third, since low-frequency R-R interval rhythms were nearly abolished

  14. Effects of mental stress on autonomic cardiac modulation during weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Aubert, André E; Verheyden, Bart; d'Ydewalle, Constantin; Beckers, Frank; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2010-01-01

    Sustained weightlessness affects all body functions, among these also cardiac autonomic control mechanisms. How this may influence neural response to central stimulation by a mental arithmetic task remains an open question. The hypothesis was tested that microgravity alters cardiovascular neural response to standardized cognitive load stimuli. Beat-to-beat heart rate, brachial blood pressure, and respiratory frequency were collected in five astronauts, taking part in three different short-duration (10 to 11 days) space missions to the International Space Station. Data recording was performed in supine position 1 mo before launch; at days 5 or 8 in space; and on days 1, 4, and 25 after landing. Heart rate variability (HRV) parameters were obtained in the frequency domain. Measurements were performed in the control condition for 10 min and during a 5-min mental arithmetic stress task, consisting of deducting 17 from a four-digit number, read by a colleague, and orally announcing the result. Our results show that over all sessions (pre-, in-, and postflight), mental stress induced an average increase in mean heart rate (Delta7 +/- 1 beats/min; P = 0.03) and mean arterial pressure (Delta7 +/- 1 mmHg; P = 0.006). A sympathetic excitation during mental stress was shown from HRV parameters: increase of low frequency expressed in normalized units (Delta8.3 +/- 1.4; P = 0.004) and low frequency/high frequency (Delta1.6 +/- 0.3; P = 0.001) and decrease of high frequency expressed in normalized units (Delta8.9 +/- 1.4; P = 0.004). The total power was not influenced by mental stress. No effect of spaceflight was found on baseline heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and HRV parameters. No differences in response to mental stress were found between pre-, in-, and postflight. Our findings confirm that a mental arithmetic task in astronauts elicits sympathovagal shifts toward enhanced sympathetic modulation and reduced vagal modulation. However, these responses are not changed in

  15. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    PubMed Central

    Jyotsna, Viveka P.; Ambekar, Smita; Singla, Rajiv; Joshi, Ansumali; Dhawan, Anju; Kumar, Neeta; Deepak, K. K.; Sreenivas, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam) had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04). The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75). Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06). In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99). Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone. PMID:23869306

  16. Complex and interacting influences of the autonomic nervous system on cardiac electrophysiology in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Heidi L; Rivers, Joshua P; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2016-12-01

    Mice may now be the preferred animal model for biomedical research due to its anatomical, physiological, and genetic similarity to humans. However, little is known about accentuated antagonism of chronotropic and dromotropic properties in conscious mice. Accordingly, we describe the complex and interacting influence of the autonomic nervous system on cardiac electrophysiology in conscious mice. Specifically, we report the effects of single and combined cardiac autonomic blockade on measurements of pulse interval (heart rate), atrio-ventricular interval, sinus node recovery time (SNRT), SNRT corrected for spontaneous sinus cycle, and Wenckebach cycle length in conscious mice free of the confounding influences of anesthetics and surgical trauma. Autonomic influences were quantified as the change in parameter induced by its selective blocker (Sympathetic or Parasympathetic Effect) or as the difference between the intrinsic value and the value after a selective blocker (Sympathetic or Parasympathetic Tonus). Sympatho-Vagal Balance (SVB) was assessed as the ratio of control interval to intrinsic interval. SVB suggests slight parasympathetic dominance in the control of cardiac electrophysiology intervals. Furthermore, results documents a complex interaction between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system in the control of cardiac electrophysiology parameters. Specifically, the parasympathetic effect was greater than the parasympathetic tonus in the control of cardiac electrophysiology parameters. In contrast, the sympathetic effect was smaller than the sympathetic tonus in the control of cardiac electrophysiology parameters. Results have important implications because actions of pharmacological agents that alter the autonomic control of cardiac electrophysiology are transformed by these interacting mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-05-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS.The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G).Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0-0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters.AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients.

  18. An essential cell-autonomous role for hepcidin in cardiac iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Chung, Yu Jin; Christian, Helen C; Heather, Lisa C; Brescia, Marcella; Ball, Vicky; Diaz, Rebeca; Santos, Ana; Biggs, Daniel; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Derived primarily from the liver, it inhibits the iron exporter ferroportin in the gut and spleen, the sites of iron absorption and recycling respectively. Recently, we demonstrated that ferroportin is also found in cardiomyocytes, and that its cardiac-specific deletion leads to fatal cardiac iron overload. Hepcidin is also expressed in cardiomyocytes, where its function remains unknown. To define the function of cardiomyocyte hepcidin, we generated mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of hepcidin, or knock-in of hepcidin-resistant ferroportin. We find that while both models maintain normal systemic iron homeostasis, they nonetheless develop fatal contractile and metabolic dysfunction as a consequence of cardiomyocyte iron deficiency. These findings are the first demonstration of a cell-autonomous role for hepcidin in iron homeostasis. They raise the possibility that such function may also be important in other tissues that express both hepcidin and ferroportin, such as the kidney and the brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19804.001 PMID:27897970

  19. Biochemical regulators in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kölbel, F; Schreiber, V

    1983-01-01

    In recent years research has shown that muscle is capable of reacting to mechanical stimuli by altering biochemical processes. Myocardium is probably the source of a biochemical factor, or factors which activate myocardial protein synthesis. In experimentally induced cardiac hypertrophy adaptive alterations have been shown to occur not only in the adrenal medulla but also in the adrenal cortex. Finally, detection of cross reactivity between digitalis glycosides and a number of steroid hormones has succeeded. We assume that such cross reactivity indicates the existence of an endogenic factor of steroid character, which is produced in the adrenal gland and functions as an endogenic cardiotonic agent. During experimental cardiac hypertrophy its synthesis is possibly increased. We propose the term "endocardin" or "endocardiotonin" for this agent.

  20. Redox regulation of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sag, Can M; Santos, Celio X C; Shah, Ajay M

    2014-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that redox-dependent modifications in cellular proteins and signaling pathways (or redox signaling) play important roles in many aspects of cardiac hypertrophy. Indeed, these redox modifications may be intricately linked with the process of hypertrophy wherein there is not only a significant increase in myocardial O2 consumption but also important alterations in metabolic processes and in the local generation of O2-derived reactive species (ROS) that modulate and/or amplify cell signaling pathways. This article reviews our current knowledge of redox signaling pathways and their roles in cardiac hypertrophy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System". Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Exercise training and cardiac autonomic function in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bhati, Pooja; Shenoy, Shweta; Hussain, M Ejaz

    2017-09-06

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a common complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It has been found to independently predict all cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. It remains unclear whether exercise training could improve autonomic control in T2DM patients. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the effects of exercise training on cardiac autonomic function in T2DM patients. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PEDro, Scopus and Web of science) were systematically searched to retrieve relevant evidence. Clinical trials administering exercise training for at least 4 weeks and examining either heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), heart rate recovery (HRR) as outcome measures were eligible. Eighteen articles were found to be relevant and were then assessed for characteristics and quality. Fifteen studies out of 18 found that exercise training leads to positive improvements in autonomic function of T2DM patients. Exercise participation enhances cardiac autonomic function of type 2 diabetics and therefore should be implemented in their management programs. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. DAILY VARIATION OF PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION AND POOR CARDIAC AUTONOMIC CONTROL IN THE ELDERLY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter air pollution (PM) has been related to cardiovascular disease mortality in a number of recent studies. The pathophysiologic mechanisms for this association are under study. Low heart rate variability, a marker of poor cardiac autonomic control, is associated wi...

  3. Teaching Cardiac Autonomic Function Dynamics Employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) Maneuver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated,…

  4. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  5. An epigenome-wide association analysis of cardiac autonomic responses among a population of welders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinming; Liu, Zhonghua; Umukoro, Peter E.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Fang, Shona C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Lin, Xihong; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA methylation is one of the potential epigenetic mechanisms associated with various adverse cardiovascular effects; however, its association with cardiac autonomic dysfunction, in particular, is unknown. In the current study, we aimed to identify epigenetic variants associated with alterations in cardiac autonomic responses. Cardiac autonomic responses were measured with two novel markers: acceleration capacity (AC) and deceleration capacity (DC). We examined DNA methylation levels at more than 472,506 CpG probes through the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assay. We conducted separate linear mixed models to examine associations of DNA methylation levels at each CpG with AC and DC. One CpG (cg26829071) located in the GPR133 gene was negatively associated with DC values after multiple testing corrections through false discovery rate. Our study suggests the potential functional importance of methylation in cardiac autonomic responses. Findings from the current study need to be replicated in future studies in a larger population. PMID:28075199

  6. Teaching Cardiac Autonomic Function Dynamics Employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) Maneuver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated,…

  7. DAILY VARIATION OF PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTION AND POOR CARDIAC AUTONOMIC CONTROL IN THE ELDERLY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter air pollution (PM) has been related to cardiovascular disease mortality in a number of recent studies. The pathophysiologic mechanisms for this association are under study. Low heart rate variability, a marker of poor cardiac autonomic control, is associated wi...

  8. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  9. Modulation of Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Ischemic Stroke following Ayurveda (Indian System of Medicine) Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jaideep, Sriranjini Sitaram; Nagaraja, Dindagur; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Sudhakara, D.; Talakad, Sathyaprabha N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in stroke has implications on morbidity and mortality. Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine) describes stroke as pakshaghata. We intended to study the effect of Ayurveda therapies on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Methods. Fifty patients of ischemic stroke (middle cerebral artery territory) (mean age 39.26 ± 9.88 years; male 43, female 7) were recruited within one month of ictus. All patients received standard allopathic medications as advised by neurologist. In addition, patients were randomized to receive physiotherapy (Group I) or Ayurveda treatment (Group II) for 14 days. Continuous electrocardiogram and finger arterial pressure were recorded for 15 min before and after treatments and analyzed offline to obtain heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Results were analysed by RMANOVA. Results. Patients in Group II showed statistically significant improvement in cardiac autonomic parameters. The standard deviation of normal to normal intervals,and total and low frequency powers were significantly enhanced (F = 8.16, P = 0.007, F = 9.73, P = 0.004, F = 13.51, and P = 0.001, resp.). The BRS too increased following the treatment period (F = 10.129, P = 0.004). Conclusions. The current study is the first to report a positive modulation of cardiac autonomic activity after adjuvant Ayurveda treatment in ischemic stroke. Further long term studies are warranted. PMID:24971149

  10. p53 regulates the cardiac transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tak W.; Hauck, Ludger; Grothe, Daniela; Billia, Filio

    2017-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Trp53 (p53) inhibits cell growth after acute stress by regulating gene transcription. The mammalian genome contains hundreds of p53-binding sites. However, whether p53 participates in the regulation of cardiac tissue homeostasis under normal conditions is not known. To examine the physiologic role of p53 in adult cardiomyocytes in vivo, Cre-loxP–mediated conditional gene targeting in adult mice was used. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses of conditional heart-specific p53 knockout mice were performed. Genome-wide annotation and pathway analyses of >5,000 differentially expressed transcripts identified many p53-regulated gene clusters. Correlative analyses identified >20 gene sets containing more than 1,000 genes relevant to cardiac architecture and function. These transcriptomic changes orchestrate cardiac architecture, excitation-contraction coupling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and oxidative phosphorylation capacity. Interestingly, the gene expression signature in p53-deficient hearts confers resistance to acute biomechanical stress. The data presented here demonstrate a role for p53, a previously unrecognized master regulator of the cardiac transcriptome. The complex contributions of p53 define a biological paradigm for the p53 regulator network in the heart under physiological conditions. PMID:28193895

  11. Slow breathing influences cardiac autonomic responses to postural maneuver: Slow breathing and HRV.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, Giovanna Ana de Paula; Tavares, Bruna S; Garner, David M; Porto, Andrey A; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2016-05-01

    Chronic slow breathing has been reported to improve Heart Rate Variability (HRV) in patients with cardiovascular disorders. However, it is not clear regarding its acute effects on HRV responses on autonomic analysis. We evaluated the acute effects of slow breathing on cardiac autonomic responses to postural change manoeuvre (PCM). The study was conducted on 21 healthy male students aged between 18 and 35 years old. In the control protocol, the volunteer remained at rest seated for 15 min under spontaneous breathing and quickly stood up within 3 s and remained standing for 15 min. In the slow breathing protocol, the volunteer remained at rest seated for 10 min under spontaneous breath, then performed slow breathing for 5 min and rapidly stood up within 3 s and remained standing for 15 min. Slow breathing intensified cardiac autonomic responses to postural maneuver.

  12. Music Improves Subjective Feelings Leading to Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Modulation: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kume, Satoshi; Nishimura, Yukako; Mizuno, Kei; Sakimoto, Nae; Hori, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Mitsuhashi, Rika; Akiba, Keigo; Koizumi, Jun-Ichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that listening to music improves subjective feelings and reduces fatigue sensations, and different kinds of music lead to different activations of these feelings. Recently, cardiac autonomic nervous modulation has been proposed as a useful objective indicator of fatigue. However, scientific considerations of the relation between feelings of fatigue and cardiac autonomic nervous modulation while listening to music are still lacking. In this study, we examined which subjective feelings of fatigue are related to participants' cardiac autonomic nervous function while they listen to music. We used an album of comfortable and relaxing environmental music, with blended sounds from a piano and violin as well as natural sound sources. We performed a crossover trial of environmental music and silent sessions for 20 healthy subjects, 12 females, and 8 males, after their daily work shift. We measured changes in eight types of subjective feelings, including healing, fatigue, sleepiness, relaxation, and refreshment, using the KOKORO scale, a subjective mood measurement system for self-reported feelings. Further, we obtained measures of cardiac autonomic nervous function on the basis of heart rate variability before and after the sessions. During the music session, subjective feelings significantly shifted toward healing and a secure/relaxed feeling and these changes were greater than those in the silent session. Heart rates (ΔHR) in the music session significantly decreased compared with those in the silent session. Other cardiac autonomic parameters such as high-frequency (HF) component and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF) were similar in the two sessions. In the linear regression analysis of the feelings with ΔHR and changes in LF/HF (ΔLF/HF), increases and decreases in ΔHR were correlated to the feeling axes of Fatigue-Healing and Anxiety/Tension-Security/Relaxation, whereas those in ΔLF/HF were related to the feeling axes

  13. Music Improves Subjective Feelings Leading to Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Modulation: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Satoshi; Nishimura, Yukako; Mizuno, Kei; Sakimoto, Nae; Hori, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Mitsuhashi, Rika; Akiba, Keigo; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that listening to music improves subjective feelings and reduces fatigue sensations, and different kinds of music lead to different activations of these feelings. Recently, cardiac autonomic nervous modulation has been proposed as a useful objective indicator of fatigue. However, scientific considerations of the relation between feelings of fatigue and cardiac autonomic nervous modulation while listening to music are still lacking. In this study, we examined which subjective feelings of fatigue are related to participants' cardiac autonomic nervous function while they listen to music. We used an album of comfortable and relaxing environmental music, with blended sounds from a piano and violin as well as natural sound sources. We performed a crossover trial of environmental music and silent sessions for 20 healthy subjects, 12 females, and 8 males, after their daily work shift. We measured changes in eight types of subjective feelings, including healing, fatigue, sleepiness, relaxation, and refreshment, using the KOKORO scale, a subjective mood measurement system for self-reported feelings. Further, we obtained measures of cardiac autonomic nervous function on the basis of heart rate variability before and after the sessions. During the music session, subjective feelings significantly shifted toward healing and a secure/relaxed feeling and these changes were greater than those in the silent session. Heart rates (ΔHR) in the music session significantly decreased compared with those in the silent session. Other cardiac autonomic parameters such as high-frequency (HF) component and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF) were similar in the two sessions. In the linear regression analysis of the feelings with ΔHR and changes in LF/HF (ΔLF/HF), increases and decreases in ΔHR were correlated to the feeling axes of Fatigue-Healing and Anxiety/Tension–Security/Relaxation, whereas those in ΔLF/HF were related to the feeling axes

  14. Tissue-Level Cardiac Electrophysiology Studied in Murine Myocardium Using a Microelectrode Array: Autonomic and Thermal Modulation.

    PubMed

    Lane, Jem D; Montaigne, David; Tinker, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology is regulated by the autonomic nervous system, and this has both pathophysiological, and possibly therapeutic importance. Furthermore, chamber differences in electrophysiology exist between atria and ventricles, yet there have been few direct comparisons. There is substantial literature on ion channel modulation at the single-cell level but less work on how this affects tissue-level parameters. We used a microelectrode array system to explore these issues using murine atrial and ventricular tissue slices. Activation time, conduction velocity and repolarisation were measured, and their modulation by temperature and pharmacological autonomic agonists were assessed. The system recorded reliable measurements under control conditions in the absence of drug/thermal challenge, and significant baseline differences were found in chamber electrophysiology. The sodium channel blocker mexiletine, produced large magnitude changes in all three measured parameters. Carbachol and isoprenaline induced differing effects in atria and ventricles, whereas temperature produced similar effects on activation and repolarisation.

  15. [Cardiac autonomic responses to head-up tilt in obese adolescents].

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Antônio Fernando; Roseguini, Bruno Tesini; Silva, Bruno Moreira; Hirai, Daniel Müller; Guedes, Dartagnan Pinto

    2005-01-01

    Obesity is associated with alterations of the autonomic nervous system. Previous studies in adults have shown that obese individuals present a decreased cardiac autonomic response to postural challenges. However, little is known about the impact of overweight on autonomic responses to passive postural stress in adolescents. to compare cardiac autonomic responses to the head-up tilt maneuver between obese and non-obese adolescents by analyzing heart rate variability. Fourteen obese adolescents (15.5+/-1.6 years) were compared with twenty non-obese subjects (15.4+/-0.8 years). Cardiac autonomic modulation was studied by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of 5 minute RR interval recordings before and after a 70 masculine head-up tilt maneuver. HRV was analyzed according to the time domain (TD) and frequency-domain (FD) methods. The power spectral components were studied at low (LF) and high (HF) frequencies and as the LF/HF ratio. Obese adolescents demonstrated significantly lower HF normalized units (38.2+/-11.1 vs 53.9+/-15.5, p<0.05) and higher LF normalized units (60.7+/-11.3 vs 44.6+/-15.7, p<0.05) in the supine position. No difference was found in any HRV parameters after head-up tilt. When comparing differences between the orthostatic and supine positions, obese adolescents showed lesser changes of LF normalized units (22.4+/-12.6 vs 38+/-16.4, p<0.05) and HF normalized units (-21.9+/-12.4 vs -37.3+/-16.3, p<0.05). Obese adolescents have an abnormal cardiac autonomic response to the head-up tilt maneuver, characterized principally by a decreased parasympathetic response.

  16. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Presents Higher Sympathetic Cardiac Autonomic Modulation that is not altered by Strength Training

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, VICTOR B.; KOGURE, GISLAINE S.; REIS, ROSANA M.; GASTALDI, ADA C.; DE ARAÚJO, JOÃO E.; MAZON, JOSÉ H.; BORGHI, AUDREY; SOUZA, HUGO C.D.

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may present important comorbidities, such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, which are often preceded by changes in cardiac autonomic modulation. Different types of physical exercises are frequently indicated for the prevention and treatment of PCOS. However, little is known about the effects of strength training on the metabolic, hormonal, and cardiac autonomic parameters. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of strength training on the autonomic modulation of heart rate variability (HRV) and its relation to endocrine-metabolic parameters in women with PCOS. Fifty-three women were divided into two groups: CONTROL (n=26) and PCOS (n=27). The strength training lasted 4 months, which was divided into mesocycles of 4 weeks each. The training load started with 70% of one repetition maximum (1RM). Blood samples were collected before and after intervention for analysis of fasting insulin and glucose, HOMA-IR, testosterone, androstenedione and testosterone/androstenedione (T/A) ratio. Spectral analysis of HRV was performed to assess cardiac autonomic modulation indexes. The PCOS group presented higher insulin and testosterone levels, T/A ratio, along with increased sympathetic cardiac autonomic modulation before intervention. The training protocol used did not cause any change of endocrine-metabolic parameters in the CONTROL group. Interestingly, in the PCOS group, reduced testosterone levels and T/A ratio. Additionally, strength training did not have an effect on the spectral parameter values of HRV obtained in both groups. Strength training was not able to alter HRV autonomic modulation in women with PCOS, however may reduce testosterone levels and T/A ratio. PMID:27990221

  17. Interval and continuous aerobic exercise training similarly increase cardiac function and autonomic modulation in infarcted mice.

    PubMed

    Abad, Cesar Cavinato Cal; do Nascimento, Ademir Manuel; Dos Santos, Leandro Eziquiel; Figueroa, Diego; Ramona, Pamella; Sartori, Michele; Scapini, Katia B; Albuquerque, Oscar; Moraes-Silva, Ivana Cinthya; Coelho-Júnior, Hélio José; Rodrigues, Bruno; Mostarda, Cristiano Teixeira; De Angelis, Kátia; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effects of moderate-intensity continuous and high-intensity interval exercise training (ET) on exercise tolerance, cardiac morphometry and function, hemodynamic, and cardiac autonomic modulation in myocardial infarcted mice. Wild-type mice (WT) were divided into four groups: sedentary WT (S); WT myocardium infarction sedentary (IS); WT myocardium infarction underwent to moderate-intensity continuous ET (MICT), and WT myocardium infarction underwent to high-intensity interval ET (MIIT). After 60 days of descending coronary artery ligation, moderate-intensity continuous ET consisted of running at 60% of maximum, while the high-intensity interval training consisted of eight sprints of 4 min at 80% of maximum and a 4-min recovery at 40% of maximum. Both exercises were performed 1 hr a day, 5 days a week, during 8 weeks. Results demonstrated that IS showed elevated exercise tolerance, as well as decreased hemodynamic and heart function, and autonomic control. On the other hand, both programs of ET were equally effective to increase all parameters, without further differences between the groups. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed that myocardial infarction leads to damage in both investigated strains and the two types of physical exercise attenuated the major impairments provoked by myocardial infarction in exercise tolerance, cardiac structure, cardiac function, hemodynamic and cardiac autonomic modulation.

  18. Gender differences in cardiac patients: a longitudinal investigation of exercise, autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression.

    PubMed

    Hunt-Shanks, Tiffany; Blanchard, Christopher; Reid, Robert D

    2009-05-01

    Female cardiac patients frequently experience greater anxiety and depression and engage in less exercise when compared with their male counterparts. This study considered whether exercise had similar effects on male and female cardiac patients' autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression, and whether exercise behavior explained the gender difference in their affective functioning (e.g. autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression). Eight hundred one participants completed the Hospital and Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) and the leisure score index (LSI) of the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire at baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months. Female cardiac patients had greater autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression and reduced exercise when compared with male cardiac patients at all time points. Although exercise was significantly related to affective outcomes at various time points for both men and women, gender did not moderate any of the exercise/affective relationships, and exercise did not mediate any of the gender/affective relationships. Further research is needed to clarify the complex relationships between gender, exercise, and the affective functioning of cardiac patients.

  19. Can a Canine Companion Modify Cardiac Autonomic Reactivity and Tone in PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    Germplasm; cell lines, DNA probes, animal models); • clinical interventions; • new business creation; and • other. 7. PARTICIPANTS... animal -assisted therapy, autonomic regulation, autonomic reactivity, mood, sociality, social cognition, sleep, ambulatory monitoring, defense...on sleep are well underway. It is still premature to attribute any changes in the practice of providing service animals to Veterans or in the

  20. Effects of water temperature on cardiac autonomic nervous system modulation during foot immersion (foot bath)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, M.; Ono, K.; Onodera, S.

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to make clear the effects of water temperature during foot immersion (foot bath) on heart rate, blood pressure, rectal temperature and autonomic nervous system modulation. The subjects performed foot immersion at 25, 35, 41 and 45 degrees Celsius at random, during different days, but always at the same time. Cardiac autonomic nervous system modulation was estimated with the power spectrum analysis of heart rate variability by using the Fast Fourier Transformation. The two frequency components of HRV was measured by integrate low frequency (LF; 0.04- 0.15 Hz) and high frequency (HF; 0.15- 0.40 Hz). HF was used as an indicator of cardiac vagal modulation and was showed logarithmically (LogHF). LogHF during foot immersion at 35 and 41 degrees Celsius was significantly increased. These data indicate that cardiac vagal activity was affected by water temperature during foot immersion (foot bath).

  1. Autonomic regulation in fetuses with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Saira; Wilpers, Abigail; Myers, Michael; Nugent, J. David; Fifer, William P.; Williams, Ismée A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to antenatal stressors affects autonomic regulation in fetuses. Whether the presence of congenital heart disease (CHD) alters the developmental trajectory of autonomic regulation is not known. Aims/Study Design This prospective observational cohort study aimed to further characterize autonomic regulation in fetuses with CHD; specifically hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Subjects From 11/2010 – 11/2012, 92 fetuses were enrolled: 41 controls and 51 with CHD consisting of 19 with HLHS, 12 with TGA, and 20 with TOF. Maternal abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were obtained at 3 gestational ages: 19-27 weeks (F1), 28-33 weeks (F2), and 34-38 weeks (F3). Outcome measures Fetal ECG was analyzed for mean heart rate along with 3 measures of autonomic variability of the fetal heart rate: interquartile range, standard deviation, and root mean square of the standard deviation of the heart rate (RMSSD), a measure of parasympathetic activity. Results During F1 and F2 periods, HLHS fetuses demonstrated significantly lower mean HR than controls (p<0.05). Heart rate variability at F3, as measured by standard deviation, interquartile range, and RMSSD was lower in HLHS than controls (p<0.05). Other CHD subgroups showed a similar, though non-significant trend towards lower variability. Conclusions Autonomic regulation in CHD fetuses differs from controls with HLHS fetuses most markedly affected. PMID:25662702

  2. Autonomic regulation in fetuses with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Saira; Wilpers, Abigail; Myers, Michael; Nugent, J David; Fifer, William P; Williams, Ismée A

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to antenatal stressors affects autonomic regulation in fetuses. Whether the presence of congenital heart disease (CHD) alters the developmental trajectory of autonomic regulation is not known. This prospective observational cohort study aimed to further characterize autonomic regulation in fetuses with CHD; specifically hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), transposition of the great arteries (TGA), and tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). From 11/2010 to 11/2012, 92 fetuses were enrolled: 41 controls and 51 with CHD consisting of 19 with HLHS, 12 with TGA, and 20 with TOF. Maternal abdominal fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were obtained at 3 gestational ages: 19-27 weeks (F1), 28-33 weeks (F2), and 34-38 weeks (F3). Fetal ECG was analyzed for mean heart rate along with 3 measures of autonomic variability of the fetal heart rate: interquartile range, standard deviation, and root mean square of the standard deviation of the heart rate (RMSSD), a measure of parasympathetic activity. During F1 and F2 periods, HLHS fetuses demonstrated significantly lower mean HR than controls (p<0.05). Heart rate variability at F3, as measured by standard deviation, interquartile range, and RMSSD was lower in HLHS than controls (p<0.05). Other CHD subgroups showed a similar, though non-significant trend towards lower variability. Autonomic regulation in CHD fetuses differs from controls, with HLHS fetuses most markedly affected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Is Baseline Cardiac Autonomic Modulation Related to Performance and Physiological Responses Following a Supramaximal Judo Test?

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Lafarga, Cristina; Martínez-Navarro, Ignacio; Mateo-March, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Little research exists concerning Heart Rate (HR) Variability (HRV) following supramaximal efforts focused on upper-body explosive strength-endurance. Since they may be very demanding, it seems of interest to analyse the relationship among performance, lactate and HR dynamics (i.e. HR, HRV and complexity) following them; as well as to know how baseline cardiac autonomic modulation mediates these relationships. The present study aimed to analyse associations between baseline and post-exercise HR dynamics following a supramaximal Judo test, and their relationship with lactate, in a sample of 22 highly-trained male judoists (20.70±4.56 years). A large association between the increase in HR from resting to exercise condition and performance suggests that individuals exerted a greater sympathetic response to achieve a better performance (Rating of Perceived Exertion: 20; post-exercise peak lactate: 11.57±2.24 mmol/L; 95.76±4.13 % of age-predicted HRmax). Athletes with higher vagal modulation and lower sympathetic modulation at rest achieved both a significant larger ∆HR and a faster post-exercise lactate removal. A enhanced resting parasympathetic modulation might be therefore related to a further usage of autonomic resources and a better immediate metabolic recovery during supramaximal exertions. Furthermore, analyses of variance displayed a persistent increase in α1 and a decrease in lnRMSSD along the 15 min of recovery, which are indicative of a diminished vagal modulation together with a sympathovagal balance leaning to sympathetic domination. Eventually, time-domain indices (lnRMSSD) showed no lactate correlations, while nonlinear indices (α1 and lnSaEn) appeared to be moderate to strongly correlated with it, thus pointing to shared mechanisms between neuroautonomic and metabolic regulation. PMID:24205273

  4. Measuring Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) Activity in Toddlers - Resting and Developmental Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Nicole R.; Caron, Zoe K.; Blackburn, Katherine S.; Alkon, Abbey

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) consists of two branches, the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, and controls the function of internal organs (e.g., heart rate, respiration, digestion) and responds to everyday and adverse experiences 1. ANS measures in children have been found to be related to behavior problems, emotion regulation, and health 2-7. Therefore, understanding the factors that affect ANS development during early childhood is important. Both branches of the ANS affect young children's cardiovascular responses to stimuli and have been measured noninvasively, via external monitoring equipment, using valid and reliable measures of physiological change 8-11. However, there are few studies of very young children with simultaneous measures of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, which limits understanding of the integrated functioning of the two systems. In addition, the majority of existing studies of young children report on infants' resting ANS measures or their reactivity to commonly used mother-child interaction paradigms, and less is known about ANS reactivity to other challenging conditions. We present a study design and standardized protocol for a non-invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in 18 month old children. We describe methods for continuous monitoring of the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the ANS under resting and challenge conditions during a home or laboratory visit and provide descriptive findings from our sample of 140 ethnically diverse toddlers using validated equipment and scoring software. Results revealed that this protocol can produce a range of physiological responses to both resting and developmentally challenging conditions, as indicated by changes in heart rate and indices of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. Individuals demonstrated variability in resting levels, responses to challenges, and challenge reactivity, which provides additional evidence that

  5. Effect of the duration of daily aerobic physical training on cardiac autonomic adaptations.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Janaina E; Pereira, Marília G A G; Dias da Silva, Valdo J; Dambrós, Camila; Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Souza, Hugo C D

    2011-01-20

    The present study has investigated in conscious rats the influence of the duration of physical training sessions on cardiac autonomic adaptations by using different approaches; 1) double blockade with methylatropine and propranolol; 2) the baroreflex sensitivity evaluated by alternating bolus injections of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside; and 3) the autonomic modulation of HRV in the frequency domain by means of spectral analysis. The animals were divided into four groups: one sedentary group and three training groups submitted to physical exercise (swimming) for 15, 30, and 60min a day during 10 weeks. All training groups showed similar reduction in intrinsic heart rate (IHR) after double blockade with methylatropine and propranolol. However, only 30-min and 60-min physical training presented an increase in the vagal autonomic component for determination of basal heart rate (HR) in relation to group sedentary. Spectral analysis of HR showed that the 30-min and 60-min physical training presented the reduction in low-frequency oscillations (LF=0.20-0.75Hz) and the increase in high-frequency oscillations (HF=0.75-2.5Hz) in normalized units. These both groups only showed an increased baroreflex sensitivity to tachycardiac responses in relation to group sedentary, however when compared, the physical training of 30-min exhibited a greater gain. In conclusion, cardiac autonomic adaptations, characterised by the increased predominance of the vagal autonomic component, were not proportional to the duration of daily physical training sessions. In fact, 30-minute training sessions provided similar cardiac autonomic adaptations, or even more enhanced ones, as in the case of baroreflex sensitivity compared to 60-minute training sessions.

  6. The yin and yang of cardiac autonomic control: vago-sympathetic interactions revisited.

    PubMed

    Paton, J F R; Boscan, P; Pickering, A E; Nalivaiko, E

    2005-11-01

    We review the pattern of activity in the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves innervating the heart. Unlike the conventional textbook picture of reciprocal control of cardiac vagal and sympathetic nervous activity, as seen during a baroreceptor reflex, many other reflexes involve simultaneous co-activation of both autonomic limbs. Indeed, even at 'rest', the heart receives tonic drives from both sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac nerves. Autonomic co-activation occurs during peripheral chemoreceptor, diving, oculocardiac, somatic nociceptor reflex responses as well as being evoked from structures within the brain. It is suggested that simultaneous co-activation may lead to a more efficient cardiac function giving greater cardiac output than activation of the sympathetic limb alone; this permits both a longer time for ventricular filling and a stronger contraction of the myocardium. This may be important when pumping blood into a constricted vascular tree such as is the case during the diving response. We discuss that in some instances, high drive to the heart from both autonomic limbs may also be arrhythmogenic.

  7. Cardiac autonomic control in high level Brazilian power and endurance track-and-field athletes.

    PubMed

    Abad, C C C; do Nascimento, A M; Gil, S; Kobal, R; Loturco, I; Nakamura, F Y; Mostarda, C T; Irigoyen, M C

    2014-08-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) has an important role in physical performance. However, the cardiac ANS activity in high-level track and field athletes has been poorly explored. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that endurance and power athletes would present a markedly different cardiac autonomic control at rest. We analyzed the cardiac ANS by means of time and frequency domains heart rate variability (HRV) analyses and by symbolic analysis. Endurance athletes showed higher pulse interval than power athletes (1,265±126 vs. 1,031±98 ms respectively; p<0.05). No differences were found in time and frequency domains between the groups. However, the LF%, HF% and LF/HF ratio presented high effect sizes (1.46, 1.46 and 1.30, respectively). The symbolic analysis revealed that endurance athletes had higher 2V parasympathetic modulation (36±6.5) than power athletes (24±9.3; p<0.05). A reduced 0V sympathetic modulation was observed in endurance athletes (21±9.9) compared to power athletes (33±11; p<0.05 and ES=1.30). Our results suggest greater parasympathetic modulation and less sympathetic modulation in endurance athletes compared to power athletes. Additionally, the type of HRV analysis needs to be chosen with well-defined criteria and caution because their use in assessing cardiac autonomic modulation can interfere with the interpretation of results. In practical terms, symbolic analysis appears to better discriminate between cardiac autonomic activities of athletes with different training backgrounds than frequency domain analysis.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of heart-rate recovery after exercise in the assessment of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sacre, J W; Jellis, C L; Coombes, J S; Marwick, T H

    2012-09-01

    Poor prognosis associated with blunted post-exercise heart-rate recovery may reflect autonomic dysfunction. This study sought the accuracy of post-exercise heart-rate recovery in the diagnosis of cardiac autonomic neuropathy, which represents a serious, but often unrecognized complication of Type 2 diabetes. Clinical assessment of cardiac autonomic neuropathy and maximal treadmill exercise testing for heart-rate recovery were performed in 135 patients with Type 2 diabetes and negative exercise echocardiograms. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy was defined by abnormalities in ≥ 2 of 7 autonomic function markers, including four cardiac reflex tests and three indices of short-term (5-min) heart-rate variability. Heart-rate recovery was defined at 1-, 2- and 3-min post-exercise. Patients with cardiac autonomic neuropathy (n = 27; 20%) had lower heart-rate recovery at 1-, 2- and 3-min post-exercise (P < 0.01). Heart-rate recovery demonstrated univariate associations with autonomic function markers (r-values 0.20-0.46, P < 0.05). Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve revealed good diagnostic performance of all heart-rate recovery parameters (range 0.80-0.83, P < 0.001). Optimal cut-offs for heart-rate recovery at 1-, 2- and 3-min post-exercise were ≤ 28 beats/min (sensitivity 93%, specificity 69%), ≤ 50 beats/min (sensitivity 96%, specificity 63%) and ≤ 52 beats/min (sensitivity 70%, specificity 84%), respectively. These criteria predicted cardiac autonomic neuropathy independently of relevant clinical and exercise test information (adjusted odds ratios 7-28, P < 0.05). Post-exercise heart-rate recovery provides an accurate diagnostic test for cardiac autonomic neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes. The high sensitivity and modest specificity suggests heart-rate recovery may be useful to screen for patients requiring clinical autonomic evaluation. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  9. Hedgehog signaling plays a cell-autonomous role in maximizing cardiac developmental potential

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Natalie A.; Koudijs, Marco; van Eeden, Fredericus J. M.; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Yelon, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the complete roster of signals required for myocardial specification is crucial to the future of cardiac regenerative medicine. Prior studies have implicated the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in the regulation of multiple aspects of heart development. However, our understanding of the contribution of Hh signaling to the initial specification of myocardial progenitor cells remains incomplete. Here, we show that Hh signaling promotes cardiomyocyte formation in zebrafish. Reduced Hh signaling creates a cardiomyocyte deficit, and increased Hh signaling creates a surplus. Through fate-mapping, we find that Hh signaling is required at early stages to ensure specification of the proper number of myocardial progenitors. Genetic inducible fate mapping in mouse indicates that myocardial progenitors respond directly to Hh signals, and transplantation experiments in zebrafish demonstrate that Hh signaling acts cell autonomously to promote the contribution of cells to the myocardium. Thus, Hh signaling plays an essential early role in defining the optimal number of cardiomyocytes, making it an attractive target for manipulation of multipotent progenitor cells. PMID:18842815

  10. Cardiac autonomic responses induced by a single bout of exercise with flexible pole.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos António, Ana Márcia; Navega, Marcelo Tavella; Cardoso, Marco Aurélio; Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-01-01

    Flexible poles are tools used to provide rapid eccentric and concentric muscle contractions. It lacks in the literature studies that analyze acute cardiovascular responses in different exercises performed with this instrument. It was investigated the acute effects of exercise with flexible poles on heart period in healthy women. The study was performed on 32 women between 18 and 25 years old. It was evaluated the heart rate variability (HRV) in the time (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50) and frequency domain (HF, LF and LF/HF ratio). The subjects remained at rest for 10 minutes. After the rest period, the volunteers performed the exercises with the flexible poles. Immediately after the exercise protocol, the volunteers remained seated at rest for 60 minutes and HRV were analyzed. It was observed no significance changes in the time domain (SDNN: p = 0.14; RMSSD: p = 0.8 and pNN50: p = 0.86) and frequency domain indices (LF (nu): 0.4; LF (ms(2)): p = 0.34; HF (nu): p = 0.4; HF (ms(2)): p = 0.8 and LF/HF ratio: p = 0.3) between before and after single bout of exercise with flexible pole. A single bout of exercise with flexible pole did not significantly change cardiac autonomic regulation in healthy women.

  11. Exercise training-induced modification in autonomic nervous system: An update for cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Besnier, Florent; Labrunée, Marc; Pathak, Atul; Pavy-Le Traon, Anne; Galès, Céline; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Guiraud, Thibaut

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease show autonomic dysfunction, including sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal, which leads to fatal events. This review aims to place sympathovagal balance as an essential element to be considered in management for cardiovascular disease patients who benefit from a cardiac rehabilitation program. Many studies showed that exercise training, as non-pharmacologic treatment, plays an important role in enhancing sympathovagal balance and could normalize levels of markers of sympathetic flow measured by microneurography, heart rate variability or plasma catecholamine levels. This alteration positively affects prognosis with cardiovascular disease. In general, cardiac rehabilitation programs include moderate-intensity and continuous aerobic exercise. Other forms of activities such as high-intensity interval training, breathing exercises, relaxation and transcutaneous electrical stimulation can improve sympathovagal balance and should be implemented in cardiac rehabilitation programs. Currently, the exercise training programs in cardiac rehabilitation are individualized to optimize health outcomes. The sports science concept of the heart rate variability (HRV)-vagal index used to manage exercise sessions (for a goal of performance) could be implemented in cardiac rehabilitation to improve cardiovascular fitness and autonomic nervous system function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Autonomic control of cardiac function and myocardial oxygen consumption during hypoxic hypoxia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, H. H.; Stone, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation in 19 conscious dogs of the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in the coronary and cardiac response to altitude (hypoxic) hypoxia. Beta-adrenergic blockade was used to minimize the cardiac effect associated with sympathetic receptors. It is shown that the autonomic nervous system, and particularly the sympathetic nervous system, is responsible for the increase in ventricular function and myocardial oxygen consumption that occurs during hypoxia. Minimizing this response through appropriate conditioning and training may improve the operating efficiency of the heart and reduce the hazard of hypoxia and other environmental stresses, such as acceleration, which are encountered in advanced aircraft systems.

  13. Cardiac autonomic denervation and functional response to neurotoxins during acute experimental Chagas' disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A L; Fontoura, B F; Freire-Maia, L; Chiari, E; Machado, C R; Teixeira, M M; Camargos, E R

    2001-06-20

    Severe cardiac autonomic denervation occurs in the acute Chagas' disease in rats. The present study aims at verifying whether this denervation was accompanied by impairment of heart function. Scorpionic (Tityus serrulatus) crude venom was used for neurotransmitter release in isolated hearts (Langendorff's preparation). In control hearts, the venom induced significant bradycardia followed by tachycardia. In infected animals, despite the severe (sympathetic) or moderate (parasympathetic) cardiac denervation, the venom provoked similar bradycardia but the tachycardia was higher. The hearts of infected animals beat at significantly lower rate. Atropine prevented this lower rate. Our results demonstrated sympathetic dysfunction during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rats, the parasympathetic function being spared.

  14. Canonical Wnt signaling is a positive regulator of mammalian cardiac progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chulan; Arnold, Joshua; Hsiao, Edward C.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Srivastava, Deepak

    2007-01-01

    Guiding multipotent cells into distinct lineages and controlling their expansion remain fundamental challenges in developmental and stem cell biology. Members of the Wnt pathway control many pivotal embryonic events, often promoting self-renewal or expansion of progenitor cells. In contrast, canonical Wnt ligands are thought to negatively regulate cardiomyogenesis in several species. However, the cell-autonomous role of canonical Wnt signaling within precardiac mesoderm, through its obligatory transcriptional mediator, β-catenin, is unknown. Using tissue-specific in vivo genetic manipulation, we found that β-catenin is required for development of cardiac progenitors and is a positive regulator of proliferative expansion of such progenitor cells. At discrete windows of development in embryonic stem cells, activation of canonical Wnt signaling promoted expansion of cardiac progenitors after initial commitment and was required for cardiac differentiation. Together, these data provide in vivo and in vitro evidence that canonical Wnt signaling promotes the expansion of cardiac progenitors and differentiation of cardiomyocytes. PMID:17576928

  15. Teaching cardiac autonomic function dynamics employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando

    2008-03-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated, and some guidelines are established for simple application of the maneuver in a teaching or research laboratory setting. These include the hemodynamic and cardiac autonomic mechanisms involved, technical aspects such as the intensity and duration of the expiratory straining, frequency of maneuver sessions, training and posture of the individuals tested, different time- and grade change-dependent indexes of heart interval variation, and clinical application of the maneuver.

  16. Cardiac autonomic responses induced by mental tasks and the influence of musical auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Juliana Cristina; Guida, Heraldo L; Fontes, Anne M G; Antonio, Ana M S; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Barnabé, Viviani; Marcomini, Renata S; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; da Silva, Meire L; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the acute effects of musical auditory stimulation on cardiac autonomic responses to a mental task in 28 healthy men (18-22 years old). In the control protocol (no music), the volunteers remained at seated rest for 10 min and the test was applied for five minutes. After the end of test the subjects remained seated for five more minutes. In the music protocol, the volunteers remained at seated rest for 10 min, then were exposed to music for 10 min; the test was then applied over five minutes, and the subjects remained seated for five more minutes after the test. In the control and music protocols the time domain and frequency domain indices of heart rate variability remained unchanged before, during and after the test. We found that musical auditory stimulation with baroque music did not influence cardiac autonomic responses to the mental task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients With Infantile Spasm and the Effect of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Kocabas, Abdullah; Duman, Özgür; Dündar, Nihal Olgaç; Haspolat, Senay; Kardelen, Fırat

    2016-02-01

    Infantile spasm is an age-dependent epileptic-encephalopathy syndrome. Cardiac autonomic function is frequently altered in epilepsy. In this study, we examined heart rate variability in patients with infantile spasm before and after treatment. Nineteen patients with infantile spasm and 13 healthy comparisons were enrolled in the study. Cardiac rhythm was recorded with a Holter device for 24 hours before adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) (Synacthen depot) and B6 vitamin administration and 1 month after treatment. Heart rate variability analysis found lower heart rate variability parameters in patients with infantile spasm at the onset of the syndrome, prior to treatment with ACTH. The time domain parameters of heart rate variability values showed a statistically significant increase following ACTH treatment. Our data suggest that patients with infantile spasm exhibit lower heart rate variability parameters, and the treatment of spasms with ACTH and B6 together diminished the autonomic dysfunction in our cohort.

  18. The role of the autonomic nervous system in arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Franciosi, Sonia; Perry, Frances K G; Roston, Thomas M; Armstrong, Kathryn R; Claydon, Victoria E; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2017-03-31

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is complex and plays an important role in cardiac arrhythmia pathogenesis. A deeper understanding of the anatomy and development of the ANS has shed light on its involvement in cardiac arrhythmias. Alterations in levels of Sema-3a and NGF, both growth factors involved in innervation patterning during development of the ANS, leads to cardiac arrhythmias. Dysregulation of the ANS, including polymorphisms in genes involved in ANS development, have been implicated in sudden infant death syndrome. Disruptions in the sympathetic and/or parasympathetic systems of the ANS can lead to cardiac arrhythmias and can vary depending on the type of arrhythmia. Simultaneous stimulation of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems is thought to lead to atrial fibrillation whereas increased sympathetic stimulation is thought to lead to ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia. In inherited arrhythmia syndromes, such as Long QT and Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia, sympathetic system stimulation is thought to lead to ventricular tachycardia, subsequent arrhythmias, and in severe cases, cardiac death. On the other hand, arrhythmic events in Brugada Syndrome have been associated with periods of high parasympathetic tone. Increasing evidence suggests that modulation of the ANS as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias is safe and effective. Further studies investigating the involvement of the ANS in arrhythmia pathogenesis and its modulation for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias is warranted.

  19. Effects of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for primary hyperhidrosis on cardiac autonomic nervous activity.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jorge; Sousa, João; Oliveira, Antonio G; Silva-Carvalho, Luis

    2009-03-01

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy is performed to treat primary hyperhidrosis. The second and third sympathetic thoracic ganglia excised also innervate the heart. Some studies have shown decreased heart rate but have not been conclusive regarding other cardiac effects of sympathectomy. We studied the cardiac autonomic effects of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy in a group of patients with primary hyperhidrosis. Heart rate variability is a simple, noninvasive electrocardiographic marker reflecting the activity and balance of the sympathetic and vagal components of the autonomous nervous system. We performed a prospective study in 38 patients with primary hyperhidrosis with 24-hour Holter recordings obtained before endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy and 6 months later. We found statistically significant differences (P < .05) in both time and frequency domains. Parameters that evaluate global cardiac autonomic activity (total power, SD of normal R-R intervals, SD of average normal R-R intervals) and vagal activity (rhythm corresponding to percentage of normal R-R intervals with cycle greater than 50 ms relative to previous interval, square root of mean squared differences of successive normal R-R intervals, high-frequency power, high-frequency power in normalized units) were statistically significantly increased after sympathectomy. Low-frequency power in normalized units, reflecting sympathetic activity, was statistically significantly decreased after sympathectomy. Low-/high-frequency power ratio also showed a significant decrease, indicating relative decrease in sympathetic activity and increase in vagal activity. These results provide, for the first time to our knowledge, clear evidence of increased vagal and global cardiac autonomic activity and decreased sympathetic activity after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

  20. Evaluation of cardiac autonomic function using heart rate variability in children with acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Vural, Cagdas; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Kosger, Pelin; Bolluk, Ozge; Kilic, Zubeyir; Ucar, Birsen

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Carbon monoxide poisoning may cause myocardial toxicity and cardiac autonomic dysfunction, which may contribute to the development of life-threatening arrhythmias. We investigated the potential association between acute carbon monoxide exposure and cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability. The present study included 40 children aged 1-17 years who were admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit with acute carbon monoxide poisoning and 40 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Carboxyhaemoglobin and cardiac enzymes were measured at admission. Electrocardiography was performed on admission and discharge, and 24-hour Holter electrocardiography was digitally recorded. Heart rate variability was analysed at both time points - 24-hour recordings - and frequency domains - from the first 5 minutes of intensive care unit admission. Time domain and frequency indices such as high-frequency spectral power and low-frequency spectral power were similar between patient and control groups (p>0.05). The ratio of low-frequency spectral power to high-frequency spectral power was significantly lower in the carbon monoxide poisoning group (p<0.001) and was negatively correlated with carboxyhaemoglobin levels (r=-0.351, p<0.05). The mean heart rate, QT dispersion, corrected QT dispersion, and P dispersion values were higher in the carbon monoxide poisoning group (p<0.05) on admission. The QT dispersion and corrected QT dispersion remained longer in the carbon monoxide poisoning group compared with controls on discharge (p<0.05). The frequency domain indices, especially the ratio of low-frequency spectral power to high-frequency spectral power, are useful for the evaluation of the cardiac autonomic function. The decreased low-frequency spectral power-to-high-frequency spectral power ratio reflects a balance of the autonomic nervous system, which shifted to parasympathetic components.

  1. Neural network regulation driven by autonomous neural firings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myoung Won

    2016-07-01

    Biological neurons naturally fire spontaneously due to the existence of a noisy current. Such autonomous firings may provide a driving force for network formation because synaptic connections can be modified due to neural firings. Here, we study the effect of autonomous firings on network formation. For the temporally asymmetric Hebbian learning, bidirectional connections lose their balance easily and become unidirectional ones. Defining the difference between reciprocal connections as new variables, we could express the learning dynamics as if Ising model spins interact with each other in magnetism. We present a theoretical method to estimate the interaction between the new variables in a neural system. We apply the method to some network systems and find some tendencies of autonomous neural network regulation.

  2. The association between anger-related personality trait and cardiac autonomic response abnormalities in elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kosuke; Murata, Tetsuhito; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hamada, Toshihiko; Kosaka, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Haruyoshi; Wada, Yuji

    2007-09-01

    Cardiac autonomic response abnormality associated with trait anger has been recognized to elevate blood pressure in daily life, leading to atherosclerotic progression and cardiovascular disease. To clarify the relationship between anger-related personality traits and cardiac autonomic response in healthy elderly subjects, 54 volunteers consisting of 30 male (mean age 62.2+/-5.4) and 24 female (mean age 58.4+/-4.6) subjects underwent testing of heart rate variability (HRV) with head-up tilt. For the evaluation of trait anger, we used a questionnaire corresponding to the trait anger score taken from the State and Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Furthermore, we measured carotid intima-medial thickness (IMT) to evaluate atherosclerotic progression in subjects with anger trait. In female subjects, higher trait anger was positively associated with elevated carotid IMT and the suppression of HRV vagal attenuation from the supine to head-up position, and negatively associated with the HRV sympathetic activity in the head-up position and also with the HRV sympathetic response from the supine to head-up position. In male subjects, trait anger was not significantly associated with carotid IMT or any HRV component with or without head-up tilt testing. We conclude that a simple noninvasive measure, short-term HRV with head-up tilt testing, could be a useful method to investigate the association between cardiac autonomic imbalance and increased risk of atherosclerosis associated with trait anger in healthy elderly subjects.

  3. Gender differences in cardiac autonomic modulation during medical internship.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Ching-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsuan; Liu, Chun-Hao; Weng, Wei-Hung; Kuo, Terry B J; Yang, Cheryl C H

    2013-06-01

    Medical internship is known to be a time of high stress and long working hours, which increases the risk of depression and cardiovascular disease. Gender differences in medical interns' cardiovascular risk have not been reported previously. Thirty-eight medical interns (29 males) were repeatedly tested for depressive symptoms using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and 5-min spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) at 3-month intervals during their internship. Among the male interns, the variance of the heart rate decreased at 6, 9, 12 months, and a reduced high frequency, which suggests reduced cardiac parasympathetic modulation, was found at 9 and 12 months into their internship. Increased depressive symptoms were also identified at 12 months in the male group. No significant differences in depression or any of the HRV indices were identified among the female interns during their internship.

  4. Response of cardiac autonomic modulation after a single exposure to musical auditory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas L; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M; Guida, Heraldo L; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Garner, David M; Vanderlei, Franciele M; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2015-01-01

    The acute effects after exposure to different styles of music on cardiac autonomic modulation assessed through heart rate variability (HRV) analysis have not yet been well elucidated. We aimed to investigate the recovery response of cardiac autonomic modulation in women after exposure to musical auditory stimulation of different styles. The study was conducted on 30 healthy women aged between 18 years and 30 years. We did not include subjects having previous experience with musical instruments and those who had an affinity for music styles. The volunteers remained at rest for 10 min and were exposed to classical baroque (64-84 dB) and heavy metal (75-84 dB) music for 10 min, and their HRV was evaluated for 30 min after music cessation. We analyzed the following HRV indices: Standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) intervals, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), percentage of normal-to-normal 50 (pNN50), low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), and LF/HF ratio. SDNN, LF in absolute units (ms 2 ) and normalized (nu), and LF/HF ratio increased while HF index (nu) decreased after exposure to classical baroque music. Regarding the heavy metal music style, it was observed that there were increases in SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50, and LF (ms 2 ) after the musical stimulation. In conclusion, the recovery response of cardiac autonomic modulation after exposure to auditory stimulation with music featured an increased global activity of both systems for the two musical styles, with a cardiac sympathetic modulation for classical baroque music and a cardiac vagal tone for the heavy metal style.

