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Sample records for cardiac blood pool

  1. Value of blood-pool subtraction in cardiac indium-111-labeled platelet imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Machac, J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldman, M.E.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Palestro, C.; Strashun, A.; Vaquer, R.; Phillips, R.A.; Fuster, V. )

    1989-09-01

    Blood-pool subtraction has been proposed to enhance {sup 111}In-labeled platelet imaging of intracardiac thrombi. We tested the accuracy of labeled platelet imaging, with and without blood-pool subtraction, in ten subjects with cardiac thrombi of varying age, eight with endocarditis being treated with antimicrobial therapy and ten normal controls. Imaging was performed early after labeled platelet injection (24 hr or less) and late (48 hr or more). Blood-pool subtraction was carried out. All images were graded subjectively by four experienced, blinded readers. Detection accuracy was measured by the sensitivity at three fixed levels of specificity estimated from receiver operator characteristic curve analysis and tested by three-way analysis of variance. Detection accuracy was generally improved on delayed images. Blood-pool subtraction did not improve accuracy. Although blood-pool subtraction increased detection sensitivity, this was offset by decreased specificity. For this population studied, blood-pool subtraction did not improve subjective detection of abnormal platelet deposition by 111In platelet imaging.

  2. Cinematic three-dimensional surface display of cardiac blood pool tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, N.; Machida, K.; Takishima, T.; Mamiya, T.; Takahashi, T.; Kamano, T.; Tamaki, S.; Ban, R. )

    1991-02-01

    A method of three-dimensional cinematic display (3D cine) of cardiac blood pool tomography is described. ECG-gated transaxial blood pool imaging was obtained from a set of projection images that were collected from 32 images with 10 ECG-gated images per projection during a 180 degrees arc of a rotating gamma camera. A surface contour of the blood pool was determined by a set of isocount lines (40-55% of the maximum pixel counts) of the transaxial images. 3D cine was made by a depth-shading method, in which brightness of a given point on the contour was set proportional to the distance between the viewing plane and the point and to the incident angle formed by the viewing line and the surface of the point. In 15 patients, 3D cine showed hypokinesia, akinesia, dyskinesia, ventricular aneurysm, and opposite motions of the atria and ventricles. Diagnoses of left ventricular motion by 3D cine agreed well with those by echocardiography and contrast left ventriculography.

  3. Comparison of technetium-99m IgG with technetium-99m red blood cells labeling in cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Hamid; Asli, Isa Neshandar; Semnani, Shahriar; Jallalat, Sara; Ansari, Mojtaba; Amini, Abdullatif; Barekat, Maryam; Assadi, Majid

    2011-01-01

    This first clinical prospective study was conducted to use of technetium-99m immunoglobulin G ((99m)Tc-IgG) as compared with autologous (99m)Tc-red blood cells (RBC) in gated blood pool ventriculography. We studied 12 patients who referred to us for a possible diagnosis of liver hemangioma or infection. Six patients underwent gated planar blood pool (GPBP) acquisition using (99m)Tc-RBC and 6 GPBP acquisition using (99m)Tc-IgG. The use of (99m)Tc-IgG in cardiac blood pool studies provided comparable images to (99m)Tc-RBC. In conclusion, (99m)Tc-IgG, which is readily available and needs only a single injection, may be an attractive alternative to (99m)Tc-RBC for the estimation of various cardiac function parameters like left ventricular function.

  4. Multimodality evaluation of ventricular function: comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and planar and SPECT blood pool imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen M.; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2001-05-01

    Fifteen patients underwent resting echocardiography (EC), ECG gated cardiac MR ventriculography (MRV) and blood pool planar and SPECT ventriculography (SPV) sequentially on the same day. In addition, 36 patients had sequential ECG gated blood pool and SPV and 20 normal volunteers, age > 18 years, had sequential ECG gated cardiac MRI performed on both Siemens closed, 1.5T, and open, 0.2T, magnets. Echocardiography was performed using a HP 5500 system equipped with an S4 transducer in 2D mode. MRV at 0.2T and 1.5T used a circular polarized body coil. Nuclear Medicine studies used 25 mCi Tc- 99m labeled red blood cells. Gated planar and SPV were acquired on a dual head Siemens E-Cam system. We have found that MRV affords the most accurate measurement of ventricular function. SPV and MRV provide similar estimations of left ventricular function (LVEF). Further, SPV consistently provides higher LVEF, as compared to the planar data simultaneously acquired. Observed significant differences in intermodality measurements indicate that follow up studies in patients, especially in patients whose management is critically dependent on functional measurement changes, should be monitored by one modality only.

  5. Cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy in rats and hamsters: comparison of five radiopharmaceuticals and three pinhole collimator apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Pieri, P.; Fischman, A.J.; Ahmad, M.; Moore, R.H.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1991-05-01

    Preclinical evaluation of cardiac drugs may require evaluation of cardiac function in intact animals. To optimize the quality of radionuclide measurements of ventricular function in small animals, a comparison was made of gated blood-pool scans recorded with five blood-pool radiopharmaceuticals ({sup 99}mTc-labeled human polyclonal IgG, {sup 99}mTc-human serum albumin labeled by two methods, and red blood cells radiolabeled with {sup 99}mTc via in vivo and in vitro methods) in rats and three pinhole apertures in hamsters. The quality of the radiopharmaceuticals was evaluated by comparing count density ratios (LV/BACKGROUND and LV/LIVER) and ejection fractions recorded with each agent. The edge definition of the left ventricle and count rate performance of the 1-, 2-, and 3-mm apertures was evaluated in hamsters. In general, the images obtained with the radiolabeled cells were superior to those obtained with the labeled proteins and no significant differences between the protein preparations were detected. Left ventricular ejection fractions calculated with all five radiopharmaceuticals were not significantly different. The best quality images were obtained with the 1-mm pinhole collimator. Ejection fraction and acquisition time were inversely related to aperture size. A good compromise between resolution and sensitivity was obtained with the 2-mm pinhole collimator.

  6. Blood Pool Segmentation Results in Superior Virtual Cardiac Models than Myocardial Segmentation for 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Lengua, Carlos Gonzalez; Weinberg, Alan D; Nielsen, James C; Sanz, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The method of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) three-dimensional (3D) image acquisition and post-processing which should be used to create optimal virtual models for 3D printing has not been studied systematically. Patients (n = 19) who had undergone CMR including both 3D balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were retrospectively identified. Post-processing for the creation of virtual 3D models involved using both myocardial (MS) and blood pool (BP) segmentation, resulting in four groups: Group 1-bSSFP/MS, Group 2-bSSFP/BP, Group 3-MRA/MS and Group 4-MRA/BP. The models created were assessed by two raters for overall quality (1-poor; 2-good; 3-excellent) and ability to identify predefined vessels (1-5: superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, main pulmonary artery, ascending aorta and at least one pulmonary vein). A total of 76 virtual models were created from 19 patient CMR datasets. The mean overall quality scores for Raters 1/2 were 1.63 ± 0.50/1.26 ± 0.45 for Group 1, 2.12 ± 0.50/2.26 ± 0.73 for Group 2, 1.74 ± 0.56/1.53 ± 0.61 for Group 3 and 2.26 ± 0.65/2.68 ± 0.48 for Group 4. The numbers of identified vessels for Raters 1/2 were 4.11 ± 1.32/4.05 ± 1.31 for Group 1, 4.90 ± 0.46/4.95 ± 0.23 for Group 2, 4.32 ± 1.00/4.47 ± 0.84 for Group 3 and 4.74 ± 0.56/4.63 ± 0.49 for Group 4. Models created using BP segmentation (Groups 2 and 4) received significantly higher ratings than those created using MS for both overall quality and number of vessels visualized (p < 0.05), regardless of the acquisition technique. There were no significant differences between Groups 1 and 3. The ratings for Raters 1 and 2 had good correlation for overall quality (ICC = 0.63) and excellent correlation for the total number of vessels visualized (ICC = 0.77). The intra-rater reliability was good for Rater A (ICC = 0.65). Three models were successfully printed

  7. Integrating atlas and graph cut methods for right ventricle blood-pool segmentation from cardiac cine MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangi, Shusil; Linte, Cristian A.

    2017-03-01

    Segmentation of right ventricle from cardiac MRI images can be used to build pre-operative anatomical heart models to precisely identify regions of interest during minimally invasive therapy. Furthermore, many functional parameters of right heart such as right ventricular volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and thickness can also be assessed from the segmented images. To obtain an accurate and computationally efficient segmentation of right ventricle from cardiac cine MRI, we propose a segmentation algorithm formulated as an energy minimization problem in a graph. Shape prior obtained by propagating label from an average atlas using affine registration is incorporated into the graph framework to overcome problems in ill-defined image regions. The optimal segmentation corresponding to the labeling with minimum energy configuration of the graph is obtained via graph-cuts and is iteratively refined to produce the final right ventricle blood pool segmentation. We quantitatively compare the segmentation results obtained from our algorithm to the provided gold-standard expert manual segmentation for 16 cine-MRI datasets available through the MICCAI 2012 Cardiac MR Right Ventricle Segmentation Challenge according to several similarity metrics, including Dice coefficient, Jaccard coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and Mean absolute distance error.

  8. Morphology of drying blood pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, Nick; Smith, Fiona; Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David; D-Blood project Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Often blood pools are found on crime scenes providing information concerning the events and sequence of events that took place on the scene. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the drying dynamics of blood pools. This study focuses on the drying process of blood pools to determine what relevant information can be obtained for the forensic application. We recorded the drying process of blood pools with a camera and measured the weight. We found that the drying process can be separated into five different: coagulation, gelation, rim desiccation, centre desiccation, and final desiccation. Moreover, we found that the weight of the blood pool diminishes similarly and in a reproducible way for blood pools created in various conditions. In addition, we verify that the size of the blood pools is directly related to its volume and the wettability of the surface. Our study clearly shows that blood pools dry in a reproducible fashion. This preliminary work highlights the difficult task that represents blood pool analysis in forensic investigations, and how internal and external parameters influence its dynamics. We conclude that understanding the drying process dynamics would be advancement in timeline reconstitution of events. ANR funded project: D-Blood Project.

  9. Combined first pass and gated blood pool radionuclide studies in the hemodynamic-cardiac evaluation of patients with low cardiac output

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Mansour, P.; Fouad, F.M.; Sheeler, L.R.; Bravo, E.L.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Tarazi, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) is frequently used in the evaluation of cardiac function but low CO does not necessarily reflect heart failure. Similarly, low ejection fraction (EF) can be present in compensated heart diseases. In order to evaluate cardiac performance in relation to systematic hemodynamics, the authors used a multifactorial approach for the determination of CO, EF, pulmonary mean transit time (MTT), ratio of cardiopulmonary volume over total blood volume (CPV/TBV as an index of venous tone) all obtained from a single injection of 99m Tc-HSA. Four different conditions associated with low CO (less than or equal to 2.1 L/min/m/sup 2/) were evaluated. The combined use of CO, EF, MTT and CPV/TBV allowed a better understanding of the myocardial and peripheral circulatory factors associated with low CO states. This is helpful in the selection and follow-up of appropriate therapeutic intervention.

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance angiography using blood-pool contrast agents: comparison of citrate-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles with gadofosveset trisodium in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, J; Taupitz, M; Schellenberger, E A; Warmuth, C; Fahlenkamp, U L; Wagner, S; Kaufels, N; Wagner, M

    2012-02-01

    To compare citrate-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP) with gadofosveset trisodium as blood pool contrast agents for cardiac magnetic resonance angiography (CMRA) in pigs. Animal experiments were approved by the responsible authority. 10 CMRA-like examinations were performed at 1.5 T after administration of VSOP (0.06  mmol Fe/kg; 5 examinations) and gadofosveset trisodium (0.03  mmol Gd/kg; 5 examinations). The CMRA protocol included ECG-gated inversion-recovery-prepared T1-weighted gradient echo imaging (IR-GRE; one slice) and ECG-gated inversion recovery prepared steady state free precession imaging (IR SSFP; one slice) before and 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 60  min after injection. At each time point, three different inversion times (TI; 200  msec, 300  msec, and 400  msec) were applied. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) between blood and myocardium were calculated and compared using mixed linear models. No significant differences of CNR were found between IR-GRE and IR SSFP. At 3 and 5  min after contrast agent administration, VSOP showed a significantly higher CNR than gadofosveset trisodium when TI of 200  msec and 300 msec were applied (TI of 200  msec at 3 min: 8.2 ± 0.7 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7; TI of 200  msec at 5 min: 7.9 ± 0.7 vs. 3.5 ± 0.8; TI of 300  msec at 3  min: 11.7 ± 0.7 vs. 8.8 ± 0.8; TI of 300  msec at 5  min: 11.4 ± 0.7 vs. 8.0 ± 0.8; p < 0.05). Moreover, significant differences in favor of VSOP were found for all time points from 10 to 40  min irrespective of TI (p < 0.05). VSOP has superior blood-pool properties compared to gadofosveset trisodium resulting in prolonged improvement of CNR on CMRA. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Nonstationary temporal Wiener filtering of gated blood pool studies

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.A.; Miller, T.R.; Doherty, P.W.; Bianco, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Temporal filtering of dynamic images can significantly improve the image quality of gated blood pool (GBP) studies and serves as a necessary preprocessing step in the formation of cardiac functional images based on derivatives of pixel time activity curves. Generally, either linear combination of the frames, or a simple frequency domain low pass filter have been employed. The work described in this paper introduces the Wiener temporal filter which adjusts to match the temporal characteristic of the image at each pixel. For temporal data degraded by signal-dependent Poisson noise, the frequency domain form of the filter is presented. Use of nonstationary temporal Wiener filtering was found to improve the quality of cines formed from GBP studies and yielded better separation of cardiac from non-cardiac regions in functional images the peak ejection and filling rates.

  12. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  13. Three-dimensional presentation of the Fourier amplitude and phase: a fast display method for gated cardiac blood-pool SPECT.

    PubMed

    Máté, E; Mester, J; Csernay, L; Kuba, A; Madani, S; Makay, A

    1992-03-01

    The routine clinical use of gated SPECT is inhibited by sophisticated, time-consuming processing techniques. The present paper describes a new technique for the simultaneous three-dimensional presentation of the amplitude and phase of the first Fourier harmonics, with the aim of obtaining detailed information about the ventricular motion in a relatively short time, from each angle of view of three-dimensional space. The method is simple and robust, and processing is automatic. It does not need carefully elaborated techniques for surface determination, because the cardiac surface is merely used as a reference skeleton onto which the functional information of amplitude and phase is mapped. The Fourier analysis before reconstruction results in running times shorter than 15 min and may further open the way for the routine use of gated SPECT.

  14. Expanding the donor pool: donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Elgharably, Haytham; Shafii, Alexis E; Mason, David P

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is the definitive treatment of patients with end-stage lung disease. Availability of donor lungs remains the primary limitation and leads to substantial wait-list mortality. Efforts to expand the donor pool have included a resurgence of interest in the use of donation after cardiac death (DCD) lungs. Unique in its physiology, lung viability seems more tolerant to the variable durations of ischemia that occur in DCD donors. Initial experience with DCD LTx is promising and, in combination with ex vivo lung perfusion systems, seems a valuable opportunity to expand the lung donor pool.

  15. Blood conservation in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Blaudszun, G; Butchart, A; Klein, A A

    2017-09-21

    This article aims at reviewing the currently available evidence about blood conservation strategies in cardiac surgery. Pre-operative anaemia and perioperative allogeneic blood transfusions are associated with worse outcomes after surgery. In addition, transfusions are a scarce and costly resource. As cardiac surgery accounts for a significant proportion of all blood products transfused, efforts should be made to decrease the risk of perioperative transfusion. Pre-operative strategies focus on the detection and treatment of anaemia. The management of haematological abnormalities, most frequently functional iron deficiency, is a matter for debate. However, iron supplementation therapy is increasingly commonly administered. Intra-operatively, antifibrinolytics should be routinely used, whereas the cardiopulmonary bypass strategy should be adapted to minimise haemodilution secondary to circuit priming. There is less evidence to recommend minimally invasive surgery. Cell salvage and point-of-care tests should also be a part of the routine care. Post-operatively, any unnecessary iatrogenic blood loss should be avoided. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  16. Cardiac and Arterial Contribution to Blood Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    heart to the blood pressure . We conclude that when the heart hypertrophies, as a result of the hypertension , the changed cardiac behavior, in turn...Plenary Talks Cardiac and Arterial Contribution to Blood Pressure N.Westerhof, Lab. for Physiology, Institute for Cardiovascular Research...Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam Blood pressure and blood flow result from the interaction of the heart, the pump, and the arterial system, the load

  17. An improved method of right ventricular gated equilibrium blood pool radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.; Marshall, J.; Wright, A.L.; Daly, M.; Henry, R.

    1982-11-01

    Gated blood pool radionuclide ventriculography provides a means for obtaining repeated studies of both cardiac ventricles with a single dose of radionuclide. Quantitative assessment of right ventricular (RV) function using this technique has been complicated by several technical problems. We describe a new method of RV blood pool analysis which attempts to solve these problems using well-established concepts for left ventricular (LV) blood pool analysis: (1) variable regions of interest; (2) computer edge detection with operator intervention; and (3) computer selected background. Results showed a strong linear correlation between gated first pass RV ejection fraction (RVEF) and the gated blood pool RVEF (n . 22; r . 0.93; blood pool RVEF . 0.03 + 0.89 X first pass RVEF; Sy.x . 0.04). There was also a strong linear correlation between LV and RV stroke counts in patients without valvular regurgitation, intracardiac shunts, or ventricular aneurysms (n . 19; r .0.86; RV counts . 72 + 0.94 X LV counts; Sy.x . 116). In terms of both of these validation standards this method proved superior to three published methods of RV blood pool analysis that used hand-drawn regions, and is suitable for analysis of rest, exercise, and intervention studies of RV function.

  18. Combined blood pool and extracellular contrast agents for pediatric and young adult cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joyce T; Robinson, Joshua D; Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive cardiac magnetic resonance (cardiac MR) study including both late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and MR angiography may be indicated for patients with a history of acquired or congenital heart disease. To study the novel use of an extracellular agent for assessment of LGE combined with a blood pool contrast agent for detailed MR angiography evaluation to yield a comprehensive cardiac MR study in these patients. We reviewed clinical cardiac MR studies utilizing extracellular and blood pool contrast agents and noted demographics, clinical data and adverse events. We rated LGE image quality and MR angiography image quality for each vascular segment and calculated inter-rater variability. We also quantified contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Thirty-three patients (mean age 13.9 ± 3 years) received an extracellular contrast agent (10 gadobenate dimeglumine, 23 gadopentetate dimeglumine) and blood pool contrast agent (33 gadofosveset trisodium). No adverse events were reported. MRI indications included Kawasaki disease (8), cardiomyopathy and coronary anatomy (15), repaired congenital heart disease (8), and other (2). Mean LGE quality was 2.6 ± 0.6 with 97% diagnostic imaging. LGE quality did not vary by type of contrast agent given (P = 0.07). Mean MR angiography quality score was 4.7 ± 0.6, with high inter-rater agreement (k = 0.6-0.8, P < 0.002). MR angiography quality did not vary by type of contrast agent used (P = 0.6). Cardiac MR studies utilizing both extracellular and blood pool contrast agents are feasible and safe and provide excellent-quality LGE and MR angiography images. The use of two contrast agents allows for a comprehensive assessment of both myocardial viability and vascular anatomy during the same exam.

  19. Gallbladder visualization during technetium-99m RBC blood pool imaging. Case report and literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Kotlyarov, E.V.; Mattay, V.S.; Reba, R.C.

    1988-07-01

    Gallbladder visualization occurred after a Tc-99m red blood cell (RBC) cardiac gated blood pool scan. To date, seven cases of gallbladder visualization after the intravenous injection of Tc-99m RBCs have been reported. In the previous six patients the gallbladder was visualized incidentally during a search for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. All of the patients were anemic, six of seven had chronic renal failure, and five of seven had received multiple blood transfusions. When interpreting GI bleeding scans in patients with anemia and renal failure, awareness of the possibility of gallbladder visualization in the delayed images is important to avoid false-positive results. 3 references.

  20. Fourier analysis of a gated blood-pool study during atrial flutter

    SciTech Connect

    Makler, P.T. Jr.; McCarthy, D.M.; London, J.W.; Sandler, M.S.; Alavi, A.

    1983-08-01

    First-harmonic Fourier analysis of a gated blood-pool study is based on the assumption that the cardiac chambers contract once per cardiac cycle. In atrial arrhythmias this condition may not exist for the atria. We recently studied a patient with atrial flutter and 2:1 artioventricular conduction. There were predictable alterations in the first-harmonic Fourier phase and amplitude images. The observed changes from first-harmonic Fourier analysis were: (a) very low atrial amplitude values, and (b) absence of identifiable atrial regions on the phase image.

  1. [Labile iron pool formation in rat's blood under rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Shandrenko, S H

    2012-01-01

    The labile nonheme iron pool formation in blood under glycerol induced rhabdomyolysis in rats has been investigated. This iron is not included in transferrin, thereby it is redox-active. Rhabdomyolysis was caused by intramuscular injection of 50% glycerol in a dose of 10 ml/kg. In the first day it has been registered that the blood plasma free heme content increased 10 times and the liver heme-oxigenase activity increased 6 times. Plasma redox-active iron pool formation has been registered by EPR method. Such iron was absent in the control group. This iron pool content in the interval from the 1st to the 6st day was more than 2 mg/l and significantly higher than the transferrin iron level. The plasma iron pool unshielded by transferrin may be one of oxidative stress causes.

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the blood plasma properties of cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Gwoździński, Krzysztof; Pieniążek, Anna; Czepas, Jan; Brzeszczyńska, Joanna; Jegier, Anna; Pawlicki, Lucjan

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves exercise tolerance and general function. However, its effects on blood plasma in cardiac patients remain uncertain. Our aim was to examine the effect of comprehensive CR on the oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant plasma status in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) after cardiac interventions. Exercise-based rehabilitation was established as ergometer training, adjusted for individual patients' physical efficiency. Training was repeated three times a week for two months. The standard biochemical (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) and metabolic parameters (peak oxygen uptake [VO2] and peak workload) were determined. We assessed plasma viscosity, lipid peroxidation, carbonyl compounds levels, glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASC) levels and the non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity of plasma in 12 patients with CAD before and after CR. Parameters were examined before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 1 h later. We also compared morphological and biochemical parameters of blood, as well as other parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure (resting and exercise), VO2max and peak workload (W) before and after CR. Before CR, a significant decrease in GSH concentration was observed 1 h after exercise. Conversely, after CR, GSH, and ASC levels remained unchanged immediately after exercise. However, ASC increased after CR after exercise and 1 h later in comparison to before CR. There was a significant increase in ferric reduction ability of plasma immediately after exercise after CR, when compared with before CR. CR improved several blood biochemical parameters, peak VO2, induced an increase in systolic blood pressure peak, and patients' peak workload. After CR, improvements were detected in oxidative stress parameters, except in the level of carbonyls. These changes may contribute to the increased functional heart capacity and better tolerance to exercise and

  3. Detection of varicocele by radionuclide blood-pool scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, J.; Handelsman, D.J.; Bautovich, G.J.; Conway, A.J.; Morris, J.G.

    1980-10-01

    Varicocele is a common and treatable cause of male subfertility. The authors describe a new technique for varicocele detection using radionuclide blood-pool imaging of the scrotum. The results indicate that this technique detects unilateral varicoceles with high sensitivity, including some which are subclinical. There may be significant implications for treatment of infertility.

  4. Slower Lower Limb Blood Pooling Increases Orthostatic Tolerance in Women with Vasovagal Syncope.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Johan; Zachrisson, Helene; Länne, Toste; Lindenberger, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Slower lower limb blood pooling and associated blunted sympathetic activation has been detected in healthy women prone to orthostatic syncope. Whether these findings are true also for patients with vasovagal syncope (VVS) is unknown. The aim was to investigate initial blood pooling time (poolingtime, time to 50% of total blood pooling) together with hemodynamic responses and orthostatic tolerance during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in VVS and healthy controls. Fourteen VVS women (25.7 ± 1.3 years) and 15 healthy women (22.8 ± 0.8 years) were subjected to single-step and graded LBNP to pre-syncope. Lower limb blood pooling (ml · 100 ml(-1)), poolingtime (s), hemodynamic responses and LBNP-tolerance were evaluated. LBNP induced comparable lower limb blood pooling in both groups (controls, 3.1 ± 0.3; VVS, 2.9 ± 0.3 ml · 100 ml(-1), P = 0.70). In controls, shorter poolingtime correlated to higher LBNP-tolerance (r = -0.550, P < 0.05) as well as better maintained stroke volume (r = -0.698, P < 0.01) and cardiac output (r = -0.563, P < 0.05). In contrast, shorter poolingtime correlated to lower LBNP-tolerance in VVS (r = 0.821, P < 0.001) and larger decline in stroke volume (r = 0.611, P < 0.05). Furthermore, in controls, shorter poolingtime correlated to baroreflex-mediated hemodynamic changes during LBNP, e.g., increased vasoconstriction (P < 0.001). In VVS, poolingtime was not correlated with LBNP-induced baroreceptor unloading, but rather highly correlated to resting calf blood flow (P < 0.001). Shorter poolingtime seems to elicit greater sympathetic activation with a concomitant higher orthostatic tolerance in healthy women. The contrasting findings in VVS indicate a deteriorated vascular sympathetic control suggesting well-defined differences already in the initial responses during orthostatic stress.

  5. Strategies for blood conservation in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery accounts for the majority of blood transfusions in a hospital. Blood transfusion has been associated with complications and major adverse events after cardiac surgery. Compared to adults it is more difficult to avoid blood transfusion in children after cardiac surgery. This article takes into account the challenges and emphasizes on the various strategies that could be implemented, to conserve blood during pediatric cardiac surgery. PMID:27716703

  6. Trigeminal Cardiac Reflex and Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Dominga; Scuri, Rossana; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals). During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart, and brain and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is sequestered within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing. The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min) by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral levels, reducing the arterial blood pressure, and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activate the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension. Opposite effects, such as hypotension, and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone, were observed, when these responses were compared to those elicited by the diving reflex. PMID:27812317

  7. Synthetic copolymer kit for radionuclide blood-pool imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, A.A. Jr.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    A synthetic blood pool imaging agent labeled with {sup 99m}Tc is reported. The agent, methoxypolyethylene glycolpoly-L-Iysyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate monoamide was synthesized from a covalent graft copolymer of methoxypolyethylene glycol succinate (molecular weight 5.1 kD) with subsequent modification of the product with diethylenetriamineacetyl residues. The polymer was formulated into a kit that contained Sn(II) and sodium acetate for radiolabeling with {sup 99m}Tc. Biodistribution studies were performed in rats. Blood-pool imaging and blood clearance determination was carried out in rabbits and in a rhesus monkey. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled agent [specific activity greater than 3.7 GBq/mg; radiochemical purity more than 98% by thin-layer and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)] demonstrated remarkable stability in solution (pH 5.5-6.5) with no radioactive products of degradation detectable by HPLC even at 24 hr postlabeling. The agent exhibited prolonged circulation in the blood with a half-life of 31.5 hr in rabbits. Bio-distribution in rats showed a lack of substantial accumulation of the agent in the reticuloendothelial system. Sequential acquisitions were performed in a rhesus monkey. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled polymer kit was compared with the {sup 99m}Tc-red blood cells (RBCs) labeled in vitro. Both methods produced similar heart-to-lung ratios. The ratios remained essentially unchanged for up to 15 hr postinjection. The {sup 99m}Tc-labeled methaxypolyethylene glycol-poly-L-lysyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate monoamide is an attractive alternative to radiolabeled RBCs for blood pool imaging applications. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Blood transfusion and infection after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Keith A; Acker, Michael A; Chang, Helena; Bagiella, Emilia; Smith, Peter K; Iribarne, Alexander; Kron, Irving L; Lackner, Pamela; Argenziano, Michael; Ascheim, Deborah D; Gelijns, Annetine C; Michler, Robert E; Van Patten, Danielle; Puskas, John D; O'Sullivan, Karen; Kliniewski, Dorothy; Jeffries, Neal O; O'Gara, Patrick T; Moskowitz, Alan J; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac surgery is the largest consumer of blood products in medicine; although believed life saving, transfusion carries substantial adverse risks. This study characterizes the relationship between transfusion and risk of major infection after cardiac surgery. In all, 5,158 adults were prospectively enrolled to assess infections after cardiac surgery. The most common procedures were isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery (31%) and isolated valve surgery (30%); 19% were reoperations. Infections were adjudicated by independent infectious disease experts. Multivariable Cox modeling was used to assess the independent effect of blood and platelet transfusions on major infections within 60 ± 5 days of surgery. Red blood cells (RBC) and platelets were transfused in 48% and 31% of patients, respectively. Each RBC unit transfused was associated with a 29% increase in crude risk of major infection (p < 0.001). Among RBC recipients, the most common infections were pneumonia (3.6%) and bloodstream infections (2%). Risk factors for infection included postoperative RBC units transfused, longer duration of surgery, and transplant or ventricular assist device implantation, in addition to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and elevated preoperative creatinine. Platelet transfusion decreased the risk of infection (p = 0.02). Greater attention to management practices that limit RBC use, including cell salvage, small priming volumes, vacuum-assisted venous return with rapid autologous priming, and ultrafiltration, and preoperative and intraoperative measures to elevate hematocrit could potentially reduce occurrence of major postoperative infections.

  9. Blood conservation strategies in cardiac valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Junnan; Chen, Liangwei; Qian, Linfeng; Jiang, Jianjie; Chen, Yinglian; Xie, Jue; Shi, Liping; Ni, Yiming; Zhao, Haige

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to evaluate whether blood conservation strategies including intraoperative autologous donation (IAD) could reduce perioperative blood transfusion for patients undergoing cardiac valve replacement including mitral valve replacement, aortic valve replacement (AVR), and double valve replacement (DVR). A total of 726 patients were studied over a 3-year period (2011–2013) after the implementation of IAD and were compared with 919 patients during the previous 36-month period (January 2008–December 2010). The method of small-volume retrograde autologous priming, strict blood transfusion standard together with IAD constituted a progressive blood-saving strategy. Baseline characteristics and preoperative information showed no statistically significant difference between IAD group and non-IAD group. Most of the postoperative morbidities are statistically the same in the 2 groups. Chest tube output (415.2 vs 1029.8 mL, P < 0.001) and postoperative respiratory failure (5.9% vs 8.6%, P = 0.039) favored the IAD group, whereas hematocrit levels were more favorable in the non-IAD group (30.3% vs 33.0% at the end of the operation, P < 0.001; 30.4% vs 31.5% at the time of discharge). The use of blood product transfusion was higher in the non-IAD group (22.6% vs 43.3%, P < 0.001). Binary multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that high age, non-IAD, DVR surgery, and absent smoking history are associated with a higher risk of intra-/postoperative blood transfusion. Blood conservation is effective and safe in cardiac valve replacement surgeries. The use of intraoperative autologous donation can lead to improved outcomes including a significantly lower rate of intra-/postoperative blood transfusion and postoperative complications. PMID:27741149

  10. Evaluating venous pool technique for blood sampling in neonatal ICU.

    PubMed

    Hatler, Carol; Dalton, Beverly; Day, Susan; Sharfner, Andrea; Hauffe, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate venous pool technique (VPT) for obtaining neonatal blood samples as compared with the needlestick technique. An experimental design was used with subjects enrolled in two phases: an equivalence phase (N = 10) and a comparison phase (N = 64). In the equivalence phase, subjects weighing 1,500 g or more had two needlesticks. In the comparison phase, subjects weighing 800 g or more were randomized to receive blood drawn by either needlestick method or VPT. Comparative results suggest that infant and maternal demographic factors, sampling attempts, and sampling failures were similar. However, for the outcome of hematoma development, the standard technique was significantly worse (t = 2.25 ; p = .029). Results suggest that the VPT method is safe and accurate for use in critically ill neonates. This study demonstrated that the VPT process is easily learned and may provide advantages over standard blood sampling methods. Nurses can use this information to evaluate this VPT technique in their institutions.

  11. Slower Lower Limb Blood Pooling Increases Orthostatic Tolerance in Women with Vasovagal Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Skoog, Johan; Zachrisson, Helene; Länne, Toste; Lindenberger, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: Slower lower limb blood pooling and associated blunted sympathetic activation has been detected in healthy women prone to orthostatic syncope. Whether these findings are true also for patients with vasovagal syncope (VVS) is unknown. The aim was to investigate initial blood pooling time (poolingtime, time to 50% of total blood pooling) together with hemodynamic responses and orthostatic tolerance during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in VVS and healthy controls. Methods and Results: Fourteen VVS women (25.7 ± 1.3 years) and 15 healthy women (22.8 ± 0.8 years) were subjected to single-step and graded LBNP to pre-syncope. Lower limb blood pooling (ml · 100 ml−1), poolingtime (s), hemodynamic responses and LBNP-tolerance were evaluated. LBNP induced comparable lower limb blood pooling in both groups (controls, 3.1 ± 0.3; VVS, 2.9 ± 0.3 ml · 100 ml−1, P = 0.70). In controls, shorter poolingtime correlated to higher LBNP-tolerance (r = –0.550, P < 0.05) as well as better maintained stroke volume (r = –0.698, P < 0.01) and cardiac output (r = –0.563, P < 0.05). In contrast, shorter poolingtime correlated to lower LBNP-tolerance in VVS (r = 0.821, P < 0.001) and larger decline in stroke volume (r = 0.611, P < 0.05). Furthermore, in controls, shorter poolingtime correlated to baroreflex-mediated hemodynamic changes during LBNP, e.g., increased vasoconstriction (P < 0.001). In VVS, poolingtime was not correlated with LBNP-induced baroreceptor unloading, but rather highly correlated to resting calf blood flow (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter poolingtime seems to elicit greater sympathetic activation with a concomitant higher orthostatic tolerance in healthy women. The contrasting findings in VVS indicate a deteriorated vascular sympathetic control suggesting well-defined differences already in the initial responses during orthostatic stress. PMID:27378941

  12. Blood pool contrast agents for venous magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Irai S.; Li, Weier; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the venous system plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of clinically significant disorders. There have been great advances in venous imaging techniques, culminating in the use of magnetic resonance venography (MRV). Although MRV has distinct advantages in anatomic and quantitative cross sectional imaging without ionizing radiation, there are well-known challenges in acquisition timing and contrast administration in patients with renal impairment. The latest advancement involves the addition of new contrast media agents, which have emerged as valuable alternatives in these difficult scenarios. In this review, we will focus on a group of specific contrast agents called blood pool agents and discuss their salient features and clinical applications. PMID:28123972

  13. Diagnostic yield of blood flow and blood pool studies of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, M.; Royal, H.D.; Parker, J.A.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of Tc-99m RBC studies of the liver to diagnose cavernous hemangiomas has been previously reported. The authors have reviewed 82 of these studies performed in the last four years to determine the prevalence of this benign lesion when it is suspected. Studies were performed in patients with focal solid abnormalities of the liver if the patient had no known primary or if there were no definitive clinical or laboratory findings to support the diagnosis of metastatic disease. Blood flow, immediate blood pool and one hour delayed blood pool images were obtained in all patients. The combination of decreased or normal blood flow and markedly increased blood pool is pathognomonic for patients having cavernous hemangiomas. Seventeen percent (14/82) of patients were found to have cavernous hemangiomas of the liver. The remaining patients had metastatic disease (38), abscess (6), hepatomas (6), and miscellaneous diagnosis (11). All patients diagnosed as having cavernous hemangioma have been followed for at least one year. Seven of the remaining patients were lost to medical follow-up. In the series no false positive or false negative results have been obtained; however, false negative cases are anticipated for small or thrombosed hemangiomas. RBC liver studies should be encouraged since 1) the diagnostic yield is high; 2) it is the diagnostic procedure of choice; 3) biopsy of these lesions can be catastrophic; and 4) therapy and prognosis is greatly altered if the liver lesions are proven to be benign.

  14. Cardiac Hypertrophy Is Inhibited by a Local Pool of cAMP Regulated by Phosphodiesterase 2.

    PubMed

    Zoccarato, Anna; Surdo, Nicoletta C; Aronsen, Jan M; Fields, Laura A; Mancuso, Luisa; Dodoni, Giuliano; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Livie, Craig; Jiang, He; Sin, Yuan Yan; Gesellchen, Frank; Terrin, Anna; Baillie, George S; Nicklin, Stuart A; Graham, Delyth; Szabo-Fresnais, Nicolas; Krall, Judith; Vandeput, Fabrice; Movsesian, Matthew; Furlan, Leonardo; Corsetti, Veronica; Hamilton, Graham; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Sjaastad, Ivar; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2015-09-25

    Chronic elevation of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels has been associated with cardiac remodeling and cardiac hypertrophy. However, enhancement of particular aspects of cAMP/protein kinase A signaling seems to be beneficial for the failing heart. cAMP is a pleiotropic second messenger with the ability to generate multiple functional outcomes in response to different extracellular stimuli with strict fidelity, a feature that relies on the spatial segregation of the cAMP pathway components in signaling microdomains. How individual cAMP microdomains affect cardiac pathophysiology remains largely to be established. The cAMP-degrading enzymes phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play a key role in shaping local changes in cAMP. Here we investigated the effect of specific inhibition of selected PDEs on cardiac myocyte hypertrophic growth. Using pharmacological and genetic manipulation of PDE activity, we found that the rise in cAMP resulting from inhibition of PDE3 and PDE4 induces hypertrophy, whereas increasing cAMP levels via PDE2 inhibition is antihypertrophic. By real-time imaging of cAMP levels in intact myocytes and selective displacement of protein kinase A isoforms, we demonstrate that the antihypertrophic effect of PDE2 inhibition involves the generation of a local pool of cAMP and activation of a protein kinase A type II subset, leading to phosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells. Different cAMP pools have opposing effects on cardiac myocyte cell size. PDE2 emerges as a novel key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo, and its inhibition may have therapeutic applications. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Coronary MR angiography: experimental results with a monomer-stabilized blood pool contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Taupitz, Matthias; Schnorr, Jörg; Wagner, Susanne; Abramjuk, Claudia; Pilgrimm, Herbert; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Schink, Tania; Hansel, Jörg; Laub, Gerhard; Hünigen, Hanna; Hamm, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the signal-enhancing characteristics of monomer-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles used as a blood pool contrast medium for magnetic resonance (MR) angiography in the coronary arteries. The particles used in this study were coated with citrate as the monomer (VSOP-C91). The particles have a total diameter of 7 nm and show the following relaxivities at 0.47 T: T1, 19 L/mmol. sec(-1); T2, 29 L/mmol. sec(-1). Fifteen cardiac MR examinations were performed at 1.5 T in five pigs. Images were acquired from immediately to 35 minutes (equilibrium phase) after intravenous injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine, and the very small SPIO particles (n = 5 for each substance). Immediately after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadobenate dimeglumine, and the very small SPIO particles, respectively, increases in the signal-to-noise ratio in blood were 94%, 103%, and 102% and in myocardium were 83%, 83%, and 29% (P <.05, very small SPIO particles versus the low-molecular-weight gadolinium-based compounds). Differences in the blood-to-myocardium contrast-to-noise ratio and visualization of the coronary arteries and their branches were also significant. VSOP-C91 significantly improves visualization of the coronary arteries at MR angiography from immediately to 35 minutes after injection.

  16. A method for measuring mean circumferential fiber shortening rate from gated blood pool scans.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, V; Costello, D; Slutsky, R; Verba, J

    1982-01-01

    Ejection fraction and ejection rate are easily obtained from gated cardiac images, but no method is available for calculating mean circumferential fiber shortening rate. We assumed that the cube root of left ventricular end-diastolic volume or counts is proportional to the minor axis of the left ventricle at end-diastole or end-systole. Mean circumferential fiber shortening rate is then equal to the [cube root of the end-diastolic volume (count) minus cube root of end-systolic volume (count)] divided by [cube root of end-diastolic volume (count) multiplied by the ejection time]. In 250 contrast ventriculograms, the standard mean circumferential fiber shortening rate (MCFSR) and that derived by the cube root method correlated well (r = 0.94). The mean value of MCFSR (0.85 +/- 0.35) was greater than the cube root value (0.75 +/- 0.35) (P less than 0.001). The regression equation was y = 0.86x + 0.02. Similar correlations were obtained from gated radionuclide images using a semiautomated program (r = 0.93) in 24 subjects or completely automated program (r = 0.85) in 28 patients. The regression equation between MCFSR and that derived from the cube root of counts for the semiautomated program was y = 0.82x + 0.04 and for the automated program was y = 0.84x + 0.004. Similar correlations, slopes, and intercepts were seen using circumferential fractional shortening for angiographic data when correlated with both the semiautomated and automated gated blood pool scan programs. These data indicate that MCFSR and circumferential fractional shortening may be obtained from gated blood pool images using cube root estimates of end-diastolic and end-systolic radii with a high degree of correlation with the standard contrast ventriculographic technique.

  17. Nanoparticle encapsulation in red blood cells enables blood-pool magnetic particle imaging hours after injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmer, J.; Antonelli, A.; Sfara, C.; Tiemann, B.; Gleich, B.; Magnani, M.; Weizenecker, J.; Borgert, J.