  5. Response of cardiac autonomic modulation after a single exposure to musical auditory stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Lucas L.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.; Guida, Heraldo L.; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Garner, David M.; Vanderlei, Franciele M.; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E.

    2015-01-01

    The acute effects after exposure to different styles of music on cardiac autonomic modulation assessed through heart rate variability (HRV) analysis have not yet been well elucidated. We aimed to investigate the recovery response of cardiac autonomic modulation in women after exposure to musical auditory stimulation of different styles. The study was conducted on 30 healthy women aged between 18 years and 30 years. We did not include subjects having previous experience with musical instruments and those who had an affinity for music styles. The volunteers remained at rest for 10 min and were exposed to classical baroque (64-84 dB) and heavy metal (75-84 dB) music for 10 min, and their HRV was evaluated for 30 min after music cessation. We analyzed the following HRV indices: Standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) intervals, root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), percentage of normal-to-normal 50 (pNN50), low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), and LF/HF ratio. SDNN, LF in absolute units (ms2) and normalized (nu), and LF/HF ratio increased while HF index (nu) decreased after exposure to classical baroque music. Regarding the heavy metal music style, it was observed that there were increases in SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50, and LF (ms2) after the musical stimulation. In conclusion, the recovery response of cardiac autonomic modulation after exposure to auditory stimulation with music featured an increased global activity of both systems for the two musical styles, with a cardiac sympathetic modulation for classical baroque music and a cardiac vagal tone for the heavy metal style. PMID:25774614

  6. Cardiac autonomic function and vascular profile in subclinical hypothyroidism: Increased beat-to-beat QT variability

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Pramila; Yeragani, Vikram K.; Prasanna Kumar, K. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) may have higher incidence of coronary heart disease and autonomic dysfunction. Design of the Study: Prospective case control study. Aim and Objectives: To evaluate beat-to-beat QT variability and vascular stiffness in patients with SH compared to normal controls. Materials and Methods: We compared linear and nonlinear measures of cardiac repolarization liability using beat-to-beat QT intervals derived from the surface electrocardiogram during supine posture and vascular indices including pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial index (ABI) during supine posture between female patients with SH and age- and sex-matched normal controls. Spectral analysis was done at very low frequency (LF) (0.003–0.04 Hz), Low frequency (LF) (0.04–0.15 Hz), and high frequency (HF) (0.15–0.4 Hz). The HF represents vagal regulation (parasympathetic) and LF represents both parasympathetic and sympathetic regulation. Results: We recruited 58 women with a mean age of 31.83 ± 8.9 years and 49 controls with mean age of 32.4 ± 9.9 years (P = NS). QT variability index (QTvi) was higher in cases compared to controls (P = 0.01). The ratio of LF/HF of R-R interval which is an index of sympathovagal tone was significantly more in cases compared to controls (P = 0.02). The difference in the left minus the right ABI was significant between cases and controls (P = 0.03). Conclusions: The cases had lower parasympathetic activity as compared to controls, and there was a predominance of sympathetic activity in cases. QTvi may be an important noninvasive tool in this group of patients to study the risk of cardiovascular mortality. PMID:27730068

  7. [Autonomic cardiovascular regulation in patients with tics and Tourette syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zykov, V P; Komarova, I B; Nazarova, E K; Begasheva, O I; Kabanova, S A

    2005-01-01

    Autonomic cardiovascular regulation has been assessed in patients aged 4-15 years with Tourette syndrome (n = 22) and other tic disorders (n = 48). Symptom significance was estimated by a number of hyperkinetic episodes per 20 minutes, tic scale and variants of the disease course. The functional condition of autonomic nervous system was studied clinically and using spectral analysis of heart rate variability in both upright and supine positions. Negative correlation between the ratio of sympathetic and vagus influences and severity of the disease was found: the severer were tic symptoms, the stronger was a trend to vagotonia (beta = -0.36; p < 0.0025; F > 4.0). In orthostatic test, patients with Tourette syndrome demonstrated an unfavorable hypersympathicotonic type of cardiovascular system reaction. Patients were treated during 4 weeks with glycinum (0.2 +/- 0.1 mg/day), phenibutum (0.5 +/- 0.25 mg/day), clonazepam (1.5 +/- 0.5 mg/day), tiapride (200 +/- 100 mg/day), haloperidol (1-1.5 mg/day), rispolept (2 mg/day). There was no negative effect of the drugs on heart rate variability. On the contrary, the therapy reduced hyperkinetic symptoms and corrected autonomic influences on the sinus rhythm. It is suggested that changes in autonomic cardiovascular regulation might be of secondary character and do not need any special correction.

  8. Assessment of Cardiac Autonomic Tone Following Long Sudarshan Kriya Yoga in Art of Living Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Lakshmi; Kharya, Chhaya; Deepak, K K; Kochupillai, Vinod

    2017-09-01

    The breathing processes are known to modulate cardiac autonomic tone and improve psychological status. We investigated cardiac autonomic tone following long Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) using heart rate variability (HRV) and skin conductance level (SCL). Thirty healthy volunteers (age 28.3 ± 8.4 years; 23 M: 7 F) participated in the study. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and SCL were recorded for 5 min each, before and after long SKY. Long SKY is a combination of pranayama and cyclic rhythmic breathing and is performed by following the guided audio instructions. HRV analysis was used for the assessment of cardiac autonomic tone. Time and frequency domain parameters of HRV were calculated by using RR interval of ECG. SCL was acquired using Galvanic skin response (GSR) amplifier of PowerLab in microSeimens (μS). Time domain parameters of HRV, including mean RR interval (p = 0.000), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) (p = 0.037), standard deviation of all NN intervals (SDNN) (p = 0.013), NN50 count divided by the total number of all NN intervals (pNN50) (p = 0.004), and square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals (RMSSD) (p = 0.002) increased, and mean heart rate decreased (p = 0.000) following long SKY. In frequency domain analysis, power of low-frequency (LF) component (p = 0.010) and LF/HF ratio (p = 0.008) decreased significantly, whereas power of high frequency (HF) significantly increased (p = 0.010). SCL decreased following long SKY, although it did not attain statistical significance. The results suggest that long SKY induces significant oscillations in cardiac autonomic tone. Parasympathetic activity increases and sympathetic activity decreases and sympathovagal balance improves following long SKY. Decrease in sympathetic activity is also demonstrated by decrease in conductance although it did not reach statistical significance. From this study it can be concluded that long

  9. Stress-induced cardiac autonomic reactivity and preclinical atherosclerosis: does arterial elasticity modify the association?

    PubMed

    Chumaeva, Nadja; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Merjonen, Päivi; Elovainio, Marko; Hintsa, Taina; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acute mental stress on atherosclerosis can be estimated using arterial elasticity measured by carotid artery distensibility (Cdist). We examined the interactive effect of acute stress-induced cardiac reactivity and Cdist to preclinical atherosclerosis assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in 58 healthy adults aged 24-39 years participated in the epidemiological Young Finns Study. Cdist and IMT were measured ultrasonographically. Impedance electrocardiography was used to measure acute mental stress-induced cardiac autonomic responses: heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia and pre-ejection period after the mental arithmetic and the public speaking tasks. Interactions between HR reactivity and Cdist in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis were found. The results imply that elevated HR reactivity to acute mental stress is related to less atherosclerosis among healthy participants with higher arterial elasticity. Possibly, increased cardiac reactivity in response to challenging tasks is an adaptive reaction related to better cardiovascular health.

  10. Fitness, autonomic regulation and orthostatic tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckey, Jay C.

    1991-01-01

    Work on this grant has consisted of two major studies of cardiovascular regulation in athletes along with several smaller supporting studies. This summary will give a brief overview of two major studies, and then conclude with an analysis of what the findings from these studies mean practically, and how they can be applied to current problems with post-flight orthostatic intolerance. The first study addresses a cross-sectional analysis of orthostatic intolerance in highly aerobically trained individuals; the second addresses ventricular pressure/volume relationships in athletes.

  11. Complex nonlinear autonomic nervous system modulation link cardiac autonomic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Kinda; Jelinek, Herbert F; Robinson, Caroline; Cornforth, David J; Tarvainen, Mika P; Al-Aubaidy, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    Physiological interactions are abundant within, and between, body systems. These interactions may evolve into discrete states during pathophysiological processes resulting from common mechanisms. An association between arterial stenosis, identified by low ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) as been reported. Whether an association between vascular calcification-characterized by high ABPI and a different pathophysiology-is similarly associated with CVD, has not been established. The current study aims to investigate the association between ABPI, and cardiac rhythm, as an indicator of cardiovascular health and functionality, utilizing heart rate variability (HRV). Two hundred and thirty six patients underwent ABPI assessment. Standard time and frequency domain, and non-linear HRV measures were determined from 5-min electrocardiogram. ABPI data were divided into normal (n = 101), low (n = 67) and high (n = 66) and compared to HRV measures.(DFAα1 and SampEn were significantly different between the low ABPI, high ABPI and control groups (p < 0.05). A possible coupling between arterial stenosis and vascular calcification with decreased and increased HRV respectively was observed. Our results suggest a model for interpreting the relationship between vascular pathophysiology and cardiac rhythm. The cardiovascular system may be viewed as a complex system comprising a number of interacting subsystems. These cardiac and vascular subsystems/networks may be coupled and undergo transitions in response to internal or external perturbations. From a clinical perspective, the significantly increased sample entropy compared to the normal ABPI group and the decreased and increased complex correlation properties measured by DFA for the low and high ABPI groups respectively, may be useful indicators that a more holistic treatment approach in line with this more complex clinical picture is required.

  12. Influence of Smoking Consumption and Nicotine Dependence Degree in Cardiac Autonomic Modulation

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Ana Paula Soares; Ramos, Dionei; de Oliveira, Gabriela Martins; dos Santos, Ana Alice Soares; Freire, Ana Paula Coelho Figueira; It, Juliana Tiyaki; Fernandes, Renato Peretti Prieto; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo

    2016-01-01

    Background Smoking consumption alters cardiac autonomic function. Objective Assess the influence of the intensity of smoking and the nicotine dependence degree in cardiac autonomic modulation evaluated through index of heart rate variability (HRV). Methods 83 smokers, of both genders, between 50 and 70 years of age and with normal lung function were divided according to the intensity of smoking consumption (moderate and severe) and the nicotine dependency degree (mild, moderate and severe). The indexes of HRV were analyzed in rest condition, in linear methods in the time domain (TD), the frequency domain (FD) and through the Poincaré plot. For the comparison of smoking consumption, unpaired t test or Mann-Whitney was employed. For the analysis between the nicotine dependency degrees, we used the One-way ANOVA test, followed by Tukey's post test or Kruskal-Wallis followed by Dunn's test. The significance level was p < 0,05. Results Differences were only found when compared to the different intensities of smoking consumption in the indexes in the FD. LFun (62.89 ± 15.24 vs 75.45 ± 10.28), which corresponds to low frequency spectrum component in normalized units; HFun (37.11 ± 15.24 vs 24.55 ± 10.28), which corresponds to high frequency spectrum component in normalized units and in the LF/HF ratio (2.21 ± 1.47 vs 4.07 ± 2.94). However, in the evaluation of nicotine dependency, significant differences were not observed (p > 0.05). Conclusion Only the intensity of smoking consumption had an influence over the cardiac autonomic modulation of the assessed tobacco smokers. Tobacco smokers with severe intensity of smoking consumption presented a lower autonomic modulation than those with moderate intensity. PMID:27142649

  13. Decreased autonomic modulation of heart rate and altered cardiac sympathovagal balance in patients with Cushing's syndrome: role of endogenous hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Dinu S; Ali, Naseer; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Jyotsna, Viveka P; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Previous literature suggested multiple possible links by which hypercortisolism may alter the autonomic control of cardiovascular functions. We investigated the impact of chronic endogenous hypercortisolism on the autonomic regulation of cardiac functions by short-term heart rate variability analysis. Eighteen patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome and 20 age-, gender- and BMI-matched controls participated in the study. ECG signal was acquired in lead II configuration for 5 min and heart rate variability assessment was made in both time and frequency domain using the extracted RR interval data. All time and frequency domain measures of heart rate variability were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the patient group compared to the control group. The patient group had an altered sympathovagal balance with low frequency/high frequency band ratio significantly higher than the control group [1.857 (0.6747-2.610) vs. 0.8581 (0.4779-1.352); p = 0.0253]. A significant negative correlation was obtained between normalized high frequency power of heart rate variability and basal cortisol levels (r = -0.6594; p = 0.0029). Multiple linear regression analysis identified age, disease duration (in months), basal cortisol levels and systolic blood pressure as independent predictors of normalized high frequency power. Findings of the study clearly portrayed the diminished autonomic modulation of heart rate in endogenous Cushing's syndrome and its possible relationship with hypercortisolism as the main causative factor. Diminished heart rate variability may be an indicator of the increased risk of cardiac mortality in these patients. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Previous exposure to musical auditory stimulation immediately influences the cardiac autonomic responses to the postural change maneuver in women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to musical auditory stimulation has been reported to improve cardiac autonomic regulation. However, it is not clear if music acutely influences it in response to autonomic tests. We evaluated the acute effects of music on heart rate variability (HRV) responses to the postural change maneuver (PCM) in women. Method We evaluated 12 healthy women between 18 and 28 years old and HRV was analyzed in the time (SDNN, RMSSD, NN50 and pNN50) and frequency (LF, HF and LF/HF ratio) domains. In the control protocol, the women remained at seated rest for 10 minutes and quickly stood up within three seconds and remained standing still for 15 minutes. In the music protocol, the women remained at seated rest for 10 minutes, were exposed to music for 10 minutes and quickly stood up within three seconds and remained standing still for 15 minutes. HRV was recorded at the following time: rest, music (music protocol) 0–5, 5–10 and 10–15 min during standing. Results In the control protocol the SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50 indexes were reduced at 10–15 minutes after the volunteers stood up, while the LF (nu) index was increased at the same moment compared to seated rest. In the protocol with music, the indexes were not different from control but the RMSSD, pNN50 and LF (nu) were different from the music period. Conclusion Musical auditory stimulation attenuates the cardiac autonomic responses to the PCM. PMID:23941333

  15. Spaceflight alters autonomic regulation of arterial pressure in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Charles, John B.; Jones, Michele M.; Beightol, Larry A.; Eckberg, Dwain L.

    1994-01-01

    Spaceflight is associated with decreased orthostatic tolerance after landing. Short-duration spaceflight (4 - 5 days) impairs one neutral mechanism: the carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex. To understand the effects of longer-duration spaceflight on baroreflex function, we measured R-R interval power spectra, antecubital vein plasma catecholamine levels, carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses, responses to Valsalva maneuvers, and orthostatic tolerance in 16 astronauts before and after shuttle missions lasting 8 - 14 days. We found the following changes between preflight and landing day: (1) orthostatic tolerance decreased; (2) R-R interval spectral power in the 0.05- to 0.15-Hz band increased; (3) plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels increased; (4) the slope, range, and operational point of the carotid baroreceptor cardiac reflex response decreased; and (5) blood pressure and heart rate responses to Valsalva maneuvers were altered. Autonomic changes persisted for several days after landing. These results provide further evidence of functionally relevent reductions in parasympathetic and increases in sympathetic influences on arterial pressure control after spaceflight.

  16. Abnormal left ventricular torsion and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Milan K.; Shivu, Ganesh Nallur; Tahrani, Abd; Dubb, Kiran; Abozguia, Khalid; Phan, T.T.; Narendran, Parth; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Frenneaux, Michael; Stevens, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular torsion is increased and cardiac energetics are reduced in uncomplicated type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Our aim was to determine the relationships of these abnormalities to cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in subjects with T1DM. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 20 subjects with T1DM free of known coronary heart disease attending an outpatient clinic. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy was assessed using heart rate variability studies and the continuous wavelet transform method. Left ventricular function was determined by speckle tracking echocardiography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and stress magnetic resonance imaging were used to measure cardiac energetics and myocardial perfusion reserve index, respectively. Twenty subjects (age, 35 ± 8 years; diabetes duration, 16 ± 9 years; hemoglobin A1c, 8.0% ± 1.1%) were recruited. Forty percent of the subjects exhibited definite or borderline CAN. Log peak radial strain was significantly increased in subjects with CAN compared with those without (1.56 ± 0.06 vs 1.43 ± 0.14, respectively; P = .011). Data were adjusted for log duration of diabetes, and log left ventricular torsion correlated (r = 0.593, P = .01) with log low-frequency to high-frequency ratio during the Valsalva maneuver. Log isovolumic relaxation time correlated significantly with log Valsalva ratio and log proportion of differences in consecutive RR intervals of normal beats greater than 50 milliseconds during deep breathing. However, CAN did not correlate with cardiac energetics or myocardial perfusion reserve index. Spectral analysis of low-frequency to high-frequency ratio power during the Valsalva maneuver is associated with altered left ventricular torsion in subjects with T1DM. Parasympathetic dysfunction is closely associated with diastolic deficits. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is not however the principal cause of impaired cardiac energetics. The role of CAN in the development of cardiomyopathy

  17. Mechanosensing and Regulation of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Dostal, David E; Feng, Hao; Nizamutdinov, Damir; Golden, Honey B; Afroze, Syeda H; Dostal, Joseph D; Jacob, John C; Foster, Donald M; Tong, Carl; Glaser, Shannon; Gerilechaogetu, FNU

    2014-01-01

    The role of mechanical force as an important regulator of structure and function of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs has recently been recognized. However, mechanical overload is a pathogenesis or comorbidity existing in a variety of heart diseases, such as hypertension, aortic regurgitation and myocardial infarction. Physical stimuli sensed by cells are transmitted through intracellular signal transduction pathways resulting in altered physiological responses or pathological conditions. Emerging evidence from experimental studies indicate that β1-integrin and the angiotensin II type I (AT1) receptor play critical roles as mechanosensors in the regulation of heart contraction, growth and leading to heart failure. Integrin link the extracellular matrix and the intracellular cytoskeleton to initiate the mechanical signalling, whereas, the AT1 receptor could be activated by mechanical stress through an angiotensin-II-independent mechanism. Recent studies show that both Integrin and AT1 receptor and their downstream signalling factors including MAPKs, AKT, FAK, ILK and GTPase regulate heart function in cardiac myocytes. In this review we describe the role of mechanical sensors residing within the plasma membrane, mechanical sensor induced downstream signalling factors and its potential roles in cardiac contraction and growth. PMID:25485172

  18. Modulation of cardiac autonomic balance with adjuvant yoga therapy in patients with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sathyaprabha, T N; Satishchandra, P; Pradhan, C; Sinha, S; Kaveri, B; Thennarasu, K; Murthy, B T C; Raju, T R

    2008-02-01

    The practice of yoga regulates body physiology through control of posture, breathing, and meditation. Effects of yoga on autonomic functions of patients with refractory epilepsy, as quantified by standardized autonomic function tests (AFTs), were determined. The yoga group (n=18) received supervised training in yoga, and the exercise group (n=16) practiced simple routine exercises. AFTs were repeated after 10 weeks of daily sessions. Data were compared with those of healthy volunteers (n=142). The yoga group showed significant improvement in parasympathetic parameters and a decrease in seizure frequency scores. There was no improvement in blood pressure parameters in either group. Two patients in the yoga group achieved normal autonomic functions at the end of 10 weeks of therapy, whereas there were no changes in the exercise group. The data suggest that yoga may have a role as an adjuvant therapy in the management of autonomic dysfunction in patients with refractory epilepsy.

  19. [Cardiac autonomic blockade in sinus disease and indication for a pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Solórzano Martín, C J; Delgado Caro, G; Lugo Peña, P

    1990-01-01

    Functional autonomic blockade (FAB) with metoprolol (0.2 mg/kg body weight) and atropine sulphate (0.04 mg/kg) was carried out in 23 patients, 20 to 81 years old (mean age 61 years) with symptomatic sick sinus syndrome with clinical indication for permanent pacing. Several measurements were determined before and after FAB, 7 had normal intrinsic heart rate (IHR) and 16 abnormal. With normal IHR, 3 had severe autonomic regulation disturbances and in only two patients the corrected sinus nodal recovery time (SNRTC) and the sinoatrial conduction time (SACT) were prolonged after FAB. On the 16 patients with abnormal IHR only 4 had severe extrinsic autonomic influence and 15 had SACT and SNRTC prolonged after FAB. All measurements were determined by standard electrocardiographic surface tracings. Indications for permanent pacing were reduced to intrinsic sick sinus syndrome and bradycardia with severe autonomic disturbances in symptomatic patients.

  20. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento, Adriana de Oliveira; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Dantas, Marciano Moacir; Oliveira Marques, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Barbosa, Bruno Teixeira; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Andrade, Maria do Amparo; Jaguaribe-Lima, Anna Myrna; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do Socorro

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis) and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline) and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver). Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac sympathetic activity compared to physically active older adult subjects at baseline (63.13±3.31 vs 50.45±3.55 nu, P=0.02). The variance (heart rate variability index) was increased in active older adults (1,438.64±448.90 vs 1,402.92±385.14 ms, P=0.02), and cardiac sympathetic activity (symbolic analysis) was increased in sedentary older adults (5,660.91±1,626.72 vs 4,381.35±1,852.87, P=0.03) during isometric handgrip exercise. Sedentary older adults showed higher cardiac sympathetic activity (spectral analysis) (71.29±4.40 vs 58.30±3.50 nu, P=0.03) and lower parasympathetic modulation (28.79±4.37 vs 41.77±3.47 nu, P=0.03) compared to physically active older adult subjects during isometric handgrip exercise. Regarding muscle vasodilation response, there was an increase in the skeletal muscle blood flow in the second (4.1±0.5 vs 3.7±0.4 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.01) and third minute (4.4±0.4 vs 3.9±0.3 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.03) of handgrip exercise in active older adults. The results indicate that

  1. Silent myocardial infarction secondary to cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jacob, Aasems; Anthony Diaz, Mark; Lederman, Jeffrey

    2016-08-03

    An 83-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis and hypertension presented to the emergency department with fever and chills of 1 day duration. On examination, temperature was 100.9 F, heart rate 111/min and she had orthostatic hypotension. Laboratory tests showed elevated blood urea nitrogen and white cell count. The patient underwent treatment for symptomatic urinary tract infection and while her fever and leucocytosis resolved, tachycardia persisted. An EKG done showed T inversions in leads II, III, arteriovenous fistula, V2 and V3. Troponin-I was elevated. Nuclear stress test revealed apical wall motion abnormality confirming myocardial infarction. Ewing's tests were carried out at bedside and these diagnosed severe autonomic neuropathy. Rheumatoid arthritis can cause cardiac autonomic neuropathy from chronic inflammation. This case entails the importance of assessing and detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy in chronic inflammatory conditions, and the need to be cautious of acute coronary events in these patients, even for minimal or no symptoms.

  2. (Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.

  3. Altered cardiovascular autonomic regulation in overweight children engaged in regular physical activity.

    PubMed

    Lucini, Daniela; de Giacomi, Gaia; Tosi, Fabio; Malacarne, Mara; Respizzi, Stefano; Pagani, Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Overweight (OW) and obesity in children are important forerunners of cardiovascular risk, possibly through autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysregulation, while physical exercise exerts a beneficial influence. In this observational study we hypothesise that OW might influence ANS profile even in a population performing high volume of supervised exercise. We study 103 young soccer players, homogeneous in terms of gender (all male), cultural background, school, age (11.2 ± 1 years) and exercise routine, since they all belong to the same soccer club, thus guaranteeing equality of supervised training and similar levels of competitiveness. ANS is evaluated by autoregressive spectral analysis of heart rate and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) variabilities. We estimate also the accumulated weekly Metabolic Equivalents and time spent in sedentary activities. We subdivide the entire population in two subgroups (normal weight and OW) based on the International Obesity Task Force criteria. In OW soccer players (10.7% of total group) we observe an altered profile of autonomic cardiovascular regulation, characterised by higher values of SAP (113 ± 4 vs 100 ± 1 mm Hg, 39.7 ± 3 vs 66.2 ± 10%), higher Low Frequency variability power of SAP (an index of vasomotor sympathetic regulation) (12 ± 3 vs 4.5 mm Hg(2)) and smaller spontaneous baroreflex gain (an index of cardiac vagal regulation) (19 ± 3 vs 33 ± 3 ms/mm Hg) (all (p < 0.02)). Moreover Correlation analysis on the entire study population shows a significant link between anthropometric and autonomic indices. These data show that OW is associated to a clear autonomic impairment even in children subjected to an intense aerobic training.

  4. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Schizophrenia and Their Healthy Relatives – A Small Review

    PubMed Central

    Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The majority of excess mortality among people with schizophrenia seems to be caused by cardiovascular complications, and in particular, coronary heart disease. In addition, the prevalence of heart failure and arrhythmias is increased in this population. Reduced efferent vagal activity, which has been consistently described in these patients and their healthy first-degree relatives, might be one important mechanism contributing to their increased cardiac mortality. A decrease in heart rate variability and complexity was often shown in unmedicated patients when compared to healthy controls. In addition, faster breathing rates, accompanied by shallow breathing, seem to influence autonomic cardiac functioning in acute unmedicated patients substantially. Moreover, low-physical fitness is a further and independent cardiac risk factor present in this patient population. Interestingly, new studies describe chronotropic incompetence during physical exercise as an important additional risk factor in patients with schizophrenia. Some studies report a correlation of the autonomic imbalance with the degree of positive symptoms (i.e., delusions) and some with the duration of disease. The main body of psychiatric research is focused on mental aspects of the disease, thereby neglecting obvious physical health needs of these patients. Here, a joint effort is needed to design interventional strategies in everyday clinical settings to improve physical health and quality of life. PMID:26157417

  5. Cardiac autonomic reactivity and recovery in predicting carotid atherosclerosis: the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study.

    PubMed

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Elovainio, Marko; Pulkki, Laura; Puttonen, Sampsa; Raitakari, Olli; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the association of cardiac autonomic task-induced reactivity and recovery to preclinical atherosclerosis. Thirty-three men and 33 women aged 24-39 years participated in the ongoing epidemiological Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study. The authors measured heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), and preejection period (PEP) during the mental arithmetic and speech tasks in 1999. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by measuring the thickness of the common carotid artery intima-media complex (IMT) with ultrasound in 2001. Higher HR, RSA, and PEP reactivity were associated with lower IMT values even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors (lipid levels, obesity, and blood pressure). In addition, better HR recovery after the mental arithmetic task was associated with lower IMT values, and this association persisted after all adjustments. Thus, higher task-induced cardiac autonomic reactivity and better HR recovery were related to less preclinical atherosclerosis. The authors concluded that cardiac pattern of reactivity and quick recovery may be associated with better cardiovascular health, and therefore all reactivity occurring in challenging situations should not automatically be considered as potentially pathological.

  6. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    PubMed

    Makiguchi, Yuya; Nagata, Shinya; Kojima, Takahito; Ichimura, Masaki; Konno, Yoshifumi; Murata, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2009-06-19

    Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG) data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  7. Cardiac Arrest during Gamete Release in Chum Salmon Regulated by the Parasympathetic Nerve System

    PubMed Central

    Makiguchi, Yuya; Nagata, Shinya; Kojima, Takahito; Ichimura, Masaki; Konno, Yoshifumi; Murata, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG) data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) at the moment of gamete release for 7.39±1.61 s in females and for 5.20±0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release. PMID:19543389

  8. Effects of Kefir on the Cardiac Autonomic Tones and Baroreflex Sensitivity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Klippel, Brunella F.; Duemke, Licia B.; Leal, Marcos A.; Friques, Andreia G. F.; Dantas, Eduardo M.; Dalvi, Rodolfo F.; Gava, Agata L.; Pereira, Thiago M. C.; Andrade, Tadeu U.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.; Campagnaro, Bianca P.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: It has been previously shown that the probiotic kefir (a symbiotic matrix containing acid bacteria and yeasts) attenuated the hypertension and the endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the present study, the effect of chronic administration of kefir on the cardiac autonomic control of heart rate (HR) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in SHR was evaluated. Methods: SHR were treated with kefir (0.3 mL/100 g body weight) for 60 days and compared with non-treated SHR and with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. Cardiac autonomic vagal (VT) and sympathetic (ST) tones were estimated through the blockade of the cardiac muscarinic receptors (methylatropine) and the blockade of β1−adrenoceptor (atenolol). The BRS was evaluated by the tachycardia and bradycardia responses to vasoactive drug-induced decreases and increases in arterial blood pressure (BP), respectively. Additionally, spontaneous BRS was estimated by autoregressive spectral analysis. Results: Kefir-treated SHR exhibited significant attenuation of basal BP, HR, and cardiac hypertrophy compared to non-treated SHR (12, 13, and 21%, respectively). Cardiac VT and ST were significantly altered in the SHR (~40 and ~90 bpm) compared with Wistar rats (~120 and ~30 bpm) and were partially recovered in SHR-kefir (~90 and ~25 bpm). SHR exhibited an impaired bradycardic BRS (~50%) compared with Wistar rats, which was reduced to ~40% in the kefir-treated SHR and abolished by methylatropine in all groups. SHR also exhibited a significant impairment of the tachycardic BRS (~23%) compared with Wistar rats and this difference was reduced to 8% in the SHR-kefir. Under the action of atenolol the residual reflex tachycardia was smaller in SHR than in Wistar rats and kefir attenuated this abnormality. Spectral analysis revealed increased low frequency components of BP (~3.5-fold) and pulse interval (~2-fold) compared with Wistar rats and these differences were reduced by kefir-treatment to ~1

  9. Effects of Kefir on the Cardiac Autonomic Tones and Baroreflex Sensitivity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Brunella F; Duemke, Licia B; Leal, Marcos A; Friques, Andreia G F; Dantas, Eduardo M; Dalvi, Rodolfo F; Gava, Agata L; Pereira, Thiago M C; Andrade, Tadeu U; Meyrelles, Silvana S; Campagnaro, Bianca P; Vasquez, Elisardo C

    2016-01-01

    It has been previously shown that the probiotic kefir (a symbiotic matrix containing acid bacteria and yeasts) attenuated the hypertension and the endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the present study, the effect of chronic administration of kefir on the cardiac autonomic control of heart rate (HR) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in SHR was evaluated. SHR were treated with kefir (0.3 mL/100 g body weight) for 60 days and compared with non-treated SHR and with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats. Cardiac autonomic vagal (VT) and sympathetic (ST) tones were estimated through the blockade of the cardiac muscarinic receptors (methylatropine) and the blockade of β1-adrenoceptor (atenolol). The BRS was evaluated by the tachycardia and bradycardia responses to vasoactive drug-induced decreases and increases in arterial blood pressure (BP), respectively. Additionally, spontaneous BRS was estimated by autoregressive spectral analysis. Kefir-treated SHR exhibited significant attenuation of basal BP, HR, and cardiac hypertrophy compared to non-treated SHR (12, 13, and 21%, respectively). Cardiac VT and ST were significantly altered in the SHR (~40 and ~90 bpm) compared with Wistar rats (~120 and ~30 bpm) and were partially recovered in SHR-kefir (~90 and ~25 bpm). SHR exhibited an impaired bradycardic BRS (~50%) compared with Wistar rats, which was reduced to ~40% in the kefir-treated SHR and abolished by methylatropine in all groups. SHR also exhibited a significant impairment of the tachycardic BRS (~23%) compared with Wistar rats and this difference was reduced to 8% in the SHR-kefir. Under the action of atenolol the residual reflex tachycardia was smaller in SHR than in Wistar rats and kefir attenuated this abnormality. Spectral analysis revealed increased low frequency components of BP (~3.5-fold) and pulse interval (~2-fold) compared with Wistar rats and these differences were reduced by kefir-treatment to ~1.6- and ~1.5-fold, respectively

  10. Impact of liver transplantation on cardiac autonomic denervation in familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Delahaye, Nicolas; Rouzet, François; Sarda, Laure; Tamas, Carmen; Dinanian, Sylvie; Plante-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Adams, David; Samuel, Didier; Merlet, Pascal; Syrota, André; Slama, Michel S; Le Guludec, Dominique

    2006-07-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is a rare and severe hereditary form of amyloidosis, due to the deposition of a genetic variant transthyretin essentially produced by the liver, and characterized by both sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy. Liver transplantation (LT) is the most effective treatment to stop the progression of the disease. Cardiac amyloid infiltration is usually associated with cardiac denervation, restrictive cardiomyopathy, conduction disturbances, and sometimes sudden death. Whether the cardiac involvement related to amyloid deposition may be altered after LT remains unclear. We conducted the present study to define the outcome of cardiac involvement after LT in 31 patients with FAP (age, 39 +/- 12 yr). Patients were evaluated before and after LT (24 +/- 15 mo). Cardiac sympathetic denervation was assessed by both iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy and heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. The scintigraphic importance of sympathetic denervation was evaluated globally on planar imaging using heart-to-mediastinum activity ratio (H/M) measured 4 hours after injection, and regionally using single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging. Amyloid myocardial infiltration was assessed by echocardiography. Diffuse sympathetic denervation was found when using cardiac MIBG planar imaging in patients evaluated before LT and compared with 12 control subjects (H/M: 1.45 +/- 0.29 vs. 1.98 +/- 0.35, p < 0.001). On SPET images, defects were diffuse in 12 patients and focal in 19 patients, with predominance at the inferior and apical segments. No change in sympathetic innervation was found in patients after LT as assessed either with planar imaging (H/M after LT: 1.46 +/- 0.28, p = not significant vs. H/M before LT) or with SPET imaging. HRV nonspectral indexes showed that the standard deviation of all cycles was significantly lower in patients compared with control subjects, and remained unchanged after LT. Conduction disturbances and

  11. Association of altered cardiac autonomic function with psychopathology and metabolic profiles in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ming-Shun; Yang, Albert C; Lin, Yu-Chung; Lin, Chieh-Nan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Shen, Shu-hua; Ouyang, Wen-Chen; Loh, El-Wui; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2013-12-30

    Schizophrenia has been associated with autonomic dysregulation and increased cardiovascular co-morbidity. We hypothesised that autonomic dysregulation in patients with schizophrenia is associated with psychopathology and metabolic profiles. In this study, we aimed to evaluate psychopathology, comprehensive metabolic profiles and cardiac autonomic function using heart-rate variability (HRV) analysis in patients with schizophrenia. A total of 94 patients with schizophrenia and 51 healthy controls were recruited. Each patient underwent a physical examination, laboratory tests and rating scale evaluation, and all subjects underwent a 1-h electrocardiogram monitoring. Analysis of variance was used to compare demographic and HRV variables between control and patient groups. We applied multiple regression analysis with backward selection to examine the association between HRV indices and demographic, metabolic and psychopathology profiles. A decreased HRV was found in patient groups, compared to controls. Reduced vagal-related and complexity domain of HRV indices in patient groups were correlated with increased body mass indices, diastolic pressure, triglycerides, high- and low-density lipoprotein and severity of psychosis mainly in the negative symptom domain. This study provides evidence that altered autonomic function is associated with both psychopathology and metabolic profiles in patients with schizophrenia. These findings may warrant future research in using HRV as objective markers to monitor cardiovascular health and the severity of psychosis in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recent Advances and Clinical Applications of PET Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boutagy, Nabil E; Sinusas, Albert J

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarize current advances in positron emission tomography (PET) cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) imaging, with a specific focus on clinical applications of novel and established tracers. [(11)C]-Meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED) has provided useful information in evaluation of normal and pathological cardiovascular function. Recently, [(11)C]-HED PET imaging was able to predict lethal arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death (SCD), and all-cause mortality in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). In addition, initial [(11)C]-HED PET imaging studies have shown the potential of this agent in elucidating the relationship between impaired cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) innervation and the severity of diastolic dysfunction in HF patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and in predicting the response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in HFrEF patients. Longer half-life (18)F-labeled presynaptic SNS tracers (e.g., [(18)F]-LMI1195) have been developed to facilitate clinical imaging, although no PET radiotracers that target the ANS have gained wide clinical use in the cardiovascular system. Although the use of parasympathetic nervous system radiotracers in cardiac imaging is limited, the novel tracer, [(11)C]-donepezil, has shown potential utility in initial studies. Many ANS radioligands have been synthesized for PET cardiac imaging, but to date, the most clinically relevant PET tracer has been [(11)C]-HED. Recent studies have shown the utility of [(11)C]-HED in relevant clinical issues, such as in the elusive clinical syndrome of HFpEF. Conversely, tracers that target cardiac PNS innervation have been used less clinically, but novel tracers show potential utility for future work. The future application of [(11)C]-HED and newly designed (18)F-labeled tracers for targeting the ANS hold promise for the evaluation and management of a wide range of cardiovascular diseases, including the

  13. Juvenile onset depression alters cardiac autonomic balance in response to psychological and physical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bylsma, Lauren M.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Rottenberg, Jonathan; Jennings, J. Richard; George, Charles J.; Kiss, Enikő; Kapornai, Krisztina; Halas, Kitti; Dochnal, Roberta; Lefkovics, Eszter; Benák, István; Baji, Ildikó; Vetró, Ágnes; Kovacs, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic balance (CAB) indexes the ratio of parasympathetic to sympathetic activation (Berntson, Norman, Hawkley, & Cacioppo, 2008), and is believed to reflect overall autonomic flexibility in the face of environmental challenges. However, CAB has not been examined in depression. We examined changes in CAB and other physiological variables in 179 youth with a history of juvenile onset depression (JOD) and 161 healthy controls, in response to two psychological (unsolvable puzzle, sad film) and two physical (handgrip, and forehead cold pressor) challenges. In repeated measures analyses, controls showed expected reductions in CAB for both the handgrip and unsolvable puzzle, reflecting a shift to sympathetic relative to parasympathetic activation. By contrast, JOD youth showed increased CAB from baseline for both tasks (ps<.05). No effects were found for the forehead cold pressor or sad film tasks, suggesting that CAB differences may arise under conditions requiring greater attentional control or sustained effort. PMID:26225465

  14. Resistance exercise improves autonomic regulation at rest and haemodynamic response to exercise in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Hallsworth, Kate; Zalewski, Pawel; Thoma, Christian; Klawe, Jacek J; Day, Christopher P; Newton, Julia; Trenell, Michael I

    2013-08-01

    Autonomic dysfunction has been reported in patients with NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) and is associated with clinical presentations. To date, there are no therapies to improve autonomic regulation in people with NAFLD. The present study defines the impact of a short-term exercise programme on cardiac autonomic and haemodynamic regulation in patients with NAFLD. A total of 17 patients with clinically defined NAFLD [age, 55±12 years; BMI (body mass index), 33±5 kg/m²; liver fat, 17±9%] were randomized to 8 weeks of resistance exercise or a control group to continue standard care. Resting and submaximal exercise (50% of peak oxygen consumption) autonomic and cardiac haemodynamic measures were assessed before and after the intervention. Resistance exercise resulted in a 14% reduction in HR (heart rate) and 7% lower SBP (systolic blood pressure) during submaximal exercise (16 beats/min, P=0.03 and 16 mmHg, P=0.22). Sympathovagal balance, expressed as LF/HF (low-frequency/high-frequency) ratio of the mean HR beat-to-beat (R-R) interval, was reduced by 37% (P=0.26). Similarly sympathovagal balance of DBP (diastolic blood pressure) and SBP variability decreased by 29% (P=0.33) and 19% (P=0.55), respectively in the exercise group only. BRS (baroreflex sensitivity) increased by 31% (P=0.08) following exercise. The mean R-R interval increased by 23% (159 ms, P=0.09). Parasympathetic regulation was decreased by 17% (P=0.05) and overall sympathovagal balance in BP regulation (LF/HF ratio) increased by 26% (P=0.02) following resistance exercise. Resting haemodynamic measures remained similar between groups. Resistance exercise therapy seems to improve autonomic and submaximal exercise haemodynamic regulation in NAFLD. Further studies are required to define its role in clinical management of the condition.

  15. An Autonomic Link Between Inhaled Diesel Exhaust and Impaired Cardiac Performance: Insight From Treadmill and Doubutamine Challenges in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Short-term exposure to vehicular emissions is associated with adverse cardiac events. Diesel exhaust (DE) is an ubiquitous air pollutant believed to provoke cardiac events partly through imbalance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervo...

  16. An Autonomic Link Between Inhaled Diesel Exhaust and Impaired Cardiac Performance: Insight From Treadmill and Doubutamine Challenges in Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Short-term exposure to vehicular emissions is associated with adverse cardiac events. Diesel exhaust (DE) is an ubiquitous air pollutant believed to provoke cardiac events partly through imbalance of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervo...

  17. Effects of interval and continuous exercise training on autonomic cardiac function in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Diego A; Arbillaga, Ane; Barberan-Garcia, Anael; Ramirez-Sarmiento, Alba; Torralba, Yolanda; Vilaró, Jordi; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Gea, Joaquim; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Roca, Josep; Marco, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Both interval (IT) and continuous (CT) exercise training results in an improvement of aerobic capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, their effects on cardiac autonomic function remains unclear. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of a supervised CT vs IT on autonomic cardiac function in COPD patients. COPD patients were divided into two different groups according to training modality (IT or CT). Autonomic cardiac dysfunction (ACD) was defined as a heart rate recovery lower than 12 bpm heart rate after the first minute of maximal exercise (HRR1 ) and an abnormal chronotropic response (CR) to exercise (<80%). A total of 29 patients {mean [standard deviation (SD)] age: 68 (8) years, %FEV1 : 42 (13) predicted} were trained (15 subjects in the CT group, 14 subjects in the IT group). After training, both groups increased peak oxygen consumption [mean difference ΔVO2 peak: 156 mL/min (P = 0.04) on IT; and 210 mL/min (P = 0.01) on CT], HRR1 [IT, from 10.4 (5) to 13.8 (5) bpm (P = 0.04); and CT, from 14.3 (5) to 17.7 (5) bpm (P = 0.04)] and CR [IT, from 57% (22) to 81% (9) (P = 0.001); and CT, from 48% (28) to 73% (17) (P = 0.001)]. Sixteen patients showed ACD. Among these patients, HRR1 (P = 0.01 for IT and P = 0.04 for CT) and CR (P = 0.001 for IT and P = 0.002 for CT) were enhanced after training. Both IT and CT exercise training improve heart rate recovery and CR in COPD patients. These benefits could help to individualize exercise training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Physical Fitness and Dehydration Influences on the Cardiac Autonomic Control of Fighter Pilots.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Silva, Iransé; Boullosa, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    Physical fitness and dehydration are factors that may influence cardiac autonomic control. We aimed to verify the influence of these factors on cardiac autonomic control before, during, and after a flight. At the same time of day, 11 healthy fighter pilots recorded several 1-h bouts of heart rate (HR) activity during a non- (control) and a training flight day. Autonomic control of HR was examined via time domain and non-linear heart rate variability (HRV) analyses. The level of dehydration during the flight was evaluated by changes in hematocrit, while aerobic capacity, muscular strength, and body fatness were the physical fitness components evaluated. The flight induced a significant reduction in most parameters of HRV during flight time when compared to the control day. However, no differences were found between the days before the flight, while the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) of HR was the only parameter significantly reduced (11.05 ± 7.7%) after the flight. Significant correlations were observed between the sample entropy of HR during flight and aerobic capacity (r = 0.777) and body fatness (r = -0.617). Correlations between dehydration and changes in HRV (RMSSD and SD1) were also identified (r = -0.61 to -0.81). The current results demonstrated significant relationships between aerobic capacity, body fatness, and hydration status on autonomic control of HR during and after flights. No relationship to muscular strength was observed. Future studies may further elucidate the impact of these factors on pilot training in order to accommodate flight's stressors and enhance performance.

  19. Effects of manual lymph drainage on cardiac autonomic tone in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Joong; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of manual lymph drainage on the cardiac autonomic tone. Thirty-two healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to manual lymph drainage (MLD) (experimental) and rest (control) groups. Electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters were recorded with bipolar electrocardiography using standard limb lead positions. The pressure-pain threshold (PPT) was quantitatively measured using an algometer. Heart rate variability differed significantly between the experimental and control groups (p < 0.05), but the PPT in the upper trapezius muscle did not (p > 0.05). These findings indicate that the application of MLD was effective in reducing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system.

  20. Impaired aerobic exercise capacity and cardiac autonomic control in primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C B; Perandini, L A; Seguro, L P C; Gualano, B; Roschel, H; Bonfa, E; Borba, E F; Sá-Pinto, A L

    2013-08-01

    Primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Aerobic capacity and cardiac autonomic control are also associated with these risks. The aim of our study was to assess aerobic capacity and cardiac autonomic control in PAPS patients. Thirteen women with PAPS and 13 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and body mass index were enrolled for the study. Both groups were sedentary and were not under chronotropic, antidepressants and hypolipemiant drugs. All subjects performed a treadmill-graded maximal exercise. Aerobic capacity was assessed by peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), time at anaerobic ventilatory threshold (VAT) and respiratory compensation point (RCP) and time-to-exhaustion, whereas cardiac autonomic control was assessed by chronotropic reserve (CR) and heart rate recovery at the first and second minutes after graded exercise (HRR1min and HRR2min, respectively). All aerobic capacity indexes were reduced more in PAPS patients than in healthy subjects: VO2peak (30.2 ± 4.7 vs 34.6 ± 4.3 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), p = 0.021), time at VAT (3.0 ± 1.5 vs 5.0 ± 2.0 min, p = 0.016), time at RCP (6.5 ± 2.0 vs 8.0 ± 2.0 min, p = 0.050), time-to-exhaustion (8.5 ± 2.0 vs 11.0 ± 2.5 min, p = 0.010). HRR1min (22 ± 9 vs 30 ± 7 bpm, p = 0.032) and HRR2min (33 ± 9 vs 46 ± 8 bpm, p = 0.002) were delayed in PAPS patients compared to healthy controls but CR was not significantly different (p = 0.272). In conclusion, an impaired aerobic capacity and cardiac autonomic control was identified in PAPS.

  1. Irisin regulates cardiac physiology in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Sundarrajan, Lakshminarasimhan; Yeung, Chanel; Hahn, Logan; Weber, Lynn P.

    2017-01-01

    Irisin is a myokine encoded in its precursor fibronectin type III domain containing 5 (FNDC5). It is abundantly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscle, and is secreted upon the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1 alpha). We aimed to study the role of irisin on cardiac function and muscle protein regulation in zebrafish. Western blot analyses detected the presence of irisin protein (23 kDa) in zebrafish heart and skeletal muscle, and irisin immunoreactivity was detected in both tissues. Irisin siRNA treated samples did not show bands corresponding to irisin in zebrafish. In vitro studies found that treatment with irisin (0.1 nM) downregulated the expression of PGC-1 alpha, myostatin a, and b, while upregulating troponin C mRNA expression in zebrafish heart and skeletal muscle. Exogenous irisin (0.1 and 1 ng/g B.W) increased diastolic volume, heart rate and cardiac output, while knockdown of irisin (10 ng/g B.W) showed opposing effects on cardiovascular function. Irisin (1 and 10 ng/g B.W) downregulated PGC-1 alpha, myostatin a and b, and upregulated troponin C and troponin T2D mRNA expression. Meanwhile, knockdown of irisin showed opposing effects on troponin C, troponin T2D and myostatin a and b mRNAs in zebrafish heart and skeletal muscle. Collectively, these results identified muscle proteins as novel targets of irisin, and added irisin to the list of peptide modulators of cardiovascular physiology in zebrafish. PMID:28771499

  2. Evaluation of various cardiac autonomic indices in patients with familial Mediterranean fever on colchicine treatment.

    PubMed

    Canpolat, Uğur; Dural, Muhammed; Aytemir, Kudret; Akdoğan, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Sahiner, Levent; Yalçin, Ulvi; Canpolat, Asena Gökçay; Calgüneri, Meral; Kabakçi, Giray; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali

    2012-04-03

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is characterized by sporadic, acute attacks of fever and serositis. Cardiovascular involvement is one of the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among FMF patients. Herein, we aimed to evaluate cardiac autonomic functions in FMF patients without overt cardiac symptoms. We enrolled 38 patients (20 female; mean age 34.4 ± 10.2 years) with FMF and 34 healthy subjects (18 female; mean age 33.2 ± 9.3 years). All participants underwent 24-hour Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting first, second, and third minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV), heart rate turbulance (HRT) and QT dispersion analysis. The mean FMF duration was 9.8 ± 4.2 years. Both groups were similar with regard to baseline characteristics. Mean HRR1 (p=0.001), HRR2 (p=0.003) and HRR3 (p<0.001) were significantly lower in FMF group. SDNN (standard deviation of all NN intervals), SDANN (SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals), RMSSD (root square of successive differences in RR interval), and PNN50 (proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms) and high-frequency (HF) components were significantly decreased, but low frequency (LF) and LF/HF were significantly higher in FMF patients. HRT onset and slope were significantly less negative in FMF patients. Also, QTd was significantly higher in FMF patients (p<0.001). Patients with FMF showed delayed recovery of heart rate and abnormal HRV and HRT parameters with respect to normal subjects. Cardiac autonomic functions might be involved in FMF patients even in patients without cardiac symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of linear mixed-effects model with LASSO to identify metal components associated with cardiac autonomic responses among welders: a repeated measures study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinming; Cavallari, Jennifer M; Fang, Shona C; Weisskopf, Marc G; Lin, Xihong; Mittleman, Murray A; Christiani, David C

    2017-06-29

    Environmental and occupational exposure to metals is ubiquitous worldwide, and understanding the hazardous metal components in this complex mixture is essential for environmental and occupational regulations. To identify hazardous components from metal mixtures that are associated with alterations in cardiac autonomic responses. Urinary concentrations of 16 types of metals were examined and 'acceleration capacity' (AC) and 'deceleration capacity' (DC), indicators of cardiac autonomic effects, were quantified from ECG recordings among 54 welders. We fitted linear mixed-effects models with least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) to identify metal components that are associated with AC and DC. The Bayesian Information Criterion was used as the criterion for model selection procedures. Mercury and chromium were selected for DC analysis, whereas mercury, chromium and manganese were selected for AC analysis through the LASSO approach. When we fitted the linear mixed-effects models with 'selected' metal components only, the effect of mercury remained significant. Every 1 µg/L increase in urinary mercury was associated with -0.58 ms (-1.03, -0.13) changes in DC and 0.67 ms (0.25, 1.10) changes in AC. Our study suggests that exposure to several metals is associated with impaired cardiac autonomic functions. Our findings should be replicated in future studies with larger sample sizes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Co-expression changes of lncRNAs and mRNAs in the cervical sympathetic ganglia in diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilin; Sheng, Xuan; Xu, Yurong; Jiang, Huaide; Zheng, Chaoran; Guo, Jingjing; Sun, Shanshan; Yi, Zhihua; Qin, Shulan; Liu, Shuangmei; Gao, Yun; Zhang, Chunping; Xu, Hong; Wu, Bing; Zou, Lifang; Liang, Shangdong; Zhu, Gaochun

    2016-12-19

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is often a devastating complication. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important effects on both normal development and disease pathogenesis. In this study, we explored the expression profiles of some lncRNAs involved in inflammation which may be co-expressed with messenger RNA (mRNA) in superior cervical and stellate ganglia after type 2 diabetic injuries. Total RNA isolated from 10 pairs of superior cervical and stellate ganglia in diabetic and normal male rats was hybridized to lncRNA arrays for detections. Pathway analysis indicated that the most significant gene ontology (GO) processes that were upregulated in diabetes were associated with immune response, cell migration, defense response, taxis, and chemotaxis. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway revealed that most of the target genes of the lncRNAs were located in cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, the chemokine signaling pathway and cell adhesion molecules, which were involved in T2D. Gene co-expression network construction showed that the co-expression network in the experimental rats consisted of 268 regulation edges among 105 lncRNAs and 11 mRNAs. Our studies demonstrated the co-expression profile of lncRNAs and mRNAs in diabetic cardiac autonomic ganglia, suggesting possible roles for multiple lncRNAs as potential targets for the development of therapeutic strategies or biomarkers for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Sympathetic cardiac hyperinnervation and atrial autonomic imbalance in diet-induced obesity promote cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Hasan, Wohaib; Streiff, Cole T; Houle, Jennifer C; Woodward, William R; Giraud, George D; Brooks, Virginia L; Habecker, Beth A

    2013-11-15

    Obesity increases the risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that obesity-induced cardiac sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation promotes the development of arrhythmic events. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-275 g), fed a high-fat diet (33% kcal/fat), diverged into obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) groups and were compared with rats fed normal chow (13% kcal/fat; CON). In vitro experiments showed that both OR and OP rats exhibited hyperinnervation of the heart and high sympathetic outgrowth compared with CON rats, even though OR rats are not obese. Despite the hyperinnervation and outgrowth, we showed that, in vivo, OR rats were less susceptible to arrhythmic events after an intravenous epinephrine challenge compared with OP rats. On examining total and stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter levels in an ex vivo system, we demonstrate that atrial acetylcholine content and release were attenuated in OP compared with OR and CON groups. OP rats also expressed elevated atrial norepinephrine content, while norepinephrine release was suppressed. These findings suggest that the consumption of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overt obesity, stimulates sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation of the heart. However, normalized cardiac parasympathetic nervous system control may protect the heart from arrhythmic events.