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging approach that is based on the nonlinear magnetization response of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) injected into the blood stream. To date, real-time MPI of the bolus passage of an approved MRI SPIO contrast agent injected into the tail vein of living mice has been demonstrated. However, nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood stream by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Therefore, imaging applications for long-term monitoring require the repeated administration of bolus injections, which complicates quantitative comparisons due to the temporal variations in concentration. Encapsulation of SPIOs into red blood cells (RBCs) has been suggested to increase the blood circulation time of nanoparticles. This work presents first evidence that SPIO-loaded RBCs can be imaged in the blood pool of mice several hours after injection using MPI. This finding is supported by magnetic particle spectroscopy performed to quantify the iron concentration in blood samples extracted from the mice 3 and 24 h after injection of SPIO-loaded RBCs. Based on these results, new MPI applications can be envisioned, such as permanent 3D real-time visualization of the vessel tree during interventional procedures, bleeding monitoring after stroke, or long-term monitoring and treatment control of cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Factors affecting postoperative blood loss in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Faraoni, David; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-02-11

    We hypothesized that the influence of cyanotic disease on postoperative blood loss is closely related to age in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of a cyanotic disease is associated with increased postoperative blood loss in children aged 1 to 6 months. Children with cyanotic disease and aged<1 month who received fresh frozen plasma during cardiopulmonary bypass had less postoperative blood loss and higher maximal clot firmness on FIBTEM than cyanotic children from all other groups. Additional studies are needed to define optimal pathophysiology-based management in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

  19. Slower lower limb blood pooling in young women with orthostatic intolerance.

    PubMed

    Lindenberger, Marcus; Länne, Toste

    2015-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? Orthostatic stress is mostly caused by venous blood pooling in the lower limbs. Venous distension elicits sympathetic responses, and increased distension speed enhances the cardiovascular response. We examine whether lower limb blood pooling rate during lower body negative pressure is linked to orthostatic intolerance. What is the main finding and its importance? A similar amount of blood was pooled in the lower limb, but at a slower rate in women who developed signs of orthostatic intolerance. The difference in blood pooling rate increased with orthostatic stress and was most prominent at a presyncope-inducing level of lower body negative pressure. The findings have implications for the pathophysiology as well as treatment of orthostatic intolerance. Vasovagal syncope is common in young women, but its aetiology remains elusive. Orthostatic stress-induced lower limb blood pooling is linked with central hypovolaemia and baroreceptor unloading. Venous distension in the arm elicits a sympathetic response, which is enhanced with more rapid distension. Our aim was to study both the amount and the speed of lower limb pooling during orthostatic stress and its effects on compensatory mechanisms to maintain cardiovascular homeostasis in women with orthostatic intolerance. Twenty-seven healthy women, aged 20-27 years, were subjected to a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of 11-44 mmHg. Five women developed symptoms of vasovagal syncope (orthostatic intolerant) and were compared with the remaining women, who tolerated LBNP well (orthostatic tolerant). Lower limb blood pooling, blood flow and compensatory mobilization of venous capacitance blood were measured. Lower body negative pressure induced equal lower limb blood pooling in both groups, but at a slower rate in orthostatic intolerant women (e.g. time to 50% of total blood pooling, orthostatic intolerant 44 ± 7 s and orthostatic tolerant 26 ± 2 s; P < 0.001). At presyncope

  20. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  1. A Separate Pool of Cardiac Phospholemman That Does Not Regulate or Associate with the Sodium Pump

    PubMed Central

    Wypijewski, Krzysztof J.; Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Tulloch, Lindsay B.; Aughton, Karen L.; McLatchie, Linda M.; Shattock, Michael J.; Calaghan, Sarah C.; Fuller, William

    2013-01-01

    Phospholemman (PLM), the principal quantitative sarcolemmal substrate for protein kinases A and C in the heart, regulates the cardiac sodium pump. Much like phospholamban, which regulates the related ATPase SERCA, PLM is reported to oligomerize. We investigated subpopulations of PLM in adult rat ventricular myocytes based on phosphorylation status. Co-immunoprecipitation identified two pools of PLM: one not associated with the sodium pump phosphorylated at Ser63 and one associated with the pump, both phosphorylated at Ser68 and unphosphorylated. Phosphorylation of PLM at Ser63 following activation of PKC did not abrogate association of PLM with the pump, so its failure to associate with the pump was not due to phosphorylation at this site. All pools of PLM co-localized to cell surface caveolin-enriched microdomains with sodium pump α subunits, despite the lack of caveolin-binding motif in PLM. Mass spectrometry analysis of phosphospecific immunoprecipitation reactions revealed no unique protein interactions for Ser63-phosphorylated PLM, and cross-linking reagents also failed to identify any partner proteins for this pool. In lysates from hearts of heterozygous transgenic animals expressing wild type and unphosphorylatable PLM, Ser63-phosphorylated PLM co-immunoprecipitated unphosphorylatable PLM, confirming the existence of PLM multimers. Dephosphorylation of the PLM multimer does not change sodium pump activity. Hence like phospholamban, PLM exists as a pump-inhibiting monomer and an unassociated oligomer. The distribution of different PLM phosphorylation states to different pools may be explained by their differential proximity to protein phosphatases rather than a direct effect of phosphorylation on PLM association with the pump. PMID:23532852

  2. [Reference values for the blood coagulation tests in Mexico: usefulness of the pooled plasma from blood donors].

    PubMed

    Calzada-Contreras, Adriana; Moreno-Hernández, Manuel; Castillo-Torres, Noemi Patricia; Souto-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Hernández-Juárez, Jesús; Ricardo-Moreno, María Tania; Sánchez-Fernández, Maria Guadalupe de Jesús; García-González, América; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The blood coagulation system maintains the blood in a liquid state and bleeding and thrombosis are the manifestations of its malfunction. Blood coagulation laboratory evaluates the physiology of this system. To establish both, the reference values for several tests performed at the blood coagulation laboratory as well as the utility of the pooled plasma to perform these assays. MATERIAL AND: In this descriptive, cross-sectional, randomized study, we collected plasma from Mexican Mestizos. Each pooled plasma was prepared with the plasma from at least 20 blood donors. We performed screening and special tests and the Levey-Jennings graphs were built and interpreted after each pass. Results of the tests were analyzed and their distribution was established using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. To establish the reference values we used 95% confidence intervals. We collected 72 pooled plasmas. The distribution for PT, APTT, and TT tests was abnormal. Although the PT test showed a bimodal distribution it was normal for factor VII. The reference values for the hemostatic, anticoagulant, and fibrinolytic factors were different from those suggested by the manufacturers. We established the reference values for the blood coagulation tests in the adult Mexican population. We have shown that the pooled plasma must be used for the screening tests. We suggest that each clinical laboratory should establish its own reference values (at least for the screening tests). To reach this objective, we encourage the use of the pooled plasma.

  3. Limiting excessive postoperative blood transfusion after cardiac procedures. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, V A; Ferraris, S P

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of blood product use after cardiac operations reveals that a few patients (< or = 20%) consume the majority of blood products (> 80%). The risk factors that predispose a minority of patients to excessive blood use include patient-related factors, transfusion practices, drug-related causes, and procedure-related factors. Multivariate studies suggest that patient age and red blood cell volume are independent patient-related variables that predict excessive blood product transfusion after cardiac procedures. Other factors include preoperative aspirin ingestion, type of operation, over- or underutilization of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass, failure to correct hypothermia after cardiopulmonary bypass, and physician overtransfusion. A survey of the currently available blood conservation techniques reveals 5 that stand out as reliable methods: 1) high-dose aprotinin therapy, 2) preoperative erythropoietin therapy when time permits adequate dosage before operation, 3) hemodilution by harvest of whole blood immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass, 4) autologous predonation of blood, and 5) salvage of oxygenator blood after cardiopulmonary bypass. Other methods, such as the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid or desmopressin, cell saving devices, reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood, and hemofiltration have been reported to be less reliable and may even be harmful in some high-risk patients. Consideration of the available data allows formulation of a 4-pronged plan for limiting excessive blood transfusion after surgery: 1) recognize the causes of excessive transfusion, including the importance of red blood cell volume, type of procedure being performed, preoperative aspirin ingestion, etc.; 2) establish a quality management program, including a survey of transfusion practices that emphasizes physician education and availability of real-time laboratory testing to guide transfusion therapy; 3) adopt a multimodal approach using institution-proven techniques; and

  4. Pictorial estimation of blood loss in a birthing pool--an aide memoire.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Anushia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this article is to share some photographic images to help midwives visually estimate blood loss at water births. PubMed, CINAHL and MEDLINE databases were searched for relevant research. There is little evidence to inform the practice of visually estimating blood loss in water, as discussed further on in the article. This article outlines a simulation where varying amounts of blood were poured into a birthing pool, captured by photo images. Photo images of key amounts like 150mls, 300mls and 450mls can be useful visual markers when estimating blood loss at water births. The speed of spread across the pool may be a significant factor in assessing blood loss. The author recommends that midwives and educators embark on similar simulations to inform their skill in estimating blood loss at water births.

  5. Desiccation of a pool of blood: from fluid mechanics to forensic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicloux, Celine; Brutin, David

    2012-11-01

    The evaporation of biological fluids (with droplet configuration) has been studied since a few years due to several applications in medical fields such as medical tests, drug screening, biostabilization... The evaporation of a drop of whole blood leads to the formation of final typical pattern of cracks. Flow motion, adhesion, gelation and fracturation all occur during the evaporation of this complex matter. During the drying, a sol-gel transition develops. The evaporation of a pool of blood is studied in order to link the pattern formation and the evaporation dynamics. We intend to transfer the knowledge acquired for drops on pool to improve the forensic investigations. In this study, we focus on both pool of blood and pure water to determine the transition region from drop to pool and then to characterize the evaporation rate in the pool configuration. The spreading of blood which can be seen as a complex fluid is strongly influenced the substrate nature. The initial contact angle of blood on different substrate nature will influence the maximum thickness of the layer and then will influence the evaporation mass flux. The authors gratefully acknowledge the help and the fruitful discussions raised with A. Boccoz.

  6. Assessment of the site of ventricular activation by Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool studies

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Raichlen, J.S.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Reid, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The authors studied the use of first-harmonic Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool images to assess the site of ventricular activation in a group of 12 patients undergoing electrophysiologic pacing studies. They acquired gated blood-pool studies during pacing at up to four sites at each of two different rates. A total of 50 studies were made. At a pacing rate of 100 beats/min, when the pacing electrode was the right-ventricular outflow tract, 7/8; at the anterolateral left-ventricular wall, 4/4. When the Fourier activation site was at the right-ventricular apex, 9/9 times the pacing electrode was there; at the right-ventricular outflow tract, 7/10; in the left ventricle, 4/4. Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool studies can help identify the site of ventricular activation but is not sufficiently accurate to fully replace endocardial mapping.

  7. Is donation after cardiac death reducing the brain-dead donor pool in Australia?

    PubMed

    Sampson, Brett G; O'Callaghan, Gerry P; Russ, Graeme R

    2013-03-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has increased faster than donation after brain death (DBD) in Australia. However, DBD is the preferred pathway because it provides more organs per donor, the donation process is simpler and transplant outcomes are optimised. To determine if the increase in DCD has reduced the brain-dead donor pool in Australia. Retrospective analysis of records of organ donors (intended and actual) with brain injury as the cause of death from 2001 to 2011 in Australian intensive care units. Change in median ventilation period, over time, before brain-death determination in DBD donors (as DCD increased); a decreased median ventilation period in DBD donors being consistent with the conversion of DBD to DCD. As DCD (n = 311) increased, the median ventilation period in DBD donors (n = 2218) did not fall overall (P = 0.83), in all jurisdictions (P > 0.25) and for all causes of death (P > 0.3). The proportion of patients ventilated for less than 2 days was unchanged over time in both DBD (P = 1) and DCD (P = 0.99). The overall ventilation period in DCD donors (3.8 days; interquartile range [IQR], 2.1-6.3 days), exceeded the ventilation period in DBD donors (1.3 days; IQR, 1.0-2.4 days; P < 0.0001). DCD ventilation period was significantly longer in all jurisdictions, for all causes of death and annually (P < 0.05). In Australia, brain-injured donors appear to be ventilated long enough to allow progression to brain death before proceeding to DCD. Therefore, DCD is unlikely to have reduced the brain-dead donor pool.

  8. Cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 distribution in myocytes via interacting proteins: the multiple pool model.

    PubMed

    Shy, Diana; Gillet, Ludovic; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac sodium current (INa) is responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac cells, thus allowing for their contraction. It is also involved in regulating the duration of the cardiac action potential (AP) and propagation of the impulse throughout the myocardium. Cardiac INa is generated by the voltage-gated Na(+) channel, NaV1.5, a 2016-residue protein which forms the pore of the channel. Over the past years, hundreds of mutations in SCN5A, the human gene coding for NaV1.5, have been linked to many cardiac electrical disorders, including the congenital and acquired long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, conduction slowing, sick sinus syndrome, atrial fibrillation, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Similar to many membrane proteins, NaV1.5 has been found to be regulated by several interacting proteins. In some cases, these different proteins, which reside in distinct membrane compartments (i.e. lateral membrane vs. intercalated disks), have been shown to interact with the same regulatory domain of NaV1.5, thus suggesting that several pools of NaV1.5 channels may co-exist in cardiac cells. The aim of this review article is to summarize the recent works that demonstrate its interaction with regulatory proteins and illustrate the model that the sodium channel NaV1.5 resides in distinct and different pools in cardiac cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction.

  9. (18)F-FDG-labeled red blood cell PET for blood-pool imaging: preclinical evaluation in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsusaka, Yohji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Iwabuchi, Yu; Nishime, Chiyoko; Kajimura, Mayumi; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) labeled with single-photon emitters have been clinically used for blood-pool imaging. Although some PET tracers have been introduced for blood-pool imaging, they have not yet been widely used. The present study investigated the feasibility of labeling RBCs with (18)F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) for blood-pool imaging with PET. RBCs isolated from venous blood of rats were washed with glucose-free phosphate-buffered saline and labeled with (18)F-FDG. To optimize labeling efficiency, the effects of glucose deprivation time and incubation (labeling) time with (18)F-FDG were investigated. Post-labeling stability was assessed by calculating the release fraction of radioactivity and identifying the chemical forms of (18)F in the released and intracellular components of (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs incubated in plasma. Just after intravenous injection of the optimized autologous (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs, dynamic PET scans were performed to evaluate in vivo imaging in normal rats and intraabdominal bleeding models (temporary and persistent bleeding). The optimal durations of glucose deprivation and incubation (labeling) with (18)F-FDG were 60 and 30 min, respectively. As low as 10% of (18)F was released as the form of (18)F-FDG from (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs after a 60-min incubation. Dynamic PET images of normal rats showed strong persistence in the cardiovascular system for at least 120 min. In the intraabdominal bleeding models, (18)F-FDG-labeled RBC PET visualized the extravascular blood clearly and revealed the dynamic changes of the extravascular radioactivity in the temporary and persistent bleeding. RBCs can be effectively labeled with (18)F-FDG and used for blood-pool imaging with PET in rats.

  10. Independent effects of heart-head distance and caudal blood pooling on blood pressure regulation in aquatic and terrestrial snakes.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Roger S; Arndt, Joachim O

    2004-03-01

    Changes in orientation in a gravitational field markedly alter the patterns of blood pressure and flow in animals, especially tall or long ones such as giraffes or snakes. Vertical orientation tends to reduce blood flow and pressure in the head for two major reasons. First, the increased vertical blood column above the heart creates a gravitational hydrostatic pressure against which the heart must work. Second, expansion of dependent vessels in the lower extremities causes blood pooling and reduces return of venous blood to the heart, thereby lowering flow and pressure. For most animals, it is difficult to separate these two effects, but snakes offer the possibility of bending the animal in the region of the heart and manipulating the two ends of the body independently. We studied baroregulatory responses in terrestrial pythons (Liasis fuscus) and aquatic file snakes (Acrochordus arafurae) by tilting only the front or rear parts and then the whole animal. Changes in head blood pressure during partial tilts added up to the change during full tilt. The vertical distance to the head had twice as much influence on head blood pressure than did blood pooling in the pythons and four times as much in file snakes. This accounts for the cephalad location of the heart in terrestrial species compared with aquatic ones.

  11. Coronary blood flow in patients with cardiac syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nihat; Tavil, Yusuf; Yazici, Hüseyin Uğur; Abacl, Adnan; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-02-01

    Epicardial coronary arteries are normal in patients with cardiac syndrome X. It is, however, unclear whether there is an abnormality at the level of microvascular circulation. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the epicardial coronary blood flow and myocardial perfusion in patients with cardiac syndrome X. Two hundred and three patients (mean age 53+/-10 years, 85 men) were included in the study. The diagnosis of cardiac syndrome X was made in patients who had a complaint of typical anginal chest pain and had ischemic findings on either myocardial perfusion scintigraphy or a treadmill exercise test, and whose coronary angiograms did not reveal any pathology. Fifty patients (mean age 54+/-11 years, 24 men) who had a complaint of typical anginal chest pain and had a normal myocardial perfusion test and normal coronary arteries were recruited as the control group. Epicardial coronary blood flow was evaluated with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count method and myocardial perfusion was evaluated with the myocardial blush grade method. A myocardial blush grade of < or =2 in any vessel was considered abnormal. Although the right coronary thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count was higher in patients with syndrome X (14.9+/-7.6 vs. 11.7+/-4.4 in controls; P=0.014), there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of mean thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count in the coronary arteries. Abnormal myocardial blush grade was present in 85 patients (42.3%) with syndrome X, and in 17 patients (34.7%) in the control group (P>0.05). We found that the epicardial coronary blood flow, as assessed by thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count, and myocardial perfusion, as assessed by myocardial blush grade, were normal in patients with cardiac syndrome X.

  12. Effect of pool length on blood lactate, heart rate, and velocity in swimming.

    PubMed

    Keskinen, O P; Keskinen, K L; Mero, A A

    2007-05-01

    Exercise testing in water has been used to follow the progression of conditioning during regular training in swimmers. The present study examined the effects of pool length in eleven male swimmers on a set of 5 x 200-m freestyle swims with increasing speed from submaximal to maximal. Mean velocity of swimming, blood lactate and heart rate were examined in both 25-m and 50-m pools. Turning benefit as a marker for turning skill was measured separately by a underwater video system (speed difference between pre- and post-turning) during short all-out swims. Maximum force during swimming was measured in tethered swimming and explosive strength of leg extensor muscles was evaluated by a counter movement jump. The significantly higher (p=0.033 - 0.000) blood lactate values for the 50-m pool as compared to the 25-m pool were found at each point of swimming velocity versus blood lactate curve. The highest post-test lactate level was 7.36 +/- 1.47 mmol x l (-1) in the short course and 8.24 +/- 1.55 mmol x l (-1) (p=0.033) in the long course. The maximum swimming velocity was significantly greater (4.5 %) in the 25-m pool swimming (1.38 +/- 0.11 m x s (-1) vs. 1.32 +/- 0.12 m x s (-1); p=0.000). The heart rate values were significantly (p=0.020 - 0.000) lower in the short course than in the long course at all points of submaximal velocity with a mean difference of 7.3 +/- 0.7 bpm. Heart rate was equal (172 +/- 14 vs. 172 +/- 14 bpm) after the maximum swims in both short and long course. The turning benefit in the short maximum swim was 0.12 +/- 0.05 m x s (-1) (8.1 +/- 3.2 %), correlating positively with the difference in maximal swimming velocity between the short and long-pool swims (r = 0.59; p = 0.029), with the maximum force during tethered swimming (r=0.75; p=0.004) and with the vertical jumping height in the counter movement jump (r=0.55; p=0.039). We conclude that the pool length has a strong effect on blood lactate concentration and heart rate with greater swimming

  13. Blood lipids of cardiac patients after acute exercise on land and in water.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Margaret A; Mahajan, Deepika; Neaverson, Michael A

    2004-03-01

    To compare the effect on lipids of a single bout of high-intensity interval training performed on land and in water in a group of cardiac patients involved in an intensive cardiac rehabilitation program. Single-group, quasiexperimental, crossover design. Swimming pool at a cardiac rehabilitation hospital in Australia. Ten men, ages 55 to 77 years, with ischemic heart disease. Subjects performed 15 minutes of interval arm ergometer work at 65% to 75% of attained heart rate, as determined by treadmill testing on land and in water on the same day. Each patient had his own exercise prescription. At each endurance phase, the number of revolutions and rate-pressure product (RPP) during the final minute of work were taken. Fasting bloods were taken at baseline and after maximum exercise, and lipid profiles were determined; differences were analyzed by paired t test. No significant differences in revolutions or RPP were observed, which indicates that workload and heart work were similar in all experiments. There were no significant changes in total, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, or apolipoproteins A-I or B after exercise (paired t test). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was increased significantly by exercise on land. In 6 patients with low baseline HDL-C (<0.9 mmol/L), HDL-C was increased only on land. A single bout of high-intensity interval training was more effective in improving HDL-C when performed on land than in water.

  14. Development of chagas cardiac manifestations among Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa N; Murray, Kristy O; Hotez, Peter J; Rossmann, Susan N; Gorchakov, Rodion; Ontiveros, Alejandra; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Rhodes, Charles E; Ballantyne, Christie M; Aguilar, David

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, has recently been identified as an important emerging parasitic disease in the United States. To describe the cardiac abnormalities in T. cruzi-positive blood donors in southeastern Texas, a pilot study of donors who had screened positive from 2007 to 2012 was performed. This one-time assessment included (1) a questionnaire to evaluate the source of infection, cardiac symptoms, and health co-morbidities; (2) electrocardiography; (3) echocardiography if electrocardiographic findings were abnormal; and (4) measurement of a high-sensitivity troponin T biomarker. Of those with confirmed infection, 41% (7 of 17) had electrocardiographic abnormalities consistent with Chagas cardiomyopathy. In addition, 36% (6 of 17) were suspected to be locally acquired cases. High-sensitivity troponin T serum levels increased with cardiac severity. In conclusion, cardiologists should consider Chagas disease in their differential diagnoses for patients who may have clinically compatible electrocardiographic changes or nonischemic cardiomyopathy, even if the patients have no histories of residing in Chagas-endemic countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Beitzke, Dietrich Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-02-15

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  16. Accuracy and precision of regional multiharmonic Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool images.

    PubMed

    Machac, J; Horowitz, S F; Broder, D; Goldsmith, S J

    1984-12-01

    In order to estimate the precision and accuracy of parameters derived from segmental multiharmonic Fourier analysis of gated blood-pool images, a Monte Carlo computer noise simulation was tested on five sample regional time-activity curves. The first three Fourier harmonics were retained and the precision and accuracy of parameters of ventricular function were calculated, varying the ejection fraction, segment size, and framing rate. Precision improved with higher ejection fraction, higher counts per frame, or higher framing rate. There was no change in precision as the framing rate changed at fixed total counts. Accuracy changed little with changing framing rate. Thus, for segmental analysis there is no advantage to using a higher framing rate. Regions five or more pixels in size are recommended for reliable results. This study provides useful information for the optimization of acquisition and processing conditions for regional gated blood-pool analysis.

  17. Assessment of coronary blood flow in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Blair, John E A; Ricciardi, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Coronary blood flow is tightly autoregulated but is subject to epicardial and microvascular obstruction, primarily owing to coronary atherosclerosis. Because coronary flow limitation underlies ischemic heart disease, an understanding of coronary physiology is paramount. Measurement of coronary blood flow, once relegated to the research laboratory is now easily performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. In particular, the measurement of fractional flow reserve has been extensively studied and is an important adjunct to clinical decision making. Measurement of coronary flow informs clinicians of prognosis, guides revascularization therapy, and forms the basis of ongoing research in treatment of complex myocardial disease processes. Newer methods of assessing coronary flow measurements are undergoing validation for clinical use and should further enhance our ability to assess the importance of coronary flow in clinical disease.

  18. Mathematical modeling of gravitational effects on the circulation: importance of the time course of venous pooling and blood volume changes in the lungs.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, K; Gisolf, J; Stok, W J; Dijkstra, S; Karemaker, J M

    2006-11-01

    A dip in blood pressure (BP) in response to head-up tilt (HUT) or active standing might be due to rapid pooling in the veins below the heart (preload) or muscle activation-induced drop in systemic vascular resistance (afterload). We hypothesized that, in the cardiovascular response to passive HUT, where, in contrast to active standing, little BP dip is observed, features affecting the preload play a key role. We developed a baroreflex model combined with a lumped-parameter model of the circulation, including viscoelastic stress-relaxation of the systemic veins. Cardiac contraction is modeled using the varying-elastance concept. Gravity affects not only the systemic, but also the pulmonary, circulation. In accordance with the experimental results, model simulations do not show a BP dip on HUT; the tilt-back response is also realistic. If it is assumed that venous capacities are steady-state values, the introduction of stress-relaxation initially reduces venous pooling. The resulting time course of venous pooling is comparable to measured impedance changes. When venous pressure-volume dynamics are neglected, rapid (completed within 30 s) venous pooling leads to a drop in BP. The direct effect of gravity on the pulmonary circulation influences the BP response in the first approximately 5 s after HUT and tilt back. In conclusion, the initial BP response to HUT is mainly determined by the response of the venous system. The time course of lower body pooling is essential in understanding the response to passive HUT.

  19. Blood-pool contrast agent for pre-clinical computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruje, Charmainne; Tse, Justin J.; Holdsworth, David W.; Gillies, Elizabeth R.; Drangova, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have led to the development of blood-pool contrast agents for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Although long-circulating nanoparticle-based agents exist for micro-CT, they are predominantly based on iodine, which has a low atomic number. Micro-CT contrast increases when using elements with higher atomic numbers (i.e. lanthanides), particularly at higher energies. The purpose of our work was to develop and evaluate a lanthanide-based blood-pool contrast agent that is suitable for in vivo micro-CT. We synthesized a contrast agent in the form of polymer-encapsulated Gd nanoparticles and evaluated its stability in vitro. The synthesized nanoparticles were shown to have an average diameter of 127 +/- 6 nm, with good size dispersity. Particle size distribution - evaluated by dynamic light scattering over the period of two days - demonstrated no change in size of the contrast agent in water and saline. Additionally, our contrast agent was stable in a mouse serum mimic for up to 30 minutes. CT images of the synthesized contrast agent (containing 27 mg/mL of Gd) demonstrated an attenuation of over 1000 Hounsfield Units. This approach to synthesizing a Gd-based blood-pool contrast agent promises to enhance the capabilities of micro-CT imaging.

  20. Pelvic blood pooling of men and women during lower body negative pressure.

    PubMed

    White, D D; Montgomery, L D

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate possible gender differences in the hemodynamic responses of the lower body during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). In this study, 17 women (mean age = 56 yrs) and 15 men (mean age = 55 yrs) underwent a 15 min exposure to -50 mm Hg LBNP. A Beckman (BR-100) Impedance Plethysmograph was used to measure each subject's leg and pelvic blood flow and pooling during the LBNP test. The women had an 83% greater increase in blood volume in the pelvic region than men as a result of the LBNP exposure. Women and men had similar increases in leg blood volume as a result of the 15 min exposure to -50 mm Hg. There was no significant gender difference in the decreased amount of blood flow to the leg or pelvic regions by the end of -50 mm Hg LBNP. These results demonstrate that women have greater blood pooling in the pelvic region compared to men when exposed to -50 mm Hg LBNP. These results should be considered when designing life-support equipment for men and women pilots and astronauts, especially the designing of anti-G and Space Shuttle re-entry garments.

  1. Effect of solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma on fibrinolysis in reconstituted whole blood.

    PubMed

    Saadah, Nicholas H; van der Meer, Pieter F; Brinkman, Herm Jan M; de Korte, Dirk; Bontekoe, Ido J; Korsten, Herbert H; Middelburg, Rutger A; van der Bom, Johanna G; Schipperus, Martin R

    2017-10-01

    Hyperfibrinolysis has been observed in patients heavily transfused with solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma (S/D plasma). We compared coagulation and fibrinolytic variables in blood containing S/D plasma with blood containing fresh-frozen plasma (FFP), with and without α2-antiplasmin or tranexamic acid (TXA) supplementation. Whole blood samples were reconstituted from red blood cells, platelet (PLT) concentrates, and varying mixtures of FFP and S/D plasma. Hematocrit and PLT count of reconstituted whole blood samples were varied. For a subset of runs, α2-antiplasmin or TXA was added to S/D plasma whole blood samples. Thromboelastography (TEG) analysis was performed to assess 50% clot lysis time (CLT50% ), maximum amplitude (MA), and initial clotting time (R-time). The change in CLT50% of whole blood as the plasma compartment transitions from FFP to S/D plasma was -52% (95% confidence interval [CI], -60% to -45%; p < 0.001). PLT count strengthened the effect, leading to an additional change in CLT50% of -8% (95% CI, -14% to -2%; p = 0.012) as PLT count increased from 10 × 10(9) to 150 × 10(9) /L. MA and R-time were not associated with fraction of S/D plasma in whole blood. α2-Antiplasmin and TXA restored clot lysis time in S/D plasma whole blood. Whole blood with S/D plasma has shorter clot lysis times in vitro compared to whole blood with FFP. α2-Antiplasmin and TXA restore clot lysis time of S/D plasma whole blood to that of FFP whole blood. Clinicians should be aware of the decreased clot lysis time associated with S/D plasma transfusion. © 2017 AABB.

  2. A novel blood-pooling MR contrast agent: Carboxymethyl-diethylaminoethyl dextran magnetite.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Akinaga; Nitta, Norihisa; Tsuchiya, Keiko; Nitta-Seko, Ayumi; Ohta, Shinichi; Otani, Hideji; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2016-12-01

    Gadofosveset trisodium is available as a prolonged pooling vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. As gadolinium (Gd)-based agents may increase the risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency, the present study synthesized carboxymethyl-diethylaminoethyl dextran magnetite (CMEADM) particles as a blood-pooling, non-Gd‑based contrast agent. CMEADM particles carry a negative or positive charge due to the binding of amino and carboxyl groups to the hydroxyl group of dextran. The present study evaluated whether the degree of charge alters the blood‑pooling time. The evaluation was performed by injecting four groups of three Japanese white rabbits each with CMEADM‑, CMEADM2‑, CMEADM+ (surface charges: ‑10.4, ‑41.0 and +9.6 mV, respectively) or with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO; ‑11.5 mV). The relative signal intensity (SIrel) of each was calculated using the following formula: SIrel = (SI post‑contrast ‑ SI pre‑contrast / SI pre‑contrast) x 100. Following injection with the CMEADMs, but not with USPIO, the in vivo pooling time was prolonged to >300 min. No significant differences were attributable to the electric charge among the CMEADM‑, CMEADM2‑ or and CMEADM+ particles when analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey's HSD test. Taken together, all three differently‑charged CMEADM2 particles exhibited prolonged vascular enhancing effects, compared with the USPIO. The degree of charge of the contrast agents used in the present study did not result in alteration of the prolonged blood pooling time.

  3. Gene expression changes in blood RNA after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    PubMed

    Salas, Lucas A; Font-Ribera, Laia; Bustamante, Mariona; Sumoy, Lauro; Grimalt, Joan O; Bonnin, Sarah; Aguilar, Maria; Mattlin, Heidi; Hummel, Manuela; Ferrer, Anna; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBP) such as trihalomethanes (THM) in swimming pools has been linked to adverse health effects in humans, but their biological mechanisms are unclear. We evaluated short-term changes in blood gene expression of adult recreational swimmers after swimming in a chlorinated pool. Volunteers swam 40min in an indoor chlorinated pool. Blood samples were drawn and four THM (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform) were measured in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Intensity of physical activity was measured as metabolic equivalents (METs). Gene expression in whole blood mRNA was evaluated using IlluminaHumanHT-12v3 Expression-BeadChip. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate the relationship between gene expression changes and THM exposure. Thirty-seven before-after pairs were analyzed. The median increase from baseline to after swimming were: 0.7 to 2.3 for MET, and 1.4 to 7.1μg/m(3) for exhaled total THM (sum of the four THM). Exhaled THM increased on average 0.94μg/m(3) per 1 MET. While 1643 probes were differentially expressed post-exposure. Of them, 189 were also associated with exhaled levels of individual/total THM or MET after False Discovery Rate. The observed associations with the exhaled THM were low to moderate (Log-fold change range: -0.17 to 0.15). In conclusion, we identified short-term gene expression changes associated with swimming in a pool that were minor in magnitude and their biological meaning was unspecific. The high collinearity between exhaled THM levels and intensity of physical activity precluded mutually adjusted models with both covariates. These exploratory results should be validated in future studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Neutrophil function is preserved in a pooled granulocyte component prepared from whole blood donations.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Saber; Stanworth, Simon; Massey, Edwin; Goddard, Fred; Cardigan, Rebecca

    2008-03-01

    Whole blood-derived granulocytes (buffy coats) are issued as an alternative to apheresis donations, but are heavily contaminated with red cells and platelets and there is minimal in vitro data describing their functionality. We developed a purer pooled granulocyte component (PGC) from whole blood donations by pooling 10 ABO-matched buffy coats with 400 ml of platelet additive solution (SSP+) and re-centrifuging. The PGC was irradiated (25-50 Gy) and neutrophil viability, chemotaxis, phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity were determined by flow cytometry. Results from 13 PGC at 16-20 h following donation were compared with those obtained from 20 standard individual buffy coats and with fresh whole blood. The PGC contained similar numbers of neutrophils (approximately 0.9 x 10(10)) with a reduced volume and haemoglobin content when compared with 10 individual buffy coats. Neutrophils in the PGC maintained >90% viability, oxidative burst and phagocytic activity and their ability to migrate towards a chemoattractant 16-20 h following donation, which is similar to results obtained with either fresh whole blood or standard buffy coats. Therefore, neutrophil function in the PGC was preserved 16-20 h following donation, but this product had significantly lower red cell contamination compared with 10 buffy coats, which are currently transfused.

  5. Gallium-68-DOTA-albumin as a PET blood-pool marker: experimental evaluation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoffend, Johannes; Mier, Walter; Schuhmacher, Jochen; Schmidt, Kerstin; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Strauss, Ludwig G; Eisenhut, Michael; Kinscherf, Ralf; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2005-04-01

    Investigations into tumor angiogenesis and antiangiogenic treatment have renewed interest in tumor perfusion. To image tumor blood-pool by PET, suitable tracers are not generally available. In this experimental study, we characterized a 68Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugate of rat serum albumin (68Ga-DOTA-RSA) in vivo using a generator-produced isotope. Biodistribution was determined in ACI rats after intravenous administration of 3-6 MBq of 68Ga-DOTA-RSA. Three ACI rats were imaged over 1 h by dynamic PET after intravenous administration of 15-25 MBq of 68Ga-DOTA-RSA while the blood-pool activity was recorded simultaneously in a closed extracorporeal loop (ECL) between the carotid artery and the jugular vein. Time-activity curves (TACs) were obtained from volume of interest (VOI) analysis and from the ECL data. Stability and metabolites in plasma and urine were analyzed by size exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) 1 h after intravenous injection of 67Ga-DOTA-RSA. Blood radioactivity decreased by 10% and 18% from 10 to 60 min p.i. by biodistribution and PET or ECL, respectively. Tissue sampling between 10 and 60 min p.i. showed slight increases in the uptake of spleen, myocardium, kidney and skeletal muscle while hepatic accretion remained unchanged. Total urinary excretion after 60 min amounted to 9% of the injected dose. HPLC demonstrated a single urinary metabolite corresponding in size to gallium-labeled DOTA. 68Ga-DOTA-RSA is a blood-pool tracer whose physical and biological half-life is well suited for PET. Our findings support clinical imaging using 68Ga-DOTA-labeled human serum albumin (HSA). The generator-produced label makes 68Ga-DOTA-labeled albumin continuously available even to centers lacking an in-house cyclotron.

  6. Jugular venous pooling during lowering of the head affects blood pressure of the anesthetized giraffe.

    PubMed

    Brøndum, E; Hasenkam, J M; Secher, N H; Bertelsen, M F; Grøndahl, C; Petersen, K K; Buhl, R; Aalkjaer, C; Baandrup, U; Nygaard, H; Smerup, M; Stegmann, F; Sloth, E; Ostergaard, K H; Nissen, P; Runge, M; Pitsillides, K; Wang, T

    2009-10-01

    How blood flow and pressure to the giraffe's brain are regulated when drinking remains debated. We measured simultaneous blood flow, pressure, and cross-sectional area in the carotid artery and jugular vein of five anesthetized and spontaneously breathing giraffes. The giraffes were suspended in the upright position so that we could lower the head. In the upright position, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was 193 +/- 11 mmHg (mean +/- SE), carotid flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and carotid cross-sectional area was 0.85 +/- 0.04 cm(2). Central venous pressure (CVP) was 4 +/- 2 mmHg, jugular flow was 0.7 +/- 0.2 l/min, and jugular cross-sectional area was 0.14 +/- 0.04 cm(2) (n = 4). Carotid arterial and jugular venous pressures at head level were 118 +/- 9 and -7 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively. When the head was lowered, MAP decreased to 131 +/- 13 mmHg, while carotid cross-sectional area and flow remained unchanged. Cardiac output was reduced by 30%, CVP decreased to -1 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.01), and jugular flow ceased as the jugular cross-sectional area increased to 3.2 +/- 0.6 cm(2) (P < 0.01), corresponding to accumulation of approximately 1.2 l of blood in the veins. When the head was raised, the jugular veins collapsed and blood was returned to the central circulation, and CVP and cardiac output were restored. The results demonstrate that in the upright-positioned, anesthetized giraffe cerebral blood flow is governed by arterial pressure without support of a siphon mechanism and that when the head is lowered, blood accumulates in the vein, affecting MAP.

  7. Blood Product Supply in Germany: The Impact of Apheresis and Pooled Platelet Concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Karin; Schopohl, Dorothee; Wittmann, Georg; Schramm, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Helmut; Rieger, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Background In Germany, about 60% of all produced platelet concentrates (PCs) are apheresis PCs (APCs). Ongoing discussions on APC reimbursement and costs might lead to a potential shift in pooled PC (PPC)/APC production. Objective of this analysis was to build a comprehensive model from the societal perspective to evaluate consequences associated with shifts in platelet supply and demand. Methods Literature search, desktop researches on platelet supply and demand. Model calculations, time horizon one year: model input from the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, data 2013. Base case: 19.2% of annual whole blood donations (WBDs) were used for production of 38.5% PPCs, decay of 46,218 PCs (8.0%). Scenarios calculated: variation in PPC proportion of 10-100%. Results Base case: during PPC production 41,957-83,913 red blood cell concentrates (RBCCs) are estimated to be lost, which corresponds to 1-2% of annual RBCCs in Germany. Scenarios were calculated for a production of 60-100% PPCs: loss is estimated to be 1.5-5.0% of annual RBCCs (65,430-218,099), decay 54,189-69,022 PCs (9.4-12.0%). Conclusion Production of different blood components is interlinked and sensitive to unidimensional decisions. Increasing PPC proportion has negative impact on the RBCC production and on the antigen-matched APC donor pool. Completion of the model calculations to predict the optimal PPC/APC proportion would require evidence on the number of refractory patients, donor pool sizes, and incidences of diseases requiring platelet transfusions. PMID:27994524

  8. Evaluation of hemangiomas with technetium 99m-labeled RBCs: the perfusion-blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Joachims, H.; Brown, Y.; Eliachar, I.

    1983-03-18

    A case report is presented of a woman with a tumor mass in the nasopharynx. Early and delayed scintigraphy with Technetium 99m-labeled RBCs showed a large area of increased uptake which was later shown to be a hemangioma by contrast angiography. The perfusion-blood pool mismatch observed in hemangiomas is characteristic of these lesions and has not been described in any other abnormalities. The Tc-RBC using both early and delayed scintigraphy is a simple, noninvasive method for assessing the vascular characteristics of these tumors. (JMT)

  9. Systolic blood pressure and (cardiac) mortality over 15 years after venous coronary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Voors, A A; van Brussel, B L; Kelder, J C; Plokker, H W

    1997-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of pre-operative systolic blood pressure and systolic blood pressure 1 and 5 years after venous coronary bypass surgery on subsequent cardiac and non-cardiac mortality. A prospective 15 years follow-up study. A series of 446 consecutive coronary bypass surgery patients, operated on between April 1976 and April 1977. According to their systolic blood pressure, patients were divided into five groups. Systolic blood pressure 5 years after surgery, but not pre-operative systolic blood pressure, was an independent predictor of cardiac mortality. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed that pre-operative systolic blood pressure was not associated with cardiac mortality, while higher systolic blood pressure 1 year after surgery showed a trend towards increased cardiac mortality. Systolic blood pressure 5 years after surgery appeared to be a strong independent predictor of cardiac mortality during the subsequent follow-up period. Patients with a systolic blood pressure of 130-139 mmHg had the lowest risk. Compared to this group, the cardiac mortality risk in patients with a systolic blood pressure 5 years after surgery of 140-149 mmHg, 150-159 mmHg and > or = 160 mmHg, was 2.3 (1.2 to 4.6), 3.4 (1.6 to 7.1) and 3.1 (1.4 to 6.5) times higher. Systolic blood pressure < 130 mmHg 5 years after surgery was also associated with a 2.3 times (1.1 to 4.7) times increased risk for cardiac mortality, compared to patients with a systolic blood pressure of 130-139 mmHg. These findings underline the importance of systolic blood pressure control in the initial years after coronary bypass surgery.

  10. Circadian rhythm of blood pressure reflects the severity of cardiac impairment in familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Eliahou, Ludivine; Thierry, Isabelle; Bouzeman, Abdeslam; Dasoveanu, Madalina; Sebag, Claude; Moubarak, Ghassan; Le Guludec, Dominique; Samuel, Didier; Adams, David; Dinanian, Sylvie; Slama, Michel S

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis due to familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) includes restrictive cardiomyopathy, thickened cardiac walls, conduction disorders and cardiac denervation. Impaired blood pressure variability has been documented in FAP related to the Val30Met mutation. To document blood pressure variability in FAP patients with various mutation types and its relationship to the severity of cardiac involvement. Blood pressure variability was analysed in 49 consecutive FAP patients and was compared with a matched control population. Cardiac evaluation included echocardiography, right heart catheterization, electrophysiological study, Holter electrocardiogram and metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. A non-dipping pattern was found in 80% of FAP patients and in 35% of control patients (P<0.0001); this was due to a significantly lower diurnal blood pressure in FAP patients (FAP group, 113 ± 21 mmHg; control group, 124 ± 8 mmHg; P<0.0001), whereas nocturnal blood pressures were similar. Among FAP patients, a non-dipping pattern was significantly associated with haemodynamic involvement, cardiac thickening or conduction disorders. These associations did not depend on the average blood pressure levels. Impaired blood pressure variability was more frequent and more pronounced in patients with multiple criteria for severe cardiac amyloidosis. Low blood pressure variability is common in cardiac amyloidosis due to FAP. A non-dipping pattern was more frequently observed in FAP patients with haemodynamic impairment, cardiac thickening or conduction disorders. It is suggested that impairment of circadian rhythm of blood pressure reflects the severity of cardiac amyloidosis due to FAP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of desvenlafaxine on blood pressure in patients treated for major depressive disorder: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Thase, Michael E; Fayyad, Rana; Cheng, Ru-Fong J; Guico-Pabia, Christine J; Sporn, Jonathan; Boucher, Matthieu; Tourian, Karen A

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of the serotonin-norepinephrine re-uptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine on blood pressure and incidence of new onset hypertension in pooled short-term studies and in two longer-term, randomized withdrawal studies. Data from patients randomly assigned to desvenlafaxine 10 mg to 400 mg/day or placebo in 11 short-term (8-12 weeks), fixed-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) were pooled for analysis; two desvenlafaxine randomized withdrawal studies (36 and 46 weeks) were analyzed separately. www.clinicaltrials.gov , NCT00072774, NCT00073762, NCT00277823, NCT00300378, NCT00384033, NCT00798707, NCT00863798, NCT01121484, NCT00824291, NCT01432457, NCT00075257, NCT00887224. Outcomes included change from baseline in supine systolic blood pressure (SSBP) and supine diastolic blood pressure (SDBP), assessed using a mixed model repeated measures (MMRM) analysis, and incidence of hypertension (defined as three consecutive second SDBP measures ≥90 mm Hg AND increase of ≥10 mm Hg from baseline and/or SSBP ≥140 mm Hg AND increase of ≥10 mm Hg), analyzed using Cochran Mantel Hanzael tests. Potential predictors of change in SSBP and SDBP at LOCF were examined by including predictor variables in a regression model. In the pooled, short-term studies, mean changes from baseline over time in SSBP and SDBP were statistically significant compared with placebo for the desvenlafaxine doses of 10 mg/day or greater for SSBP (p ≤ 0.0004; MMRM) and 25 mg/day or greater for SDBP (p ≤ 0.0449; MMRM). The proportion of patients with new onset hypertension differed significantly from placebo for the 50, 200, and 400 mg/day doses (1.9%, 2.4%, 4.8%, respectively, vs 0.8%; all p ≤ 0.0244). Predictors of change in BP included baseline SDBP, baseline SSBP, dose, body mass index, gender, age, race, and history of hypertension. Data were pooled from studies which differed somewhat in study design and

  12. Bulky DNA adducts in white blood cells: a pooled analysis of 3600 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ricceri, Fulvio; Godschalk, Roger; Peluso, Marco; Phillips, David H.; Agudo, Antonio; Georgiadis, Panos; Loft, Steffen; Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Palli, Domenico; Perera, Frederica; Vermeulen, Roel; Taioli, Emanuela; Sram, Radim J.; Munnia, Armelle; Rosa, Fabio; Allione, Alessandra; Matullo, Giuseppe; Vineis, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background Bulky DNA adducts are markers of exposure to genotoxic aromatic compounds, which reflect an individual’s ability to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) represent a major class of carcinogens that are capable of forming such adducts. Factors that have been reported to be related to DNA adduct levels include smoking, diet, body mass index (BMI), genetic polymorphisms, the season of collection of biologic material, and air pollutants. Methods We pooled eleven studies (3,600 subjects) in which bulky DNA adducts were measured in human white blood cells with similar 32P-postlabelling techniques and for which a similar set of variables was available, including individual data on age, gender, ethnicity, batch, smoking habits, BMI, season of blood collection and a limited set of gene variants. Results Lowest DNA adduct levels were observed in the spring (median 0.50 adducts per 108 nucleotides), followed by summer (0.64), autumn (0.70) and winter (0.85) (p=0.006). The same pattern emerged in multivariate analysis, but only among never smokers (p=0.02). Adduct levels were significantly lower (p=0.001) in Northern Europe (the Netherlands, Denmark) (mean 0.60, median 0.40) than in Southern Europe (Italy, Spain, France, Greece) (mean 0.79, median 0.60). Conclusions In this large pooled analysis, we have found only weak associations between bulky DNA adducts and exposure variables. Seasonality (with higher adducts levels in winter) and air pollution may partly explain some of the inter-area differences (North vs South Europe), but most inter-area and inter-individual variation in adduct levels still remain unexplained. Impact Our study describes the largest pooled analysis of bulky DNA adducts so far, showing that inter-individual variation is still largely unexplained, though seasonality appears to play a role. PMID:20921335

  13. Characteristics of the Rat Cardiac Sphingolipid Pool in Two Mitochondrial Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Jeffrey S.; Gómez, Luis A.; Moreau, Régis F.; Bemer, Brett A.; Taylor, Alan W.; Hagen, Tory M.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (~10,000 pmols/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (~70 pmols/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16 to 24 carbon units in their acyl side-chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmols/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  14. Characteristics of the rat cardiac sphingolipid pool in two mitochondrial subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Monette, Jeffrey S; Gómez, Luis A; Moreau, Régis F; Bemer, Brett A; Taylor, Alan W; Hagen, Tory M

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (approximately 10,000 pmol/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (approximately 70 pmol/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16- to 24-carbon units in their acyl side chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmol/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other.

  15. Synthesis of fluorine-18 radio-labeled serum albumins for PET blood pool imaging.

    PubMed

    Basuli, Falguni; Li, Changhui; Xu, Biying; Williams, Mark; Wong, Karen; Coble, Vincent L; Vasalatiy, Olga; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V; Griffiths, Gary L; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2015-03-01

    We sought to develop a practical, reproducible and clinically translatable method of radiolabeling serum albumins with fluorine-18 for use as a PET blood pool imaging agent in animals and man. Fluorine-18 radiolabeled fluoronicotinic acid-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester, [(18)F]F-Py-TFP was prepared first by the reaction of its quaternary ammonium triflate precursor with [(18)F]tetrabutylammonium fluoride ([(18)F]TBAF) according to a previously published method for peptides, with minor modifications. The incubation of [(18)F]F-Py-TFP with rat serum albumin (RSA) in phosphate buffer (pH9) for 15 min at 37-40 °C produced fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA and the product was purified using a mini-PD MiniTrap G-25 column. The overall radiochemical yield of the reaction was 18-35% (n=30, uncorrected) in a 90-min synthesis. This procedure, repeated with human serum albumin (HSA), yielded similar results. Fluorine-18-radiolabeled RSA demonstrated prolonged blood retention (biological half-life of 4.8 hours) in healthy awake rats. The distribution of major organ radioactivity remained relatively unchanged during the 4 hour observation periods either by direct tissue counting or by dynamic PET whole-body imaging except for a gradual accumulation of labeled metabolic products in the bladder. This manual method for synthesizing radiolabeled serum albumins uses fluorine-18, a widely available PET radionuclide, and natural protein available in both pure and recombinant forms which could be scaled up for widespread clinical applications. These preclinical biodistribution and PET imaging results indicate that [(18)F]RSA is an effective blood pool imaging agent in rats and might, as [(18)F]HSA, prove similarly useful as a clinical imaging agent.

  16. Haemoglobin, blood volume, cardiac function, and aerobic power.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, N; Warburton, D; Jamnik, V

    1999-02-01

    Alterations in [Hb], which are mediated through changes in arterial oxygen content, and alterations in BV, which are mediated through changes in cardiac output (Q), have a significant effect on both VO2max and aerobic performance. If BV is held constant, a decrease in [Hb] (anaemia) causes a decrease in VO2max and aerobic performance, while an increase in [Hb] (blood doping) causes an increase in VO2max and aerobic performance. If [Hb] is held constant, an increase in BV can cause and increase in both VO2max and aerobic performance, while a decrease in BV can cause a decrease in VO2max and aerobic performance. In addition, an increase in BV can compensate for moderate reductions in [Hb] through increase in Q, allowing VO2max to remain unchanged or even increase. Also, a large portion of the difference in the enhanced cardiovascular function of endurance athletes is due to their high BV and the resultant enhancement of diastolic function. Hence, optimizing both [Hb] and BV is a very important consideration for endurance performance.

  17. Effect of increases in cardiac contractility on cerebral blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Moralez, Gilbert; Washio, Takuro; Sarma, Satyam; Hieda, Michinari; Romero, Steven A; Cramer, Matthew N; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-09-15

    The effect of acute increases in cardiac contractility on cerebral blood flow (CBF) remains unknown. We hypothesized that the external carotid artery (ECA) downstream vasculature modifies the direct influence of acute increases in heart rate and cardiac function on CBF regulation. Twelve healthy subjects received two infusions of dobutamine (first a low dose; 5 μg/kg/min and then a high dose; 15 μg/kg/min) for 12 min each. Cardiac output, blood flow through the internal carotid artery (ICA) and ECA and echocardiographic measurements were performed during dobutamine infusions. Despite increases in cardiac contractility, cardiac output and arterial pressure with dobutamine, ICA blood flow and conductance slightly decreased from resting baseline during both low and high dose infusions. In contrast, ECA blood flow and conductance increased appreciably during both low and high dose infusions. Greater ECA vascular conductance and corresponding increases in blood flow may protect over-perfusion of intracranial cerebral arteries during enhanced cardiac contractility and associated increases in cardiac output and perfusion pressure. Importantly, these findings suggest that the acute increase of blood perfusion due to dobutamine administration does not cause cerebral over-perfusion or an associated risk of cerebral vascular damage. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

  18. Blood pool agent contrast-enhanced MRA: level-set-based artery-vein separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bemmel, Cornelis M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Verdonck, Bert; Viergever, Max A.; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2002-05-01

    Blood pool agents (BPAs) for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) allow prolonged imaging times for higher contrast and resolution by imaging during the steady-state when the contrast agent is distributed through the complete vascular system. However, simultaneous venous and arterial enhancement hampers interpretation. It is shown that arterial and venous segmentation in this equilibrium phase can be achieved if the central arterial axis (CAA) and central venous axis (CVA) are known. Since the CAA can not straightforwardly be obtained from the steady-state data, images acquired during the first-pass of the contrast agent can be utilized to determine the CAA with minimal user initialization. Utilizing the CAA to provide a rough arterial segmentation, the CVA can subsequently be determined from the steady-state dataset. The final segmentations of the arteries and veins are achieved by simultaneously evolving two level-sets in the steady-state dataset starting from the CAA and CVA.

  19. Blood Versus Crystalloid Cardioplegia in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, Konstantinos S; Tzani, Aspasia; Metaxas, Panagiotis; Schizas, Dimitrios; Boikou, Vasileios; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P

    2017-09-25

    The benefit of blood cardioplegia (BCP) compared to crystalloid cardioplegia (CCP) is still debatable. Our aim was to systematically review and synthesize all available evidence on the use of BCP and CCP to assess if any modality provides superior outcomes in pediatric cardiac surgery. A systematic literature search of the PubMed and Cochrane databases was performed with respect to the PRISMA statement (end-of-search date: January 30th, 2017). We extracted data on study design, demographics, cardioplegia regimens, and perioperative outcomes as well as relevant biochemical markers, namely cardiac troponin I (cTnI), lactate, and ATP levels at baseline, after reperfusion and postoperatively at 1, 4, 12, and 24 h as applicable. Data were appropriately pooled using random and mixed effects models. Our systematic review includes 56 studies reporting on a total of 7711 pediatric patients. A meta-analysis of the 10 eligible studies directly comparing BCP (n = 416) to CCP (n = 281) was also performed. There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to cTnI and Lac at any measured time point, ATP levels after reperfusion, length of intensive care unit stay (WMD: -0.08, 95% CI -1.52 to 1.36), length of hospital stay (WMD: 0.13, 95% CI -0.85 to 1.12), and 30-day mortality (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.43-2.88). Only cTnI levels at 4 h postoperatively were significantly lower with BCP (WMD: -1.62, 95% CI -2.07 to -1.18). Based on the available data, neither cardioplegia modality seems to be superior in terms of clinical outcomes, ischemia severity, and overall functional recovery.

  20. Microfiltration platform for continuous blood plasma protein extraction from whole blood during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Aran, Kiana; Fok, Alex; Sasso, Lawrence A; Kamdar, Neal; Guan, Yulong; Sun, Qi; Ündar, Akif; Zahn, Jeffrey D

    2011-09-07

    This report describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a cross-flow filtration microdevice, for the continuous extraction of blood plasma from a circulating whole blood sample in a clinically relevant environment to assist in continuous monitoring of a patient's inflammatory response during cardiac surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) procedures (about 400,000 adult and 20,000 pediatric patients in the United States per year). The microfiltration system consists of a two-compartment mass exchanger with two aligned sets of PDMS microchannels, separated by a porous polycarbonate (PCTE) membrane. Using this microdevice, blood plasma has been continuously separated from blood cells in a real-time manner with no evidence of bio-fouling or cell lysis. The technology is designed to continuously extract plasma containing diagnostic plasma proteins such as complements and cytokines using a significantly smaller blood volume as compared to traditional blood collection techniques. The microfiltration device has been tested using a simulated CPB circulation loop primed with donor human blood, in a manner identical to a clinical surgical setup, to collect plasma fractions in order to study the effects of CPB system components and circulation on immune activation during extracorporeal circulatory support. The microdevice, with 200 nm membrane pore size, was connected to a simulated CPB circuit, and was able to continuously extract ~15% pure plasma volume (100% cell-free) with high sampling frequencies which could be analyzed directly following collection with no need to further centrifuge or modify the fraction. Less than 2.5 ml total plasma volume was collected over a 4 h sampling period (less than one Vacutainer blood collection tube volume). The results tracked cytokine concentrations collected from both the reservoir and filtrate samples which were comparable to those from direct blood draws, indicating very high protein recovery of the microdevice

  1. Microfiltration platform for continuous blood plasma protein extraction from whole blood during cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aran, Kiana; Fok, Alex; Sasso, Lawrence A.; Kamdar, Neal; Guan, Yulong; Sun, Qi; Ündar, Akif

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, and testing of a cross-flow filtration microdevice, for the continuous extraction of blood plasma from a circulating whole blood sample in a clinically relevant environment to assist in continuous monitoring of a patient’s inflammatory response during cardiac surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) procedures (about 400 000 adult and 20 000 pediatric patients in the United States per year). The microfiltration system consists of a two-compartment mass exchanger with two aligned sets of PDMS microchannels, separated by a porous polycarbonate (PCTE) membrane. Using this microdevice, blood plasma has been continuously separated from blood cells in a real-time manner with no evidence of bio-fouling or cell lysis. The technology is designed to continuously extract plasma containing diagnostic plasma proteins such as complements and cytokines using a significantly smaller blood volume as compared to traditional blood collection techniques. The microfiltration device has been tested using a simulated CPB circulation loop primed with donor human blood, in a manner identical to a clinical surgical setup, to collect plasma fractions in order to study the effects of CPB system components and circulation on immune activation during extracorporeal circulatory support. The microdevice, with 200 nm membrane pore size, was connected to a simulated CPB circuit, and was able to continuously extract ~15% pure plasma volume (100% cell-free) with high sampling frequencies which could be analyzed directly following collection with no need to further centrifuge or modify the fraction. Less than 2.5 ml total plasma volume was collected over a 4 h sampling period (less than one Vacutainer blood collection tube volume). The results tracked cytokine concentrations collected from both the reservoir and filtrate samples which were comparable to those from direct blood draws, indicating very high protein recovery of the microdevice

  2. Effect of Vanadate on Elevated Blood Glucose and Depressed Cardiac Performance of Diabetic Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyliger, Clayton E.; Tahiliani, Arun G.; McNeill, John H.

    1985-03-01

    The trace element vanadium has an unclear biological function. Vanadate, an oxidized form of vanadium, appears to have an insulin-like action. The effect of vanadate on blood glucose and cardiac performance was assessed in female Wistar rats 6 weeks after they were made diabetic with streptozotocin. When vanadate was administered for a 4-week period to the diabetic rats, their blood glucose was not significantly different from that of nondiabetic controls despite a low serum insulin. In contrast, blood glucose was increased about threefold in the diabetic rats that were not treated with vanadate; these rats also had low insulin levels. Cardiac performance was depressed in the untreated diabetic animals, but the cardiac performance of the vanadate-treated diabetic animals was not significantly different from that of nondiabetic controls. Thus vanadate controlled the high blood glucose and prevented the decline in cardiac performance due to diabetes.

  3. Importance of SPECT/CT in detecting multiple hemangiomas on 99mTc-labeled RBC blood pool scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shambo Guha; Karunanithi, Sellam; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-04-01

    Vascular malformations and hemangiomas are common in children, but gastric hemangioma is extremely rare with less than 15 reported cases in the pediatric age group. Gastric hemangioma accounts for only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms, and intra-abdominal hemangiomas are rarely found outside of the liver. We present a unique case of gastric hemangioma, and multiple hemangiomas were detected in a single scan by 99mTc-labeled RBC blood pool imaging. This case also depicts the incremental role of SPECT/CT over planar acquisition for detecting multiple hemangiomas, especially for those lesions located adjacent to physiological blood pool activity.

  4. Duration of red blood cell storage and outcomes in pediatric cardiac surgery: an association found for pump prime blood.

    PubMed

    Ranucci, Marco; Carlucci, Concetta; Isgrò, Giuseppe; Boncilli, Alessandra; De Benedetti, Donatella; De la Torre, Teresa; Brozzi, Simonetta; Frigiola, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass in newborns, infants and small children often requires intraoperative red blood cell transfusions to prime the circuit and oxygenator and to replace blood lost during surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of red blood cell storage time prior to transfusion on postoperative morbidity in pediatric cardiac operations. One hundred ninety-two consecutive children aged five years or less who underwent cardiac operations using cardiopulmonary bypass and who received red blood cells for priming the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit comprised the blood-prime group. Forty-seven patients receiving red blood cell transfusions after cardiopulmonary bypass were separately analyzed. Patients in the blood-prime group were divided into two groups based on the duration of storage of the red blood cells they received. The newer blood group included patients who received only red blood cells stored for less than or equal to four days and the older blood group included patients who received red blood cells stored for more than four days. Patients in the newer blood group had a significantly lower rate of pulmonary complications (3.5% versus 14.4%; P = 0.011) as well as a lower rate of acute renal failure (0.8% versus 5.2%; P = 0.154) than patients in the older blood group. Major complications (calculated as a composite score based on pulmonary, neurological, and gastroenterological complications, sepsis and acute renal failure) were found in 6.9% of the patients receiving newer blood and 17.1% of the patients receiving older blood (P = 0.027). After adjusting for other possible confounding variables, red blood cell storage time remained an independent predictor of major morbidity. The same association was not found for patients receiving red blood cell transfusions after cardiopulmonary bypass. The storage time of the red blood cells used for priming the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit in cardiac operations on

  5. Identification of cytoskeletal elements enclosing the ATP pools that fuel human red blood cell membrane cation pumps.

    PubMed

    Chu, Haiyan; Puchulu-Campanella, Estela; Galan, Jacob A; Tao, W Andy; Low, Philip S; Hoffman, Joseph F

    2012-07-31

    The type of metabolic compartmentalization that occurs in red blood cells differs from the types that exist in most eukaryotic cells, such as intracellular organelles. In red blood cells (ghosts), ATP is sequestered within the cytoskeletal-membrane complex. These pools of ATP are known to directly fuel both the Na(+)/K(+) and Ca(2+) pumps. ATP can be entrapped within these pools either by incubation with bulk ATP or by operation of the phosphoglycerate kinase and pyruvate kinase reactions to enzymatically generate ATP. When the pool is filled with nascent ATP, metabolic labeling of the Na(+)/K(+) or Ca(2+) pump phosphoproteins (E(Na)-P and E(Ca)-P, respectively) from bulk [γ-(32)P]-ATP is prevented until the pool is emptied by various means. Importantly, the pool also can be filled with the fluorescent ATP analog trinitrophenol ATP, as well as with a photoactivatable ATP analog, 8-azido-ATP (N(3)-ATP). Using the fluorescent ATP, we show that ATP accumulates and then disappears from the membrane as the ATP pools are filled and subsequently emptied, respectively. By loading N(3)-ATP into the membrane pool, we demonstrate that membrane proteins that contribute to the pool's architecture can be photolabeled. With the aid of an antibody to N(3)-ATP, we identify these labeled proteins by immunoblotting and characterize their derived peptides by mass spectrometry. These analyses show that the specific peptides that corral the entrapped ATP derive from sequences within β-spectrin, ankyrin, band 3, and GAPDH.

  6. Dendrimers meet zwitterions: development of a unique antifouling nanoplatform for enhanced blood pool, lymph node and tumor CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhijuan; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Jingyi; Li, Xin; He, Yao; Qu, Jiao; Shen, Mingwu; Xia, Jindong; Shi, Xiangyang

    2017-08-31

    We report the synthesis and characterization of antifouling zwitterion carboxybetaine acrylamide (CBAA)-modified dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) for enhanced CT imaging applications. The CBAA-modified nanodevice displays a better protein resistance property, less macrophage cellular uptake and liver accumulation, and longer blood half-delay time than the PEGylated counterpart material, thereby enabling enhanced blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging.

  7. Utility of the SPECT Tc-99m labeled RBC blood pool scan in the detection of hepatic hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Guze, B.H.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1989-11-01

    The sensitivity of SPECT imaging of hepatic blood pool activity using Tc-99m labeled RBCs was contrasted with magnetic resonance and CT imaging in 22 cases. SPECT is a noninvasive technique with a high sensitivity for the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. It is helpful for clarifying equivocal magnetic resonance imaging results.

  8. Imaging the whole body atherosclerosis: high resolution magnetic resonance angiography using blood-pool agent. Initial clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Napoli, A; Catalano, C; Anzidei, M; Lanciotti, K; Calabrese, F A; Cavallo Marincola, B; Zini, C; Di Paolo, P L; Kyventidis, T; Passariello, R

    2007-06-01

    Recently whole-body 3D MR angiography (MRA) with blood-pool contrast agent has become available. The purpose of this study was to introduce and evaluate this technique to demonstrate arterial steno-occlusive involvement in systemic atherosclerosis and to compare blood-pool enhanced MRA results with those of CT angiography (CTA) as reference modality. Twenty patients with clinically and US documented carotid occlusive disease underwent whole-body MRA on a 1.5 T scanner and CTA on a 64-MDCT unit. Ten milliliters of a blood-pool agent (MS-235 Gadofosveset Trisodium, VASOVIST, Schering, Berlin, Germany) were administered intravenously and four 3-D MRA stations were acquired successively through automatic table moving. Images were reviewed by two observers. Overall image quality of each arterial segment was assessed and rated for both MRA and CTA examinations; MRA sensitivity, MRA specificity interobserver and intermodality agreement were calculated. Whole-body MRA with blood-pool contrast agent was well tolerated by all patients. It yielded a detailed display of the arterial system with a short examination time. In 14 out of 20 patients there was extensive involvement of the arterial bed by steno-occlusive atherosclerotic disease; for the identification and characterization of vessel damage in the various vascular districts MRA sensitivity was 92-100%, MRA specificity was 95-100%; in 2 cases MRA underestimated the degree of peripheral vessel stenosis. Interobserver agreement calculated with K value was 0.63, intermodality agreement with CTA was 93% (P<0.01). The whole-body MRA technique is a valuable tool for comprehensive evaluation of arterial steno-occlusive involvement in systemic arterial atherosclerosis; there is a good agreement between blood-pool enhanced MRA results and CTA, used as modality of reference.

  9. Stability of echogenic liposomes as a blood pool ultrasound contrast agent in a physiologic flow phantom.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Haworth, Kevin J; Huang, Shao-Ling; Klegerman, Melvin E; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2012-11-01

     vivo investigations will be needed to evaluate the optimal usage of ELIP as blood pool contrast agents.

  10. Chronic fatigue syndrome: illness severity, sedentary lifestyle, blood volume and evidence of diminished cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Barry E; Coryell, Virginia T; Parker, Meela; Martin, Pedro; Laperriere, Arthur; Klimas, Nancy G; Sfakianakis, George N; Bilsker, Martin S

    2009-10-19

    The study examined whether deficits in cardiac output and blood volume in a CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) cohort were present and linked to illness severity and sedentary lifestyle. Follow-up analyses assessed whether differences in cardiac output levels between CFS and control groups were corrected by controlling for cardiac contractility and TBV (total blood volume). The 146 participants were subdivided into two CFS groups based on symptom severity data, severe (n=30) and non-severe (n=26), and two healthy non-CFS control groups based on physical activity, sedentary (n=58) and non-sedentary (n=32). Controls were matched to CFS participants using age, gender, ethnicity and body mass. Echocardiographic measures indicated that the severe CFS participants had 10.2% lower cardiac volume (i.e. stroke index and end-diastolic volume) and 25.1% lower contractility (velocity of circumferential shortening corrected by heart rate) than the control groups. Dual tag blood volume assessments indicated that the CFS groups had lower TBV, PV (plasma volume) and RBCV (red blood cell volume) than control groups. Of the CFS subjects with a TBV deficit (i.e. > or = 8% below ideal levels), the mean+/-S.D. percentage deficit in TBV, PV and RBCV were -15.4+/-4.0, -13.2+/-5.0 and -19.1+/-6.3% respectively. Lower cardiac volume levels in CFS were substantially corrected by controlling for prevailing TBV deficits, but were not affected by controlling for cardiac contractility levels. Analyses indicated that the TBV deficit explained 91-94% of the group differences in cardiac volume indices. Group differences in cardiac structure were offsetting and, hence, no differences emerged for left ventricular mass index. Therefore the findings indicate that lower cardiac volume levels, displayed primarily by subjects with severe CFS, were not linked to diminished cardiac contractility levels, but were probably a consequence of a co-morbid hypovolaemic condition. Further study is needed to address

  11. Impact of extracorporeal blood flow rate on blood pressure, pulse rate and cardiac output during haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Schytz, Philip Andreas; Mace, Maria Lerche; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Nilsson, Brian; Karamperis, Nikolaos; Kristensen, Bent; Ladefoged, Søren Daustrand; Hansen, Henrik Post

    2015-12-01

    If blood pressure (BP) falls during haemodialysis (HD) [intradialytic hypotension (IDH)] a common clinical practice is to reduce the extracorporeal blood flow rate (EBFR). Consequently the efficacy of the HD (Kt/V) is reduced. However, only very limited knowledge on the effect of reducing EBFR on BP exists and data are conflicting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and the potential mechanism(s) involved by investigating the impact of changes in EBFR on BP, pulse rate (PR) and cardiac output (CO) in HD patients with arteriovenous-fistulas (AV-fistulas). We performed a randomized, crossover trial in 22 haemodynamically stable HD patients with AV-fistula. After a conventional HD session each patient was examined during EBFR of 200, 300 and 400 mL/min in random order. After 15 min when steady state was achieved CO, BP and PR were measured at each EFBR, respectively. Mean (SD) age was 71 (11) years. Systolic BP was significantly higher at an EBFR of 200 mL/min as compared with 300 mL/min [133 (23) versus 128 (24) mmHg; P < 0.05], but not as compared with 400 mL/min [133 (23) versus 130 (19) mmHg; P = 0.20]. At EBFR of 200, 300 and 400 mL/min diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, PR and CO remained unchanged. Our study does not show any consistent trend in BP changes by a reduction in EBFR. Reduction in EBFR if BP falls during IDH is thus not supported. However, none of the patients experienced IDH. Further studies are required to evaluate the impact of changes in EBFR on BP during IDH. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced transfusion requirement with use of fresh whole blood in pediatric cardiac surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Jobes, David R; Sesok-Pizzini, Deborah; Friedman, David

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing cardiac operations are at high risk for blood loss and transfusion. A practice intended to reduce transfusion using a standard order of 2 units fresh whole blood (< 48 hours from donation) for elective cardiac operations in patients younger than 2 years of age was in place from 1995 to 2010. The objective of this study was to describe blood use in this population and to compare the results with those in published reports describing the use of blood components exclusively for transfusion. Retrospective data from a surgical registry and blood bank records for 15 consecutive years were analyzed. Transfusion requirements were identified as donor exposures for the day of operation and the next postoperative day. Transfusions were fresh whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and cryoprecipitate. Donor exposures for subgroups according to procedure and age were compared with those in published reports. The cohort consisted of 4,111 patients with a median age of 94 days and a median weight of 4.4 kg. The median donor exposure was 2 (range, 0 to 28). Younger patients having complex procedures had the most donor exposures. Fewer donor exposures were incurred in all subgroups compared with reports of component use in the literature. The use of fresh whole blood for cardiac operations in children younger than 2 years old reduces donor exposures compared with published reports of component use. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation of carotid blood flow and corrected carotid flow time with invasive cardiac output measurements.

    PubMed

    Ma, Irene W Y; Caplin, Joshua D; Azad, Aftab; Wilson, Christina; Fifer, Michael A; Bagchi, Aranya; Liteplo, Andrew S; Noble, Vicki E

    2017-12-01

    Non-invasive measures that can accurately estimate cardiac output may help identify volume-responsive patients. This study seeks to compare two non-invasive measures (corrected carotid flow time and carotid blood flow) and their correlations with invasive reference measurements of cardiac output. Consenting adult patients (n = 51) at Massachusetts General Hospital cardiac catheterization laboratory undergoing right heart catheterization between February and April 2016 were included. Carotid ultrasound images were obtained concurrently with cardiac output measurements, obtained by the thermodilution method in the absence of severe tricuspid regurgitation and by the Fick oxygen method otherwise. Corrected carotid flow time was calculated as systole time/√cycle time. Carotid blood flow was calculated as π × (carotid diameter)(2)/4 × velocity time integral × heart rate. Measurements were obtained using a single carotid waveform and an average of three carotid waveforms for both measures. Single waveform measurements of corrected flow time did not correlate with cardiac output (ρ = 0.25, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.49, p = 0.08), but an average of three waveforms correlated significantly, although weakly (ρ = 0.29, 95% CI 0.02-0.53, p = 0.046). Carotid blood flow measurements correlated moderately with cardiac output regardless of if single waveform or an average of three waveforms were used: ρ = 0.44, 95% CI 0.18-0.63, p = 0.004, and ρ = 0.41, 95% CI 0.16-0.62, p = 0.004, respectively. Carotid blood flow may be a better marker of cardiac output and less subject to measurements issues than corrected carotid flow time.

  14. Hemodynamic and ADH responses to central blood volume shifts in cardiac-denervated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Thompson, C. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Savin, W. M.; Gordon, E. P.; Haskell, W. L.; Schroeder, J. S.; Sandler, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes designed to induce blood volume shifts in ten cardiac transplant recipients to assess the contribution of cardiac and vascular volume receptors in the control of ADH secretion. Each subject underwent 15 min of a control period in the seated posture, then assumed a lying posture for 30 min at 6 deg head down tilt (HDT) followed by 20 min of seated recovery. Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions (echocardiography) were taken at 0 and 15 min before HDT, 5, 15, and 30 min of HDT, and 5, 15, and 30 min of seated recovery. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Resting plasma volume (PV) was measured by Evans blue dye and percent changes in PV during posture changes were calculated from changes in hematocrit. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded every 2 min. Results indicate that cardiac volume receptors are not the only mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute blood volume shifts in man.

  15. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective.

    PubMed

    Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Slawski, Diana; Bhandary, Sujatha P; Saranteas, Theodosios; Kaminiotis, Eva; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement) and non-complex (isolated CABG) cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk of complications and blood transfusion requirement. It becomes difficult to demonstrate the association between transfusions and mortality because of the fact that most patients undergoing cardiac surgery are also critically ill. Transfusion rates remain high despite the advances in perioperative blood conservation, such as the intraoperative use of cell saver in cardiac surgery. Some recent prospective studies have suggested that the use of blood products, even in low-risk patients, may adversely affect clinical outcomes. In light of this information, we reviewed the literature to assess the clinical outcomes in terms of 30-day and 1-year morbidity and mortality in transfused patients who underwent uncomplicated CABG surgery.

  16. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Slawski, Diana; Bhandary, Sujatha P.; Saranteas, Theodosios; Kaminiotis, Eva; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement) and non-complex (isolated CABG) cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk of complications and blood transfusion requirement. It becomes difficult to demonstrate the association between transfusions and mortality because of the fact that most patients undergoing cardiac surgery are also critically ill. Transfusion rates remain high despite the advances in perioperative blood conservation, such as the intraoperative use of cell saver in cardiac surgery. Some recent prospective studies have suggested that the use of blood products, even in low-risk patients, may adversely affect clinical outcomes. In light of this information, we reviewed the literature to assess the clinical outcomes in terms of 30-day and 1-year morbidity and mortality in transfused patients who underwent uncomplicated CABG surgery. PMID:28299184

  17. Cardiac cryosurgery: regional myocardial blood flow of ventricular cryolesions

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, W.L.; Ikeshita, M.; Lease, J.G.; Smith, P.K.; Ungerleider, R.M.; Cox, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    Cryosurgery is one of three methods introduced recently for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Cryothermic exposure ablates arrhythmogenic ventricular myocardium, and produces a dense fibrous scar with a sharp border to histologically normal tissue. Myocardial blood flow in the region of the cryolesion, however, has not been quantitated. The purpose of this study was to measure regional blood flow within and around the cryolesion in an attempt to identify ischemic zones that might become arrhythmogenic. Left ventricular cryolesions were created in eleven adult dogs. Two weeks later, the animals underwent radioactive tracer microsphere injection for quantitation of regional myocardial blood flow. The fibrotic cryolesion demonstrated a significantly depressed blood flow (0.44 +/- 0.07 ml/min/g) compared to blood flow in control tissue (1.36 +/- 0.12 ml/min/g) (P less than 0.001). A 1-mm strip of myocardium immediately adjacent to the cryolesion, as well as other myocardium surrounding and subjacent to the cryolesion, did not show a significant decrease in regional blood flow. The border between the fibrotic cryolesion and the surrounding myocardium is, therefore, sharply defined not only in terms of histology but also in regards to regional blood flow. These data lend further support to the safe clinical use of cryothermia in the treatment of refractory ventricular tachycardia.

  18. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Priming Using Autologous Cord Blood in Neonatal Congenital Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun Seok; Cho, Sungkyu; Jang, Woo Sung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A blood transfusion is almost inevitable in neonatal cardiac surgery. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using autologous cord blood for a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) priming as an alternative to an allo-transfusion in neonatal cardiac surgery. Subjects and Methods From January 2012 to December 2014, cord blood had been collected during delivery after informed consent and was stored immediately into a blood bank. Eight neonatal patients had their own cord blood used for CPB priming during cardiac surgery. Results All patients underwent surgery for their complex congenital heart disease. The median age and body weight at surgery was 11 days (from 0 to 21 days) and 3.2 kg (from 2.2 to 3.7 kg). The median amount and hematocrit of collected cord blood was 72.5 mL (from 43 to 105 mL) and 48.7% (from 32.0 to 51.2%). The median preoperative hematocrit of neonates was 36.5% (from 31.0 to 45.0%); the median volume of CPB priming was 130 mL (From 120 to 140 mL). Seven out of eight patients did not need an allo-transfusion in CPB priming and only one neonate used 20 mL of packed red blood cells in CPB priming to obtain the target hematocrit. Conclusion Autologous cord blood can be used for CPB priming as alternative to packed red blood cells in neonatal congenital cardiac surgery in order to reduce allo-transfusion. PMID:27721864

  19. A separate pool of cardiac phospholemman that does not regulate or associate with the sodium pump: multimers of phospholemman in ventricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Tulloch, Lindsay B; Aughton, Karen L; McLatchie, Linda M; Shattock, Michael J; Calaghan, Sarah C; Fuller, William

    2013-05-10

    Phospholemman regulates the plasmalemmal sodium pump in excitable tissues. In cardiac muscle, a subpopulation of phospholemman with a unique phosphorylation signature associates with other phospholemman molecules but not with the pump. Phospholemman oligomers exist in cardiac muscle. Much like phospholamban regulation of SERCA, phospholemman exists as both a sodium pump inhibiting monomer and an unassociated oligomer. Phospholemman (PLM), the principal quantitative sarcolemmal substrate for protein kinases A and C in the heart, regulates the cardiac sodium pump. Much like phospholamban, which regulates the related ATPase SERCA, PLM is reported to oligomerize. We investigated subpopulations of PLM in adult rat ventricular myocytes based on phosphorylation status. Co-immunoprecipitation identified two pools of PLM: one not associated with the sodium pump phosphorylated at Ser(63) and one associated with the pump, both phosphorylated at Ser(68) and unphosphorylated. Phosphorylation of PLM at Ser(63) following activation of PKC did not abrogate association of PLM with the pump, so its failure to associate with the pump was not due to phosphorylation at this site. All pools of PLM co-localized to cell surface caveolin-enriched microdomains with sodium pump α subunits, despite the lack of caveolin-binding motif in PLM. Mass spectrometry analysis of phosphospecific immunoprecipitation reactions revealed no unique protein interactions for Ser(63)-phosphorylated PLM, and cross-linking reagents also failed to identify any partner proteins for this pool. In lysates from hearts of heterozygous transgenic animals expressing wild type and unphosphorylatable PLM, Ser(63)-phosphorylated PLM co-immunoprecipitated unphosphorylatable PLM, confirming the existence of PLM multimers. Dephosphorylation of the PLM multimer does not change sodium pump activity. Hence like phospholamban, PLM exists as a pump-inhibiting monomer and an unassociated oligomer. The distribution of different PLM

  20. Reduction of blood oxygen levels enhances postprandial cardiac hypertrophy in Burmese python (Python bivittatus).

    PubMed

    Slay, Christopher E; Enok, Sanne; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias

    2014-05-15

    Physiological cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by reversible enlargement of cardiomyocytes and changes in chamber architecture, which increase stroke volume and via augmented convective oxygen transport. Cardiac hypertrophy is known to occur in response to repeated elevations of O2 demand and/or reduced O2 supply in several species of vertebrate ectotherms, including postprandial Burmese pythons (Python bivittatus). Recent data suggest postprandial cardiac hypertrophy in P. bivittatus is a facultative rather than obligatory response to digestion, though the triggers of this response are unknown. Here, we hypothesized that an O2 supply-demand mismatch stimulates postprandial cardiac enlargement in Burmese pythons. To test this hypothesis, we rendered animals anemic prior to feeding, essentially halving blood oxygen content during the postprandial period. Fed anemic animals had heart rates 126% higher than those of fasted controls, which, coupled with a 71% increase in mean arterial pressure, suggests fed anemic animals were experiencing significantly elevated cardiac work. We found significant cardiac hypertrophy in fed anemic animals, which exhibited ventricles 39% larger than those of fasted controls and 28% larger than in fed controls. These findings support our hypothesis that those animals with a greater magnitude of O2 supply-demand mismatch exhibit the largest hearts. The 'low O2 signal' stimulating postprandial cardiac hypertrophy is likely mediated by elevated ventricular wall stress associated with postprandial hemodynamics.

  1. Development of a control algorithm for a rotary blood pump: prediction of recovery from cardiac failure.

    PubMed

    Konishi, H; Misawa, Y; Fuse, K

    1998-01-01

    Under extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) support, it is difficult to predict recovery of cardiac function. The authors examined the rotary blood pump function curve and developed a new index of dynamic vascular impedance (DVI) for controlling the ECMO system. The cases of nine patients assisted by ECMO after cardiac surgery were analyzed. The index of DVI was calculated from the pump flow and the pressure difference (delta pressure) between the inlet and outlet of the pump. Seven patients were weaned from support. In the patients with recovery of cardiac function, the index of DVI was high and the delta pressure converged on the specific value. Analysis of the rotary blood pump function curve during ECMO support reflects the pump characteristics and provides data for the management of pump speed. The index of DVI can be used to predict the timing for weaning patients from ECMO support. The authors are developing an automatic control system that uses the index of DVI.

  2. Increased cardiac output and microvascular blood flow during mild hemoconcentration in hamster window model.

    PubMed

    Martini, Judith; Tsai, Amy G; Cabrales, Pedro; Johnson, Paul C; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2006-07-01

    The effect of small hematocrit (Hct) increases on cardiac index (cardiac output/body wt) and oxygen release to the microcirculation was investigated in the awake hamster window chamber model by means of exchange transfusions of homologous packed red blood cells. Increasing Hct between 8 and 13% from baseline increased cardiac index by 5-31% from baseline (P < 0.05) and significantly lowered systemic blood pressure (P < 0.05). The relationship between Hct and cardiac index is described by a second-order polynomial (R2 = 0.84; P < 0.05) showing that Hct increases up to 20% from baseline increase cardiac index, whereas increases over 20% from baseline decrease cardiac index. Combining this data with measurements of blood pressure allowed to determine total peripheral vascular resistance, which was a minimum at 8-13% Hct increase and was described by a second-order polynomial (R2 = 0.83; P < 0.05). Oxygen measurements in arterioles, venules, and the tissue at 8-13% Hct increase were identical to control; thus, as a consequence of increased flow and oxygen-carrying capacity, oxygen delivery and extraction increased, but the change was not statistically significant. Previous results with the same model showed that the observed effects are related to shear stress-mediated release of nitric oxide, an effect that should be also present in the heart microcirculation, leading to increased blood flow, myocardial oxygen consumption, and contractility. We conclude that a minimum viscosity level is necessary for generating the shear stress required for maintaining normal cardiovascular function.

  3. Modulation of cardiac autonomic tone in non-hypotensive hypovolemia during blood donation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Kavita; Singh, Akanksha; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Coshic, Poonam; Chatterjee, Kabita; Deepak, K K

    2016-08-02

    Non-hypotensive hypovolemia, observed during mild haemorrhage or blood donation leads to reflex readjustment of the cardiac autonomic tone. In the present study, the cardiac autonomic tone was quantified using heart rate and blood pressure variability during and after non-hypotensive hypovolemia of blood donation. 86 voluntary healthy male blood donors were recruited for the study (age 35 ± 9 years; weight 78 ± 12 kg; height 174 ± 6 cms). Continuous lead II ECG and beat-to-beat blood pressure was recorded before, during and after blood donation followed by offline time and frequency domain analysis of HRV and BPV. The overall heart rate variability (SDNN and total power) did not change during or after blood donation. However, there was a decrease in indices that represent the parasympathetic component (pNN50 %, SDSD and HF) while an increase was observed in sympathetic component (LF) along with an increase in sympathovagal balance (LF:HF ratio) during blood donation. These changes were sustained for the period immediately following blood donation. No fall of blood pressure was observed during the period of study. The blood pressure variability showed an increase in the SDNN, CoV and RMSSD time domain measures in the post donation period. These results suggest that mild hypovolemia produced by blood donation is non-hypotensive but is associated with significant changes in the autonomic tone. The increased blood pressure variability and heart rate changes that are seen only in the later part of donation period could be because of the progressive hypovolemia associated parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic activation that manifest during the course of blood donation.

  4. The effect of insulin therapy algorithms on blood glucose levels in patients following cardiac surgery: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Megan; Fernandez, Ritin

    2015-06-12

    . All results were subject to double data entry. Statistical pooling of the data in meta-analysis was carried out using Review Manager meta-analysis software where possible. Odds Ratios, Relative Risks, Weighted Means Differences and their 95% Confidence Interval were calculated where appropriate. Where statistical pooling was not possible due to the heterogeneity of the studies the findings are presented in narrative form including tables and figures. Thirteen studies were included in the final review. Pooled data demonstrated significantly improved mean blood glucose levels (Weighted Means Differences -27.24, 95% Confidence Interval: -27.77 - -26.72), p < 0.00001 and achievement of target blood glucose levels range (Relative Risks 1.43, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.18 - 1.72), p = 0.0002, among participants who received the paper nomogram continuous intravenous insulin method of glucose control compared to the bolus regime group. Studies that investigated paper nomogram directed continuous intravenous insulin compared to computer calculator directed continuous intravenous insulin demonstrated a statistically significant improved mean blood glucose levels (Weighted Means Differences -23.74, 95% Confidence Interval: -24.45 - -23.02), p <0.00001 and higher percentage of time in which glucose levels were within the target range in the computer calculator group. A significantly lower incidence (p < 0.05) of hyperglycemia was observed in the computerized calculator directed CII group (1.3 ± 1.2%) compared to the paper nomogram CII (6.5 ± 2%). There is evidence of a benefit of continuous insulin infusions for patients following cardiac surgery with the computer calculator CII method achieving optimal glycemic control. The implementation of a computer calculator CII algorithm allows for individualized patient treatment. However, given the limited availability of the computer based algorithm, the implementation of a paper based algorithm would be justified. Future studies to

  5. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p< 0.05. RESULTS: Artery diameter did not change from baseline. BF increased (p<0.05) after exercise in each condition except LBFR(sub SBP) in the order of HL (12.73+/-1.42 cm3,mean+/-SE) > LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of

  6. In Vivo Interactions Between Cobalt or Ferric Compounds and the Pools of Sulphide in the Blood During and After H2S Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Haouzi, Philippe; Sonobe, Takashi; Torsell-Tubbs, Nicole; Prokopczyk, Bogdan; Chenuel, Bruno; Klingerman, Candice M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), a chemical hazard in oil and gas production, has recently become a dreadful method of suicide, posing specific risks and challenges for the first responders. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment against H2S poisoning and its severe neurological, respiratory or cardiac after-effects. We have recently described that H2S is present in various compartments, or pools, in the body during sulphide exposure, which have different levels of toxicity. The general goals of our study were to (1) determine the concentrations and kinetics of the various pools of hydrogen sulphide in the blood, i.e., gaseous (CgH2S) versus total sulphide, i.e., reacting with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S), during and following H2S exposure in a small and large mammal and (2) establish the interaction between the pools of H2S and a methemoglobin (MetHb) solution or a high dose of hydroxocobalamin (HyCo). We found that CgH2S during and following H2S infusion was similar in sedated sheep and rats at any given rate of infusion/kg and provoked symptoms, i.e., hyperpnea and apnea, at the same CgH2S. After H2S administration was stopped, CgH2S disappeared within 1 min. CMBBH2S also dropped to 2–3μM, but remained above baseline levels for at least 30 min. Infusion of a MetHb solution during H2S infusion produced an immediate reduction in the free/soluble pool of H2S only, whereas CMBBH2S increased by severalfold. HyCo (70 mg/kg) also decreased the concentrations of free/soluble H2S to almost zero; CgH2S returned to pre-HyCo levels within a maximum of 20 min, if H2S infusion is maintained. These results are discussed in the context of a relevant scenario, wherein antidotes can only be administered after H2S exposure. PMID:25015662

  7. In vivo interactions between cobalt or ferric compounds and the pools of sulphide in the blood during and after H2S poisoning.