  6. Cardiac autonomic function and hot flashes among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Carolyn J; Mendes, Wendy Berry; Schembri, Michael; Grady, Deborah; Huang, Alison J

    2017-07-01

    Abnormalities in autonomic function are posited to play a pathophysiologic role in menopausal hot flashes. We examined relationships between resting cardiac autonomic activity and hot flashes in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Autonomic function was assessed at baseline and 12 weeks among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women (n = 121, mean age 53 years) in a randomized trial of slow-paced respiration for hot flashes. Pre-ejection period (PEP), a marker of sympathetic activation, was measured with impedance cardiography. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a marker of parasympathetic activation, was measured with electrocardiography. Participants self-reported hot flash frequency and severity in 7-day symptom diaries. Analysis of covariance models were used to relate autonomic function and hot flash frequency and severity at baseline, and to relate changes in autonomic function to changes in hot flash frequency and severity over 12 weeks, adjusting for age, body mass index, and intervention assignment. PEP was not associated with hot flash frequency or severity at baseline or over 12 weeks (P > 0.05 for all). In contrast, there was a trend toward greater frequency of moderate-to-severe hot flashes with higher RSA at baseline (β = 0.43, P = 0.06), and a positive association between change in RSA and change in frequency of moderate-to-severe hot flashes over 12 weeks (β = 0.63, P = 0.04). Among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with hot flashes, variations in hot flash frequency and severity were not explained by variations in resting sympathetic activation. Greater parasympathetic activation was associated with more frequent moderate-to-severe hot flashes, which may reflect increased sensitivity to perceiving hot flashes.

  7. Cardiac sodium channel regulator MOG1 regulates cardiac morphogenesis and rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Wang, Longfei; Zuo, Mengxia; Wang, Xiaojing; Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Chen, Qiuyun; Wang, Qing K.

    2016-01-01

    MOG1 was initially identified as a protein that interacts with the small GTPase Ran involved in transport of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. In addition, we have established that MOG1 interacts with the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 and regulates cell surface trafficking of Nav1.5. Here we used zebrafish as a model system to study the in vivo physiological role of MOG1. Knockdown of mog1 expression in zebrafish embryos significantly decreased the heart rate (HR). Consistently, the HR increases in embryos with over-expression of human MOG1. Compared with wild type MOG1 or control EGFP, mutant MOG1 with mutation E83D associated with Brugada syndrome significantly decreases the HR. Interestingly, knockdown of mog1 resulted in abnormal cardiac looping during embryogenesis. Mechanistically, knockdown of mog1 decreases expression of hcn4 involved in the regulation of the HR, and reduces expression of nkx2.5, gata4 and hand2 involved in cardiac morphogenesis. These data for the first time revealed a novel role that MOG1, a nucleocytoplasmic transport protein, plays in cardiac physiology and development. PMID:26903377

  8. Regulation of cardiac C-protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic responses were addressed by studying subcellular changes in protein phosphorylation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity and protein phosphatase activity in frog hearts. B-adrenergic agonists increased and muscarinic cholinergic agonists decreased (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporation into C-protein, a thick filament component. Regulation of protein phosphatase activity by Iso and methacholine (MCh) was assayed using extracts of drug treated frog hearts and (/sup 32/P)phospho-C-protein as substrate. Total phosphatase activity decreased 21% in extracts from hearts perfused with 0.1 ..mu..M Iso and 17% in hearts exposed to Iso plus 1 ..mu..M methacholine. This decrease reflected decreased phosphatase-2A activity. No changes in total phosphatase activity were measurable in broken cells treated with Iso or MCh. The results suggest adrenergic stimulation changes contractile activity in frog hearts by activating cAMP-dependent protein kinase associated with particulate cellular elements and inactivating soluble protein phosphatase-2A. This is the first demonstration of coordinated regulation of these enzymes by B-adrenergic agonists favoring phosphorylation of effector proteins. Coordinated regulation by methacholine in the presence of Iso was not observed.

  9. Fetal Cardiac Autonomic Control during Breathing and Non-Breathing Epochs: The Effect of Maternal Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Kathleen M.; May, Linda E.; Yeh, Hung-wen; Million, Stephanie K.; Allen, John J. B.

    2013-01-01

    We explored whether maternal exercise during pregnancy moderates the effect of fetal breathing movements on fetal cardiac autonomic control assessed by metrics of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty women were assigned to Exercise or Control group (n=15/group) based on the modifiable physical activity questionnaire (MPAQ). Magnetocardiograms (MCG) were recorded using a dedicated fetal biomagnetometer. Periods of fetal breathing activity and apnea were identified using the fetal diaphragmatic magnetomyogram (dMMG) as a marker. MCG R-waves were marked. Metrics of fetal HR and HRV were compared using 1 breathing and1 apneic epoch/fetus. The main effects of group (Exercise vs. Control) and condition (Apnea vs. Breathing) and their interactions were explored. Fetal breathing resulted in significantly lower fetal HR and higher vagally-mediated HRV. Maternal exercise resulted in significantly lower fetal HR, higher total HRV and vagally-mediated HRV with no difference in frequency band ratios. Significant interactions between maternal exercise and fetal breathing were found for metrics summarizing total HRV and a parasympathetic metric. Post hoc comparison showed no group difference during fetal apnea. Fetal breathing was associated with a loss of Total HRV in the Control group and no difference in the Exercise group. Both groups show enhanced vagal function during fetal breathing; greater in the Exercise group. During in utero breathing movements, the fetus of the exercising mother has enhanced cardiac autonomic function that may give the offspring an adaptive advantage. PMID:22264436

  10. Fetal cardiac autonomic control during breathing and non-breathing epochs: the effect of maternal exercise.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Kathleen M; May, Linda E; Yeh, Hung-wen; Million, Stephanie K; Allen, John J B

    2012-07-01

    We explored whether maternal exercise during pregnancy moderates the effect of fetal breathing movements on fetal cardiac autonomic control assessed by metrics of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV). Thirty women were assigned to Exercise or Control group (n=15/group) based on the modifiable physical activity questionnaire (MPAQ). Magnetocardiograms (MCG) were recorded using a dedicated fetal biomagnetometer. Periods of fetal breathing activity and apnea were identified using the fetal diaphragmatic magnetomyogram (dMMG) as a marker. MCG R-waves were marked. Metrics of fetal HR and HRV were compared using 1 breathing and 1 apneic epoch/fetus. The main effects of group (Exercise vs. Control) and condition (Apnea vs. Breathing) and their interactions were explored. Fetal breathing resulted in significantly lower fetal HR and higher vagally-mediated HRV. Maternal exercise resulted in significantly lower fetal HR, higher total HRV and vagally-mediated HRV with no difference in frequency band ratios. Significant interactions between maternal exercise and fetal breathing were found for metrics summarizing total HRV and a parasympathetic metric. Post hoc comparison showed no group difference during fetal apnea. Fetal breathing was associated with a loss of Total HRV in the Control group and no difference in the Exercise group. Both groups show enhanced vagal function during fetal breathing; greater in the Exercise group. During in utero breathing movements, the fetus of the exercising mother has enhanced cardiac autonomic function that may give the offspring an adaptive advantage.

  11. Physical training induced resting bradycardia and its association with cardiac autonomic nervous activities.

    PubMed

    Alom, M M; Bhuiyan, N I; Hossain, M M; Hoque, M F; Rozario, R J; Nessa, W

    2011-10-01

    Regular physical exercise causes resting bradycardia. This exercise-induced resting bradycardia may be associated with exercise-induced changes in Cardiac autonomic nervous activities (CANA). Power Spectral Analysis (PSA) of Heart rate variability (HRV) is one of the most promising new techniques to quantify CANA. Regular physical exercise induced bradycardia is associated with exercise-induced adaptation in CANA. To observe the HRV parameters by frequency domain method (PSA), in male adolescent athletes in order to find out the influence of regular physical exercise on resting heart rate (HR) and CANA. The cross sectional study was carried out on 62 adolescent male athletes aged 12-18 years (group B), in the Department of Physiology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University from 1st July 2007 to 30th June 2008. For comparison 30 age, sex and socioeconomic condition matched apparently healthy sedentary subjects (group A) were also studied. The study group was selected from the BKSP (Bangladesh Krira Shikka Prothistan, Savar, Dhaka) and the control from a residential school of Dhaka city. HRV parameters were assessed by Polygraph (Polyrite D, version 2.2). For statistical analysis Independent-Samples t-test was done as applicable. Resting mean HR was significantly (p<0.001) lower in the athletes. The mean value of Total (variance), VLF, LF and HF power was significantly (p<0.001) higher in athletes than that of non-athetes. Regular physical exercise-induced resting bradycardia is associated with exercise-induced adaptation in cardiac autonomic nervous activities.

  12. Aerobic exercise during pregnancy influences fetal cardiac autonomic control of heart rate and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    May, Linda E; Glaros, Alan; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Clapp, James F; Gustafson, Kathleen M

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies using ultrasound technology showed that fetal heart rate (HR) may be responsive to maternal aerobic exercise. Although it is recognized that cardiac autonomic control may be influenced by the intrauterine environment, little is known about how maternal exercise affects fetal heart development. This study tested the hypothesis that regular maternal exercise throughout gestation influences fetal cardiac autonomic control of HR and heart rate variability (HRV) when compared to fetuses of non-exercising women. Magnetocardiograms (MCGs) were recorded using a dedicated fetal biomagnetometer at 28, 32 and 36 weeks gestational age (GA) from 26 regularly exercising (>30 min of aerobic exercise, 3x per week) and 35 healthy, non-exercising pregnant women. Fetal MCG was isolated and normal R-peaks were marked to derive fetal HR and HRV in the time and frequency domains. We applied a mixed-effects model to investigate the effects of exercise, GA and fetal activity state. At 36 weeks GA, during the active fetal state, fetal HR was significantly lower in the exercise group (p=<0.0006). Post-hoc comparisons showed significantly increased HRV in the exercise group during the active fetal state at 36 weeks GA for both time and frequency domain measures. These results indicate that regular maternal exercise throughout gestation results in significantly lower fetal HR and increased HRV. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of feeding schedule changes on the circadian phase of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and serum lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Takahiro; Tada, Yuki; Hida, Azumi; Sunami, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Yuri; Yasuda, Jun; Nakai, Ayumi; Togo, Fumiharu; Kawano, Yukari

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether scheduling meals earlier in the day affects the circadian phase of the cardiac autonomic nervous system as assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) and serum lipid levels. Healthy men aged 21.4 ± 0.5 years (n = 14) with a habit of regularly skipping breakfast participated in this parallel trial involving altered feeding schedules. Participants in the early mealtime group (EM group, n = 8) were asked to eat three meals at 8:00, 13:00, and 18:00, and the control group (n = 6) ate at 13:00, 18:00, and 23:00 for 2 weeks. On the measurement day before and after intervention, fasting blood samples and 24-h electrocardiograph recordings were collected. Spectral analysis was used for approximate 10-min HRV segments. Low frequency (LF) power, high frequency (HF) power, and the ratio of HF to total power (%HF) were calculated to assess sympathovagal balance. Acrophases of the circadian rhythm of HRV variables were obtained by nonlinear least squares regression. Triglyceride and total and LDL cholesterol levels were significantly decreased in the EM group when compared with the control group (p = 0.035, 0.008, and 0.004, respectively). Acrophases for HRV variables were advanced in the EM group and their difference between before and after the intervention in LF power (-3.2 ± 1.2 h) and %HF (-1.2 ± 0.5 h) reached significant level, respectively (p < 0.05). Timing of meals was a key factor in regulating circadian phases of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and lipid metabolism.

  14. Cardiac reflexes in a warming world: thermal plasticity of barostatic control and autonomic tones in a temperate fish.

    PubMed

    Sandblom, Erik; Ekström, Andreas; Brijs, Jeroen; Sundström, L Fredrik; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Clark, Timothy D; Adill, Anders; Aho, Teija; Gräns, Albin

    2016-09-15

    Thermal plasticity of cardiorespiratory function allows ectotherms like fish to cope with seasonal temperature changes and is critical for resilience to climate change. Yet, the chronic thermal effects on cardiovascular homeostatic reflexes in fish are little understood although this may have important implications for physiological performance and overall resilience to climate warming. We compared cardiac autonomic control and baroreflex regulation of heart rate in perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) from a reference area in the Baltic Sea at 18-19°C with conspecifics from the Biotest enclosure, a chronically heated ecosystem receiving warmed effluent water (24-25°C) from a nuclear power plant. Resting heart rate of Biotest fish displayed clear thermal compensation and was 58.3±2.3 beats min(-1) compared with 52.4±2.6 beats min(-1) in reference fish at their respective environmental temperatures (Q10=1.2). The thermally compensated heart rate of Biotest fish was a combined effect of elevated inhibitory cholinergic tone (105% in Biotest fish versus 70% in reference fish) and reduced intrinsic cardiac pacemaker rate. A barostatic response was evident in both groups, as pharmacologically induced increases and decreases in blood pressure resulted in atropine-sensitive bradycardia and tachycardia, respectively. Yet, the tachycardia in Biotest fish was significantly greater, presumably due to the larger scope for vagal release. Acclimation of Biotest fish to 18°C for 3 weeks abolished differences in intrinsic heart rate and autonomic tone, suggesting considerable short-term thermal plasticity of cardiovascular control in this species. The heightened hypotensive tachycardia in Biotest perch may represent an important mechanism of ectothermic vertebrates that safeguards tissue perfusion pressure when tissue oxygen demand is elevated by environmental warming.

  15. Quantification of cardiac autonomic nervous activities in ambulatory dogs by eliminating cardiac electric activities using cubic smoothing spline.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Choi, Eue Keun; Chung, Gih Sung; Oh, Seil; Park, Kwang Suk

    2012-02-01

    With the development of an implantable radio transmitter system, direct measurement of cardiac autonomic nervous activities (CANAs) became possible for ambulatory animals for a couple of months. However, measured CANAs include not only CANA but also cardiac electric activity (CEA) that can affect the quantification of CANAs. In this study, we propose a novel CEA removal method using moving standard deviation and cubic smoothing spline. This method consisted of two steps of detecting CEA segments and eliminating CEAs in detected segments. Using implanted devices, we recorded stellate ganglion nerve activity (SGNA), vagal nerve activity (VNA) and superior left ganglionated plexi nerve activity (SLGPNA) directly from four ambulatory dogs. The CEA-removal performance of the proposed method was evaluated and compared with commonly used high-pass filtration (HPF) for various heart rates and CANA amplitudes. Results tested with simulated CEA and simulated true CANA revealed stable and excellent performance of the suggested method compared to the HPF method. The averaged relative error percentages of the proposed method were less than 0.67%, 0.65% and 1.76% for SGNA, VNA and SLGPNA, respectively.

  16. High-Intensity Progressive Resistance Training Increases Strength With No Change in Cardiovascular Function and Autonomic Neural Regulation in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Kanegusuku, Hélcio; Queiroz, Andréia C; Silva, Valdo J; de Mello, Marco T; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Forjaz, Cláudia L

    2015-07-01

    The effects of high-intensity progressive resistance training (HIPRT) on cardiovascular function and autonomic neural regulation in older adults are unclear. To investigate this issue, 25 older adults were randomly divided into two groups: control (CON, N = 13, 63 ± 4 years; no training) and HIPRT (N = 12, 64 ± 4 years; 2 sessions/week, 7 exercises, 2–4 sets, 10–4 RM). Before and after four months, maximal strength, quadriceps cross-sectional area (QCSA), clinic and ambulatory blood pressures (BP), systemic hemodynamics, and cardiovascular autonomic modulation were measured. Maximal strength and QCSA increased in the HIPRT group and did not change in the CON group. Clinic and ambulatory BP, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, stroke volume, heart rate, and cardiac sympathovagal balance did not change in the HIPRT group or the CON group. In conclusion, HIPRT was effective at increasing muscle mass and strength without promoting changes in cardiovascular function or autonomic neural regulation.

  17. Effect of Yoga on migraine: A comprehensive study using clinical profile and cardiac autonomic functions.

    PubMed

    Kisan, Ravikiran; Sujan, Mu; Adoor, Meghana; Rao, Raghavendra; Nalini, A; Kutty, Bindu M; Chindanda Murthy, Bt; Raju, Tr; Sathyaprabha, Tn

    2014-07-01

    Migraine is an episodic disabling headache requiring long-term management. Migraine management through Yoga therapy would reduce the medication cost with positive health benefits. Yoga has shown to improve the quality of life, reduce the episode of headache and medication. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of Yoga as an adjuvant therapy in migraine patients by assessing clinical outcome and autonomic functions tests. Migraine patients were randomly given either conventional care (n = 30) or Yoga with conventional care (n = 30). Yoga group received Yoga practice session for 5 days a week for 6 weeks along with conventional care. Clinical assessment (frequency, intensity of headache and headache impact) and autonomic function test were done at baseline and at the end of the intervention. Yoga with conventional care and convention care groups showed significant improvement in clinical variables, but it was better with Yoga therapy. Improvement in the vagal tone along with reduced sympathetic activity was observed in patients with migraine receiving Yoga as adjuvant therapy. Intervention showed significant clinical improvement in both groups. Headache frequency and intensity were reduced more in Yoga with conventional care than the conventional care group alone. Furthermore, Yoga therapy enhanced the vagal tone and decreased the sympathetic drive, hence improving the cardiac autonomic balance. Thus, Yoga therapy can be effectively incorporated as an adjuvant therapy in migraine patients.

  18. Gender differences in autonomic cardiovascular regulation: spectral, hormonal, and hemodynamic indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. M.; Ziegler, M. G.; Patwardhan, A. R.; Ott, J. B.; Kim, C. S.; Leonelli, F. M.; Knapp, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system drives variability in heart rate, vascular tone, cardiac ejection, and arterial pressure, but gender differences in autonomic regulation of the latter three parameters are not well documented. In addition to mean values, we used spectral analysis to calculate variability in arterial pressure, heart rate (R-R interval, RRI), stroke volume, and total peripheral resistance (TPR) and measured circulating levels of catecholamines and pancreatic polypeptide in two groups of 25 +/- 1.2-yr-old, healthy men and healthy follicular-phase women (40 total subjects, 10 men and 10 women per group). Group 1 subjects were studied supine, before and after beta- and muscarinic autonomic blockades, administered singly and together on separate days of study. Group 2 subjects were studied supine and drug free with the additional measurement of skin perfusion. In the unblocked state, we found that circulating levels of epinephrine and total spectral power of stroke volume, TPR, and skin perfusion ranged from two to six times greater in men than in women. The difference (men > women) in spectral power of TPR was maintained after beta- and muscarinic blockades, suggesting that the greater oscillations of vascular resistance in men may be alpha-adrenergically mediated. Men exhibited muscarinic buffering of mean TPR whereas women exhibited beta-adrenergic buffering of mean TPR as well as TPR and heart rate oscillations. Women had a greater distribution of RRI power in the breathing frequency range and a less negative slope of ln RRI power vs. ln frequency, both indicators that parasympathetic stimuli were the dominant influence on women's heart rate variability. The results of our study suggest a predominance of sympathetic vascular regulation in men compared with a dominant parasympathetic influence on heart rate regulation in women.

  19. Gender differences in autonomic cardiovascular regulation: spectral, hormonal, and hemodynamic indexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. M.; Ziegler, M. G.; Patwardhan, A. R.; Ott, J. B.; Kim, C. S.; Leonelli, F. M.; Knapp, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system drives variability in heart rate, vascular tone, cardiac ejection, and arterial pressure, but gender differences in autonomic regulation of the latter three parameters are not well documented. In addition to mean values, we used spectral analysis to calculate variability in arterial pressure, heart rate (R-R interval, RRI), stroke volume, and total peripheral resistance (TPR) and measured circulating levels of catecholamines and pancreatic polypeptide in two groups of 25 +/- 1.2-yr-old, healthy men and healthy follicular-phase women (40 total subjects, 10 men and 10 women per group). Group 1 subjects were studied supine, before and after beta- and muscarinic autonomic blockades, administered singly and together on separate days of study. Group 2 subjects were studied supine and drug free with the additional measurement of skin perfusion. In the unblocked state, we found that circulating levels of epinephrine and total spectral power of stroke volume, TPR, and skin perfusion ranged from two to six times greater in men than in women. The difference (men > women) in spectral power of TPR was maintained after beta- and muscarinic blockades, suggesting that the greater oscillations of vascular resistance in men may be alpha-adrenergically mediated. Men exhibited muscarinic buffering of mean TPR whereas women exhibited beta-adrenergic buffering of mean TPR as well as TPR and heart rate oscillations. Women had a greater distribution of RRI power in the breathing frequency range and a less negative slope of ln RRI power vs. ln frequency, both indicators that parasympathetic stimuli were the dominant influence on women's heart rate variability. The results of our study suggest a predominance of sympathetic vascular regulation in men compared with a dominant parasympathetic influence on heart rate regulation in women.

  20. Cardiac autonomic recovery after strength exercise in lower and upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Isidoro, Naerton JoséXavier; Santana, Milana Drumond Ramos; Valenti, Vitor E; Garner, David M; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Strength exercises influence the cardiovascular system by promoting autonomic adjustments induced by the increased metabolic demand and consequent increase in local blood flow. However, it is unclear whether there are differences between upper and lower limbs. We aimedto evaluate recovery of cardiac autonomic modulation afterstrengthexercise in upper and lower limbs. Methods We analysed 29 healthy male subjects physically active but not professional athletes aged between 20 and 35 years old. We analysed heart rate variability (HRV) in the time and frequency domain 0-10 minutes before exercise (T1), 0-10 minutes after exercise (T2), 10-20 minutes after exercise (T3) and 20-30 minutes after exercise (T4). Results Regarding the time domain we observed that the SDNN, pNN50 and RMSSD were reduced (P < 0.0001) in T2, T3, T4 in relation to T1 with no difference between upper and lower limbs. In the frequency domain analysis, we observed stronger significancefor the increased values of LF (nu) (P = 0.0008) and LF/HF ratio (P = 0.0008) and for reduction in HF (nu) (P = 0.0008) in the lower limbs compared to upper limbs (LF (nu) - P = 0.0015, LF/HF ratio - P = 0.0028 and HF (nu) - P = 0.0028). Conclusion Strength exercise acutely induced more pronounced cardiac autonomic responses in lower limbs compared to upper limbs.

  1. Modulation of cardiac autonomic tone in non-hypotensive hypovolemia during blood donation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kavita; Singh, Akanksha; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Coshic, Poonam; Chatterjee, Kabita; Deepak, K K

    2016-08-02

    Non-hypotensive hypovolemia, observed during mild haemorrhage or blood donation leads to reflex readjustment of the cardiac autonomic tone. In the present study, the cardiac autonomic tone was quantified using heart rate and blood pressure variability during and after non-hypotensive hypovolemia of blood donation. 86 voluntary healthy male blood donors were recruited for the study (age 35 ± 9 years; weight 78 ± 12 kg; height 174 ± 6 cms). Continuous lead II ECG and beat-to-beat blood pressure was recorded before, during and after blood donation followed by offline time and frequency domain analysis of HRV and BPV. The overall heart rate variability (SDNN and total power) did not change during or after blood donation. However, there was a decrease in indices that represent the parasympathetic component (pNN50 %, SDSD and HF) while an increase was observed in sympathetic component (LF) along with an increase in sympathovagal balance (LF:HF ratio) during blood donation. These changes were sustained for the period immediately following blood donation. No fall of blood pressure was observed during the period of study. The blood pressure variability showed an increase in the SDNN, CoV and RMSSD time domain measures in the post donation period. These results suggest that mild hypovolemia produced by blood donation is non-hypotensive but is associated with significant changes in the autonomic tone. The increased blood pressure variability and heart rate changes that are seen only in the later part of donation period could be because of the progressive hypovolemia associated parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic activation that manifest during the course of blood donation.

  2. The Importance of Autonomous Regulation for Students' Successful Translation of Intentions into Behavior Change via Planning.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dian Sheng; Lippke, Sonia; Liu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity has a high prevention potential in adolescents. This study investigated the relations between physical activity and intention, autonomous regulation, and planning. We hypothesized that planning mediates the relationship between intention and behavior and that this mediation should depend on the level of autonomous regulation. Stratified randomization sampling method was administered to assemble a sample of N = 534 students among two schools in China. To test the hypothesis, autonomous regulation, intention, and physical activity were assessed at baseline as well as planning and follow-up physical activity four weeks after the pretest. A moderated mediation model confirmed that planning mediated the intention-behavior relation with the effect of planning being moderated by autonomous regulation. Study results demonstrated that autonomous regulation facilitated the translation of intention into behavior change via planning. To promote physical activity among adolescents, interventions targeting planning and autonomous regulation might facilitate successful translation of intentions into behavior change.

  3. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na+/K+-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1–3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na+/K+-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na+/K+-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca2+ signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na+/K+-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na+/K+-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling. PMID:27667975

  4. Regulation of Cardiac Remodeling by Cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Wu, Jian; Kennedy, David J

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling occurs after cardiac pressure/volume overload or myocardial injury during the development of heart failure and is a determinant of heart failure. Preventing or reversing remodeling is a goal of heart failure therapy. Human cardiomyocyte Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase has multiple α isoforms (1-3). The expression of the α subunit of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is often altered in hypertrophic and failing hearts. The mechanisms are unclear. There are limited data from human cardiomyocytes. Abundant evidences from rodents show that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates cardiac contractility, cell signaling, hypertrophy and fibrosis. The α1 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is the ubiquitous isoform and possesses both pumping and signaling functions. The α2 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase regulates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, contractility and pathological hypertrophy. The α3 isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase may also be a target for cardiac hypertrophy. Restoration of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression may be an effective approach for prevention of cardiac remodeling. In this article, we will overview: (1) the distribution and function of isoform specific Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the cardiomyocytes. (2) the role of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of cell signaling, contractility, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. Selective targeting of cardiac Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform may offer a new target for the prevention of cardiac remodeling.

  5. G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 Regulates Cardiac Lipolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christoph; Radner, Franz P. W.; Moustafa, Tarek; Schreiber, Renate; Grond, Susanne; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Schweiger, Martina; Schmidt, Albrecht; Cerk, Ines K.; Oberer, Monika; Theussl, H.-Christian; Wojciechowski, Jacek; Penninger, Josef M.; Zimmermann, Robert; Zechner, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    The anabolism and catabolism of myocardial triacylglycerol (TAG) stores are important processes for normal cardiac function. TAG synthesis detoxifies and stockpiles fatty acids to prevent lipotoxicity, whereas TAG hydrolysis (lipolysis) remobilizes fatty acids from endogenous storage pools as energy substrates, signaling molecules, or precursors for complex lipids. This study focused on the role of G0/G1 switch 2 (G0S2) protein, which was previously shown to inhibit the principal TAG hydrolase adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), in the regulation of cardiac lipolysis. Using wild-type and mutant mice, we show the following: (i) G0S2 is expressed in the heart and regulated by the nutritional status with highest expression levels after re-feeding. (ii) Cardiac-specific overexpression of G0S2 inhibits cardiac lipolysis by direct protein-protein interaction with ATGL. This leads to severe cardiac steatosis. The steatotic hearts caused by G0S2 overexpression are less prone to fibrotic remodeling or cardiac dysfunction than hearts with a lipolytic defect due to ATGL deficiency. (iii) Conversely to the phenotype of transgenic mice, G0S2 deficiency results in a de-repression of cardiac lipolysis and decreased cardiac TAG content. We conclude that G0S2 acts as a potent ATGL inhibitor in the heart modulating cardiac substrate utilization by regulating cardiac lipolysis. PMID:26350455

  6. Analyzing Systolic-Diastolic Interval Interaction Characteristics in Diabetic Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Progression

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohammad Hasan; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN), one of the major complications in diabetes, if detected at the subclinical stage allows for effective treatment and avoiding further complication including cardiovascular pathology. Surface ECG (Electrocardiogram)-based diagnosis of CAN is useful to overcome the limitation of existing cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests traditionally used for CAN identification in clinical settings. The aim of this paper is to analyze the changes in the mechanical function of the ventricles in terms of systolic-diastolic interval interaction (SDI) from a surface ECG to assess the severity of CAN progression [no CAN, early CAN (ECAN) or subclinical CAN, and definite CAN (DCAN) or clinical CAN]. ECG signals recorded in supine resting condition from 72 diabetic subjects without CAN (CAN-) and 70 diabetic subjects with CAN were analyzed in this paper. The severity of CAN was determined by Ewing’s Cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Fifty-five subjects of the CAN group had ECAN and 15 subjects had DCAN. In this paper, we propose an improved version of the SDI parameter (i.e., TQ/RR interval ratio) measured from the electrical diastolic interval (i.e., TQ interval) and the heart rate interval (i.e., RR interval). The performance of the proposed SDI measure was compared with the performance of the existing SDI measure (i.e., QT/TQ interval ratio). The proposed SDI parameter showed significant differences among three groups (no CAN, ECAN, and DCAN). In addition, the proposed SDI parameter was found to be more sensitive in detecting CAN progression than other ECG interval-based features traditionally used for CAN diagnosis. The modified SDI parameter might be used as an alternative measure for the Ewing autonomic reflex tests to identify CAN progression for those subjects who are unable to perform the traditional tests. These findings could also complement the echocardiographic findings of the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction by providing

  7. Analyzing Systolic-Diastolic Interval Interaction Characteristics in Diabetic Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Progression.

    PubMed

    Imam, Mohammad Hasan; Karmakar, Chandan K; Jelinek, Herbert F; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Khandoker, Ahsan H

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN), one of the major complications in diabetes, if detected at the subclinical stage allows for effective treatment and avoiding further complication including cardiovascular pathology. Surface ECG (Electrocardiogram)-based diagnosis of CAN is useful to overcome the limitation of existing cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests traditionally used for CAN identification in clinical settings. The aim of this paper is to analyze the changes in the mechanical function of the ventricles in terms of systolic-diastolic interval interaction (SDI) from a surface ECG to assess the severity of CAN progression [no CAN, early CAN (ECAN) or subclinical CAN, and definite CAN (DCAN) or clinical CAN]. ECG signals recorded in supine resting condition from 72 diabetic subjects without CAN (CAN-) and 70 diabetic subjects with CAN were analyzed in this paper. The severity of CAN was determined by Ewing's Cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests. Fifty-five subjects of the CAN group had ECAN and 15 subjects had DCAN. In this paper, we propose an improved version of the SDI parameter (i.e., TQ/RR interval ratio) measured from the electrical diastolic interval (i.e., TQ interval) and the heart rate interval (i.e., RR interval). The performance of the proposed SDI measure was compared with the performance of the existing SDI measure (i.e., QT/TQ interval ratio). The proposed SDI parameter showed significant differences among three groups (no CAN, ECAN, and DCAN). In addition, the proposed SDI parameter was found to be more sensitive in detecting CAN progression than other ECG interval-based features traditionally used for CAN diagnosis. The modified SDI parameter might be used as an alternative measure for the Ewing autonomic reflex tests to identify CAN progression for those subjects who are unable to perform the traditional tests. These findings could also complement the echocardiographic findings of the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction by providing

  8. Influence of nutrients on cardiac autonomic function in nondiabetic overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Valensi, Paul; Pariès, Jacques; Lormeau, Boris; Attia, Sandra; Attali, Jean-Raymond

    2005-10-01

    The current study sought to determine whether there is a link between cardiac autonomic dysfunction and food intake in overweight subjects. One hundred five nondiabetic overweight (body mass index >27 kg/m2) subjects were studied. Heart rate variations were analyzed during 3 bedside standard tests investigating mainly vagal control: deep breathing, lying-to-standing, and Valsalva tests. The resting metabolic rate and substrate oxidation rates were measured by indirect calorimetry. Dietary intake was estimated from a 3-day recall of food intake. Cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction (PSD) was found in 39 subjects. The sex ratio, age, anthropometric parameters, biochemical parameters and insulin resistance index, resting metabolic rate, and substrate oxidation rates did not differ in the subjects with or without PSD. The total 24-hour energy intake was similar, but the carbohydrate intake was significantly higher in the subjects with PSD (P = .006), and the fat and protein intakes were significantly lower (P = .026 and .045, respectively). In the logistic regression analyses, PSD correlated with carbohydrate and fat intake, independently of serum insulin levels. Glucose oxidation rate correlated negatively with fasting and postglucose serum insulin levels only in the subjects with PSD (P = .006 and .005, respectively). Cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction is associated with higher carbohydrate intake and lower fat and protein intakes in overweight subjects. A sympathetic override may contribute to reducing the glucose oxidation rate in subjects with PSD.

  9. Validation of a questionnaire measuring the regulation of autonomic function

    PubMed Central

    Kröz, M; Feder, G; von Laue, HB; Zerm, R; Reif, M; Girke, M; Matthes, H; Gutenbrunner, C; Heckmann, C

    2008-01-01

    Background To broaden the range of outcomes that we can measure for patients undergoing treatment for oncological and other chronic conditions, we aimed to validate a questionnaire measuring self-reported autonomic regulation (aR), i.e. to characterise a subject's autonomic functioning by questions on sleeping and waking, vertigo, morningness-eveningness, thermoregulation, perspiration, bowel movements and digestion. Methods We administered the questionnaire to 440 participants (♀: N = 316, ♂: N = 124): 95 patients with breast cancer, 49 with colorectal cancer, 60 with diabetes mellitus, 39 with coronary heart disease, 28 with rheumatological conditions, 32 with Hashimoto's disease, 22 with multiple morbidities and 115 healthy people. We administered the questionnaire a second time to 50.2% of the participants. External convergence criteria included the German version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D), a short questionnaire on morningness-eveningness, the Herdecke Quality of Life Questionnaire (HLQ) and a short version questionnaire on self-regulation. Results A principal component analysis yielded a three dimensional 18-item inventory of aR. The subscales orthostatic-circulatory, rest/activity and digestive regulation had internal consistency (Cronbach-α: rα = 0.65 – 0.75) and test-retest reliability (rrt = 0.70 – 85). AR was negatively associated with anxiety, depression, and dysmenorrhoea but positively correlated to HLQ, self-regulation and in part to morningness (except digestive aR) (0.49 – 0.13, all p < 0.05). Conclusion An internal validation of the long-version scale of aR yielded consistent relationships with health versus illness, quality of life and personality. Further studies are required to clarify the issues of external validity, clinical and physiological relevance. PMID:18533043

  10. Evaluation of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yorgun, H; Canpolat, U; Aytemir, K; Ateş, A H; Kaya, E B; Akdoğan, A; Sunman, H; Gökçay Canpolat, A; Çalgüneri, M; Kabakçi, G; Tokgözoğlu, L; Oto, A

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular involvement is one of the leading causes of death among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we aimed to investigate cardiac autonomic functions in SLE patients. We enrolled 36 patients (25 female; mean age 34.2 ± 10.2 years) with SLE and 32 healthy subjects (23 female; mean age 35.0 ± 10.3 years). All participants underwent 24-h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting first, second, and third-minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV), heart rate turbulence (HRT) and QT dispersion analysis. The mean SLE duration was 8.4 ± 4.0 years. According to the baseline demographic characteristics, both groups were similar with regard to age, gender, body mass index and left ventricular ejection fraction. Mean HRR1 (32.6 ± 10.9 vs. 42.5 ± 6.5, p = 0.038), HRR2 (51.0 ± 16.9 vs. 61.0 ± 10.8, p = 0.01) and HRR3 (52.8 ± 17.5 vs. 65.8 ± 9.8, p < 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. When HRV was considered, SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, PNN50 and high frequency (HF) component were significantly decreased in patients with SLE compared with healthy controls, but low frequency (LF) component and LF/HF were significantly higher in SLE patients. In addition, HRT onset and HRT slope values were significantly less negative in SLE patients. QT dispersion was significantly greater in SLE patients than healthy subjects (81.3 ± 15.8 vs. 53.2 ± 13.1, p < 0.001). Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in SLE patients despite the absence of overt cardiac involvement and symptoms. Further studies are needed to elucidate the prognostic significance and clinical implications of impaired autonomic functions in patients with SLE.

  11. Nine months in space: effects on human autonomic cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Cooke, W H; Ames JE, I V; Crossman, A A; Cox, J F; Kuusela, T A; Tahvanainen, K U; Moon, L B; Drescher, J; Baisch, F J; Mano, T; Levine, B D; Blomqvist, C G; Eckberg, D L

    2000-09-01

    We studied three Russian cosmonauts to better understand how long-term exposure to microgravity affects autonomic cardiovascular control. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic pressure, and respiratory flow before, during, and after two 9-mo missions to the Russian space station Mir. Measurements were made during four modes of breathing: 1) uncontrolled spontaneous breathing; 2) stepwise breathing at six different frequencies; 3) fixed-frequency breathing; and 4) random-frequency breathing. R wave-to-R wave (R-R) interval standard deviations decreased in all and respiratory frequency R-R interval spectral power decreased in two cosmonauts in space. Two weeks after the cosmonauts returned to Earth, R-R interval spectral power was decreased, and systolic pressure spectral power was increased in all. The transfer function between systolic pressures and R-R intervals was reduced in-flight, was reduced further the day after landing, and had not returned to preflight levels by 14 days after landing. Our results suggest that long-duration spaceflight reduces vagal-cardiac nerve traffic and decreases vagal baroreflex gain and that these changes may persist as long as 2 wk after return to Earth.

  12. Aroused at Home: Basic Autonomic Regulation during Orthostatic and Physical Activation is Altered in Children with Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Asbrand, Julia; Blechert, Jens; Nitschke, Kai; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Schmitz, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has documented altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity to laboratory-based social stress tasks in children with social anxiety disorder (SAD). It is unclear, however, whether these alterations are caused by the unfamiliar and possibly threatening lab environment or whether they generalize to other, more representative contexts. Sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic functioning was assessed in the home (minimizing environmental threat) during a supine baseline phase and two physical activation phases (orthostatic stress, stair stepping) in children (9-13 years) with SAD (n = 27) and healthy control children (n = 27). Relative to controls, children with SAD showed tonic autonomic hyperarousal as indicated by higher heart rate and electrodermal activity during the supine baseline phase. Further, there was evidence for stronger cardiac and vascular sympathetic reactivity (T-wave amplitude, pulse wave transit time) to moderate physical activation in children with SAD. Higher autonomic arousal during rest was related to measures of trait social anxiety and general psychopathology. Groups did not differ on parasympathetic parameters. Our results extend previous laboratory findings and provide the first evidence for alterations in children with SAD during basal autonomic regulation and in the absence of explicit social evaluative threat. They may further help to clarify conflicting study results from previous laboratory studies. The findings underline the importance of psychophysiological assessment using different environments and tasks to elucidate the physiological bases of SAD.

  13. Effects of GABA, Neural Regulation, and Intrinsic Cardiac Factors on Heart Rate Variability in Zebrafish Larvae.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Rafael Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a periodic activity that is variable over time due to intrinsic cardiac factors and extrinsic neural control, largely by the autonomic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV) is analyzed by measuring consecutive beat-to-beat intervals. This variability can contain information about the factors regulating cardiac activity under normal and pathological conditions, but the information obtained from such analyses is not yet fully understood. In this article, HRV in zebrafish larvae was evaluated under normal conditions and under the effect of substances that modify intrinsic cardiac activity and cardiac activity modulated by the nervous system. We found that the factors affecting intrinsic activity have negative chronotropic and arrhythmogenic effects at this stage of development, whereas neural modulatory factors have a lesser impact. The results suggest that cardiac activity largely depends on the intrinsic properties of the heart tissue in the early stages of development and, to a lesser extent, in the maturing nervous system. We also report, for the first time, the influence of the neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid on HRV. The results demonstrate the larval zebrafish model as a useful tool in the study of intrinsic cardiac activity and its role in heart diseases.

  14. Arginyltransferase regulates alpha cardiac actin, myofibril formation and contractility during heart development

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Xu, Tao; Leu, N. Adrian; Dong, Dawei W.; Guo, Caiying; McLaughlin, K. John; Yates, John R.; Kashina, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Summary Posttranslational arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (Ate1) is essential for cardiovascular development and angiogenesis in mammals and directly affects the myocardium structure in the developing heart. We recently showed that arginylation exerts a number of intracellular effects by modifying proteins involved in the functioning of actin cytoskeleton and the events of cell motility. Here we investigate the role of arginylation in the development and function of cardiac myocytes and their actin-containing structures during embryogenesis. Biochemical and mass spectrometry analysis shows that alpha cardiac actin undergoes arginylation on multiple sites during development. Ultrastructural analysis of the myofibrils in wild type and Ate1 knockout mouse hearts shows that the absence of arginylation results in defects in myofibril structure that delay their development and affect the continuity of myofibrils throughout the heart, predicting defects in cardiac contractility. Comparison of cardiac myocytes derived from wild type and Ate1 knockout mouse embryos show that the absence of arginylation results in abnormal beating patterns. Our results demonstrate cell-autonomous cardiac myocyte defects in arginylation knockout mice that lead to severe congenital abnormalities similar to those observed in human disease, and outline a new function of arginylation in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton in cardiac myocytes. PMID:18948421

  15. Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Measured by Heart Rate Variability and Markers of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Early Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fakhrzadeh, Hossein; Yamini-Sharif, Ahmad; Sharifi, Farshad; Tajalizadekhoob, Yaser; Mirarefin, Mojde; Mohammadzadeh, Maryam; Sadeghian, Saeed; Badamchizadeh, Zohre; Larijani, Bagher

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a critical complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Heart rate variability (HRV) is a noninvasive tool to assess cardiac autonomic function. We aimed to evaluate whether CAN is associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis in T2DM. A total of 57 diabetic and 54 nondiabetic subjects, free of coronary heart disease, were recruited. Carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), coronary calcium score (CAC), and brachial Flow Mediated Dilation (FMD) were measured. Heart rate variability and vagal components of autonomic function were determined. Significant reduction of normalized HF power (P < 0.05) and total power (P < 0.01) was observed in T2DM. CIMT and CAC scores were significantly higher while FMD was significantly lower in diabetics (P < 0.01 for all). Median HbA1c levels were significantly higher in diabetics. CIMT was inversely and independently associated with total power both in diabetics and controls (P < 0.01 for both groups). There was also an inverse association between total power and median HbA1c. Autonomic dysfunction, especially parasympathetic neuropathy, was present since early-stage T2DM. This was related to subclinical atherosclerosis. Early detection of cardiac autonomic neuropathy can help us detect the development of atherosclerosis earlier in T2DM to prevent unfavorable outcomes. PMID:23259073

  16. Flux regulation of cardiac ryanodine receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwei; Porta, Maura; Qin, Jia; Ramos, Jorge; Nani, Alma; Shannon, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    The cardiac type 2 ryanodine receptor (RYR2) is activated by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). The inherent positive feedback of CICR is well controlled in cells, but the nature of this control is debated. Here, we explore how the Ca2+ flux (lumen-to-cytosol) carried by an open RYR2 channel influences its own cytosolic Ca2+ regulatory sites as well as those on a neighboring channel. Both flux-dependent activation and inhibition of single channels were detected when there were super-physiological Ca2+ fluxes (>3 pA). Single-channel results indicate a pore inhibition site distance of 1.2 ± 0.16 nm and that the activation site on an open channel is shielded/protected from its own flux. Our results indicate that the Ca2+ flux mediated by an open RYR2 channel in cells (∼0.5 pA) is too small to substantially regulate (activate or inhibit) the channel carrying it, even though it is sufficient to activate a neighboring RYR2 channel. PMID:20008518

  17. The cardiac cycle: regulation and energy oscillations.

    PubMed

    Wikman-Coffelt, J; Sievers, R; Coffelt, R J; Parmley, W W

    1983-08-01

    Cyclical changes in energy-related metabolites were observed in glucose-perfused but not pyruvate-perfused isolated working rat hearts. A chronological study of various phases of the cardiac cycle indicated maximum changes in metabolites occurred at half time to peak pressure (dF/dtmax). The high-energy phosphates ATP and phosphocreatine, as well as the glycolytic metabolites, glucose 6-phosphate and pyruvate, reached minimum values immediately prior to peak systole and maximum values during late diastole. The products of high-energy phosphate hydrolysis, ADP, inorganic phosphate, and creatine, as well as the regulator, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, showed the phase alternate. It was necessary to study cyclical changes in a maximally stressed glucose-perfused heart because the cyclical changes were small and appeared to be the result of rate-limiting steps in glycolysis and the slow transport of NADH into the mitochondria. For stressing the heart, thereby increasing ATP utilization and augmenting cyclical changes, the afterload chamber was set at 110 mmHg, and the perfusate contained high concentrations of calcium (3.5 mM, free) and isoproterenol (5 X 10(-9) M). When correction was made for binding and compartmentation of metabolites, data indicated that the free energy of ATP hydrolysis was preserved during the contraction process by a continuous binding and recycling of ADP.

  18. Potential force dynamics of heart rate variability reflect cardiac autonomic modulation with respect to posture, age, and breathing pattern.

    PubMed

    Mahananto, Faizal; Igasaki, Tomohiko; Murayama, Nobuki

    2015-09-01

    Various physiological and pathological conditions are correlated with cardiac autonomic function. Heart rate variability is a marker of cardiac autonomic modulation and can be measured by several methods. However, the available methods are sensitive to breathing patterns. To quantify cardiac autonomic modulation by observing the potential force dynamics of the R-R interval time series in healthy individuals. We propose two "potentials of unbalanced complex kinetic" (PUCK) parameters to quantify the characteristics of the potential force dynamics of R-R interval time series: potential strength (slope) and fluctuation size (slope standard deviations [SSD1, SSD2]). We applied this method to the series of R-R intervals obtained from 30 healthy subjects in an experimental condition that elicited cardiac autonomic (i.e., sympathetic and vagal) activation (in supine, sitting, and standing positions). Subjects were categorized into three groups by decade (i.e., 20 s, 30 s, and 40 s) to verify the cardiac autonomic differences by age. Two respiration patterns were introduced to check the influence of the pattern into the analytical results. Sympathetic modulation activation significantly increased the slope and reduced SSD1 and SSD2; these trends were confirmed in all groups. The slope is concordant with the result of the low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio in frequency components as an indicator of sympathetic modulation. No trend was observed in slope among age groups. However, SSD1 and SSD2 in the 40 s group were significantly decreased in the supine and sitting positions. The results with respect to respiration frequency showed lower sympathetic modulation as shown in the LF/HF ratio and slope, whereas higher vagal modulation as shown in the HF appeared with a longer breathing rate. PUCK can quantify the cardiac autonomic modulation in the experimental conditions of different postures. SSD1 and SSD2 are more sensitive to age than frequency components and are

  19. From Syncitium to Regulated Pump: A Cardiac Muscle Cellular Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korzick, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information…

  20. From Syncitium to Regulated Pump: A Cardiac Muscle Cellular Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korzick, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information…

  1. Dysfunction of pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous system in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junlong; Tu, Weifeng; Dai, Jianqiang; Lv, Qing; Yang, Xiaoqi

    2011-01-01

    The pre- and post-operative cardiac autonomic nervous functions were compared in elderly, non-cardiac surgery patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and without diabetes mellitus (NDM). A group of 30 unpremedicated elderly patients scheduled to undergo elective non-cardiac surgery were studied, including 15 DM patients and 15 NDM patients. Each component of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in the frequency domain was monitored with Holter during the nights of the day before and on 1st and 2nd day after operation. After surgery, total power (TP), high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF) and very low frequency (VLF) significantly decreased as compared to the baseline values before operation in both groups (p<0.05). The LF/HF ratio was significantly changed in DM group but did not change in NDM group. On the 2nd postoperative day, TP, HF, LF and VLF in DM group were further decreased as compared to those on the 1st postoperative day and were significantly lower than those in NDM group (p<0.01 or 0.05), but these indices in NDM group did not show significant decreases. Surgery induced the cardiac autonomic nervous dysfunction in elderly patients not only with DM but also without diabetes. On the 2nd postoperative day, the disturbances of cardiac autonomic nervous activity were more sever in DM patients, compared to the 1st postoperative day, but was not significantly more sever than in the NDM patients.

  2. Improving the adverse changes in cardiac autonomic nervous control during laparoscopic surgery, using an intermittent sequential pneumatic compression device.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Amitai; Yahalom, Malka; Roguin, Nathan; Ivry, Shimon; Breslava, Jona; Frankel, Roman; Eitan, Arie

    2004-01-01

    The creation of positive pressure pneumoperitoneum (PP) may lead to adverse cardiovascular effects during laparoscopic operations. It can also lead to increased sympathetic cardiac activity, that might have serious consequences. We hypothesized that by reversing the hemodynamic effects, the use of intermittent sequential pneumatic compression device (Lympha-press) on the lower extremities would lead to improved cardiac autonomic control. This was a prospective cohort study, in which patients served as their own control. Fifteen patients without cardiorespiratory disease undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled prospectively. The activity of the cardiac autonomic nervous system was evaluated by using spectral analysis of heart rate variability, with the Del Mar Avionics 363 (Irvine, California), based on the fast Fourier transformation. The Lympha-press was manipulated several minutes after induction of PP. In each frequency band we measured and compared the power values during anesthesia against those of PP, as well as those of PP against those recorded during activation of Lympha-press. Creation of PP caused increased sympathetic activity, as was manifested by increased power of the low frequency band. Manipulation of the Lympha-Press compression device caused increased parasympathetic activity, as was evident by significant increased power of the high frequency band in all patients. Using an intermittent sequential pneumatic compression device during laparoscopic cholecystectomy may improve cardiac autonomic control by enhancing protective parasympathetic activity. That may have clinical significance, especially in patients suffering from cardiac disease, by improving heart rate variability and elevating the threshold of the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia.

  3. Birth Weight and Its Relationship with the Cardiac Autonomic Balance in Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Livia Victorino; Oliveira, Vanessa; De Meneck, Franciele; Grotti Clemente, Ana Paula; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Franco, Maria do Carmo

    2017-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the fetal environment plays a significant role in the development of cardiometabolic disease later in life. However, a few studies present conflicting data about the correlation between birth weight and the impairment of cardiac autonomic modulation. The purpose of the present study was to provide further knowledge to elucidate this contradictory relationship. One hundred children aged 5 and 14 years had anthropometric parameters, body composition and blood pressure levels determined. Heart rate variability (HRV) was evaluated by heart rate monitoring, including measurements of both the time and frequency domains. The results showed inverse correlation between the HRV parameters with BMI (RMSSD: P = 0.047; PNN50: P = 0.021; HF: P = 0.041), systolic (RMSSD: P = 0.023; PNN50: P = 0.032) and diastolic (PNN50: P = 0.030) blood pressure levels. On the other hand, there were consistent positive correlations between the HRV parameters and birth weight (RMSSD: P = 0.001; PNN50: P = 0.001; HF: P = 0.002). To determine the effect of birth weight on HRV parameters, we perform multivariate linear regression analysis adjusted for potentially confounding factors (prematurity, gender, age, BMI, physical activity index and SBP levels). These findings were preserved even after adjusting for these confounders. Our results suggested that impaired cardiac autonomic modulation characterized by a reduction in the parasympathetic activity occurs in children with low birth weight. One possible interpretation for these data is that a vagal withdrawal, rather than a sympathetic overactivity, could precede the development of hypertension and other cardiometabolic diseases in children with low birth weight. However, long-term studies should be performed to investigate this possibility. PMID:28095501

  4. Age-related decline in cardiac autonomic function is not attenuated with increased physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Njemanze, Hugo; Warren, Charlotte; Eggett, Christopher; MacGowan, Guy A.; Bates, Matthew G D; Siervo, Mario; Ivkovic, Srdjan; Trenell, Michael I.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.

    2016-01-01

    Age and physical inactivity are important risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. Heart rate response to exercise (HRRE) and heart rate recovery (HRR), measures of cardiac autonomic function, are strong predictors of mortality. The present study defined the effect of age and physical activity on HRRE and HRR. Healthy women (N=72) grouped according to age (young, 20-30 years; middle, 40-50 years; and older, 65-81 years) and daily physical activity (low active <7500, high active >12,500 steps/day) performed a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. The HRRE was defined as an increase in heart rate from rest to 1, 3 and 5 minutes of exercise and at 1/3 of total exercise time, and HRR as the difference in heart rate between peak exercise and 1, 2, and 3 minutes later. Age was associated with a significant decline in HRRE at 1 min and 1/3 of exercise time (r= − 0.27, p=0.04, and r=−0.39, p=0.02) and HRR at 2 min and 3 min (r=−0.35, p=0.01, and r=−0.31, p=0.02). There was no significant difference in HRRE and HRR between high and low-active middle-age and older women (p>0.05). Increased level of habitual physical activity level appears to have a limited effect on age-related decline in cardiac autonomic function in women. PMID:27705949

  5. Warm-up phenomenon and cardiac autonomic control in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Tuomainen, Petri; Hartikainen, Juha; Vanninen, Esko; Peuhkurinen, Keijo

    2005-03-25

    Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate turbulence (HRT) are independent predictors of mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). There are no previous studies on the relationship between warm-up phenomenon and cardiac autonomic control in stable coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the responses in HRV to repeated exercise induced ischemia and differences in global HRV and HRT in patients with and without adaptation to ischemia (warm-up phenomenon). Fifty male patients with CAD underwent two successive exercise tests with ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings. HRV was evaluated using time and frequency domain measures and HRT was determined among patients with ventricular premature complexes (VPCs). The patients were divided in two groups on the basis of either positive (warm-up+) or negative (warm-up-) ischemia adaptation. Total power, ULF and VLF power and pNN50 calculated from the entire ECG recording were higher in the group demonstrating warm-up phenomenon (P<0.05 for all). In the assessment of the four short-term stationary phases (pre-and post-test 1 and 2) total power, VLF power and pNN50 were significantly higher in the warm-up positive group already at the baseline (P<0.05 for all). Furthermore, in the entire recordings total power, ULF and VLF power and SDNN correlated positively with the decrease in ischemic burden in the recovery phase (Pcardiac autonomic control, and this correlates with the extent of ischemia adaptation. The true prognostic significance of this needs to be prospectively studied, however.