    PubMed

    Haouzi, Philippe; Sonobe, Takashi; Torsell-Tubbs, Nicole; Prokopczyk, Bogdan; Chenuel, Bruno; Klingerman, Candice M

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S), a chemical hazard in oil and gas production, has recently become a dreadful method of suicide, posing specific risks and challenges for the first responders. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment against H2S poisoning and its severe neurological, respiratory or cardiac after-effects. We have recently described that H2S is present in various compartments, or pools, in the body during sulphide exposure, which have different levels of toxicity. The general goals of our study were to (1) determine the concentrations and kinetics of the various pools of hydrogen sulphide in the blood, i.e., gaseous (CgH2S) versus total sulphide, i.e., reacting with monobromobimane (CMBBH2S), during and following H2S exposure in a small and large mammal and (2) establish the interaction between the pools of H2S and a methemoglobin (MetHb) solution or a high dose of hydroxocobalamin (HyCo). We found that CgH2S during and following H2S infusion was similar in sedated sheep and rats at any given rate of infusion/kg and provoked symptoms, i.e., hyperpnea and apnea, at the same CgH2S. After H2S administration was stopped, CgH2S disappeared within 1 min. CMBBH2S also dropped to 2-3μM, but remained above baseline levels for at least 30 min. Infusion of a MetHb solution during H2S infusion produced an immediate reduction in the free/soluble pool of H2S only, whereas CMBBH2S increased by severalfold. HyCo (70 mg/kg) also decreased the concentrations of free/soluble H2S to almost zero; CgH2S returned to pre-HyCo levels within a maximum of 20 min, if H2S infusion is maintained. These results are discussed in the context of a relevant scenario, wherein antidotes can only be administered after H2S exposure.

  8. Echo motion imaging with adaptive clutter filter for assessment of cardiac blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Visualization of the vortex blood flow in the cardiac chamber is a potential diagnostic tool for the evaluation of cardiac function. In the present study, a method for automatic selection of the desirable cutoff frequency of a moving target indicator filter, namely, a clutter filter, was proposed in order to visualize complex blood flows by the ultrahigh-frame-rate imaging of echoes from blood particles while suppressing clutter echoes. In this method, the cutoff frequency was adaptively changed as a function of the velocity of the heart wall (clutter source) in each frame. The feasibility of the proposed method was examined through the measurement of a healthy volunteer using parallel receive beamforming with a single transmission of a non-steered diverging beam. Using the moving target indicator filter as above with the cutoff frequency determined by the proposed method, the vortex-like blood flow in the cardiac chamber was visualized as movements of echoes from blood particles at a very high frame rate of 6024 Hz while suppressing clutter echoes.

  9. Potential uses of cord blood in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in the fields of prevention, medical intervention and surgical therapy, cardiovascular disease remains a major public healthcare issue. A promising area of research is the potential application of regenerative therapies with pluripotential stem cells to reduce the burden of heart disease and its sequelae. Umbilical cord blood, a rich source of multiple populations of nonembryonic stem cells, will be a valuable resource and has the potential to advance therapeutic options for patients with acquired and congenital heart disease.

  10. Effects of cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation on regional coronary blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Haws, C.W.; Green, L.S.; Burgess, M.J.; Abildskov, J.A.

    1987-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation on regional coronary blood flow following ..beta..-blockade. In 17 anesthetized dogs treated with propranolol (2 mg/kg iv) regional myocardial perfusion was measured (radio labelled microspheres) during control and during stimulation of the ventrolateral, ventromedial, or recurrent cardiac nerve. Ventrolateral nerve stimulation produced 25.5 +/- 3.4 and 23.5 +/- 3.1% (mean +/- SE) decreases in coronary blood flow in the posterior and lateral quadrants of the left ventricle. Ventromedial nerve stimulation produced 18.6 +/- 2.8, 15.4 +/- 2.8, and 10.1 +/- 3.2% decreases in flow in the anterior, septal, and lateral left ventricle, respectively. Recurrent cardiac nerve stimulation produced 16.4 +/- 2.1, 15.6 +/- 2.2, and 13.6 +/- 2.5% decreases in flow in the anterior and septal left ventricle and right ventricle, respectively. Ventrolateral nerve stimulation resulted in a small but significant increase in the endocardial-to-epicardial blood flow ratio in the posterolateral left ventricle. The authors conclude that the cardiac sympathetic nerves have selective regional effects on myocardial perfusion that could contribute to fine regulation of flow in the normal heart and could have beneficial or adverse effects in the setting of coronary stenosis or occlusion.

  11. Leaning during chest compressions impairs cardiac output and left ventricular myocardial blood flow in piglet cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zuercher, Mathias; Hilwig, Ronald W.; Ranger-Moore, James; Nysaether, Jon; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Berg, Marc D.; Kern, Karl B.; Sutton, Robert; Berg, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Complete recoil of the chest wall between chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is recommended, because incomplete chest wall recoil from leaning may decrease venous return and thereby decrease blood flow. We evaluated the hemodynamic effect of 10% or 20% lean during piglet cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Design Prospective, sequential, controlled experimental animal investigation. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Domestic piglets. Interventions After induction of ventricular fibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was provided to ten piglets (10.7 ± 1.2 kg) for 18 mins as six 3-min epochs with no lean, 10% lean, or 20% lean to maintain aortic systolic pressure of 80–90 mm Hg. Because the mean force to attain 80–90 mm Hg was 18 kg in preliminary studies, the equivalent of 10% and 20% lean was provided by use of 1.8- and 3.6-kg weights on the chest. Measurements and Main Results Using a linear mixed-effect regression model to control for changes in cardiopulmonary resuscitation hemodynamics over time, mean right atrial diastolic pressure was 9 ± 0.6 mm Hg with no lean, 10 ± 0.3 mm Hg with 10% lean (p < .01), and 13 ± 0.3 mm Hg with 20% lean (p < .01), resulting in decreased coronary perfusion pressure with leaning. Microsphere-determined cardiac index and left ventricular myocardial blood flow were lower with 10% and 20% leaning throughout the 18 mins of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Mean cardiac index decreased from 1.9 ± 0.2 L · M–2 · min–1 with no leaning to 1.6 ± 0.1 L · M–2 · min–1 with 10% leaning, and 1.4 ± 0.2 L · M–2 · min–1 with 20% leaning (p < .05). The myocardial blood flow decreased from 39 ± 7 mL · min–1 · 100 g–1 with no lean to 30 ± 6 mL · min–1 · 100 g–1 with 10% leaning and 26 ± 6 mL · min–1 · 100 g–1 with 20% leaning (p < .05). Conclusions Leaning of 10% to 20% (i.e., 1.8–3.6 kg) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation substantially decreased coronary

  12. New whole blood analyzers and their impact on cardiac and critical care.

    PubMed

    Kost, G J

    1993-01-01

    Miniaturized whole blood biosensors, patient-focused hospitals, and rising expectations of patients and physicians are shifting laboratory diagnostics to the point of care. Expanding transplantation and intensive care are increasing the need for rapid test results. Whole blood analysis improves accuracy, eliminates centrifugation, reduces response time, and conserves blood volume. Several hand-held, and over 20 portable or transportable whole blood instruments are now available. Criteria for instrument evaluation include test menus, point-of-care features, analysis time, on-site performance, and information integration. Whole blood analyzers measure several vital indicators (pO2, pCO2, pH, hematocrit, K+, Ca2+, Na+, Cl-, glucose, and lactate) simultaneously in less than 2 min with less than 200 microliters of whole blood. Other in vitro tests are available (Mg2+, osmolality, CO2 content, urea nitrogen, beta-hydroxybutyrate, hemoglobin, coagulation) or under development (HCO3- phosphorus). Some can be monitored in vivo (O2 saturation, pO2, pCO2, pH, glucose) or ex vivo. The clinical impact is demonstrated by ionized calcium, now established in importance for cardiac and neurologic problems, and ionized magnesium, a promising new measurement. The hybrid laboratory (a composite of conventional clinical laboratory and patient-focused testing), performance maps, and quality paths facilitate implementation of new whole blood analyzers for optimal support of cardiac and critical care, and improved patient outcomes (prospects).

  13. Blood pressure-independent cardiac hypertrophy in acromegalic patients.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, M; Arosio, M; Barelli, M V; Paliotti, R; Porretti, S; Valentini, P; Tortora, G; Buonamici, V; Moraschi, A; Capiello, V; Magrini, F

    1999-12-01

    Acromegaly is frequently associated with an increase in left ventricular mass, even in the absence of systemic hypertension. Pathological studies on acromegalic hearts have shown an extensive interstitial fibrosis, suggesting the existence of a specific acromegalic cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to assess left ventricular wall structure in acromegaly by ultrasonic tissue characterization. We studied 10 untreated acromegalic patients and 10 age-matched healthy control subjects. The echo patterns of two-dimensional long-axis end-diastolic echocardiograms were assessed by colour-scale analysis of the interventricular septum, with estimates of the mean colour scale value, the broad band (Bb) and the derived collagen volume fraction (dCVF). We also measured electrocardiographic QT interval dispersion (QTd) as a marker of dyshomogeneous ventricular repolarization. Seven patients had left ventricular hypertrophy according to the sex-independent criteria; of these, two had arterial hypertension. None of our patients had echocardiographic evidence of diastolic or systolic dysfunction. All patients showed significantly increased myocardial echoreflectivity (Bb = 106.4+/-12.1 versus 79.3+/-6.5; dCVF% = 2.78+/-0.53 versus 1.58+/-0.29; P < 0.0001) and QTd (66+/-13 ms versus 54+/-8 ms, P < 0.05). A significant correlation was found between dCVF and the duration of acromegaly (r = 0.80; P = 0.005). Left ventricular remodelling observed in acromegaly is not related to the presence of arterial hypertension; we hypothesize that the increased echoreflectivity and QTd are long-term consequences of cardiac hypertrophy and prolonged exposure to high levels of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I.

  14. A non-invasive approach to investigation of ventricular blood pressure using cardiac sound features.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hong; Zhang, Jinghui; Chen, Huaming; Mondal, Ashok; Park, Yongwan

    2017-02-01

    Heart sounds (HSs) are produced by the interaction of the heart valves, great vessels, and heart wall with blood flow. Previous researchers have demonstrated that blood pressure can be predicted by exploring the features of cardiac sounds. These features include the amplitude of the HSs, the ratio of the amplitude, the systolic time interval, and the spectrum of the HSs. A single feature or combinations of several features have been used for prediction of blood pressure with moderate accuracy. Experiments were conducted with three beagles under various levels of blood pressure induced by different doses of epinephrine. The HSs, blood pressure in the left ventricle and electrocardiograph signals were simultaneously recorded. A total of 31 records (18 262 cardiac beats) were collected. In this paper, 91 features in various domains are extracted and their linear correlations with the measured blood pressures are examined. These features are divided into four groups and applied individually at the input of a neural network to predict the left ventricular blood pressure (LVBP). The analysis shows that non-spectral features can track changes of the LVBP with lower standard deviation. Consequently, the non-spectral feature set gives the best prediction accuracy. The average correlation coefficient between the measured and the predicted blood pressure is 0.92 and the mean absolute error is 6.86 mmHg, even when the systolic blood pressure varies in the large range from 90 mmHg to 282 mmHg. Hence, systolic blood pressure can be accurately predicted even when using fewer HS features. This technique can be used as an alternative to real-time blood pressure monitoring and it has promising applications in home health care environments.

  15. Cardiac Morphology and Function, and Blood Gas Transport in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Wang, Yong; Meissner, Joachim D.; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have studied cardiac and respiratory functions of aquaporin-1-deficient mice by the Pressure-Volume-loop technique and by blood gas analysis. In addition, the morphological properties of the animals' hearts were analyzed. In anesthesia under maximal dobutamine stimulation, the mice exhibit a moderately elevated heart rate of < 600 min−1 and an O2 consumption of ~0.6 ml/min/g, which is about twice the basal rate. In this state, which is similar to the resting state of the conscious animal, all cardiac functions including stroke volume and cardiac output exhibited resting values and were identical between deficient and wildtype animals. Likewise, pulmonary and peripheral exchange of O2 and CO2 were normal. In contrast, several morphological parameters of the heart tissue of deficient mice were altered: (1) left ventricular wall thickness was reduced by 12%, (2) left ventricular mass, normalized to tibia length, was reduced by 10–20%, (3) cardiac muscle fiber cross sectional area was decreased by 17%, and (4) capillary density was diminished by 10%. As the P-V-loop technique yielded normal end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes, the deficient hearts are characterized by thin ventricular walls in combination with normal intraventricular volumes. The aquaporin-1-deficient heart thus seems to be at a disadvantage compared to the wild-type heart by a reduced left-ventricular wall thickness and an increased diffusion distance between blood capillaries and muscle mitochondria. While under the present quasi-resting conditions these morphological alterations have no consequences for cardiac function, we expect that the deficient hearts will show a reduced maximal cardiac output. PMID:27252655

  16. Implementation of a transfusion algorithm to reduce blood product utilization in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Gina; Daves, Suanne; Hughes, Alex; Watkins, Scott; Woods, Marcella; Kreger, Michael; Marincola, Paula; Chocron, Isaac; Donahue, Brian

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this project is to measure the impact of standardization of transfusion practice on blood product utilization and postoperative bleeding in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. Transfusion is common following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in children and is associated with increased mortality, infection, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Transfusion in pediatric cardiac surgery is often based on clinical judgment rather than objective data. Although objective transfusion algorithms have demonstrated efficacy for reducing transfusion in adult cardiac surgery, such algorithms have not been applied in the pediatric setting. This quality improvement effort was designed to reduce blood product utilization in pediatric cardiac surgery using a blood product transfusion algorithm. We implemented an evidence-based transfusion protocol in January 2011 and monitored the impact of this algorithm on blood product utilization, chest tube output during the first 12 h of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and predischarge mortality. When compared with the 12 months preceding implementation, blood utilization per case in the operating room odds ratio (OR) for the 11 months following implementation decreased by 66% for red cells (P = 0.001) and 86% for cryoprecipitate (P < 0.001). Blood utilization during the first 12 h of ICU did not increase during this time and actually decreased 56% for plasma (P = 0.006) and 41% for red cells (P = 0.031), indicating that the decrease in OR transfusion did not shift the transfusion burden to the ICU. Postoperative bleeding, as measured by chest tube output in the first 12 ICU hours, did not increase following implementation of the algorithm. Monthly surgical volume did not change significantly following implementation of the algorithm (P = 0.477). In a logistic regression model for predischarge mortality among the nontransplant patients, after accounting for surgical severity and duration of CPB, use of the transfusion

  17. Gross anatomy of the cardiac blood vessels in the North American beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Bisaillon, A

    1981-01-01

    The cardiac arteries and veins are described in the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) following the injection of the vessels of 15 hearts with either latex, vinyl plastic or barium sulfate. The left coronary artery gives off the typical circumflex and paraconal interventricular branches which supply the left atrium and ventricle and part of the right ventricle and interventricular septum. The right coronary artery vascularizes the right atrium and ventricule and by means of its subsinuosal interventricular branch, part of the left ventricle and interventricular septum. The paraconal interventricular branch of the left coronary artery lies within the myocardium and is not visible on the surface of the heart. There are no intercoronary anastomoses between the right and left vessels. The major cardiac veins open into the terminal end of the left cranial vena cava. Unlike the arteries, there are venous anastomoses interconnecting the great cardiac vein and the middle cardiac vein. It is concluded that the cardiac blood vessels in Castor canadensis are typically mammalian and resemble those of both land and aquatic mammals.

  18. RETRACTED: Bosentan attenuates cardiac fibrosis in diabetic mice without affecting blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Yun-Dai; Li, Min; Zhou, Fei-Hu; Xu, Yong; Wang, Guang-Yi; Li, Tian-De; Xing, You-Hong

    2015-12-01

    At the request of the authors, 'Bosentan attenuates cardiac fibrosis in diabetic mice without affecting blood glucose' Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System, published ahead of print August 15, 2011 as doi: 10.1177/1470320311417274 has been retracted. This is due to mistakes in the published data at Figure 3. For clarification: this problem came to the attention of Bo Yang only after publication in the journal. Bo Yang immediately brought it to the attention of the Journal.

  19. Ultrastable polyethyleneimine-stabilized gold nanoparticles modified with polyethylene glycol for blood pool, lymph node and tumor CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongxing; Wen, Shihui; Zhao, Lingzhou; Li, Du; Liu, Changcun; Jiang, Wenbin; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Wentao; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2016-03-14

    Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG monomethyl ether via PEI amine-enabled conjugation chemistry, followed by acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines. The formed PEGylated Au PSNPs were characterized via different methods. We show that the PEGylated Au PSNPs with an Au core size of 5.1 nm have a relatively long half-decay time (7.8 h), and display a better X-ray attenuation property than conventionally used iodine-based CT contrast agents (e.g., Omnipaque), and are hemocompatible and cytocompatible in a given concentration range. These properties of the Au PSNPs afford their uses as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of the blood pool and major organs of rats, lymph node of rabbits, and the xenografted tumor model of mice. Importantly, the PEGylated Au PSNPs could be excreted out of the body with time and also showed excellent in vivo stability. These findings suggest that the formed PEGylated Au PSNPs may be used as a promising contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems.

  20. Colloidal gold nanoparticles as a blood-pool contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography in mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Quan-Yu; Kim, Sun Hee; Choi, Kyu Sil; Kim, Soo Yeon; Byun, Seung Jae; Kim, Kyoung Woo; Park, Seong Hoon; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2007-12-01

    To present the pharmacokinetics and computed tomographic imaging efficacy of colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a blood-pool agent for x-ray computed tomography (CT). To prepare the colloidal AuNPs, gold nanocrystals were modified using sulfhydrated polyethylene glycol (PEG). Cytotoxicity and histopathologic tests were carried out for toxicity evaluation. Six adult Balb/c mice underwent microcomputed tomography scans after injection of colloidal AuNPs (2.5 micromol Au/g body weight). Four mice with HT-1080 tumors were imaged for visualization of the tumor vasculature. The PEG coated colloidal AuNPs appeared as spherical nanoparticles with 38-nm diameters. The AuNPs-PEG showed a biocompatibility without toxicity in the mice. We identified a stable imaging window for visualizing the vasculature system, immediately to 24 hours after injection. Microcomputed tomography imaging using AuNPs-PEG clearly visualized the tumor vascular structures. Colloidal AuNPs show potential as a blood-pool agent for x-ray CT imaging.

  1. Left ventricular platelet deposition after acute myocardial infarction. An attempt at quantification using blood pool subtracted indium-111 platelet scintigraphy.

    PubMed Central

    Verheugt, F W; Lindenfeld, J; Kirch, D L; Steele, P P

    1984-01-01

    Since indium-111 platelet scintigraphy for the detection of left ventricular thrombosis often shows considerable non-specific blood pool activity a subtraction method using simultaneous technetium-99m blood pool scintigraphy was undertaken in 11 subjects with well documented remote myocardial infarction, who served as positive or negative controls, and in 18 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction. The results were compared with those of cross sectional echocardiography. Thirteen patients had transmural myocardial infarction and the calculated count per pixel in the left ventricle of the subtracted indium-111 platelet scintigram was (mean (SD)) 0.28(0.35), but five patients with subendocardial myocardial infarction had a mean count of 0.04(0.06). In seven patients with transmural myocardial infarction (two anterior and five inferior) left ventricular thrombosis was detected by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy but in only one of these by cross sectional echocardiography. None of the patients with subendocardial myocardial infarction had left ventricular thrombosis. Subtracted left ventricular counts correlated well with the visual results. It is concluded that left ventricular platelet sequestration after acute myocardial infarction may be quantified and precisely located and that quantitative longitudinal studies of the natural history and drug intervention are now possible. Images PMID:6437421

  2. The Case for a Conservative Approach to Blood Transfusion Management in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Tyler; Paone, Gaetano; Emery, Robert W; Ferraris, Victor A

    2016-01-01

    Limiting blood transfusion in cardiac operations is a well-meaning goal of perioperative care. Potential benefits include decreasing morbidity and limiting procedural costs. It is difficult to identify transfusion as the cause of adverse outcomes. The need for transfusion may identify a sicker patient population at greater risk for a worse outcome that may or may not be related to the transfusion. We reviewed the indications for and adverse effects of blood transfusion in patients undergoing cardiac procedures to provide a balanced approach to management of blood resources in this population. We reviewed current literature, including systematic reviews and practice guidelines, to synthesize a practice management plan in patients having cardiac operations. Several prospective randomized studies and large population cohort studies compared a postoperative restrictive transfusion policy to a more liberal policy and found very little difference in outcomes but decreased costs with a restrictive policy. Evidence-based practice guidelines and implementation standards provide robust intervention plans that can limit harmful effects of transfusion and provide safe and effective procedure outcomes. A restrictive transfusion policy seems to be safe and effective but does not necessarily provide better outcome in most patient cohorts. The implications of these findings suggest that many discretionary transfusions could be avoided. A subset of high-risk patients could undoubtedly benefit from a more liberal transfusion policy, but the definition of high risk is ill defined.

  3. Tonic blood pressure modulates the relationship between baroreceptor cardiac reflex sensitivity and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Del Paso, Gustavo A Reyes; González, M Isabel; Hernández, José Antonio; Duschek, Stefan; Gutiérrez, Nicolás

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the effects of tonic blood pressure on the association between baroreceptor cardiac reflex sensitivity and cognitive performance. Sixty female participants completed a mental arithmetic task. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity was assessed using sequence analysis. An interaction was found, indicating that the relationship between baroreceptor reflex sensitivity and cognitive performance is modulated by blood pressure levels. Reflex sensitivity was inversely associated to performance indices in the subgroup of participants with systolic blood pressure above the mean, whereas the association was positive in participants with systolic values below the mean. These results are in accordance with the findings in the field of pain perception and suggest that tonic blood pressure modulates the inhibitory effects of baroreceptor stimulation on high central nervous functions.

  4. Cardiac and peripheral blood similarities in the comparison of nordiazepam and bromazepam blood concentrations.

    PubMed

    Pos Pok, P-Rop; Haddouche, Djamel; Mauras, Michel; Kuhlmann, Erika; Burle, Joëlle; Salmon, Thierry; Berland, Emilie; Coiffait, P-Emmanuel; Viala, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Concomitant heart and peripheral blood determinations were performed on 40 fatal cases involving nordiazepam (20 cases) and bromazepam (20 cases). The heart blood concentration for the two drugs (588 ng/mL for nordiazepam and 802 ng/mL for bromazepam) does not differ from the corresponding peripheral blood concentration (587 ng/mL for nordiazepam and 883 ng/mL for bromazepam). The mean ratios for the heart and peripheral blood concentrations were 0.95 for nordiazepam and 0.86 for bromazepam. No postmortem redistribution was observed for these two benzodiazepines. The authors thus suggest that corresponding heart blood can be proposed in the quantitative analysis of these drugs when peripheral blood is unavailable. The present study also shows the stability of the two drugs after a year of storage.

  5. Reliable Measurements of the β-Amyloid Pool in Blood Could Help in the Early Diagnosis of AD

    PubMed Central

    Pesini, Pedro; Pérez-Grijalba, Virginia; Monleón, Inmaculada; Boada, Mercè; Tárraga, Lluís; Martínez-Lage, Pablo; San-José, Itziar; Sarasa, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at assessing the capability of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 levels in undiluted plasma (UP), diluted plasma (DP), and cell bound (CB) to distinguish between early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy control (HC). Four blood samples from each participant were collected during one month and the levels of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 were determined by a blinded proprietary ELISA sandwich (Araclon Biotech. Zaragoza, Spain). First striking result was that the amount of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in UP represented only a small proportion (~15%) of the total beta-amyloid pool in blood (βAPB) described here as the sum of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in blood where they are free in plasma, bound to plasma proteins, and bound to blood cells. Furthermore, we found that levels of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in UP, DP, and CB were significantly higher in MCI when compared to HC. On average, the total βAPB was 1.8 times higher in MCI than in HC (P = 0.03) and allowed to discriminate between MCI and HC with a sensitivity and specificity over 80%. Thus, quantification of several markers of the βAPB could be useful and reliable in the discrimination between MCI and HC. PMID:22957297

  6. Body Size Predicts Cardiac and Vascular Resistance Effects on Men's and Women's Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Evans, Joyce M; Wang, Siqi; Greb, Christopher; Kostas, Vladimir; Knapp, Charles F; Zhang, Qingguang; Roemmele, Eric S; Stenger, Michael B; Randall, David C

    2017-01-01

    Key Points Summary We report how blood pressure, cardiac output and vascular resistance are related to height, weight, body surface area (BSA), and body mass index (BMI) in healthy young adults at supine rest and standing.Much inter-subject variability in young adult's blood pressure, currently attributed to health status, may actually result from inter-individual body size differences.Each cardiovascular variable is linearly related to height, weight and/or BSA (more than to BMI).When supine, cardiac output is positively related, while vascular resistance is negatively related, to body size. Upon standing, the change in vascular resistance is positively related to size.The height/weight relationships of cardiac output and vascular resistance to body size are responsible for blood pressure relationships to body size.These basic components of blood pressure could help distinguish normal from abnormal blood pressures in young adults by providing a more effective scaling mechanism. Introduction: Effects of body size on inter-subject blood pressure (BP) variability are not well established in adults. We hypothesized that relationships linking stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) with body size would account for a significant fraction of inter-subject BP variability. Methods: Thirty-four young, healthy adults (19 men, 15 women) participated in 38 stand tests during which brachial artery BP, heart rate, SV, CO, TPR, and indexes of body size were measured/calculated. Results: Steady state diastolic arterial BP was not significantly correlated with any index of body size when subjects were supine. However, upon standing, the more the subject weighed, or the taller s/he was, the greater the increase in diastolic pressure. Systolic pressure strongly correlated with body weight and height both supine and standing. Diastolic and systolic BP were more strongly related to height, weight and body surface area than to body mass index. When

  7. Effects of cardiac preload reduction and dobutamine on hepatosplanchnic blood flow regulation in porcine endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Stephan M; Bracht, Hendrik; Porta, Francesca; Balsiger, Bruno M; Brander, Lukas; Knuesel, Rafael; Feng, Hong-Qiang; Kolarova, Anna; Ma, Yingmin; Takala, Jukka

    2012-07-15

    Insufficient cardiac preload and impaired contractility are frequent in early sepsis. We explored the effects of acute cardiac preload reduction and dobutamine on hepatic arterial (Qha) and portal venous (Qpv) blood flows during endotoxin infusion. We hypothesized that the hepatic arterial buffer response (HABR) is absent during preload reduction and reduced by dobutamine. In anesthetized pigs, endotoxin or vehicle (n = 12, each) was randomly infused for 18 h. HABR was tested sequentially by constricting superior mesenteric artery (SMA) or inferior vena cava (IVC). Afterward, dobutamine at 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 μg/kg per minute or another vehicle (n = 6, each) was randomly administered in endotoxemic and control animals, and SMA was constricted during each dose. Systemic (cardiac output, thermodilution) and carotid, splanchnic, and renal blood flows (ultrasound Doppler) and blood pressures were measured before and during administration of each dobutamine dose. HABR was expressed as hepatic arterial pressure/flow ratio. Compared with controls, 18 h of endotoxin infusion was associated with decreased mean arterial blood pressure [49 ± 11 mmHg vs. 58 ± 8 mmHg (mean ± SD); P = 0.034], decreased renal blood flow, metabolic acidosis, and impaired HABR during SMA constriction [0.32 (0.18-1.32) mmHg/ml vs. 0.22 (0.08-0.60) mmHg/ml; P = 0.043]. IVC constriction resulted in decreased Qpv in both groups; whereas Qha remained unchanged in controls, it decreased after 18 h of endotoxemia (P = 0.031; constriction-time-group interaction). One control and four endotoxemic animals died during the subsequent 6 h. The maximal increase of cardiac output during dobutamine infusion was 47% (22-134%) in controls vs. 53% (37-85%) in endotoxemic animals. The maximal Qpv increase was significant only in controls [24% (12-47%) of baseline (P = 0.043) vs. 17% (-7-32%) in endotoxemia (P = 0.109)]. Dobutamine influenced neither Qha nor HABR. Our data suggest that acute cardiac preload

  8. Retained Blood Syndrome After Cardiac Surgery: A New Look at an Old Problem.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Edward M; Gillinov, A Marc; Cohn, William E; Ley, S Jill; Fischlein, Theodor; Perrault, Louis P

    2015-01-01

    Retained blood occurs when drainage systems fail to adequately evacuate blood during recovery from cardiothoracic surgery. As a result, a spectrum of mechanical and inflammatory complications can ensue in the acute, subacute, and chronic setting. The objectives of this review were to define the clinical syndrome associated with retained blood over the spectrum of recovery and to review existing literature regarding how this may lead to complications and contributes to poor outcomes. To better understand and prevent this constellation of clinical complications, a literature review was conducted, which led us to create a new label that better defines the clinical entity we have titled retained blood syndrome. Analysis of published reports revealed that 13.8% to 22.7% of cardiac surgical patients develop one or more components of retained blood syndrome. This can present in the acute, subacute, or chronic setting, with different pathophysiologic mechanisms active at different times. The development of retained blood syndrome has been linked to other clinical outcomes, including the development of postoperative atrial fibrillation and infection and the need for hospital readmission. Grouping multiple objectively measurable and potentially preventable postoperative complications that share a common etiology of retained blood over the continuum of recovery demonstrates a high prevalence of retained blood syndrome. This suggests the need to develop, implement, and test clinical strategies to enhance surgical drainage and reduce postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery.

  9. Correlation of Cardiac Markers and Biomarkers With Blood Pressure of Middle-Aged Marathon Runners.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Joo; Ahn, Jae Ki; Shin, Kyung-A; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Yoon-Hee; Park, Kyoung-Min

    2015-11-01

    Runners with exercise-induced high blood pressure have recently been reported to exhibit higher levels of cardiac markers, vasoconstrictors, and inflammation. The authors attempted to identify correlations between exercise-related personal characteristics and the levels of biochemical/cardiac markers in marathon runners in this study. Forty healthy runners were enrolled. Blood samples were taken both before and after finishing a full marathon. The change in each cardiac/biochemical marker over the course of the marathon was determined. All markers were significantly (P<.001) increased immediately after the marathon (creatine kinase-MB [CK-MB]: 7.9 ± 2.7 ng/mL, cardiac troponin I (cTnI): 0.06 ± 0.10 ng/mL, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP): 95.7 ± 76.4, endothelin-1: 2.7 ± 1.16, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP]: 0.1 ± 0.09, creatine kinase [CK]: 315.7 ± 94.0, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]: 552.8 ± 130.3) compared with their premarathon values (CK-MB: 4.3 ± 1.3, cTnI: 0.01 ± 0.003, NT-proBNP: 27.6 ± 31.1, endothelin-1: 1.11 ± 0.5, hs-CRP: 0.06 ± 0.07, CK: 149.2 ± 66.0, LDH: 399 ± 75.1). In middle-aged marathon runners, factors related to increased blood pressure were correlated with marathon-induced increases in cTnI, NT-proBNP, endothelin-1, and hs-CRP. These correlations were observed independent of running history, records of finishing, and peak oxygen uptake. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. An integrated chip for rapid, sensitive, and multiplexed detection of cardiac biomarkers from fingerprick blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Jun; Luo, Zhan Hong Henry; Huang, Min Joon; Ang, Jun'an Jason; Kang, Tae Goo; Ji, Hongmiao

    2011-10-15

    Cardiovascular diseases are the major cause of death among adults worldwide. Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a first test when a patient suffering from chest pain sees a doctor, however, it is lack of the required sensitivity. Standard assays to detect cardiac biomarkers, like enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are sensitive, but suffer from important sample and reagent consumption in large-scale studies. Moreover they are performed in central laboratories of clinics and hospitals and take a long time, which is highly incompatible with the quick decisions needed to save a heart attack patient. Herein, we describe an integrated chip allowing rapid, sensitive, and simultaneous analysis of three cardiac biomarkers in fingerprick blood. The integrated chip is composed of a filtration chip for plasma separation from blood and a silicon nanowire (SiNW) array sensor chip for protein detection. These two chips are fabricated separately and bonded to form a single unit after alignment. The integrated chip is capable of reducing the dead volume of the sample by eliminating the tubing between the two chips. After the plasma is filtrated by the filtration chip, the SiNW sensor, spotted with three different antibodies, enabled us to detect three cardiac biomarkers, troponin T (cTnT), creatine kinase MM (CK-MM) and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), simultaneously. The integrated chip is able to attain a low detection limit of 1 pg/ml for the three cardiac biomarkers from 2 μl blood in 45 min. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Road traffic noise, blood pressure and heart rate: Pooled analyses of harmonized data from 88,336 participants.

    PubMed

    Zijlema, Wilma; Cai, Yutong; Doiron, Dany; Mbatchou, Stéphane; Fortier, Isabel; Gulliver, John; de Hoogh, Kees; Morley, David; Hodgson, Susan; Elliott, Paul; Key, Timothy; Kongsgard, Havard; Hveem, Kristian; Gaye, Amadou; Burton, Paul; Hansell, Anna; Stolk, Ronald; Rosmalen, Judith

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to road traffic noise may increase blood pressure and heart rate. It is unclear to what extent exposure to air pollution may influence this relationship. We investigated associations between noise, blood pressure and heart rate, with harmonized data from three European cohorts, while taking into account exposure to air pollution. Road traffic noise exposure was assessed using a European noise model based on the Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe framework (CNOSSOS-EU). Exposure to air pollution was estimated using a European-wide land use regression model. Blood pressure and heart rate were obtained by trained clinical professionals. Pooled cross-sectional analyses of harmonized data were conducted at the individual level and with random-effects meta-analyses. We analyzed data from 88,336 participants, across the three participating cohorts (mean age 47.0 (±13.9) years). Each 10dB(A) increase in noise was associated with a 0.93 (95% CI 0.76;1.11) bpm increase in heart rate, but with a decrease in blood pressure of 0.01 (95% CI -0.24;0.23) mmHg for systolic and 0.38 (95% CI -0.53; -0.24) mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. Adjustments for PM10 or NO2 attenuated the associations, but remained significant for DBP and HR. Results for BP differed by cohort, with negative associations with noise in LifeLines, no significant associations in EPIC-Oxford, and positive associations with noise >60dB(A) in HUNT3. Our study suggests that road traffic noise may be related to increased heart rate. No consistent evidence for a relation between noise and blood pressure was found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilisation of Blood Components in Cardiac Surgery: A Single-Centre Retrospective Analysis with Regard to Diagnosis-Related Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Raoul Georg; Rotering, Heinrich; Buddendick, Hubert; Franz, Dominik; Bunzemeier, Holger; Roeder, Norbert; Kwiecien, Robert; Sibrowski, Walter; Scheld, Hans H.; Martens, Sven; Schlenke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background More blood components are required in cardiac surgery than in most other medical disciplines. The overall blood demand may increase as a function of the total number of cardiothoracic and vascular surgical interventions and their level of complexity, and also when considering the demographic ageing. Awareness has grown with respect to adverse events, such as transfusion-related immunomodulation by allogeneic blood supply, which can contribute to morbidity and mortality. Therefore, programmes of patient blood management (PBM) have been implemented to avoid unnecessary blood transfusions and to standardise the indication of blood transfusions more strictly with aim to improve patients' overall outcomes. Methods A comprehensive retrospective analysis of the utilisation of blood components in the Department of Cardiac Surgery at the University Hospital of Münster (UKM) was performed over a 4-year period. Based on a medical reporting system of all medical disciplines, which was established as part of a PBM initiative, all transfused patients in cardiac surgery and their blood components were identified in a diagnosis- and medical procedure-related system, which allows the precise allocation of blood consumption to interventional procedures in cardiac surgery, such as coronary or valve surgery. Results This retrospective single centre study included all in-patients in cardiac surgery at the UKM from 2009 to 2012, corresponding to a total of 1,405-1,644 cases per year. A blood supply was provided for 55.6-61.9% of the cardiac surgery patients, whereas approximately 9% of all in-patients at the UKM required blood transfusions. Most of the blood units were applied during cardiac valve surgery and during coronary surgery. Further surgical activities with considerable use of blood components included thoracic surgery, aortic surgery, heart transplantations and the use of artificial hearts. Under the measures of PBM in 2012 a noticeable decrease in the number of

  13. Utilisation of blood components in cardiac surgery: a single-centre retrospective analysis with regard to diagnosis-related procedures.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Raoul Georg; Rotering, Heinrich; Buddendick, Hubert; Franz, Dominik; Bunzemeier, Holger; Roeder, Norbert; Kwiecien, Robert; Sibrowski, Walter; Scheld, Hans H; Martens, Sven; Schlenke, Peter

    2015-03-01

    More blood components are required in cardiac surgery than in most other medical disciplines. The overall blood demand may increase as a function of the total number of cardiothoracic and vascular surgical interventions and their level of complexity, and also when considering the demographic ageing. Awareness has grown with respect to adverse events, such as transfusion-related immunomodulation by allogeneic blood supply, which can contribute to morbidity and mortality. Therefore, programmes of patient blood management (PBM) have been implemented to avoid unnecessary blood transfusions and to standardise the indication of blood transfusions more strictly with aim to improve patients' overall outcomes. A comprehensive retrospective analysis of the utilisation of blood components in the Department of Cardiac Surgery at the University Hospital of Münster (UKM) was performed over a 4-year period. Based on a medical reporting system of all medical disciplines, which was established as part of a PBM initiative, all transfused patients in cardiac surgery and their blood components were identified in a diagnosis- and medical procedure-related system, which allows the precise allocation of blood consumption to interventional procedures in cardiac surgery, such as coronary or valve surgery. This retrospective single centre study included all in-patients in cardiac surgery at the UKM from 2009 to 2012, corresponding to a total of 1,405-1,644 cases per year. A blood supply was provided for 55.6-61.9% of the cardiac surgery patients, whereas approximately 9% of all in-patients at the UKM required blood transfusions. Most of the blood units were applied during cardiac valve surgery and during coronary surgery. Further surgical activities with considerable use of blood components included thoracic surgery, aortic surgery, heart transplantations and the use of artificial hearts. Under the measures of PBM in 2012 a noticeable decrease in the number of transfused cases was observed

  14. A pool of repeat blood donors can be generated with little expense to the blood center in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Allain, Jean-Pierre; Sarkodie, Francis; Boateng, Peter; Asenso, Kwame; Kyeremateng, Ernest; Owusu-Ofori, Shirley

    2008-04-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, most collected blood originates from accessible and cheaper replacement donors while recruiting and retaining volunteers requires considerable costs not all countries can afford. The Kumasi Teaching Hospital Blood Center and a local FM radio station developed a partnership calling three times a year for donation at the radio station where music, entertainment, and token gifts were available. To assess the program's impact, attendance, deferral, age, sex, identification, and viral test results of donors attending 12 consecutive sessions in 2003 through 2006 were analyzed, and this donor population was compared to other types of donors in Kumasi, Ghana. A total of 3801 donors attended the program and 92 percent of the potential FM donors were eligible to donate compared to 85.5 and 70.3 percent of other volunteer and replacement donors, respectively. Ninety percent of donors were male (median, 25 years) and 4.9 percent were hepatitis B surface antigen-positive compared to 11 and 15 percent in other volunteer and replacement donors. This reflected 63.6 percent spontaneous repeat donations from donors responding to the radio appeal compared to 15 to 30 percent in other volunteer donors. It has been demonstrated that the use of a culturally and socially adapted environment to make the gift of blood a pleasurable and festive experience generated a new pool of blood donors spontaneously repeating donations. This program indicates that retaining Ghanaian blood donors is possible at little extra cost to the blood center and that such an approach may represent a substantial help in the efforts of sub-Saharan Africa to collect volunteer blood.

  15. Molecular RH blood group typing of serologically D-/CE+ donors: the use of a polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer test kit with pooled samples.

    PubMed

    Londero, Donatella; Fiorino, Mauro; Miotti, Valeria; de Angelis, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The known presence of RHD blood group alleles in apparently D– individuals who are positive for C or E antigens leads to an appropriate investigation for the RHD gene on the red blood cells (RBCs) of D– blood donors, thus preventing their RBCs from immunizing D– recipients. Ready-to-use polymerase chain reaction–sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) typing kits are available and allow single-sample results. The need to perform this testing on a large number of donors affiliated with the Transfusion Department of Udine (Northern Italy) led to the use of molecular genetic RH blood group typing with PCR-SSP test kits and DNA samples mixed in pools. From a population of 35,000 blood donors screened for D antigen by serologic typing, a total of 235 samples, distributed in pools of 5 DNA samples, were investigated. Positive results were reevaluated by opening the pools and retesting single samples. Validation of DNA-pool typing with commercial kits was done. Among 235 genotyped samples, 12 were found to be PCR positive (5.1%), exhibiting DEL genotype and RHD-CE-D hybrid alleles. Our data demonstrate that the use of a PCR-SSP commercial test kit with pooled samples is a helpful and valid method to correctly detect RHD alleles. As a consequence, we reclassified our donors as carriers of potentially immunogenic alleles.

  16. Viscoelastic blood coagulation measurement with Sonoclot predicts postoperative bleeding in cardiac surgery after heparin reversal.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Dominique B; Ganter, Michael T; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hartnack, Sonja; Klaghofer, Richard; Graves, Kirk; Genoni, Michele; Hofer, Christoph K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if Sonoclot with its sensitive glass bead-activated, viscoelastic test can predict postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at predefined time points. A prospective, observational clinical study. A teaching hospital, single center. Consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery (N = 300). Besides routine laboratory coagulation studies and heparin management with standard (kaolin) activated clotting time, additional native blood samples were analyzed on a Sonoclot using glass bead-activated tests. Glass bead-activated clotting time, clot rate, and platelet function were recorded immediately before anesthesia induction and at the end of surgery after heparin reversal but before chest closure. Primary outcome was postoperative blood loss (chest tube drainage at 4, 8, and 12 hours postoperatively). Secondary outcome parameters were transfusion requirements, need for surgical re-exploration, time of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and hospital morbidity and mortality. Patients were categorized into "bleeders" and "nonbleeders." Patient characteristics, operations, preoperative standard laboratory parameters, and procedural times were comparable between bleeders and nonbleeders except for sex and age. Bleeders had higher rates of transfusions, surgical re-explorations, and complications. Only glass bead measurements by Sonoclot after heparin reversal before chest closure but not preoperatively were predictive for increased postoperative bleeding. Sonoclot with its glass bead-activated tests may predict the risk for postoperative bleeding in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at the end of surgery after heparin reversal but before chest closure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. ABO-Rh blood groups distribution in cardiac syndrome X patients.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Rasmi, Yousef; Nemati, Mohaddeseh; Mohammadzad, Mir Hossein Seyed

    2012-07-01

    Data on frequency distribution of ABO-Rh blood groups in cardiac syndrome X (CSX) patients are not available. We aimed to investigate the distribution of ABO-Rh blood groups in these patients. A total of 247 CSX patients' records were reviewed in a cross-sectional study from 2006 to 2010. One hundred forty six patients (59.1%) were female, and the mean patient age was 52 ± 11 years. The frequency of ABO-Rh blood groups was compared to the frequency of these blood groups in the West-Azerbaijan province, Iran; general population. Blood groups distribution among CSX patients showed phenotypes A, B, AB, O and Rh negative as 33.1%, 21.9%, 9.3%, 35.8%, and 7.9%, respectively. According to our results, there were no differences in ABO-Rh blood groups distribution between CSX patients and normal population. These data suggest that ABO-Rh blood groups might be unassociated with CSX.

  18. Effects of Blood Purification on Serum Levels of Inflammatory Cytokines and Cardiac Function in a Rat Model of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cong-Meng; Chen, Cun-Rong; Wu, Xue-Qiong; Ren, Jin-Hua; Chen, Shao-Zhen; Luo, Xiao-Feng; Mei, Xu-Qiao; Shen, Lv-Ying; Guo, Meng-Xian; Ma, Xu-Dong; Yang, Ting

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the effects of blood purification (BP) on serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and cardiac function in a rat model of sepsis. A rat model of sepsis was established by cecal ligation and puncture. All rats were divided into the normal control, sham operation, model, sham treatment, and BP treatment groups. Cardiac functions, inflammatory cytokines, myocardial enzymes, pathological score of cardiac muscle tissue, and myocardial apoptosis of rats in each group were compared. Sepsis rats had higher serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and lower cardiac function than those in the normal control and sham operation groups. Compared with the model and sham treatment groups, improved cardiac functions, decreased inflammatory cytokines, myocardial enzymes, pathological score, and myocardial apoptosis and mortality were observed in the BP treatment group. BP may reduce serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and improve cardiac function of sepsis rats. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Imaging of pulmonary embolism and t-PA therapy effects using MDCT and liposomal iohexol blood pool agent: preliminary results in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Burke, Stephen J; Annapragada, Ananth; Hoffman, Eric A; Chen, Emmanuel; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Sieren, Jered; van Beek, Edwin J R

    2007-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol-coated liposomal blood pool contrast agents maintain contrast enhancement over several hours. This study aimed to evaluate (long-term) imaging of pulmonary arteries, comparing conventional iodinated contrast with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Also, visualization of the (real-time) therapeutic effects of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) on pulmonary embolism (PE) was attempted. Six rabbits (weight approximately 4 kg) had autologous blood clots injected through the superior vena cava. Imaging was performed using conventional contrast (iohexol, 350 mg I/ml; GE HealthCare, Princeton, NJ) at a dose of 1400 mg I per animal, and after wash-out, animals were imaged using an iodinated liposomal blood pool agent (88 mg I/mL, dose 900 mg I/animal). Subsequently, five animals were injected with 2 mg of t-PA and imaging continued for up to 4(1/2) hours. Both contrast agents identified PE in the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries in all rabbits. Liposomal blood pool agent yielded uniform enhancement, which remained relatively constant throughout the experiments. Conventional agents exhibited nonuniform opacification and rapid clearance postinjection. Three of six rabbits had mistimed bolus injections, requiring repeat injections. Following t-PA, pulmonary embolus volume (central to segmental) decreased in four of five treated rabbits (range 10-57%, mean 42%). One animal showed no response to t-PA. Liposomal blood pool agents effectively identified acute PE without need for reinjection. PE resolution following t-PA was quantifiable over several hours. Blood pool agents offer the potential for repeated imaging procedures without need for repeated (nephrotoxic) contrast injections.

  20. Imaging of pulmonary embolism and t-PA therapy effects using MDCT and liposomal iohexol blood pool agent – preliminary results in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Stephen J; Annapragada, Ananth; Hoffman, Eric A; Chen, Emmanuel; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Sieren, Jered; van Beek, Edwin JR

    2007-01-01

    Hypothesis and Objectives PEGylated liposomal blood pool contrast agents maintain contrast enhancement over several hours. This study aimed to evaluate (long-term) imaging of pulmonary arteries, comparing conventional iodinated contrast with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Secondly, visualization of the (real-time) therapeutic effects of tissue-Plasminogen Activator (t-PA) on pulmonary embolism (PE) was attempted. Materials and Methods Six rabbits (approximate 4 kg weight) had autologous blood clots injected through the superior vena cava. Imaging was performed using conventional contrast (iohexol, 350 mg I/ml, GE HealthCare, Princeton, NJ) at a dose of 1400 mgI per animal and after wash-out, animals were imaged using an iodinated liposomal blood pool agent (88 mg I/mL, dose 900 mgI/animal). Subsequently, five animals were injected with 2mg t-PA and imaging continued for up to 4 ½ hours. Results Both contrast agents identified PE in the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries in all rabbits. Liposomal blood pool agent yielded uniform enhancement, which remained relatively constant throughout the experiments. Conventional agents exhibited non uniform opacification and rapid clearance post injection. Three out of six rabbits had mistimed bolus injections, requiring repeat injections. Following t-PA, Pulmonary embolus volume (central to segmental) decreased in four of five treated rabbits (range 10–57%, mean 42%). One animal showed no response to t-PA. Conclusions Liposomal blood pool agents effectively identified acute PE without need for re-injection. PE resolution following t-PA was quantifiable over several hours. Blood pool agents offer the potential for repeated imaging procedures without need for repeated (nephrotoxic) contrast injections. PMID:17307669

  1. Ultrastable polyethyleneimine-stabilized gold nanoparticles modified with polyethylene glycol for blood pool, lymph node and tumor CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongxing; Wen, Shihui; Zhao, Lingzhou; Li, Du; Liu, Changcun; Jiang, Wenbin; Gao, Xiang; Gu, Wentao; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Jinhua; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhao, Qinghua

    2016-03-01

    Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG monomethyl ether via PEI amine-enabled conjugation chemistry, followed by acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines. The formed PEGylated Au PSNPs were characterized via different methods. We show that the PEGylated Au PSNPs with an Au core size of 5.1 nm have a relatively long half-decay time (7.8 h), and display a better X-ray attenuation property than conventionally used iodine-based CT contrast agents (e.g., Omnipaque), and are hemocompatible and cytocompatible in a given concentration range. These properties of the Au PSNPs afford their uses as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of the blood pool and major organs of rats, lymph node of rabbits, and the xenografted tumor model of mice. Importantly, the PEGylated Au PSNPs could be excreted out of the body with time and also showed excellent in vivo stability. These findings suggest that the formed PEGylated Au PSNPs may be used as a promising contrast agent for CT imaging of different biological systems.Development of new long-circulating contrast agents for computed tomography (CT) imaging of different biological systems still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the design and synthesis of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au PSNPs) modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for blood pool, lymph node, and tumor CT imaging. In this study, thiolated PEI was first synthesized and used as a stabilizing agent to form AuNPs. The formed Au PSNPs were then grafted with PEG

  2. Synthesis and characterization of PEGylated polyethylenimine-entrapped gold nanoparticles for blood pool and tumor CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Benqing; Zheng, Linfeng; Peng, Chen; Li, Du; Li, Jingchao; Wen, Shihui; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2014-10-08

    The synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) entrapped within polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified polyethylenimine (PEI) for blood pool and tumor computed tomography (CT) imaging are reported. In this approach, partially PEGylated PEI was used as a template for AuNP synthesis, followed by acetylating the PEI remaining surface amines. The synthesized PEGylated PEI-entrapped AuNPs (Au PENPs) were characterized via different methods. Our results reveal that the synthesized Au PENPs can be tuned to have an Au core size in a range of 1.9-4.6 nm and to be water-soluble, stable, and noncytotoxic in a studied concentration range. With a demonstrated better X-ray attenuation property than that of clinically used iodinated small molecular contrast agent (e.g., Omnipaque) and the prolonged half-decay time (11.2 h in rat) confirmed by pharmacokinetics studies, the developed PEGylated Au PENPs enabled efficient and enhanced blood pool CT imaging with imaging time up to 75 min. Likewise, thanks to the enhanced permeability and retention effect, the PEGylated Au PENPs were also able to be used as a contrast agent for effective CT imaging of a tumor model. With the proven organ biocompatibility by histological studies, the designed PEGylated Au PENPs may hold great promise to be used as contrast agents for CT imaging of a variety of biological systems. The significance of this study is that rather than the use of dendrimers as templates, cost-effective branched polymers (e.g., PEI) can be used as templates to generate functionalized AuNPs for CT imaging applications.

  3. Activity-adjusted 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and cardiac remodeling in children with sleep disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Amin, Raouf; Somers, Virend K; McConnell, Keith; Willging, Paul; Myer, Charles; Sherman, Marc; McPhail, Gary; Morgenthal, Ashley; Fenchel, Matthew; Bean, Judy; Kimball, Thomas; Daniels, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Questions remain as to whether pediatric sleep disordered breathing increases the risk for elevated blood pressure and blood pressure-dependent cardiac remodeling. We tested the hypothesis that activity-adjusted morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and diurnal and nocturnal blood pressure are significantly higher in children with sleep disordered breathing than in healthy controls and that these blood pressure parameters relate to left ventricular remodeling. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure parameters were compared between groups. The associations between blood pressure and left ventricular relative wall thickness and mass were measured. 140 children met the inclusion criteria. In children with apnea hypopnea index <5 per hour, a significant difference from controls was the morning blood surge. Significant increases in blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure were evident in those whom the apnea hypopnea index exceeded 5 per hour. Sleep disordered breathing and body mass index had similar effect on blood pressure parameters except for nocturnal diastolic blood pressure, where sleep disordered breathing had a significantly greater effect than body mass index. Diurnal and nocturnal systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure predicted the changes in left ventricular relative wall thickness. Therefore, sleep disordered breathing in children who are otherwise healthy is independently associated with an increase in morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. The association between left ventricular remodeling and 24-hour blood pressure highlights the role of sleep disordered breathing in increasing cardiovascular morbidity.

  4. Correlation-based discrimination between cardiac tissue and blood for segmentation of 3D echocardiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saris, Anne E. C. M.; Nillesen, Maartje M.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; de Korte, Chris L.

    2013-03-01

    Automated segmentation of 3D echocardiographic images in patients with congenital heart disease is challenging, because the boundary between blood and cardiac tissue is poorly defined in some regions. Cardiologists mentally incorporate movement of the heart, using temporal coherence of structures to resolve ambiguities. Therefore, we investigated the merit of temporal cross-correlation for automated segmentation over the entire cardiac cycle. Optimal settings for maximum cross-correlation (MCC) calculation, based on a 3D cross-correlation based displacement estimation algorithm, were determined to obtain the best contrast between blood and myocardial tissue over the entire cardiac cycle. Resulting envelope-based as well as RF-based MCC values were used as additional external force in a deformable model approach, to segment the left-ventricular cavity in entire systolic phase. MCC values were tested against, and combined with, adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data. Segmentation results were compared with manually segmented volumes using a 3D Dice Similarity Index (3DSI). Results in 3D pediatric echocardiographic images sequences (n = 4) demonstrate that incorporation of temporal information improves segmentation. The use of MCC values, either alone or in combination with adaptive filtered, demodulated RF-data, resulted in an increase of the 3DSI in 75% of the cases (average 3DSI increase: 0.71 to 0.82). Results might be further improved by optimizing MCC-contrast locally, in regions with low blood-tissue contrast. Reducing underestimation of the endocardial volume due to MCC processing scheme (choice of window size) and consequential border-misalignment, could also lead to more accurate segmentations. Furthermore, increasing the frame rate will also increase MCC-contrast and thus improve segmentation.

  5. Universal pooled plasma (Uniplas(®)) does not induce complement-mediated hemolysis of human red blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heger, Andrea; Brandstätter, Hubert; Prager, Bettina; Brainovic, Janja; Cortes, Rhoda; Römisch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Pooling of plasma of different blood groups before large scale manufacturing of Uniplas(®) results in the formation of low levels of soluble immune complexes (CIC). The aim of this study was to investigate the level and removal of CIC during Uniplas(®) manufacturing. In addition, an in vitro hemolysis assay should be developed and investigate if Uniplas(®) does induce complement-mediated hemolysis of human red blood cells (RBC). In-process samples from Uniplas(®) (universal plasma) and Octaplas(LG)(®) (blood group specific plasma) routine manufacturing batches were tested on CIC using commercially available ELISA test kits. In addition, CIC was produced by admixing heat-aggregated immunoglobulins or monoclonal anti-A/anti-B antibodies to plasma and removal of CIC was followed in studies of the Uniplas(®) manufacturing process under down-scale conditions. The extent of RBC lysis was investigated in plasma samples using the in-house hemolysis assay. Levels of CIC in Uniplas(®) are within the normal ranges for plasma and comparable to that found in Octaplas(LG)(®). Down-scale experiments showed that both IgG/IgM-CIC levels are significantly removed on average by 40-50% during Uniplas(®) manufacturing. Uniplas(®) does not induce hemolysis of RBCs in vitro. Hemolysis occurs only after spiking with high titers of anti-A/anti-B antibodies and depends on the antibody specificity (i.e. titer) in the plasma sample. The results of this study confirm the safety of Uniplas(®) regarding transfusion to patients of all ABO blood groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pheochromocytoma Crisis With Severe Cyclic Blood Pressure Fluctuations in a Cardiac Pheochromocytoma Patient Successfully Resuscitated by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Dawei; Su, Longxiang; Long, Yun; Du, Wei; Miao, Qi; Li, Fang; Jin, Zhengyu; Zeng, Zhengpei; Luo, Ailun; Huang, Yuguang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac pheochromocytoma is relatively rare. Few reports describe the intraoperative and postoperative progression of patients experiencing a life-threatening pheochromocytoma crisis treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). A 35-year-old man was referred to our facility for paroxysmal hypertension with a 10-year history of sweating, headaches, cardiac palpitations, and postexercise dyspnea. The patient initially underwent urine catecholamine measurement and an isotope scan, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (CT), which indicated a multiple, cardiac pheochromocytoma. Echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT reconstruction, and a coronary CT angiography revealed several lesions at the aortic root and along the cardiac vasculature. Multifocal cardiac pheochromocytoma was diagnosed and pheochromocytoma crisis with severe cyclic blood pressure fluctuation occurred during surgery. Surgical resection of multiple pheochromocytomas in the right medial carotid sheath, mediastinum between the main and pulmonary arteries, and between the abdominal aorta and inferior vena artery was performed. To ensure cardiac perfusion and avoid severe circulatory fluctuation, the cardiac paraganglioma resection was prioritized. After resecting the cardiac pheochromocytoma, a severe pheochromocytoma crisis with rapid cyclic blood pressure fluctuation developed. ECMO and intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) were initiated to stabilize circulation and perfusion. Phenoxybenzamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and fluid resuscitation were administered to support cardiovascular function. The magnitude of blood pressure fluctuation steadily decreased with treatment. IABP was discontinued after 3 days, and ECMO was discontinued after 16 days. The patient was discharged 3 months postoperatively. This case indicates that mechanical life support with ECMO is a valuable option for

  7. Blood transfusion in cardiac surgery--does the choice of anesthesia or type of surgery matter?

    PubMed

    Nesković, Vojislava; Milojević, Predrag; Unić-Stojanović, Dragana; Slavković, Zoran

    2013-05-01

    In spite of the evidence suggesting a significant morbidity associated with blood transfusions, the use of blood and blood products remain high in cardiac surgery. To successfully minimize the need for blood transfusion, a systematic approach is needed. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of different anesthetic techniques, general vs combine epidural and general anesthesia, as well as different surgery strategies, on-pump vs off-pump, on postoperative bleeding complications and the need for blood transfusions during perioperative period. Eighty-two consecutive patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass surgery were randomized according to surgical and anesthetic techniques into 4 different groups: group 1 (patients operated on off-pump, under general anesthesia); group 2 (patients operated on off-pump, with combined general and high thoracic epidural anesthesia); group 3 (patients operated on using standard revascularization technique, with the use of extracorporeal circulation, under general anesthesia), and group 4 (patients operated on using standard revascularization technique, with the use of extracorporeal circulation, with combined general and high thoracic epidural anesthesia). Indications for transfusion were based on clinical judgment, but a restrictive policy was encouraged. Bleeding was considered significant if it required transfusion of blood or blood products, or reopening of the chest. The quantity of transfused blood or blood products was specifically noted. None of the patients was transfused blood or blood products during the surgery, and as many as 70/81 (86.4%) patients were not transfused at all during hospital stay. No difference in postoperative bleeding or blood transfusion was noted in relation to the type of surgery and anesthetic technique applied. If red blood cells were transfused, postoperative bleeding was the most influential parameter for making clinical decision. No influence of off-pump surgery or epidural

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Red Blood Cell Transfusion Triggers in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Koch, Colleen G; Sessler, Daniel I; Mascha, Edward J; Sabik, Joseph F; Li, Liang; Duncan, Andra I; Zimmerman, Nicole M; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-10-01

    Class I evidence supporting a threshold for transfusion in the cardiac surgical setting is scarce. We randomly allocated patients to a transfusion hematocrit trigger of 24% versus 28% to compare morbidity, mortality, and resource use. From March 2007 to August 2014, two centers randomly assigned 722 adults undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery or valve procedures to a 24% hematocrit trigger (n = 363, low group) or 28% trigger (n = 354, high group). One unit of red blood cells was transfused if the hematocrit fell below the designated threshold. The primary endpoint was a composite of postoperative morbidities and mortality. Treatment effect was primarily assessed using an average relative effect generalized estimating equation model. At the second planned interim analysis, the a priori futility boundary was crossed, and the study was stopped. There was no detected treatment effect on the composite outcome (average relative effect odds ratio, low versus high, 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.29 to 2.54, p = 0.71). However, the low group received fewer red blood cell transfusions than the high group (54% versus 75%, p < 0.001), mostly administered in the operating room (low group, 112 [31%]; high group, 208 [59%]), followed by intensive care unit (low, 105 [31%]; high, 115 [34%]) and floor (low, 41 [12%]; high, 42 [13%]). The low group was exposed to lower hematocrits: median before transfusion, 22% (Q1 = 21%, Q3 = 23%) versus 24% (Q1 = 22%, Q3 = 25%). Negative exposures differed between treatment groups, with lower hematocrit in the 24% trigger group and more red blood cells used in the 28% group, but adverse outcomes did not differ. Because red blood cell use was less with a 24% trigger without adverse effects, our randomized trial results support aggressive blood conservation efforts in cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and optimization of SPECT gated blood pool cluster analysis for the prediction of CRT outcome.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Michel; Wells, R Glenn; Birnie, David; Ruddy, Terrence D; Wassenaar, Richard

    2014-07-01

    Phase analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography (RNA) has been investigated for its potential to predict the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). However, phase analysis may be limited in its potential at predicting CRT outcome as valuable information may be lost by assuming that time-activity curves (TAC) follow a simple sinusoidal shape. A new method, cluster analysis, is proposed which directly evaluates the TACs and may lead to a better understanding of dyssynchrony patterns and CRT outcome. Cluster analysis algorithms were developed and optimized to maximize their ability to predict CRT response. About 49 patients (N = 27 ischemic etiology) received a SPECT RNA scan as well as positron emission tomography (PET) perfusion and viability scans prior to undergoing CRT. A semiautomated algorithm sampled the left ventricle wall to produce 568 TACs from SPECT RNA data. The TACs were then subjected to two different cluster analysis techniques, K-means, and normal average, where several input metrics were also varied to determine the optimal settings for the prediction of CRT outcome. Each TAC was assigned to a cluster group based on the comparison criteria and global and segmental cluster size and scores were used as measures of dyssynchrony and used to predict response to CRT. A repeated random twofold cross-validation technique was used to train and validate the cluster algorithm. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) and compare results to those obtained for SPECT RNA phase analysis and PET scar size analysis methods. Using the normal average cluster analysis approach, the septal wall produced statistically significant results for predicting CRT results in the ischemic population (ROC AUC = 0.73;p < 0.05 vs. equal chance ROC AUC = 0.50) with an optimal operating point of 71% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Cluster analysis results were

  10. Development and optimization of SPECT gated blood pool cluster analysis for the prediction of CRT outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Lalonde, Michel Wassenaar, Richard; Wells, R. Glenn; Birnie, David; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Phase analysis of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclide angiography (RNA) has been investigated for its potential to predict the outcome of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). However, phase analysis may be limited in its potential at predicting CRT outcome as valuable information may be lost by assuming that time-activity curves (TAC) follow a simple sinusoidal shape. A new method, cluster analysis, is proposed which directly evaluates the TACs and may lead to a better understanding of dyssynchrony patterns and CRT outcome. Cluster analysis algorithms were developed and optimized to maximize their ability to predict CRT response. Methods: About 49 patients (N = 27 ischemic etiology) received a SPECT RNA scan as well as positron emission tomography (PET) perfusion and viability scans prior to undergoing CRT. A semiautomated algorithm sampled the left ventricle wall to produce 568 TACs from SPECT RNA data. The TACs were then subjected to two different cluster analysis techniques, K-means, and normal average, where several input metrics were also varied to determine the optimal settings for the prediction of CRT outcome. Each TAC was assigned to a cluster group based on the comparison criteria and global and segmental cluster size and scores were used as measures of dyssynchrony and used to predict response to CRT. A repeated random twofold cross-validation technique was used to train and validate the cluster algorithm. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) and compare results to those obtained for SPECT RNA phase analysis and PET scar size analysis methods. Results: Using the normal average cluster analysis approach, the septal wall produced statistically significant results for predicting CRT results in the ischemic population (ROC AUC = 0.73;p < 0.05 vs. equal chance ROC AUC = 0.50) with an optimal operating point of 71% sensitivity and 60% specificity. Cluster

  11. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  12. [The influence of cardiosurgical intervention type and conditions of artificial blood circulation of perioperative dynamics of cardiac biomarkers].

    PubMed

    Dement'eva, I I; Morozov, Iu A; Charnaia, M A

    2013-01-01

    125 patients after cardiac surgery operated on with the use of artificial blood circulation (ABC) were followed-up. Blood levels of cardiac protein, binding aliphatic acids and troponin 1 and 3 days after the operation were registered. The study showed that aorta clamping more then 90 minutes and hypothermic perfusion regimen influence cardiomyocites negatively. The state of "surgical trauma" and reperfusional myocardium damage was approximately the same during aortic surgery, myocardium revascularization with the use of aortic clamping and cardioplegia, and correction of the acquired heart disease, according to the dynamics of the studied proteins in blood. The minimal blood level of cardiac protein, binding aliphatic acids after coronary by-pass surgery on the working heart witnesses about negative influence of crystalloid hypothermic cardioplegia on coronary microcirculation.

  13. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/. mu. Tc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.; Munck, O.

    1981-11-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/..mu..Tc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  14. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/mTc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.L.; Munck, O.

    1981-01-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/mTc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  15. [Risk Assessment of Single-Donor (Apheresis) Platelet Concentrates and Pooled Whole-Blood-Derived Platelet Concentrates].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter; Hutschenreuter, Gabriele; Wartensleben, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    According to the risk estimates of the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and the Paul Ehrlich-Institute (PEI) an equivalence cannot be assumed to exist between the two different platelet preparations. Differences between single-donor (apheresis) platelet concentrates (ATK) and pooled whole-blood-derived platelet concentrates (PTK) result from donor populations, donation intervals, and preparation techniques. There are no prospective randomized studies with regard to the clinical efficacy, which would unambiguously demonstrate equivalence of the therapeutic efficacy of PTK (buffy coat method) in comparison to ATK. The German Association of Blood Transfusion Services (StKB) points out that, due to the non-equivalence of PTK and ATK, it is incumbent on the transfusion physician to select the platelet concentrate, make the appropriate disclosures, and assume treatment responsibility. Proper compensation for ATK and PTK must be ensured by the health insurance companies, whereby a special indication for the selection of either PTK or ATK is not given. Exceptions are patients with known HLA antibodies in which only selected platelet concentrates may be administered. Otherwise, no indication exists in the selection of the different platelet concentrates (Article is in German).

  16. Radionuclide angiography and blood pool imaging to assess skin ulcer healing prognosis in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alazraki, N.; Lawrence, P.F.; Syverud, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Several non-invasive diagnostic techniques including segmental limb blood pressures, skin fluoresence, and photo plethysmography, have been evaluated as predictors of skin ulcer healing in patients with peripheral vascular disease, but none are widely used. Using 20mCi of Tc-99m phosphate compounds, four phase bone scans were obtained, including (1) radionuclide angiogram (2) blood pool image (3) 2 hour and 4-6 hour static images and (4) 24 hour static delayed images. The first two phases were used to assess vacularity to the region of distal extremity ulceration; the last two phases evaluated presence or absence of osteomyelitis. Studies were performed in 30 patients with non-healing ulcers of the lower extremities. Perfusion to the regions of ulceration on images was graded as normal, increased, or reduced with respect to the opposite (presumed normal) limb or some other normal reference area. Hypervascular response was interpreted as good prognosis for healing unless osteomyelitis was present. Clinicians followed patients for 14 days to assess limb healing with optimum care. If there was no improvement, angiography and/or surgery (reconstructive surgery, sympathectomy, or amputation) was done. Results showed: sensitivity for predicting ulcer healing was 94%, specificity 89%. Patients who failed to heal their ulcers showed reduced perfusion, no hypervascular response, or osteomyelitis. Microcirculatory adequacy for ulcer healing appear predictable by this technique.

  17. Clinical Assessment of Intraventricular Blood Transport in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Legazpi, P.; Benito, Y.; Perez Del Villar, C.; Gonzalez-Mansilla, A.; Barrio, A.; Yotti, R.; Kahn, A. M.; Shadden, S. C.; Fernandez-Aviles, F.; Bermejo, J.; Del Alamo, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    In the healthy heart, left ventricular (LV) filling generates flow patterns which have been proposed to optimize blood transport by coupling diastole and systole phases. We present a novel image-based method to assess how flow patterns influence LV blood transport in patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Solving the advection equation with time-varying inflow boundary conditions allows to track the transport of blood entering the LV in the different filling waves, as well as the transport barriers which couple filling and ejection. The velocity fields were obtained using echocardiographic color Doppler velocimetry, which provides two-dimensional time-resolved flow maps in the apical long axis three-chamber view of the LV. We analyze flow transport in a group of patients with CRT devices as well as in healthy volunteers. In the patients under CRT, the device programming was varied to analyze flow transport under different values of the atrioventricular (AV) conduction delay and to model tachycardia. This analysis illustrates how CRT influences the transit of blood inside the LV, contributes to conserving kinetic energy and favors the generation of hemodynamic forces that accelerate blood in the direction of the LV outflow tract.

  18. A comparison of methods for the measurement of cardiac output and blood oxygen content.

    PubMed

    Douglas, I R; MacDonald, J A; Milligan, G F; Mellon, A; Ledingham, I M

    1975-04-01

    A comparison has been made between the recently introduced thermal dilution method for measurement of cardiac output and the standard dye dilution technique. Two relatively new methods of measurement of blood oxygen content, one involving the measurement of oxygen tension after release of oxygen by carbon monoxide, and the other the measurement of current flow upon reduction of oxygen in a galvanic cell, have been compared with a standard indirect method of measurement of blood oxygen content. All three new methods fulfilled the criteria of accuracy and simplicity and compared favourably with the standard methods. Of the two new methods for measurement of oxygen content, that involving reduction of oxygen in a galvanic cell was superior by virtue of compactness and speed of operation.

  19. Diagnosis of storage pool deficiency by determination of diadenosine 5', 5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Flodgaard, H; Zamecnik, P C; Meyers, K; Klenow, H

    1986-02-01

    Platelets from cat and cattle with Chediak-Higashi disease were found completely devoid of Ap4A as measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Using a very sensitive firefly biolumnescence method 6% of the normal content of Ap4A was, however, found in platelets from sick animals. A content of Ap A of 1.90 +/- 0.11 X 10 M (means +/- SEM, n = 10) was found in whole normal human blood as measured by firefly bioluminescense method in trichloroacetic acid extracts of the blood samples. This concentration corresponds to the contribution from the platelets, thus the contribution of Ap4A from erythrocytes and the "buffy-coat" is negligible. Using the same method an Ap4A contents in platelets of 0.063 and 0.021 nmol/mg of protein compared to the normal content of 0.42 nmol/mg of protein (1) was found in two patients with severe myeloproliferative disorder calculated in this way on basis of platelet counts and on the assumption that 10(11) platelets contain 189 mg of protein (2). Comparison of these figures with parallel HPLC analyses on acid extracts of platelets isolated from the same patient were in agreement. The storage pool deficiency of adenine nucleotides in this disease found by others on basis of release experiments (3) can thus be diagnosed by rapid and simple measurements of Ap4A in whole blood using the advantage of Ap4A being a specific components stored in dense granules.

  20. Bacteriologic and endotoxin analysis of salvaged blood used in autologous transfusions during cardiac operations.

    PubMed

    Bland, L A; Villarino, M E; Arduino, M J; McAllister, S K; Gordon, S M; Uyeda, C T; Valdon, C; Potts, D; Jarvis, W R; Favero, M S

    1992-03-01

    Autologous blood transfusion is a common method of reducing the need for heterologous blood transfusion during cardiac operations. Recently we investigated an outbreak of severe, nonsurgical postoperative bleeding among patients undergoing heart operations and receiving intraoperative transfusion of blood from a cell conservation device (Cell Saver System, Haemonetics Corp., Braintree, Mass.). As a result of this investigation, we conducted a prospective study to determine if bacterial or endotoxin contamination of the blood collected in the Cell Saver System and used for reinfusion during heart operations contributes to postoperative bleeding complications. Patients' blood samples were collected immediately before operation, at the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, 1 hour postoperatively, and from the Cell Saver System. All blood samples were cultured for bacteria, and all plasma samples were assayed for endotoxin. Preoperatively all patients having heart operations were without signs of infection, 33 of 37 blood cultures taken were negative, and none of the plasma samples had detectable endotoxin. After discontinuance of cardiopulmonary bypass but before delivery of blood from the Cell Saver System, bacteria and endotoxin were detected in 11 of 36 (30.6%) and five of 35 (14.3%) of the patients' blood samples, respectively. The blood aspirated from the open chest and collected by the Cell Saver System was culture positive in 30 of 31 (96.8%) samples, and seven of 29 (24.1%) contained endotoxin. One of 28 blood samples collected 1 hour postoperatively was culture positive, and five of 25 samples contained endotoxin. Of 61 total microorganisms isolated, 50 (82%) were coagulase-negative staphylococci, four (6.6%) aerobic diphtheroids, five (8.2%) anaerobic "diphtheroids" (Propionibacterium acnes), and two (3.2%) gram-negative bacilli. Plasma endotoxin concentrations ranged from 10 to 765 pg/ml. No signs of endotoxemia or unusual bleeding were observed intraoperatively

  1. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  2. Preoperative haemostasis testing does not predict requirement of blood products in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Prohaska, W; Zittermann, A; Inoue, K; Tenderich, G; Lüth, J-U; Köster-Eiserfunke, W; Körfer, R; Kleesiek, K

    2008-11-24

    Standard haemostasis screening tests are performed to reveal unknown congenital or acquired disturbances of plasma and/or platelet haemostasis. Since their diagnostic efficacy is often low, routinely performed haemostasis testing has been questioned. We investigated whether preoperatively assessed haemostasis testing can be used to predict the requirement of blood products. We retrospectively assessed haemostasis parameters including platelet function testing by PFA 100 as well as the numbers of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates, fresh frozen plasmas (FFPs), and platelet concentrates (PCs) that were given peri-operatively and during the first two postoperative days in 2,831 cardiac surgery patients. Logistic regression analyses were used to select those parameters, which could predict blood product requirement. Of our study cohort, 56.5% needed RBCs, 15% FFPs, and 5% PCs. The need for RBCs was associated with significantly altered pre-operative values of most haemostasis parameters. However, by the use of logistic regression analysis fibrinogen was the only haemostasis parameter that was independently associated with the use of RBCs (odds ratio 1.56; 95% CI: 1.27-1.91; P <0.001). The predictive value of other parameters such as age, body weight, haemoglobin, and haematocrit was however much higher in comparison to fibrinogen (odds ratios: 1.92-3.50; P <0.001). It was not possible to develop a score based on haemostasis parameters to accurately identify patients at risk for RBC use. Moreover, we were unable to estimate the need for FFPs and PCs using preoperative haemostasis testing. Our data demonstrate that preoperatively performed haemostasis testing is not predictive in estimating the need for blood products in cardiac surgery patients.

  3. Patient-centric Blood Pressure–targeted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival from Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Friess, Stuart H.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Lampe, Joshua W.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. Objectives: To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods: After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure–targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. Measurements and Main Results: The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9–13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0–12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0–3] vs. 2 [range, 2–2]; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Blood pressure–targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest. PMID:25321490

  4. Impact of Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure Change during Middle Age on the Remaining Lifetime Risk for Cardiovascular Disease: The Cardiovascular Lifetime Risk Pooling Project

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Norrina; Berry, Jarett D.; Ning, Hongyan; Van Horn, Linda; Dyer, Alan; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prior estimates of lifetime risk (LTR) for cardiovascular disease (CVD) examined the impact of blood pressure at the index age and did not account for changes in blood pressure over time. We examined how changes in blood pressure during middle-age affect LTR for CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke. Methods and Results Data from 7 diverse US cohort studies were pooled. Remaining LTR for CVD, CHD and stroke were estimated for White and Black men and women with death free of CVD as a competing event. LTR for CVD by blood pressure (BP) strata and by changes in BP over an average of 14 years were estimated. Starting at age 55, we followed 61,585 men and women for 700,000 person-years. LTR for CVD was 52.5% (95% CI 51.3–53.7) for men and 39.9% (38.7–41.0) for women. LTR for CVD was higher for Blacks and increased with increasing BP at index age. Individuals who maintained or decreased their BP to normal levels had the lowest remaining LTR for CVD, 22–41%, as compared to individuals who had or developed hypertension by the age of 55, 42–69%; suggesting a dose-response effect for the length of time at high BP levels Conclusions Individuals who experience increases or decreases in BP in middle age have associated higher and lower remaining LTR for CVD. Prevention efforts should continue to emphasize the importance of lowering BP and avoiding or delaying the incidence of hypertension in order to reduce the LTR for CVD. PMID:22184621

  5. Patient-Specific Simulation of Cardiac Blood Flow From High-Resolution Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Jonas; Henriksson, Lilian; Persson, Anders; Karlsson, Matts; Ebbers, Tino

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac hemodynamics can be computed from medical imaging data, and results could potentially aid in cardiac diagnosis and treatment optimization. However, simulations are often based on simplified geometries, ignoring features such as papillary muscles and trabeculae due to their complex shape, limitations in image acquisitions, and challenges in computational modeling. This severely hampers the use of computational fluid dynamics in clinical practice. The overall aim of this study was to develop a novel numerical framework that incorporated these geometrical features. The model included the left atrium, ventricle, ascending aorta, and heart valves. The framework used image registration to obtain patient-specific wall motion, automatic remeshing to handle topological changes due to the complex trabeculae motion, and a fast interpolation routine to obtain intermediate meshes during the simulations. Velocity fields and residence time were evaluated, and they indicated that papillary muscles and trabeculae strongly interacted with the blood, which could not be observed in a simplified model. The framework resulted in a model with outstanding geometrical detail, demonstrating the feasibility as well as the importance of a framework that is capable of simulating blood flow in physiologically realistic hearts.

  6. Predictive factors for red blood cell transfusion in children undergoing noncomplex cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mulaj, Muj; Faraoni, David; Willems, Ariane; Sanchez Torres, Cristel; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequently required in pediatric cardiac surgery and is associated with altered outcome and increased costs. Determining which factors predict transfusion in this context will enable clinicians to adopt strategies that will reduce the risk of RBC transfusion. This study aimed to assess predictive factors associated with RBC transfusion in children undergoing low-risk cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Children undergoing surgery to repair ventricular septal defect or atrioventricular septal defect from 2006 to 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Demography, preoperative laboratory testing, intraoperative data, and RBC transfusion were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to define factors that were able to predict RBC transfusion. Then, we employed receiver operating characteristic analysis to design a predictive score. Among the 334 children included, 261 (78%) were transfused. Age (<18 months), priming volume of the CPB (>43 mL/kg), type of oxygenator used, minimal temperature reached during CPB (<32°C), and preoperative hematocrit (<34%) were independently associated with RBC transfusion in the studied population. A predictive score 2 or greater was the best predictor of RBC transfusion. The present study identified several factors that were significantly associated with perioperative RBC transfusion. Based on these factors, we designed a predictive score that can be used to develop a patient-based blood management program with the aim of reducing the incidence of RBC transfusion. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effect of octacostyl alcohol preparation on blood free radical metabolism and cardiac endocrine function of rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-ying; Liu, Hua-gang; Lin, Jing-song; Cao, Jun-tao

    2008-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of octacostyl alcohol preparation on the motor function, blood free radical metabolism and cardiac endocrine function of rats. A rat model of exercise fatigue was used for this study. The rats were made to perform continuous exhaustive exercise, and the total exercise time of the rats till exhaustion was recorded followed by examination of the serum superoxide dismutase (SOD), malonaldehyde (MDA), plasma endothelin (ET), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Compared with rats without interventions for exercise fatigue, the rats receiving octacostyl alcohol preparation had significant prolonged exercise time till exhaustion (P<0.05), with also significantly enhanced serum SOD activity (P<0.05), significantly decreased MDA level and plasma ET (P<0.05) and increased CGRP and ANP levels (P<0.05). Octacostyl alcohol preparation produced more favorable effect on all the indices measured than pyruvic acid-creatine (P<0.05). The octacostyl alcohol preparation can promote the motor function, increases blood antioxidase activity, suppressed lipid peroxidation in rats engaged in exhaustive exercise. The preparation also produces favorable effect on cardiac endocrine function for heart protection during exercise.

  8. Effect of Prime Blood Storage Duration on Clinical Outcome After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bishnoi, Arvind Kumar; Garg, Pankaj; Patel, Kartik; Solanki, Parth; Surti, Jigar; Solanki, Atul; Shah, Komal; Patel, Sanjay

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with blood prime, the storage duration of the packed red blood cells (PRBCs) used in prime led to differences in postoperative complications and metabolic profiles of the patients. For this prospective observational study we included 400 pediatric patients undergoing cardiac operations using CPB and requiring PRBCs prime. To study the effect of storage duration of PRBCs on postoperative morbidity, mortality, and metabolic profile, patients were divided into four groups (based on storage duration of PRBCs used in prime). Group 1: ≤7 days, group 2: 8 to 14 days, group 3: 15 to 21 days, and group 4: >21 days. On univariate analysis, patients transfused with PRBCs stored >14 days had significantly higher incidence of postoperative complications, for example, liver dysfunction, hematological complications, sepsis, and multiorgan failure. However, after regression analysis and adjusting for the other confounder's effects, no significant association was found between storage duration of PRBCs and postoperative complications and mortality. Metabolic profile of PRBCs was observed to become deranged with increasing duration of storage. This, however, improved to near physiological range early after the initiation of CPB and remained normal one hour after weaning from CPB, irrespective of the storage duration. Storage duration of PRBCs used for priming the pediatric CPB circuit neither affects the metabolic profile of the patients on CPB or early after surgery, nor it has any association with postoperative complications and mortality.

  9. Evaluation of cardiac function during left ventricular assist by a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kikugawa, D

    2000-08-01

    In this study, the effects on varying cardiac function during a left ventricular (LV) bypass from the apex to the descending aorta using a centrifugal blood pump were evaluated by analyzing the left ventricular pressure and the motor current of the centrifugal pump in a mock circulatory loop. Failing heart models (preload 15 mm Hg, afterload 40 mm Hg) and normal heart models (preload 5 mm Hg, afterload 100 mm Hg) were simulated by adjusting the contractility of the latex rubber left ventricle. In Study 1, the bypass flow rate, left ventricular pressure, aortic pressure, and motor current levels were measured in each model as the centrifugal pump rpm were increased from 1,000 to 1,500 to 2,000. In Study 2, the pump rpm were fixed at 1,300, 1,500, and 1,700, and at each rpm, the left ventricular peak pressure was increased from 40 to 140 mm Hg by steps of 20 mm Hg. The same measurements as in Study 1 were performed. In Study 1, the bypass flow rate and mean aortic pressure both increased with the increase in pump rpm while the mean left ventricular pressure decreased. In Study 2, a fairly good correlation between the left ventricular pressure and the motor current of the centrifugal pump was obtained. These results suggest that cardiac function as indicated by left ventricular pressure may be estimated from a motor current analysis of the centrifugal blood pump during left heart bypass.

  10. Effect of yoga therapy on heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac autonomic function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Bandi Hari; Pal, Pravati; G K, Pal; J, Balachander; E, Jayasettiaseelon; Y, Sreekanth; M G, Sridhar; G S, Gaur

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that a hall mark of heart failure is adverse changes in autonomic function. Elevated blood pressure is a powerful predictor of congestive heart failure and other Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) outcomes. In this study, we planned to examine the effects of a 12 week yoga therapy on blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and rate pressure product (RPP). Out of 130 heart failure patients recruited for the study, 65 patients were randomly selected to receive 12 week yoga therapy along with standard medical therapy (yoga group). Other patients (n=65) received only standard medical therapy (control group). Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac autonomic function (by short-term heart-rate variability analysis) and myocardial oxygen consumption (by RPP) were assessed before and after 12 weeks. In the yoga group, 44 patients and in the control group, 48 patients completed the study. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, blood pressure and RPP in yoga group compared to control group. Also, LFnu and LF-HF ratio decreased significantly and HFnu increased significantly in yoga group compared to control group. Twelve-week yoga therapy significantly improved the parasympathetic activity and decreased the sympathetic activity in heart failure patients (NYHA I&II).

  11. Cerebral blood flow is decoupled from blood pressure and linked to EEG bursting after resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Crouzet, Christian; Wilson, Robert H.; Bazrafkan, Afsheen; Farahabadi, Maryam H.; Lee, Donald; Alcocer, Juan; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Choi, Bernard; Akbari, Yama

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have developed a multi-modal instrument that combines laser speckle imaging, arterial blood pressure, and electroencephalography (EEG) to quantitatively assess cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and brain electrophysiology before, during, and after asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) and resuscitation. Using the acquired data, we quantified the time and magnitude of the CBF hyperemic peak and stabilized hypoperfusion after resuscitation. Furthermore, we assessed the correlation between CBF and MAP before and after stabilized hypoperfusion. Finally, we examined when brain electrical activity resumes after resuscitation from CA with relation to CBF and MAP, and developed an empirical predictive model to predict when brain electrical activity resumes after resuscitation from CA. Our results show that: 1) more severe CA results in longer time to stabilized cerebral hypoperfusion; 2) CBF and MAP are coupled before stabilized hypoperfusion and uncoupled after stabilized hypoperfusion; 3) EEG activity (bursting) resumes after the CBF hyperemic phase and before stabilized hypoperfusion; 4) CBF predicts when EEG activity resumes for 5-min asphyxial CA, but is a poor predictor for 7-min asphyxial CA. Together, these novel findings highlight the importance of using multi-modal approaches to investigate CA recovery to better understand physiological processes and ultimately improve neurological outcome. PMID:27896005

  12. Blood product conservation is associated with improved outcomes and reduced costs after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    LaPar, Damien J; Crosby, Ivan K; Ailawadi, Gorav; Ad, Niv; Choi, Elmer; Spiess, Bruce D; Rich, Jeffery B; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Fonner, Edwin; Kron, Irving L; Speir, Alan M

    2013-03-01

    Efforts to reduce blood product use have the potential to avoid transfusion-related complications and reduce health care costs. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a multi-institutional effort to reduce blood product use affects postoperative events after cardiac surgical operations and to determine the influence of perioperative transfusion on risk-adjusted outcomes. A total of 14,259 patients (2006-2010) undergoing nonemergency, primary, isolated coronary artery bypass grafting operations at 17 different statewide cardiac centers were stratified according to transfusion guideline era: pre-guideline (n = 7059, age = 63.7 ± 10.6 years) versus post-guideline (n = 7200, age = 63.7 ± 10.5 years). Primary outcomes of interest were observed differences in postoperative events and mortality risk-adjusted associations as estimated by multiple regression analysis. Overall intraoperative (24% vs 18%, P < .001) and postoperative (39% vs 33%, P < .001) blood product transfusion were significantly reduced in the post-guideline era. Patients in the post-guideline era demonstrated reduced morbidity with decreased pneumonia (P = .01), prolonged ventilation (P = .05), renal failure (P = .03), new-onset hemodialysis (P = .004), and composite incidence of major complications (P = .001). Operative mortality (1.0% vs 1.8%, P < .001) and postoperative ventilation time (22 vs 26 hours, P < .001) were similarly reduced in the post-guideline era. Of note, after mortality risk adjustment, operations performed in the post-guideline era were associated with a 47% reduction in the odds of death (adjusted odds ratio, 0.57; P < .001), whereas the risk of major complications and mortality were significantly increased after intraoperative (adjusted odds ratio, 1.86 and 1.25; both P < .001) and postoperative (adjusted odds ratio, 4.61 and 4.50, both P < .001) transfusion. Intraoperative and postoperative transfusions were associated with increased adjusted incremental

  13. Scintigraphic assessment of heterotopic cardiac transplants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.A.; Kahn, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Patients receiving heterotopic (''piggyback'') cardiac transplants, when the patient's own and transplanted donor hearts are connected in parallel, present special problems in determining their relative contributions to total cardiac function. Three patients who had transplants because of intractable heart failure were studied using first pass and gated equilibrium technetium-99m-labeled blood pool scintigraphy. In one patient, thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scans were obtained. These nuclear cardiology techniques provided anatomic and functional information noninvasively that proved helpful in patient management.