  6. Cardiac autonomic responses during upper versus lower limb resistance exercise in healthy elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vidotti, Heloisa G.; Mendes, Renata G.; Simões, Rodrigo P.; Castello-Simões, Viviane; Catai, Aparecida M.; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cardiac autonomic responses during upper versus lower limb discontinuous resistance exercise (RE) at different loads in healthy older men. Method Ten volunteers (65±1.2 years) underwent the one-repetition maximum (1RM) test to determine the maximum load for the bench press and the leg press. Discontinuous RE was initiated at a load of 10%1RM with subsequent increases of 10% until 30%1RM, followed by increases of 5%1RM until exhaustion. Heart rate (HR) and R-R interval were recorded at rest and for 4 minutes at each load applied. Heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed in 5-min segments at rest and at each load in the most stable 2-min signal. Results Parasympathetic indices decreased significantly in both exercises from 30%1RM compared to rest (rMSSD: 20±2 to 11±3 and 29±5 to 12±2 ms; SD1: 15±2 to 8±1 and 23±4 to 7±1 ms, for upper and lower limb exercise respectively) and HR increased (69±4 to 90±4 bpm for upper and 66±2 to 89±1 bpm for lower). RMSM increased for upper limb exercise, but decreased for lower limb exercise (28±3 to 45±9 and 34±5 to 14±3 ms, respectively). In the frequency domain, the sympathetic (LF) and sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) indices were higher and the parasympathetic index (HF) was lower for upper limb exercise than for lower limb exercise from 35% of 1RM. Conclusions Cardiac autonomic change occurred from 30% of 1RM regardless of RE limb. However, there was more pronounced sympathetic increase and vagal decrease for upper limb exercise than for lower limb exercise. These results provide a basis for more effective prescription of RE to promote health in this population. PMID:24675908

  7. Association between left-handedness and cardiac autonomic function in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Işcen, Sinan; Özenç, Salim; Tavlasoglu, Urat

    2014-07-01

    Effects of nonright-handedness on risk for sudden death associated with coronary artery disease via sympathetic imbalance contributed to ventricular arrhythmogenesis previously have been demonstrated. This study hypothesized that left-handedness might be associated with cardiac autonomic functions in healthy young men. The aim of this study was to examine the association between left-handedness and cardiac autonomic functions in healthy young men. A total of 992 asymptomatic young male subjects underwent routine health checkup between May 2012 and July 2013, and were included in this study. All were submitted to a standard protocol that included a complete clinical examination, laboratory evaluation, 12-lead electrocardiogram, and 2D-echocardiogram. Fifty-two subjects were left-handed; 32 subjects had abnormal QRS-T angle. Statistical analyses were performed using statistical package SPSS 15.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA) and statistical significance was assessed at the two-tailed 0.05 threshold. A total of 52 (5%) subjects were left-handed; 32 (3%) subjects had an abnormal frontal QRS-T angle. The mean age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose, current smoking, estimated glomerular filtration rate, hemoglobin, leukocyte count, platelet count, and echocardiographic parameters were not different between two groups. But subjects with left-handedness had greater prevalence of abnormal QRS-T angle. The left-handedness group had 18 subjects with abnormal QRS-T angle (34%) and the right-handedness group had 14 subjects with abnormal QRS-T angle (1.4%). The difference between two groups was significant (P < 0.001). In this study, there was a significant association between left-handedness and abnormal QRS-T angle in healthy young subjects. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Birth Weight and Its Relationship with the Cardiac Autonomic Balance in Healthy Children.

    PubMed

    Souza, Livia Victorino; Oliveira, Vanessa; De Meneck, Franciele; Grotti Clemente, Ana Paula; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Franco, Maria do Carmo

    2017-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the fetal environment plays a significant role in the development of cardiometabolic disease later in life. However, a few studies present conflicting data about the correlation between birth weight and the impairment of cardiac autonomic modulation. The purpose of the present study was to provide further knowledge to elucidate this contradictory relationship. One hundred children aged 5 and 14 years had anthropometric parameters, body composition and blood pressure levels determined. Heart rate variability (HRV) was evaluated by heart rate monitoring, including measurements of both the time and frequency domains. The results showed inverse correlation between the HRV parameters with BMI (RMSSD: P = 0.047; PNN50: P = 0.021; HF: P = 0.041), systolic (RMSSD: P = 0.023; PNN50: P = 0.032) and diastolic (PNN50: P = 0.030) blood pressure levels. On the other hand, there were consistent positive correlations between the HRV parameters and birth weight (RMSSD: P = 0.001; PNN50: P = 0.001; HF: P = 0.002). To determine the effect of birth weight on HRV parameters, we perform multivariate linear regression analysis adjusted for potentially confounding factors (prematurity, gender, age, BMI, physical activity index and SBP levels). These findings were preserved even after adjusting for these confounders. Our results suggested that impaired cardiac autonomic modulation characterized by a reduction in the parasympathetic activity occurs in children with low birth weight. One possible interpretation for these data is that a vagal withdrawal, rather than a sympathetic overactivity, could precede the development of hypertension and other cardiometabolic diseases in children with low birth weight. However, long-term studies should be performed to investigate this possibility.

  9. Effects of vigorous late-night exercise on sleep quality and cardiac autonomic activity.

    PubMed

    Myllymäki, Tero; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Savolainen, Katri; Hokka, Laura; Jakonen, Riikka; Juuti, Tanja; Martinmäki, Kaisu; Kaartinen, Jukka; Kinnunen, Marja-Liisa; Rusko, Heikki

    2011-03-01

    Sleep is the most important period for recovery from daily load. Regular physical activity enhances overall sleep quality, but the effects of acute exercise on sleep are not well defined. In sleep hygiene recommendations, intensive exercising is not suggested within the last 3 h before bed time, but this recommendation has not been adequately tested experimentally. Therefore, the effects of vigorous late-night exercise on sleep were examined by measuring polysomnographic, actigraphic and subjective sleep quality, as well as cardiac autonomic activity. Eleven (seven men, four women) physically fit young adults (VO(2max) 54±8 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) , age 26±3 years) were monitored in a sleep laboratory twice in a counterbalanced order: (1) after vigorous late-night exercise; and (2) after a control day without exercise. The incremental cycle ergometer exercise until voluntary exhaustion started at 21:00±00:28 hours, lasted for 35±3 min, and ended 2:13±00:19 hours before bed time. The proportion of non-rapid eye movement sleep was greater after the exercise day than the control day (P<0.01), while no differences were seen in actigraphic or subjective sleep quality. During the whole sleep, no differences were found in heart rate (HR) variability, whereas HR was higher after the exercise day than the control day (54±7 versus 51±7, P<0.01), and especially during the first three sleeping hours. The results indicate that vigorous late-night exercise does not disturb sleep quality. However, it may have effects on cardiac autonomic control of heart during the first sleeping hours.

  10. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery indices in patients with myocardial bridge.

    PubMed

    Okutucu, Sercan; Aparci, Mustafa; Sabanoglu, Cengiz; Karakulak, Ugur Nadir; Aksoy, Hakan; Ozturk, Cengiz; Karaduman, Mehmet; Isilak, Zafer; Adar, Adem; Oto, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) recovery (HRR) reflects autonomic activity and predicts cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to assess HRR in patients with myocardial bridge (MB). Medical recordings of 93 patients with MB and appropriate age, compared to 78 sex-matched healthy subjects were analyzed. MB was diagnosed via coronary computed tomography angiography after a positive exercise stress test (EST). HRR indices were calculated by subtracting 1st (HRR1), 2nd (HRR2) and 3rd (HRR3) minute HR from the maximal HR during EST. HRR1 (30.2 ± 13.3 bpm vs. 35.8 ± 10.4 bpm, p = 0.001) and HRR2 (52.3 ± 13.3 bpm vs. 57.1 ± 11.6 bpm, p = 0.013) were lower in patients with MB. In addition, HRR1 was lower in patients with left anterior descending (LAD) MB than non-LAD MB (28.5 ± 13.2 vs. 37.1 ± 11.4, p = 0.013). Presence of MB, deep MB, LAD MB and multi-vessel MB were predictors of HRR1 (p < 0.01 for all). In a multivariate analysis, LAD MB was the only significant independent predictor of HRR1 (b = -8.524, p = 0.009). Patients with MB have impairment in HRR indices which is more pronounced among patients with LAD MB. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in MB might be due to recurrent myocardial ischemia.

  11. Cardiac autonomic responses to standing up and cognitive task in overtrained athletes.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, E; Uusitalo, A; Konttinen, N; Rusko, H

    2008-07-01

    This study compared the autonomic responses to an active orthostatic test and Stroop Color Word Test (Stroop) as well as cognitive performance in Stroop in twelve severely overtrained (OA, 6 men and 6 women) and twelve control athletes (CA, 6 men and 6 women). RR-intervals were recorded during the orthostatic test, the Stroop, and a relaxation period succeeding the Stroop. Low frequency power during standing in the orthostatic test was lower in OA than in CA (1322 +/- 955 ms2 vs. 2262 +/- 1029 ms2, p = 0.030, respectively). During Stroop, OA had higher relative total power (50 +/- 47 % vs. 19 +/- 14 % of the individual total power during supine rest after awakening, p = 0.028, respectively) and high frequency power (38.5 +/- 9.4 % vs. 13.5 +/- 2.3 % of the individual high frequency power during supine rest after awakening, p = 0.035, respectively) than CA. In the Stroop, OA made more mistakes than CA (9.7 +/- 6.5 % vs. 5.4 +/- 3.0 %, p = 0.045). The increase in absolute total power from the Stroop to relaxation correlated negatively with the amount of mistakes in the Stroop (r = - 0.588, p = 0.003). Thus, cardiac autonomic modulation during orthostatic task and responses to cognitive task and to relaxation, as well as the cognitive performance were attenuated in severe overtraining.

  12. Effect of yoga therapy on heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac autonomic function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Bandi Hari; Pal, Pravati; G K, Pal; J, Balachander; E, Jayasettiaseelon; Y, Sreekanth; M G, Sridhar; G S, Gaur

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that a hall mark of heart failure is adverse changes in autonomic function. Elevated blood pressure is a powerful predictor of congestive heart failure and other Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) outcomes. In this study, we planned to examine the effects of a 12 week yoga therapy on blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and rate pressure product (RPP). Out of 130 heart failure patients recruited for the study, 65 patients were randomly selected to receive 12 week yoga therapy along with standard medical therapy (yoga group). Other patients (n=65) received only standard medical therapy (control group). Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac autonomic function (by short-term heart-rate variability analysis) and myocardial oxygen consumption (by RPP) were assessed before and after 12 weeks. In the yoga group, 44 patients and in the control group, 48 patients completed the study. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, blood pressure and RPP in yoga group compared to control group. Also, LFnu and LF-HF ratio decreased significantly and HFnu increased significantly in yoga group compared to control group. Twelve-week yoga therapy significantly improved the parasympathetic activity and decreased the sympathetic activity in heart failure patients (NYHA I&II).

  13. Impaired Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Function is Associated with Pediatric Hypertension Independent of Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Justin R.; O’Connell, Michael; Bosch, Tyler A.; Chow, Lisa; Rudser, Kyle D.; Dengel, Donald R.; Fox, Claudia K.; Steinberger, Julia; Kelly, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined whether sympathetic nervous system activity influences hypertension status and systolic blood pressure (SBP) independent of adiposity in youth ranging from normal-weight to severe obesity. Methods We examined the association of heart rate variability (HRV) with hypertension status and SBP among youth (6-18 years old; n = 188; 103 female). Seated SBP was measured using an automated cuff. Pre-hypertension (SBP percentile≤90th-<95th) and hypertension (SBP percentile≤95th) were defined by age-, sex-, and height-norms. Autonomic nervous system activity was measured using HRV via SphygmoCorTM MM3 system and analyzed for time- and frequency-domains. Total body fat was measured via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Logistic regression models demonstrated lower values in each time-domain HRV measure and larger LF:HF ratio to be significantly associated with higher odds of being pre-hypertensive/hypertensive (11-47% higher odds) independent of total body fat (p<0.05). In linear regression analysis, lower time-domain, but not frequency-domain, HRV measures were significantly associated with higher SBP independent of total body fat (p<0.05). Conclusion These data suggest that impaired cardiac autonomic nervous system function, at rest, is associated with higher odds of being pre-hypertensive/hypertensive and higher SBP which may be independent of adiposity in youth. PMID:26389821

  14. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Sujan, M. U.; Rao, M. Raghavendra; Kisan, Ravikiran; Abhishekh, Hulegar A.; Nalini, Atchayaram; Raju, Trichur R.; Sathyaprabha, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head) in migraine patients. Methods: Forty chronic migraine patients fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria were recruited from the neurology outpatient clinic. Patients were randomized to receive either hydrotherapy plus conventional pharmacological care (n = 20) or conventional medication only (n = 20). Hydrotherapy group received treatment with hot arm and foot bath (103°F to 110°F) and ice massage to head daily for 20 min for 45 days. Patients were assessed using headache impact test (HIT), visual analog scale for pain and cardiac autonomic function by heart rate variability (HRV) before and after intervention period. Results: There was a significant decrease in HIT score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment in both the groups. However, it was more evident in add on hydrotherapy group compared to pharmacological treatment alone group. There was also significant improvement in the HRV parameters. In particular, there was a significant decrease in heart rate (P = 0.017), increase in high frequency (HF) (P = 0.014) and decrease in low frequency/HF ratio (P = 0.004) in add on hydrotherapy group. Conclusion: Our study shows that add on hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients. PMID:26933356

  15. Cardiac autonomic responses at onset of exercise: effects of aerobic fitness.

    PubMed

    D'Agosto, T; Peçanha, T; Bartels, R; Moreira, D N; Silva, L P; Nóbrega, A C L; Lima, J R P

    2014-09-01

    Analyzes of cardiac autonomic responses at the initial transient of exercise have been used for the investigation of the cardiovascular health. We evaluated the influence of aerobic fitness on HR and HRV responses at the onset of exercise. 25 male subjects (22.3±2.4 years) were divided into 2 groups: 'low aerobic fitness' (36.2±2.6ml.kg(-1).min(-1); n=10) and 'high aerobic fitness' (46.4±5.0ml.kg(-1).min(-1); n=15). The experimental session consisted of assessing the beat-to-beat HR at rest and during submaximal exercise. The autonomic responses at the onset of exercise were calculated by fitting the HR and HRV (rMSSD-index) curves during the initial 300s of exercise into a first-order exponential equation. The time constant of HR and of the rMSSD index (τonHR and τonrMSSD) were calculated for analysis. We observed lower values of τonrMSSD in the high aerobic fitness group compared to the low aerobic fitness group (26.8±5s vs. 38.0±18s, respectively; p=0.02). The τonHR (42.0±15 vs. 49.3±26s, p=0.38) for the groups showed no difference. Aerobic fitness partially influenced the autonomic responses during exercise, since individuals with higher fitness showed faster decreases in beat-to-beat HRV at the onset of exercise.

  16. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Sujan, M U; Rao, M Raghavendra; Kisan, Ravikiran; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Nalini, Atchayaram; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, T N

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head) in migraine patients. Forty chronic migraine patients fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria were recruited from the neurology outpatient clinic. Patients were randomized to receive either hydrotherapy plus conventional pharmacological care (n = 20) or conventional medication only (n = 20). Hydrotherapy group received treatment with hot arm and foot bath (103°F to 110°F) and ice massage to head daily for 20 min for 45 days. Patients were assessed using headache impact test (HIT), visual analog scale for pain and cardiac autonomic function by heart rate variability (HRV) before and after intervention period. There was a significant decrease in HIT score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment in both the groups. However, it was more evident in add on hydrotherapy group compared to pharmacological treatment alone group. There was also significant improvement in the HRV parameters. In particular, there was a significant decrease in heart rate (P = 0.017), increase in high frequency (HF) (P = 0.014) and decrease in low frequency/HF ratio (P = 0.004) in add on hydrotherapy group. Our study shows that add on hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients.

  17. Short-term supervised inpatient physiotherapy exercise protocol improves cardiac autonomic function after coronary artery bypass graft surgery--a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; De Souza Melo Costa, Fernando; Pantoni, Camila Bianca Falasco; Di Thommazo, Luciana; Luzzi, Sérgio; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is accompanied by severe impairment of cardiac autonomous regulation (CAR). This study aimed to determine whether a short-term physiotherapy exercise protocol post-CABG, during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR), might improve CAR. Seventy-four patients eligible for CABG were recruited and randomised into physiotherapy exercise group (EG) or physiotherapy usual care group (UCG). EG patients underwent a short-term supervised inpatient physiotherapy exercise protocol consisting of an early mobilisation with progressive exercises plus usual care (respiratory exercises). UCG only received respiratory exercises. Forty-seven patients (24 EG and 23 UGC) completed the study. Outcome measures of CAR included linear and non-linear measures of heart rate variability (HRV) assessed before discharge. By hospital discharge, EG presented significantly higher parasympathetic HRV values [rMSSD, high frequency (HF), SD1)], global power (STD RR, SD2), non-linear HRV indexes [detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)alpha1, DFAalpha2, approximate entropy (ApEn)] and mean RR compared to UCG (p<0.05). Conversely, higher values of mean HR, low frequency (LF) (sympathetic activity) and the LF/HF (global sympatho-vagal balance) were found in the UCG. A short-term supervised physiotherapy exercise protocol during inpatient CR improves CAR at the time of discharge. Thus, exercise-based inpatient CR might be an effective non-pharmacological tool to improve autonomic cardiac tone in patient's post-CABG.

  18. Scintigraphic evidence for cardiac sympathetic dysinnervation in long-term IDDM patients with and without ECG-based autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schnell, O; Kirsch, C M; Stemplinger, J; Haslbeck, M; Standl, E

    1995-11-01

    To analyse the presence and extent of global and regional distributions of cardiac sympathetic dysinnervation in long-term insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) without myocardial perfusion abnormalities (99mTc-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile study), 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy was performed in two clinically-comparable groups (20 diabetic patients with and 22 diabetic patients without ECG-based cardiac autonomic neuropathy). For comparison nine control subjects without heart disease were investigated. Only six diabetic patients (27%) without and one diabetic patient (5%) with ECG-based autonomic neuropathy were found to have a uniform homogeneous uptake of 123I-MIBG, in contrast to a uniform homogeneous uptake in all control subjects. The uptake of 123I-MIBG in the posterior myocardium of diabetic patients was smaller than in the anterior, lateral and septal myocardium (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.001). In addition, diabetic patients with cardiac autonomic neuropathy (> or = two of five age-related cardiac reflex tests abnormal) demonstrated a more reduced uptake in the global, lateral and posterior myocardium than diabetic patients without (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.001). A correlation between global or regional myocardial 123I-MIBG uptake, however, and duration of diabetes, HbA1c, body mass index or QT interval length was not observed. Our study demonstrates that cardiac sympathetic dysinnervation is common in long-term IDDM even in patients without ECG-based cardiac autonomic neuropathy and that the posterior myocardium is predominantly affected. We conclude that 123I-MIBG scintigraphy is a promising approach to further elucidate the pattern and natural history of myocardial dysinnervation in IDDM.

  19. Cardiac Autonomic Effects of Acute Exposures to Airborne Particulates in Men and Women

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, M. S.; Schlegel, T. T.; Knapp, C. F.; Patwardhan, A. R.; Jenkins, R. A.; Ilgner, R. H.; Evans, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate cardiac autonomic changes associated with acute exposures to airborne particulates. Methods: High fidelity 12-lead ECG (CardioSoft, Houston, TX) was acquired from 19 (10 male / 9 female) non-smoking volunteers (age 33.6 +/- 6.6 yrs) during 10 minutes pre-exposure, exposure and post-exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), cooking oil fumes, wood smoke and sham (water vapor). To control exposure levels, noise, subject activity, and temperature, all studies were conducted inside an environmental chamber. Results: The short-term fractal scaling exponent (Alpha-1) and the ratio of low frequency to high frequency Heart Rate Variability (HRV) powers (LF/HF, a purported sympathetic index) were both higher in males (p<0.017 and p<0.05, respectively) whereas approximate entropy (ApEn) and HF/(LF+HF) (a purported parasympathetic index) were both lower in males (p<0.036, and p<0.044, respectively). Compared to pre-exposure (p<0.0002) and sham exposure (p<0.047), male heart rates were elevated during early ETS post-exposure. Our data suggest that, in addition to tonic HRV gender differences, cardiac responses to some acute airborne particulates are gender related.

  20. [Relationship between blood pressure, heart rate and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in non-diabetic obese patients].

    PubMed

    Banu, I; Nguyen, M T; Hamo-Tchatchouang, E; Cosson, E; Valensi, P

    2015-06-01

    Some studies suggest that a high heart rate (HR) would be predictive of the incidence of an elevated blood pressure (BP). Cardiac autonomic dysfunction (CAD) affects a high proportion of obese patients. CAD could be involved in BP increase. Our aim was to examine the relationship between CAD, HR and BP in obese patients without known diabetes. We included 428 overweight or obese patients. CAD was assessed by analyzing HR variations during three standard tests (Valsalva, deep breathing, lying-to-standing), which are mostly dependent on vagal control. An oral load in glucose was performed and the Matsuda index was calculated. The population was separated in 4 groups according to the grade of CAD (no or only one abnormal test, 2 or 3 abnormal tests) and HR (< or ≥ 75 bpm). Age was similar in the four groups. Systolic (P=0.05), diastolic (P<0.005) and mean BP (P<0.001) differed significantly between the 4 groups, and was the highest in the group of patients who had 2 or 3 abnormal tests and HR ≥ 75 bpm. Matsuda index differed across the groups (P=0.018) and was the lowest in this group. These data indicate that among overweight or obese patients with a defect in cardiac vagal activity BP is elevated only in those with a high heart rate, which is indicative of a more marked insulin resistance and probably an excess in sympathetic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Pyridostigmine restores cardiac autonomic balance after small myocardial infarction in mice.

    PubMed

    Durand, Marina T; Becari, Christiane; de Oliveira, Mauro; do Carmo, Jussara M; Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; Prado, Cibele M; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C

    2014-01-01

    The effect of pyridostigmine (PYR)--an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor--on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control, was never studied in conscious myocardial infarcted mice. Telemetry transmitters were implanted into the carotid artery under isoflurane anesthesia. Seven to ten days after recovery from the surgery, basal arterial pressure and heart rate were recorded, while parasympathetic and sympathetic tone (ΔHR) was evaluated by means of methyl atropine and propranolol. After the basal hemodynamic recording the mice were subjected to left coronary artery ligation for producing myocardial infarction (MI), or sham operation, and implantation of minipumps filled with PYR or saline. Separate groups of anesthetized (isoflurane) mice previously (4 weeks) subjected to MI, or sham coronary artery ligation, were submitted to cardiac function examination. The mice exhibited an infarct length of approximately 12%, no change in arterial pressure and increased heart rate only in the 1st week after MI. Vagal tone decreased in the 1st week, while the sympathetic tone was increased in the 1st and 4th week after MI. PYR prevented the increase in heart rate but did not affect the arterial pressure. Moreover, PYR prevented the increase in sympathetic tone throughout the 4 weeks. Concerning the parasympathetic tone, PYR not only impaired its attenuation in the 1st week, but enhanced it in the 4th week. MI decreased ejection fraction and increased diastolic and systolic volume. Therefore, the pharmacological increase of peripheral acetylcholine availability by means of PYR prevented tachycardia, increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic tone after MI in mice.

  2. Pyridostigmine Restores Cardiac Autonomic Balance after Small Myocardial Infarction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Marina T.; Becari, Christiane; de Oliveira, Mauro; do Carmo, Jussara M.; Aguiar Silva, Carlos Alberto; Prado, Cibele M.; Fazan, Rubens; Salgado, Helio C.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of pyridostigmine (PYR) - an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor - on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control, was never studied in conscious myocardial infarcted mice. Telemetry transmitters were implanted into the carotid artery under isoflurane anesthesia. Seven to ten days after recovery from the surgery, basal arterial pressure and heart rate were recorded, while parasympathetic and sympathetic tone (ΔHR) was evaluated by means of methyl atropine and propranolol. After the basal hemodynamic recording the mice were subjected to left coronary artery ligation for producing myocardial infarction (MI), or sham operation, and implantation of minipumps filled with PYR or saline. Separate groups of anesthetized (isoflurane) mice previously (4 weeks) subjected to MI, or sham coronary artery ligation, were submitted to cardiac function examination. The mice exhibited an infarct length of approximately 12%, no change in arterial pressure and increased heart rate only in the 1st week after MI. Vagal tone decreased in the 1st week, while the sympathetic tone was increased in the 1st and 4th week after MI. PYR prevented the increase in heart rate but did not affect the arterial pressure. Moreover, PYR prevented the increase in sympathetic tone throughout the 4 weeks. Concerning the parasympathetic tone, PYR not only impaired its attenuation in the 1st week, but enhanced it in the 4th week. MI decreased ejection fraction and increased diastolic and systolic volume. Therefore, the pharmacological increase of peripheral acetylcholine availability by means of PYR prevented tachycardia, increased parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic tone after MI in mice. PMID:25133392

  3. Effect of Weight Gain on Cardiac Autonomic Control During Wakefulness and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Taro; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H.; Calvin, Andrew D.; Singh, Prachi; Romero-Corral, Abel; van der Walt, Christelle; Davison, Diane E.; Bukartyk, Jan; Konecny, Tomas; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Somers, Virend K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness, but the effect on sleep-related sympathetic modulation is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fat gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep in humans. We performed a randomized controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on heart rate variability (HRV). We recruited 36 healthy volunteers, who were randomized to either a standardized diet to gain approximately 4 kg over 8 weeks followed by an 8 week weight loss period (n=20), or to serve as a weight-maintainer control (n=16). An overnight polysomnogram with power spectral analysis of HRV was performed at baseline, after weight gain, and after weight loss to determine the ratio of low frequency (LF) to high frequency (HF) power, and to examine the relationship between changes in HRV and changes in insulin, leptin and adiponectin levels. Mean weight gain was 3.9 kg in the fat gain group versus 0.1 kg in the maintainer group. LF/HF increased both during wakefulness and sleep after fat gain and returned to baseline after fat loss in the fat gain group, and did not change in the control group. Insulin, leptin and adiponectin also increased after fat gain and fell after fat loss, but no clear pattern of changes were seen that correlated consistently with changes in HRV. Short-term fat gain in healthy subjects is associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness and sleep but the mechanisms remain unclear. PMID:21357280

  4. Simvastatin-induced cardiac autonomic control improvement in fructose-fed female rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata Juliana da; Bernardes, Nathalia; Brito, Janaina de O; Sanches, Iris Callado; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2011-01-01

    Because autonomic dysfunction has been found to lead to cardiometabolic disorders and because studies have reported that simvastatin treatment has neuroprotective effects, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin treatment on cardiovascular and autonomic changes in fructose-fed female rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls (n = 8), fructose (n = 8), and fructose+ simvastatin (n = 8). Fructose overload was induced by supplementing the drinking water with fructose (100 mg/L, 18 wks). Simvastatin treatment (5 mg/kg/day for 2 wks) was performed by gavage. The arterial pressure was recorded using a data acquisition system. Autonomic control was evaluated by pharmacological blockade. Fructose overload induced an increase in the fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels and insulin resistance. The constant rate of glucose disappearance during the insulin intolerance test was reduced in the fructose group (3.4 ± 0.32%/min) relative to that in the control group (4.4 ± 0.29%/min). Fructose + simvastatin rats exhibited increased insulin sensitivity (5.4 ± 0.66%/min). The fructose and fructose + simvastatin groups demonstrated an increase in the mean arterial pressure compared with controls rats (fructose: 124 ± 2 mmHg and fructose+simvastatin: 126 ± 3 mmHg vs. controls: 112 ± 2 mmHg). The sympathetic effect was enhanced in the fructose group (73 ± 7 bpm) compared with that in the control (48 ± 7 bpm) and fructose+simvastatin groups (31 ± 8 bpm). The vagal effect was increased in fructose + simvastatin animals (84 ± 7 bpm) compared with that in control (49 ± 9 bpm) and fructose animals (46 ± 5 bpm). Simvastatin treatment improved insulin sensitivity and cardiac autonomic control in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome in female rats. These effects were independent of the improvements in the classical plasma lipid profile and of reductions in arterial pressure. These results support the

  5. Regulation of autonomic nervous system in space and magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Petrov, V. M.; Chernikova, A. G.

    Variations in the earth's magnetic field and magnetic storms are known to be a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disorders. The main ``targets'' for geomagnetic perturbations are the central nervous system and the neural regulation of vascular tone and heart rate variability. This paper presents the data about effect of geomagnetic fluctuations on human body in space. As a method for research the analysis of heart rate variability was used, which allows evaluating the state of the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of the autonomic nervous system, vasomotor center and subcortical neural centers activity. Heart rate variability data were analyzed for 30 cosmonauts at the 2-nd day of space flight on transport spaceship Soyuz (32nd orbit). There were formed three groups of cosmonauts: without magnetic storm (n=9), on a day with magnetic storm (n=12) and 1-2 days after magnetic storm (n=9). The present study was the first to demonstrate a specific impact of geomagnetic perturbations on the system of autonomic circulatory control in cosmonauts during space flight. The increasing of highest nervous centers activity was shown for group with magnetic storms, which was more significant on 1-2 days after magnetic storm. The use of discriminate analysis allowed to classify indicated three groups with 88 % precision. Canonical variables are suggested to be used as criterions for evaluation of specific and non-specific components of cardiovascular reactions to geomagnetic perturbations. The applied aspect of the findings from the present study should be emphasized. They show, in particular, the need to supplement the medical monitoring of cosmonauts with predictions of probable geomagnetic perturbations in view of the prevention of unfavorable states appearances if the adverse reactions to geomagnetic perturbations are added to the tension experienced by regulatory systems during various stresses situations (such as work in the open space).

  6. Regulation of autonomic nervous system in space and magnetic storms.

    PubMed

    Baevsky, R M; Petrov, V M; Chernikova, A G

    1998-01-01

    Variations in the earth's magnetic field and magnetic storms are known to be a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disorders. The main "targets" for geomagnetic perturbations are the central nervous system and the neural regulation of vascular tone and heart rate variability. This paper presents the data about effect of geomagnetic fluctuations on human body in space. As a method for research the analysis of heart rate variability was used, which allows evaluating the state of the sympathetic and parasympathetic parts of the autonomic nervous system, vasomotor center and subcortical neural centers activity. Heart rate variability data were analyzed for 30 cosmonauts at the 2nd day of space flight on transport spaceship Soyuz (32nd orbit). There were formed three groups of cosmonauts: without magnetic storm (n=9), on a day with magnetic storm (n=12) and 1-2 days after magnetic storm (n=9). The present study was the first to demonstrate a specific impact of geomagnetic perturbations on the system of autonomic circulatory control in cosmonauts during space flight. The increasing of highest nervous centers activity was shown for group with magnetic storms, which was more significant on 1-2 days after magnetic storm. The use of discriminate analysis allowed to classify indicated three groups with 88% precision. Canonical variables are suggested to be used as criterions for evaluation of specific and non-specific components of cardiovascular reactions to geomagnetic perturbations. The applied aspect of the findings from the present study should be emphasized. They show, in particular, the need to supplement the medical monitoring of cosmonauts with predictions of probable geomagnetic perturbations in view of the prevention of unfavorable states appearances if the adverse reactions to geomagnetic perturbations are added to the tension experienced by regulatory systems during various stresses situations (such as work in the open space).

  7. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction in the early phase after left ventricular assist device implant: Implications for surgery and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Compostella, Leonida; Russo, Nicola; Setzu, Tiziana; Tursi, Vincenzo; Bottio, Tomaso; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Compostella, Caterina; Covolo, Elisa; Livi, Ugolino; Gerosa, Gino; Sani, Guido; Bellotto, Fabio

    2013-06-25

    In congestive heart failure (CHF) patients, a profound cardiac autonomic derangement, clinically expressed by reduced heart rate variability (HRV), is present and is related to the degree of ventricular dysfunction. Implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) can progressively improve HRV, associated with an increased circulatory output. Data from patients studied at different times after LVAD implantation are controversial. The aims of this study were to assess cardiac autonomic function in the early phases after axial-flow LVAD implantation, and to estimate the potential relevance of recent major surgical stress on the autonomic balance.
 HRV (time-domain; 24-h Holter) was evaluated in 14 patients, 44.8 ± 25.8 days after beginning of Jarvik-2000 LVAD support; 47 advanced stage CHF, 24 cardiac surgery (CS) patients and 
30 healthy subjects served as control groups. sinus rhythm, stable clinical conditions, no diabetes or other known causes of HRV alteration.
 HRV was considerably reduced in LVAD patients in the early phases after device implantation in comparison to all control groups. A downgrading of HRV parameters was also present in CS controls. Circadian oscillations were highly depressed in LVAD and CHF patients, and slightly reduced in CS patients.
 In CHF patients supported by a continuous-flow LVAD, a profound cardiac dysautonomia is still evident in the first two months from the beginning of circulatory support; the degree of cardiac autonomic imbalance is even greater in comparison to advanced CHF patients. The recent surgical stress could be partly linked to these abnormalities.

  8. Acute toxicant exposure and cardiac autonomic dysfunction from smoking a single narghile waterpipe with tobacco and with a “healthy” tobacco-free alternative

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Caroline O.; Sahmarani, Kamar; Eissenberg, Thomas; Shihadeh, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoking using a waterpipe (narghile, hookah, shisha) has become a global epidemic. Unlike cigarette smoking, little is known about the health effects of waterpipe use. One acute effect of cigarette smoke inhalation is dysfunction in autonomic regulation of the cardiac cycle, as indicated by reduction in heart rate variability (HRV). Reduced HRV is implicated in adverse cardiovascular health outcomes, and is associated with inhalation exposure-induced oxidative stress. Using a 32 participant cross-over study design, we investigated toxicant exposure and effects of waterpipe smoking on heart rate variability when, under controlled conditions, participants smoked a tobacco-based and a tobacco-free waterpipe product promoted as an alternative for “health-conscious” users. Outcome measures included HRV, exhaled breath carbon monoxide (CO), plasma nicotine, and puff topography, which were measured at times prior to, during, and after smoking. We found that waterpipe use acutely decreased HRV (p<0.01 for all measures), independent of product smoked. Plasma nicotine, blood pressure, and heart rate increased only with the tobacco-based product (p<0.01), while CO increased with both products (p<0.01). More smoke was inhaled during tobacco-free product use, potentially reflecting attempted regulation of nicotine intake. The data thus indicate that waterpipe smoking acutely compromises cardiac autonomic function, and does so through exposure to smoke constituents other than nicotine. PMID:23059956

  9. Acute toxicant exposure and cardiac autonomic dysfunction from smoking a single narghile waterpipe with tobacco and with a "healthy" tobacco-free alternative.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Caroline O; Sahmarani, Kamar; Eissenberg, Thomas; Shihadeh, Alan

    2012-11-23

    Tobacco smoking using a waterpipe (narghile, hookah, shisha) has become a global epidemic. Unlike cigarette smoking, little is known about the health effects of waterpipe use. One acute effect of cigarette smoke inhalation is dysfunction in autonomic regulation of the cardiac cycle, as indicated by reduction in heart rate variability (HRV). Reduced HRV is implicated in adverse cardiovascular health outcomes, and is associated with inhalation exposure-induced oxidative stress. Using a 32 participant cross-over study design, we investigated toxicant exposure and effects of waterpipe smoking on heart rate variability when, under controlled conditions, participants smoked a tobacco-based and a tobacco-free waterpipe product promoted as an alternative for "health-conscious" users. Outcome measures included HRV, exhaled breath carbon monoxide (CO), plasma nicotine, and puff topography, which were measured at times prior to, during, and after smoking. We found that waterpipe use acutely decreased HRV (p<0.01 for all measures), independent of product smoked. Plasma nicotine, blood pressure, and heart rate increased only with the tobacco-based product (p<0.01), while CO increased with both products (p<0.01). More smoke was inhaled during tobacco-free product use, potentially reflecting attempted regulation of nicotine intake. The data thus indicate that waterpipe smoking acutely compromises cardiac autonomic function, and does so through exposure to smoke constituents other than nicotine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of a soccer match on the cardiac autonomic control of referees.

    PubMed

    Boullosa, Daniel Alexandre; Abreu, Laurinda; Tuimil, José Luis; Leicht, Anthony Scott

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a soccer match on the cardiac autonomic control of heart rate (HR) in soccer referees. Sixteen Spanish regional and third division referees (11 males: 26 ± 7 years, 74.4 ± 4.1 kg, 178 ± 3 cm, Yo-Yo IR1 ~600-1,560 m; 5 females: 22 ± 3 years, 59.3 ± 4.8 kg, 158 ± 8 cm, Yo-Yo IR1 ~200-520 m) participated with 24-h HR recordings measured with a Polar RS800 during a rest and a match day. Autonomic control of HR was assessed from HR variability (HRV) analysis. Inclusion of a soccer match (92.5% spent at >75% maximum HR) reduced pre-match (12:00-17:00 hours; small to moderate), post-match (19:00-00:00 hours; moderate to almost perfect), and night-time (00:00-05:00 hours; small to moderate) HRV. Various moderate-to-large correlations were detected between resting HRV and the rest-to-match day difference in HRV. The rest-to-match day differences of low and high-frequency bands ratio (LF/HF) and HR in the post-match period were moderately correlated with time spent at different exercise intensities. Yo-Yo IR1 performance was highly correlated with jump capacity and peak lactate, but not with any HRV parameter. These results suggest that a greater resting HRV may allow referees to tolerate stresses during a match day with referees who spent more time at higher intensities during matches exhibiting a greater LF/HF increment in the post-match period. The relationship between match activities, [Formula: see text] and HR recovery kinetics in referees and team sport athletes of different competitive levels remains to be clarified.

  11. CHIP protects against cardiac pressure overload through regulation of AMPK.

    PubMed

    Schisler, Jonathan C; Rubel, Carrie E; Zhang, Chunlian; Lockyer, Pamela; Cyr, Douglas M; Patterson, Cam

    2013-08-01

    Protein quality control and metabolic homeostasis are integral to maintaining cardiac function during stress; however, little is known about if or how these systems interact. Here we demonstrate that C terminus of HSC70-interacting protein (CHIP), a regulator of protein quality control, influences the metabolic response to pressure overload by direct regulation of the catalytic α subunit of AMPK. Induction of cardiac pressure overload in Chip-/- mice resulted in robust hypertrophy and decreased cardiac function and energy generation stemming from a failure to activate AMPK. Mechanistically, CHIP promoted LKB1-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK, increased the specific activity of AMPK, and was necessary and sufficient for stress-dependent activation of AMPK. CHIP-dependent effects on AMPK activity were accompanied by conformational changes specific to the α subunit, both in vitro and in vivo, identifying AMPK as the first physiological substrate for CHIP chaperone activity and establishing a link between cardiac proteolytic and metabolic pathways.

  12. CHIP protects against cardiac pressure overload through regulation of AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Rubel, Carrie E.; Zhang, Chunlian; Lockyer, Pamela; Cyr, Douglas M.; Patterson, Cam

    2013-01-01

    Protein quality control and metabolic homeostasis are integral to maintaining cardiac function during stress; however, little is known about if or how these systems interact. Here we demonstrate that C terminus of HSC70-interacting protein (CHIP), a regulator of protein quality control, influences the metabolic response to pressure overload by direct regulation of the catalytic α subunit of AMPK. Induction of cardiac pressure overload in Chip–/– mice resulted in robust hypertrophy and decreased cardiac function and energy generation stemming from a failure to activate AMPK. Mechanistically, CHIP promoted LKB1-mediated phosphorylation of AMPK, increased the specific activity of AMPK, and was necessary and sufficient for stress-dependent activation of AMPK. CHIP-dependent effects on AMPK activity were accompanied by conformational changes specific to the α subunit, both in vitro and in vivo, identifying AMPK as the first physiological substrate for CHIP chaperone activity and establishing a link between cardiac proteolytic and metabolic pathways. PMID:23863712

  13. Neuralized functions cell autonomously to regulate Drosophila sense organ development.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E; Zhou, L; Rudzik, N; Boulianne, G L

    2000-09-01

    Neurogenic genes, including Notch and Delta, are thought to play important roles in regulating cell-cell interactions required for Drosophila sense organ development. To define the requirement of the neurogenic gene neuralized (neu) in this process, two independent neu alleles were used to generate mutant clones. We find that neu is required for determination of cell fates within the proneural cluster and that cells mutant for neu autonomously adopt neural fates when adjacent to wild-type cells. Furthermore, neu is required within the sense organ lineage to determine the fates of daughter cells and accessory cells. To gain insight into the mechanism by which neu functions, we used the GAL4/UAS system to express wild-type and epitope-tagged neu constructs. We show that Neu protein is localized primarily at the plasma membrane. We propose that the function of neu in sense organ development is to affect the ability of cells to receive Notch-Delta signals and thus modulate neurogenic activity that allows for the specification of non-neuronal cell fates in the sense organ.

  14. Adaptation of autonomic heart rate regulation in astronauts after spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Vandeput, Steven; Widjaja, Devy; Aubert, Andre E.; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Background Spaceflight causes changes in the cardiovascular control system. The aim of this study was to evaluate postflight recovery of linear and nonlinear neural markers of heart rate modulation, with a special focus on day-night variations. Material/Methods Twenty-four-hour Holter ECG recordings were obtained in 8 astronauts participating in space missions aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Data recording was performed 1 month before launch, and 5 and 30 days after return to Earth from short- and long-term flights. Cardiovascular control was inferred from linear and nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) parameters, separately during 2-hour day and 2-hour night recordings. Results No remarkable differences were found in the postflight recovery between astronauts from short- and long-duration spaceflights. Five days after return to Earth, vagal modulation was significantly decreased compared to the preflight condition (day: p=0.001; night: p=0.019), while the sympathovagal balance was strongly increased, but only at night (p=0.017). A few nonlinear parameters were reduced early postflight compared to preflight values, but these were not always statistically significant. No significant differences remained after 30 days of postflight recovery. Conclusions Our results show that 5 days after return from both short- and long-duration space missions, neural mechanisms of heart rate regulation are still disturbed. After 1 month, autonomic control of heart rate recovered almost completely. PMID:23291736

  15. The autonomic nervous system regulates postprandial hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bruinstroop, Eveline; la Fleur, Susanne E; Ackermans, Mariette T; Foppen, Ewout; Wortel, Joke; Kooijman, Sander; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Rensen, Patrick C N; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2013-05-15

    The liver is a key organ in controlling glucose and lipid metabolism during feeding and fasting. In addition to hormones and nutrients, inputs from the autonomic nervous system are also involved in fine-tuning hepatic metabolic regulation. Previously, we have shown in rats that during fasting an intact sympathetic innervation of the liver is essential to maintain the secretion of triglycerides by the liver. In the current study, we hypothesized that in the postprandial condition the parasympathetic input to the liver inhibits hepatic VLDL-TG secretion. To test our hypothesis, we determined the effect of selective surgical hepatic denervations on triglyceride metabolism after a meal in male Wistar rats. We report that postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations were significantly elevated in parasympathetically denervated rats compared with control rats (P = 0.008), and VLDL-TG production tended to be increased (P = 0.066). Sympathetically denervated rats also showed a small rise in postprandial triglyceride concentrations (P = 0.045). On the other hand, in rats fed on a six-meals-a-day schedule for several weeks, a parasympathetic denervation resulted in >70% higher plasma triglycerides during the day (P = 0.001), whereas a sympathetic denervation had no effect. Our results show that abolishing the parasympathetic input to the liver results in increased plasma triglyceride levels during postprandial conditions.

  16. Cardiac Organ Damage and Arterial Stiffness in Autonomic Failure: Comparison With Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Valeria; Maule, Simona; Di Stefano, Cristina; Tosello, Francesco; Totaro, Silvia; Veglio, Franco; Milan, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic failure (AF) is characterized by orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, and increased blood pressure (BP) variability. AF patients develop cardiac organ damage, similarly to essential hypertension (EH), and have higher arterial stiffness than healthy controls. Determinants of cardiovascular organ damage in AF are not well known: both BP variability and mean BP values may be involved. The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac organ damage, arterial stiffness, and central hemodynamics in AF, compared with EH subjects with similar 24-hour BP and a group of healthy controls, and to evaluate determinants of target organ damage in patients with AF. Twenty-seven patients with primary AF were studied (mean age, 65.7±11.2 years) using transthoracic echocardiography, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, central hemodynamics, and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. They were compared with 27 EH subjects matched for age, sex, and 24-hour mean BP and with 27 healthy controls. AF and EH had similar left ventricular mass (101.6±33.3 versus 97.7±28.1 g/m(2), P=0.59) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (9.3±1.8 versus 9.2±3.0 m/s, P=0.93); both parameters were significantly lower in healthy controls (P<0.01). Compared with EH, AF patients had higher augmentation index (31.0±7.6% versus 26.1±9.2%, P=0.04) and central BP values. Nighttime systolic BP and 24-hour systolic BP predicted organ damage, independent of BP variability. AF patients develop hypertensive heart disease and increased arterial stiffness, similar to EH with comparable mean BP values. Twenty-four-hour and nighttime systolic BP were determinants of cardiovascular damage, independent of BP variability.

  17. Low-frequency power of heart rate variability is not a measure of cardiac sympathetic tone but may be a measure of modulation of cardiac autonomic outflows by baroreflexes.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Bentho, Oladi; Park, Mee-Yeong; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2011-12-01

    Power spectral analysis of heart rate variability has often been used to assess cardiac autonomic function; however, the relationship of low-frequency (LF) power of heart rate variability to cardiac sympathetic tone has been unclear. With or without adjustment for high-frequency (HF) power, total power or respiration, LF power seems to provide an index not of cardiac sympathetic tone but of baroreflex function. Manipulations and drugs that change LF power or LF:HF may do so not by affecting cardiac autonomic outflows directly but by affecting modulation of those outflows by baroreflexes.

  18. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs by serum response factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Helms, Scott A; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2011-02-08

    Serum response factor (SRF) regulates certain microRNAs that play a role in cardiac and skeletal muscle development. However, the role of SRF in the regulation of microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis in cardiac hypertrophy has not been well established. In this report, we employed two distinct transgenic mouse models to study the impact of SRF on cardiac microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis. Cardiac-specific overexpression of SRF (SRF-Tg) led to altered expression of a number of microRNAs. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a and upregulation of miR-21 occurred by 7 days of age in these mice, long before the onset of cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that SRF overexpression impacted the expression of microRNAs which contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. Reducing cardiac SRF level using the antisense-SRF transgenic approach (Anti-SRF-Tg) resulted in the expression of miR-1, miR-133a and miR-21 in the opposite direction. Furthermore, we observed that SRF regulates microRNA biogenesis, specifically the transcription of pri-microRNA, thereby affecting the mature microRNA level. The mir-21 promoter sequence is conserved among mouse, rat and human; one SRF binding site was found to be in the mir-21 proximal promoter region of all three species. The mir-21 gene is regulated by SRF and its cofactors, including myocardin and p49/Strap. Our study demonstrates that the downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a, and upregulation of miR-21 can be reversed by one single upstream regulator, SRF. These results may help to develop novel therapeutic interventions targeting microRNA biogenesis.

  19. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Abildtrup, Mads; Shattock, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal, hereditary, neurodegenerative disorder best known for its clinical triad of progressive motor impairment, cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. Although a disease of the central nervous system, mortality surveys indicate that heart disease is a leading cause of death. The nature of such cardiac abnormalities remains unknown. Clinical findings indicate a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction - dysautonomia - which may be a result of pathology of the central autonomic network. Dysautonomia can have profound effects on cardiac health, and pronounced autonomic dysfunction can be associated with neurogenic arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Significant advances in the knowledge of neural mechanisms in cardiac disease have recently been made which further aid our understanding of cardiac mortality in Huntington's disease. Even so, despite the evidence of aberrant autonomic activity the potential cardiac consequences of autonomic dysfunction have been somewhat ignored. In fact, underlying cardiac abnormalities such as arrhythmias have been part of the exclusion criteria in clinical autonomic Huntington's disease research. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac function in Huntington's disease patients is warranted. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to clarify how the autonomic nervous system is controlled and regulated in higher, central areas of the brain - and how these regions may be altered in neurological pathology, such as Huntington's disease. Ultimately, research will hopefully result in an improvement of management with the aim of preventing early death in Huntington's disease from cardiac causes.

  20. Cardiac autonomic function during sleep: effects of alcohol dependence and evidence of partial recovery with abstinence

    PubMed Central

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Willoughby, Adrian R.; Baker, Fiona C.; Sugarbaker, David S.; Colrain, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is associated with the development of cardiac and peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) pathology. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which recovery in ANS function could be demonstrated over the first 4 months of abstinence. Fifteen alcoholics (7 women) were studied on three occasions: within a month of detoxification, at approximately 2 months post-detox, and at 4 months post-detox. Thirteen control subjects (6 women) were also studied on three occasions with inter-study intervals matching those of the alcoholics. Six alcoholics relapsed, 48.7 ± 27.9 days following the initial PSG session. ANS function was assessed in the first part of stable non-rapid eye movement sleep. Frequency-domain power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) produced variables including: heart rate (HR), total power (TP; an index representing total HR variability), High Frequency power (HFa; an index reflecting cardiac vagal modulation), HF proportion of total power (HFprop sympathovagal balance), and HF peak frequency (HFpf; an index reflecting respiration rate). Overall, high total and high frequency variability and low sympathovagal balance and myocardial contractility are considered as desired conditions to promote cardiovascular health. At initial assessment, alcoholics had a higher HR (p < 0.001) and respiratory rate (p < 0.01), and lower vagal activity (HFa; p < 0.01) than controls. Alcoholics showed evidence of recovery in HR (p = 0.039) and HFa (p = 0.031) with 4 months of abstinence. Alcoholics with higher TP at the initial visit showed a greater improvement in TP from the initial to the 4-month follow-up session (r = 0.75, p < 0.05). Alcoholics showed substantial recovery in HR and vagal modulation of HRV with 4 months of abstinence, with evidence that the extent of recovery in HRV may be partially determined by the extent of alcohol dependence-related insult to the cardiac ANS system. These data support other studies

  1. Alteration of cardiac autonomic function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Goit, Rajesh K; Jha, Santosh K; Pant, Bhawana N

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if heart rate variability (HRV) showed any changes in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy in comparison with controls. Sixty-five patients with epilepsy (38 males and 27 females), aged 30-50 years, who had never previously received treatment with antiepileptic drugs were eligible for inclusion in this study. Resting electrocardiogram (ECG) at spontaneous respiration was recorded for 5 min in supine position. Time-domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, and Poincare plot of HRV were recorded from ECG In time-domain measures, the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals (RMSSD) and percentage of consecutive RR intervals that differ by more than 50 msec (pNN50) were significantly less in patients with epilepsy. In frequency-domain measures, high frequency [(HF) msec(2)], HF (nu), and low frequency [LF (msec(2))] were significantly less in patients with epilepsy while LF (nu) and LF/HF were significantly high in patients with epilepsy. In Poincare plot, standard deviation perpendicular to line of Poincare plot (SD1) and standard deviation along the line of entity in Poincare plot (SD2) were significantly less in patients with epilepsy. Our results suggest that epileptic patients have an impact on the cardiac autonomic function as measured by HRV. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  2. Identifying diabetic patients with cardiac autonomic neuropathy by heart rate complexity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khandoker, Ahsan H; Jelinek, Herbert F; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in diabetes has been called a "silent killer", because so few patients realize that they suffer from it, and yet its effect can be lethal. Early sub clinical detection of CAN and intervention are of prime importance for risk stratification in preventing sudden death due to silent myocardial infarction. This study presents the usefulness of heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity analyses from short term ECG recordings as a screening tool for CAN. Methods A total of 17 sets of ECG recordings during supine rest were acquired from diabetic subjects with CAN (CAN+) and without CAN (CAN-) and analyzed. Poincaré plot indexes as well as traditional time and frequency, and the sample entropy (SampEn) measure were used for analyzing variability (short and long term) and complexity of HRV respectively. Results Reduced (p > 0.05)_Poincaré plot patterns and lower (p < 0.05) SampEn values were found in CAN+ group, which could be a practical diagnostic and prognostic marker. Classification Trees methodology generated a simple decision tree for CAN+ prediction including SampEn and Poincaré plot indexes with a sensitivity reaching 100% and a specificity of 75% (percentage of agreement 88.24%). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the potential utility of SampEn (a complexity based estimator) of HRV in identifying asymptomatic CAN. PMID:19178728

  3. Sequential modulation of cardiac autonomic control induced by cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Palazzolo, L.; Rimoldi, A.; Diedrich, A.; Harris, P. A.; Porta, A.; Malliani, A.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonhypotensive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) induces a reflex increase in forearm vascular resistance and muscle sympathetic neural discharge without affecting mean heart rate. We tested the hypothesis that a reflex change of the autonomic modulation of heartbeat might arise during low intensity LBNP without changes of mean heart rate. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten healthy volunteers underwent plasma catecholamine evaluation and a continuous recording of ECG, finger blood pressure, respiratory activity, and central venous pressure (CVP) during increasing levels of LBNP up to -40 mm Hg. Spectrum and cross-spectrum analyses assessed the changes in the spontaneous variability of R-R interval, respiration, systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and CVP and in the gain (alpha(LF)) of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate. Baroreceptor sensitivity was also evaluated by the SAP/R-R spontaneous sequences technique. LBNP began decreasing significantly: CVP at -10, R-R interval at -20, SAP at -40, and the indexes alpha(LF) and baroreceptor sensitivity at -30 and -20 mm Hg, compared with baseline conditions. Plasma norepinephrine increased significantly at -20 mm Hg. The normalized low-frequency component of R-R variability (LF(R-R)) progressively increased and was significantly higher than in the control condition at -15 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhypotensive LBNP elicits a reflex increase of cardiac sympathetic modulation, as evaluated by LF(R-R), which precedes the changes in the hemodynamics and in the indexes of arterial baroreflex control.

  4. Abnormalities of neurohormonal and cardiac autonomic nervous activities relate poorly to functional status in fontan patients.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hideo; Takasugi, Hisashi; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Osamu; Watanabe, Ken; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Echigo, Shigeyuki

    2004-10-26

    Impaired cardiac autonomic nervous activities and increased neurohumoral activities (CANA, NHA) characterize Fontan patients. However, the clinical significance of these changes is not clearly understood. Our purpose was to clarify the clinical significance of the CANA and NHA in stable Fontan patients. We divided 22 atriopulmonary connection (APC) and 75 total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) patients into 4 subgroups according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) class (1.8+/-0.6) and measured various CANA and NHA indices. All NHA indices were elevated in the symptomatic patients (P<0.001). Natriuretic peptides were higher in the APC than in the TCPC patients, and the hemodynamics showed no correlation with brain natriuretic peptide in the APC patients. Low arterial oxygen saturation and impaired hemodynamics greatly influenced all elevated NHA indices (P<0.01), except for plasma renin activity, in the TCPC patients. Impaired CANA indices did not relate to NYHA class, although surgeries were associated with lower heart rate variability. In addition to poor correlation between NHA and CANA, age and ventricular morphology had no impact on all CANA and NHA indices, except for high norepinephrine in right ventricular Fontan patients. Although symptomatic Fontan patients exhibit higher NHA, CANA is not related to either NYHA class or NHA. APC itself is responsible for higher natriuretic peptides, and arterial oxygen desaturation has a great impact on elevated NHA in the TCPC patients. These characteristics of the NHA and CANA differ from those of heart failure patients with biventricular physiology.

  5. Cardiac Autonomic Alteration and Metabolic Syndrome: An Ambulatory ECG-based Study in A General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Ahn, Andrew; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Chen, Ming-Fong; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with chronic damage to the cardiovascular system. This study aimed to evaluate early stage cardiac autonomic dysfunction with electrocardiography (ECG)-based measures in MetS subjects. During 2012–2013, 175 subjects with MetS and 226 healthy controls underwent ECG recordings of at least 4 hours starting in the morning with ambulatory one-lead ECG monitors. MetS was diagnosed using the criteria defined in the Adult Treatment Panel III, with a modification of waist circumference for Asians. Conventional heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, and complexity index (CI1–20) calculated from 20 scales of entropy (multiscale entropy, MSE), were compared between subjects with MetS and controls. Compared with the healthy controls, subjects with MetS had significantly reduced HRV, including SDNN and pNN20 in time domain, VLF, LF and HF in frequency domain, as well as SD2 in Poincaré analysis. MetS subjects have significantly lower complexity index (CI1–20) than healthy subjects (1.69 ± 0.18 vs. 1.77 ± 0.12, p < 0.001). MetS severity was inversely associated with the CI1–20 (r = −0.27, p < 0.001). MetS is associated with significant alterations in heart rate dynamics, including HRV and complexity. PMID:28290487

  6. Aerobic exercise improves cardiac autonomic modulation in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sá, Joceline C F; Costa, Eduardo C; da Silva, Ester; Tamburús, Nayara Y; Porta, Alberto; Medeiros, Leany F; Lemos, Telma M A M; Soares, Elvira M M; Azevedo, George D

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise on cardiac autonomic modulation in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Thirty women with PCOS (25.8±4.8 years old; body mass index, BMI≥25 kg/m2) were divided into two groups; exercise group (n=15) and control group (n=15). R-R interval was recorded during 15-min at rest in the supine position. Heart rate variability (HRV) was analyzed by linear (rMSSD, SDNN, LF, HF, LFnu, HFnu, and LF/HF) and nonlinear methods (Shannon entropy, SE; symbolic analyses, 0 V%, 1 V%, 2LV%, and 2UV%) at baseline and after 16 weeks. The multivariate analysis of covariance was used to analyze the effects of exercise on HRV indexes, adjusted for changes in BMI, fasting insulin, and testosterone level. The exercise group increased parasympathetic modulation (rMSSD, HF, HFnu, 2UV%; (p<0.05)) and decreased sympathetic modulation (LF, LFnu, 0 V%; (p<0.05)) independently of changes in BMI, fasting insulin, and testosterone level. Moreover, the exercise group decreased resting HR and systolic blood pressure (p<0.05). All parameters remained unchanged in the control group. Aerobic exercise increased vagal modulation and decreased sympathetic modulation in women with PCOS. This finding reinforces the recommendations for exercise during the clinical management of these patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Sequential modulation of cardiac autonomic control induced by cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Palazzolo, L.; Rimoldi, A.; Diedrich, A.; Harris, P. A.; Porta, A.; Malliani, A.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonhypotensive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) induces a reflex increase in forearm vascular resistance and muscle sympathetic neural discharge without affecting mean heart rate. We tested the hypothesis that a reflex change of the autonomic modulation of heartbeat might arise during low intensity LBNP without changes of mean heart rate. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten healthy volunteers underwent plasma catecholamine evaluation and a continuous recording of ECG, finger blood pressure, respiratory activity, and central venous pressure (CVP) during increasing levels of LBNP up to -40 mm Hg. Spectrum and cross-spectrum analyses assessed the changes in the spontaneous variability of R-R interval, respiration, systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and CVP and in the gain (alpha(LF)) of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate. Baroreceptor sensitivity was also evaluated by the SAP/R-R spontaneous sequences technique. LBNP began decreasing significantly: CVP at -10, R-R interval at -20, SAP at -40, and the indexes alpha(LF) and baroreceptor sensitivity at -30 and -20 mm Hg, compared with baseline conditions. Plasma norepinephrine increased significantly at -20 mm Hg. The normalized low-frequency component of R-R variability (LF(R-R)) progressively increased and was significantly higher than in the control condition at -15 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhypotensive LBNP elicits a reflex increase of cardiac sympathetic modulation, as evaluated by LF(R-R), which precedes the changes in the hemodynamics and in the indexes of arterial baroreflex control.

  8. Regulation of cell-non-autonomous proteostasis in metazoans.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel; van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija

    2016-10-15

    Cells have developed robust adaptation mechanisms to survive environmental conditions that challenge the integrity of their proteome and ensure cellular viability. These are stress signalling pathways that integrate extracellular signals with the ability to detect and efficiently respond to protein-folding perturbations within the cell. Within the context of an organism, the cell-autonomous effects of these signalling mechanisms are superimposed by cell-non-autonomous stress signalling pathways that allow co-ordination of stress responses across tissues. These transcellular stress signalling pathways orchestrate and maintain the cellular proteome at an organismal level. This article focuses on mechanisms in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that activate stress responses in a cell-non-autonomous manner. We discuss emerging insights and provide specific examples on how components of the cell-non-autonomous proteostasis network are used in cancer and protein-folding diseases to drive disease progression across tissues.

  9. Regulation of cell-non-autonomous proteostasis in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Daniel; van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija

    2016-01-01

    Cells have developed robust adaptation mechanisms to survive environmental conditions that challenge the integrity of their proteome and ensure cellular viability. These are stress signalling pathways that integrate extracellular signals with the ability to detect and efficiently respond to protein-folding perturbations within the cell. Within the context of an organism, the cell-autonomous effects of these signalling mechanisms are superimposed by cell-non-autonomous stress signalling pathways that allow co-ordination of stress responses across tissues. These transcellular stress signalling pathways orchestrate and maintain the cellular proteome at an organismal level. This article focuses on mechanisms in both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms that activate stress responses in a cell-non-autonomous manner. We discuss emerging insights and provide specific examples on how components of the cell-non-autonomous proteostasis network are used in cancer and protein-folding diseases to drive disease progression across tissues. PMID:27744329

  10. From syncitium to regulated pump: a cardiac muscle cellular update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to present a basic overview of some key teaching concepts that should be considered for inclusion in an six- to eight-lecture introductory block on the regulation of cardiac performance for graduate students. Within the context of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, this review incorporates information on Ca2+ microdomains and local control theory, with particular emphasis on the role of Ca2+ sparks as a key regulatory component of ventricular myocyte contraction dynamics. Recent information pertaining to local Ca2+ cycling in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) as a mechanism underlying cardiac automaticity is also presented as part of the recently described coupled-clock pacemaker system. The details of this regulation are emerging; however, the notion that the sequestration and release of Ca2+ from internal stores in SANCs (similar to that observed in ventricular myocytes) regulates the rhythmic excitation of the heart (i.e., membrane ion channels) is an important advancement in this area. The regulatory role of cardiac adrenergic receptors on cardiac rate and function is also included, and fundamental concepts related to intracellular signaling are discussed. An important point of emphasis is that whole organ cardiac dynamics can be traced back to cellular events regulating intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and, as such, provides an important conceptual framework from which students can begin to think about whole organ physiology in health and disease. Greater synchrony of Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms between ventricular and pacemaker cells should enhance student comprehension of complex regulatory phenomenon in cardiac muscle. PMID:21385997

  11. Prenatal Stress and Balance of the Child's Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System at Age 5-6 Years

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aimée E.; van Eijsden, Manon; Stronks, Karien; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Autonomic nervous system (ANS) misbalance is a potential causal factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. The ANS may be programmed during pregnancy due to various maternal factors. Our aim is to study maternal prenatal psychosocial stress as a potential disruptor of cardiac ANS balance in the child. Methods Mothers from a prospective birth cohort (ABCD study) filled out a questionnaire at gestational week 16 [IQR 12–20], that included validated instruments for state anxiety, depressive symptoms, pregnancy-related anxiety, parenting daily hassles and job strain. A cumulative stress score was also calculated (based on 80th percentiles). Indicators of cardiac ANS in the offspring at age 5–6 years are: pre-ejection period (PEP), heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and cardiac autonomic balance (CAB), measured with electrocardiography and impedance cardiography in resting supine and sitting positions. Results 2,624 mother-child pairs, only single births, were available for analysis. The stress scales were not significantly associated with HR, PEP, RSA and CAB (p≥0.17). Accumulation of maternal stress was also not associated with HR, PEP, RSA and CAB (p≥0.07). Conclusion Results did not support the hypothesis that prenatal maternal psychosocial stress deregulates cardiac ANS balance in the offspring, at least in rest, and at the age of five-six years. PMID:22272345

  12. Assessment of cardiac autonomic modulation during graded head-up tilt by symbolic analysis of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Porta, Alberto; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Guzzetti, Stefano; Furlan, Raffaello; Montano, Nicola; Gnecchi-Ruscone, Tomaso

    2007-07-01

    Two symbolic indexes, the percentage of sequences characterized by three heart periods with no significant variations (0V%) and that with two significant unlike variations (2UV%), have been found to reflect changes in sympathetic and vagal modulations, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that symbolic indexes may track the gradual shift of the cardiac autonomic modulation during an incremental head-up tilt test. Symbolic analysis was carried out over heart period variability series (250 cardiac beats) derived from ECG recordings during a graded head-up tilt test (0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 degrees ) in 17 healthy subjects. The percentage of subjects showing a significant linear correlation (Spearman rank-order correlation) with tilt angles was utilized to evaluate the performance of symbolic analysis. Spectral analysis was carried out for comparison over the same series. 0V% progressively increased with tilt angles, whereas 2UV% gradually decreased. The decline of 2UV% was greater than the increase of 0V% at low tilt angles. Linear correlation with tilt angles was exhibited in a greater percentage of subjects for 0V% and 2UV% than for any spectral index. Our findings suggest that symbolic analysis performed better than spectral analysis and, thus, is a suitable methodology for assessment of the subtle changes of cardiac autonomic modulation induced by a graded head-up tilt test. Moreover, symbolic analysis indicates that the changes of cardiac sympathetic and vagal modulations observed during this protocol were reciprocal but characterized by different absolute magnitudes.

  13. Regulation of Breathing and Autonomic Outflows by Chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung ventilation fluctuates widely with behavior but arterial PCO2 remains stable. Under normal conditions, the chemoreflexes contribute to PaCO2 stability by producing small corrective cardiorespiratory adjustments mediated by lower brainstem circuits. Carotid body (CB) information reaches the respiratory pattern generator (RPG) via nucleus solitarius (NTS) glutamatergic neurons which also target rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) presympathetic neurons thereby raising sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chemoreceptors also regulate presympathetic neurons and cardiovagal preganglionic neurons indirectly via inputs from the RPG. Secondary effects of chemoreceptors on the autonomic outflows result from changes in lung stretch afferent and baroreceptor activity. Central respiratory chemosensitivity is caused by direct effects of acid on neurons and indirect effects of CO2 via astrocytes. Central respiratory chemoreceptors are not definitively identified but the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is a particularly strong candidate. The absence of RTN likely causes severe central apneas in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Like other stressors, intense chemosensory stimuli produce arousal and activate circuits that are wake- or attention-promoting. Such pathways (e.g., locus coeruleus, raphe, and orexin system) modulate the chemoreflexes in a state-dependent manner and their activation by strong chemosensory stimuli intensifies these reflexes. In essential hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and congestive heart failure, chronically elevated CB afferent activity contributes to raising SNA but breathing is unchanged or becomes periodic (severe CHF). Extreme CNS hypoxia produces a stereotyped cardiorespiratory response (gasping, increased SNA). The effects of these various pathologies on brainstem cardiorespiratory networks are discussed, special consideration being given to the interactions between central and peripheral chemoreflexes. PMID:25428853

  14. Regulation of breathing and autonomic outflows by chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G

    2014-10-01

    Lung ventilation fluctuates widely with behavior but arterial PCO2 remains stable. Under normal conditions, the chemoreflexes contribute to PaCO2 stability by producing small corrective cardiorespiratory adjustments mediated by lower brainstem circuits. Carotid body (CB) information reaches the respiratory pattern generator (RPG) via nucleus solitarius (NTS) glutamatergic neurons which also target rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) presympathetic neurons thereby raising sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chemoreceptors also regulate presympathetic neurons and cardiovagal preganglionic neurons indirectly via inputs from the RPG. Secondary effects of chemoreceptors on the autonomic outflows result from changes in lung stretch afferent and baroreceptor activity. Central respiratory chemosensitivity is caused by direct effects of acid on neurons and indirect effects of CO2 via astrocytes. Central respiratory chemoreceptors are not definitively identified but the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is a particularly strong candidate. The absence of RTN likely causes severe central apneas in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Like other stressors, intense chemosensory stimuli produce arousal and activate circuits that are wake- or attention-promoting. Such pathways (e.g., locus coeruleus, raphe, and orexin system) modulate the chemoreflexes in a state-dependent manner and their activation by strong chemosensory stimuli intensifies these reflexes. In essential hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and congestive heart failure, chronically elevated CB afferent activity contributes to raising SNA but breathing is unchanged or becomes periodic (severe CHF). Extreme CNS hypoxia produces a stereotyped cardiorespiratory response (gasping, increased SNA). The effects of these various pathologies on brainstem cardiorespiratory networks are discussed, special consideration being given to the interactions between central and peripheral chemoreflexes.

  15. Autonomic regulation of anti-inflammatory activities from salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Mathison, Ronald D; Davison, Joseph S; St Laurent, Chris D; Befus, A Dean

    2012-01-01

    The cervical sympathetic nerves which innervate the medial basal hypothalamus-hypophyseal complex, primary and secondary lymph organs, and numerous glands, such as the pineal, thyroid, parathyroid and salivary glands form a relevant neuroimmunoendocrine structure that is involved in the regulation of systemic homeostasis. The superior cervical ganglia and the submandibular glands form a 'neuroendocrine axis' called the cervical sympathetic trunk submandibular gland (CST-SMG) axis. The identification of this axis usurps the traditional view of salivary glands as accessory digestive structures and reinforces the view that they are important sources of systemically active immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory factors whose release is intimately controlled by the autonomic nervous system, and in particular the sympathetic branch. An end component of the CST-SMG axis is the synthesis, processing and release of submandibular rat-1 protein (SMR1), a prohormone, that generates several different peptides, one from near its N-terminus called sialorphin and another from its C-terminus called - submandibular gland peptide-T (SGP-T). SGP-T formed the template for tripeptide fragment (FEG) and its metabolically stable D-isomeric peptide feG, which are potent inhibitors of allergy and asthma (IgE-mediated allergic reactions) and several non-IgE-mediated inflammations. The translation from rat genetics and proteomics to humans has yielded structural and functional correlates that hopefully will lead to the development of new medications and therapeutic approaches for difficult to treat disorders. Although the CST-SMG axis has barely been explored in humans recognition of the importance of this axis could facilitate an understanding and improved management of periodontal disease, and other diseases with a more systemic and nervous system basis such as asthma, autoimmunity, graft-versus-host disease and even Parkinson's disease.

  16. RSK3 – A Regulator of Pathological Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Eliana C.; Passariello, Catherine L.; Li, Jinliang; Matheson, Christopher J.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Reigan, Philip; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The family of p90 ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK) are pleiotropic effectors for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Recently, RSK3 was shown to be important for pathological remodeling of the heart. While cardiac myocyte hypertrophy can be compensatory for increased wall stress, in chronic heart diseases this non-mitotic cell growth is usually associated with interstitial fibrosis, increased cell death, and decreased cardiac function. Although RSK3 is less abundant in the cardiac myocyte than other RSK family members, RSK3 appears to serve a unique role in cardiac myocyte stress responses. A potential mechanism conferring RSK3’s unique function in the heart is anchoring by the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase Anchoring Protein β (mAKAPβ). Recent findings suggest that RSK3 should be considered as a therapeutic target for the prevention of heart failure, a clinical syndrome of major public health significance. PMID:25988524

  17. Early maternal separation has mild effects on cardiac autonomic balance and heart structure in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Trombini, M; Hulshof, H J; Graiani, G; Carnevali, L; Meerlo, P; Quaini, F; Sgoifo, A

    2012-07-01

    Early life adverse experiences have long-term physiologic and behavioral effects and enhance stress sensitivity. This study examined the effects of maternal separation (MS) on cardiac stress responsivity and structure in adulthood. Male Wistar rats were separated from the dams for 3 h per day from postnatal days 2 through 15. When exposed to 5-day intermittent restraint stress (IRS) as adults, MS, and control rats showed similar acute modifications of cardiac sympathovagal balance, quantified via heart rate variability analysis. In addition, MS had no effect on cardiac pacemaker intrinsic activity (as revealed by autonomic blockade with scopolamine and atenolol) and did not affect the circadian rhythmicity of heart rate, neither before nor after IRS. However, MS differed from control rats in cardiac parasympathetic drive following IRS, which was heightened in the latter but remained unchanged in the former, both during the light and dark phases of the daily rhythm. The evaluation of adult cardiac structure indicated that stress experienced during a crucial developmental period induced only modest changes, involving cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, increased density of vascular structures, and myocardial fibrosis. The mildness of these functional-structural effects questions the validity of MS as a model for early stress-induced cardiac disease in humans.

  18. Systematic morphology and evolutionary anatomy of the autonomic cardiac nervous system in the lesser apes, gibbons (hylobatidae).

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Thorington, Richard W; Kunimatsu, Yutaka; Whatton, James F

    2008-08-01

    We examined the morphology of the autonomic cardiac nervous system (ACNS) on 20 sides of 10 gibbons (Hylobatidae) of three genera, and we have inferred the evolution of the anatomy of the primate ACNS. We report the following. (1) Several trivial intraspecific and interspecific variations are present in gibbons, but the general arrangement of the ACNS in gibbons is consistent. (2) Although the parasympathetic vagal cardiac nervous system is extremely consistent, the sympathetic cardiac nervous system, such as the composition of the sympathetic ganglia and the range of origin of the sympathetic cardiac nerves, exhibit topographical differences among primates. (3) The vertebral ganglion, seldom observed in the Old World monkeys (Cercopithecidae), was consistently present in gibbons as well as in humans. (4) There are fewer thoracic ganglia contributing to the cervicothoracic ganglion in humans than in gibbons and in gibbons than in Old World monkeys. (5) The superior cardiac nerve originating from the superior cervical ganglion, rarely observed in Old World monkeys but commonly observed in humans, was present in 13 of 20 sides (65%), mostly on the left. Accordingly, the ACNS morphology exhibits evolutionary changes within the primate lineage. These evolutionary differences between Old World monkeys, gibbons, and humans are most parsimoniously interpreted as resulting from regular changes in the lineages leading from their common ancestor to the extant species that we dissected. They include the reduction in the number of thoracic ganglia contributing to the cervicothoracic ganglion and the expansion of the range of the cardiac nervous origin.

  19. Regulation of cardiac cushion development by hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Camenisch, Todd D; Biesterfeldt, Jennifer; Brehm-Gibson, Tammy; Bradley, Judy; McDonald, John A

    2001-01-01

    Hyaluronan is an extracellular matrix component implicated in expansion of the extracellular space, organization of supramolecular architecture, cell motility, proliferation, tumour metastases and wound healing. Hyaluronan is highly expressed in the developing heart but it is only a minor component of the mature heart. The loss of hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) results in embryonic lethality with a phenotype remarkably similar to that of the versican-deficient heart defect mouse. Has2-deficient embryos lack hyaluronan-containing cardiac jelly, and at embryonic day 9.5 show arrested development, with an apparent absence of the right ventricle and underdevelopment of the conustruncus segment, and pericardial effusion consistent with heart failure. Cardiac cushions are totally absent, and endocardial cell migration over collagen gels is not detectable in Has2-deficient atrioventricular (AV) canal explants. Endothelial to mesenchymal transformation is also defective in AV explants from Has2-null embryos. The normal phenotype is restored in AV canal explants from Has2-deficient embryos by co-culture with wild type AV canal explants, with conditioned media from wild type AV explants or with exogenous hyaluronan. These results provide evidence for a direct role for hyaluronan during endocardial cushion and AV canal morphogenesis. PMID:20428437

  20. Mechanisms regulating cardiac fuel selection in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, M C; Holness, M J; Liu, Y L; Smith, D M; Fryer, L G; Kruszynska, Y T

    1992-01-01

    Starvation (48 h) decreases fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2) concentrations and the ratio of free to acylated carnitine in hearts of euthyroid rats. These decreases, which are indicative of increased lipid fuel oxidation, are accompanied by decreased rates of glucose uptake and phosphorylation, assessed by using radioactive 2-deoxyglucose. Cardiac concentrations of acylated carnitines were increased at the expense of free carnitine even in the fed state in response to experimental hyperthyroidism, but neither Fru-2,6-P2 concentrations nor rates of glucose utilization were suppressed. Starvation (48 h) did not further increase the proportion of acylated carnitine in the heart in hyperthyroidism, and suppression of Fru-2,6-P2 concentrations and glucose utilization rates by starvation was attenuated. Although glucose utilization rates were decreased, starvation did not decrease immunoreactive GLUT 4 protein concentrations. Furthermore, although hyperthyroidism was associated with a statistically significant (30-40%) increase in relative abundance of GLUT 4 mRNA, the amount of GLUT 4 protein was not increased by hyperthyroidism in either the fed or the starved state. The results demonstrate a significant effect of hyperthyroidism to enhance cardiac glucose utilization in starvation by a mechanism which does not involve changes in GLUT 4 expression but may be secondary to changes in glucose-lipid interactions at the tissue level. PMID:1530584

  1. Tyrosine kinase FYN negatively regulates NOX4 in cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Shouji; Kuroda, Junya; Zhai, Peiyong; Liu, Tong; Ikeda, Shohei; Nagarajan, Narayani; Yokota, Takashi; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Hsu, Chiao-Po; Li, Hong; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (Noxes) produce ROS that regulate cell growth and death. NOX4 expression in cardiomyocytes (CMs) plays an important role in cardiac remodeling and injury, but the posttranslational mechanisms that modulate this enzyme are poorly understood. Here, we determined that FYN, a Src family tyrosine kinase, interacts with the C-terminal domain of NOX4. FYN and NOX4 colocalized in perinuclear mitochondria, ER, and nuclear fractions in CMs, and FYN expression negatively regulated NOX4-induced O2– production and apoptosis in CMs. Mechanistically, we found that direct phosphorylation of tyrosine 566 on NOX4 was critical for this FYN-mediated negative regulation. Transverse aortic constriction activated FYN in the left ventricle (LV), and FYN-deficient mice displayed exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction and increased ROS production and apoptosis. Deletion of Nox4 rescued the exaggerated LV remodeling in FYN-deficient mice. Furthermore, FYN expression was markedly decreased in failing human hearts, corroborating its role as a regulator of cardiac cell death and ROS production. In conclusion, FYN is activated by oxidative stress and serves as a negative feedback regulator of NOX4 in CMs during cardiac remodeling. PMID:27525436

  2. Assesment of Heart Rate Variability As A Measure of Cardiac Autonomic Status in Psychiatric Patients Exposed to Chemical Irritants

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Supriya; Rastogi, Rajesh; Gupta, Manushree

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose However, little is known about the cardiac autonomic activity due to chemicals in psychiatric patients. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effect of chemical irritants on the ANS of the person and measure that in the form of Heart Rate Variability (HRV), a noninvasive method to estimate the cardiac autonomic activity. The autonomic nervous system can significantly compromised by use of chemical irritants. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted in which 33 patients (mean age: 29.94 years) of depression/anxiety were compared with 37 age matched controls (mean age: 28.10). The patients who were diagnosed as either depressed or anxious by the psychiatry were included in the study group by random sampling. Out of these 8 patients gave positive history of odour use. Thirty seven age matched healthy persons were taken as controls. Grading of patients was done according to DSMV-IV criteria and short- term HRV was recorded. Five minute HRV recording was done and time domain and frequency domain indices of HRV were assessed using RMS Polyearite D. The result in case and control groups was compared. Results We have reported a poor HRV compared to control group in patients of depression/anxiety as reflected by NN50 values (p< 0.05). Although not significant the trend shows a better HRV control in almost all the time domain and frequency domain parameters in controls compared to cases. Regarding the history of use of chemical irritants the trend showed a poor HRV control in these cases compared to the patients who did not give any such history. Conclusion Our results suggest that impaired cardiac autonomic nerve function characterized by sympathetic over activity may occur in depression/phobic patients. The study also proves a poor HRV in psychiatric subjects with history of use of odoriferous substances. PMID:26266195

  3. Prolonged QT period in diabetic autonomic neuropathy: a possible role in sudden cardiac death?

    PubMed Central

    Bellavere, F; Ferri, M; Guarini, L; Bax, G; Piccoli, A; Cardone, C; Fedele, D

    1988-01-01

    Twenty four men with insulin dependent diabetes and different degrees of autonomic neuropathy were studied to establish the response of the QT interval to various heart rates. Nine men with autonomic neuropathy had a longer QT interval than 13 healthy individuals and 15 patients who had diabetes without, or with only mild, autonomic neuropathy. Those with autonomic neuropathy also had a proportionally greater lengthening of the QT interval for a given increase in RR interval. The results of this study suggest a basis for the finding that sudden death is more common in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. PMID:3355728

  4. Effects of an isotonic beverage on autonomic regulation during and after exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With prolonged physical activity, it is important to maintain adequate fluid balance. The impact of consuming isotonic drinks during and after exercise on the autonomic regulation of cardiac function is unclear. This study aimed to analyze the effects of consuming an isotonic drink on heart rate variability (HRV) during and after prolonged exercise. Methods Thirty-one young males (21.55 ± 1.89 yr) performed three different protocols (48 h interval between each stage): I) maximal exercise test to determine the load for the protocols; II) Control protocol (CP) and; III). Experimental protocol (EP). The protocols consisted of 10 min at rest with the subject in the supine position, 90 min of treadmill exercise (60% of VO2 peak) and 60 min of rest placed in the dorsal decubitus position. No rehydration beverage consumption was allowed during CP. During EP, however, the subjects were given an isotonic solution (Gatorade, Brazil) containing carbohydrate (30 g), sodium (225 mg), chloride (210 mg) and potassium (60 mg) per 500 ml of the drink. For analysis of HRV data, time and frequency domain indices were investigated. HRV was recorded at rest (5–10 min), during exercise (25–30 min, 55–60 min and 85–90 min) and post-exercise (5–10 min, 15–20 min, 25–30 min, 40–45 min and 55–60 min). Results Regardless of hydration, alterations in the SNS and PSNS were observed, revealing an increase in the former and a decrease in the latter. Hydrating with isotonic solution during recovery induced significant changes in cardiac autonomic modulation, promoting faster recovery of linear HRV indices. Conclusion Hydration with isotonic solution did not significantly influence HRV during exercise; however, after exercise it promoted faster recovery of linear indices. PMID:23286515

  5. Maladaptive autonomic regulation in PTSD accelerates physiological aging

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, John B.; Porges, Eric C.; Lamb, Damon G.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    A core manifestation of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disconnection between physiological state and psychological or behavioral processes necessary to adequately respond to environmental demands. Patients with PTSD experience abnormal oscillations in autonomic states supporting either fight and flight behaviors or withdrawal, immobilization, and dissociation without an intervening “calm” state that would provide opportunities for positive social interactions. This defensive autonomic disposition is adaptive in dangerous and life threatening situations, but in the context of every-day life may lead to significant psychosocial distress and deteriorating social relationships. The perpetuation of these maladaptive autonomic responses may contribute to the development of comorbid mental health issues such as depression, loneliness, and hostility that further modify the nature of cardiovascular behavior in the context of internal and external stressors. Over time, changes in autonomic, endocrine, and immune function contribute to deteriorating health, which is potently expressed in brain dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. In this theoretical review paper, we present an overview of the literature on the chronic health effects of PTSD. We discuss the brain networks underlying PTSD in the context of autonomic efferent and afferent contributions and how disruption of these networks leads to poor health outcomes. Finally, we discuss treatment approaches based on our theoretical model of PTSD. PMID:25653631

  6. Maladaptive autonomic regulation in PTSD accelerates physiological aging.

    PubMed

    Williamson, John B; Porges, Eric C; Lamb, Damon G; Porges, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    A core manifestation of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disconnection between physiological state and psychological or behavioral processes necessary to adequately respond to environmental demands. Patients with PTSD experience abnormal oscillations in autonomic states supporting either fight and flight behaviors or withdrawal, immobilization, and dissociation without an intervening "calm" state that would provide opportunities for positive social interactions. This defensive autonomic disposition is adaptive in dangerous and life threatening situations, but in the context of every-day life may lead to significant psychosocial distress and deteriorating social relationships. The perpetuation of these maladaptive autonomic responses may contribute to the development of comorbid mental health issues such as depression, loneliness, and hostility that further modify the nature of cardiovascular behavior in the context of internal and external stressors. Over time, changes in autonomic, endocrine, and immune function contribute to deteriorating health, which is potently expressed in brain dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. In this theoretical review paper, we present an overview of the literature on the chronic health effects of PTSD. We discuss the brain networks underlying PTSD in the context of autonomic efferent and afferent contributions and how disruption of these networks leads to poor health outcomes. Finally, we discuss treatment approaches based on our theoretical model of PTSD.

  7. Cardiomyocyte Circadian Oscillations Are Cell-Autonomous, Amplified by β-Adrenergic Signaling, and Synchronized in Cardiac Ventricle Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks impact vital cardiac parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate, and adverse cardiac events such as myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, synchronizes cellular circadian clocks in the heart and many other tissues throughout the body. Cardiac ventricle explants maintain autonomous contractions and robust circadian oscillations of clock gene expression in culture. In the present study, we examined the relationship between intrinsic myocardial function and circadian rhythms in cultures from mouse heart. We cultured ventricular explants or dispersed cardiomyocytes from neonatal mice expressing a PER2::LUC bioluminescent reporter of circadian clock gene expression. We found that isoproterenol, a β-adrenoceptor agonist known to increase heart rate and contractility, also amplifies PER2 circadian rhythms in ventricular explants. We found robust, cell-autonomous PER2 circadian rhythms in dispersed cardiomyocytes. Single-cell rhythms were initially synchronized in ventricular explants but desynchronized in dispersed cells. In addition, we developed a method for long-term, simultaneous monitoring of clock gene expression, contraction rate, and basal intracellular Ca2+ level in cardiomyocytes using PER2::LUC in combination with GCaMP3, a genetically encoded fluorescent Ca2+ reporter. In contrast to robust PER2 circadian rhythms in cardiomyocytes, we detected no rhythms in contraction rate and only weak rhythms in basal Ca2+ level. In summary, we found that PER2 circadian rhythms of cardiomyocytes are cell-autonomous, amplified by adrenergic signaling, and synchronized by intercellular communication in ventricle explants, but we detected no robust circadian rhythms in contraction rate or basal Ca2+. PMID:27459195

  8. Exercise Type Affects Cardiac Vagal Autonomic Recovery After a Resistance Training Session.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Xián; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Fariñas-Rodríguez, Juán; Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Kingsley, J Derek

    2016-09-01

    Mayo, X, Iglesias-Soler, E, Fariñas-Rodríguez, J, Fernández-del-Olmo, M, and Kingsley, JD. Exercise type affects cardiac vagal autonomic recovery after a resistance training session. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2565-2573, 2016-Resistance training sessions involving different exercises and set configurations may affect the acute cardiovascular recovery pattern. We explored the interaction between exercise type and set configuration on the postexercise cardiovagal withdrawal measured by heart rate variability and their hypotensive effect. Thirteen healthy participants (10 repetitions maximum [RM] bench press: 56 ± 10 kg; parallel squat: 91 ± 13 kg) performed 6 sessions corresponding to 2 exercises (Bench press vs. Parallel squat), 2 set configurations (Failure session vs. Interrepetition rest session), and a Control session of each exercise. Load (10RM), volume (5 sets), and rest (720 seconds) were equated between exercises and set configurations. Parallel squat produced higher reductions in cardiovagal recovery vs. Bench press (p = 0.001). These differences were dependent on the set configuration, with lower values in Parallel squat vs. Bench press for Interrepetition rest session (1.816 ± 0.711 vs. 2.399 ± 0.739 Ln HF/IRR × 10, p = 0.002), but not for Failure session (1.647 ± 0.904 vs. 1.808 ± 0.703 Ln HF/IRR × 10, p > 0.05). Set configuration affected the cardiovagal recovery, with lower values in Failure session in comparison with Interrepetition rest (p = 0.027) and Control session (p = 0.022). Postexercise hypotension was not dependent on the exercise type (p > 0.05) but was dependent on the set configuration, with lower values of systolic (p = 0.004) and diastolic (p = 0.011) blood pressure after the Failure session but not after an Interrepetition rest session in comparison with the Control session (p > 0.05). These results suggest that the exercise type and an Interrepetition rest design could blunt the decrease of cardiac vagal activity after

  9. [Autonomic neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Siepmann, T; Penzlin, A I; Illigens, B M W

    2013-07-01

    Autonomic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that involve damage of small peripheral autonomic Aδ- and C-fibers. Causes of autonomic nerve fiber damage are disorders such as diabetes mellitus and HIV-infection. Predominant symptoms of autonomic neuropathy are orthostatic hypotension, gastro-intestinal problems, urogenital dysfunction, and cardiac arrhythmia, which can severely impair the quality of life in affected patients. Furthermore, autonomic neuropathies can be induced by autoimmune diseases such as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, hereditary disorders such as the lysosomal storage disorder Fabry disease and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies, as well as certain toxins and drugs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Enhancing Predictive Accuracy of Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Using Blood Biochemistry Features and Iterative Multitier Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Abawajy, Jemal; Kelarev, Andrei; Chowdhury, Morshed U; Jelinek, Herbert F

    2016-01-01

    Blood biochemistry attributes form an important class of tests, routinely collected several times per year for many patients with diabetes. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of blood biochemistry for improving the predictive accuracy of the diagnosis of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) progression. Blood biochemistry contributes to CAN, and so it is a causative factor that can provide additional power for the diagnosis of CAN especially in the absence of a complete set of Ewing tests. We introduce automated iterative multitier ensembles (AIME) and investigate their performance in comparison to base classifiers and standard ensemble classifiers for blood biochemistry attributes. AIME incorporate diverse ensembles into several tiers simultaneously and combine them into one automatically generated integrated system so that one ensemble acts as an integral part of another ensemble. We carried out extensive experimental analysis using large datasets from the diabetes screening research initiative (DiScRi) project. The results of our experiments show that several blood biochemistry attributes can be used to supplement the Ewing battery for the detection of CAN in situations where one or more of the Ewing tests cannot be completed because of the individual difficulties faced by each patient in performing the tests. The results show that AIME provide higher accuracy as a multitier CAN classification paradigm. The best predictive accuracy of 99.57% has been obtained by the AIME combining decorate on top tier with bagging on middle tier based on random forest. Practitioners can use these findings to increase the accuracy of CAN diagnosis.

  11. A Submaximal Running Test With Postexercise Cardiac Autonomic and Neuromuscular Function in Monitoring Endurance Training Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Vesterinen, Ville; Nummela, Ari; Laine, Tanja; Hynynen, Esa; Mikkola, Jussi; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2017-01-01

    Vesterinen, V, Nummela, A, Laine, T, Hynynen, E, Mikkola, J, and Häkkinen, K. A submaximal running test with postexercise cardiac autonomic and neuromuscular function in monitoring endurance training adaptation. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 233-243, 2017-The aim of this study was to investigate whether a submaximal running test (SRT) with postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR), heart rate variability (HRV), and countermovement jump (CMJ) measurements could be used to monitor endurance training adaptation. Thirty-five endurance-trained men and women completed an 18-week endurance training. Maximal endurance performance and maximal oxygen uptake were measured every 8 weeks. In addition, SRTs with postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ measurements were carried out every 4 weeks. Submaximal running test consisted of two 6-minute stages at 70 and 80% of maximum heart rate (HRmax) and a 3-minute stage at 90% HRmax, followed by a 2-minute recovery stage for measuring postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ test. The highest responders according to the change of maximal endurance performance showed a significant improvement in running speeds during stages 2 and 3 in SRT, whereas no changes were observed in the lowest responders. The strongest correlation was found between the change of maximal endurance performance and running speed during stage 3, whereas no significant relationships were found between the change of maximal endurance performance and the changes of postexercise HRR, HRV, and CMJ. Running speed at 90% HRmax intensity was the most sensitive variable to monitor adaptation to endurance training. The present submaximal test showed potential to monitor endurance training adaptation. Furthermore, it may serve as a practical tool for athletes and coaches to evaluate weekly the effectiveness of training program without interfering in the normal training habits.

  12. Cardiac Autonomic Changes After Thoracic Sympathectomy: A Prospective, Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Messina, Giovanni; Chiodini, Paolo; Costanzo, Saveria; Viggiano, Andrea; Monda, Marcellino; Vicidomini, Giovanni; Santini, Mario

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated whether cardiac autonomic changes could be associated with different extent of sympathetic nerve resection in the management of essential palmar hyperhidrosis. Sixty patients with essential palmar hyperhidrosis were randomly allocated to undergo excision of T3 ganglia (sympathicectomy group; n = 30) or to interruption of sympathetic chain at the T2 to T3 level with ganglion sparing (sympathicotomy group; n = 30). Time and frequency domains were measured with a 24-Holter monitor during daytime, nighttime, and 24-hour periods at different interval points (7 days before operation; 24 hours; and 1, 3, and 6 months later), and the differences were statistically compared. Clinical outcomes were also evaluated. Twenty-eight of 30 patients of the sympathectomy and 29 of 30 patients of the sympathicotomy group completed the study. In both groups, we observed a significant increase (p < 0.05) of vagal activity measurements as root mean square of the successive differences of heart period; proportion of adjacent normal R-R intervals >50 ms; high frequency; and a significant decrease (p < 0.05) of adrenergic activity variables as heart rate, low frequency, and the ratio between low frequency and high frequency during daytime, nighttime, and 24-hour periods. These changes were significantly more evident (p < 0.05) in the sympathectomy group than in the sympathicotomy group. Clinical outcomes were similar between the two groups. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy caused a shift of sympathovagal balance toward parasympathetic tone that seems to be associated with the extent of denervation. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02733497. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of the autonomic nervous system in the reduced maximal cardiac output at altitude.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Harm J; Hopkins, Susan R; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Niizeki, Kyuichi; Ziegler, Michael G; Wagner, Peter D

    2002-07-01

    After acclimatization to high altitude, maximal exercise cardiac output (QT) is reduced. Possible contributing factors include 1) blood volume depletion, 2) increased blood viscosity, 3) myocardial hypoxia, 4) altered autonomic nervous system (ANS) function affecting maximal heart rate (HR), and 5) reduced flow demand from reduced muscle work capability. We tested the role of the ANS reduction of HR in this phenomenon in five normal subjects by separately blocking the sympathetic and parasympathetic arms of the ANS during maximal exercise after 2-wk acclimatization at 3,800 m to alter maximal HR. We used intravenous doses of 8.0 mg of propranolol and 0.8 mg of glycopyrrolate, respectively. At altitude, peak HR was 170 +/- 6 beats/min, reduced from 186 +/- 3 beats/min (P = 0.012) at sea level. Propranolol further reduced peak HR to 139 +/- 2 beats/min (P = 0.001), whereas glycopyrrolate increased peak HR to sea level values, 184 +/- 3 beats/min, confirming adequate dosing with each drug. In contrast, peak O(2) consumption, work rate, and QT were similar at altitude under all drug treatments [peak QT = 16.2 +/- 1.2 (control), 15.5 +/- 1.3 (propranolol), and 16.2 +/- 1.1 l/min (glycopyrrolate)]. All QT results at altitude were lower than those at sea level (20.0 +/- 1.8 l/min in air). Therefore, this study suggests that, whereas the ANS may affect HR at altitude, peak QT is unaffected by ANS blockade. We conclude that the effect of altered ANS function on HR is not the cause of the reduced maximal QT at altitude.

  14. Cardiac autonomic response following high-intensity running work-to-rest interval manipulation.

    PubMed

    Cipryan, Lukas; Laursen, Paul B; Plews, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    The cardiorespiratory, cardiac autonomic (via heart rate variability (HRV)) and plasma volume responses to varying sequences of high-intensity interval training (HIT) of consistent external work were investigated. Twelve moderately trained males underwent three HIT bouts and one control session. The HIT trials consisted of warm-up, followed by 12 min of 15 s, 30 s or 60 s work:relief HIT sequences at an exercise intensity of 100% of the individual velocity at [Formula: see text]O2max (v[Formula: see text]O2max), interspersed by relief intervals at 60% [Formula: see text]O2max (work/relief ratio = 1). HRV was evaluated via the square root of the mean sum of the squared differences between R-R intervals (rMSSD) before, 1 h, 3 h and 24 h after the exercise. Plasma volume was assessed before, immediately after, and 3 h and 24 h after. There were no substantial between-trial differences in acute cardiorespiratory responses. The rMSSD values remained decreased 1 h after the exercise cessation in all exercise groups. The rMSSD subsequently increased between 1 h and 3 h after exercise, with the most pronounced change in the 15/15 group. There were no relationships between HRV and plasma volume. All HIT protocols resulted in similar cardiorespiratory responses with slightly varying post-exercise HRV responses, with the 30/30 protocol eliciting the least disruption to post-exercise HRV. These post-exercise HRV findings suggest that the 30/30 sequence may be the preferable HIT prescription when the between-training period is limited.

  15. Source location of air pollution and cardiac autonomic function: trajectory cluster analysis for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Kyun; O'Neill, Marie S; Stunder, Barbara J B; Vokonas, Pantel S; Sparrow, David; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2007-08-01

    Although many studies report that exposure to air pollution harms health, few have examined associations between pollution sources and health outcomes. We hypothesized that pollution originating in different locations has different associations with heart rate variability (HRV) among 497 men from the Normative Aging Study in Boston, Massachusetts. We identified the paths that air masses traveled ('back-trajectories') before arriving in Boston on the days the men were examined. Next, we classified these trajectories into six clusters. We examined whether the association of measured air pollutants with HRV (standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals, high-frequency power (HF) and low-frequency power (LF), and LF/HF ratio) differed by cluster. We also examined whether the clusters alone (not considering air pollution measurements) showed different associations with HRV. The effects of black carbon (BC) on all HRV measures were strongest on days with southwest trajectories. Subjects who were examined on days where air parcels came from west had the strongest associations with ozone. All particle pollutants (particulate matter <2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5), BC, and sulfates) were associated with increased LF/HF ratio on days with relatively short trajectories, which are related to local, slow-moving air masses. We also observed significant increases in LF/HF in days where air came from the northwest and west, compared to north trajectory days. Health effects associated with exposure to air pollution can be evaluated using pollutant concentrations as well as aspects of the pollution mixture captured by identifying locations where air masses originate. Independent effects of both these indicators of pollution exposure were seen on cardiac autonomic function.

  16. Vagal reactivation after exercise and cardiac autonomic nervous activity in adult Fontan patients without pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Eser, Prisca; Herzig, David; Vogt, Marcel; Stämpfli, Roger; Trovato, Moreno; Olstad, Daniela Schäfer; Trachsel, Lukas; Deluigi, Christina; Wustmann, Kerstin; Greutmann, Matthias; Tobler, Daniel; Stambach, Dominik; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Schwerzmann, Markus; Wilhelm, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    Patients with Fontan circulation have reduced heart rate variability (HRV) in supine position. However, neither cardiac autonomic nervous activity (CANA) in response to orthostatic challenge nor vagal reactivation by means of heart rate (HR) recovery after cessation of exercise have previously been investigated in Fontan patients. The aim of this study was to compare HRV in supine and standing position, as well as HR recovery between Fontan patients and healthy controls. Eight Fontan patients (4 male/4 female) without pacemakers and 12 healthy volunteers (5m/7f) with minimum age of 18years were recruited. HR was measured by Holter-electrocardiogram. HRV was measured in supine position and after orthostatic challenge. The power of the high frequency (HF: 0.15Hz-0.4Hz) and low frequency (LF: 0.04Hz-0.15Hz) bands was analysed by fast-Fourier transformation. HR recovery was determined at 30s and 60s after termination of a maximal exercise test. In both supine and standing position, total power, HF and LF power were reduced in Fontan patients compared to controls (by approximately a factor of 10) while there was no differences in LF/HF power ratio. Response to orthostatic challenge was blunted in absolute power but normal in relative power. HR recovery was not different between groups. Fontan patients have greatly reduced HRV, a blood-pressure dependent marker of CANA, but normal HR recovery, a blood pressure independent marker of vagal reactivation, suggesting that vagal activity may be normal, and only vascular capacitance reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sleep variability and cardiac autonomic modulation in adolescents – Penn State Child Cohort (PSCC) study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Colón, Sol M.; He, Fan; Bixler, Edward O.; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Calhoun, Susan; Zheng, Zhi-Jie; Liao, Duanping

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of objectively measured habitual sleep patterns on cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) in a population-based sample of adolescents. Methods We used data from 421 adolescents who completed the follow-up examination in the Penn State Children Cohort study. CAM was assessed by heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) analysis of beat-to-beat normal R-R intervals from a 39-h electrocardiogram, on a 30-min basis. The HRV indices included frequency domain (HF, LF, and LF/HF ratio), and time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, and heart rate or HR) variables. Actigraphy was used for seven consecutive nights to estimate nightly sleep duration and time in bed. The seven-night mean (SD) of sleep duration and sleep efficiency were used to represent sleep duration, duration variability, sleep efficiency, and efficiency variability, respectively. HF and LF were log-transformed for statistical analysis. Linear mixed-effect models were used to analyze the association between sleep patterns and CAM. Results After adjusting for major confounders, increased sleep duration variability and efficiency variability were significantly associated with lower HRV and higher HR during the 39-h, as well as separated by daytime and nighttime. For instance, a 1-h increase in sleep duration variability is associated with −0.14(0.04), −0.12(0.06), and −0.16(0.05) ms2 decrease in total, daytime, and nighttime HF, respectively. No associations were found between sleep duration, or sleep efficiency and HRV. Conclusion Higher habitual sleep duration variability and efficiency variability are associated with lower HRV and higher HR, suggesting that an irregular sleep pattern has an adverse impact on CAM, even in healthy adolescents. PMID:25555635

  18. Sleep variability and cardiac autonomic modulation in adolescents - Penn State Child Cohort (PSCC) study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colón, Sol M; He, Fan; Bixler, Edward O; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Calhoun, Susan; Zheng, Zhi-Jie; Liao, Duanping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of objectively measured habitual sleep patterns on cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) in a population-based sample of adolescents. We used data from 421 adolescents who completed the follow-up examination in the Penn State Children Cohort study. CAM was assessed by heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) analysis of beat-to-beat normal R-R intervals from a 39-h electrocardiogram, on a 30-min basis. The HRV indices included frequency domain (HF, LF, and LF/HF ratio), and time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, and heart rate or HR) variables. Actigraphy was used for seven consecutive nights to estimate nightly sleep duration and time in bed. The seven-night mean (SD) of sleep duration and sleep efficiency were used to represent sleep duration, duration variability, sleep efficiency, and efficiency variability, respectively. HF and LF were log-transformed for statistical analysis. Linear mixed-effect models were used to analyze the association between sleep patterns and CAM. After adjusting for major confounders, increased sleep duration variability and efficiency variability were significantly associated with lower HRV and higher HR during the 39-h, as well as separated by daytime and nighttime. For instance, a 1-h increase in sleep duration variability is associated with -0.14(0.04), -0.12(0.06), and -0.16(0.05) ms(2) decrease in total, daytime, and nighttime HF, respectively. No associations were found between sleep duration, or sleep efficiency and HRV. Higher habitual sleep duration variability and efficiency variability are associated with lower HRV and higher HR, suggesting that an irregular sleep pattern has an adverse impact on CAM, even in healthy adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of gender and aerobic fitness on cardiac autonomic responses to head-up tilt in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, A F; Roseguini, B T; Silva, B M; Hirai, D M; Guedes, D P

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic responses to orthostatic challenges are affected by gender and cardiorespiratory fitness in adults. However, little is know about the effects of these factors in healthy adolescents. We studied 41 adolescents (20 boys and 21 girls) aged 12-17 years, divided into aerobic fitness tertiles based on the results of a maximal treadmill exercise test. Cardiac autonomic modulation was assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of 5-minute RR interval recordings before and after 70 degrees head-up tilt maneuver. HRV was analyzed by time (TD) and frequency domain (FD) methods. TD was analyzed by standard deviation of the RR intervals and the root mean square of successive differences of RR intervals. The power spectral components were studied at low (LF) and high (HF) frequencies and as the LF/HF ratio. We did not find any differences in TD and FD measures before and after tilt in either gender or fitness groups, except for a higher heart rate response for boys. These results suggests that cardiac autonomic responses to head-up tilt in healthy adolescents are not affected by gender or aerobic fitness.

  20. [Non-invasive evaluation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system by PET]. Progress report, September 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The proposed research addresses the development, validation and application of cardiac PET imaging techniques to characterize the autonomic nervous system of the heart. PET technology has significantly matured over the last two decades. Instrument design, image processing and production of radiochemical compounds have formed an integrative approach to provide a powerful and novel imaging modality for the quantitative in vivo evaluation of the autonomic nervous system of the heart. Animal studies using novel tracers for the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve terminals will be employed to characterize the functional integrity of nerve terminals. This work will be complemented by the development of agents which bind to postsynaptic receptor sites. The combined evaluation of presynaptic and postsynaptic neuronal function will allow a unique characterization of neuronal function. Initial development in animal studies will be followed by feasibility studies in humans. These studies are designed to test sophisticated imaging protocols in the human heart and validate the scintigraphic findings with independent markers of autonomic innervation. Subsequent clinical application in various cardiac diseases is expected to provide new insights into the neuropathophysiology of the heart.

  1. Intracoronary gastrin 17 increases cardiac perfusion and function through autonomic nervous system, CCK receptors, and nitric oxide in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Caimmi, Philippe; Molinari, Claudio; Uberti, Francesca; Mary, David; Vacca, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    The release of gastrointestinal hormones has been reported to modulate reflex cardiovascular responses caused by gastric distension, although the role played by gastrin 17 is as yet unknown. The present study was therefore planned to determine the primary in vivo effect of gastrin 17 on coronary blood flow and cardiac function and the involvement of autonomic nervous system, CCK1/2 receptors, and nitric oxide (NO). In 40 anesthetized pigs, gastrin 17 was infused into the left anterior descending coronary artery at constant heart rate and arterial blood pressure. In 35 of the 40 pigs, the mechanisms of the observed hemodynamic responses were analyzed by repeating gastrin 17 infusion after autonomic nervous system and NO blockade, and after specific CCK receptors agonists/antagonists administration. Intracoronary gastrin 17 administration caused dose-related increases of both coronary blood flow and cardiac function. The intracoronary co-administration of CCK33/pentagastrin and gastrin 17 potentiated the coronary effects observed when the above agents were given alone (P <0.05). The potentiation of the cardiac response was observed only with the co-administration of pentagastrin and gastrin 17 (P <0.05). Moreover, blockade of muscarinic cholinoceptors (intravenous atropine) and of α-adrenoceptors (intravenous phentolamine) did not abolish the hemodynamic responses to gastrin 17. The cardiac and vascular effects of the hormone were prevented by blockade of β-adrenoceptors (intravenous atenolol and butoxamine), CCK1/2 receptors (intracoronary lorglumide and CAM-1028), and NO synthase (intracoronary Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester). In conclusion, gastrin 17 primarily increased coronary blood flow and cardiac function through the involvement of CCK receptors, β-adrenoceptors, and NO release.