  14. Scintigraphic assessment of heterotopic cardiac transplants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.A.; Kahn, D.R.

    1981-10-01

    Patients receiving heterotopic (piggyback) cardiac transplants, when the patient's own and transplanted donor hearts are connected in parallel, present special problems in determining their relative contributions to total cardiac function. Three patients who had transplants because of intractable heart failure were studied using first pass and gated equilibrium technetium-99m-labeled blood pool scintigraphy. In one patient, thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scans were obtained. These nuclearcardiology techniques provided anatomic and functional information noninvasively that proved helpful in patient management.

  15. Comparative evaluation of blood salvage techniques in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Serdar; Robertson, Craig; Budak, Ali Baran; Gourlay, Terence

    2017-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to test and compare the efficacy of currently available intraoperative blood salvage systems via a demonstration of the level of increase in percentage concentration of red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells 9WBC) and platelets (Plt) in the end product. In a prospective, randomized study, data of 80 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass in a 6-month period was collected, of which the volume aspirated from the surgical field was processed by either the HemoSep Novel Collection Bag (Advancis Surgical, Kirkby-in-Ashfield, Notts, UK) (N=40) (Group 1) or a cell- saver (C.A.T.S Plus Autotransfusion System, Fresenius Kabi, Bad Homburg, Germany) (N=40) (Group 2). Hematocrit levels increased from 23.05%±2.7 to 43.02%±12 in Group 1 and from 24.5±2 up to 55.2±9 in Group 2 (p=0.013). The mean number of platelets rose to 225200±47000 from 116400 ±40000 in the HemoSep and decreased from 125200±25000 to 96500±30000 in the cell-saver group (p=0.00001). The leukocyte count was concentrated significantly better in Group 1 (from 10100±4300 to 18120±7000; p=0.001). IL-6 levels (pg/dL) decreased from 223±47 to 83±21 in Group 1 and from 219±40 to 200±40 in Group 2 (p=0.001). Fibrinogen was protected significantly better in the HemoSep group (from 185±35 to 455±45; p=0.004). Intraoperative blood salvage systems functioned properly and the resultant blood product was superior in terms of red blood cell species. The HemoSep group had significantly better platelet and leukocyte concentrations and fibrinogen content.

  16. Human cord blood CD34+ progenitor cells acquire functional cardiac properties through a cell fusion process.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Daniele; Crespi, Alessia; Brioschi, Chiara; Parente, Valeria; Toietta, Gabriele; Devanna, Paolo; Baruscotti, Mirko; Truffa, Silvia; Scavone, Angela; Rusconi, Francesca; Biondi, Andrea; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Vigna, Elisa; Difrancesco, Dario; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Barbuti, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    The efficacy of cardiac repair by stem cell administration relies on a successful functional integration of injected cells into the host myocardium. Safety concerns have been raised about the possibility that stem cells may induce foci of arrhythmia in the ischemic myocardium. In a previous work (36), we showed that human cord blood CD34(+) cells, when cocultured on neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes, exhibit excitation-contraction coupling features similar to those of cardiomyocytes, even though no human genes were upregulated. The aims of the present work are to investigate whether human CD34(+) cells, isolated after 1 wk of coculture with neonatal ventricular myocytes, possess molecular and functional properties of cardiomyocytes and to discriminate, using a reporter gene system, whether cardiac differentiation derives from a (trans)differentiation or a cell fusion process. Umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells were isolated by a magnetic cell sorting method, transduced with a lentiviral vector carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, and seeded onto primary cultures of spontaneously beating rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cocultured EGFP(+)/CD34(+)-derived cells were analyzed for their electrophysiological features at different time points. After 1 wk in coculture, EGFP(+) cells, in contact with cardiomyocytes, were spontaneously contracting and had a maximum diastolic potential (MDP) of -53.1 mV, while those that remained isolated from the surrounding myocytes did not contract and had a depolarized resting potential of -11.4 mV. Cells were then resuspended and cultured at low density to identify EGFP(+) progenitor cell derivatives. Under these conditions, we observed single EGFP(+) beating cells that had acquired an hyperpolarization-activated current typical of neonatal cardiomyocytes (EGFP(+) cells, -2.24 ± 0.89 pA/pF; myocytes, -1.99 ± 0.63 pA/pF, at -125 mV). To discriminate between cell autonomous differentiation and fusion, EGFP(+)/CD34

  17. Mitigation of variation observed in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based HIV-1 neutralization assay by donor cell pooling.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce K; Delsarto Macedo, Camila; Wesberry-Schmierer, Maggie; Ngauy, Viseth; Rosa Borges, Andrew; Michael, Nelson L; Marovich, Mary A; Montefiori, David C; Polonis, Victoria R

    2013-12-01

    Cultured primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) represent a potentially physiologic in vitro model of HIV-1 infection, but assessment of antibody-mediated HIV-1 neutralization using PBMC has been hindered by donor variability and lack of a sustainable individual PBMC source. To advance this model for HIV vaccine evaluation, intra- and inter-assay variability were assessed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and PBMC targets from multiple HIV-seronegative donors. Inter-assay variability was introduced by using different PBMC for virus propagation, and more substantially, for assay targets. Neutralization titers varied by as much as 4 logs when using different individual donor PBMC as targets; variability was antibody-specific, with the greatest variation observed using an individual polyclonal plasma. Pooling of multiple PBMC donors significantly reduced median inter-assay variation to the level of intra-assay variation, suggesting a pathway forward for establishing a uniform, sustainable and standardized approach to the assessment of antibody function using a PBMC model.

  18. Independent and interactive effects of blood pressure and cardiac function on brain volume and white matter hyperintensities in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Alosco, Michael L; Brickman, Adam M; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Griffith, Erica Y; Narkhede, Atul; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Reduced systemic perfusion and comorbid medical conditions are key contributors to adverse brain changes in heart failure (HF). Hypertension, the most common co-occurring condition in HF, accelerates brain atrophy in aging populations. However, the independent and interactive effects of blood pressure and systemic perfusion on brain structure in HF have yet to be investigated. Forty-eight older adults with HF underwent impedance cardiography to assess current systolic blood pressure status and cardiac index to quantify systemic perfusion. All participants underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging to quantify total brain, total and subcortical gray matter volume, and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) volume. Regression analyses adjusting for medical and demographic factors showed decreased cardiac index was associated with smaller subcortical gray matter volume (P < .01), and higher systolic blood pressure predicted reduced total gray matter volume (P = .03). The combination of higher blood pressure and lower cardiac index exacerbated WMH (P = .048). Higher blood pressure and systemic hypoperfusion are associated with smaller brain volume, and these factors interact to exacerbate WMH in HF. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the effects of blood pressure on the brain in HF, including the role of long-term blood pressure fluctuations. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Independent and Interactive Effects of Blood Pressure and Cardiac Function on Brain Volume and White Matter Hyperintensities in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Brickman, Adam M.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Griffith, Erica Y.; Narkhede, Atul; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Reduced systemic perfusion and comorbid medical conditions are key contributors to adverse brain changes in heart failure (HF). Hypertension, the most common co-occurring condition in HF, accelerates brain atrophy in aging populations. However, the independent and interactive effects of blood pressure and systemic perfusion on brain structure in HF have yet to be investigated. Methods Forty-eight older adults with HF underwent impedance cardiography to assess current systolic blood pressure status, and cardiac index to quantify systemic perfusion. All participants underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging to quantify total brain, total and subcortical gray matter volume, and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) volume. Results Regression analyses adjusting for medical and demographic factors showed decreased cardiac index was associated with smaller subcortical gray matter volume (p < .01) and higher systolic blood pressure predicted reduced total gray matter volume (p = .03). The combination of higher blood pressure and lower cardiac index exacerbated WMH (p = .048). Conclusions Higher blood pressure and systemic hypoperfusion are associated with smaller brain volume and these factors interact to exacerbate WMH in HF. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the effects of blood pressure on the brain in HF, including the role of long-term blood pressure fluctuations. PMID:23735419

  20. Enhancing Predictive Accuracy of Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Using Blood Biochemistry Features and Iterative Multitier Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Abawajy, Jemal; Kelarev, Andrei; Chowdhury, Morshed U; Jelinek, Herbert F

    2016-01-01

    Blood biochemistry attributes form an important class of tests, routinely collected several times per year for many patients with diabetes. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of blood biochemistry for improving the predictive accuracy of the diagnosis of cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) progression. Blood biochemistry contributes to CAN, and so it is a causative factor that can provide additional power for the diagnosis of CAN especially in the absence of a complete set of Ewing tests. We introduce automated iterative multitier ensembles (AIME) and investigate their performance in comparison to base classifiers and standard ensemble classifiers for blood biochemistry attributes. AIME incorporate diverse ensembles into several tiers simultaneously and combine them into one automatically generated integrated system so that one ensemble acts as an integral part of another ensemble. We carried out extensive experimental analysis using large datasets from the diabetes screening research initiative (DiScRi) project. The results of our experiments show that several blood biochemistry attributes can be used to supplement the Ewing battery for the detection of CAN in situations where one or more of the Ewing tests cannot be completed because of the individual difficulties faced by each patient in performing the tests. The results show that AIME provide higher accuracy as a multitier CAN classification paradigm. The best predictive accuracy of 99.57% has been obtained by the AIME combining decorate on top tier with bagging on middle tier based on random forest. Practitioners can use these findings to increase the accuracy of CAN diagnosis.

  1. Reducing the immediate availability of red blood cells in cardiac surgery, a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Haanschoten, M C; van Straten, A H M; Verstappen, F; van de Kerkhof, D; van Zundert, A A J; Soliman Hamad, M A

    2015-01-01

    In our institution, we have redefined our criteria for direct availability of red blood cell (RBC) units in the operation room. In this study, we sought to evaluate the safety of applying this new logistical policy of blood transfusion in the first preliminary group of patients. In March 2010, we started a new policy concerning the elective availability of RBC units in the operation room. This policy was called: No Elective Red Cells (NERC) program. The program was applied for patients undergoing primary isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or single valve surgery. No elective RBC units were preoperatively ordered for these patients. In case of urgent need, blood was delivered to the operating room within 20 min. The present study includes the first 500 patients who were managed according to this policy. Logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the impact of biomedical variables on fulfilling this NERC program. The majority of patients (n = 409, 81 %) did not receive any RBCs during the hospital stay. In patients who did receive RBCs (n = 91, 19 %), 11 patients (2.2 %) received RBCs after 24 h postoperatively. Female gender, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and EuroSCORE were significant predictors for the need of blood transfusion (OR = 3.12; 2.79; 1.17 respectively). In a selected group of patients, it is safe to perform cardiac surgery without the immediate availability of RBCs in the operating room. Transfusion was avoided in 81 % of these patients. Female gender, LVEF and EuroSCORE were associated with blood transfusion.

  2. Measuring high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T blood concentration in population surveys

    PubMed Central

    Mindell, Jennifer S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The blood test for high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (HS-CTnT) has been proposed as a marker of cardiovascular risk in the general population, as it is associated with subsequent incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality. We aimed at evaluating the feasibility of HS-CTnT testing within large nationally-representative population surveys in which blood samples are collected during household visits, shipped using the standard civil postal service, and then frozen for subsequent analyses. Methods The Health Survey for England (HSE) consists of a series of annual surveys beginning in 1991. It is designed to provide regular information on various aspects of the nation’s health and risk factors. We measured HS-CTnT in the blood of 200 people from the HSE 2016 wave, then froze and stored their blood samples at -40°C for 5–10 weeks, and then thawed and retested them to appreciate the extent of within-person agreement or test-retest reliability of the two measurements. Results The Cronbach's Alpha (Scale Reliability Coefficient) and the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (two-way mixed-effects model for consistency of agreement at individual level) were 0.97 (95%CI = 0.96–0.99) and 0.95 (95%CI = 0.94–0.96) respectively. The time delay from blood withdrawal to analysis and storage (1–4 days) did not affect the results, nor did the freezing time before the retest (5–10 weeks). Conclusion The measurement of HS-CTnT plasma concentration within large nationally-representative surveys such as the Health Survey for England is feasible. PMID:28141863

  3. [Relationship between blood pressure, heart rate and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in non-diabetic obese patients].

    PubMed

    Banu, I; Nguyen, M T; Hamo-Tchatchouang, E; Cosson, E; Valensi, P

    2015-06-01

    Some studies suggest that a high heart rate (HR) would be predictive of the incidence of an elevated blood pressure (BP). Cardiac autonomic dysfunction (CAD) affects a high proportion of obese patients. CAD could be involved in BP increase. Our aim was to examine the relationship between CAD, HR and BP in obese patients without known diabetes. We included 428 overweight or obese patients. CAD was assessed by analyzing HR variations during three standard tests (Valsalva, deep breathing, lying-to-standing), which are mostly dependent on vagal control. An oral load in glucose was performed and the Matsuda index was calculated. The population was separated in 4 groups according to the grade of CAD (no or only one abnormal test, 2 or 3 abnormal tests) and HR (< or ≥ 75 bpm). Age was similar in the four groups. Systolic (P=0.05), diastolic (P<0.005) and mean BP (P<0.001) differed significantly between the 4 groups, and was the highest in the group of patients who had 2 or 3 abnormal tests and HR ≥ 75 bpm. Matsuda index differed across the groups (P=0.018) and was the lowest in this group. These data indicate that among overweight or obese patients with a defect in cardiac vagal activity BP is elevated only in those with a high heart rate, which is indicative of a more marked insulin resistance and probably an excess in sympathetic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Frequency components of systolic blood pressure variability reflect vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic functions in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takahiko; Eguchi, Kunihiro; Sakurai, Hiroki; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuyuki; Ohmichi, Mika; Morimoto, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Ushida, Takahiro; Iwase, Satoshi; Sugenoya, Junichi; Kumazawa, Takao

    2011-09-01

    In this study, after confirming the suppression of autonomic nervous function by isoflurane anesthesia using autonomic antagonists, we pharmacologically investigated the involvement of vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic functions in systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) frequency components in conscious rats at rest and during exposure to low-ambient temperature (LT-exposure, 9°C for 90 min). Under unanesthesia, phentolamine administration (α-adrenoceptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg) decreased the mid-frequency component (MF 0.33-0.73 Hz) and inversely increased the high-frequency component (HF 1.3-2.5 Hz). The increased HF was suppressed by subsequent treatment with atenolol (β-adrenoceptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg), but not with atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg). Moreover, phentolamine administration after atenolol decreased MF, but did not increase HF. LT-exposure increased MF and HF; however, phentolamine pretreatment suppressed the increased MF during LT-exposure, and atenolol pretreatment dose-dependently decreased the increased HF. These results suggest that MF and HF of SBPV may reflect α-adrenoceptor-mediated vasomotor function and β-adrenoceptor-mediated cardiac sympathetic function, respectively, in the conscious state.

  5. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  6. The effectiveness of acute normolvolemic hemodilution and autologous prime on intraoperative blood management during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Stammers, Alfred H; Mongero, Linda B; Tesdahl, Eric; Stasko, Andrew; Weinstein, Samuel

    2017-09-01

    Intraoperative blood management during cardiac surgery is a multifaceted process incorporating various interventions directed at optimizing oxygen delivery and enhancing hemostasis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) and autologous priming (AP) on preserving the hematocrit during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Case records from a national registry of adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January and October 2016 were reviewed. Groups were determined as follows: ANH, AP, ANH+AP or Neither. Primary endpoint was first the hematocrit on CPB with secondary endpoints of hematocrit drift and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion rate. Eighteen thousand and twenty-four (18,024) consecutive patients were reviewed. The first CPB hematocrit was lowest in the ANH group (26.5%±4.4%) and highest in ANH+AP patients (27.5%±4.8%) (p<0.001). The change in hematocrit was greatest in the ANH group (8.3%±3.9%) compared to both the AP (6.4%±3.8%) and ANH+AP (6.9%±4.1%) groups (p<0.001). Intraoperative RBC transfusions were as follows: ANH 26 (7.8%), AP 2,531 (20.0%), ANH+AP 287 (10.3%) and Neither 592 (26.7%) (p<0.001). Regression results show that the use of ANH will result in the greatest decline in hematocrit values. When combined with AP, higher hematocrits and lower transfusions were seen.

  7. Temporal averaging of two-dimensional correlation functions for velocity vector imaging of cardiac blood flow.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic imaging of blood flow in the cardiac lumen is a very useful tool to evaluate the pumping function of the human heart. The speckle tracking technique makes it possible to estimate the blood velocity vector. However, a stable estimation of the velocity vector of blood flow is difficult because signal-to-noise ratios of echoes from tiny blood particles are low. In this study, the speckle tracking technique with averaging of multiple two-dimensional correlation functions was employed for stable estimation of the blood velocity vector. Multiple two-dimensional correlation functions can be averaged during a very short period by using the echo data acquired by high-frame-rate echocardiography with diverging beam transmission. A steady flow experiment using blood-mimicking fluid (mean fluid velocity 0.2 m/s, flow angle 56° from the transducer surface) was implemented to investigate the effect of the averaging of two-dimensional correlation functions at a frame rate of 6024 Hz. First, to examine the averaging duration required for stable estimation of the flow velocity vector, the accuracies of vector estimates were evaluated at different durations for averaging of two-dimensional correlation functions in the steady flow measurement. It was found that the proposed averaging process with an averaging duration of over 8 frames could reduce the directional error in vector estimation to almost half that of the conventional speckle tracking technique. In subsequent experiments, the averaging duration was set at 12 frames corresponding to 2 ms. Measurements of steady flow at higher velocities were further implemented. The steady flow measurements with higher flow velocities of 0.4 and 0.6 m/s were simulated by changing the frame interval of the echo data at a flow velocity of 0.2 m/s. Although the averaging duration was a mere 2 ms, directional errors at mean flow velocities of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 m/s were reduced significantly. In an in vivo experiment of the healthy

  8. Low-Dose Sevoflurane May Reduce Blood Loss and Need for Blood Products After Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Li; Qin, Zhen; Luo, Ming; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Jiyue; Li, Jian; Liu, Ting; Du, Lei; Zhou, Jing

    2016-04-01

    Patients undergoing cardiac surgery often experience abnormal bleeding, due primarily to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)-induced activation of platelets. Sevoflurane may inhibit platelet activation, raising the possibility that administering it during CPB may reduce blood loss.Patients between 18 and 65 years old who were scheduled for cardiac surgery under CPB at our hospital were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive intravenous anesthetics alone (control group, n = 77) or together with sevoflurane (0.5-1.0 vol/%) from an oxygenator (sevoflurane group, n = 76). The primary outcome was postoperative blood loss, the secondary outcome was postoperative need for blood products.Volume of blood loss was 48% lower in the sevoflurane group than the control group at 4 hours after surgery, and 33% lower at 12 hours after surgery. Significantly fewer patients in the sevoflurane group lost >700 mL blood within 24 hours (9 of 76 vs 28 of 77, P < 0.001). As a result, the sevoflurane group received significantly smaller volumes of packed red blood cells (1.25 ± 2.36 vs 2.23 ± 3.75 units, P = 0.011) and fresh frozen plasma (97 ± 237 vs 236 ± 344 mL, P = 0.004). Thus the sevoflurane group was at significantly lower risk of requiring complex blood products after surgery (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.68, P = 0.002).Sevoflurane inhalation from an oxygenator during CPB may reduce blood loss and need for blood products after cardiac surgery.

  9. High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Angiography in the Mouse Using a Nanoparticle Blood-Pool Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Howles, Gabriel P.; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Qi, Yi; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Johnson, G. Allan

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance angiography is already a useful tool for studying mouse models of human disease. Magnetic resonance angiography in the mouse is typically performed using time-of-flight) contrast. In this work, a new long-circulating blood-pool contrast agent—a liposomal nanoparticle with surface-conjugated gadolinium (SC-Gd liposomes)—was evaluated for use in mouse neurovascular magnetic resonance angiography. A total of 12 mice were imaged. Scan parameters were optimized for both time-of-flight and SC-Gd contrast. Compared to time-of-flight contrast, SC-Gd liposomes (0.08 mmol/kg) enabled improved small-vessel contrast-to-noise ratio, larger field of view, shorter scan time, and imaging of venous structures. For a limited field of view, time-of-flight and SC-Gd were not significantly different; however, SC-Gd provided better contrast-to-noise ratio when the field of view encompassed the whole brain (P < 0.001) or the whole neurovascular axis (P < 0.001). SC-Gd allowed acquisition of high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography (52 × 52 × 100 micrometer3 or 0.27 nL), with 123% higher (P < 0.001) contrast-to-noise ratio in comparable scan time (~45 min). Alternatively, SC-Gd liposomes could be used to acquire high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography (0.27 nL) with 32% higher contrast-to-noise ratio (P < 0.001) in 75% shorter scan time (12 min). PMID:19902507

  10. Effect of telmisartan vs. ramipril on 'dipping' status and blood pressure variability: pooled analysis of the PRISMA studies.

    PubMed

    Gosse, Philippe; Schumacher, Helmut

    2014-02-01

    A retrospective pooled analysis of the 'Prospective, Randomized Investigation of the Safety and Efficacy of MICARDIS vs. Ramipril Using ABPM' studies conducted in Europe and South Africa (PRISMA I) and in the United States of America and Canada (PRISMA II) was carried out to investigate the effects of telmisartan and ramipril on dipper status (extreme dippers, dippers, non-dippers, risers/reverse dippers), and blood pressure (BP) variability in 1279 patients (with normal sleeping patterns and valid 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring recordings at baseline and end point). After 14 weeks' treatment, telmisartan had a greater systolic BP (SBP) reduction and higher smoothness index in all four dipper groups compared with ramipril. In addition, the tendency toward dipping was significantly higher in patients treated with) telmisartan than ramipril (P=0.032; odds ratio for telmisartan vs. ramipril: 1.27 (95% confidence interval: 1.102-1.58)). In patients with an early morning SBP surge 35 mm Hg, telmisartan treatment was associated with significantly greater reductions from baseline in the night-time low mean, early morning mean and early morning SBP surge compared with ramipril (P=0.026, P<0.0001 and P=0.0006, respectively). In this retrospective analysis, telmisartan was shown to normalize the circadian BP pattern to a dipper profile in a larger proportion of patients than ramipril, and reduce early-morning SBP surge in high-risk patients, indicative of a cardioprotective effect. These findings need to be confirmed in long-term prospective trials and observational studies.

  11. In vitro and in vivo comparison of a tailored magnetic particle imaging blood pool tracer with Resovist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Mummert, Tobias; Jung, Caroline; Salamon, Johannes; Khandhar, Amit P.; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Kemp, Scott J.; Ittrich, Harald; Krishnan, Kannan M.; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias

    2017-05-01

    Optimizing tracers for individual imaging techniques is an active field of research. The purpose of this study was to perform in vitro and in vivo magnetic particle imaging (MPI) measurements using a new monodisperse and size-optimized tracer, LS-008, and to compare it with the performance of Resovist, the standard MPI tracer. Magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) and in vitro MPI measurements were performed in concerns of concentration and amount of tracer in a phantom. In vivo studies were carried out in healthy FVB mice. The first group (n  =  3) received 60 µl LS-008 (87 mM) and the second (n  =  3) diluted Resovist of the same concentration and volume. Tracer injections were performed with a syringe pump during a dynamic MPI scan. For anatomic referencing MRI was applied beforehand of the MPI measurements. Summing up MPS examinations and in vitro MPI experiments, LS-008 showed better sensitivity and spatial resolution than Resovist. In vivo both tracers can visualize the propagation of the bolus through the inferior vena cava. MPI with LS-008 did show less temporal fluctuation artifacts and the pulsation of blood due to respiratory and cardiac cycle was detectable. With LS-008 the aorta was distinguishable from the caval vein while with Resovist this failed. A liver vessel and a vessel structure leading cranially could only be observed with LS-008 and not with Resovist. Beside these structural advantages both tracers showed very different blood half-life. For LS-008 we found 88 min. Resovist did show a fast liver accumulation and a half-life of 13 min. Only with LS-008 the perfusion fraction in liver and kidney was measureable. MPI for angiography can be significantly improved by applying more effective tracers. LS-008 shows a clear improvement concerning the delineation while resolving a larger number of vessels in comparison to Resovist. Therefore, in aspects of quality and quantity LS-008 is clearly favorable for angiographic and

  12. Hemodynamic and regional blood flow distribution responses to dextran, hydralazine, isoproterenol and amrinone during experimental cardiac tamponade

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, R.W.; Fowler, N.O.; Gabel, M.

    1983-06-01

    Four different interventions were examined in dogs with cardiac tamponade. Infusion of 216 to 288 ml saline solution into the pericardium reduced cardiac output from 3.5 +/- 0.3 to 1.7 +/- 0.2 liters/min as systemic vascular resistance increased from 4,110 +/- 281 to 6,370 +/- 424 dynes . s . cm-5. Left ventricular epicardial and endocardial blood flows were 178 +/- 13 and 220 +/- 12 ml/min per 100 g, respectively, and decreased to 72 +/- 14 and 78 +/- 11 ml/min per 100 g with tamponade. Reductions of 25 to 65% occurred in visceral and brain blood flows and in a composite brain sample. Cardiac output during tamponade was significantly increased by isoproterenol, 0.5 microgram/kg per min intravenously; hydralazine, 40 mg intravenously; dextran infusion or combined hydralazine and dextran, but not by amrinone. Total systemic vascular resistance was reduced by all interventions. Left ventricular epicardial flow was increased by isoproterenol, hydralazine and the hydralazine-dextran combination. Endocardial flow was increased by amrinone and the combination of hydralazine and dextran. Right ventricular myocardial blood flow increased with all interventions except dextran. Kidney cortical and composite brain blood flows were increased by both dextran alone and by the hydralazine-dextran combinations. Blood flow to small intestine was increased by all interventions as was that to large intestine by all except amrinone and hydralazine. Liver blood flow response was variable. The most pronounced hemodynamic and tissue perfusion improvements during cardiac tamponade were effected by combined vasodilation-blood volume expansion with a hydralazine-dextran combination. Isoproterenol had as dramatic an effect but it was short-lived. Amrinone was the least effective intervention.

  13. Effects of kimchi supplementation on blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy with varying sodium content in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Cho, Yoonsu; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Shin, Dong-Hyuk; Ha, Woel-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Chul; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2012-08-01

    We tested the effects of dietary intake of freeze-dried Korean traditional fermented cabbage (generally known as kimchi) with varying amounts of sodium on blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), as a control group, received a regular AIN-76 diet, and the SHRs were divided into four groups. The SHR group was fed a regular diet without kimchi supplementation, the SHR-L group was fed the regular diet supplemented with low sodium kimchi containing 1.4% salt by wet weight, which was provided in a freeze-dried form, the SHR-M group was supplemented with medium levels of sodium kimchi containing 2.4% salt, and the SHR-H group was supplemented with high sodium kimchi containing 3.0% salt. Blood pressure was measured over 6 weeks, and cardiac hypertrophy was examined by measuring heart and left ventricle weights and cardiac histology. SHRs showed higher blood pressure compared to that in WKY rats, which was further elevated by consuming high sodium containing kimchi but was not influenced by supplementing with low sodium kimchi. None of the SHR groups showed significant differences in cardiac and left ventricular mass or cardiomyocyte size. Levels of serum biochemical parameters, including blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, sodium, and potassium were not different among the groups. Elevations in serum levels of aldosterone in SHR rats decreased in the low sodium kimchi group. These results suggest that consuming low sodium kimchi may not adversely affect blood pressure and cardiac function even under a hypertensive condition.

  14. Supervised training with wireless monitoring of ECG, blood pressure and oxygen-saturation in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Busch, Clemens; Baumbach, Christian; Willemsen, Detlev; Nee, Oliver; Gorath, Torsten; Hein, Andreas; Scheffold, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a tele-rehabilitation application for training cardiac patients. It uses a modified ergometer bicycle with a set of wireless sensors. While the patient is exercising, the ECG, blood pressure and oxygen-saturation are monitored constantly and automatically. If sensor values exceed pre-defined thresholds, the patient receives an alarm. As a result the training will either be stopped or continued at a reduced load, depending on the severity of the alarm. To measure user acceptance, we introduced the system to 13 members of staff and four patients, who trained on the system every day during their stay in hospital. A total of 39 training sessions were completed. In 27% of the exercise sessions an ECG connection could not be established and in 23%, blood pressure measurement failed. However, there were no failures to measure oxygen saturation. The overall acceptance of the patient's graphical user interface (GUI) was excellent. The doctor's GUI with its functions received an overall score of 1.5 on a scale of 1 to 4 (usefulness 1.6, usability 1.3 and operability 1.6). The SAPHIRE tele-rehabilitation system operated properly and was well accepted by patients and doctors.

  15. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review

    PubMed Central

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  16. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    PubMed

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field.

  17. Measurement of the Red Blood Cell Distribution Width Improves the Risk Prediction in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Boros, András Mihály; Perge, Péter; Jenei, Zsigmond; Karády, Júlia; Zima, Endre; Molnár, Levente; Becker, Dávid; Gellér, László; Prohászka, Zoltán; Merkely, Béla; Széplaki, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Increases in red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and NT-proBNP (N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide) predict the mortality of chronic heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). It was hypothesized that RDW is independent of and possibly even superior to NT-proBNP from the aspect of long-term mortality prediction. Design. The blood counts and serum NT-proBNP levels of 134 patients undergoing CRT were measured. Multivariable Cox regression models were applied and reclassification analyses were performed. Results. After separate adjustment to the basic model of left bundle branch block, beta blocker therapy, and serum creatinine, both the RDW > 13.35% and NT-proBNP > 1975 pg/mL predicted the 5-year mortality (n = 57). In the final model including all variables, the RDW [HR = 2.49 (1.27–4.86); p = 0.008] remained a significant predictor, whereas the NT-proBNP [HR = 1.18 (0.93–3.51); p = 0.07] lost its predictive value. On addition of the RDW measurement, a 64% net reclassification improvement and a 3% integrated discrimination improvement were achieved over the NT-proBNP-adjusted basic model. Conclusions. Increased RDW levels accurately predict the long-term mortality of CRT patients independently of NT-proBNP. Reclassification analysis revealed that the RDW improves the risk stratification and could enhance the optimal patient selection for CRT. PMID:26903690

  18. Importance of Calibration Method in Central Blood Pressure for Cardiac Structural Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Kazuaki; Yang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Nolan, Mark T; Negishi, Tomoko; Pathan, Faraz; Marwick, Thomas H; Sharman, James E

    2016-09-01

    Central blood pressure (CBP) independently predicts cardiovascular risk, but calibration methods may affect accuracy of central systolic blood pressure (CSBP). Standard central systolic blood pressure (Stan-CSBP) from peripheral waveforms is usually derived with calibration using brachial SBP and diastolic BP (DBP). However, calibration using oscillometric mean arterial pressure (MAP) and DBP (MAP-CSBP) is purported to provide more accurate representation of true invasive CSBP. This study sought to determine which derived CSBP could more accurately discriminate cardiac structural abnormalities. A total of 349 community-based patients with risk factors (71±5years, 161 males) had CSBP measured by brachial oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph, IEM GmbH, Stolberg, Germany) using 2 calibration methods: MAP-CSBP and Stan-CSBP. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and left atrial dilatation (LAD) were measured based on standard guidelines. MAP-CSBP was higher than Stan-CSBP (149±20 vs. 128±15mm Hg, P < 0.0001). Although they were modestly correlated (rho = 0.74, P < 0.001), the Bland-Altman plot demonstrated a large bias (21mm Hg) and limits of agreement (24mm Hg). In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses, MAP-CSBP significantly better discriminated LVH compared with Stan-CSBP (area under the curve (AUC) 0.66 vs. 0.59, P = 0.0063) and brachial SBP (0.62, P = 0.027). Continuous net reclassification improvement (NRI) (P < 0.001) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) (P < 0.001) corroborated superior discrimination of LVH by MAP-CSBP. Similarly, MAP-CSBP better distinguished LAD than Stan-CSBP (AUC 0.63 vs. 0.56, P = 0.005) and conventional brachial SBP (0.58, P = 0.006), whereas Stan-CSBP provided no better discrimination than conventional brachial BP (P = 0.09). CSBP is calibration dependent and when oscillometric MAP and DBP are used, the derived CSBP is a better discriminator for cardiac structural abnormalities. © American Journal of Hypertension

  19. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  20. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  1. Tailoring the Blood Ordering Process for Cardiac Surgical Cases Using an Institution-Specific Version of the Maximum Surgical Blood Order Schedule.

    PubMed

    Ural, Kelly Graham; Volpi-Abadie, Jacqueline; Owen, Garrett; Gilly, George; Egger, Allison L; Scuderi-Porter, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Excess ordering of blood products for surgical cases is expensive and wasteful. Evidence has shown that institution-specific versions of the Maximum Surgical Blood Order Schedule (MSBOS) lead to better ordering practices. Most MSBOSs recommend a crossmatch for a minimum of 2 units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) for cardiac surgical cases; however, studies have shown that >50% of these patients receive no transfusions. Our aim was to create a blood order algorithm for cardiac surgical cases that would decrease unnecessary crossmatching. Retrospective data was collected for 264 patients from January 2011 through April 2012. The crossmatch-to-transfusion ratio (C:tx), transfusion probability (%T), and transfusion index (TI) were calculated for each type of procedure. All 264 patients were crossmatched and 98 patients were transfused, resulting in an overall transfusion probability (%T) of 37.12% (95% confidence interval 31.52-43.09). A total of 1175 units of blood were crossmatched, but only 370 units of blood were transfused, resulting in a C:tx of 3.17 (95% confidence interval 2.61-4.03). The average number of units transfused per procedure (transfusion index) was 1.40. C:tx was highest and TI was lowest for CABG, where approximately 11 units of blood were ordered for every 1 unit transfused (C:tx =11.70 ± 3.04), and the TI was 0.32. Using the gold standard C:tx of >2:1 as an indicator of inappropriate blood utilization, our analysis confirmed that excessive crossmatching occurred for several procedures. Now a subset of cardiac surgical cases only requires a type and screen order prior to surgery. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Evaluation of menstrual blood stem cells seeded in biocompatible Bombyx mori silk fibroin scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Maryam; Mohseni-Kouchesfehani, Homa; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan; Mobini, Sahba; Nikoo, Shohreh; Kazemnejad, Somaieh

    2014-08-01

    Recently, silk fibroin scaffolds have been introduced as novel and promising biomaterials in the field of cardiac tissue engineering. This study was designed to compare infiltration, proliferation, and cardiac differentiation potential of menstrual blood-derived stem cells (MenSCs) versus bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in Bombyx mori-derived silk scaffold. Our primary data revealed that the fabricated scaffold has mechanical and physical qualities suitable for cardiac tissue engineering. The MenSCs tracking in scaffolds using immunofluorescent staining and scanning electron microscopy confirmed MenSCs attachment, penetration, and distribution within the porous scaffold matrix. Based on proliferation assay using propidium iodide DNA quantification, the significantly higher level of growth rates of both MenSCs and BMSCs was documented in scaffolds than that in two-dimensional culture (p < 0.01). The expression level of TNNT2, a bona fide cardiac differentiation marker, in BMSCs differentiated on silk scaffolds was markedly higher than those cultured in two-dimensional culture indicating the improvement of cardiac differentiation in the silk scaffolds. Furthermore, differentiated MenSCs exhibited higher expression of TNNT2 compared with induced BMSCs. It seems that silk scaffold-seeded MenSCs could be viewed as a novel, safe, natural, and accessible construct for cardiac tissue engineering. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-06-01

    To determine the relationship between acid-base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid-base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis.The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960-0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146-0.627; P = 0.001).pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population.

  4. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between acid–base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid–base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis. The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960–0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146–0.627; P = 0.001). pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population. PMID:27336894

  5. Gd complexes of macrocyclic diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) biphenyl-2,2'-bisamides as strong blood-pool magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki-Hye; Kim, Hee-Kyung; Lee, Gang Ho; Kang, Duk-Sik; Park, Ji-Ae; Kim, Kyeong Min; Chang, Yongmin; Kim, Tae-Jeong

    2011-08-11

    We report the synthesis of macrocyclic DTPA conjugates of 2,2'-diaminobiphenyl and their Gd complexes of the type [Gd(L)(H(2)O)]·xH(2)O (2a,b; L = 1a,b) for use as new MRI blood-pool contrast agents (MRI BPCAs). Pharmacokinetic inertness of 2 compares well with those of analogous Gd-DTPA MRI CAs currently in use. The present system also shows very high stability in human serum. The R(1) relaxivity reaches 10.9 mM(-1) s(-1), which is approximately 3 times as high as that of structurally related Gd-DOTA (R(1) = 3.7 mM(-1) s(-1)). The R(1) relaxivity in HSA goes up to 37.2 mM(-1) s(-1), which is almost twice as high as that of MS-325, a leading BPCA, demonstrating a strong blood pool effect. The in vivo MR images of mice obtained with 2b are coherent, showing strong signal enhancement in heart, abdominal aorta, and small vessels. Even the brain tumor is vividly enhanced for an extended period of time. The structural uniqueness of 2 is that it is neutral in charge and thus makes no resort to electrostatic interaction, supposedly one of the essential factors for the blood-pool effect.

  6. Pulmonary Hemorrhage: Imaging with a New Magnetic Resonance Blood Pool Agent in Conjunction with Breathheld Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Schmidt, Michaela; Debatin, Joerg F.

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To describe the three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA) imaging appearance of the pulmonary arteries following administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent to human volunteers, and to demonstrate in an animal model (pigs) how this technique can be used to detect pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage. Methods: Two volunteers were examined following the intravenous administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent (NC100150 Injection, Nycomed Amersham Imaging, Wayne, PA, USA). T1-weighted 3D gradient recalled echo (GRE) image sets (TR/TE 5.1/1.4 msec, flip angle 30 deg.) were acquired breathheld over 24 sec. To assess the detectability of pulmonary bleeding with intravascular MR contrast, pulmonary parenchymal injuries were created in two animals under general anesthesia, and fast T1-weighted 3D GRE image sets collected before and after the injury. Results: Administration of the intravascular contrast in the two volunteers resulted in selective enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature permitting complete visualization and excellent delineation of central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Following iatrogenic injury in the two animals, pulmonary hemorrhage was readily detected on the 3D image sets. Conclusion: The data presented illustrate that ultrafast 3D GRE MR imaging in conjunction with an intravenously administered intravascular blood pool agent can be used to perform high-quality pulmonary MRA as well as to detect pulmonary hemorrhage.

  7. Using high resolution cardiac CT data to model and visualize patient-specific interactions between trabeculae and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Scott; Gao, Mingchen; Zhang, Shaoting; Qian, Zhen; Voros, Szilard; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method to simulate and visualize blood flow through the human heart, using the reconstructed 4D motion of the endocardial surface of the left ventricle as boundary conditions. The reconstruction captures the motion of the full 3D surfaces of the complex features, such as the papillary muscles and the ventricular trabeculae. We use visualizations of the flow field to view the interactions between the blood and the trabeculae in far more detail than has been achieved previously, which promises to give a better understanding of cardiac flow. Finally, we use our simulation results to compare the blood flow within one healthy heart and two diseased hearts.

  8. Low blood mononuclear cell magnesium in intensive cardiac care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Ryzen, E; Elkayam, U; Rude, R K

    1986-03-01

    Magnesium deficiency may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmias, and coronary spasm. Because less than 1% of magnesium (Mg) is extracellular, the serum magnesium (sMg) does not always accurately reflect intracellular Mg stores. To determine the frequency of Mg deficiency in patients with cardiovascular disease, we measured blood mononuclear cell Mg content (mMg) and sMg concentrations in 104 unselected patients admitted to our intensive cardiac care unit (CCU). Twenty-seven normal healthy controls and 33 hypomagnesemic patients with chronic alcoholism and/or malabsorption syndrome served as reference groups. The sMg concentration in the CCU patients was 2.05 +/- 0.03 mg/dl (mean +/- SEM), and did not differ from normal controls (mean 2.01 +/- 0.03 mg/dl). Only 8 of 104 CCU patients were hypomagnesemic (7.7%). mMg in the CCU patients, however, was significantly lower than in the normal controls (1.15 +/- 0.02 micrograms/mg protein and 1.34 +/- 0.02 micrograms/mg protein respectively, p less than 0.001). Fifty-three percent (55 of 104) of CCU patients had mMg contents less than 1.119 micrograms/mg protein, i.e., below that of the lowest normal control. mMg was significantly lower in those patients with congestive heart failure (mMg = 1.08 +/- 0.03 micrograms/mg protein) when compared to those patients without congestive heart failure (1.23 +/- 0.02 micrograms/mg protein, p less than 0.001). We conclude that the incidence of intracellular Mg deficiency in patients with cardiovascular disease is much higher than the sMg would lead one to suspect, and may contribute to clinical cardiovascular morbidity.

  9. Reduction of allogeneic red blood cell usage during cardiac surgery by an integrated intra- and postoperative blood salvage strategy: results of a randomized comparison.

    PubMed

    Weltert, Luca; Nardella, Saverio; Rondinelli, Maria Beatrice; Pierelli, Luca; De Paulis, Ruggero

    2013-04-01

    The amount of allogeneic blood transfusion may relate to worse outcome in cardiac surgery. The reinfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) lost by patients, including those of chest drains, is a promising strategy to minimize allogeneic transfusions. To verify this hypotheis, 1047 cardiac surgery patients were randomly assigned to either traditional intraoperative blood salvage followed by chest drain insertion or intra- and postoperative strategy with the Haemonetics cardioPAT system. Allogeneic RBC transfusion rate (primary endpoint) and postoperative complications (secondary endpoint) were recorded at the time of discharge from the hospital and at first month follow-up visit, respectively. The cardioPAT arm received 1.20 units of allogeneic RBCs per patient, whereas the control group required 2.11 units per patient, and this difference proved to be highly significant (p=0.02). We observed a comparable 45-day mortality rate but a lower rate of deep vein thrombosis (p=0.04) and atrial fibrillation (p=0.04) in the cardioPAT arm. A significant reduction in patient exposure to allogeneic RBCs was observed in the cardioPAT system arm. Complications were slightly less frequent in the cardioPAT group. The use of the cardioPAT is a safe and effective strategy to reduce allogeneic RBC transfusions in cardiac surgery. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Metabolic syndrome in the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study: daily life blood pressure, cardiac damage, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Bombelli, Michele; Corrao, Giovanni; Facchetti, Rita; Madotto, Fabiana; Giannattasio, Cristina; Trevano, Fosca Quarti; Grassi, Guido; Zanchetti, Alberto; Sega, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria) and its relationships with daily life blood pressures, cardiac damage, and prognosis were determined in 2013 subjects from a Northern Italian population aged 25 to 74 years. Home blood pressure, 24-hour blood pressure, and left ventricular mass index (echocardiography) were also measured. Cardiovascular and noncardiovascular deaths were registered over 148 months. Metabolic syndrome was found in 16.2% of the sample, an office blood pressure elevation being the most frequent (95.4%) and the blood glucose abnormality the least frequent (31.5%) component. There was in metabolic syndrome a frequent elevation in home and/or 24-hour average blood pressure, as well as a greater left ventricular mass index and prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy, which was manifest even when data were adjusted for between-group differences, including blood pressure. The adjusted risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality was greater in metabolic syndrome subjects (+71.0% and +37.0%; P<0.05), a further marked increase being observed with left ventricular hypertrophy or "in-office" and "out-of-office" blood pressure elevations. The increased risk was related to the blood pressure and the blood glucose component of metabolic syndrome, with no contribution of the remaining components. Thus, metabolic syndrome is common in a Mediterranean population in which it significantly increases the long-term risk of death. Cardiac abnormalities and increases in home and 24-hour blood pressure are common in metabolic syndrome, and their occurrence further enhances the risk. The contribution of metabolic syndrome components to the risk, however, is unbalanced and mainly related to blood pressure and glucose abnormalities.