  2. Autonomic control of cardiac action potentials: role of potassium channel kinetics in response to sympathetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Terrenoire, Cecile; Clancy, Colleen E; Cormier, Joseph W; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2005-03-18

    I(Ks), the slowly activating component of the delayed rectifier current, plays a major role in repolarization of the cardiac action potential (AP). Genetic mutations in the alpha- (KCNQ1) and beta- (KCNE1) subunits of I(Ks) underlie Long QT Syndrome type 1 and 5 (LQT-1 and LQT-5), respectively, and predispose carriers to the development of polymorphic ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. beta-adrenergic stimulation increases I(Ks) and results in rate dependent AP shortening, a control system that can be disrupted by some mutations linked to LQT-1 and LQT-5. The mechanisms by which I(Ks) regulates action potential duration (APD) during beta-adrenergic stimulation at different heart rates are not known, nor are the consequences of mutation induced disruption of this regulation. Here we develop a complementary experimental and theoretical approach to address these questions. We reconstituted I(Ks) in CHO cells (ie, KCNQ1 coexpressed with KCNE1 and the adaptator protein Yotiao) and quantitatively examined the effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation on channel kinetics. We then developed theoretical models of I(Ks) in the absence and presence of beta-adrenergic stimulation. We simulated the effects of sympathetic stimulation on channel activation (speeding) and deactivation (slowing) kinetics on the whole cell action potential under different pacing conditions. The model suggests these kinetic effects are critically important in rate-dependent control of action potential duration. We also investigate the effects of two LQT-5 mutations that alter kinetics and impair sympathetic stimulation of I(Ks) and show the likely mechanism by which they lead to tachyarrhythmias and indicate a distinct role of I(KS) kinetics in this electrical dysfunction. The full text of this article is available online at http://circres.ahajournals.org.

  3. Association between obesity and heart rate variability indices: an intuition toward cardiac autonomic alteration – a risk of CVD

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ram Lochan; Yadav, Prakash Kumar; Yadav, Laxmi Kumari; Agrawal, Kopila; Sah, Santosh Kumar; Islam, Md Nazrul

    2017-01-01

    Background Obese people have a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease, which is supposed to be due to autonomic dysfunction and/or metabolic disorder. The alterations in cardiac autonomic functions bring out the changes in the heart rate variability (HRV) indicators, an assessing tool for cardiac autonomic conditions. Objective To compare the cardiac autonomic activity between obese and normal weight adults and find out the highest association between the indices of HRV and obesity. Methods The study was conducted in 30 adult obese persons (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m2) and 29 healthy normal weight controls (BMI 18–24 kg/m2). Short-term HRV variables were assessed using standard protocol. Data were compared between groups using Mann–Whitney U test. Obesity indices such as waist circumference, hip circumference, waist–hip ratio (WHR), and BMI were measured and calculated, and they were correlated with HRV indices using Spearman’s correlation analysis. Results In the obese group, there was a significant increase in the mean heart rate, whereas the HRV parasympathetic indicators were less (eg, root mean square of differences of successive RR intervals [28.75 {16.72–38.35} vs 41.55 {30.6–56.75} ms, p=0.018], number of RR intervals that differ by >50 ms, that is, NN50 [15.5 {2–39} vs 83.5 {32.75–116.25}, p=0.010], etc) and the sympathetic indicator low frequency (LF)/high frequency (HF) ratio (1.2 [0.65–2.20] vs 0.79 [0.5–1.02], p=0.045) was more than that of the normal weight group. Spearman’s correlation between HRV and obesity indices showed significant positive correlation of WHR with LF in normalized unit (r=0.478, p<0.01) and LF/HF ratio (r=0.479, p<0.01), whereas it had significant negative correlation with high frequency power ms2 (r=−0.374, p<0.05) and HF in normalized unit (r=−0.478, p<0.01). There was a nonsignificant correlation of BMI with HRV variables in obese individuals. Conclusion Increased WHR, by far an indicator of

  4. Examining the role of TRPA1 in air pollution-induced cardiac arrhythmias and autonomic imbalance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe how air pollution causes cardiac arrhythmogenesis through sensory irritation in the airways. Time-series studies show the risk of adverse cardiac events increases significantly in the hours to days after expos...

  5. Examining the role of TRPA1 in air pollution-induced cardiac arrhythmias and autonomic imbalance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we describe how air pollution causes cardiac arrhythmogenesis through sensory irritation in the airways. Time-series studies show the risk of adverse cardiac events increases significantly in the hours to days after expos...

  6. CaMKII regulation of cardiac K channels

    PubMed Central

    Mustroph, Julian; Maier, Lars S.; Wagner, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac K channels are critical determinants of cardiac excitability. In hypertrophied and failing myocardium, alterations in the expression and activity of voltage-gated K channels are frequently observed and contribute to the increased propensity for life-threatening arrhythmias. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of disturbed K channel regulation in heart failure (HF) is of critical importance. Amongst others, Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has been identified as an important regulator of K channel activity. In human HF but also various animal models, increased CaMKII expression and activity has been linked to deteriorated contractile function and arrhythmias. This review will discuss the current knowledge about CaMKII regulation of several K channels, its influence on action potential properties, dispersion of repolarization, and arrhythmias with special focus on HF. PMID:24600393

  7. Effect of aerobic training on baroreflex regulation of cardiac and sympathetic function.

    PubMed

    Sheldahl, L M; Ebert, T J; Cox, B; Tristani, F E

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effect of aerobic exercise training on baroreflex regulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and cardiac R-R intervals in a middle-aged to older population, 10 healthy men > 40 yr of age underwent tests of autonomic function before and after 12 wk of high-intensity training. Cardiac and peripheral baroslopes were determined from the R-R interval vs. mean arterial pressure (MAP) and peroneal MSNA vs. diastolic pressure relationships, respectively, during sequential bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Maximal oxygen uptake increased (P < 0.05) 17% with training. Resting R-R interval increased (881 +/- 23 to 956 +/- 38 ms, P < 0.05), MAP decreased (96 +/- 2 to 91 +/- 3 mmHg, P < 0.05), and MSNA was unaltered (23.1 +/- 2.3 to 23.6 +/- 1.9 bursts/min) with training. Before and after training, respectively, cardiac baroslopes determined with decreasing (8.7 +/- 0.9 to 9.9 +/- 5.5 ms/mmHg) and increasing MAP (9.6 +/- 2.1 to 9.9 +/- 2.2 ms/mmHg) and the peripheral sympathetic baroslope (-3.3 +/- 0.4 to -3.5 +/- 0.6 bursts.min-1 x mmHg-1) did not differ. The results suggest that short-term aerobic training does not alter resting MSNA or neurocirculatory responses to baroreceptor challenges in middle-aged and older men.

  8. Cardiac autonomic modulation evaluated by heart interval variability is unaltered but subtly widespread in the indeterminate Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Correia, Dalmo; Junqueira, Luiz Fernando; Molina, Rodrigo Juliano; Prata, Aluízio

    2007-06-01

    Cardiac autonomic function in the indeterminate chronic form of Chagas' disease deserves better clearing-up and understanding, since the existing findings are scarce and controversial. This work analyzed the short-term heart interval variability in order to verify the cardiac autonomic modulation in indeterminate Chagas' disease subjects examined in a Brazilian endemic area. Variability in time and frequency domain of 5-minute electrocardiogram (ECG) series of R-R intervals in supine and active standing positions were obtained from 18 age-, gender-, body mass index-, lifestyle-, and physical activity-matched chagasics and 18 control healthy subjects examined in Agua Comprida city, MG, Brazil. Mann-Whitney test was used for analysis of the data and spread of the individual indices in both groups. The median of the all variability indices in the chagasic group were statistically similar (P= 0.17-0.87) to that in the control group. A wide dispersion of the almost all individual indices values, ranging from normal to variably reduced or increased ones, was noted in the majority of the chagasics in relation to the control interquartile range, in both postural positions. As a group, indeterminate Chagas' disease subjects showed unaltered short-term heart interval variability. Individual somewhat widespread of majority of time- and frequency-domain indices, from depressed to exacerbated ones appears to exist. This conforms to a variable cardiac autonomic modulation in this form of disease, suggesting that the majority of chagasics has no lesions, and a minority has subtle lesions of the efferent innervation-sinus node complex.

  9. Effect of vagotomy on the activity of cardiac autonomic ganglia: Insight from left atrial high density frequency mapping.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Yu; Lo, Li-Wei; Chou, Yu-Hui; Lin, Wei-Lun; Lin, Yenn-Jiang; Yamada, Shinya; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2016-10-01

    Both extrinsic and intrinsic cardiac autonomic nervous systems are important for initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to evaluate the effect of vagotomy on the activity of cardiac autonomic ganglionated plexi (GP) and the change of dominant frequency (DF) distribution in the left atrium (LA) during AF. A mid-sternal thoracotomy was performed in 6 dogs. High frequency stimulation was applied to locate the GPs. There were four major LA GPs, which were located near the pulmonary vein ostia, and a superior vena cava-aorta (SVC-Ao) GP that was located near the superior vena cava-right atrial junction. Acetylcholine patch was applied on GPs to induce intrinsic vagal response. Vagal denervation was performed thereafter. An Ensite Array was deployed in the LA to record atrial signals before and after vagotomy during induced AF. The LA mean DF values (8.2±0.1 vs. 7.6±0.1Hz, p=0.002) were higher during GP activation before than after vagotomy. The maximal DF distribution was located at the primary GPs and the nearby secondary GPs during LA GPs activation and at the LA septum and right superior pulmonary vein during SVC-Ao GP activation before vagotomy. After vagotomy, the maximal DF distribution shifted to non-GP LA sites during activation of the GPs. The findings suggest the important role of the extrinsic neural input in the activation and interaction of the intrinsic cardiac autonomic activity during cholinergic AF, whereas the non-GP LA sites were responsible for the AF induced without the physiological extrinsic neural input. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The frequency and pattern of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in type 2 DM patients in a diabetic clinic in Enugu South-East Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Eze, C; Onwuekwe, I; Ogunniyi, A

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency, pattern and grades of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in type 2 diabetic patients in a diabetes mellitus (DM) clinic in Enugu South-East Nigeria. A cross sectional study of seventy (70) type 2 diabetic patients attending a DM clinic in Enugu South-East Nigeria was carried out. Cardiac autonomic function was determined using a battery of 5 noninvasive tests which include; Heart rate response (HRR) to Valsalva manoeuvre, HRR to deep breathing, HRR to standing, Resting heart rate, and Blood pressure (BP) response to standing. The frequency of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in type 2 diabetic patients was 44.3%. Resting tachycardia was the most specific, HRR to Valsalva manoeuvre was most sensitive while BP response to standing had the best positive predictive value in detecting cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy is a common complication in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients seen at Enugu. It is therefore recommended that tonomic function tests be part of the standard care of type 2 diabetic patients and appropriate management instituted for both primary and secondary prevention.

  11. Cardiac Fibroblasts Regulate Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Neurocardiac Synapse Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mias, Céline; Coatrieux, Christelle; Denis, Colette; Genet, Gaël; Seguelas, Marie-Hélène; Laplace, Nathalie; Rouzaud-Laborde, Charlotte; Calise, Denis; Parini, Angelo; Cussac, Daniel; Pathak, Atul; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Galés, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays a key role in cardiac homeostasis and its deregulations always associate with bad clinical outcomes. To date, little is known about molecular mechanisms regulating cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to determine the role of fibroblasts in heart sympathetic innervation. RT-qPCR and western-blots analysis performed in cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts isolated from healthy adult rat hearts revealed that Pro-Nerve growth factor (NGF) and pro-differentiating mature NGF were the most abundant neurotrophins expressed in cardiac fibroblasts while barely detectable in cardiomyocytes. When cultured with cardiac fibroblasts or fibroblast-conditioned medium, PC12 cells differentiated into/sympathetic-like neurons expressing axonal marker Tau-1 at neurites in contact with cardiomyocytes. This was prevented by anti-NGF blocking antibodies suggesting a paracrine action of NGF secreted by fibroblasts. When co-cultured with cardiomyocytes to mimic neurocardiac synapse, differentiated PC12 cells exhibited enhanced norepinephrine secretion as quantified by HPLC compared to PC12 cultured alone while co-culture with fibroblasts had no effect. However, when supplemented to PC12-cardiomyocytes co-culture, fibroblasts allowed long-term survival of the neurocardiac synapse. Activated fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) isolated from myocardial infarction rat hearts exhibited significantly higher mature NGF expression than normal fibroblasts and also promoted PC12 cells differentiation. Within the ischemic area lacking cardiomyocytes and neurocardiac synapses, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was increased and associated with local anarchical and immature sympathetic hyperinnervation but tissue norepinephrine content was similar to that of normal cardiac tissue, suggesting depressed sympathetic function. Collectively, these findings demonstrate for the first time that fibroblasts are essential for the setting of cardiac sympathetic

  12. Periodic variation in R-R intervals and cardiovascular autonomic regulation in young adult Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Mongue-Din, H; Salmon, A; Fiszman, M Y; Fromes, Y

    2009-03-01

    Several hamster strains are commonly used as models for cardiomyopathic phenotypes evolving toward heart failure. However, little is known about heart rate variability (HRV) in this species. Prolonged surface ECG recording, a prerequisite to HRV studies, can be obtained either by telemetry or by restraints. Here, we performed long time ECG recording using telemetry on young adult Syrian hamsters and we analyzed time series of interbeat intervals. Standard statistics showed that the mean of normal R-R intervals slightly increased with age, with standard deviation of normal R-R intervals remaining stable over time. However, time domain analysis using Poincaré plots revealed dynamic changes in the HRV. Analysis of frequency domains revealed that the ratio of spectral components (low frequency/high frequency) exhibited a maturation pattern. Thus refined analysis of HRV revealed a more complex pattern than common statistical analysis would translate. Unlike other rodents, hamsters display a great spontaneous variability of their heart rate. As the complexity canvas of HRV might be the consequence of extracardiac regulation factors, we assessed the sympathovagal balance in both time and frequency domain of heart rate. Pharmacological tests revealed that both sympathetic and vagal tones contribute to HRV in Syrian hamsters. Thus Syrian hamsters have a broad intrinsic HRV with large influences of the neurovegetative system. However, the influence of the previous beat seems to prevail over the autonomic oscillators. These animals present a high sensitivity to artificially altered cardiac regulation and might be great models for the diagnosis of early alterations in the HRV related to pathology. Therefore, Syrian hamsters represent a unique model for HRV studies.

  13. Mammalian enabled (Mena) is a critical regulator of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Frédérick; Belmonte, Stephen L; Ram, Rashmi; Noujaim, Sami F; Dunaevsky, Olga; Protack, Tricia L; Jalife, Jose; Todd Massey, H; Gertler, Frank B; Blaxall, Burns C

    2011-05-01

    Mammalian enabled (Mena) of the Drosophila enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein gene family is a cytoskeletal protein implicated in actin regulation and cell motility. Cardiac Mena expression is enriched in intercalated discs (ICD), the critical intercellular communication nexus between adjacent muscle cells. We previously identified Mena gene expression to be a key predictor of human and murine heart failure (HF). To determine the in vivo function of Mena in the heart, we assessed Mena protein expression in multiple HF models and characterized the effects of genetic Mena deletion on cardiac structure and function. Immunoblot analysis revealed significant upregulation of Mena protein expression in left ventricle tissue from patients with end-stage HF, calsequestrin-overexpressing mice, and isoproterenol-infused mice. Characterization of the baseline cardiac function of adult Mena knockout mice (Mena(-/-)) via echocardiography demonstrated persistent cardiac dysfunction, including a significant reduction in percent fractional shortening compared with wild-type littermates. Electrocardiogram PR and QRS intervals were significantly prolonged in Mena(-/-) mice, manifested by slowed conduction on optical mapping studies. Ultrastructural analysis of Mena(-/-) hearts revealed disrupted organization and widening of ICD structures, mislocalization of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) to the lateral borders of cardiomyoycytes, and increased Cx43 expression. Furthermore, the expression of vinculin (an adherens junction protein) was significantly reduced in Mena(-/-) mice. We report for the first time that genetic ablation of Mena results in cardiac dysfunction, highlighted by diminished contractile performance, disrupted ICD structure, and slowed electrical conduction.

  14. Mathematical biomarkers for the autonomic regulation of cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Campos, Luciana A; Pereira, Valter L; Muralikrishna, Amita; Albarwani, Sulayma; Brás, Susana; Gouveia, Sónia

    2013-10-07

    Heart rate and blood pressure are the most important vital signs in diagnosing disease. Both heart rate and blood pressure are characterized by a high degree of short term variability from moment to moment, medium term over the normal day and night as well as in the very long term over months to years. The study of new mathematical algorithms to evaluate the variability of these cardiovascular parameters has a high potential in the development of new methods for early detection of cardiovascular disease, to establish differential diagnosis with possible therapeutic consequences. The autonomic nervous system is a major player in the general adaptive reaction to stress and disease. The quantitative prediction of the autonomic interactions in multiple control loops pathways of cardiovascular system is directly applicable to clinical situations. Exploration of new multimodal analytical techniques for the variability of cardiovascular system may detect new approaches for deterministic parameter identification. A multimodal analysis of cardiovascular signals can be studied by evaluating their amplitudes, phases, time domain patterns, and sensitivity to imposed stimuli, i.e., drugs blocking the autonomic system. The causal effects, gains, and dynamic relationships may be studied through dynamical fuzzy logic models, such as the discrete-time model and discrete-event model. We expect an increase in accuracy of modeling and a better estimation of the heart rate and blood pressure time series, which could be of benefit for intelligent patient monitoring. We foresee that identifying quantitative mathematical biomarkers for autonomic nervous system will allow individual therapy adjustments to aim at the most favorable sympathetic-parasympathetic balance.

  15. Mathematical biomarkers for the autonomic regulation of cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Luciana A.; Pereira, Valter L.; Muralikrishna, Amita; Albarwani, Sulayma; Brás, Susana; Gouveia, Sónia

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate and blood pressure are the most important vital signs in diagnosing disease. Both heart rate and blood pressure are characterized by a high degree of short term variability from moment to moment, medium term over the normal day and night as well as in the very long term over months to years. The study of new mathematical algorithms to evaluate the variability of these cardiovascular parameters has a high potential in the development of new methods for early detection of cardiovascular disease, to establish differential diagnosis with possible therapeutic consequences. The autonomic nervous system is a major player in the general adaptive reaction to stress and disease. The quantitative prediction of the autonomic interactions in multiple control loops pathways of cardiovascular system is directly applicable to clinical situations. Exploration of new multimodal analytical techniques for the variability of cardiovascular system may detect new approaches for deterministic parameter identification. A multimodal analysis of cardiovascular signals can be studied by evaluating their amplitudes, phases, time domain patterns, and sensitivity to imposed stimuli, i.e., drugs blocking the autonomic system. The causal effects, gains, and dynamic relationships may be studied through dynamical fuzzy logic models, such as the discrete-time model and discrete-event model. We expect an increase in accuracy of modeling and a better estimation of the heart rate and blood pressure time series, which could be of benefit for intelligent patient monitoring. We foresee that identifying quantitative mathematical biomarkers for autonomic nervous system will allow individual therapy adjustments to aim at the most favorable sympathetic-parasympathetic balance. PMID:24109456

  16. Evidence of defective cardiovascular regulation in insulin-dependent diabetic patients without clinical autonomic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Weston, P J; James, M A; Panerai, R B; McNally, P G; Potter, J F; Thurston, H

    1998-12-01

    (1) Autonomic dysfunction is a well recognised complication of diabetes mellitus and early detection may allow therapeutic manoeuvres to reduce the associated mortality and morbidity. We sought to identify early cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy using spectral analysis of heart rate and systolic blood pressure variability. (2) Thirty patients with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (DM) and 30 matched control subjects were studied. In addition to standard tests of autonomic function, heart rate and systolic blood pressure variability were assessed using power spectral analysis. From the frequency domain analysis of systolic blood pressure and R-R interval, the overall gain of baroreflex mechanisms was assessed. (3) Standard tests of autonomic function were normal in both groups. Total spectral power of R-R interval was reduced in the Type 1 DM group for low-frequency (473 +/- 63 vs. 747 +/- 78 ms2, mean +/- S.E.M., P = 0.002) and high-frequency bands (125 +/- 13 vs. 459+/-90 ms2, P < 0.0001). Systolic blood pressure low-frequency power was increased in the diabetic group (9.3 +/- 1.2 vs. 6.6+/-0.7 mmHg2, P < 0.05). The low frequency/high frequency ratio for heart rate variability was significantly higher in the Type 1 DM patients (4.6+/-0.5 vs. 2.9+/-0.5, P = 0.002), implying a relative sympathetic predominance. When absolute powers were expressed in normalised units, these differences persisted. There were significant reductions in baroreceptor-cardiac reflex sensitivity in Type 1 DM patients compared to controls while supine (9.7+/-0.7 vs. 18.5 +/- 1.7 ms/mmHg, P < 0.0001) and standing (2.9+/-0.9 vs. 7.18+/-1.9 ms/mmHg, P < 0.001). (4) Spectral analysis of cardiovascular variability detects autonomic dysfunction more frequently in Type 1 DM patients than conventional tests, and is suggestive of an abnormality of parasympathetic function. The abnormality of baroreceptor-cardiac reflex sensitivity could be explained by this impairment of parasympathetic

  17. [Potential Mechanisms Underlying Acupuncture Regulation on Hypertensive Myocardial Hypertrophy and Cardiac Function Damage].

    PubMed

    Xin, Juan-juan; Gao, Jun-hong; Lu, Feng-yan; Zhao, Yu-xue; Jing, Xiang-hong; Yu, Xiao-chun

    2015-08-01

    Long-lasting hypertension results in ventricular remodeling characteristic of myocardial hypertrophy including myocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis, a pathological process failed to be blocked by the current biomedical means and could eventually lead to heart failure. It has been shown that acupuncture can excite the parasympathetic nerve to counter the overtonic activity of sympathetic nerve, elicit antihypertensive effect and produce cardioprotection via the regulation of calcium signaling-related proteins in myocytes, suggesting its potential role in the management of these disorders. In this paper, the authors review relevant studies and propose, with respect to the autonomic nerve, endocrine system, cytokines and intracellular calcium signaling pathways, several novel ideas concerning the treatment of hypertensive myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac malfunction by acupuncture.

  18. The influence of cardiac autonomic nerve plexus on the electrophysiological properties in canines with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Juan; Lu, Yanmei; Wugeti, Najina; Aikemu, Ainiwaer

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study sought to examine the effect of the cardiac autonomic nerve plexus, which originates from the vagus nerve trunk, on atrial vulnerability. Methods: Dogs in group I (n = 6) underwent ganglionated plexi (GP) sequential ablation following six hours of left atrial appendage rapid atrial pacing (RAP). The monophasic action potential duration at 90% of repolarization (APD90), effective refractory period (ERP), and the atrial fibrillation inducing rate of bilateral atria and pulmonary veins were recorded at baseline, l h, 3 h and 6 h after pacing, as well as after sequential ablation (RAGP + RIGP ablation, LSGP + RIGP ablation). Dogs in group II (n = 6) received vagus nerve stimulation following six hours of left atrial appendage RAP. APD90, ERP and atrial fibrillation inducing rate of bilateral atria and pulmonary veins were recorded at baseline, 1 h, 3 h and 6 h after pacing, as well as after GP sequential ablation (RAGP + RIGP ablation, LSGP + RIGP ablation). Results: In group I, APD90 and ERP progressively shortened and atrial fibrillation inducing rate increased in various sites l h, 3 h and 6 h after RAP (P < 0.05). APD90 and ERP shortened significantly and atrial fibrillation inducing rate was significantly higher in the left atrial appendage and bilateral pulmonary veins than in other sites (P < 0.05). Following GP sequential ablation, APD90, ERP and atrial fibrillation inducing rate were not significantly different from baseline levels (P > 0.05). In group II, APD90 and ERP progressively shortened in various sites over pacing time period, and the atrial fibrillation inducing rate increased l h, 3 h and 6 h after RAP + VNS (P < 0.05). APD90 and ERP shortened significantly and atrial fibrillation inducing rate was significantly higher in the left atrial appendage and right superior/inferior pulmonary veins when compared with other sites (P < 0.05). After GP sequential ablation, APD90, ERP and atrial fibrillation inducing rate were not

  19. The transcription factor GATA-6 regulates pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Elrod, John W.; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M.G.; York, Allen J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The transcriptional code that programs maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy involves the zinc finger-containing DNA binding factor GATA-4. The highly related transcription factor GATA-6 is also expressed in the adult heart, although its role in controlling the hypertrophic program is unknown. Objective To determine the role of GATA-6 in cardiac hypertrophy and homeostasis. Methods and Results Here we performed a cardiomyocyte-specific conditional gene targeting approach for Gata6, as well as a transgenic approach to overexpress GATA-6 in the mouse heart. Deletion of Gata6-loxP with Nkx2.5-cre produced late embryonic lethality with heart defects, while deletion with β-myosin heavy chain-cre (βMHC-cre) produced viable adults with greater than 95% loss of GATA-6 protein in the heart. These later mice were subjected to pressure overload induced hypertrophy for 2 and 6 weeks, which showed a significant reduction in cardiac hypertrophy similar to that observed Gata4 heart-specific deleted mice. Gata6-deleted mice subjected to pressure overload also developed heart failure while control mice maintained proper cardiac function. Gata6-deleted mice also developed less cardiac hypertrophy following 2 weeks of angiotensin II/phenylephrine infusion. Controlled GATA-6 overexpression in the heart induced hypertrophy with aging and predisposed to greater hypertrophy with pressure overload stimulation. Combinatorial deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 from the adult heart resulted in dilated cardiomyopathy and lethality by 16 weeks of age. Mechanistically, deletion of Gata6 from the heart resulted in fundamental changes in the levels of key regulatory genes and myocyte differentiation-specific genes. Conclusions These results indicate that GATA-6 is both necessary and sufficient for regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response and differentiated gene expression, both alone and in coordination with GATA-4. PMID:20705924

  20. Vestibular autonomic regulation (including motion sickness and the mechanism of vomiting)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaban, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Autonomic manifestations of vestibular dysfunction and motion sickness are well established in the clinical literature. Recent studies of 'vestibular autonomic regulation' have focused predominantly on autonomic responses to stimulation of the vestibular sense organs in the inner ear. These studies have shown that autonomic responses to vestibular stimulation are regionally selective and have defined a 'vestibulosympathetic reflex' in animal experiments. Outside the realm of experimental preparations, however, the importance of vestibular inputs in autonomic regulation is unclear because controls for secondary factors, such as affective/emotional responses and cardiovascular responses elicited by muscle contraction and regional blood pooling, have been inadequate. Anatomic and physiologic evidence of an extensive convergence of vestibular and autonomic information in the brainstem suggests though that there may be an integrated representation of gravitoinertial acceleration from vestibular, somatic, and visceral receptors for somatic and visceral motor control. In the case of vestibular dysfunction or motion sickness, the unpleasant visceral manifestations (e.g. epigastric discomfort, nausea or vomiting) may contribute to conditioned situational avoidance and the development of agoraphobia.

  1. Vestibular autonomic regulation (including motion sickness and the mechanism of vomiting)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaban, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Autonomic manifestations of vestibular dysfunction and motion sickness are well established in the clinical literature. Recent studies of 'vestibular autonomic regulation' have focused predominantly on autonomic responses to stimulation of the vestibular sense organs in the inner ear. These studies have shown that autonomic responses to vestibular stimulation are regionally selective and have defined a 'vestibulosympathetic reflex' in animal experiments. Outside the realm of experimental preparations, however, the importance of vestibular inputs in autonomic regulation is unclear because controls for secondary factors, such as affective/emotional responses and cardiovascular responses elicited by muscle contraction and regional blood pooling, have been inadequate. Anatomic and physiologic evidence of an extensive convergence of vestibular and autonomic information in the brainstem suggests though that there may be an integrated representation of gravitoinertial acceleration from vestibular, somatic, and visceral receptors for somatic and visceral motor control. In the case of vestibular dysfunction or motion sickness, the unpleasant visceral manifestations (e.g. epigastric discomfort, nausea or vomiting) may contribute to conditioned situational avoidance and the development of agoraphobia.

  2. Gross anatomical study on the human myocardial bridges with special reference to the spatial relationship among coronary arteries, cardiac veins, and autonomic nerves.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuko; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kageyama, Ikuo; Aizawa, Yukio; Kumaki, Katsuji; Miki, Akinori; Terashima, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    Coronary arteries are frequently covered by cardiac muscles. This arrangement is termed a myocardial bridge. Previous studies have shown that myocardial bridges can cause myocardial ischemic diseases or cardiac arrhythmia, but the relevant pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. We examined 60 hearts from Japanese cadavers macroscopically to clarify the spatial relationships among coronary arteries, cardiac veins and autonomic nerves. We found 86 myocardial bridges in 47 hearts from the 60 cadavers examined (78.3%). Next, we dissected out nine hearts with myocardial bridges in detail under the operating microscope. We found no additional branches of coronary arteries on the myocardial bridge surfaces. However, the cardiac veins, which usually accompany the coronary arteries, ran independently on the myocardial bridge surfaces in the same region. Cardiac autonomic nerves comprised two rami: one was associated with the coronary artery under the myocardial bridge and the other ran on the surface of the bridge. Such spatial relationships among the coronary arteries, cardiac veins and cardiac autonomic nerves at the myocardial bridges are quite similar to those in mouse embryo hearts. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Status of the mechanisms of autonomic regulation in Raynaud's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabeeva, G R

    1991-01-01

    Patients suffering from Raynaud's disease underwent clinicoelectrophysiological studies for the status of the segmental and autonomous nervous system. Based on the distribution of the patients' group with Raynaud's disease according to the type of the disease course and intensity of Raynaud's phenomenon, the author shows a relationship between the clinical manifestations of the leading phenomenon and disorders of sympathetic conduction in the limbs. That made it possible to suggest that peripheral vegetative neuropathy together with the well-defined psychovegetative syndrome may be implicated in the pathogenesis of Raynaud's disease.

  4. Heart rate variability as a measure of cardiac autonomic function in anorexia nervosa: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mazurak, Nazar; Enck, Paul; Muth, Eric; Teufel, Martin; Zipfel, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) exhibit a wide range of autonomic system disturbances; these patients have also high mortality risk due to cardio-vascular complications. Origin and pathogenesis of such changes are not absolutely clear. Relevant publications were drawn from PUBMED using the keywords 'anorexia nervosa' AND 'autonomic'. Fifty two abstracts were identified and screened for papers that measured the state of autonomic regulation by means of analysis of heart rate variability either during 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring or during a short-term laboratory test. Studies selected were analysed for the number of patients included, the presence and quality of control groups, gender, age and body mass index (BMI) of patients, type of AN as well as methods used to determine heart rate variability (HRV). Twenty papers on HRV in patients with anorexia were identified and analysed, revealing three distinct positions regarding changes of autonomic nervous system (ANS) functions in patients with AN. The majority of papers identified parasympathetic/sympathetic imbalance with parasympathetic dominance and decreased sympathetic modulation; others could not replicate these findings, but instead described sympathetic dominance; finally a group of papers could not identify any autonomic differences in comparison to control samples. We conclude that in its current state of analysis HRV may not be suitable for routine assessment of ANS function in AN patients but rather remains a research tool. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  5. Acute psychosocial challenge and cardiac autonomic response in women: the role of estrogens, corticosteroids, and behavioral coping styles.

    PubMed

    Pico-Alfonso, M Angeles; Mastorci, Francesca; Ceresini, Graziano; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Manghi, Massimo; Pino, Olimpia; Troisi, Alfonso; Sgoifo, Andrea

    2007-06-01

    Theoretical statements, as well as clinical and experimental data, suggest that the amplitude of cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors can be a good predictor of preclinical and clinical cardiovascular states. The aim of the present study is to investigate the role of estrogens, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical activity, and the behavioral profile in individual cardiac autonomic reactivity to brief laboratory stressors in women. Thirty-six adult, healthy women were exposed to a stress interview and a mental task test, each lasting 5 min. They were assigned to two experimental groups: D4, i.e. 4 days after menses beginning (follicular phase, n=18), and D14, i.e. 14 days after menses beginning (ovulatory phase, n=18). The cardiac measurements in the baseline, stress and recovery periods consisted in heart rate (average R-R interval) and parasympathetic tone (r-MSSD) quantification, while the HPA axis activity and stress reactivity were assessed via plasma cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone concentrations. The ethological profile during the interview was drawn by means of non-verbal behavior analysis. The cardiac, adrenocortical and behavioral responses to the two stressors were similar in groups D4 and D14, despite significantly higher estradiol levels in the latter. Subjects with higher pre-stress cortisol levels had higher heart rate and lower vagal activity in the baseline, stress and recovery phases. Women showing higher level of submission were characterized by higher heart rate acceleration and vagal withdrawal during both the interview and the recovery phase. In addition, the subjects that exhibited greater displacement during the interview were also characterized by lower heart rate increments and less pronounced vagal suppression during post-stress recovery. In conclusion, the present results do not support a clear buffering role of estrogens in cardiovascular response to acute stressors. However, they confirm that baseline HPA axis activity

  6. CD38 positively regulates postnatal development of astrocytes cell-autonomously and oligodendrocytes non-cell-autonomously.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Kaji, Minoru; Ishii, Hiroshi; Jureepon, Roboon; Takarada-Iemata, Mika; Minh Ta, Hieu; Manh Le, Thuong; Konno, Ayumu; Hirai, Hirokazu; Shiraishi, Yoshitake; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Higashida, Haruhiro; Kitao, Yasuko; Hori, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    Glial development is critical for the function of the central nervous system. CD38 is a multifunctional molecule with ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity. While critical roles of CD38 in the adult brain such as oxytocin release and social behavior have been reported, those in the developing brain remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that deletion of Cd38 leads to impaired development of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in mice. CD38 is highly expressed in the developing brains between postnatal day 14 (P14) and day 28 (P28). In situ hybridization and FACS analysis revealed that CD38 is expressed predominantly in astrocytes in these periods. Analyses of the cortex of Cd38 knockout (Cd38(-/-) ) mice revealed delayed development of astrocytes and subsequently delayed differentiation of oligodendrocytes (OLs) at postnatal stages. In vitro experiments using primary OL cultures, mixed glial cultures, and astrocytic conditioned medium showed that astrocytic CD38 regulates the development of astrocytes in a cell-autonomous manner and the differentiation of OLs in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Further experiments revealed that connexin43 (Cx43) in astrocytes plays a promotive role for CD38-mediated OL differentiation. Finally, increased levels of NAD(+) , caused by CD38 deficiency, are likely to be responsible for the suppression of astrocytic Cx43 expression and OL differentiation. Our data indicate that CD38 is a positive regulator of astrocyte and OL development. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Short-term ECG recording for the identification of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in people with diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinek, Herbert F.; Pham, Phuong; Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Spence, Ian

    2007-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a serious and increasing health problem worldwide. Compared to non-diabetics, patients experience an increased risk of all cardiovascular diseases, including dysfunctional neural control of the heart. Poor diagnoses of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) may result in increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction and ischaemia, which can lead to sudden death. Traditionally the Ewing battery of tests is used to identify CAN. The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of heart rate variability (HRV) analyses of short-term ECG recordings as a method for detecting CAN. HRV may be able to identify asymptomatic individuals, which the Ewing battery is not able to do. Several HRV parameters are assessed, including time and frequency domain, as well as nonlinear parameters. Eighteen out of thirty-eight individuals with diabetes were positive for two or more of the Ewing battery of tests indicating CAN. Approximate Entropy (ApEn), log normalized total power (LnTP) and log normalized high frequency (LnHF) power demonstrate a significant difference at p < 0.05 between CAN+ and CAN-. This indicates that nonlinear scaling parameters are able to identify people with cardiac autonomic neuropathy in short ECG recordings. Our study paves the way to assess the utility of nonlinear parameters in identifying asymptomatic CAN.

  8. Alterations in the ultrastructure of cardiac autonomic nervous system triggered by crotoxin from rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus cumanensis) venom.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Miguelina; Scannone, Héctor; Finol, Héctor J; Pineda, Maria E; Fernández, Irma; Vargas, Alba M; Girón, María E; Aguilar, Irma; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2007-10-01

    This study explored the toxic effects of crotoxin isolated from Crotalus durissus cumanensis venom on the ultrastructure of mice cardiac autonomic nervous system. Mice were intravenously injected with saline (control group) and crotoxin diluted in saline venom (study group) at a dose of 0.107 mg/kg mouse body weight. Samples from the inter-ventricular septum were prepared for electron microscopy after 6 h (G1), 12 h (G2), 24 h (G3) and 48 h (G4). The G1 group showed some cardiomyocyte with pleomorphic mitochondria. Capillary swollen walls, nerve cholinergic endings with depleted acetylcholine vesicles in their interior and other depletions were observed. A space completely lacking in contractile elements was noticed. The G2 group demonstrated a myelinic figure, a subsarcolemic region with few myofibrils and nervous cholinergic terminal with scarce vacuoles in their interior. The G3 group demonstrated a structure with a depleted axonic terminal, mitochondrias varying in size and enhanced electron density. In addition, muscular fibers with myofibrillar structure disorganization, a depleted nervous structure surrounded by a Schwann cell along with an abundance of natriuretic peptides, were seen. An amyelinic terminal with depleted Schwann cell and with scarce vesicles was also observed. Finally, axonic lysis with autophagic vacuoles in their interior and condensed mitochondria was observed in the G4 group. This work describes the first report of ultrastructural damage caused by crotoxin on mice cardiac autonomic nervous system.

  9. Effects of psychological stress test on the cardiac response of public safety workers: alternative parameters to autonomic balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Franco, M. R.; Vargas-Luna, F. M.; Delgadillo-Holtfort, I.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that public safety workers (PSW) face many stressful situations that yield them as high-risk population for suffering chronic stress diseases. In this multidisciplinary research the cardiac response to induced psychological stress by a short duration Stroop test was evaluated in 20 female and 19 male PSW, in order to compare traditionally used cardiac response parameters with alternative ones. Electrocardiograms have been recorded using the Eindhoven electrodes configuration for 1 min before, 3 min during and 1 min after the test. Signals analysis has been performed for the heart rate and the power spectra of its variability and of the variability of the amplitude of the R-wave, i.e. the highest peak of the electrocardiographic signal periodic sequence. The results demonstrated that the traditional autonomic balance index shows no significant differences between stages. In contrast, the median of the area of the power spectrum of the R-wave amplitude variability in the frequency region dominated by the autonomous nervous system (0.04-to-0.4 Hz) is the more sensitive parameter. Moreover, this parameter allows to identify gender differences consistent with those encountered in other studies.

  10. Cardiac autonomic function evaluated by the heart rate turbulence method was not changed in obese patients without co-morbidities.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Alaettin; Acarturk, Gursel; Melek, Mehmet; Kilit, Celal; Celik, Atac; Onrat, Ersel

    2007-08-01

    Obese subjects are more prone to sudden deaths and arrhythmias than non-obese subjects. Heart rate turbulence (HRT) impairment reflects cardiac autonomic dysfunction, in particular impaired baroreflex sensitivity and reduced parasympathetic activity. Our aim was to evaluate the cardiac autonomic function in obesity by the HRT method. Ninety obese subjects and 112 healthy subjects were included in the study. Twenty-four hours ambulatory electrocardiograms were recorded and Holter recordings were analyzed. HRT parameters, turbulence onset (TO) and turbulence slope (TS), were calculated with HRT View Version 0.60-0.1 software program. HRT were calculated in 43 obese and 43 control subjects who had at least one ventricular premature beat in their Holter recordings. We excluded 47 obese patients and 69 control subjects who showed no ventricular premature beats in their Holter recordings from the statistical analysis. There were no significant differences in TO and TS between obese and control subjects (TO obese: -1.6 +/- 2.2%, TO control: -2.1 +/- 2.6%, p>0.05; TS obese: 8.2 +/- 5.2, TS control: 10.1 +/- 6.7, p>0.05, respectively). HRT parameters seem to be normal in obese patients without comorbidities.

  11. Impact of traffic-related air pollution on acute changes in cardiac autonomic modulation during rest and physical activity: a cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Cole-Hunter, Tom; Weichenthal, Scott; Kubesch, Nadine; Foraster, Maria; Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Bouso, Laura; Martínez, David; Westerdahl, Dane; de Nazelle, Audrey; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    People are often exposed to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) during physical activity (PA), but it is not clear if PA modifies the impact of TRAP on cardiac autonomic modulation. We conducted a panel study among 28 healthy adults in Barcelona, Spain to examine how PA may modify the impact of TRAP on cardiac autonomic regulation. Participants completed four 2-h exposure scenarios that included either rest or intermittent exercise in high- and low-traffic environments. Time- and frequency-domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV) were monitored during each exposure period along with continuous measures of TRAP. Linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate the impact of TRAP on HRV as well as potential effect modification by PA. Exposure to TRAP was associated with consistent decreases in HRV; however, exposure-response relationships were not always linear over the broad range of exposures. For example, each 10 μg/m(3) increase in black carbon was associated with a 23% (95% CI: -31, -13) decrease in high frequency power at the low-traffic site, whereas no association was observed at the high-traffic site. PA modified the impact of TRAP on HRV at the high-traffic site and tended to weaken inverse associations with measures reflecting parasympathetic modulation (P ≤ 0.001). Evidence of effect modification at the low-traffic site was less consistent. The strength and direction of the relationship between TRAP and HRV may vary across exposure gradients. PA may modify the impact of TRAP on HRV, particularly at higher concentrations.

  12. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery, heart rate variability and QT dynamicity parameters in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dural, Muhammet; Kabakcı, Giray; Cınar, Neşe; Erbaş, Tomris; Canpolat, Uğur; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Aytemir, Kudret

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. However, there is little data regarding cardiac autonomic functions in these patients. Herein, we aimed to investigate several parameters of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with acromegaly compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 20 newly diagnosed acromegalic patients (55% female, age:45.7 ± 12.6 years) and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent 24 h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting 1st, 2nd and 3rd minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV) and QT dynamicity analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar except diabetes mellitus and hypertension among groups. Mean HRR1 (29.2 ± 12.3 vs 42.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.001), HRR2 (43.5 ± 15.6 vs 61.1 ± 10.8, p = 0.001) and HRR3 (46.4 ± 16.2 vs 65.8 ± 9.8, p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. HRV parameters as, SDNN [standard deviation of all NN intervals] (p = 0.001), SDANN [SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals] (p = 0.001), RMSSD [root square of successive differences in RR interval] (p = 0.001), PNN50 [proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms] (p = 0.001) and high-frequency [HF] (p = 0.001) were significantly decreased in patients with acromegaly; but low frequency [LF] (p = 0.046) and LF/HF (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in acromegaly patients. QTec (p = 0.009), QTac/RR slope (p = 0.017) and QTec/RR slope (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly. Additionally, there were significant negative correlation of disease duration with HRR2, HRR3, SDNN, PNN50, RMSSD, variability index. Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in patients with acromegaly. Further large scale studies are needed to exhibit the prognostic significance of impaired autonomic functions in patients with

  13. Scaffold Proteins Regulating Extracellular Regulated Kinase Function in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway is a central downstream signaling pathway that is activated in cardiac muscle cells during mechanical and agonist-mediated hypertrophy. Studies in genetic mouse models deficient in ERK-associated MAPK components pathway have further reinforced a direct role for this pathway in stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and disease. However, more recent studies have highlighted that these signaling pathways may exert their regulatory functions in a more compartmentalized manner in cardiac muscle. Emerging data has uncovered specific MAPK scaffolding proteins that tether MAPK/ERK signaling specifically at the sarcomere and plasma membrane in cardiac muscle and show that deficiencies in these scaffolding proteins alter ERK activity and phosphorylation, which are then critical in altering the cardiac myocyte response to stress-induced hypertrophy and disease progression. In this review, we provide insights on ERK-associated scaffolding proteins regulating cardiac myofilament function and their impact on cardiac hypertrophy and disease. PMID:26973524

  14. Selective contribution of diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors to cardiac autonomic dysfunction in the general population.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, D; Zentai, C; Perz, S; Rathmann, W; Haastert, B; Meisinger, C; Löwel, H

    2006-04-01

    Both cardiac autonomic dysfunction adn cardiovascular risk factors are related to and excess risk of mortality. We sought to determine whether the major cardiovascular risk factors are associated with diminished heart rate variability (HRV), prolonged QTc interval, or increased QT dispersion (QTD). Male (n = 1030) and female (n = 957) subjects, aged 55-74 years, who participated in the population-based MONICA Augsburg survey 1989/90 were assessed for the presence of cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking, and low physical activity. Lowest quartiles for time domain indexes of HRV (SD of R-R intervals [SDNN], max-min difference), QTc > 440 ms, and QTD > 60 ms determined from 12-lead resting ECG were used as cutpoints. In men, after adjustment for age and alcohol consumption, significant independent determinants for the lowest quartiles of SDNN were diabetes, obesity, and smoking. Independent contributors to prolonged QTc were hypertension, obesity, smoking, and low physical activity, whereas for increased QTD it was only hypertension. In women, diabetes was the only contributor to low SDNN, and hypertension was the only determinant of prolonged QTc. In conclusion, diabetes is the primary determinant of reduced HRV in the general population, while hypertension is the primary contributor to prolonged QTc in both sexes. However, obesity and smoking contribute to autonomic dysfunction in men but not women. Thus, a selectivity and sex-related differences exist among the various cardiovascular risk factors as to their influence on autonomic dysfunction.

  15. Repair Injured Heart by Regulating Cardiac Regenerative Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Paul, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac regeneration is a homeostatic cardiogenic process by which the sections of malfunctioning adult cardiovascular tissues are repaired and renewed employing a combination of both cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, while high-quality regeneration can be performed in amphibians and zebrafish hearts, mammalian hearts do not respond in kind. Indeed, a long-term loss of proliferative capacity in mammalian adult cardiomyocytes in combination with dysregulated induction of tissue fibrosis impairs mammalian endogenous heart regenerative capacity, leading to deleterious cardiac remodeling at the end stage of heart failure. Interestingly, several studies have demonstrated that cardiomyocyte proliferation capacity is retained in mammals very soon after birth, and cardiac regeneration potential is correspondingly preserved in some preadolescent vertebrates after myocardial infarction. There is therefore great interest in uncovering the molecular mechanisms that may allow heart regeneration during adult stages. This review will summarize recent findings on cardiac regenerative regulatory mechanisms, especially with respect to extracellular signals and intracellular pathways that may provide novel therapeutics for heart diseases. Particularly, both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidences will be presented to highlight the functional role of these signaling cascades in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferation, cardiomyocyte growth, and maturation, with special emphasis on their responses to heart tissue injury. PMID:27799944

  16. Cardiac diastolic and autonomic dysfunction are aggravated by central chemoreflex activation in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction rats.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Camilo; Andrade, David C; Lucero, Claudia; Arce-Alvarez, Alexis; Díaz, Hugo S; Aliaga, Valentín; Schultz, Harold D; Marcus, Noah J; Manríquez, Mónica; Faúndez, Marcelo; Del Rio, Rodrigo

    2017-04-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with disordered breathing patterns, and sympatho-vagal imbalance. Although it is well accepted that altered peripheral chemoreflex control plays a role in the progression of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying deterioration of cardiac function in HFpEF are poorly understood. We found that central chemoreflex is enhanced in HFpEF and neuronal activation is increased in pre-sympathetic regions of the brainstem. Our data showed that activation of the central chemoreflex pathway in HFpEF exacerbates diastolic dysfunction, worsens sympatho-vagal imbalance and markedly increases the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in rats with HFpEF. Heart failure (HF) patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) display irregular breathing, sympatho-vagal imbalance, arrhythmias and diastolic dysfunction. It has been shown that tonic activation of the central and peripheral chemoreflex pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of HF with reduced ejection fraction. In contrast, no studies to date have addressed chemoreflex function or its effect on cardiac function in HFpEF. Therefore, we tested whether peripheral and central chemoreflexes are hyperactive in HFpEF and if chemoreflex activation exacerbates cardiac dysfunction and autonomic imbalance. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 32) were subjected to sham or volume overload to induce HFpEF. Resting breathing variability, chemoreflex gain, cardiac function and sympatho-vagal balance, and arrhythmia incidence were studied. HFpEF rats displayed [mean ± SD; chronic heart failure (CHF) vs. Sham, respectively] a marked increase in the incidence of apnoeas/hypopnoeas (20.2 ± 4.0 vs. 9.7 ± 2.6 events h(-1) ), autonomic imbalance [0.6 ± 0.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.1 low/high frequency heart rate variability (LF/HFHRV )] and cardiac arrhythmias (196.0 ± 239.9 vs. 19.8 ± 21.7 events h(-1

  17. Assessment of autonomic regulation of heart rate variability by the method of complex demodulation.

    PubMed

    Shin, S J; Tapp, W N; Reisman, S S; Natelson, B H

    1989-02-01

    Complex demodulation was used to examine the effect of both divisions of the autonomic nervous system (sympathetic and parasympathetic) on heart rate. Data were analyzed from dogs during classical conditioning procedures which caused different changes in the autonomic regulation of heart rate. Two significant peaks in the heart rate variability spectrum were examined by this technique. The amplitude of the peak at the respiration frequency showed parasympathetic changes, while the amplitude of the low frequency peak (0-0.124 Hz) showed both sympathetic and parasympathetic effects. Complex demodulation results at these frequencies clearly showed the activities of both branches of the autonomic nervous system in regulating heart rate. During the CS+ period, when trained dogs were presented with a tone predicting a subsequent shock, the observed tachycardia was due to decreased parasympathetic activity and a transient increase in sympathetic activity. During the CS- period where a different tone predicts no shock, parasympathetic and sympathetic activities were unchanged from the baseline condition. The use of complex demodulation enables us to examine autonomic contributions to heart rate regulation in conditioning and a variety of other physiological and environmental conditions where autonomic input can be expected to change rapidly.

  18. Diverse autonomic regulation of pupillary function and the cardiovascular system during alcohol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Thomas; Hoyme, Johannes; Schulz, Steffen; Weißenfels, Markus; Voss, Andreas; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Previous research indicated the complexity of autonomic dysfunction during acute alcohol withdrawal. This study aimed to investigate the pupillary light reflex as an indicator of midbrain and brainstem regulatory systems in relation to cardiovascular autonomic function. Thirty male patients were included in the study. They were investigated during acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome and 24h later during clomethiazole treatment and compared to healthy controls. Parameters of pupillary light reflex of both eyes as well as heart rate variability, blood pressure variability and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) were studied. We observed significantly reduced sympathetic (small diameter, e.g., left eye: 5.00 in patients vs. 5.91 mm in controls) and vagal modulation (e.g., prolonged latencies, left eye: 0.28 vs. 0.26 ms) regarding both pupils during acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Cardiovascular parameters showed reduced vagal modulation (e.g., b-slope of BRS: 7. 57 vs. 13.59 ms/mm Hg) and mixed results for sympathetic influence. After 24h, autonomic dysfunction improved significantly, both for the pupils (e.g., left diameter: 5.38 mm) and the heart (e.g., b-slope of BRS: 9.34 ms/mm Hg). While parameters obtained from the pupil correlated with cardiac autonomic function (e.g, BRS and left diameter: r=0.564) in healthy controls, no such pattern was observed in patients. Results obtained from the pupil during acute alcohol withdrawal do not simply mirror autonomic dysfunction regarding the heart. Pupillary and cardiovascular changes after 24h indicate state dependencies of the results. The findings are discussed with respect to autonomic mechanisms and potentially involved brain regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. B-vitamin Supplementation Mitigates Effects of Fine Particles on Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction and Inflammation: A Pilot Human Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia; Trevisi, Letizia; Urch, Bruce; Lin, Xinyi; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A; Liss, Gary; Thompson, Aaron; Wu, Shaowei; Wilson, Ander; Koutrakis, Petros; Silverman, Frances; Gold, Diane R; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2017-04-03

    Ambient fine particle (PM2.5) pollution triggers acute cardiovascular events. Individual-level preventions are proposed to complement regulation in reducing the global burden of PM2.5-induced cardiovascular diseases. We determine whether B vitamin supplementation mitigates PM2.5 effects on cardiac autonomic dysfunction and inflammation in a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot trial. Ten healthy adults received two-hour controlled-exposure-experiment to sham under placebo, PM2.5 (250 μg/m(3)) under placebo, and PM2.5 (250 μg/m(3)) under B-vitamin supplementation (2.5 mg/d folic acid, 50 mg/d vitamin B6, and 1 mg/d vitamin B12), respectively. At pre-, post-, 24 h-post-exposure, we measured resting heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) with electrocardiogram, and white blood cell (WBC) counts with hematology analyzer. Compared to sham, PM2.5 exposure increased HR (3.8 bpm, 95% CI: 0.3, 7.4; P = 0.04), total WBC count (11.5%, 95% CI: 0.3%, 24.0%; P = 0.04), lymphocyte count (12.9%, 95% CI: 4.4%, 22.1%; P = 0.005), and reduced low-frequency power (57.5%, 95% CI: 2.5%, 81.5%; P = 0.04). B-vitamin supplementation attenuated PM2.5 effect on HR by 150% (P = 0.003), low-frequency power by 90% (P = 0.01), total WBC count by 139% (P = 0.006), and lymphocyte count by 106% (P = 0.02). In healthy adults, two-hour PM2.5 exposure substantially increases HR, reduces HRV, and increases WBC. These effects are reduced by B vitamin supplementation.

  20. B-vitamin Supplementation Mitigates Effects of Fine Particles on Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction and Inflammation: A Pilot Human Intervention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia; Trevisi, Letizia; Urch, Bruce; Lin, Xinyi; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A.; Liss, Gary; Thompson, Aaron; Wu, Shaowei; Wilson, Ander; Koutrakis, Petros; Silverman, Frances; Gold, Diane R.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2017-01-01

    Ambient fine particle (PM2.5) pollution triggers acute cardiovascular events. Individual-level preventions are proposed to complement regulation in reducing the global burden of PM2.5–induced cardiovascular diseases. We determine whether B vitamin supplementation mitigates PM2.5 effects on cardiac autonomic dysfunction and inflammation in a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot trial. Ten healthy adults received two-hour controlled-exposure-experiment to sham under placebo, PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under placebo, and PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under B-vitamin supplementation (2.5 mg/d folic acid, 50 mg/d vitamin B6, and 1 mg/d vitamin B12), respectively. At pre-, post-, 24 h-post-exposure, we measured resting heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) with electrocardiogram, and white blood cell (WBC) counts with hematology analyzer. Compared to sham, PM2.5 exposure increased HR (3.8 bpm, 95% CI: 0.3, 7.4; P = 0.04), total WBC count (11.5%, 95% CI: 0.3%, 24.0%; P = 0.04), lymphocyte count (12.9%, 95% CI: 4.4%, 22.1%; P = 0.005), and reduced low-frequency power (57.5%, 95% CI: 2.5%, 81.5%; P = 0.04). B-vitamin supplementation attenuated PM2.5 effect on HR by 150% (P = 0.003), low-frequency power by 90% (P = 0.01), total WBC count by 139% (P = 0.006), and lymphocyte count by 106% (P = 0.02). In healthy adults, two-hour PM2.5 exposure substantially increases HR, reduces HRV, and increases WBC. These effects are reduced by B vitamin supplementation. PMID:28367952

  1. B-vitamin Supplementation Mitigates Effects of Fine Particles on Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction and Inflammation: A Pilot Human Intervention Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jia; Trevisi, Letizia; Urch, Bruce; Lin, Xinyi; Speck, Mary; Coull, Brent A.; Liss, Gary; Thompson, Aaron; Wu, Shaowei; Wilson, Ander; Koutrakis, Petros; Silverman, Frances; Gold, Diane R.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2017-04-01

    Ambient fine particle (PM2.5) pollution triggers acute cardiovascular events. Individual-level preventions are proposed to complement regulation in reducing the global burden of PM2.5-induced cardiovascular diseases. We determine whether B vitamin supplementation mitigates PM2.5 effects on cardiac autonomic dysfunction and inflammation in a single-blind placebo-controlled crossover pilot trial. Ten healthy adults received two-hour controlled-exposure-experiment to sham under placebo, PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under placebo, and PM2.5 (250 μg/m3) under B-vitamin supplementation (2.5 mg/d folic acid, 50 mg/d vitamin B6, and 1 mg/d vitamin B12), respectively. At pre-, post-, 24 h-post-exposure, we measured resting heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) with electrocardiogram, and white blood cell (WBC) counts with hematology analyzer. Compared to sham, PM2.5 exposure increased HR (3.8 bpm, 95% CI: 0.3, 7.4; P = 0.04), total WBC count (11.5%, 95% CI: 0.3%, 24.0%; P = 0.04), lymphocyte count (12.9%, 95% CI: 4.4%, 22.1%; P = 0.005), and reduced low-frequency power (57.5%, 95% CI: 2.5%, 81.5%; P = 0.04). B-vitamin supplementation attenuated PM2.5 effect on HR by 150% (P = 0.003), low-frequency power by 90% (P = 0.01), total WBC count by 139% (P = 0.006), and lymphocyte count by 106% (P = 0.02). In healthy adults, two-hour PM2.5 exposure substantially increases HR, reduces HRV, and increases WBC. These effects are reduced by B vitamin supplementation.

  2. AMPK in cardiac fibrosis and repair: Actions beyond metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Dufeys, Cécile; Bertrand, Luc; Beauloye, Christophe; Horman, Sandrine

    2016-02-01

    Fibrosis is a general term encompassing a plethora of pathologies that span all systems and is marked by increased deposition of collagen. Injury of variable etiology gives rise to complex cascades involving several cell-types and molecular signals, leading to the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix that promotes fibrosis and eventually leads to organ failure. Cardiac fibrosis is a dynamic process associated notably with ischemia, hypertrophy, volume- and pressure-overload, aging and diabetes mellitus. It has profoundly deleterious consequences on the normal architecture and functioning of the myocardium and is associated with considerable mortality and morbidity. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitously expressed cellular energy sensor and an essential component of the adaptive response to cardiomyocyte stress that occurs during ischemia. Nevertheless, its actions extend well beyond its energy-regulating role and it appears to possess an essential role in regulating fibrosis of the myocardium. In this review paper, we will summarize the main elements and crucial players of cardiac fibrosis. In addition, we will provide an overview of the diverse roles of AMPK in the heart and discuss in detail its implication in cardiac fibrosis. Lastly, we will highlight the recently published literature concerning AMPK-targeting current therapy and novel strategies aiming to attenuate fibrosis.

  3. [Researches of autonomic regulation of blood circulation in the condition of long-term space flight].

    PubMed

    Baevskiĭ, R M; Luchitskaia, E S; Funtova, I I; Chernikova, A G

    2013-01-01

    In the article is presented five-year experience of experimentation in autonomic regulation of blood circulation onboard the International space station. The heart rate variability (HRV) analysis was the basic methodical approach in the researches. We described probabilistic approach created on the basis of HRV analysis to an estimation of risk of pathology development in the conditions of long space flight. The individual type of autonomic regulation had essential value during the analysis of results. It is shown that the type of regulation, which is inherent in every cosmonaut in the conditions of weightlessness, remains even during following flights. We obtained the new scientific data on connection of character of adaptable reaction of an organism to the space flight factors with individual type of autonomic regulation. It is shown that staying in weightlessness is connected with changeover of regulatory systems and with transition in a zone of prenosological states. Adaptable reactions in weightlessness are characterized by tension growth of regulatory systems at preservation of sufficient functional reserves. The mobilization of additional resources after returning to the Earth is required and consequently functional reserve of mechanisms of regulation decreases. Cosmonauts with vagotonic and normo-sympatotonic types of autonomic regulation appear to be the most resistant. Knowing the type of autonomic regulation we will be able to foresee possible reaction of the cosmonaut to the factors of space flight. As a result of HRV analysis during the flight of the past few months likelihood estimations were calculated and risk categories were defined. Consequently, 3 groups of risk of pathology development were distinguished. In conclusion, theoretical and applied relevance of the conducted experiments were considered.

  4. Autonomous and nonautonomous roles of Hedgehog signaling in regulating limb muscle formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jimmy Kuang-Hsien; McGlinn, Edwina; Harfe, Brian D.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2012-01-01

    Muscle progenitor cells migrate from the lateral somites into the developing vertebrate limb, where they undergo patterning and differentiation in response to local signals. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted molecule made in the posterior limb bud that affects patterning and development of multiple tissues, including skeletal muscles. However, the cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of Shh during limb muscle formation have remained unclear. We found that Shh affects the pattern of limb musculature non-cell-autonomously, acting through adjacent nonmuscle mesenchyme. However, Shh plays a cell-autonomous role in maintaining cell survival in the dermomyotome and initiating early activation of the myogenic program in the ventral limb. At later stages, Shh promotes slow muscle differentiation cell-autonomously. In addition, Shh signaling is required cell-autonomously to regulate directional muscle cell migration in the distal limb. We identify neuroepithelial cell transforming gene 1 (Net1) as a downstream target and effector of Shh signaling in that context. PMID:22987639

  5. Regulation of fibronectin gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts by scleraxis.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Rushita A; Lin, Justin; Wang, Ryan; Czubryt, Michael P

    2016-11-01

    The glycoprotein fibronectin is a key component of the extracellular matrix. By interacting with numerous matrix and cell surface proteins, fibronectin plays important roles in cell adhesion, migration and intracellular signaling. Up-regulation of fibronectin occurs in tissue fibrosis, and previous studies have identified the pro-fibrotic factor TGFβ as an inducer of fibronectin expression, although the mechanism responsible remains unknown. We have previously shown that a key downstream effector of TGFβ signaling in cardiac fibroblasts is the transcription factor scleraxis, which in turn regulates the expression of a wide variety of extracellular matrix genes. We noted that fibronectin expression tracked closely with scleraxis expression, but it was unclear whether scleraxis directly regulated the fibronectin gene. Here, we report that scleraxis acts via two E-box binding sites in the proximal human fibronectin promoter to govern fibronectin expression, with the second E-box being both sufficient and necessary for scleraxis-mediated fibronectin expression to occur. A combination of electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that scleraxis interacted to a greater degree with the second E-box. Over-expression or knockdown of scleraxis resulted in increased or decreased fibronectin expression, respectively, and scleraxis null mice presented with dramatically decreased immunolabeling for fibronectin in cardiac tissue sections compared to wild-type controls. Furthermore, scleraxis was required for TGFβ-induced fibronectin expression: TGFβ lost its ability to induce fibronectin expression following scleraxis knockdown. Together, these results demonstrate a novel and required role for scleraxis in the regulation of cardiac fibroblast fibronectin gene expression basally or in response to TGFβ.

  6. Behavioral regulation assessment in exercise: exploring an autonomous and controlled motivation index.

    PubMed

    Cid, Luis; Moutão, João; Leitão, José; Alves, José

    2012-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-2) and to test the hypothesis that the different types of behavioral regulation can be combined on a single factor to assess autonomous and controlled motivation. Data were collected from 550 members of private fitness centres who ranged in age from 14 to 69 years. The analysis supported an 18-item, 5-factor model after excluding one item (S-B chi2 = 221.7, df = 125, p = .000, S-B chi2/df = 1.77; SRMR = .06; NNFI = .90; CFI = .92; RMSEA = .04, 90% CI = .03-.05). However, the analysis also revealed a lack of internal consistency. The results of a hierarchical model based on 2 second-order factors that reflected controlled motivation (external and introjected regulation) and autonomous motivation (identified and intrinsic regulation) provided an acceptable fit to the data (S-B chi2 = 172.6, df = 74, p = .000, S-B chi2/df = 2.33; SRMR = .07; NNFI = .90; CFI = .92; RMSEA = .05, 90% CI = .04-.06), with reliability coefficients of .75 for controlled motivation and .76 for autonomous motivation. The study findings indicated that when item 17 was excluded, the Portuguese BREQ-2 was an appropriate measure of the controlled and autonomous motivation in exercise.

  7. Quantifying Effects of Pharmacological Blockers of Cardiac Autonomous Control Using Variability Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Miyabara, Renata; Berg, Karsten; Kraemer, Jan F.; Baltatu, Ovidiu C.; Wessel, Niels; Campos, Luciana A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the most sensitive heart rate and blood pressure variability (HRV and BPV) parameters from a given set of well-known methods for the quantification of cardiovascular autonomic function after several autonomic blockades. Methods: Cardiovascular sympathetic and parasympathetic functions were studied in freely moving rats following peripheral muscarinic (methylatropine), β1-adrenergic (metoprolol), muscarinic + β1-adrenergic, α1-adrenergic (prazosin), and ganglionic (hexamethonium) blockades. Time domain, frequency domain and symbolic dynamics measures for each of HRV and BPV were classified through paired Wilcoxon test for all autonomic drugs separately. In order to select those variables that have a high relevance to, and stable influence on our target measurements (HRV, BPV) we used Fisher's Method to combine the p-value of multiple tests. Results: This analysis led to the following best set of cardiovascular variability parameters: The mean normal beat-to-beat-interval/value (HRV/BPV: meanNN), the coefficient of variation (cvNN = standard deviation over meanNN) and the root mean square differences of successive (RMSSD) of the time domain analysis. In frequency domain analysis the very-low-frequency (VLF) component was selected. From symbolic dynamics Shannon entropy of the word distribution (FWSHANNON) as well as POLVAR3, the non-linear parameter to detect intermittently decreased variability, showed the best ability to discriminate between the different autonomic blockades. Conclusion: Throughout a complex comparative analysis of HRV and BPV measures altered by a set of autonomic drugs, we identified the most sensitive set of informative cardiovascular variability indexes able to pick up the modifications imposed by the autonomic challenges. These indexes may help to increase our understanding of cardiovascular sympathetic and parasympathetic functions in translational studies of experimental diseases. PMID

  8. Belousov-Zhabotinsky autonomic hydrogel composites: Regulating waves via asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Buskohl, Philip R.; Vaia, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) autonomic hydrogel composites contain active nodes of immobilized catalyst (Ru) encased within a nonactive matrix. Designing functional hierarchies of chemical and mechanical communication between these nodes enables applications ranging from encryption, sensors, and mechanochemical actuators to artificial skin. However, robust design rules and verification of computational models are challenged by insufficient understanding of the relative importance of local (molecular) heterogeneities, active node shape, and embedment geometry on transient and steady-state behavior. We demonstrate the predominance of asymmetric embedment and node shape in low-strain, BZ-gelatin composites and correlate behavior with gradients in BZ reactants. Asymmetric embedment of square and rectangular nodes results in directional steady-state waves that initiate at the embedded edge and propagate toward the free edge. In contrast, symmetric embedment does not produce preferential wave propagation because of a lack of diffusion gradient across the catalyzed region. The initiation at the embedded edge is correlated with bromide absorption by the inactive matrix, which locally elevates the bromate concentration required for catalyst oxidation. The competition between embedment asymmetry and node geometry was used to demonstrate a repeatable switch in wave direction that functions as a signal delay. Furthermore, signal propagation in or out of the composite was demonstrated via embedment asymmetry and relative dimensions of a T-shaped active network node. Overall, structural asymmetry provides a robust approach to controlling initiation and orientation of chemical-mechanical communication within composite BZ gels. PMID:27679818

  9. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac myofibril gene expression during heart development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weian; Liu, Lingjuan; Pan, Bo; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Jing; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac gene expression regulation is controlled not only by genetic factors but also by environmental, i.e., epigenetic factors. Several environmental toxic effects such as oxidative stress and ischemia can result in abnormal myofibril gene expression during heart development. Troponin, one of the regulatory myofibril proteins in the heart, is a well-known model in study of cardiac gene regulation during the development. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that fetal form troponin I (ssTnI) expression in the heart is partially regulated by hormones, such as thyroid hormone. In the present study, we have explored the epigenetic role of histone modification in the regulation of ssTnI expression. Mouse hearts were collected at different time of heart development, i.e., embryonic day 15.5, postnatal day 1, day 7, day 14 and day 21. Levels of histone H3 acetylation (acH3) and histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me(3)) were detected using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in slow upstream regulatory element (SURE) domain (TnI slow upstream regulatory element), 300-bp proximal upstream domain and the first intron of ssTnI gene, which are recognized as critical regions for ssTnI regulation. We found that the levels of acH3 on the SURE region were gradually decreased, corresponding to a similar decrease of ssTnI expression in the heart, whereas the levels of H3K9me(3) in the first intron of ssTnI gene were gradually increased. Our results indicate that both histone acetylation and methylation are involved in the epigenetic regulation of ssTnI expression in the heart during the development, which are the targets for environmental factors.

  10. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  11. Role of cardiac output and the autonomic nervous system in the antinatriuretic response to acute constriction of the thoracic superior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.; Ufferman, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the differential characteristics of hepatic congestion and decreased cardiac output in terms of potential afferent stimuli in the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction. An attempt is made to see if the autonomic nervous system is involved in the antinatriuretic effect of acute TIVC or thoracic superior vena cava constriction.

  12. Cardiac Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases: Function, Regulation, and Therapeutic Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Knight, W. E.; Yan, C.

    2014-01-01

    The second messengers cAMP and cGMP exist in multiple discrete compartments and regulate a variety of biological processes in the heart. The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, by catalyzing the hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, play crucial roles in controlling the amplitude, duration, and compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signaling. Over 60 phosphodiesterase isoforms, grouped into 11 families, have been discovered to date. In the heart, both cAMP- and cGMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterases play important roles in physiology and pathology. At least 7 of the 11 phosphodiesterase family members appear to be expressed in the myocardium, and evidence supports phosphodiesterase involvement in regulation of many processes important for normal cardiac function including pacemaking and contractility, as well as many pathological processes including remodeling and myocyte apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibitors for a number of phosphodiesterase families have also been used clinically or preclinically to treat several types of cardiovascular disease. In addition, phosphodiesterase inhibitors are also being considered for treatment of many forms of disease outside the cardiovascular system, raising the possibility of cardiovascular side effects of such agents. This review will discuss the roles of phosphodiesterases in the heart, in terms of expression patterns, regulation, and involvement in physiological and pathological functions. Additionally, the cardiac effects of various phosphodiesterase inhibitors, both potentially beneficial and detrimental, will be discussed. PMID:22951903

  13. Association of evening smartphone use with cardiac autonomic nervous activity after awakening in adolescents living in high school dormitories.

    PubMed

    Nose, Yoko; Fujinaga, Rina; Suzuki, Maki; Hayashi, Ikuyo; Moritani, Toshio; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Nagai, Narumi

    2017-04-01

    Smartphones are prevalently used among adolescents; however, nighttime exposure to blue-enriched light, through electric devices, is known to induce delays of the circadian rhythm phases and poor morning somatic conditions. We therefore investigated whether evening smartphone use may affect sleep-wake cycle and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity after awaking in dormitory students. The participants were high school students, living under dormitory rules regarding the curfew, study, meals, lights-out, and wake-up times. The students were forbidden from the use of both television and personal computer in their private rooms, and only the use of a smartphone was permitted. According to prior assessment of smartphone use, we chose age-, sex-, exercise time-matched long (n = 22, >120 min) and short (n = 14, ≤60 min) groups and compared sleep-wake cycle and physiological parameters, such as cardiac ANS activity, blood pressure, and intra-aural temperature. All measurements were performed during 6:30 to 7:00 a.m. in the dormitories. Compared with the short group, the long group showed a significantly lower cardiac ANS activity (2727 ± 308 vs. 4455 ± 667 ms(2), p = 0.030) with a tendency toward a high heart rate, in addition to later bedtimes during weekdays and more delayed wake-up times over the weekend. Blood pressure and intra-aural temperature did not differ between the groups. In this population, evening smartphone use may be associated with altered sleep-wake cycle and a diminished cardiac ANS activity after awakening could be affecting daytime activities.

  14. Ankyrin-based Cellular Pathways for Cardiac Ion Channel and Transporter Targeting and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Shane R.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The coordinate activities of ion channels and transporters regulate myocyte membrane excitability and normal cardiac function. Dysfunction in cardiac ion channel and transporter function may result in cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. While the past fifteen years have linked defects in ion channel biophysical properties with human disease, more recent findings illustrate that ion channel and transporter localization within cardiomyocytes is equally critical for normal membrane excitability and tissue function. Ankyrins are a family of multifunctional adapter proteins required for the expression, membrane localization, and regulation of select cardiac ion channels and transporters. Notably, loss of ankyrin expression in mice, and ankyrin loss-of-function in humans is now associated with defects in myocyte excitability and cardiac physiology. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of ankyrin polypeptides in cardiac physiology, as well as review other recently identified pathways required for the membrane expression and regulation of key cardiac ion channels and transporters. PMID:20934528

  15. Estrogen regulates histone deacetylases to prevent cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pedram, Ali; Razandi, Mahnaz; Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T.; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Levin, Ellis R.

    2013-01-01

    The development and progression of cardiac hypertrophy often leads to heart failure and death, and important modulators of hypertrophy include the histone deacetylase proteins (HDACs). Estrogen inhibits cardiac hypertrophy and progression in animal models and humans. We therefore investigated the influence of 17-β-estradiol on the production, localization, and functions of prohypertrophic (class I) and antihypertrophic (class II) HDACs in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. 17-β-Estradiol or estrogen receptor β agonists dipropylnitrile and β-LGND2 comparably suppressed angiotensin II–induced HDAC2 (class I) production, HDAC-activating phosphorylation, and the resulting prohypertrophic mRNA expression. In contrast, estrogenic compounds derepressed the opposite effects of angiotensin II on the same parameters for HDAC4 and 5 (class II), resulting in retention of these deacetylases in the nucleus to inhibit hypertrophic gene expression. Key aspects were confirmed in vivo from the hearts of wild-type but not estrogen receptor β (ERβ) gene–deleted mice administered angiotensin II and estrogenic compounds. Our results identify a novel dual regulation of cardiomyocyte HDACs, shown here for the antihypertrophic sex steroid acting at ERβ. This mechanism potentially supports using ERβ agonists as HDAC modulators to treat cardiac disease. PMID:24152730

  16. Intrinsic cardiac neurons involved in cardiac regulation possess alpha 1-, alpha 2-, beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Armour, J A

    1997-03-01

    To determine whether intrinsic cardiac neurons involved in cardiac regulation possess alpha 1-, alpha 2-, beta 1-, or beta 2-adrenoceptors. The alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, the beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist prenaterol and the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist terbutaline were administered individually to a population of spontaneously active intrinsic cardiac neurons either locally (10 microL of 100 microM solution; eight dogs) or via the local arterial blood supply (0.1 mL of 100 microM solution; 20 dogs) in artificially ventilated, open chest anesthetized dogs. Neuronal and cardiac effects induced by each of the adrenergic agonists were also tested in the presence of an antagonist selective to each adrenoceptor subtype studied. The activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons was modified by at least one of the adrenoceptor agonists tested, and 34% of the spontaneously active neurons were affected by all four agonists. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonists either increased or decreased neuronal activity, depending on the population of neurons studied. On the other hand, the activity generated by intrinsic cardiac neurons was augmented by beta-adrenoceptor agonists. Ventricular contractile force increased when intrinsic cardiac neurons were excited by adrenoceptor agonists. The spontaneous activity generated by neurons was suppressed by beta-adrenoceptor, but not alpha-adrenoceptor, blockade. Neuronal and cardiovascular responses were no longer elicited by an agonist in the presence of its selective antagonist; they were elicited in the presence of antagonists to the other receptor subtypes studied. Intrinsic cardiac neurons involved in cardiac regulation possess alpha 1-, alpha 2-, beta 1- or beta 2-adrenoceptors. Intrinsic cardiac adrenergic neurons receive tonic inputs via beta-, but not alpha-, adrenoceptors. These data indicate that adrenergic blockade may affect cardiac function, in part, via modification of the intrinsic

  17. SPARC regulates collagen interaction with cardiac fibroblast cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Harris, Brett S; Zhang, Yuhua; Card, Lauren; Rivera, Lee B; Brekken, Rolf A; Bradshaw, Amy D

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac tissue from mice that do not express secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) have reduced amounts of insoluble collagen content at baseline and in response to pressure overload hypertrophy compared with wild-type (WT) mice. However, the cellular mechanism by which SPARC affects myocardial collagen is not clearly defined. Although expression of SPARC by cardiac myocytes has been detected in vitro, immunohistochemistry of hearts demonstrated SPARC staining primarily associated with interstitial fibroblastic cells. Primary cardiac fibroblasts isolated from SPARC-null and WT mice were assayed for collagen I synthesis by [(3)H]proline incorporation into procollagen and by immunoblot analysis of procollagen processing. Bacterial collagenase was used to discern intracellular from extracellular forms of collagen I. Increased amounts of collagen I were found associated with SPARC-null versus WT cells, and the proportion of total collagen I detected on SPARC-null fibroblasts without propeptides [collagen-α(1)(I)] was higher than in WT cells. In addition, the amount of total collagen sensitive to collagenase digestion (extracellular) was greater in SPARC-null cells than in WT cells, indicating an increase in cell surface-associated collagen in the absence of SPARC. Furthermore, higher levels of collagen type V, a fibrillar collagen implicated in collagen fibril initiation, were found in SPARC-null fibroblasts. The absence of SPARC did not result in significant differences in proliferation or in decreased production of procollagen I by cardiac fibroblasts. We conclude that SPARC regulates collagen in the heart by modulating procollagen processing and interactions with fibroblast cell surfaces. These results are consistent with decreased levels of interstitial collagen in the hearts of SPARC-null mice being due primarily to inefficient collagen deposition into the extracellular matrix rather than to differences in collagen production.

  18. Phenotypic screen quantifying differential regulation of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy identifies CITED4 regulation of myocyte elongation

    PubMed Central

    Ryall, Karen A.; Bezzerides, Vassilios J.; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is controlled by a highly connected signaling network with many effectors of cardiac myocyte size. Quantification of the contribution of individual pathways to specific changes in shape and transcript abundance is needed to better understand hypertrophy signaling and to improve heart failure therapies. We stimulated cardiac myocytes with 15 hypertrophic agonists and quantitatively characterized differential regulation of 5 shape features using high-throughput microscopy and transcript levels of 12 genes using qPCR. Transcripts measured were associated with phenotypes including fibrosis, cell death, contractility, proliferation, angiogenesis, inflammation, and the fetal cardiac gene program. While hypertrophy pathways are highly connected, the agonist screen revealed distinct hypertrophy phenotypic signatures for the 15 receptor agonists. We then used k-means clustering of inputs and outputs to identify a network map linking input modules to output modules. Five modules were identified within inputs and outputs with many maladaptive outputs grouping together in one module: Bax, C/EBPβ, Serca2a, TNFα, and CTGF. Subsequently, we identified mechanisms underlying two correlations revealed in the agonist screen: correlation between regulators of fibrosis and cell death signaling (CTGF and Bax mRNA) caused by AngII; and myocyte proliferation (CITED4 mRNA) and elongation caused by Nrg1. Follow-up experiments revealed positive regulation of Bax mRNA level by CTGF and an incoherent feedforward loop linking Nrg1, CITED4 and elongation. With this agonist screen, we identified the most influential inputs in the cardiac hypertrophy signaling network for a variety of features related to pathological and protective hypertrophy signaling and shared regulation among cardiac myocyte phenotypes. PMID:24613264

  19. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  20. Long-chain, n-3 fatty acids and physical activity--independent and interactive associations with cardiac autonomic control.

    PubMed

    Harbaugh, Matthew P; Manuck, Stephen B; Jennings, J Richard; Conklin, Sarah M; Yao, Jeffrey K; Muldoon, Matthew F

    2013-09-01

    Intake of the marine-based, n-3 fatty acids and engagement in physical activity are inversely related to cardiac morbidity and mortality. Among putative mechanisms, both n-3 fatty acids and physical activity may act through modulation of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. This investigation examined the independent and interactive associations of n-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic and docosahexanenoic acid; EPA, DHA) and physical activity with heart rate variability (HRV). Subjects were 259 healthy 30-54 year-old adults. Serum phospholipid fatty acid composition was employed as a biomarker of dietary n-3 fatty acid exposure. Physical activity based on the Paffenbarger questionnaire was coded as < or ≥ 2000 kcal/week. Standard time-domain (standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals and root-mean squared of successive differences; SDNN, RMSSD) and frequency domain (high frequency and low frequency power) measures of HRV were derived from resting electrocardiographic recordings. In linear regression models with covariate adjustment for age, gender and race, greater n-3 fatty acid exposure was associated with greater SDNN and RMSSD, and high physical activity was associated with greater RMSSD. n-3 fatty acid exposure also predicted variation in SDNN, RMSSD, and high-frequency power in interaction with physical activity. Specifically, n-3 fatty acid exposure covaried positively with these three HRV indices only among participants expending 2000 kcal per week or more in physical activity. These latter findings were noted for DHA but not EPA. These results suggest that the cardiovascular benefits of n-3 fatty acid consumption may be mediated, in part, by effects on cardiac autonomic control and may be dependent upon concomitant habitual exercise. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of the Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System in Mercury-Exposed Individuals via Post-Exercise Heart Rate Recovery.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Omer Hinc; Karakulak, Ugur Nadir; Tutkun, Engin; Bal, Ceylan; Gunduzoz, Meside; Ercan Onay, Emine; Ayturk, Mehmet; Tek Ozturk, Mujgan; Alaguney, Mehmet Erdem

    The aim of this study was to assess exercise heart rate recovery (HRR) indices in mercury-exposed individuals when evaluating their cardiac autonomic function. Twenty-eight mercury-exposed individuals and 28 healthy controls were enrolled. All the subjects underwent exercise testing and transthoracic echocardiography. The HRR indices were calculated by subtracting the first- (HRR1), second- (HRR2) and third-minute (HRR3) heart rates from the maximal heart rate. The two groups were evaluated in terms of exercise test parameters, especially HRR, and a correlation analysis was performed between blood, 24-hour urine and hair mercury levels and the test parameters. The mercury-exposed and control groups were similar in age (37.2 ± 6.6 vs. 36.9 ± 9.0 years), had an identical gender distribution (16 females and 12 males) and similar left ventricular ejection fractions (65.5 ± 3.1 vs. 65.4 ± 3.1%). The mean HRR1 [25.6 ± 6.5 vs. 30.3 ± 8.2 beats per min (bpm); p = 0.009], HRR2 (43.5 ± 5.3 vs. 47.8 ± 5.5 bpm; p = 0.010) and HRR3 (56.8 ± 5.1 vs. 59.4 ± 6.3 bpm; p = 0.016) values were significantly lower in the mercury-exposed group than in the healthy controls. However, there were no significant correlations between blood, urine and hair mercury levels and exercise test parameters. Mercury-exposed individuals had lower HRR indices than normal subjects. In these individuals, mercury exposure measurements did not show correlations with the exercise test parameters, but age did show a negative correlation with these parameters. Therefore, cardiac autonomic functions might be involved in cases of mercury exposure. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Long-term continuous positive airway pressure therapy improves cardiac autonomic tone during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Iriarte, Jorge; Fernandez, Secundino; Alegre, Manuel; Valencia, Miguel; Artieda, Julio; Urrestarazu, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac autonomic tone after long-term continuous positive airway pressure therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnea remains unexplored. Thirty patients with obstructive sleep apnea (14 with moderate and 16 with severe obstructive sleep apnea) were studied during a baseline polysomnographic study, after a full night of acute continuous positive airway pressure treatment, and after long-term (~2 years) chronic continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Twenty age- and gender-matched controls with baseline sleep study were selected for comparison purposes. Cross-spectral analysis and the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components of the heart rate variability were computed separately over 10-min ECG epochs during rapid eye movement sleep, non-rapid eye movement sleep, and wakefulness. During the baseline study, obstructive sleep apnea patients exhibited increased LF, decreased HF, and increased LF/HF ratio during sleep when compared to controls. In a multiple regression model, the mean oxygen saturation explained the increased LF during rapid and non-rapid eye movement sleep in obstructive sleep apnea patients. Acute continuous positive airway pressure therapy decreased the LF modulations and the LF/HF ratio and increased the HF modulations during sleep in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea. Long-term continuous positive airway pressure therapy decreased LF modulations and LF/HF ratio with increased HF modulations during sleep in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea. Long-term continuous positive airway pressure reduces the sympathovagal imbalance in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea, both during rapid and non-rapid eye movement sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure seems to exert its changes in cardiac autonomic modulation by decreasing the burden of nocturnal hypoxia.

  3. Exercise heart rate recovery assessment of the cardiac autonomic nervous system in workers occupationally exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Karakulak, Uğur Nadir; Yılmaz, Ömer Hınç; Tutkun, Engin; Gündüzöz, Meşide; Evranos, Banu; Ercan Onay, Emine; Aytürk, Mehmet; Tek Öztürk, Müjgan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess cardiac autonomic function via indices of exercise heart rate recovery (HRR) in workers occupationally exposed to lead. A total of 98 lead-exposed workers and 98 healthy controls were enrolled. All underwent exercise testing and transthoracic echocardiography. HRR indices were calculated by subtracting 1st- (HRR1), 2nd- (HRR2), and 3rd-minute (HRR3) heart rates from maximal heart rate (HR). Exercise test parameters- HRR in particular- were compared between groups, and correlation analysis of blood, 24-hour urine lead levels, and test parameters was performed. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were found to be similar between groups. Mean HRR1 (26.2±3.6 vs 29.0±4.1 bpm, p<0.001), HRR2 (42.6±3.9 vs 46.9±3.7 bpm, p<0.001), and HRR3 (56.6±4.5 vs 61.8±4.3 bpm, p<0.001) values were significantly lower in the lead-exposed group than in the healthy controls. HRR1 was found to be significantly correlated with blood (r:-0.415; p<0.001) and 24-hour urine lead levels (r:-0.446; p<0.001). HRR2 and HRR3 were significantly correlated with 24-hour urine lead level (r:-0.396; p<0.001 and r:-0.233; p=0.021, respectively). Lead-exposed workers had lower HRR indices than normal subjects. Blood and 24-hour urine lead levels were significantly associated with HRR indices. Cardiac autonomic functions may be affected by exposure to lead, and those occupationally exposed should be closely followed for adverse cardiovascular outcome.

  4. Fatalities after taking ibogaine in addiction treatment could be related to sudden cardiac death caused by autonomic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Maas, U; Strubelt, S

    2006-01-01

    Ibogaine is the most important alkaloid of the Central African Iboga-shrub. It is the central drug in Gabonian initiation ceremonies in which it is used to cause a near-death experience. In Western countries it is used in private clinics to treat addiction. However, in the United States and most European countries it is classified as an illegal drug because at least eight persons have died after having taken Ibogaine. These fatalities occurred in most cases several days after ingestion or following the intake of very small doses. There is no conclusive explanation at the present time for these deaths. We hypothesize, that these deaths may be a result of cardiac arrhythmias, caused by a dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. Ibogaine affects the autonomic nervous system by influencing several neurotransmitter-systems and the fastigial nucleus. The cerebellar nucleus responds to small doses with a stimulation of the sympathetic system, leading to a fight or flight reaction. High doses, however, lead to a vagal dominance: a "feigned death". The risk of cardiac arrhythmias is increased in situations of sympathetic stimulation or coincidence of a high parasympathetic tonus and a left-sided sympathetic stimulation. This could occur under influence of small doses of ibogaine and also at times of exhaustion with a high vagal tonus, when sudden fear reactions could cause a critical left-sided sympathetic stimulation. Gabonian healers prevent these risks by isolating their patients from normal life and by inducing a trance-state with right-hemispheric and vagal dominance for several days.

  5. Low-intensity resistance exercise does not affect cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Andrade Lima, Aluísio H R; Farah, Breno Quintella; Rodrigues, Lausanne B C C; Miranda, Alessandra S; Rodrigues, Sérgio L C; de A Correia, Marilia; Sobral Filho, Dario C; Forjaz, Cláudia L M; Prado, Wagner Luiz; Wolosker, Nelson; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M

    2013-05-01

    To analyze the effect of a single bout of resistance exercise on cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease. Fifteen patients with peripheral artery disease (age: 58.3±4.0 years) underwent the following sessions in a random order: resistance exercise (three sets of 10 repetitions of the six resistance exercises with a workload of 5-7 in the OMNI-RES scale) and control (similar to the resistance session; however, the resistance exercises were performed with no load). The frequency domain (low frequency, high frequency and sympathovagal balance) and symbolic analysis (0V, 1V and 2V patterns) of heart rate variability were obtained before and until one hour after the interventions. After the resistance exercise and control sessions, similar increases were observed in the consecutive heartbeat intervals (control: 720.8±28.6 vs. 790.9±34.4 ms; resistance exercise: 712.9±30.1 vs. 756.8±37.9 ms; p<0.05) and in the pattern of the symbolic analysis with no variation (0V) (control: 25.1±3.5 vs. 33.4±4.1%; resistance exercise: 26.1±3.2 vs. 29.7±3.5%; p<0.05) until 50 min after both interventions. The pattern of two variations (2V) decreased similarly (control: 11.2±2.1 vs. 8.3±2.1%; resistance exercise: 9.5±1.7 vs. 7.8±1.7%; p<0.05). In contrast, the pattern of one variation (1V), the low and high frequency bands and sympathovagal balance did not change after the interventions (p>0.05). A single bout of resistance exercise did not alter cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease.

  6. Impact of overnight oximetry findings on cardiac autonomic modulation in women during second trimester of uncomplicated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Minako; Shinohara, Hitomi; Kodama, Hideya

    2015-05-01

    Although sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) might impose an underlying health threat upon some pregnant women, the influence of SDB on the health status of most pregnant women is not discernible. In order to find out which pregnant women should be evaluated for clinically meaningful SDB during the second trimester, the present study aimed to determine which overnight oximetry findings significantly affect maternal resting cardiac autonomic modulations. Overnight arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2 ) was monitored at home using pulse oximetry by 64 women with uncomplicated pregnancy between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. We then determined the impact of the findings on maternal resting heart rate variability (HRV) using 5-min photoplethysmography. A relatively increased oxygen desaturation index (number of oxygen desaturation events where SaO2 fell >3% below the baseline saturation/h) of ≥3.0 in five women did not significantly impact HRV. On the other hand, events associated with profound oxygen desaturation (minimum SaO2  ≤ 90%) in three women were associated with decreased HRV, including high- and low-frequency powers. Parasympathetic activities of cardiac autonomic modulations might be attenuated in women who experience profound night-time oxygen desaturation, even if the incidence of significant events is quite low. The oximetry finding of minimum SaO2  ≤ 90% might be a valuable criterion for clinically meaningful sleep-disordered breathing among women with early uncomplicated pregnancy. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Cardiac myosin binding protein-C Ser302 phosphorylation regulates cardiac β-adrenergic reserve

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S.; Li, Jiayang; Stelzer, Julian E.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) modulates cardiac contractile function; however, the specific roles of individual serines (Ser) within the M-domain that are targets for β-adrenergic signaling are not known. Recently, we demonstrated that significant accelerations in in vivo pressure development following β-agonist infusion can occur in transgenic (TG) mouse hearts expressing phospho-ablated Ser282 (that is, TGS282A) but not in hearts expressing phospho-ablation of all three serines [that is, Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302 (TG3SA)], suggesting an important modulatory role for other Ser residues. In this regard, there is evidence that Ser302 phosphorylation may be a key contributor to the β-agonist–induced positive inotropic responses in the myocardium, but its precise functional role has not been established. Thus, to determine the in vivo and in vitro functional roles of Ser302 phosphorylation, we generated TG mice expressing nonphosphorylatable Ser302 (that is, TGS302A). Left ventricular pressure-volume measurements revealed that TGS302A mice displayed no accelerations in the rate of systolic pressure rise and an inability to maintain systolic pressure following dobutamine infusion similar to TG3SA mice, implicating Ser302 phosphorylation as a critical regulator of enhanced systolic performance during β-adrenergic stress. Dynamic strain–induced cross-bridge (XB) measurements in skinned myocardium isolated from TGS302A hearts showed that the molecular basis for impaired β-adrenergic–mediated enhancements in systolic function is due to the absence of protein kinase A–mediated accelerations in the rate of cooperative XB recruitment. These results demonstrate that Ser302 phosphorylation regulates cardiac contractile reserve by enhancing contractile responses during β-adrenergic stress. PMID:28345052

  8. Electrochemical Skin Conductance May Be Used to Screen for Diabetic Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in a Chinese Population with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    He, Tianyi; Wang, Chuan; Zuo, Anju; Liu, Pan; Zhao, Ruxing; Li, Wenjuan; Chen, Li; Hou, Xinguo

    2017-01-01

    Aims. This study aimed to assess whether the electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) could be used to screen for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (DCAN) in a Chinese population with diabetes. Methods. We recruited 75 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 45 controls without diabetes. DCAN was diagnosed by the cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests (CARTs) as gold standard. In all subjects ESCs of hands and feet were also detected by SUDOSCAN™ as a new screening method. The efficacy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results. The ESCs of both hands and feet were significantly lower in T2DM patients with DCAN than those without DCAN (67.33 ± 15.37 versus 78.03 ± 13.73, P = 0.002, and 57.77 ± 20.99 versus 75.03 ± 11.41, P < 0.001). The ROC curve analysis showed the areas under the ROC curve were both 0.75 for ESCs of hands and feet in screening DCAN. And the optimal cut-off values of ESCs, sensitivities, and specificities were 76 μS, 76.7%, and 75.6% for hands and 75 μS, 80.0%, and 60.0% for feet, respectively. Conclusions. ESC measurement is a reliable and feasible method to screen DCAN in the Chinese population with diabetes before further diagnosis with CARTs.

  9. Electrochemical Skin Conductance May Be Used to Screen for Diabetic Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy in a Chinese Population with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianyi; Wang, Chuan; Zuo, Anju; Liu, Pan; Li, Wenjuan

    2017-01-01

    Aims. This study aimed to assess whether the electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) could be used to screen for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (DCAN) in a Chinese population with diabetes. Methods. We recruited 75 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 45 controls without diabetes. DCAN was diagnosed by the cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests (CARTs) as gold standard. In all subjects ESCs of hands and feet were also detected by SUDOSCAN™ as a new screening method. The efficacy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results. The ESCs of both hands and feet were significantly lower in T2DM patients with DCAN than those without DCAN (67.33 ± 15.37 versus 78.03 ± 13.73, P = 0.002, and 57.77 ± 20.99 versus 75.03 ± 11.41, P < 0.001). The ROC curve analysis showed the areas under the ROC curve were both 0.75 for ESCs of hands and feet in screening DCAN. And the optimal cut-off values of ESCs, sensitivities, and specificities were 76 μS, 76.7%, and 75.6% for hands and 75 μS, 80.0%, and 60.0% for feet, respectively. Conclusions. ESC measurement is a reliable and feasible method to screen DCAN in the Chinese population with diabetes before further diagnosis with CARTs. PMID:28280746

  10. Cardiac autonomic functions and the emergence of violence in a highly realistic model of social conflict in humans

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Jozsef; Raczkevy-Deak, Gabriella; Gyimesine, Katalin P.; Szakmary, Andras; Farkas, Istvan; Vegh, Jozsef

    2014-01-01

    Among the multitude of factors that can transform human social interactions into violent conflicts, biological features received much attention in recent years as correlates of decision making and aggressiveness especially in critical situations. We present here a highly realistic new model of human aggression and violence, where genuine acts of aggression are readily performed and which at the same time allows the parallel recording of biological concomitants. Particularly, we studied police officers trained at the International Training Centre (Budapest, Hungary), who are prepared to perform operations under extreme conditions of stress. We found that aggressive arousal can transform a basically peaceful social encounter into a violent conflict. Autonomic recordings show that this change is accompanied by increased heart rates, which was associated earlier with reduced cognitive complexity of perceptions (“attentional myopia”) and promotes a bias toward hostile attributions and aggression. We also observed reduced heart rate variability in violent subjects, which is believed to signal a poor functioning of prefrontal-subcortical inhibitory circuits and reduces self-control. Importantly, these autonomic particularities were observed already at the beginning of social encounters i.e., before aggressive acts were initiated, suggesting that individual characteristics of the stress-response define the way in which social pressure affects social behavior, particularly the way in which this develops into violence. Taken together, these findings suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are valuable external symptoms of internal motivational states and decision making processes, and raise the possibility that behavior under social pressure can be predicted by the individual characteristics of stress responsiveness. PMID:25374519

  11. Resting heart rate and measures of effort-related cardiac autonomic dysfunction predict cardiovascular events in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Barak; Azencot, Mali; Dobrecky-Mery, Idit; Lewis, Basil S; Flugelman, Moshe Y; Halon, David A

    2016-08-01

    Autonomic control of the cardiovascular system may be impaired in type 2 diabetes and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Parameters obtained during stress testing may reflect early stages of cardiac autonomic dysfunction and provide prognostic information in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes. We performed maximal exercise treadmill testing in 594 patients with type 2 diabetes without known coronary heart disease. The prognostic significance of physiological parameters associated with autonomic dysfunction was assessed, including chronotropic incompetence (<80% heart rate reserve), abnormal heart rate recovery at 1 minute <18 beats/minute, and resting tachycardia >100 beats/minute. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to determine the association of exercise parameters with a composite outcome of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke. Resting heart rate >100 beats/minute was observed in 18% of patients, chronotropic incompetence in 30% and heart rate recovery at 1 minute <18 beats/minute in 35%. Over 79 ± 16 months, there were 72 (12%) events. Each parameter was significantly associated with event risk in an adjusted multivariate analysis: chronotropic incompetence (hazard ratio 1.89, 95% confidence interval 1.18-3.01; P = 0.008), resting heart rate ≥100 beats/minute (hazard ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval 1.19-3.26; P = 0.008) and heart rate recovery at 1 minute <18 beats (hazard ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval 1.12-2.81; P = 0.015). A progressive relationship between the number of abnormal parameters and event risk was observed (log rank P < 0.001). Chronotropic incompetence, resting tachycardia and reduced heart rate recovery are independently and additively associated with long-term mortality, myocardial infarction or stroke in type 2 diabetes without known coronary heart disease. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. Changes in autonomic regulation with age: implications for psychopharmacologic treatments in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Galanter, C A; Wasserman, G; Sloan, R P; Pine, D S

    1999-01-01

    Developmental changes in the cardiovascular system could have an impact on risks associated with psychopharmacological interventions. Children may be more vulnerable to adverse cardiac events due to immaturity in autonomic control of the heart. These changes are incompletely understood and are characterized in this study. A consecutive series of 70 boys, aged 6-14 years, was recruited. Developmental variation in the autonomic nervous system was evaluated by assessing heart period variability (HPV), pulse, and blood pressure in response to orthostasis. Increased age correlated significantly with greater heart rate and diastolic blood pressure response to orthostasis. HPV at rest and in response to tilt did not significantly correlate with age. Boys with family histories of hypertension had a significantly greater blood pressure response to orthostasis. These findings suggest that developmental age-related changes in the sympathetic nervous system, as reflected by changes of pulse and blood pressure response to tilt, occur across this age range. Parasympathetic changes, as reflected by HPV, do not. In light of these findings, more research is needed on children's and adolescents' relative cardiac risk with psychotropic medications as opposed to adults'.

  13. Validation of the state version questionnaire on autonomic regulation (state-aR) for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Current quality of life inventories used in oncology mainly measure the effects of chemo- or radiotherapy alongside functional and role scales. A new approach is to measure the autonomic state of regulation with the trait-inventory of autonomic regulation (Trait-aR). Loss of Trait-aR has been shown in different medical conditions such as breast cancer (BC) but not in colorectal cancer patients (CRC). In this paper we report the validation of a new state autonomic regulation scale (State-aR) of the last week. Methods Study 1 included 114 participants: (41 women/16 men with cancer and 57 age- and gender-matched healthy people) to conduct a reliability-, factor- and validity-analysis. Concurrent and convergent validity was evaluated with Trait-aR, Fatigue-Numeri-cal-Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) and the self-regulation scale, 65 participants were retested. Study 2 completed 42 participants: 17 with BC and 25 with CRC receiving chemotherapy. The State-aR was administered prior, during and after chemotherapy for measuring responsiveness. Results The factor analysis loaded to four subscales of State-aR (rest-activity, orthostatic-circulatory, thermosweating and digestive regulation) with a: Cronbach-α rα = 0.77-0.83 and a test-retest-reliability rrt = 0.60-0.80. The sum- and sub scales correlated with their concurrent subscales in the Trait-aR (0.48-0.74) and with the sum-scale moderately with all convergent criteria (r = 0.41 --0.44; p < 0.001). During chemotherapy the State-aR-sum and rest-activity-scale decreased significantly compared to the change in the Trait-aR (p < 0.05). Conclusions These findings support that the state autonomic regulation scale has satisfactory to good reliability, good validity and acceptable responsiveness in the context of chemotherapy treatment. PMID:22024425

  14. One night on-call: sleep deprivation affects cardiac autonomic control and inflammation in physicians.

    PubMed

    Tobaldini, Eleonora; Cogliati, Chiara; Fiorelli, Elisa M; Nunziata, Vanessa; Wu, Maddalena A; Prado, Marta; Bevilacqua, Maurizio; Trabattoni, Daria; Porta, Alberto; Montano, Nicola

    2013-10-01

    Sleep loss is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It is known that chronic sleep restriction affects autonomic cardiovascular control and inflammatory response. However, scanty data are available on the effects of acute sleep deprivation (ASD) due to night shifts on the cardiovascular system and its capability to respond to stressor stimuli. The aim of our study was to investigate whether a real life model of ASD, such as "one night on-call", might alter the autonomic dynamic response to orthostatic challenge and modify the immune response in young physicians. Fifteen healthy residents in Internal Medicine were studied before and after one night on-call at Rest and during a gravitational stimulus (head up-tilt test, HUT). Heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure variability (BPV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) were analyzed during Rest and HUT before and after ASD. Plasmatic hormones (epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol, renin, aldosterone, ACTH) and tissue inflammatory cytokines were measured at baseline and after ASD. HRV analysis revealed a predominant sympathetic modulation and a parasympathetic withdrawal after ASD. During HUT, the sympathovagal balance shifted towards a sympathetic predominance before and after ASD. However, the magnitude of the autonomic response was lower after ASD. BPV and BRS remained unchanged before and after ASD as the hormone levels, while IFN-γ increased after ASD compared to baseline. In summary, one night of sleep deprivation, at least in this real-life model, seems to affect cardiovascular autonomic response and immune modulation, independently by the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Copyright © 2013 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of cardiac autonomic modulation of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Tatiana Dias; Wajnsztejn, Rubens; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Marques Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos; Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Adami, Fernando; Valenti, Vitor E; Monteiro, Carlos B M; Leone, Claudio; da Cruz Martins, Karen Cristina; Ferreira, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by decreased attention span, impulsiveness, and hyperactivity. Autonomic nervous system imbalance was previously described in this population. We aim to compare the autonomic function of children with ADHD and controls by analyzing heart rate variability (HRV). Methods Children rested in supine position with spontaneous breathing for 20 minutes. Heart rate was recorded beat by beat. HRV analysis was performed in the time and frequency domains and Poincaré plot. Results Twenty-eight children with ADHD (22 boys, aged 9.964 years) and 28 controls (15 boys, age 9.857 years) participated in this study. It was determined that the mean and standard deviation of indexes which indicate parasympathetic activity is higher in children with ADHD than in children without the disorder: high frequency in normalized units, 46.182 (14.159) versus 40.632 (12.247); root mean square of successive differences, 41.821 (17.834) versus 38.150 (18.357); differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals greater than 50 milliseconds, 199.75 (144.00) versus 127.46 (102.21) (P<0.05); percentage of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals greater than 50 milliseconds, 23.957 (17.316) versus 16.211 (13.215); standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat interval, 29.586 (12.622) versus 26.989 (12.983). Conclusion Comparison of the autonomic function by analyzing HRV suggests an increase in the activity of the parasympathetic autonomic nervous systems in children with ADHD in relation to the control group. PMID:24748797

  16. Cardiac autonomic function and baroreflex changes following 4 weeks of resistance versus aerobic training in individuals with pre-hypertension.

    PubMed

    Collier, S R; Kanaley, J A; Carhart, R; Frechette, V; Tobin, M M; Bennett, N; Luckenbaugh, A N; Fernhall, B

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac autonomic modulation and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) are altered in individuals with hypertension. Aerobic exercise (AE) training has been shown to improve both measures, yet little is known about the effects of resistance exercise (RE). The purpose of this study was to examine the heart rate variability (HRV) and BRS following 4 weeks of resistance or aerobic training in a population with borderline high blood pressure (BP). Twenty-nine mild hypertensives were recruited and randomly assigned to 4 weeks of RE or AE training. Before and after training, resting measures of HRV frequencies and BRS were obtained. There was a significant decrease in resting systolic BP for both exercise training modes (RE 136 +/- 3.0 pre- to 132 +/- 3.4 post-training vs. AE 142 +/- 4.0 pre- to 137 +/- 3.6 mmHg post-training, P = 0.019). Diastolic BP decreased significantly following both exercise training modes (RE 78 +/- 1.31 pre to 74 +/- 1.1 post vs. AE 80 +/- 1.7 pre to 77 +/- 1.6 mmHg post, P = 0.002). A significant time by training mode interaction for low frequency : high frequency (HF) ratio (P = 0.017) with AE decreasing the ratio (275.21 +/- 67.28 to 161.26 +/- 61.49) and RE increasing this ratio (143.73 +/- 65.00 to 227.83 +/- 59.41). Natural log-transformed (ln) HRV values showed a time-by-training mode interaction for ln HF (P = 0.05) as ln HF increased (4.7 +/- 0.38 to 5.4 +/- 0.35 ms(2)) following AE and decreased (5.98 +/- 0.37 to 5.76 +/- 0.42 ms(2)) following RE. BRS increased following aerobic training and decreased after resistance training (6.74 +/- 1.2 to 7.94 +/- 1.3 and 10.44 +/- 1.2 to 9.1 +/- 1.2 ms mmHg(-1) respectively, P = 0.021). Aerobic exercise improved the autonomic nervous system (increasing vagal tone, reducing sympathovagal balance while increasing BRS) while RE showed no improvements in cardiac autonomic tone and decreased BRS.

  17. Role of autonomic nervous dysfunction in electrocardio-graphic abnormalities and cardiac injury in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Eisuke; Ikeda, Satoshi; Miyahara, Yoshiyuki; Kohno, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    Electrocardiographic abnormalities, cardiac injury, and autonomic nervous function were investigated in patients with acute-phase subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) (42 patients with SAH related to ruptured aneurysm and 42 control subjects). Electrocardiogram and Holter electrocardiogram for spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded. Concentrations of cardiogenic enzymes (ie, creatine kinase-myocardial fraction [CK-MB], myosin light chain I, and troponin T), plasma concentrations of catecholamine (ie, noradrenaline, adrenaline, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylethylene glycol [MHPG]) and HRV were compared in the acute and chronic phase of SAH, and with the values in the controls subjects. As previously reported, patients with acute SAH exhibited electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and increased concentrations of both cardiogenic enzymes and plasma catecholamines, suggesting that acceleration of sympathetic activity is involved. However, HRV analysis showed enhanced parasympathetic activity, probably associated with increased intracranial pressure after the onset of SAH, which may be explained by accentuated antagonism, negative feedback of noradrenaline to the center, and reduction of sympathetic activity after reaching a peak level. The results suggest that not only sympathetic activity but also vagal activity is enhanced during the acute phase of SAH, thus contributing to the ECG abnormalities and the onset of cardiac injury.