  11. Serum cardiac troponin T and effective blood flow in stable extracorporeal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewska, Alicja E; Cieszyński, Krzysztof; Niepolski, Leszek; Kaczmarek, Andrzej; Sowińska, Anna

    2016-03-01

    We examined the association between extracorporeal dialysis (ED)-related effective blood flow (eQB) and serum cardiac troponin T (cTnT) as a possible indicator of silent myocardial damage in stable ED patients. In a cross-sectional study, cTnT was determined in 247 ED patients dialyzed using stable eQB and dialysate flow (QD). In a prospective study, 91 patients were switched from low-flux (LF) to high-flux (HF) hemodialysis (HD), and subsequently, the eQB increased, and the QD decreased; 65 patients continued LF-HD with stable eQB and QD. Clinical/laboratory evaluations were performed at 0, 15, 36, and 53 weeks from the start of the study. In the cross-sectional study, the main cTnT predictors were dialysis vintage, age, eQB, phosphorus, and C-reactive protein. Patients with cTnT levels in the highest quartile were excluded from the analysis, and subjects dialyzed with eQB ≤316 ml/min exhibited lower cTnT levels compared with patients dialyzed with higher eQB (P = 0.002). The all-cause and cardiac mortality rates of 154 patients, without changes in ED modality for up to 42 months, were associated with the initial cTnT concentrations but not with the initial eQB. In the prospective study, higher values for eQB and cTnT were observed during HF-HD at weeks 36 (P = 0.045) and 53 (P = 0.01) of the present study. The initial cTnT, ∆eQB, and ∆albumin influenced the ∆cTnT. The all-cause and cardiac mortality rates were not different between LF and HF groups at 21 months after the prospective study was completed. In stable ED patients, higher eQB rates and QB/QD values might contribute to silent myocardial injury, particularly in patients with lower cTnT levels, but do not affect the outcome of ED patients.

  12. The impact of administration of tranexamic acid in reducing the use of red blood cells and other blood products in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Vuylsteke, Alain; Saravanan, Palanikumar; Gerrard, Caroline; Cafferty, Fay

    2006-01-01

    Background To study the effect of administration of tranexamic acid on the use of blood and blood products, return to theatre for post-operative bleeding and the length of intensive care stay after primary cardiac surgery, data for 4191 patients, of all priorities, who underwent primary cardiac operation during the period between 30/10/00 and 21/09/04 were analysed. Methods Retrospective analysis of data collected prospectively during the study period. The main outcome measures were whether or not patients were transfused with red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma or any blood product, the proportion of patients returned to theatre for investigation for post-operative bleeding and length of stay in the intensive care unit. We performed univariate analysis to identify the factors influencing the outcome measures and multivariate analysis to identify the effect of administration of tranexamic acid on the outcome measures. Results Administration of tranexamic acid was an independent factor affecting the transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma or any blood product. It was also an independent factor influencing the rate of return to theatre for exploration of bleeding. The odds of receiving a transfusion or returning to theatre for bleeding were significantly lower in patients receiving tranexamic acid. The administration of tranexamic acid also significantly decreased blood loss. We did not find any association between the administration of tranexamic acid and the length of intensive care stay. Conclusion Based on the analysis of 4191 patients who underwent a primary cardiac operation, administration of tranexamic acid decreased the number of patients exposed to a transfusion or returned to theatre for bleeding in our institute. PMID:16942621

  13. [Pooled Umbilical Cord Blood Plasma for Culturing UCMSC and Ex Vivo Expanding Umbilical Cord Blood CD34⁺ Cells].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie-Ying; Lu, Yan; Chen, Jin-Song; Wu, Shao-Qing; Tang, Xue-Wei; Li, Yan

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of umbilical cord blood plasma (UCP) as a replacement for fetal bovine serum (FBS) for culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) derived from umbilical cord, and to observe the supporting effects of these cells (served as a feeder layer) on ex vivo expanding of human umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) units were suitable if the Guangzhou cord blood bank donor selection criteria strictly were fulfilled. UCP were ready to use after the collection from the plasma depletion/reduction during the processing and pooling of suitable UCB units (at least 30 units were screened for pathogens and microorganisms, and qualified). Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC) were harvested from the umbilical cord tissue of health full-term newborns after delivery by enzyme digestion and divided into 3 groups: group 1 and 2 were cultured in the presence of DMEM/F12 containing either FBS or UCP; and group 3 was cultured in serum-free medium (StemPro® MSC SFM CTS™). Morphology, proliferation and surface marker expression were examined by flow cytometry, and the differentiation toward adipogenic and osteogenic lineages was used for investigating the effect of media on UCMSC after 3-5 passages. Next, the cells cultured in the three different media were cryopreserved and thawed, then prepared as feeder layers with the name of UCMSC(FBS), UCMSC(UCP), and UCMSC(SFM), respectively. The CD34⁺ cells were separated from UCB by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and divided into 4 groups cultured in StemPro(-34) SFM medium added with hematopoietic cytokine combination (StemSpan® CC100). The control group included only CD34⁺ cells as group A (blank control) and experimental groups included UCMSC(FBS) + CD34⁺ cells as group B, UCMSC(UCP) + CD34⁺ cells as group C, UCMSC(SFM) + CD34⁺ cells as group D, and cells in all groups were cultured ex vivo for 7 days. The nucleated cell (NC) number was counted by cell counter, CD34

  14. Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015: a pooled analysis of 1479 population-based measurement studies with 19·1 million participants.

    PubMed

    2017-01-07

    Raised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher. For this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure. We pooled 1479 studies that had measured the blood pressures of 19·1 million adults. Global age-standardised mean systolic blood pressure in 2015 was 127·0 mm Hg (95% credible interval 125·7-128·3) in men and 122·3 mm Hg (121·0-123·6) in women; age-standardised mean diastolic blood pressure was 78·7 mm Hg (77·9-79·5) for men and 76·7 mm Hg (75·9-77·6) for women. Global age-standardised prevalence of raised blood pressure was 24·1% (21·4-27·1) in men and 20·1% (17·8-22·5) in women in 2015. Mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure decreased substantially from 1975 to 2015 in high-income western and Asia Pacific countries, moving these countries from having some of the highest worldwide blood pressure in 1975 to the lowest in 2015. Mean blood pressure also decreased in women in central and eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and, more recently, central Asia, Middle East, and north Africa, but the estimated trends in these super-regions had larger uncertainty than in high-income super-regions. By contrast, mean blood pressure might have increased in east and southeast

  15. Postoperative Acute Kidney Injury and Blood Product Transfusion After Synthetic Colloid Use During Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tobey, Rajika; Cheng, Hao; Gao, Mei; Li, Zhongmin; Young, J Nilas; Boyd, W Douglas; Ji, Fuhai; Liu, Hong

    2017-06-01

    This study assessed the effect of 2 types of hydroxyethyl starches (HES) on renal integrity and blood transfusion in cardiac surgery patients. Retrospective investigation. Patients from a single tertiary medical center. Inclusion criteria included coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and/or valve surgery that included cardiopulmonary bypass with aortic cross-clamping. Intraoperative HES and blood product administration. The study comprised 1,265 patients who met inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 70% received HES, and of these, 47% received<1,000 mL and 53% received≥1,000 mL. There was no difference in the development of acute kidney injury between the 2 groups. A parsimonious propensity model for colloids showed that combined CABG and valve surgery were less likely to be associated with HES administration than was CABG alone (OR 0.68, confidence interval [CI] 0.46-0.97; p = 0.04). Intra-aortic balloon pump use was less likely to be associated with HES administration (OR 0.57, CI 0.38-0.86; p = 0.007). Patients with chronic kidney disease, stages 3 to 5, were less likely to receive HES, with an OR of 0.56 (CI 0.38-0.84; p = 0.004); 0.51 (CI 0.20-1.33; p = 0.170); and 0.23 (CI 0.12-0.44; p<0.0001), respectively, for each stage. No difference was noted in red blood cell transfusion. However, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, and platelet transfusions were significantly higher with larger volumes of HES, with an OR of 2.03 (CI 1.64-2.52; p<0.001); 1.60 (CI 1.30-1.97; p<0.000); and 1.62 (CI 1.21-2.15; p = 0.006), respectively. No differences in surgical mortality were found between the colloid and noncolloid groups. This study showed no association of postoperative acute kidney injury and red blood cell transfusion between the colloid and noncolloid groups. Although the complication rate was higher with HES administration, there was no difference in surgery mortality between the 2 groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reconstituted fresh whole blood improves clinical outcomes compared with stored component blood therapy for neonates undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass for cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gruenwald, Colleen E; McCrindle, Brian W; Crawford-Lean, Lynn; Holtby, Helen; Parshuram, Christopher; Massicotte, Patricia; Van Arsdell, Glen

    2008-12-01

    This study compared the effects of reconstituted fresh whole blood against standard blood component therapy in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients less than 1 month of age were randomized to receive either reconstituted fresh whole blood (n = 31) or standard blood component therapy (n = 33) to prime the bypass circuit and for transfusion during the 24 hours after cardiopulmonary bypass. Primary outcome was chest tube drainage; secondary outcomes included transfusion needs, inotrope score, ventilation time, and hospital length of stay. Patients who received reconstituted fresh whole blood had significantly less postoperative chest tube volume loss per kilogram of body weight (7.7 mL/kg vs 11.8 mL/kg; P = .03). Standard blood component therapy was associated with higher inotropic score (6.6 vs 3.3; P = .002), longer ventilation times (164 hours vs 119 hours; P = .04), as well as longer hospital stays (18 days vs 12 days; P = .006) than patients receiving reconstituted fresh whole blood. Of the different factors associated with the use of reconstituted fresh whole blood, lower platelet counts at 10 minutes and at the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, older age of cells used in the prime and throughout bypass, and exposures to higher number of allogeneic donors were found to be independent predictors of poor clinical outcomes. Reconstituted fresh whole blood used for the prime, throughout cardiopulmonary bypass, and for all transfusion requirements within the first 24 hours postoperatively results in reduced chest tube volume loss and improved clinical outcomes in neonatal patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  17. Reduced central blood volume and cardiac output and increased vascular resistance during static handgrip exercise in postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Julian M; Taneja, Indu; Medow, Marvin S

    2007-09-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by exercise intolerance and sympathoactivation. To examine whether abnormal cardiac output and central blood volume changes occur during exercise in POTS, we studied 29 patients with POTS (17-29 yr) and 12 healthy subjects (18-27 yr) using impedance and venous occlusion plethysmography to assess regional blood volumes and flows during supine static handgrip to evoke the exercise pressor reflex. POTS was subgrouped into normal and low-flow groups based on calf blood flow. We examined autonomic effects with variability techniques. During handgrip, systolic blood pressure increased from 112 +/- 4 to 139 +/- 9 mmHg in control, from 119 +/- 6 to 143 +/- 9 in normal-flow POTS, but only from 117 +/- 4 to 128 +/- 6 in low-flow POTS. Heart rate increased from 63 +/- 6 to 82 +/- 4 beats/min in control, 76 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 6 beats/min in normal-flow POTS, and 88 +/- 4 to 100 +/- 6 beats/min in low-flow POTS. Heart rate variability and coherence markedly decreased in low-flow POTS, indicating uncoupling of baroreflex heart rate regulation. The increase in central blood volume with handgrip was absent in low-flow POTS and blunted in normal-flow POTS associated with abnormal splanchnic emptying. Cardiac output increased in control, was unchanged in low-flow POTS, and was attenuated in normal-flow POTS. Total peripheral resistance was increased compared with control in all POTS. The exercise pressor reflex was attenuated in low-flow POTS. While increased cardiac output and central blood volume characterizes controls, increased peripheral resistance with blunted or eliminated in central blood volume increments characterizes POTS and may contribute to exercise intolerance.

  18. Cholecystokinin as a regulator of cardiac function and postprandial gastrointestinal blood flow in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Seth, Henrik; Gräns, Albin; Axelsson, Michael

    2010-05-01

    We have studied the potential role of CCK as a regulator/modulator of the postprandial increase in gastrointestinal blood flow. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes to measure the effects of CCK on cardiac output and gastrointestinal blood flow. Furthermore, vascular preparations were used to study the direct effects of CCK on the vessels. In addition, we used in situ perfused hearts to further study the effects of CCK on the cardiovascular system. When the sulfated form of CCK-8 was injected at a physiological concentration (0.19 pmol/kg) in vivo, there was a significant increase in the gastrointestinal blood flow (18 +/- 4%). This increase in gastrointestinal blood flow was followed by a subsequent increase in cardiac output (30 +/- 6%). When the dose was increased to 0.76 pmol/kg, there was only a 14 +/- 6% increase in gastrointestinal blood flow; possibly due to a dose-dependent increase in the gill vascular resistance as previously reported or a direct effect on the heart. Nevertheless, CCK did not affect the isolated vessel preparations, and thus, it seems unlikely that CCK has a direct effect on the blood vessels of the second or third order. CCK did, however, have profound effects on the dynamics of the heart, and without a change in cardiac output, there was a significant increase in the amplitude (59 +/- 4%) and rate (dQ/dt: 55 +/- 4%; -dQ/dt: 208 +/- 49%) of the phasic flow profile. If and how this might be coupled to a postprandial gastrointestinal hyperemia remains to be determined. We conclude that CCK has the potential as a regulator of the postprandial gastrointestinal blood flow in fish and most likely has its effect by inducing a gastrointestinal hyperemia. The mechanism by which CCK acts is at present unknown.

  19. The influence of perioperative coagulation status on postoperative blood loss in complex cardiac surgery: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Karkouti, Keyvan; McCluskey, Stuart A; Syed, Summer; Pazaratz, Chris; Poonawala, Humara; Crowther, Mark A

    2010-06-01

    Coagulopathy leading to excessive blood loss is a serious complication of cardiac surgery. In this prospective cohort study, we measured patients' coagulation status before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and examined their relationships with postoperative blood loss. Patients undergoing complex cardiac surgery with CPB who did not have preexisting coagulopathy were eligible. Detailed clinical and coagulation data were prospectively collected on all patients. Coagulation testing was performed before and after CPB, and included measures of thrombin generation, clotting factor consumption and dilution, clot stabilization, and fibrinolysis. The associations of variables with post-CPB blood loss (estimated loss from CPB to intensive care unit admission and 24-hour chest tube drainage) were assessed with the Spearman rank correlation test and multivariable linear regression. The median blood loss among the 101 study patients was 952 mL (interquartile range, 601-1553 mL). Variables independently associated with increasing blood loss were as follows: previous sternotomies (P = 0.01), lower pre-CPB prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 levels (measure of thrombin generation; P = 0.001), lower post-CPB platelet counts (P = 0.01), larger percent decrease in fibrinogen levels (P = 0.05), and higher post-CPB soluble fibrin monomer levels (measure of thrombin activity and clot stabilization; P < 0.0001) (model R(2) = 0.43). In complex cardiac surgery, blood loss is directly influenced by reduced pre-CPB thrombin generation rate, increased post-CPB consumption and dilution of clotting factors, as well as inadequate post-CPB clot stabilization. This information can aid in identifying patients at high risk for excessive blood loss and testing new interventions aimed at reducing the burden of this complication. The validity and generalizability of these findings need to be assessed by other studies.

  20. Twenty-four mini-pool HCV RNA screening outside a blood transfusion setting: results of a 2-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Seme, Katja; Mocilnik, Tina; Fujs, Kristina; Babic, Dunja Z; Todorović, Aleksandra; Fras-Stefan, Tamara; Poljak, Mario

    2007-03-01

    The usefulness of 24 mini-pool hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA screening was evaluated in a 2-year prospective study carried out on a total of 6432 consecutive anti-HCV negative specimens in a routine diagnostic laboratory setting. A total of 268 mini-pools were tested using an automated commercial PCR assay for qualitative detection of HCV RNA, with a lower limit of detection of 50 IU/ml. Eighteen (0.28%) anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive serum samples obtained from 12 patients (all intravenous drug users), were detected. Ten patients responded to an invitation for follow-up testing. Five, three and one patient seroconverted in the first, second and third follow-up sample, respectively. One patient had not seroconverted by the end of the study period. The interval between the first HCV RNA positive sample and the first anti-HCV positive samples was 24-192 days. The costs of detecting a single anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive sample and a single anti-HCV negative/HCV RNA positive patient using the 24 mini-pool HCV RNA screening strategy were estimated to be around euro 643 and 965, respectively. It was shown that screening for HCV infection using the 24 mini-pool HCV RNA screening strategy can also be both useful and cost effective outside a blood transfusion setting.

  1. Association between absolute blood eosinophil count and CKD stages among cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Rui; Fujita, Shu-Ichi; Kizawa, Shun; Sakane, Kazushi; Morita, Hideaki; Ozeki, Michishige; Sohmiya, Koichi; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2016-02-01

    Elevated eosinophil count was shown to be associated with the development of cholesterol embolization syndrome, a potentially life-threatening condition, after catheter-based procedures. We investigated the association between stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the absolute eosinophil count (AEC) among cardiac patients. CKD stages were determined solely on the estimated glomerular filtration rate or requirement for hemodialysis. Eosinophilia is defined as an eosinophil count exceeding 500/μL. A total of 1022 patients were enrolled in the current study, and eosinophil counts (/μL) in the first through fourth eosinophil count quartiles were <88, 88 to 154, 155 to <238, and 238 ≤, respectively, and 29 patients (2.8 %) had eosinophilia. Correlation coefficient between the AEC and age was -0.188 (P = 0.001) in women and -0.042 (n.s.) in men (by Spearman's correlation test). Patients with higher CKD stages had a higher prevalence of the highest AEC quartile or eosinophilia. Logistic regression analysis using severe renal dysfunction (i.e., CKD stage 4 or 5) as the dependent variable, the highest AEC quartile had a significant positive association with an odds ratio of 1.99 (95 % confidence interval, 1.20-3.31, P < 0.01) after adjustment for sex, age, systolic blood pressure, and total white blood cell count. Similarly, after adjustment for the same variables, eosinophilia was associated with severe renal dysfunction with an odds ratio of 2.60 (95 % confidence interval, 1.08-6.26, P < 0.05). Eosinophil count was positively associated with higher CKD stages among cardiology patients, some fraction of which might be related to subclinical cholesterol embolization.

  2. Therapeutic options to minimize allogeneic blood transfusions and their adverse effects in cardiac surgery: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Antônio Alceu; da Silva, José Pedro; da Silva, Luciana da Fonseca; de Sousa, Alexandre Gonçalves; Piotto, Raquel Ferrari; Baumgratz, José Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Introdution Allogeneic blood is an exhaustible therapeutic resource. New evidence indicates that blood consumption is excessive and that donations have decreased, resulting in reduced blood supplies worldwide. Blood transfusions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, as well as higher hospital costs. This makes it necessary to seek out new treatment options. Such options exist but are still virtually unknown and are rarely utilized. Objective To gather and describe in a systematic, objective, and practical way all clinical and surgical strategies as effective therapeutic options to minimize or avoid allogeneic blood transfusions and their adverse effects in surgical cardiac patients. Methods A bibliographic search was conducted using the MeSH term “Blood Transfusion” and the terms “Cardiac Surgery” and “Blood Management.” Studies with titles not directly related to this research or that did not contain information related to it in their abstracts as well as older studies reporting on the same strategies were not included. Results Treating anemia and thrombocytopenia, suspending anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, reducing routine phlebotomies, utilizing less traumatic surgical techniques with moderate hypothermia and hypotension, meticulous hemostasis, use of topical and systemic hemostatic agents, acute normovolemic hemodilution, cell salvage, anemia tolerance (supplementary oxygen and normothermia), as well as various other therapeutic options have proved to be effective strategies for reducing allogeneic blood transfusions. Conclusion There are a number of clinical and surgical strategies that can be used to optimize erythrocyte mass and coagulation status, minimize blood loss, and improve anemia tolerance. In order to decrease the consumption of blood components, diminish morbidity and mortality, and reduce hospital costs, these treatment strategies should be incorporated into medical practice worldwide. PMID:25714216

  3. Blood pressure lowering, vasodilator and cardiac-modulatory potential of Carum roxburghianum seed extract.

    PubMed

    Khan, Munasib; Khan, Arif-ullah; Najeeb-ur-Rehman; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2015-01-01

    In current study, we describe blood pressure (BP)-lowering, endothelium-dependent, and independent vasodilator and cardio-modulatory actions of Carum roxburghianum seed. The crude extract of C. roxburghianum seed (Cr.Cr) induced dose-dependent (10-100 mg/kg) fall in arterial BP of anaesthetized rats. In isolated rabbit aorta, Cr.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) inhibited high K+ (80 mM) and phenylephrine (PE, 1 µM)-induced contractions, like verapamil and papaverine. In endothelium-intact rat aortic preparations, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride-sensitive vasodilator activity was observed with Cr.Cr, which also relaxed endothelium-denuded aorta tissues. In guinea-pig atria, Cr.Cr initially caused mild cardiac stimulation, followed by inhibition, as shown by papaverine. These results reveal that cardiovascular effects of C. roxburghianum seed extract are mediated possibly through combination of Ca++ antagonist, nitric oxide modulating and phosphodiesterase inhibitory mechanisms, though further in-depth studies are required for elucidating precise mode of action.

  4. Are there benefits to a fresh whole blood vs. packed red blood cell cardiopulmonary bypass prime on outcomes in neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery?

    PubMed

    Valleley, Melinda S; Buckley, Klayton W; Hayes, Kylie M; Fortuna, Randall R; Geiss, Dale M; Holt, David W

    2007-09-01

    Techniques for pediatric cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have significantly improved over the years. The use of fresh whole blood (FWB) and pre-bypass ultrafiltration (PBUF) has been suggested as means for improving perioperative and postoperative outcomes. It is the intent of this study to show that fresh whole blood along with PBUF will result in balanced CPB prime that can offer a reduction in blood product exposures and blood loss along with improving several measured postoperative outcomes. After institutional review board approval, a retrospective review was conducted on 100 patients to analyze the benefits of FWB and PBUF on outcomes in neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery. Data analysis included preoperative and CPB data, perioperative inotrope and blood product exposure, and postoperative blood loss and blood product exposure measured for up to a 12-hour period in the intensive care unit (ICU). The three groups compared were FWB prime vs. packed red blood cell (PRBC) prime, < 5 kg FWB prime vs. < 5 kg PRBC prime, and 5+ kg FWB prime and 5+ kg PRBC prime. Cumulative blood product exposures for the FWB prime group found 62% received one blood exposure for the operative and postoperative period (p < .0001). The majority of patients who received a PRBC prime (64%) received three or more cumulative exposures (p < .0003). The < 5 kg FWB group also received significantly less cumulative blood exposure, with 64% receiving just one exposure. Comparatively, 85% of the < 5 kg PRBC patients received three or more blood product exposures perioperatively and postoperatively (p < .0001). Perioperative inotrope and postoperative blood loss did not differ among the groups. Outcomes for intraoperative death, intraoperative extubation, delayed sternal closure, and mediastinal reexploration were also not statistically different. The results of this study found that FWB leads to significantly less blood exposure, specifically in the < 5-kg population

  5. Hemodynamics and Myocardial Blood Flow Patterns Following Placement of a Cardiac Passive Restraint Device in a Model of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer A.; Goodman, Amy M.; Gaillard, William F.; Rivers, William T.; McKinney, Richard A.; Mukherjee, Rupak; Baker, Nathaniel L.; Ikonomidis, John S.; Spinale, Francis G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The present study examined a cardiac passive restraint device which applies epicardial pressure (HeartNetTM Implant) in a clinically relevant model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) to determine effects on hemodynamic and myocardial blood flow patterns. Methods DCM was established in 10 pigs (3 weeks atrial pacing, 240 beats per minute). Hemodynamic parameters and regional left ventricle (LV) blood flow were measured under baseline conditions and following acute HeartNet (Paracor Medical Inc, Sunnyvale, CA) placement. Measurements were repeated following adenosine infusion, allowing maximal coronary vasodilation and coronary flow reserve determination. Results LV dilation and systolic dysfunction occurred relative to baseline as measured by echocardiography. LV end diastolic dimension increased and LV fractional shortening decreased (3.8±0.1 vs 6.1±0.2cm and 31.6±0.5 vs 16.2±2.1%, both p<0.05 respectively) consistent with the DCM phenotype. The HeartNet was successfully deployed without arrhythmias and a computed median mid-LV epicardial pressure of 1.4 mmHg was applied by the HeartNet throughout the cardiac cycle. Acute HeartNet placement did not adversely affect steady state hemodynamics. With the HeartNet in place, coronary reserve was significantly blunted. Conclusions In a large animal model of DCM, the cardiac passive restraint device did not appear to adversely affect basal resting myocardial blood flow. However, following acute HeartNet placement, LV maximal coronary reserve was blunted. These unique results suggest that cardiac passive restraint devices which apply epicardial transmural pressure can alter myocardial blood flow patterns in a DCM model. Whether this blunting of coronary reserve holds clinical relevance with chronic passive restraint device placement remains unestablished. PMID:21397269

  6. Renal sympathetic denervation increases renal blood volume per cardiac cycle: a serial magnetic resonance imaging study in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Delacroix, Sinny; Chokka, Ramesh G; Nelson, Adam J; Wong, Dennis T; Sidharta, Samuel; Pederson, Stephen M; Rajwani, Adil; Nimmo, Joanne; Teo, Karen S; Worthley, Stephen G

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated improvements in renal blood flow after renal sympathetic denervation (RSDN); however, such effects are yet to be confirmed in patients with resistant hypertension. Herein, we assessed the effects of RSDN on renal artery blood flow and diameter at multiple time points post-RSDN. Patients (n=11) with systolic blood pressures ≥160 mmHg despite taking three or more antihypertensive medications at maximum tolerated dose were recruited into this single-center, prospective, non-blinded study. Magnetic resonance imaging indices included renal blood flow and renal artery diameters at baseline, 1 month and 6 months. In addition to significant decreases in blood pressures (p<0.0001), total volume of blood flow per cardiac cycle increased by 20% from 6.9±2 mL at baseline to 8.4±2 mL (p=0.003) at 1 month and to 8.0±2 mL (p=0.04) 6 months post-procedure, with no changes in the renal blood flow. There was a significant decrease in renal artery diameters from 7±2 mm at baseline to 6±1 mm (p=0.03) at 1 month post-procedure. This decrease was associated with increases in maximum velocity of blood flow from 73±20 cm/s at baseline to 78±19 cm/s at 1 month post-procedure. Notably, both parameters reverted to 7±2 mm and 72±18 cm/s, respectively, 6 months after procedure. RSDN improves renal physiology as evidenced by significant improvements in total volume of blood flow per cardiac cycle. Additionally, for the first time, we identified a transient decrease in renal artery diameters immediately after procedure potentially caused by edema and inflammation that reverted to baseline values 6 months post-procedure.

  7. Renal sympathetic denervation increases renal blood volume per cardiac cycle: a serial magnetic resonance imaging study in resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Delacroix, Sinny; Chokka, Ramesh G; Nelson, Adam J; Wong, Dennis T; Sidharta, Samuel; Pederson, Stephen M; Rajwani, Adil; Nimmo, Joanne; Teo, Karen S; Worthley, Stephen G

    2017-01-01

    Aim Preclinical studies have demonstrated improvements in renal blood flow after renal sympathetic denervation (RSDN); however, such effects are yet to be confirmed in patients with resistant hypertension. Herein, we assessed the effects of RSDN on renal artery blood flow and diameter at multiple time points post-RSDN. Methods and results Patients (n=11) with systolic blood pressures ≥160 mmHg despite taking three or more antihypertensive medications at maximum tolerated dose were recruited into this single-center, prospective, non-blinded study. Magnetic resonance imaging indices included renal blood flow and renal artery diameters at baseline, 1 month and 6 months. In addition to significant decreases in blood pressures (p<0.0001), total volume of blood flow per cardiac cycle increased by 20% from 6.9±2 mL at baseline to 8.4±2 mL (p=0.003) at 1 month and to 8.0±2 mL (p=0.04) 6 months post-procedure, with no changes in the renal blood flow. There was a significant decrease in renal artery diameters from 7±2 mm at baseline to 6±1 mm (p=0.03) at 1 month post-procedure. This decrease was associated with increases in maximum velocity of blood flow from 73±20 cm/s at baseline to 78±19 cm/s at 1 month post-procedure. Notably, both parameters reverted to 7±2 mm and 72±18 cm/s, respectively, 6 months after procedure. Conclusion RSDN improves renal physiology as evidenced by significant improvements in total volume of blood flow per cardiac cycle. Additionally, for the first time, we identified a transient decrease in renal artery diameters immediately after procedure potentially caused by edema and inflammation that reverted to baseline values 6 months post-procedure. PMID:28919800

  8. Myocardial function after polarizing versus depolarizing cardiac arrest with blood cardioplegia in a porcine model of cardiopulmonary bypass†

    PubMed Central

    Aass, Terje; Stangeland, Lodve; Moen, Christian Arvei; Salminen, Pirjo-Riitta; Dahle, Geir Olav; Chambers, David J.; Markou, Thomais; Eliassen, Finn; Urban, Malte; Haaverstad, Rune; Matre, Knut; Grong, Ketil

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Potassium-based depolarizing St Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution No 2 administered as intermittent, oxygenated blood is considered as a gold standard for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery. However, the alternative concept of polarizing arrest may have beneficial protective effects. We hypothesize that polarized arrest with esmolol/adenosine/magnesium (St Thomas' Hospital Polarizing cardioplegic solution) in cold, intermittent oxygenated blood offers comparable myocardial protection in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODS Twenty anaesthetized young pigs, 42 ± 2 (standard deviation) kg on standardized tepid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were randomized (10 per group) to depolarizing or polarizing cardiac arrest for 60 min with cardioplegia administered in the aortic root every 20 min as freshly mixed cold, intermittent, oxygenated blood. Global and local baseline and postoperative cardiac function 60, 120 and 180 min after myocardial reperfusion was evaluated with pressure–conductance catheter and strain by Tissue Doppler Imaging. Regional tissue blood flow, cleaved caspase-3 activity, GRK2 phosphorylation and mitochondrial function and ultrastructure were evaluated in myocardial tissue samples. RESULTS Left ventricular function and general haemodynamics did not differ between groups before CPB. Cardiac asystole was obtained and maintained during aortic cross-clamping. Compared with baseline, heart rate was increased and left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic pressures decreased in both groups after weaning. Cardiac index, systolic pressure and radial peak systolic strain did not differ between groups. Contractility, evaluated as dP/dtmax, gradually increased from 120 to 180 min after declamping in animals with polarizing cardioplegia and was significantly higher, 1871 ± 160 (standard error) mmHg/s, compared with standard potassium-based cardioplegic arrest, 1351 ± 70 mmHg/s, after 180 min of reperfusion (P = 0

  9. Pre-clinical evaluation of a nanoparticle-based blood-pool contrast agent for MR imaging of the placenta.

    PubMed

    Ghaghada, Ketan B; Starosolski, Zbigniew A; Bhayana, Saakshi; Stupin, Igor; Patel, Chandreshkumar V; Bhavane, Rohan C; Gao, Haijun; Bednov, Andrey; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Belfort, Michael; George, Verghese; Annapragada, Ananth V

    2017-09-01

    Non-invasive 3D imaging that enables clear visualization of placental margins is of interest in the accurate diagnosis of placental pathologies. This study investigated if contrast-enhanced MRI performed using a liposomal gadolinium blood-pool contrast agent (liposomal-Gd) enables clear visualization of the placental margins and the placental-myometrial interface (retroplacental space). Non-contrast MRI and contrast-enhanced MRI using a clinically approved conventional contrast agent were used as comparators. Studies were performed in pregnant rats under an approved protocol. MRI was performed at 1T using a permanent magnet small animal scanner. Pre-contrast and post-liposomal-Gd contrast images were acquired using T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences. Dynamic Contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) was performed using gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem(®)). Visualization of the retroplacental clear space, a marker of normal placentation, was judged by a trained radiologist. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both single and averaged acquisitions. Images were reviewed by a radiologist and scored for the visualization of placental features. Contrast-enhanced CT (CE-CT) imaging using a liposomal CT agent was performed for confirmation of the MR findings. Transplacental transport of liposomal-Gd was evaluated by post-mortem elemental analysis of tissues. Ex-vivo studies in perfused human placentae from normal, GDM, and IUGR pregnancies evaluated the transport of liposomal agent across the human placental barrier. Post-contrast T1w images acquired with liposomal-Gd demonstrated significantly higher SNR (p = 0.0002) in the placenta compared to pre-contrast images (28.0 ± 4.7 vs. 6.9 ± 1.8). No significant differences (p = 0.39) were noted between SNR in pre-contrast and post-contrast liposomal-Gd images of the amniotic fluid, indicating absence of transplacental passage of the agent. The placental margins were

  10. Polyphosphoric acid capping radioactive/upconverting NaLuF4:Yb,Tm,153Sm nanoparticles for blood pool imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juanjuan; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Lingzhi; Wu, Yongquan; Feng, Wei; Gao, Yanhong; Li, Fuyou

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles that circulate in the bloodstream for a prolonged period of time have important biomedicine applications. However, no example of lanthanide-based nanoparticles having a long-term circulation bloodstream has been reported to date. Herein, we report on difunctional radioactive and upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP) coated with polyphosphoric acid ligand, that is ethylenediamine tetramethylenephosphonic acid (EDTMP), for an application in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) blood pool imaging. The structure, size and zeta-potential of the EDTMP-coated nanoparticles (EDTMP-UCNP) are verified using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Injection of radioisotope samarium-153-labeled EDTMP-UCNP (EDTMP-UCNP:(153)Sm) into mice reveal superior circulation time compared to control nanoparticles coated with citric acid (cit-UCNP:(153)Sm) and (153)Sm complex of EDTMP (EDTMP-(153)Sm). The mechanism for the extended circulation time may be attributed to the adhesion of EDTMP-UCNP on the membrane of red blood cells (RBCs). In vivo toxicity results show no toxicity of EDTMP-UCNP at the dose of 100 mg/kg, validating its safety as an agent for blood pool imaging. Our results provide a new strategy of nanoprobe for a long-term circulation bloodstream by introducing polyphosphoric acid as surface ligand. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. Materials and Methods A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Results Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. Conclusions 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions. PMID:27249022

  12. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    PubMed

    Salamon, Johannes; Hofmann, Martin; Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; Vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  13. [Infective endocarditis in intensive cardiac care unit - clinical and biochemical differences of blood-culture negative infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Kaziród-Wolski, Karol; Sielski, Janusz; Ciuraszkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-01-23

    Diagnosis and treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) is still a challenge for physicians. Group of patients with the worst prognosis is treated in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU). Etiologic agent can not be identified in a substantial number of patients. The aim of study is to find differences between patients with blood culture negative infective endocarditis (BCNIE) and blood culture positive infective endocarditis (BCPIE) treated in ICCU by comparing their clinical course and laboratory parameters. Retrospective analysis of 30 patients with IE hospitalized in ICCU Swietokrzyskie Cardiac Centre between 2010 and 2016. This group consist of 26 men (86,67%) and 4 women (13,3%). Mean age was 58 years ±13. Most of the cases were new disease, recurrence of the disease was observed in 2 cases (6,7%). 8 patients (26,7%) required artificial ventilation, 11 (36,7%) received inotropes and 6 (20%) vasopresors. In 14 (46,7%) cases blood cultures was negative (BCNIE), the rest of patients (16, 53,3%) was blood cultures - positive infective endocarditis (BCIE). Both of the groups were clinically similar. There were no statistically significant differences in incidence of cardiac implants, localization of bacterial vegetations, administered catecholamines, antibiotic therapy, artificial ventilation, surgical treatment, complication and in-hospital mortality. Incidence of cardiac complications in all of BCNIE cases and in 81,3% cases of BCPIE draws attention, but it is not statistically significant difference (p=0,08). There was statistically significant difference in mean BNP blood concentration (3005,17 ng/ml ±2045,2 vs 1013,42 ng/ml ±1087,6; p=0,01), but there were no statistically significant differences in rest of laboratory parameters. BCNIE group has got higher mean BNP blood concentration than BCPIE group. There were no statistically significant differences between these groups in others laboratory parameters, clinical course and administered antibiotic therapy

  14. Interactions between breathing rate and low-frequency fluctuations in blood pressure and cardiac intervals.

    PubMed

    Horsman, H M; Peebles, K C; Tzeng, Y C

    2015-10-01

    Evidence derived from spontaneous measures of cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) suggests that slow breathing at 6 breaths/min augments BRS. However, increases in BRS associated with slow breathing may simply reflect the frequency-dependent nature of the baroreflex rather than the modulation of baroreflex function by changes in breathing rate per se. To test this hypothesis we employed a crossover study design (n = 14) wherein breathing rate and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) oscillation induced via the application of oscillating lower body negative pressure (OLBNP) were independently varied at fixed frequencies. Breathing rate was controlled at 6 or 10 breaths/min with the aid of a metronome, and SAP oscillations were driven at 0.06 Hz and 0.1 Hz using OLBNP. The magnitudes of SAP and R-R interval (cardiac period) oscillations were quantified using power spectral analysis, and the transfer function gain between SAP and R-R interval was used to estimate BRS. Linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the main effects and interactions between breathing rate and OLBNP frequency. There was no statistical interaction between breathing and OLBNP frequency (P = 0.59), indicating that the effect of breathing rate on BRS did not differ according to OLBNP frequency (and vice versa). Additionally, there was no main effect for breathing rate (P = 0.28). However, we observed a significant main effect for OLBNP frequency (P = 0.01) consistent with the frequency-dependent nature of baroreflex. These findings suggest that increases in spectral indices of BRS reflect the frequency dependence of the baroreflex and are not due to slow breathing per se. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Blood pressure reduction after gastric bypass surgery is explained by a decrease in cardiac output.

    PubMed

    van Brussel, Peter M; van den Bogaard, Bas; de Weijer, Barbara A; Truijen, Jasper; Krediet, C T Paul; Janssen, Ignace M; van de Laar, Arnold; Kaasjager, Karin; Fliers, Eric; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Serlie, Mireille J; van den Born, Bert-Jan H

    2017-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) decreases in the first weeks after Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Yet the pathophysiology of the BP-lowering effects observed after gastric bypass surgery is incompletely understood. We evaluated BP, systemic hemodynamics, and baroreflex sensitivity in 15 obese women[mean age 42 ± 7 standard deviation (SD) yr, body mass index 45 ± 6 kg/m(2)] 2 wk before and 6 wk following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Six weeks after gastric bypass surgery, mean body weight decreased by 13 ± 5 kg (10%, P < 0.001). Office BP decreased from 137 ± 10/86 ± 6 to 128 ± 12/81 ± 9 mmHg (P < 0.001, P < 0.01), while daytime ambulatory BP decreased from 128 ± 14/80 ± 9 to 114 ± 10/73 ± 6 mmHg (P = 0.01, P = 0.05), whereas nighttime BP decreased from 111 ± 13/66 ± 7 to 102 ± 9/62 ± 7 mmHg (P = 0.04, P < 0.01). The decrease in BP was associated with a 1.6 ± 1.2 l/min (20%, P < 0.01) decrease in cardiac output (CO), while systemic vascular resistance increased (153 ± 189 dyn·s·cm(-5), 15%, P < 0.01). The maximal ascending slope in systolic blood pressure decreased (192 mmHg/s, 19%, P = 0.01), suggesting a reduction in left ventricular contractility. Baroreflex sensitivity increased from 9.0 [6.4-14.3] to 13.8 [8.5-19.0] ms/mmHg (median [interquartile range]; P < 0.01) and was inversely correlated with the reductions in heart rate (R = -0.64, P = 0.02) and CO (R = -0.61, P = 0.03). In contrast, changes in body weight were not correlated with changes in either BP or CO. The BP reduction following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery is correlated with a decrease in CO independent of changes in body weight. The contribution of heart rate to the reduction in CO together with enhanced baroreflex sensitivity suggests a shift toward increased parasympathetic cardiovascular control.

  16. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  17. Single-breath breath-holding estimate of pulmonary blood flow in man: comparison with direct Fick cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, A H; Rozkovec, A; Papouchado, M; West, J; Laszlo, G

    1989-06-01

    1. Resting pulmonary blood flow (Q), using the uptake of the soluble inert gas Freon-22 and an indirect estimate of lung tissue volume, has been estimated during breath-holding (Qc) and compared with direct Fick cardiac output (Qf) in 16 patients with various cardiac disorders. 2. The effect of breath-hold time was investigated by comparing Qc estimated using 6 and 10 s of breath-holding in 17 patients. Repeatability was assessed by duplicate measurements of Qc in the patients and in six normal subjects. 3. Qc tended to overestimate Qf, the bias and error being 0.09 l/min and 0.59, respectively. The coefficient of repeatability for Qc in the patients was 0.75 l/min and in the normal subjects was 0.66 l/min. For Qf it was 0.72 l/min. There was no significant difference in Qc measured at the two breath-hold times. 4. The technique is simple to perform, and provides a rapid estimate of Q, monitoring acute and chronic changes in cardiac output in normal subjects and patients with cardiac disease.

  18. The association of perioperative red blood cell transfusions and decreased long-term survival after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Surgenor, Stephen D; Kramer, Robert S; Olmstead, Elaine M; Ross, Cathy S; Sellke, Frank W; Likosky, Donald S; Marrin, Charles A S; Helm, Robert E; Leavitt, Bruce J; Morton, Jeremy R; Charlesworth, David C; Clough, Robert A; Hernandez, Felix; Frumiento, Carmine; Benak, Arnold; DioData, Christian; O'Connor, Gerald T

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to red blood cell (RBC) transfusions has been associated with increased mortality after cardiac surgery. We examined long-term survival for cardiac surgical patients who received one or two RBC units during index hospitalization. Nine thousand seventy-nine consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft, valve, or coronary artery bypass graft/valve surgery at eight centers in northern New England during 2001-2004 were examined after exclusions. A probabilistic match between the regional registry and the Social Security Administration's Death Master File determined mortality through June 30, 2006. Cox Proportional Hazard and propensity methods were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios. Thirty-six percent of patients (n = 3254) were exposed to one or two RBC units. Forty-three percent of RBCs were given intraoperatively, 56% in the postoperative period and 1% were preoperative. Patients transfused were more likely to be anemic, older, smaller, female and with more comorbid illness. Survival was significantly decreased for all patients exposed to 1 or 2 U of RBCs during hospitalization for cardiac surgery compared with those who received none (P < 0.001). After adjustment for patient and disease characteristics, patients exposed to 1 or 2 U of RBCs had a 16% higher long-term mortality risk (adjusted hazard ratios = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.01-1.34, P = 0.035). Exposure to 1 or 2 U of RBCs was associated with a 16% increased hazard of decreased survival after cardiac surgery.