  18. The effects of chewing versus caffeine on alertness, cognitive performance and cardiac autonomic activity during sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Mark; Pavy, Alan; van den Heuvel, Cameron

    2006-12-01

    Chewing has been shown to alleviate feelings of sleepiness and improve cognitive performance during the day. This study investigated the effect of chewing on alertness and cognitive performance across one night without sleep as well as the possible mediating role of cardiac autonomic activity. Fourteen adults participated in a randomized, counterbalanced protocol employing a chewing, placebo and caffeine condition. Participants completed tasks assessing psychomotor vigilance, tracking, grammatical reasoning, alertness and sleepiness each hour across the night. All participants received either placebo or caffeine (200 mg), while the chewing condition also chewed on a tasteless and odorless substance for 15 min each hour. Heart rate (HR), root mean square of the successive differences in R-R intervals on the ECG (RMSSD), and preejection period (PEP) were simultaneously recorded. Alertness and cognitive performance amongst the chewing condition did not differ or were in fact worse when compared with placebo. Similarly, measures of HR and RMSSD remained the same between these two conditions; however, PEP was reduced in the later part of the night in the chewing condition compared with a relative increase for placebo. Caffeine led to improved speed and accuracy on cognitive tasks and increased alertness when compared with chewing. Relative increases in RMSSD and reductions in HR were demonstrated following caffeine; however, no change in PEP was seen. Strong associations between cardiac parasympathetic activity and complex cognitive tasks, as well as between subjective alertness and simpler cognitive tasks, suggest a differential process mediating complex versus simple cognitive performance during sleep deprivation.

  19. Dynamic response of cardiac autonomic nervous system activity to habitual exercise during gradual variation of breathing frequency.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure cardiac autonomic nervous system activity during breathing control with gradual alteration of the frequency between habitual exercise and sedentary young male subjects. In this study, to evaluate CANS activity, Tone-Entropy analysis, which is based on statistical property of acceleration between consecutive R-R intervals, was used. Sixteen healthy young male subjects (21.6+/-1.4yrs) were participated in these experiments and their R-R interval sequences were recorded. The controlled breathing trials let the subjects synchronize their breathing frequency ranging 3 to 30 breathing per minute. After that, breathing frequency was gradually and reversely decreased from 30 to 3 breathing per minute. Before and after the breathing controlled trials, 5 minute voluntary breathing trials were performed. Our results showed that total CANS activities of HE group were activated more than those of SE group in the entire sections and also that, as compared with HE group, maximum of average HR in SE group was appeared at 30 breathing per minute and it is recognized that the statistically significant difference between HE and SE group was shown. In conclusion, our results suggest that efficiency of cardiac function on habitual exercise in breathing control may be quantitatively and graphically evaluated with HR and Tone-Entropy analysis without any physical stimulation.

  20. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stenfors, Cecilia U. D.; Hanson, Linda M.; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  1. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults.

    PubMed

    Stenfors, Cecilia U D; Hanson, Linda M; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  2. Evidence for vestibular regulation of autonomic functions in a mouse genetic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Dean M.; Erkman, Linda; Hermanson, Ola; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Fuller, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Physiological responses to changes in the gravitational field and body position, as well as symptoms of patients with anxiety-related disorders, have indicated an interrelationship between vestibular function and stress responses. However, the relative significance of cochlear and vestibular information in autonomic regulation remains unresolved because of the difficulties in distinguishing the relative contributions of other proprioceptive and interoceptive inputs, including vagal and somatic information. To investigate the role of cochlear and vestibular function in central and physiological responses, we have examined the effects of increased gravity in wild-type mice and mice lacking the POU homeodomain transcription factor Brn-3.1 (Brn-3bPou4f3). The only known phenotype of the Brn-3.1(-/-) mouse is related to hearing and balance functions, owing to the failure of cochlear and vestibular hair cells to differentiate properly. Here, we show that normal physiological responses to increased gravity (2G exposure), such as a dramatic drop in body temperature and concomitant circadian adjustment, were completely absent in Brn-3.1(-/-) mice. In line with the lack of autonomic responses, the massive increase in neuronal activity after 2G exposure normally detected in wild-type mice was virtually abolished in Brn-3.1(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that cochlear and vestibular hair cells are the primary regulators of autonomic responses to altered gravity and provide genetic evidence that these cells are sufficient to alter neural activity in regions involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine control.

  3. Evidence for vestibular regulation of autonomic functions in a mouse genetic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Dean M.; Erkman, Linda; Hermanson, Ola; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Fuller, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Physiological responses to changes in the gravitational field and body position, as well as symptoms of patients with anxiety-related disorders, have indicated an interrelationship between vestibular function and stress responses. However, the relative significance of cochlear and vestibular information in autonomic regulation remains unresolved because of the difficulties in distinguishing the relative contributions of other proprioceptive and interoceptive inputs, including vagal and somatic information. To investigate the role of cochlear and vestibular function in central and physiological responses, we have examined the effects of increased gravity in wild-type mice and mice lacking the POU homeodomain transcription factor Brn-3.1 (Brn-3bPou4f3). The only known phenotype of the Brn-3.1(-/-) mouse is related to hearing and balance functions, owing to the failure of cochlear and vestibular hair cells to differentiate properly. Here, we show that normal physiological responses to increased gravity (2G exposure), such as a dramatic drop in body temperature and concomitant circadian adjustment, were completely absent in Brn-3.1(-/-) mice. In line with the lack of autonomic responses, the massive increase in neuronal activity after 2G exposure normally detected in wild-type mice was virtually abolished in Brn-3.1(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that cochlear and vestibular hair cells are the primary regulators of autonomic responses to altered gravity and provide genetic evidence that these cells are sufficient to alter neural activity in regions involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine control.

  4. Trait Mindfulness Predicts Attentional and Autonomic Regulation of Alcohol Cue-Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Background The trait of mindfulness varies among meditation-naïve individuals and is associated with attentional and autonomic regulation, two neurocognitive functions that become impaired in addiction. It was hypothesized that alcohol dependent inpatients with comparatively high levels of trait mindfulness would exhibit significant autonomic recovery from stress-primed alcohol cues mediated by greater attentional disengagement from such cues. Methods 58 alcohol dependent inpatients participated in affect-modulated psychophysiological cue-reactivity protocol and a spatial cueing task designed to assess alcohol attentional bias (AB). Associations between trait mindfulness, alcohol AB, and an index of autonomic activity, high-frequency heart rate variability (HFHRV), were examined via multivariate path analysis. Results Higher trait mindfulness was significantly associated with less difficulty resisting the urge to drink and greater HFHRV recovery from stress-primed alcohol cues. After statistically controlling for the correlation of mindfulness and perceived difficulty resisting drinking urges, the association between mindfulness and HFHRV recovery was partially mediated by attentional disengagement from alcohol cues (model R2 = .30). Discussion Alcohol dependent inpatients higher in mindfulness are better able to disengage attention from alcohol cues, which in turn predicts the degree of HFHRV recovery from such cues. Trait mindfulness may index cognitive control over appetitive responses reflected in superior attentional and autonomic regulation of stress-primed alcohol cue-reactivity. PMID:23976814

  5. Evolutionary origin of autonomic regulation of physiological activities in vertebrate phyla.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Okabe, Masataka

    2007-10-01

    Proper regulation of physiological activities is crucial for homeostasis in animals. Autonomic regulation of these activities is most developed in mammals, in which a part of peripheral nervous system, termed the autonomic nervous system plays the dominant role. Circulatory activity and digestive activity in vertebrates change in opposite phases to each other. The stage where circulatory activity is high and digestive activity is low is termed the "fight or flight stage" while the stage where circulatory activity is low and digestive activity is high is termed the "rest and digest stage". It has been thought that the autonomic nervous system originated in early vertebrate phyla and developed to its greatest extent in mammals. In this study, we compared the pattern of change of circulatory and digestive activities in several invertebrates and found that the two stages seen in mammals are also present in a wide variety of animals, including evolutionarily early-diverging invertebrate taxa. From this and other arguments we propose a novel possibility that the basic properties of the autonomic nervous system were established very early in metazoan evolution.

  6. Updates on the Methodological Approaches for Carrying Out an In-Depth Study of the Cardiac Conduction System and the Autonomic Nervous System of Victims of Sudden Unexplained Fetal and Infant Death

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsi, Graziella; Crippa, Marina

    2016-01-01

    This article contains a set of protocols for histopathological techniques that can be used for carrying out in-depth studies of cases of sudden infant death syndrome and sudden intrauterine unexplained fetal death syndrome. In order to enable researchers to advance hypotheses regarding the causes of the unexpected death of infants and fetuses, the authors propose three innovative and accurate methodologies for studying the cardiac conduction system, the peripheral cardiac nervous system, and the central autonomic nervous system. Over the years, these protocols have been developed, modified, and improved on a vast number of cases which has enabled pathologists to carry out the microscopic analyses of the structures which regulate life, in order to highlight all the possible morphological substrates of pathophysiological mechanisms that may underlie these syndromes. In memory of our research professor Lino Rossi (1923–2004). PMID:27917382

  7. Heart rate variability modifications following exercise training in type 2 diabetic patients with definite cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pagkalos, M; Koutlianos, N; Kouidi, E; Pagkalos, E; Mandroukas, K; Deligiannis, A

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) as a result of diabetic autonomic neuropathy is positively related to a poor prognosis in diabetic patients. The measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) is a remarkable index of cardiac autonomic dysfunction. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of long-term exercise training on HRV in type 2 diabetic patients with definite CAN. Seventeen type 2 diabetic patients with definite CAN (group A: 56.2 years (SD 5.8)) and 15 without CAN (group B: 55.8 years (SD 5.6)) participated in the study. All patients followed an aerobic exercise training programme three times a week for 6 months; the intensity of the session was 70% to 85% of heart rate reserve. At the beginning and end of the study all subjects underwent graded maximal exercise testing with spiroergometry for the evaluation of their aerobic capacity (VO(2)peak). Moreover, time and frequency domain indices of HRV were obtained from 24 h ambulatory continuous ECG Holter recordings. At baseline, all measurements of HRV indices were significantly reduced in group A compared with group B (p<0.05). Moreover, group A reached a significantly lower VO(2)peak by 14.8% compared with group B (p<0.05). Following the exercise training programme, the SD of all normal-to-normal RR intervals in the entire recording (SDNN) was increased by 18.8% (p<0.05) and 13.8% (p<0.05), the square root of the average of sum of squares of difference between adjacent filtered RR intervals (rMSSd) was increased by 35% (p<0.05) and 15.2% (p<0.05), and the percentage of differences between adjacent filtered RR intervals which was greater than 50 ms for the entire analysis (pNN50) was increased by 400% (p<0.05) and 67.9% (p<0.05) in groups A and B, respectively. Regarding the frequency domain indices, only the high frequency power (HF) was found to be significantly increased in group A. At the end of the exercise training programme, SDNN, rMSSd and low frequency power (LF) were significantly lower (24

  8. Assessment of cardiac autonomic function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy using short term heart rate variability measures.

    PubMed

    Dhargave, Pradnya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Abhishekh, Hulegar Ashok; Meghana, Adoor; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2014-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a hereditary neuromuscular disorder frequently associated with progressive cardiac dysfunction, and is one of the common causes of death in these children. Early diagnostic markers of cardiac involvement might help in timely intervention. In this study we compared the short term HRV measures of DMD children with that of healthy subjects. One hundred and twenty-four genetically confirmed boys with DMD and 50 age matched controls were recruited. Error-free, electrocardiogram was recorded in all subjects at rest in the supine position. HRV parameters were computed in time and frequency domains. Time domain measures included standard deviation of NN interval (SDNN), and root of square mean of successive NN interval (RMSSD). Frequency domain consisted of total, low frequency and high frequency power values. Ratio of low frequency and high frequency power values (LF/HF) was determined using customized software. HRV parameters were significantly altered in DMD children as compared to healthy controls. Following parameters [mean (SD)] were reduced in DMD as compared to controls; RMSSD (in ms) [52.14 (33.2) vs 64.64 (43.2); p = 0.038], High frequency component (nu) [38.77 (14.4) vs 48.02 (17.1); p = 0.001] suggesting a loss of vagal tone. In contrast, measure of sympathovagal balance LF/HF [1.18 (0.87) vs 0.89 (0.79); p = 0.020] was increased in DMD group. In this cross sectional study we have demonstrated alteration in autonomic tone in DMD. Loss of vagal tone and an increase in sympathetic tone were observed in DMD children. Further prospective studies are required to confirm the utility of these measures as predictors of adverse cardiac outcome in DMD. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparison of autonomous regulation and negative self-evaluative emotions as predictors of smoking behavior change among college students.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung S; Catley, Delwyn; Harris, Kari Jo

    2012-05-01

    This study compared autonomous self-regulation and negative self-evaluative emotions as predictors of smoking behavior change in college student smokers (N = 303) in a smoking cessation intervention study. Although the two constructs were moderately correlated, latent growth curve modeling revealed that only autonomous regulation, but not negative self-evaluative emotions, was negatively related to the number of days smoked. Results suggest that the two variables tap different aspects of motivation to change smoking behaviors, and that autonomous regulation predicts smoking behavior change better than negative self-evaluative emotions.

  10. Metabolic and genetic regulation of cardiac energy substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Kodde, Izaäk Frederik; van der Stok, Johan; Smolenski, Ryszard T; de Jong, Jan Willem

    2007-01-01

    Proper heart function relies on high efficiency of energy conversion. Mitochondrial oxygen-dependent processes transfer most of the chemical energy from metabolic substrates into ATP. Healthy myocardium uses mainly fatty acids as its major energy source, with little contribution of glucose. However, lactate, ketone bodies, amino acids or even acetate can be oxidized under certain circumstances. A complex interplay exists between various substrates responding to energy needs and substrate availability. The relative substrate concentration is the prime factor defining preference and utilization rate. Allosteric enzyme regulation and protein phosphorylation cascades, partially controlled by hormones such as insulin, modulate the concentration effect; together they provide short-term adjustments of cardiac energy metabolism. The expression of metabolic machinery genes is also dynamically regulated in response to developmental and (patho)physiological conditions, leading to long-term adjustments. Specific nuclear receptor transcription factors and co-activators regulate the expression of these genes. These include peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and their nuclear receptor co-activator, estrogen-related receptor and hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1. Increasing glucose and reducing fatty acid oxidation by metabolic regulation is already a target for effective drugs used in ischemic heart disease and heart failure. Interaction with genetic factors that control energy metabolism could provide even more powerful pharmacological tools.

  11. The effect of antenatal steroid treatment on fetal autonomic heart rate regulation revealed by fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Fiedler, Anja; Schröder, Beatrix; Jaekel, Susann; Stacke, Angelika; Hoyer, Dirk; Schleussner, Ekkehard

    2010-05-01

    Steroid administration to accelerate fetal lung maturation reduces neonatal morbidity and mortality in the case of preterm delivery. Behavioral observations suggest effects on fetal cardiovascular regulation. We hypothesize that beat to beat heart rate variability (fHRV) derived from fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) will reveal a direct, acute steroidal effect on fetal autonomic heart rate regulation. Eight patients between 29 and 34 weeks of gestation at risk for preterm birth who were treated with betamethasone (2x12 mg within 24 h). Subjects were studied prior to the first and within 6 h after the second administration. Continuous fMCG was recorded with a 31-channel-SQUID biomagnetometer. Each dataset was processed by subtracting maternal cardiac artefacts and determining the time instants of the fetal heart beats. fHRV analysis was applied to periods of fetal quiescence of 4 min length. We compared fHRV prior versus post steroid administration. Steroid exposure reduced all parameters of overall fHRV significantly. The fHRV parameters representing short term variability remained unaffected. Mean fetal heart rate significantly decreased. The complexity of the heart rate patterns increased. Our results suggest an acute shift in the sympatho-vagal balance of fetuses exposed to betamethasone in utero toward sympathetic suppression. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of music and essential oil inhalation on cardiac autonomic balance in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shu-Ming; Koo, Malcolm; Yu, Zer-Ran

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of listening to soft music or inhaling Citrus bergamia aroma on autonomic nervous system activity in young healthy individuals. STUDY DESIGN, LOCATION, AND SUBJECTS: This single-institution study was an open-label randomized controlled trial carried out on 114 healthy undergraduate students at a university located in south Taiwan. Participants were randomly allocated to one of four study groups including (1) a music group, (2) an aroma group, (3) a combined music and aroma group, and (4) a control group. Participants in the music group were asked to listen to preselected soft music for 15 minutes, and those in the aroma group were asked to inhale Citrus bergamia essential oil vapor generated from an ultrasonic atomizer for 15 minutes. The outcome measure involved heart rate variability (HRV) indices measured before and after the intervention. The low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) components of the HRV were used to quantify modulation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system. The percentage changes of normalized LF (p = 0.003), normalized HF (p = 0.001), and the ratio of LF to HF (p < 0.001) were significantly different among the four groups. Tukey's post hoc analysis revealed that the percentage change of normalized LF and HF were significantly different between the control group and the music group. For the percentage change of the ratio of LF to HF, the negative change in the music group, the aroma group, and the combined group was significantly different from that of the increase in the control group. In addition, no significant differences were found in the percentage changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean heart rate in the four groups. Listening to soft music and inhaling Citrus bergamia essential oil was found to be an effective method of relaxation, as indicated by a shift of the autonomic balance toward

  13. Reduced cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing: A heritable vulnerability trait in patients with schizophrenia and their healthy first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Yeh, Chin-Bin; Kuo, Terry B J; Huang, San-Yuan; Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An

    2016-09-30

    Reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV) has been observed in patients with schizophrenia and their relatives, suggesting genetic predispositions. However, findings have not been consistent. We assessed cardiac autonomic response to deep breathing in first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia (n=45; 26 female; aged 39.69±14.82 years). Data were compared to healthy controls (n=45; 26 female; aged 38.27±9.79 years) matched for age, gender, body mass index and physical activity as well as to unmedicated patients with acute schizophrenia (n=45; 25 female; aged 37.31±12.65 years). Electrocardiograms were recorded under supine resting and deep-breathing conditions (10-12breaths/min). We measured HRV components including variance, low-frequency (LF) power, which may reflect baroreflex function, high-frequency (HF) power, which reflects cardiac parasympathetic activity, and LF/HF ratio, which may reflect sympatho-vagal balance. Patients rather than relatives exhibited lower resting-state HRV (variance, LF, and HF) than controls. As expected, deep breathing induced an increase in variance and HF-HRV in controls. However, such a response was significantly reduced in both patients and their relatives. In conclusion, the diminished cardiac autonomic reactivity to deep breathing seen in patients and their unaffected relatives indicates that this pattern of cardiac autonomic dysregulation may be regarded as a genetic trait marker for schizophrenia.

  14. Music induces different cardiac autonomic arousal effects in young and older persons.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Max J; Stadler, Peter; Gryc, Thomas; Nath, Juliane; Habib-Romstoeck, Leila; Stemper, Brigitte; Buechner, Susanne; Wong, Samuel; Koehn, Julia

    2014-07-01

    Autonomic arousal-responses to emotional stimuli change with age. Age-dependent autonomic responses to music-onset are undetermined. To determine whether cardiovascular-autonomic responses to "relaxing" or "aggressive" music differ between young and older healthy listeners. In ten young (22.8±1.7 years) and 10 older volunteers (61.7±7.7 years), we monitored respiration (RESP), RR-intervals (RRI), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BPsys, BPdia) during silence and 180second presentations of two "relaxing" and two "aggressive" classical-music excerpts. Between both groups, we compared RESP, RRI, BPs, spectral-powers of mainly sympathetic low-frequency (LF: 0.04-0.15Hz) and parasympathetic high-frequency (HF: 0.15-0.5Hz) RRI-oscillations, RRI-LF/HF-ratios, RRI-total-powers (TP-RRI), and BP-LF-powers during 30s of silence, 30s of music-onset, and the remaining 150s of music presentation (analysis-of-variance and post-hoc analysis; significance: p<0.05). During silence, both groups had similar RRI, LF/HF-ratios and LF-BPs; RESP, LF-RRI, HF-RRI, and TP-RRI were lower, but BPs were higher in older than younger participants. During music-onset, "relaxing" music decreased RRI in older and increased BPsys in younger participants, while "aggressive" music decreased RRI and increased BPsys, LF-RRI, LF/HF-ratios, and TP-RRI in older, but increased BPsys and RESP and decreased HF-RRI and TP-RRI in younger participants. Signals did not differ between groups during the last 150s of music presentation. During silence, autonomic modulation was lower - but showed sympathetic predominance - in older than younger persons. Responses to music-onset, particularly "aggressive" music, reflect more of an arousal- than an emotional-response to music valence, with age-specific shifts of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance mediated by parasympathetic withdrawal in younger and by sympathetic activation in older participants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Opioid mechanism of regulation of the autonomic and motor functions in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ian, R A; Sollertinskaia, T N

    2002-12-01

    In rabbits, effects of s.c. administration of met-enkephaline (MET) and stimulation of hypothalamic nuclei upon vegetative and motor functions are similar and involve changes of the breathing rate, heart rate, and diminishing of the motor component of orienting responses. MET acts mainly upon cardiac parameters. Administration of naloxone eliminates the MET effect upon the vegetative and motor parameters. The role of opioid mechanism in regulation of the brain's visceral-motor function regulation, is emphasized.

  16. Effects of negative air ions on activity of neural substrates involved in autonomic regulation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoko; Yanagita, Shinya; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kato, Yumi; Kubota, Natsuko; Ryushi, Tomoo; Kita, Ichiro

    2008-07-01

    The neural mechanism by which negative air ions (NAI) mediate the regulation of autonomic nervous system activity is still unknown. We examined the effects of NAI on physiological responses, such as blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) as well as neuronal activity, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), nucleus ambiguus (NA), and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) with c-Fos immunohistochemistry in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats. In addition, we performed cervical vagotomy to reveal the afferent pathway involved in mediating the effects of NAI on autonomic regulation. NAI significantly decreased BP and HR, and increased HF power of the HRV spectrum. Significant decreases in c-Fos positive nuclei in the PVN and LC, and enhancement of c-Fos expression in the NA and NTS were induced by NAI. After vagotomy, these physiological and neuronal responses to NAI were not observed. These findings suggest that NAI can modulate autonomic regulation through inhibition of neuronal activity in PVN and LC as well as activation of NA neurons, and that these effects of NAI might be mediated via the vagus nerves.

  17. Acute ingestion of alcohol and cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bau, Paulo F D; Moraes, Ruy S; Bau, Claiton H D; Ferlin, Elton L; Rosito, Guido A; Fuchs, Flávio D

    2011-03-01

    Arrhythmogenic effects of alcohol may be intermediated by its effects over heart rate variability (HRV). Most studies about the effects of alcohol over HRV were observational and did not explore the temporal influence of alcohol ingestion over autonomic modulation. The aim of this study was to verify if an acute ingestion of alcohol has a time-dependent influence over time-domain indices of HRV. The effect of the ingestion of 60 g of ethanol or placebo over autonomic modulation was compared in healthy men (35 per group), with 18-25 years of age, before and during 17 h after ingestion. Alcohol promoted a fall in the standard deviation of all normal R-R intervals, root mean square of successive differences, and percentage of pairs of adjacent R-R intervals differing by more than 50 ms and in two indices of the three-dimensional return map, by a period up to 10 h after the ingestion of alcohol, accompanied by an increase in heart rate. The indices returned to values similar of the control group 10 h after ingestion. The effects over HRV indices were attenuated by adjustment for heart rate. The ingestion of alcohol induces a broad cardiovascular adaptation secondary to vagal withdrawal and sympathetic activation that may be responsible for arrhythmogenic effects of alcohol ingestion.

  18. Short-Term Complexity of Cardiac Autonomic Control during Sleep: REM as a Potential Risk Factor for Cardiovascular System in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, Sarah L.; Casali, Karina Rabello; Porta, Alberto; Montano, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sleep is a complex phenomenon characterized by important modifications throughout life and by changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Aging is associated with a reduction of the overall heart rate variability (HRV) and a decrease of complexity of autonomic cardiac regulation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the HRV complexity using two entropy-derived measures, Shannon Entropy (SE) and Corrected Conditional Entropy (CCE), during sleep in young and older subjects. Methods A polysomnographic study was performed in 12 healthy young (21.1±0.8 years) and 12 healthy older subjects (64.9±1.9 years). After the sleep scoring, heart period time series were divided into wake (W), Stage 1–2 (S1-2), Stage 3–4 (S3-4) and REM. Two complexity indexes were assessed: SE(3) measuring the complexity of a distribution of 3-beat patterns (SE(3) is higher when all the patterns are identically distributed and it is lower when some patterns are more likely) and CCEmin measuring the minimum amount of information that cannot be derived from the knowledge of previous values. Results Across the different sleep stages, young subjects had similar RR interval, total variance, SE(3) and CCEmin. In the older group, SE(3) and CCEmin were reduced during REM sleep compared to S1-2, S3-4 and W. Compared to young subjects, during W and sleep the older subjects showed a lower RR interval and reduced total variance as well as a significant reduction of SE(3) and CCEmin. This decrease of entropy measures was more evident during REM sleep. Conclusion Our study indicates that aging is characterized by a reduction of entropy indices of cardiovascular variability during wake/sleep cycle, more evident during REM sleep. We conclude that during aging REM sleep is associated with a simplification of cardiac control mechanisms that could lead to an impaired ability of the cardiovascular system to react to cardiovascular adverse events. PMID:21544202

  19. Metabolic regulation of cardiac output during inhalation anaesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Scheeren, T W; Schwarte, L A; Arndt, J O

    1999-04-01

    The metabolic regulation of tissue blood flow manifests itself in a linear relation between blood flow and oxygen consumption, the latter being the independent variable. It is unknown, however, if this fundamental physiological principle operates also during inhalation anaesthesia known to be associated with decreases in both cardiac output (Q) and oxygen consumption (VO2). Seven dogs (23-32 kg) with chronically implanted flow probes around the pulmonary artery were repeatedly anaesthetized with halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane at increasing minimum alveolar concentrations (1-3 MAC). Cardiac output (ultrasound transit-time flowmeter) and VO2 (indirect calorimetry) were measured continuously. We also imposed selective changes in Q, and thus of O2 supply, to see if and to what extent this would alter VO2 during anaesthesia (1.5 MAC). In awake dogs under basal metabolic conditions, VO2 was 4.6 +/- 0.1 ml.kg-1.min-1 and Q 105 +/- 3 ml.kg-1.min-1 (mean +/- SEM). During inhalation anaesthesia, VO2 and Q decreased by approximately 30% and 60%, respectively. The concentration-effect relations of both variables did not differ between anaesthetics, yielding a uniform Q/VO2 relation, which was nearly linear in the range (0-2 MAC) with an average slope of 39 +/- 1 (range 30-55). Above 2 MAC, Q decreased more for a given change in VO2, and O2 extraction increased by 50%, indicating compromised oxygen delivery (DO2). Imposed changes in Q, both in awake and anaesthetized dogs, yielded Q/VO2 relations which were notably steeper (slopes 114 to 187) than those observed during inhalation anaesthesia. More important, imposed increases in Q and thus DO2 during anaesthesia (1.5 MAC) to rates comparable to that in the awake state produced a much less than proportional increase in VO2 without restoring it to baseline. Inhalation anaesthesia is characterized by a uniform Q/VO2 relation with an almost linear course at an anaesthetic concentration up to 2 MAC

  20. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  1. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, free-standing electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on-demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function. PMID:26974408

  2. Cardiac autonomic modulation in healthy elderly after different intensities of dynamic exercise

    PubMed Central

    Droguett, Viviane Santos López; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; de Medeiros, Carlos Eduardo; Marques, Douglas Porto; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the heart rate (HR) and its autonomic modulation at baseline and during dynamic postexercise (PEX) with intensities of 40% and 60% of the maximum HR in healthy elderly. Methods This cross-sectional study included ten apparently healthy people who had been submitted to a protocol on a cycle ergometer for 35 minutes. Autonomic modulation was evaluated by spectral analysis of HR variability (HRV). Results A relevant increase in HR response was observed at 15 minutes postexercise with intensities of 60% and 40% of the maximum HR (10±2 bpm versus 5±1 bpm, respectively; P=0.005), and a significant reduction in HRV was also noted with 40% and 60% intensities during the rest period, and significant reduction in HRV (RR variance) was also observed in 40% and 60% intensities when compared to the baseline, as well as between the post-exercise intensities (1032±32 ms versus 905±5 ms) (P<0.001). In the HRV spectral analysis, a significant increase in the low frequency component HRV and autonomic balance at 40% of the maximum HR (68±2 normalized units [nu] versus 55±1 nu and 2.0±0.1 versus 1.2±0.1; P<0.001) and at 60% of the maximum HR (77±1 nu versus 55±1 nu and 3.2±0.1 versus 1.2±0.1 [P<0.001]) in relation to baseline was observed. A significant reduction of high frequency component at 40% and 60% intensities, however, was observed when compared to baseline (31±2 nu and 23±1 nu versus 45±1 nu, respectively; P<0.001). Moreover, significant differences were observed for the low frequency and high frequency components, as well as for the sympathovagal balance between participants who reached 40% and 60% of the maximum HR. Conclusion There was an increase in the HR, sympathetic modulation, and sympathovagal balance, as well as a reduction in vagal modulation in the elderly at both intensities of the PEX. PMID:25653509

  3. Postictal generalized EEG suppression is not associated with peri-ictal cardiac autonomic instability in people with convulsive seizures

    PubMed Central

    Lamberts, Robert J; Laranjo, Sergio; Kalitzin, Stiliyan N; Velis, Demetrios N; Rocha, Isabel; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Postictal generalized EEG suppression (PGES) seems to be a pathophysiological hallmark in ictal recordings of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). It has recently been suggested that presence and duration of PGES might be predictors of SUDEP risk. Little is known about the aetiology of PGES. Methods We conducted a retrospective case-control study in 50 people with convulsive seizures (CS) recorded on digital video-EEG. One CS per individual was reviewed for presence and duration of PGES by two independent observers: Pre- and postictal heart rate (HR) (1 minute before seizure onset and 1, 3, 5, 15 and 30 minutes after seizure end) and frequency domain measures of heart rate variability (HRV) including the ratio of low versus high frequency power were analyzed. The relationship between PGES and peri-ictal autonomic changes was evaluated, as well as its association with several clinical variables. Key Findings Thirty seven (74%) individuals exhibited PGES and 13 (26%) did not. CS resulted in a significant increase of peri-ictal HR and the LF/HF ratio. PGES was associated with neither peri-ictal HR (mean HR difference between PGES+ and PGES− seizures: −2 bpm, 95% CI −10 to +6 bpm) nor HRV change. There was no association between the duration of PGES and peri-ictal HR change. People with PGES were more likely to be asleep prior to seizure onset (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.2-18.3) and had a higher age of onset of epilepsy (median age 15 vs. 4 years). Significance PGES was not associated with substantial changes in measures of cardiac autonomic instability but was more prevalent in CS arising from sleep. PMID:23157655

  4. Effect of controlled breathing exercises on the psychological status and the cardiac autonomic tone: Sudarshan Kriya and Prana-Yoga.

    PubMed

    Kharya, Chhaya; Gupta, Varun; Deepak, Kishore Kumar; Sagar, Rajesh; Upadhyav, Ashish; Kochupillai, Vinod; Anand, Sneh

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to observe the effect of controlled breathing exercises including Sudarshan Kriya (SK) and Prana-Yoga (PY) on the psycho-physiological status. The study group included 60 healthy volunteers (M:30, F:30) in the age group of 18 to 30 years (21.3 ± 3.2 yrs), randomly divided in to three groups of 20 subjects each--(1) The SK group (2) the PY group and the (3) Control group. The psycho-physiological data was collected at the following four time interventions: Baseline, 6th, 60th and the 150th day. Psychological assessment was done using questionnaires and for the autonomic tone quantification Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis was done using the standard lead II electrocardiogram recordings. In a post-hoc analysis each group was further sub divided in to the following two patterns, based on the baseline values of normalized Low Frequency (LF) power (cutoff 64 ms2): (i) Pattern A-Subjects with low level LF power, and (ii) Pattern B- subjects with high level LF power. The stress management skills have shown significant increase in SK group but not in PY and Control group. Subjects of SK, PY, and control group showed significant increase in LF value and LF:HF ratio for pattern A and significant decrease for pattern B. Plotted LF value for pattern A & B in SK and PY practitioners showed convergence, coming to a mean value over the period of 150 days. The LF:HF ratio curve plotted over time for pattern A & B showed convergence in SK group only. No such convergence in LF value & LF/HF ratio for pattern A & B was seen in control group. In conclusion, Sudarshan Kriya positively modifies stress coping behavior and initiates appropriate balance in cardiac autonomic tone.

  5. Epidemiological evidence of altered cardiac autonomic function in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance but not isolated impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lin, Thy-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2007-10-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is present in diabetes mellitus (DM), but no study is available on alteration in cardiac autonomic function (CAF) across different glycemic statuses including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and DM. Our objective was to examine whether CAF is altered in subjects with IGT and isolated IFG. The study was a stratified systematic cluster sampling design within the general community. A total of 1440 subjects were classified as NGT (n = 983), isolated IFG (n = 163), IGT (n = 188), and DM (n = 106). CAF was determined by 1) standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) or RR interval, power spectrum in low and high frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz; HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz), and LF/HF ratio in supine position for 5 min; 2) ratio between 30th and 15th RR interval after standing from supine position (30/15 ratio); and 3) average heart rate change during breathing of six deep breaths for 1 min (HR(DB)). Univariate analysis showed significant differences in SDNN, 30/15 ratio, HR(DB), HF power, and LF/HF ratio among subjects with NGT, isolated IFG, IGT, and DM. In multivariate analysis, none of the indices of CAF was related to isolated IFG in the reference group of NGT. IGT and DM were negatively associated with 30/15 ratio and HF power but positively associated with LF/HF ratio. In addition, DM was also related to a lower SDNN. DM and IGT subjects had an impaired CAF independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. The risk of altered CAF is not apparent in subjects with isolated IFG.

  6. Regulation of fatty acid metabolism by cell autonomous circadian clocks: time to fatten up on information?

    PubMed

    Bray, Molly S; Young, Martin E

    2011-04-08

    Molecular, cellular, and animal-based studies have recently exposed circadian clocks as critical regulators of energy balance. Invariably, mouse models of genetically manipulated circadian clock components display features indicative of altered lipid/fatty acid metabolism, including differential adiposity and circulating lipids. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a comprehensive summary of current knowledge regarding the regulation of fatty acid metabolism by distinct cell autonomous circadian clocks. The implications of these recent findings for cardiometabolic disease and human health are discussed.

  7. Effect of Head-Down Bed Rest and Artificial Gravity Countermeasure on Cardiac Autonomic and Advanced Electrocardiographic Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Platts, S.; Stenger, M.; Ribeiro, C.; Natapoff, A.; Howarth, M.; Evans, J.

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of 21 days of head-down bed rest (HDBR), with versus without an artificial gravity (AG) countermeasure, on cardiac autonomic and advanced electrocardiographic function. Fourteen healthy men participated in the study: seven experienced 21 days of HDBR alone ("HDBR controls") and seven the same degree and duration of HDBR but with approximately 1hr daily short-arm centrifugation as an AG countermeasure ("AG-treated"). Five minute supine high-fidelity 12-lead ECGs were obtained in all subjects: 1) 4 days before HDBR; 2) on the last day of HDBR; and 3) 7 days after HDBR. Besides conventional 12-lead ECG intervals and voltages, all of the following advanced ECG parameters were studied: 1) both stochastic (time and frequency domain) and deterministic heart rate variability (HRV); 2) beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV); 3) T-wave morphology, including signal-averaged T-wave residua (TWR) and principal component analysis ratios; 4) other SAECG-related parameters including high frequency QRS ECG and late potentials; and 5) several advanced ECG estimates of left ventricular (LV) mass. The most important results by repeated measures ANOVA were that: 1) Heart rates, Bazett-corrected QTc intervals, TWR, LF/HF power and the alpha 1 of HRV were significantly increased in both groups (i.e., by HDBR), but with no relevant HDBR*group differences; 2) All purely "vagally-mediated" parameters of HRV (e.g., RMSSD, HF power, Poincare SD1, etc.), PR intervals, and also several parameters of LV mass (Cornell and Sokolow-Lyon voltages, spatial ventricular activation times, ventricular gradients) were all significantly decreased in both groups (i.e., by HDBR), but again with no relevant HDBR*group differences); 3) All "generalized" or "vagal plus sympathetic" parameters of stochastic HRV (i.e., SDNN, total power, LF power) were significantly more decreased in the AG-treated group than in the HDBR-only group (i.e., here there was a relevant HDBR*group difference

  8. Effect of Head-Down Bed Rest and Artificial Gravity Countermeasure on Cardiac Autonomic and Advanced Electrocardiographic Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Platts, S.; Stenger, M.; Ribeiro, C.; Natapoff, A.; Howarth, M.; Evans, J.

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of 21 days of head-down bed rest (HDBR), with versus without an artificial gravity (AG) countermeasure, on cardiac autonomic and advanced electrocardiographic function. Fourteen healthy men participated in the study: seven experienced 21 days of HDBR alone ("HDBR controls") and seven the same degree and duration of HDBR but with approximately 1hr daily short-arm centrifugation as an AG countermeasure ("AG-treated"). Five minute supine high-fidelity 12-lead ECGs were obtained in all subjects: 1) 4 days before HDBR; 2) on the last day of HDBR; and 3) 7 days after HDBR. Besides conventional 12-lead ECG intervals and voltages, all of the following advanced ECG parameters were studied: 1) both stochastic (time and frequency domain) and deterministic heart rate variability (HRV); 2) beat-to-beat QT interval variability (QTV); 3) T-wave morphology, including signal-averaged T-wave residua (TWR) and principal component analysis ratios; 4) other SAECG-related parameters including high frequency QRS ECG and late potentials; and 5) several advanced ECG estimates of left ventricular (LV) mass. The most important results by repeated measures ANOVA were that: 1) Heart rates, Bazett-corrected QTc intervals, TWR, LF/HF power and the alpha 1 of HRV were significantly increased in both groups (i.e., by HDBR), but with no relevant HDBR*group differences; 2) All purely "vagally-mediated" parameters of HRV (e.g., RMSSD, HF power, Poincare SD1, etc.), PR intervals, and also several parameters of LV mass (Cornell and Sokolow-Lyon voltages, spatial ventricular activation times, ventricular gradients) were all significantly decreased in both groups (i.e., by HDBR), but again with no relevant HDBR*group differences); 3) All "generalized" or "vagal plus sympathetic" parameters of stochastic HRV (i.e., SDNN, total power, LF power) were significantly more decreased in the AG-treated group than in the HDBR-only group (i.e., here there was a relevant HDBR*group difference

  9. Human cardiac autonomic responses to head-up tilting during 72-h starvation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen J; Bryant, M; Mündel, T; Stannard, S R

    2012-06-01

    Starvation may change autonomic nervous system activity and sensitivity such that a greater vagal withdrawal may occur during a sympathetic challenge. Six healthy humans endured a 3-day, water-only fast, during which participants were subjected to passive 80° head-up tilt testing twice on each day (a.m. and p.m.). Heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), ventilation [Formula: see text], and respiration ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) were recorded during supine rest and head-up tilting. On Day 1 (a.m.), supine heart rate was 46.0 ± 3.3 beats min(-1), increasing to 51.6 ± 7.4 beats min(-1) on Day 3 (p.m.). On Day 1 (a.m.), supine high frequency HRV was 57.9 ± 31.6(NU), increasing to 69.5 ± 21.3(NU) on Day 3 (p.m.). Tilt-induced increases in heart rate were greater following starvation (10.5 ± 7.8 vs. 16.1 ± 8.6 beats min(-1)), and tilt-induced decreases in high frequency HRV were greater following starvation (-4.1 ± 27.7 vs. -28.0 ± 20.8(NU)). Supine V'CO(2) remained unchanged, whereas V'O(2) increased and respiratory exchange ratio decreased (0.91 ± 0.10 vs. 0.80 ± 0.05). Greater vagal withdrawal and elevated heart rate induced by head-up tilting during starvation may indicate increased autonomic sensitivity.

  10. Exercise might improve cardiovascular autonomic regulation in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lucini, Daniela; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Andrea; Malacarne, Mara; Gervasi, Federico; Pagani, Massimo

    2013-06-01

    Considering that changes in exercise routines might have relevance in treatment of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, we sought to assess whether spontaneous modifications to weekly exercise habits might occur in these patients and whether such variations would be accompanied by alterations in autonomic profile. In this observational study, we examined 77 patients (age 15.0 ± 0.6 years.) who in addition to a tailored optimal insulin treatment were invited to perform at least 1 h a day of moderate, aerobic exercise, as suggested by recent guidelines. Patients were studied at baseline (T0) and after 15.8 ± 0.7 months (T1). They were divided into three subgroups according to increased, unchanged and diminished total estimated weekly METs between T0 and T1. Autonomic profile was evaluated by assessing spontaneous baroreflex gain and low-frequency oscillation in arterial pressure, using spectral analysis of RR and systolic arterial pressure time series. Insulin therapy and biochemical data were similar among the 3 groups at T0 and T1, while body mass index standard deviation score was slightly reduced (p < 0.04) and markers of autonomic performance were improved (alpha index, from 17 ± 1 to 20 ± 2 ms/mmHg, p < 0.002) in the group who increased the amount of exercise (from 1627 ± 250 to 3582 ± 448 METs min wt(-1), p < 0.001). Furthermore, the change in total weekly METs significantly correlates with changes of key indices of autonomic regulation. The favourable autonomic effects of moderate increase in spontaneous exercise load suggest testing more formally this intervention in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

  11. Long-term prognostic value of cardiac autonomic nervous activity in postoperative patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ohuchi, Hideo; Negishi, Jun; Miyake, Akira; Sakaguchi, Heima; Miyazaki, Aya; Yamada, Osamu

    2011-09-15

    Abnormal cardiac autonomic nervous activity (CANA) is not uncommon in postoperative patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). We attempted to clarify the prognostic value of the CANA variables in postoperative CHD patients and prospectively evaluated the CANA variables in 292 consecutive biventricular and 91 Fontan repair patients. The CANA variables included the heart rate variability, arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), washout ratio of the myocardial metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy, and plasma norepinephrine level. With a follow-up of 10 ± 2 years, 98 total events that required hospitalization, including 13 deaths and 48 unscheduled cardiac events (UCEs), occurred. In all the CHD patients, all the CANA indices predicted the total events and UCEs. Of those, the NE level (p=0.0004) and BRS (p=0.0373) predicted the mortality. In a multivariate analysis, the BRS was an independent CANA-predictor for the total events (p=0.007). In the biventricular patients, the plasma NE level, heart rate variability, and BRS predicted the total events and UCEs and the BRS was the only independent CANA-predictor for the total events (p=0.0329). In the Fontan patients, the plasma NE level was the only predictor for the UCEs (p=0.0242) and no other CANA variables were independent predictors of the total events or UCEs. All CANA variables, especially the BRS, were useful predictors for future clinical events in biventricular CHD patients, whereas no CANA variables, except for the plasma NE level, predicted future clinical events in the Fontan patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence for vestibular regulation of autonomic functions in a mouse genetic model

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Dean M.; Erkman, Linda; Hermanson, Ola; Rosenfeld, Michael G.; Fuller, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Physiological responses to changes in the gravitational field and body position, as well as symptoms of patients with anxiety-related disorders, have indicated an interrelationship between vestibular function and stress responses. However, the relative significance of cochlear and vestibular information in autonomic regulation remains unresolved because of the difficulties in distinguishing the relative contributions of other proprioceptive and interoceptive inputs, including vagal and somatic information. To investigate the role of cochlear and vestibular function in central and physiological responses, we have examined the effects of increased gravity in wild-type mice and mice lacking the POU homeodomain transcription factor Brn-3.1 (Brn-3b/Pou4f3). The only known phenotype of the Brn-3.1−/− mouse is related to hearing and balance functions, owing to the failure of cochlear and vestibular hair cells to differentiate properly. Here, we show that normal physiological responses to increased gravity (2G exposure), such as a dramatic drop in body temperature and concomitant circadian adjustment, were completely absent in Brn-3.1−/− mice. In line with the lack of autonomic responses, the massive increase in neuronal activity after 2G exposure normally detected in wild-type mice was virtually abolished in Brn-3.1−/− mice. Our results suggest that cochlear and vestibular hair cells are the primary regulators of autonomic responses to altered gravity and provide genetic evidence that these cells are sufficient to alter neural activity in regions involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine control. PMID:12466504

  13. Autonomic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in health and disease: potential clinical applications for altering BAT thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tupone, Domenico; Madden, Christopher J.; Morrison, Shaun F.

    2014-01-01

    From mouse to man, brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a significant source of thermogenesis contributing to the maintenance of the body temperature homeostasis during the challenge of low environmental temperature. In rodents, BAT thermogenesis also contributes to the febrile increase in core temperature during the immune response. BAT sympathetic nerve activity controlling BAT thermogenesis is regulated by CNS neural networks which respond reflexively to thermal afferent signals from cutaneous and body core thermoreceptors, as well as to alterations in the discharge of central neurons with intrinsic thermosensitivity. Superimposed on the core thermoregulatory circuit for the activation of BAT thermogenesis, is the permissive, modulatory influence of central neural networks controlling metabolic aspects of energy homeostasis. The recent confirmation of the presence of BAT in human and its function as an energy consuming organ have stimulated interest in the potential for the pharmacological activation of BAT to reduce adiposity in the obese. In contrast, the inhibition of BAT thermogenesis could facilitate the induction of therapeutic hypothermia for fever reduction or to improve outcomes in stroke or cardiac ischemia by reducing infarct size through a lowering of metabolic oxygen demand. This review summarizes the central circuits for the autonomic control of BAT thermogenesis and highlights the potential clinical relevance of the pharmacological inhibition or activation of BAT thermogenesis. PMID:24570653

  14. Autonomic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in health and disease: potential clinical applications for altering BAT thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tupone, Domenico; Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2014-01-01

    From mouse to man, brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a significant source of thermogenesis contributing to the maintenance of the body temperature homeostasis during the challenge of low environmental temperature. In rodents, BAT thermogenesis also contributes to the febrile increase in core temperature during the immune response. BAT sympathetic nerve activity controlling BAT thermogenesis is regulated by CNS neural networks which respond reflexively to thermal afferent signals from cutaneous and body core thermoreceptors, as well as to alterations in the discharge of central neurons with intrinsic thermosensitivity. Superimposed on the core thermoregulatory circuit for the activation of BAT thermogenesis, is the permissive, modulatory influence of central neural networks controlling metabolic aspects of energy homeostasis. The recent confirmation of the presence of BAT in human and its function as an energy consuming organ have stimulated interest in the potential for the pharmacological activation of BAT to reduce adiposity in the obese. In contrast, the inhibition of BAT thermogenesis could facilitate the induction of therapeutic hypothermia for fever reduction or to improve outcomes in stroke or cardiac ischemia by reducing infarct size through a lowering of metabolic oxygen demand. This review summarizes the central circuits for the autonomic control of BAT thermogenesis and highlights the potential clinical relevance of the pharmacological inhibition or activation of BAT thermogenesis.

  15. Effect of pioglitazone on systemic inflammation is independent of metabolic control and cardiac autonomic function in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nerla, Roberto; Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Scalone, Giancarla; Coviello, Ilaria; Mollo, Roberto; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Lanza, Gaetano A; Crea, Filippo

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the relation of the anti-inflammatory effect of pioglitazone with cardiac autonomic function and metabolic control in diabetic patients. In this prospective open label trial, 36 type 2 diabetic patients (age 60 ± 10, 20 M) without overt cardiovascular disease were randomized to add pioglitazone (30 mg) to their therapy or to continue standard therapy. C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels, metabolic parameters and cardiac autonomic function (assessed by heart rate variability [HRV] on 24-h ECG Holter monitoring) were measured at baseline and after 3 months. Clinical and laboratory variables were similar in the two groups. No significant changes were observed after 3 months for metabolic and anthropometric parameters, except for a mild increase in HDL levels in the pioglitazone group only (P = 0.04 vs. controls). CRP levels decreased significantly at follow-up in the pioglitazone group (3.2 ± 1.97 vs. 2.37 ± 1.56 mg/l) but not in the control group (3.0 ± 1.92 vs. 3.93 ± 2.14 mg/l; P = 0.003). No differences were found in basal and follow-up HRV variables between the two groups. In type 2 diabetic patients pioglitazone exerts favourable effects on inflammation even after short-term therapy. This effect precedes those on metabolic and anthropometric parameters and is not associated with changes in cardiac autonomic function.

  16. Cardiac Autonomic Function at Baseline and under Stress and Its Relationship to Circulatory Markers of Inflammation in Obese Compared to Nonobese Children: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hursh, Brenden E; Fazeli, Mir Sohail; Wang, Sarah; Marchant, Elizabeth A; Woo, Paula; Elango, Rajavel; Lavoie, Pascal M; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Collet, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) provides neurogenic control of inflammatory reactions. ANS changes in obesity may result in inflammation. This study sought to gain insight into cardiac autonomic dysfunction and inflammation in childhood obesity, and to gather pilot data on the potential relationship between altered ANS and inflammation. Fifteen obese children and adolescents without metabolic complications and 15 nonobese controls underwent heart rate variability and impedance cardiography testing during rest, mental stress, and physical stress. Inflammatory cytokines and immune reactivity were measured. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in cardiac ANS testing at rest or in response to stress. Median high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was higher in the obese group [obese 2.6 mg/l (IQR 1.6-11.9); nonobese 0.3 mg/l (IQR 0.2-0.7); p < 0.001]. Interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α were similar between groups. Immune reactivity testing (in vitro Toll-like receptor stimulation) revealed a strong, but comparable, inflammatory response in both groups. Obese children and adolescents without metabolic complications did not have cardiac ANS dysfunction. While hsCRP was elevated, systemic cytokines were not raised. Compared to prior studies, which often focused on children with obesity and its complications, it is encouraging that obese children without metabolic complications may not yet have autonomic dysfunction. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Creative motivation: creative achievement predicts cardiac autonomic markers of effort during divergent thinking.

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Beaty, Roger E; Nusbaum, Emily C; Eddington, Kari M; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Executive approaches to creativity emphasize that generating creative ideas can be hard and requires mental effort. Few studies, however, have examined effort-related physiological activity during creativity tasks. Using motivational intensity theory as a framework, we examined predictors of effort-related cardiac activity during a creative challenge. A sample of 111 adults completed a divergent thinking task. Sympathetic (PEP and RZ) and parasympathetic (RSA and RMSSD) outcomes were assessed using impedance cardiography. As predicted, people with high creative achievement (measured with the Creative Achievement Questionnaire) showed significantly greater increases in sympathetic activity from baseline to task, reflecting higher effort. People with more creative achievements generated ideas that were significantly more creative, and creative performance correlated marginally with PEP and RZ. The results support the view that creative thought can be a mental challenge.

  18. Autonomous CaMKII Activity as a Drug Target for Histological and Functional Neuroprotection after Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guiying; Orfila, James E; Dietz, Robert M; Moreno-Garcia, Myriam; Rodgers, Krista M; Coultrap, Steve J; Quillinan, Nidia; Traystman, Richard J; Bayer, K Ulrich; Herson, Paco S

    2017-01-31

    The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a major mediator of physiological glutamate signaling, but its role in pathological glutamate signaling (excitotoxicity) remains less clear, with indications for both neuro-toxic and neuro-protective functions. Here, the role of CaMKII in ischemic injury is assessed utilizing our mouse model of cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR). CaMKII inhibition (with tatCN21 or tatCN19o) at clinically relevant time points (30 min after resuscitation) greatly reduces neuronal injury. Importantly, CaMKII inhibition also works in combination with mild hypothermia, the current standard of care. The relevant drug target is specifically Ca(2+)-independent "autonomous" CaMKII activity generated by T286 autophosphorylation, as indicated by substantial reduction in injury in autonomy-incompetent T286A mutant mice. In addition to reducing cell death, tatCN19o also protects the surviving neurons from functional plasticity impairments and prevents behavioral learning deficits, even at extremely low doses (0.01 mg/kg), further highlighting the clinical potential of our findings.

  19. Effort Deficits and Depression: The Influence of Anhedonic Depressive Symptoms on Cardiac Autonomic Activity During a Mental Challenge.

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Nusbaum, Emily C; Eddington, Kari M; Beaty, Roger E; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2014-12-01

    Motivational approaches to depression emphasize the role of dysfunctional motivational dynamics, particularly diminished reward and incentive processes associated with anhedonia. A study examined how anhedonic depressive symptoms, measured continuously across a wide range of severity, influenced the physiological mobilization of effort during a cognitive task. Using motivational intensity theory as a guide, we expected that the diminished incentive value associated with anhedonic depressive symptoms would reduce effort during a "do your best" challenge (also known as an unfixed or self-paced challenge), in which effort is a function of the value of achieving the task's goal. Using impedance cardiography, two cardiac autonomic responses were assessed: pre-ejection period (PEP), a measure of sympathetic activity and our primary measure of interest, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of parasympathetic activity. As expected, PEP slowed from baseline to task as anhedonic depressive symptoms increased (as measured with the DASS Depression scale), indicating diminished effort-related sympathetic activity. No significant effects appeared for RSA. The findings support motivational intensity theory as a translational model of effort processes in depression and clarify some inconsistent effects of depressive symptoms on effort-related physiology found in past work.

  20. Effort Deficits and Depression: The Influence of Anhedonic Depressive Symptoms on Cardiac Autonomic Activity During a Mental Challenge