  19. Preoperative thrombin generation is predictive for the risk of blood loss after cardiac surgery: a research article.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Yvonne; Al Dieri, Raed; ten Cate, Hugo; Nelemans, Patty; Bloemen, Saartje; Hemker, Coenraad; Weerwind, Patrick; Maessen, Jos; Mochtar, Baheramsjah

    2013-06-12

    In this study the value of thrombin generation parameters measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombography for prediction of blood loss after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass was investigated. Thirty male patients undergoing first-time coronary artery bypass grafting were enrolled. Blood samples were taken pre-bypass before heparinisation (T1) and 5 min after protamine administration (T2). Thrombin generation was measured both in platelet-rich plasma and in platelet-poor plasma. Besides thrombin generation measurements, activated clotting time, haematocrit, haemoglobin, platelet number, fibrinogen, antithrombin, D-dimers, prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were determined. Blood loss was measured and the amount of transfusion products was recorded postoperatively until 20 hours after surgery. Patients were divided into two groups based on the median volume of postoperative blood loss (group 1: patients with median blood loss <930 ml; group 2: patients with median blood loss ≥930 ml). On T1, patients of group 2 had a significantly lower endogenous thrombin potential and peak thrombin (p<0.001 and p=0.004 respectively) in platelet-rich plasma, a significantly lower endogenous thrombin potential (p=0.004) and peak thrombin (p=0.014) in platelet-poor plasma, and a lower platelet count (p=0.002). On T2 both endogenous thrombin potential and peak thrombin remain significantly lower (p=0.011 and p=0.010) in group 2, measured in platelet-rich plasma but not in platelet-poor plasma. In addition, platelet number remains lower in group 2 after protamine administration (p=0.002). The key finding is that the Calibrated Automated Thrombography assay, performed preoperatively, provides information predictive for blood loss after cardiac surgery.

  20. Assessment of Cardiac Troponin I Responses in Nonhuman Primates during Restraint, Blood Collection, and Dosing in Preclinical Safety Studies.

    PubMed

    Reagan, William J; Barnes, Robert; Harris, Peter; Summers, Sandy; Lopes, Sarah; Stubbs, Makeida; Blackwell, David; Steidl-Nichols, Jill

    2017-02-01

    Limited information has been published on the use of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) as a biomarker of cardiac injury in monkeys. The purpose of these studies was to characterize the cTnI response seen in cynomolgus macaques during routine dosing and blood collection procedures typically used in preclinical safety studies and to better understand the pathogenesis of this response. We measured cTnI using two different methods, the Siemens Immulite cTnI assay and the more sensitive Siemens Troponin I-Ultra assay. We were able to demonstrate that after oral, subcutaneous, or intravenous dosing of common vehicles, as well as serial chair restraint for venipuncture blood collection, that minimal to mild transient increases in cTnI could be detected in monkeys with both assays. cTnI values typically peaked at 2, 3, 4, or 6 hr after sham dosing and returned to baseline at 22 or 24 hr. In addition, marked increases in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) occurred in monkeys during the restraint procedures, which likely initiated the cTnI release in these animals. Monkeys that were very well acclimated to the chairing procedures and had vascular access ports for blood sampling did not have marked increases in HRs and BP or increases in cTnI.

  1. Short-term effects of oral dronedarone administration on cardiac function, blood pressure and electrocardiogram in conscious telemetry dogs

    PubMed Central

    SAENGKLUB, Nakkawee; YOUNGBLOOD, Brad; DEL RIO, Carlos; SAWANGKOON, Suwanakiet; HAMLIN, Robert L.; KIJTAWORNRAT, Anusak

    2016-01-01

    Dronedarone is a multichannel blocking antiarrhythmic drug that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but the data in veterinary medicine are inadequate. The objective of this study was to determine the short-term effects of oral dronedarone on cardiac inotropy and lusitropy, blood pressure and electrocardiogram (ECG) in healthy dogs. A total of 6 beagle dogs were instrumented with telemetry units and sono-micrometry crystals to obtain left ventricular pressure-volume relationship, mean blood pressure (MBP) and ECG. Dogs were given orally dronedarone (20 mg/kg, twice per day) for 7 days. All parameters were obtained hourly at 4–8 hr after the first dose and at 12-, 96- (day 4) and 168-hr (day 7) after dosing. The results showed that dronedarone had no effect on inotropy and lusitropy, while it significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.001) and lowered MBP (P<0.05). Dronedarone also tended to reduce cardiac output (P=0.237) and heart rate (P=0.057). These results suggested that short-term effects of oral dronedarone administration at a dose of 20 mg/kg, twice per day, produced negative dromotropy with minimal effect on cardiac function in conscious dogs. PMID:26922916

  2. Prolylcarboxypeptidase deficiency is associated with increased blood pressure, glomerular lesions, and cardiac dysfunction independent of altered circulating and cardiac angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Maier, Christoph; Schadock, Ines; Haber, Philipp K; Wysocki, Jan; Ye, Minghao; Kanwar, Yashpal; Flask, Christopher A; Yu, Xin; Hoit, Brian D; Adams, Gregory N; Schmaier, Alvin H; Bader, Michael; Batlle, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP) is a carboxypeptidase that cleaves angiotensin II (AngII) forming Ang(1-7). The impact of genetic PRCP deficiency on AngII metabolism, blood pressure (BP), kidney histology, and cardiac phenotype was investigated in two lines of PRCP-deficient mice: KST302 derived in C57BL/6 background and GST090 derived in FVB/N background. The GST090 line had increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) (113.7 ± 2.07 vs. WT 105.0 ± 1.23 mmHg; p < 0.01) and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) (ratio of diastolic left ventricular posterior wall dimension to left ventricular diameter 0.239 ± 0.0163 vs. WT 0.193 ± 0.0049; p < 0.05). Mice in the KST302 line also had mild hypertension and LVH. Cardiac defects, increased glomerular size, and glomerular mesangial expansion were also observed. After infusion of AngII to mice in the KST302 line, both MAP and LVH increased, but the constitutive differences between the gene trap mice and controls were no longer observed. Plasma and cardiac AngII and Ang(1-7) were not significantly different between PRCP-deficient mice and controls. Thus, PRCP deficiency is associated with elevated blood pressure and cardiac alterations including LVH and cardiac defects independently of systemic or cardiac AngII and Ang(1-7). An ex vivo assay showed that recombinant PRCP, unlike recombinant ACE2, did not degrade AngII to form Ang(1-7) in plasma at pH 7.4. PRCP was localized in α-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting tubule. The low pH prevailing at this site and the acidic pH preference of PRCP suggest a role of this enzyme in regulating AngII degradation in the collecting tubule where this peptide increases sodium reabsorption and therfore BP. However, there are other potential mechanisms for increased BP in this model that need to be considered as well. PRCP converts AngII to Ang(1-7) but only at an acidic pH. Global PRCP deficiency causes heart and kidney alterations and a moderate rise in BP. PRCP is abundant

  3. Effects of far infrared rays irradiated from ceramic material (BIOCERAMIC) on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure, and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chen, Chien-Ho; Tsai, Shih-Ying; Hsiao, George; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2012-10-31

    The present study examined the effects of BIOCERAMIC on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility using in vivo and in vitro animal models. We investigated the effects of BIOCERAMIC on the in vivo cardiovascular hemodynamic parameters of rats by monitoring their heart rates, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Thereafter, we assayed its effects on the heart rate in an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation, and on cardiac contractility under oxidative stress. BIOCERAMIC caused significant decreases in heart rates and systolic and mean blood pressure in the stress-conditioned heart rate rat models (P < 0.05), as well as in the experimental models of an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation (P < 0.05), and normalized cardiac contractility under oxidative stress (P < 0.05). BIOCERAMIC may, therefore, normalize the effects of psychological stress and oxidative stress conditions.

  4. Association of blood products administration during cardiopulmonary bypass and excessive post-operative bleeding in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Hemant S; Barrett, Sarah S; Barry, Kristen; Xu, Meng; Saville, Benjamin R; Donahue, Brian S; Harris, Zena L; Bichell, David P

    2015-03-01

    Our objectives were to study risk factors and post-operative outcomes associated with excessive post-operative bleeding in pediatric cardiac surgeries performed using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) support. A retrospective observational study was undertaken, and all consecutive pediatric heart surgeries over 1 year period were studied. Excessive post-operative bleeding was defined as 10 ml/kg/h of chest tube output for 1 h or 5 ml/kg/h for three consecutive hours in the first 12 h of pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) stay. Risk factors including demographics, complexity of cardiac defect, CPB parameters, hematological studies, and post-operative morbidity and mortality were evaluated for excessive bleeding. 253 patients were studied, and 107 (42 %) met the criteria for excessive bleeding. Bayesian model averaging revealed that greater volume of blood products transfusion during CPB was significantly associated with excessive bleeding. Multiple logistic regression analysis of blood products transfusion revealed that increased volume of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) administration for CPB prime and during CPB was significantly associated with excessive bleeding (p = 0.028 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Proportional odds logistic regression revealed that excessive bleeding was associated with greater time to achieve negative fluid balance, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and duration of PCICU stay (p < 0.001) after adjusting for multiple parameters. A greater volume of blood products administration, especially PRBCs transfusion for CPB prime, and during the CPB period is associated with excessive post-operative bleeding. Excessive bleeding is associated with worse post-operative outcomes.

  5. Storage of platelet concentrates from pooled buffy coats made of fresh and overnight-stored whole blood processed on the novel Atreus 2C+ system: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Per; Callaert, Martine; Shanwell, Agneta; Gulliksson, Hans

    2008-04-01

    The Atreus 2C+ system (Gambro BCT) automatically separates whole blood (WB) into buffy coat (BC), red blood cells (RBC), and plasma and transfers the components into separate containers. After processing with the Atreus, 4 to 6 BC units can be pooled and processed into leukoreduced platelets (PLTs) by use of the automated OrbiSac BC system (Gambro BCT). The aim of our in vitro study was to investigate the effects of holding either WB or BC overnight before preparation of PLTs by use of the Atreus 2C+ system for BC preparation. A standard routine procedure involving conventional blood containers for the preparation of BC combined with the OrbiSac process (top-and-top system; Terumo) was used as a reference. WB was either processed within 8 hours after collection ("fresh blood") or stored overnight before processing. WB units were separated into BC, RBC, and plasma units and transferred into individual containers. Either the BC or the WB units rested overnight at 22 +/- 2 degrees C. Six ABO-identical BCs, obtained from either fresh or overnight-stored WB, were pooled and processed with the OrbiSac BC system to obtain leukoreduced PLTs. In total, 20 Atreus and 10 reference (leukoreduced PLTs) samples were analyzed for various in vitro variables during the 7-day storage period. No significant difference in glucose consumption, lactate production, mean PLT volume, LDH activity, bicarbonate, ATP, RANTES, and the expression of CD62p and CD42b between groups was detected. pH was maintained at greater than 7.0 (Day 7). Swirling remained at the highest levels (score, 2) for all units throughout storage. PLTs derived from BCs, obtained from either fresh or overnight-stored WB processed on the novel automated Atreus 2C+ system, were equivalent to control PLTs with regard to PLT in vitro characteristics during 7 days of storage. Stable recovery of PLTs and satisfactory PLT content according to current standards were also found.

  6. Influence of a hyperlipidic diet on the composition of the non-membrane lipid pool of red blood cells of male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Remesar, Xavier; Antelo, Arantxa; Llivina, Clàudia; Albà, Emma; Berdié, Lourdes; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives. Red blood cells (RBC) are continuously exposed to oxidative agents, affecting their membrane lipid function. However, the amount of lipid in RBCs is higher than the lipids of the cell membrane, and includes triacylglycerols, which are no membrane components. We assumed that the extra lipids originated from lipoproteins attached to the cell surface, and we intended to analyse whether the size and composition of this lipid pool were affected by sex or diet. Experimental design. Adult male and female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria diets. Packed blood cells and plasma lipids were extracted and analysed for fatty acids by methylation and GC-MS, taking care of not extracting membrane lipids. Results. The absence of ω3-PUFA in RBC extracts (but not in plasma) suggest that the lipids extracted were essentially those in the postulated lipid surface pool and not those in cell membrane. In cells’ extracts, there was a marked depletion of PUFA (and, in general, of insaturation). Fatty acid patterns were similar for all groups studied, with limited effects of sex and no effects of diet in RBC (but not in plasma) fatty acids. Presence of trans fatty acids was small but higher in RBC lipids, and could not be justified by dietary sources. Conclusions. The presence of a small layer of lipid on the RBC surface may limit oxidative damage to the cell outer structures, and help explain its role in the transport of lipophilic compounds. However, there may be other, so far uncovered, additional functions for this lipid pool. PMID:26213652

  7. The relative safety of pooled whole-blood-derived platelets prepared by the buffy-coat method versus single-donor (apheresis) platelets.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Eleftherios C

    2010-01-01

    Conversion to a single-donor (apheresis) platelet inventory in Western Europe and other countries that provide similar health care to the US but rely on buffy-coat pooled whole-blood-derived platelets will confer the benefit of a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of all emerging transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs). In Europe, this benefit will include a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of acquiring variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) from platelet transfusion. In countries that use buffy coats from first-time donors to produce platelet pools, there will also be a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus infections. Conversion to a single-donor inventory collected from male donors (or female donors without a history of pregnancy or shown not to have white-blood-cell antibodies) should also reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury, although this prediction is based on theory and may not materialize or prove hard to document. Because conversion to a single-donor inventory can effect a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of all TTIs without incurring any risk, it is a more advantageous risk-reduction strategy for emerging TTIs compared with the introduction of pathogen-reduction systems for platelets. The latter cannot protect from vCJD and potentially also from some other emerging TTIs; moreover, they have recently been associated with an increased risk of bleeding.

  8. Three-dimensional MR pulmonary perfusion imaging and angiography with an injection of a new blood pool contrast agent B-22956/1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Carr, J; Harris, K; Saker, M B; Cavagna, F M; Maggioni, F; Laub, G; Li, D; Finn, J P

    2001-10-01

    Initial evaluation of a new blood pool agent, B-22956/1, for pulmonary imaging was performed in five domestic pigs with artificial embolism. Pre-embolism 3D pulmonary perfusion images were first acquired by injecting an extravascular agent, gadoteridol. The pulmonary arteries of the pigs were then occluded by the artificial emboli. Post-embolism perfusion scans were subsequently performed by injecting B-22956/1. Additional post-embolism high-spatial-resolution angiograms were also acquired. Parenchyma perfusion deficits were well depicted in the post-embolism perfusion maps. The post-embolism angiography clearly revealed the location and extent of the filling defects in the pulmonary vessels. Signal intensities of perfusion maps on the normal parenchyma were significantly improved (30%) by using B-22956/1, in comparison with perfusion images using gadoteridol (P < 0.01). Many pulmonary angiograms with approximately equal contrast could be obtained even at 22 minutes after the injection of B-22956/1. Our initial results indicate that blood pool agent B-22956/1 may provide opportunities for whole-lung-coverage perfusion mapping and additional high-resolution target angiograms after a single injection.

  9. Gd-AAZTA-MADEC, an improved blood pool agent for DCE-MRI studies on mice on 1 T scanners.

    PubMed

    Longo, Dario Livio; Arena, Francesca; Consolino, Lorena; Minazzi, Paolo; Geninatti-Crich, Simonetta; Giovenzana, Giovanni Battista; Aime, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    A novel MRI blood-pool contrast agent (Gd-AAZTA-MADEC) has been compared with established blood pool agents for tumor contrast enhanced images and angiography. Synthesis, relaxometric properties, albumin binding affinity and pharmacokinetic profiles are reported. For in vivo studies, angiographic images and tumor contrast enhanced images were acquired on mice with benchtop 1T-MRI scanners and compared with MS-325, B22956/1 and B25716/1. The design of this contrast agent involved the elongation of the spacer between the targeting deoxycholic acid moiety and the Gd-AAZTA imaging reporting unit that drastically changed either the binding affinity to albumin (KA(HSA) = 8.3 × 10(5) M(-1)) and the hydration state of the Gd ion (q = 2) in comparison to the recently reported B25716/1. The very markedly high binding affinity towards mouse and human serum albumins resulted in peculiar pharmacokinetics and relaxometric properties. The NMRD profiles clearly indicated that maximum efficiency is attainable at magnetic field strength of 1 T. In vivo studies showed high enhancement of the vasculature and a prolonged accumulation inside tumor. The herein reported pre-clinical imaging studies show that a great benefit arises from the combination of a benchtop MRI scanner operating at 1 T and the albumin-binding Gd-AAZTA-MADEC complex, for pursuing enhanced angiography and improved characterization of tumor vascular microenvironment.

  10. Blood flow dynamics of one cardiac cycle and relationship to mechanotransduction and trabeculation during heart looping

    PubMed Central

    Garita, Barbara; Jenkins, Michael W.; Han, Mingda; Zhou, Chao; VanAuker, Michael; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Fujimoto, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Analyses of form-function relationships during heart looping are directly related to technological advances. Recent advances in four-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) permit observations of cardiac dynamics at high-speed acquisition rates and high resolution. Real-time observation of the avian stage 13 looping heart reveals that interactions between the endocardial and myocardial compartments are more complex than previously depicted. Here we applied four-dimensional OCT to elucidate the relationships of the endocardium, myocardium, and cardiac jelly compartments in a single cardiac cycle during looping. Six cardiac levels along the longitudinal heart tube were each analyzed at 15 time points from diastole to systole. Using image analyses, the organization of mechanotransducing molecules, fibronectin, tenascin C, α-tubulin, and nonmuscle myosin II was correlated with specific cardiac regions defined by OCT data. Optical coherence microscopy helped to visualize details of cardiac architectural development in the embryonic mouse heart. Throughout the cardiac cycle, the endocardium was consistently oriented between the midline of the ventral floor of the foregut and the outer curvature of the myocardial wall, with multiple endocardial folds allowing high-volume capacities during filling. The cardiac area fractional shortening is much higher than previously published. The in vivo profile captured by OCT revealed an interaction of the looping heart with the extra-embryonic splanchnopleural membrane providing outside-in information. In summary, the combined dynamic and imaging data show the developing structural capacity to accommodate increasing flow and the mechanotransducing networks that organize to effectively facilitate formation of the trabeculated four-chambered heart. PMID:21239637

  11. Blood Pressure Deviations From Optimal Mean Arterial Pressure During Cardiac Surgery Measured With a Novel Monitor of Cerebral Blood Flow and Risk for Perioperative Delirium: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hori, Daijiro; Max, Laura; Laflam, Andrew; Brown, Charles; Neufeld, Karin J; Adachi, Hideo; Sciortino, Christopher; Conte, John V; Cameron, Duke E; Hogue, Charles W; Mandal, Kaushik

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether excursions of blood pressure from the optimal mean arterial pressure during and after cardiac surgery are associated with postoperative delirium identified using a structured examination. Prospective, observational study. University hospital. The study included 110 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients were monitored using ultrasound-tagged near-infrared spectroscopy to assess optimal mean arterial pressure by cerebral blood flow autoregulation monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass and the first 3 hours in the intensive care unit. The patients were tested preoperatively and on postoperative days 1 to 3 with the Confusion Assessment Method or Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit, the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98, and the Mini Mental State Examination. Summative presence of delirium on postoperative days 1 through 3, as defined by the consensus panel following Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-TR criteria, was the primary outcome. Delirium occurred in 47 (42.7%) patients. There were no differences in blood pressure excursions above and below optimal mean arterial pressure between patients with and without summative presence of delirium. Secondary analysis showed blood pressure excursions above the optimal mean arterial pressure to be higher in patients with delirium (mean±SD, 33.2±26.51 mmHgxh v 23.4±16.13 mmHgxh; p = 0.031) and positively correlated with the Delirium Rating Scale score on postoperative day 2 (r = 0.27, p = 0.011). Summative presence of delirium was not associated with perioperative blood pressure excursions; but on secondary exploratory analysis, excursions above the optimal mean arterial pressure were associated with the incidence and severity of delirium on postoperative day 2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  13. Aliskiren improves blood pressure control and prevents cardiac damage in high-risk hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Mazza, A; Montemurro, D; Zuin, M; Schiavon, L; Zorzan, S; Chondrogiannis, S; Ferretti, A; Ramazzina, E; Rubello, D

    2013-08-01

    Longitudinal study aimed to evaluate the antihypertensive efficacy, safety and the effect on cardiac damage of Aliskiren, administered to a group of high-risk hypertensive patients with mild impairment of renal function and uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) despite a two-drug antihypertensive treatment. One hundred and six patients (56 men and 50 females) aged 61.9±12.7 years, were assigned to receive Aliskiren 150-300 mg once-daily for 12 months. Clinic BP measurements were taken at every follow-up visit (1st, 6th and 12th month), while biochemical tests, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 24-hours ambulatory BP measurements (ABMP) and echocardiography were evaluated at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Analysis of variance for repeated measures compared BP, left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and eGFR values changes. A significant reduction (all P<0.0001) of clinic systolic (-28.6 mmHg) and diastolic (-12.8 mmHg) BP values, mean 24h-systolic (-12.3 mmHg) and 24h-diastolic (-6.5 mmHg), day-time systolic (-11.5 mmHg) and diastolic (-6.4 mmHg), night-time systolic (-11.9 mmHg) and diastolic (-7 mmHg) ABPM values and in the use of antihypertensive drugs was observed (3.0±0.9 vs. 2.0±0.7, p=0.01). LVMI was significantly reduced (130.2±36.1 vs. 115.9±33.4 g/m2, P<0.0001); eGFR was steady (75.3±17.3 vs. 73.1±21.5 ml/min/1.73m2, P>0.05). Putative adverse events caused withdrawal of 7 subjects (6 for gastrointestinal disturbances, 1 for alopecia). Aliskiren was effective in decreasing both clinical and ABPM values and in reducing LVMI in both genders without any influence on eGFR. The treatment resulted safe, even in combination with ACE-inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers. A significant reduction in the use of concomitant antihypertensive drugs was observed.

  14. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction

    PubMed Central

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M.; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80°C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  15. Investigation of oxyhemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin ratios in right and left cardiac blood for diagnosis of fatal hypothermia and death by fire.

    PubMed

    Kanto-Nishimaki, Yuko; Saito, Haruka; Watanabe-Aoyagi, Miwako; Toda, Ritsuko; Iwadate, Kimiharu

    2014-11-01

    Few large-scale investigations have looked at the oxyhemoglobin ratio (%O2-Hb) or the carboxyhemoglobin ratio (%CO-Hb) in fatal hypothermia and death by fire as applicable to forensic medicine. We therefore retrospectively examined right and left cardiac blood samples for both %O2-Hb and %CO-Hb in 690 forensic autopsy cases. We therefore sought to establish reference values for the above forensic diagnoses, to compare %O2-Hb in fatal hypothermia with or without cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to compare the relationship between %CO-Hb and smoking history. All %O2-Hb and %CO-Hb data were obtained during or immediately after autopsies using a portable CO-oximeter. Death by carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication and death by fire were excluded from the analysis involving smoking history. In fatal hypothermia, %O2-Hb in the left cardiac blood was significantly higher than that in the right cardiac blood, providing important evidence for fatal hypothermia. Furthermore, %O2-Hb in the left cardiac blood increases with CPR but that in the right cardiac blood increases in parallel. No correlation was observed between rectal temperature and %O2-Hb in the right and left cardiac blood, indicating that it is unlikely that postmortem cooling increases %O2-Hb in cardiac blood. %CO-Hb in smokers was significantly higher than that in non-smokers, although the number of cigarettes smoked did not appear to be significant. When assessing death by fire, we identified that %CO-Hb of >10% was a reliable marker of antemortem CO inhalation, regardless of smoking history.

  16. Cell salvage of cardiotomy suction blood improves the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gäbel, Jakob; Westerberg, Martin; Bengtsson, Anders; Jeppsson, Anders

    2013-09-01

    The inflammatory response after cardiac surgery is characterized by a profound release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Recent data suggest that the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines is of greater importance than the absolute levels. Retransfusion of unwashed cardiotomy suction blood contributes to the inflammatory response, but the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in cardiotomy suction blood and whether cell salvage before retransfusion influences the systemic balance have not been investigated previously. Twenty-five coronary artery bypass grafting patients were randomized to either cell salvage of cardiotomy suction blood or no cell salvage before retransfusion. Plasma levels of three anti-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist, IL-4 and IL-10] and two proinflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and IL-6), and the IL-6-to-IL-10 ratio was measured in cardiotomy suction blood before and after cell salvage, and in the systemic circulation before, during and after surgery. Plasma levels of all cytokines except IL-4 and IL-10 were significantly higher in cardiotomy suction blood than in the systemic circulation. The IL-6-to-IL-10 ratio was 6-fold higher in cardiotomy suction blood than in the systemic circulation [median 10.2 (range 1.1-75) vs 1.7 (0.2-24), P < 0.001]. Cell salvage reduced plasma levels of cytokines in cardiotomy suction blood and improved the systemic IL-6-to-IL-10 ratio 24 h after surgery [median 5.2 (3.6-17) vs 12.4 (4.9-31)] compared with no cell salvage (P = 0.032). The balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in cardiotomy suction blood is unfavourable. Cell salvage reduces the absolute levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in cardiotomy suction blood and improves the balance in the systemic circulation after surgery.

  17. Open-loop (feed-forward) and feedback control of coronary blood flow during exercise, cardiac pacing, and pressure changes.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ranjan K; Feigl, Eric O; Gorman, Mark W; Brengelmann, George L; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    A control system model was developed to analyze data on in vivo coronary blood flow regulation and to probe how different mechanisms work together to control coronary flow from rest to exercise, and under a variety of experimental conditions, including cardiac pacing and with changes in coronary arterial pressure (autoregulation). In the model coronary flow is determined by the combined action of a feedback pathway signal that is determined by the level of plasma ATP in coronary venous blood, an adrenergic open-loop (feed-forward) signal that increases with exercise, and a contribution of pressure-mediated myogenic control. The model was identified based on data from exercise experiments where myocardial oxygen extraction, coronary flow, cardiac interstitial norepinephrine concentration, and arterial and coronary venous plasma ATP concentrations were measured during control and during adrenergic and purinergic receptor blockade conditions. The identified model was used to quantify the relative contributions of open-loop and feedback pathways and to illustrate the degree of redundancy in the control of coronary flow. The results indicate that the adrenergic open-loop control component is responsible for most of the increase in coronary blood flow that occurs during high levels of exercise. However, the adenine nucleotide-mediated metabolic feedback control component is essential. The model was evaluated by predicting coronary flow in cardiac pacing and autoregulation experiments with reasonable fits to the data. The analysis shows that a model in which coronary venous plasma adenine nucleotides are a signal in local metabolic feedback control of coronary flow is consistent with the available data.

  18. Open-loop (feed-forward) and feedback control of coronary blood flow during exercise, cardiac pacing, and pressure changes

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Ranjan K.; Feigl, Eric O.; Gorman, Mark W.; Brengelmann, George L.

    2016-01-01

    A control system model was developed to analyze data on in vivo coronary blood flow regulation and to probe how different mechanisms work together to control coronary flow from rest to exercise, and under a variety of experimental conditions, including cardiac pacing and with changes in coronary arterial pressure (autoregulation). In the model coronary flow is determined by the combined action of a feedback pathway signal that is determined by the level of plasma ATP in coronary venous blood, an adrenergic open-loop (feed-forward) signal that increases with exercise, and a contribution of pressure-mediated myogenic control. The model was identified based on data from exercise experiments where myocardial oxygen extraction, coronary flow, cardiac interstitial norepinephrine concentration, and arterial and coronary venous plasma ATP concentrations were measured during control and during adrenergic and purinergic receptor blockade conditions. The identified model was used to quantify the relative contributions of open-loop and feedback pathways and to illustrate the degree of redundancy in the control of coronary flow. The results indicate that the adrenergic open-loop control component is responsible for most of the increase in coronary blood flow that occurs during high levels of exercise. However, the adenine nucleotide-mediated metabolic feedback control component is essential. The model was evaluated by predicting coronary flow in cardiac pacing and autoregulation experiments with reasonable fits to the data. The analysis shows that a model in which coronary venous plasma adenine nucleotides are a signal in local metabolic feedback control of coronary flow is consistent with the available data. PMID:27037372

  19. Pheochromocytoma crisis with severe cyclic blood pressure fluctuations in a cardiac pheochromocytoma patient successfully resuscitated by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Dawei; Su, Longxiang; Long, Yun; Du, Wei; Miao, Qi; Li, Fang; Jin, Zhengyu; Zeng, Zhengpei; Luo, Ailun; Huang, Yuguang

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac pheochromocytoma is relatively rare. Few reports describe the intraoperative and postoperative progression of patients experiencing a life-threatening pheochromocytoma crisis treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO).A 35-year-old man was referred to our facility for paroxysmal hypertension with a 10-year history of sweating, headaches, cardiac palpitations, and postexercise dyspnea. The patient initially underwent urine catecholamine measurement and an isotope scan, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computer tomography (CT), which indicated a multiple, cardiac pheochromocytoma. Echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), CT reconstruction, and a coronary CT angiography revealed several lesions at the aortic root and along the cardiac vasculature.Multifocal cardiac pheochromocytoma was diagnosed and pheochromocytoma crisis with severe cyclic blood pressure fluctuation occurred during surgery.Surgical resection of multiple pheochromocytomas in the right medial carotid sheath, mediastinum between the main and pulmonary arteries, and between the abdominal aorta and inferior vena artery was performed. To ensure cardiac perfusion and avoid severe circulatory fluctuation, the cardiac paraganglioma resection was prioritized. After resecting the cardiac pheochromocytoma, a severe pheochromocytoma crisis with rapid cyclic blood pressure fluctuation developed. ECMO and intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) were initiated to stabilize circulation and perfusion. Phenoxybenzamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and fluid resuscitation were administered to support cardiovascular function.The magnitude of blood pressure fluctuation steadily decreased with treatment. IABP was discontinued after 3 days, and ECMO was discontinued after 16 days. The patient was discharged 3 months postoperatively.This case indicates that mechanical life support with ECMO is a valuable option for pheochromocytoma

  20. T Lymphocytes and Inflammatory Mediators in the Interplay between Brain and Blood in Alzheimer's Disease: Potential Pools of New Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Mietelska-Porowska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder and the main cause of dementia. The disease is among the leading medical concerns of the modern world, because only symptomatic therapies are available, and no reliable, easily accessible biomarkers exist for AD detection and monitoring. Therefore extensive research is conducted to elucidate the mechanisms of AD pathogenesis, which seems to be heterogeneous and multifactorial. Recently much attention has been given to the neuroinflammation and activation of glial cells in the AD brain. Reports also highlighted the proinflammatory role of T lymphocytes infiltrating the AD brain. However, in AD molecular and cellular alterations involving T cells and immune mediators occur not only in the brain, but also in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here we review alterations concerning T lymphocytes and related immune mediators in the AD brain, CSF, and blood and the mechanisms by which peripheral T cells cross the blood brain barrier and the blood-CSF barrier. This knowledge is relevant for better AD therapies and for identification of novel biomarkers for improved AD diagnostics in the blood and the CSF. The data will be reviewed with the special emphasis on possibilities for development of AD biomarkers. PMID:28293644

  1. 3D pulmonary perfusion MRI and MR angiography of pulmonary embolism in pigs after a single injection of a blood pool MR contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Ley, Sebastian; Puderbach, Michael; Plathow, Christian; Bock, Michael; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MR angiography (MRA) of pulmonary embolism (PE) in pigs using a single injection of the blood pool contrast Gadomer. PE was induced in five domestic pigs by injection of autologous blood thrombi. Contrast-enhanced first-pass 3D perfusion MRI (TE/TR/FA: 1.0 ms/2.2 ms/40 degrees; voxel size: 1.3 x 2.5 x 4.0 mm3; TA: 1.8 s per data set) and high-resolution 3D MRA (TE/TR/FA: 1.4 ms/3.4 ms/40 degrees; voxel size: 0.8 x 1.0 x 1.6 mm3) was performed during and after a single injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of Gadomer. Image data were compared to pre-embolism Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI and post-embolism thin-section multislice CT (n = 2). SNR measurements were performed in the pulmonary arteries and lung. One animal died after induction of PE. In all other animals, perfusion MRI and MRA could be acquired after a single injection of Gadomer. At perfusion MRI, PE could be detected by typical wedge-shaped perfusion defects. While the visualization of central PE at MRA correlated well with the CT, peripheral PE were only visualized by CT. Gadomer achieved a higher peak SNR of the lungs compared to Gd-DTPA (21 +/- 8 vs. 13 +/- 3). Contrast-enhanced 3D perfusion MRI and MRA of PE can be combined using a single injection of the blood pool contrast agent Gadomer.

  2. Prognostic Significance of Hyponatremia in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Pooled Analysis of the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial Studies.

    PubMed

    Carcel, Cheryl; Sato, Shoichiro; Zheng, Danni; Heeley, Emma; Arima, Hisatomi; Yang, Jie; Wu, Guojun; Chen, Guofang; Zhang, Shihong; Delcourt, Candice; Lavados, Pablo; Robinson, Thompson; Lindley, Richard I; Wang, Xia; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-07-01

    To determine the association of hyponatremia at presentation with clinical and imaging outcomes in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Retrospective pooled analysis of prospectively collected data from 3,243 participants of the pilot and main phases of the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trials 1 and 2 (international, multicenter, open, blinded endpoint, randomized controlled trials designed to assess the effects of early intensive blood pressure lowering in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage). Clinical hospital sites in 21 countries. Patients with predominantly mild-moderate severity of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage within 6 hours of onset and elevated systolic blood pressure (150-220 mm Hg) were included in the study. Patients were assigned to receive intensive (target systolic blood pressure, < 140 mm Hg within 1 hr) or guideline-recommended (target systolic blood pressure, < 180 mm Hg) blood pressure-lowering therapy. Presentation hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium less than 135 mEq/L. The primary outcome was death at 90 days. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association of hyponatremia with important clinical events. Of 3,002 patients with available data, 349 (12%) had hyponatremia. Hyponatremia was associated with death (18% vs 11%; multivariable-adjusted odds ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.28-2.57; p < 0.001) and larger baseline intracerebral hemorrhage volume (multivariable adjusted, p = 0.046) but not with baseline perihematomal edema volume nor with growth of intracerebral hemorrhage or perihematomal edema during the initial 24 hours. Hyponatremia at presentation is associated with increased mortality in patients with predominantly deep and modest volume intracerebral hemorrhage through mechanisms that seem independent of growth in intracerebral hemorrhage or perihematomal edema.

  3. Impact of alcohol intake on the relationships of uric acid with blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seki, Shingo; Oki, Yoshitsugu; Tsunoda, Seiko; Takemoto, Tomoyuki; Koyama, Tatsuya; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2016-11-01

    Hyperuricemia, which is frequently associated with hypertension, can be caused by alcohol intake. To date, limited data have shown the link between alcohol intake and hyperuricemic hypertension. We retrospectively examined the influence of alcohol intake on the relationship between the uric acid level and blood pressure or cardio-metabolic parameters in 171 untreated non-failing hypertensive patients (mean 59.3±10.7 years). Cross-sectional analysis was separately performed in regular alcohol drinkers (more than 25g/day ethanol, n=74, 82.4% men) and non-drinkers (n=97, 33.0% men). Diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in drinkers than in non-drinkers (101.6±11.5mmHg vs. 96.8±8.2mmHg, p<0.01). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (80.4±14.7mL/min/1.73m(2) vs. 80.0±17.8mL/min/1.73m(2)) and body mass index (BMI, 24.7±4.4kg/m(2) vs. 24.8±4.2kg/m(2)) were similar in the two groups. In the drinker group, the uric acid level (mean 6.3±1.7mg/dL) was positively correlated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressures (r=0.270/p=0.020 and r=0.354/p=0.0020, respectively), and with the markers of cardiac hypertrophy, including electrocardiographic voltage (V1S+V5R, r=0.244/p=0.042) and echocardiographic left ventricular mass index (r=0.270/p=0.026). These correlations were also observed in the male drinker sub-group. In the non-drinkers, the uric acid level (mean 5.0±1.4mg/dL) was positively correlated with BMI (r=0.369/p=0.0002) but not with blood pressure or the markers of cardiac hypertrophy. The results suggest that the role of uric acid in blood pressure might differ between hypertensive drinkers and non-drinkers. In regular alcohol drinkers, there was a positive association of uric acid level with blood pressure and the severity of cardiac hypertrophy. In non-regular drinkers, an increased uric acid level is likely to be closely associated with increased BMI. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  5. Functional properties of cells obtained from human cord blood CD34+ stem cells and mouse cardiac myocytes in coculture.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Alessia; Pagani, Francesca; Avitabile, Daniele; Bonanno, Giuseppina; Scambia, Giovanni; Vigna, Elisa; Grassi, Francesca; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Fucile, Sergio; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2008-04-01

    Prior in vitro studies suggested that different types of hematopoietic stem cells may differentiate into cardiomyocytes. The present work examined whether human CD34(+) cells from the human umbilical cord blood (hUCB), cocultured with neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes, acquire the functional properties of myocardial cells and express human cardiac genes. hUCB CD34(+) cells were cocultured onto cardiomyocytes following an infection with a lentivirus-encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After 7 days, mononucleated EGFP(+) cells were tested for their electrophysiological features by patch clamp and for cytosolic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) homeostasis by [Ca(2+)](i) imaging of X-rhod1-loaded cells. Human Nkx2.5 and GATA-4 expression was examined in cocultured cell populations by real-time RT-PCR. EGFP(+) cells were connected to surrounding cells by gap junctions, acquired electrophysiological properties similar to those of cardiomyocytes, and showed action potential-associated [Ca(2+)](i) transients. These cells also exhibited spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations and the associated membrane potential depolarization. However, RT-PCR of both cell populations showed no upregulation of human-specific cardiac genes. In conclusion, under our experimental conditions, hUCB CD34(+) cells cocultured with murine cardiomyocytes formed cells that exhibited excitation-contraction coupling features similar to those of cardiomyocytes. However, the expression of human-specific cardiac genes was undetectable by RT-PCR.

  6. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your body can lead to cardiac arrest. This can include trauma, electrical shock, or major blood loss. Recreational drugs. Using certain drugs, such as cocaine ...

  7. Effect of a music intervention on noise annoyance, heart rate, and blood pressure in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Byers, J F; Smyth, K A

    1997-05-01

    Exposure to noise in a critical care unit may trigger a response by the sympathetic nervous system, thereby increasing cardiovascular work in patients recovering from cardiac surgery. To investigate the effects of a music intervention given twice on the first postoperative day on noise annoyance, heart rate, and arterial blood pressure in subjects with high (n = 22) and low (n = 18) sensitivity to noise. A prospective, quasi-experimental, repeated-measures design was used. Based on results of power analysis, the sample size was 40. Subjects were recruited preoperatively, and their sensitivity to noise was assessed. On the first postoperative day, repeated-measures data were collected on levels of noise annoyance and physiological variables during 15 minutes of baseline and 15 minutes of music intervention on two occasions. Subjects completed a follow-up questionnaire regarding their perceptions of the noise in the critical care unit and the music intervention. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that subjects had lower levels of noise annoyance during music intervention than at baseline. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure decreased during the music intervention compared with baseline. Diastolic blood pressure decreased during the music intervention from baseline during time 2, but not time 1. Subjects with high baseline scores of noise sensitivity preoperatively had higher baseline levels of noise annoyance in the critical care unit the first postoperative day. Subjects rated the music intervention as highly enjoyable regardless of their baseline noise sensitivity or noise annoyance. Results of this study support the idea that noise annoyance is a highly individual phenomenon, influenced by a transaction of personal and environmental factors. Use of a music intervention with cardiac surgery patients during the first postoperative day decreased noise annoyance, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure, regardless of the subject's noise sensitivity.

  8. Low toxicity and long circulation time of Polyampholyte-coated magnetic nanoparticles for blood pool contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Shen, Ming; Zhao, Tao; Xu, Yuanyuan; Lin, Jiang; Duan, Yourong; Gu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Polyampholyte-coated (poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-co-3-(diethylamino)-propylamine (DEAPA)) magnetite nanoparticles (PAMNPs) have been prepared as contrasting agent used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Excellent biocompatibility is required for contrasting agents used in high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. To evaluate the biocompatibility of PAMNPs, some experiments have been conducted. The hemolysis, plasma recalcification, dynamic blood clotting, prothrombin time, inflammatory cytokine release and complement system activation assays were carried out to investigate the hemocompatibility. To evaluate the toxicity to vessel, MTT test and vascular irritation tests were conducted. Tissue toxicity test was also performed to investigate the biocompability in vivo. We also looked into the biodistribution. The results showed that PAMNPs at the working concentration (0.138 mM) present similar hemocompatibility with negative control, thus have no significant effect to vessels. PAMNPs were mainly distributed in the liver and the blood. The circulation time in blood was considerably long, with the half-time of 3.77 h in plasma. This property is advantageous for PAMNPs' use in angiography. PAMNPs could be metabolized rapidly in mice and were not observed to cause any toxic or adverse effect. In short, these results suggest that the PAMNPs have great potential to serve as safe contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  9. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Delivery System Modulates Ischemic Cardiac Remodeling With an Increase of Coronary Artery Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sook; Joo, Wan Seok; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sung Wan

    2016-04-01

    Ways for extending the longevity of stem cells are imperative to attain diverse expected therapeutic effects. Here, we constructed a three-dimentional (3D) scaffold system for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. Intramyocardial injections of porous PEI1.8k blended with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (PLGA/PEI1.8k) (PPP) microparticles by physical electrostatic conjugation and structural entrapment of hMSCs demonstrated enhanced functional and geometric improvements on post-infarct cardiac remodeling in rats. In the hMSC-loaded PPP delivery, increases of coronary artery blood flow rate and in vivo engraftment rate as well as time-dependent functional, geometric, and pathologic findings reversing post-infarct cardiac remodeling account for improved left ventricular (LV) systolic function up to the level of sham thoracotomy group. This study expands our understanding by proving that increase of coronary artery blood flow augmented functional recovery of hMSC-loaded PPP delivery system after myocardial infarction (MI).

  10. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Delivery System Modulates Ischemic Cardiac Remodeling With an Increase of Coronary Artery Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Sook; Joo, Wan Seok; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sung Wan

    2016-01-01

    Ways for extending the longevity of stem cells are imperative to attain diverse expected therapeutic effects. Here, we constructed a three-dimentional (3D) scaffold system for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery. Intramyocardial injections of porous PEI1.8k blended with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (PLGA/PEI1.8k) (PPP) microparticles by physical electrostatic conjugation and structural entrapment of hMSCs demonstrated enhanced functional and geometric improvements on post-infarct cardiac remodeling in rats. In the hMSC-loaded PPP delivery, increases of coronary artery blood flow rate and in vivo engraftment rate as well as time-dependent functional, geometric, and pathologic findings reversing post-infarct cardiac remodeling account for improved left ventricular (LV) systolic function up to the level of sham thoracotomy group. This study expands our understanding by proving that increase of coronary artery blood flow augmented functional recovery of hMSC-loaded PPP delivery system after myocardial infarction (MI). PMID:26782638

  11. The effect of cardiopulmonary bypass prime volume on the need for blood transfusion after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Marc E; Charette, Kevin; Chen, Jonathan M; Quaegebeur, Jan M; Bacha, Emile

    2013-04-01

    There is increasing awareness that erythrocyte transfusions after pediatric cardiac surgery have deleterious effects. Despite reports of decreased transfusion requirements associated with smaller cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, the relationship between circuit prime volume and need for transfusion has not been systematically examined. Pediatric patients at our institution who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass between January 2005 and December 2010 were reviewed. Demographics, intraoperative data, and transfusion of packed red blood cells were retrospectively recorded. Cardiopulmonary bypass prime volume was indexed by patient body surface area. Logistic regression analysis was used to correlate these variables with need for transfusion. In the perioperative period, 1912 patients received transfusions and 266 did not. In univariate analysis, indexed prime volume was a significant predictor of transfusion (odds ratio, 1.007; P < .001). Other significant variables in univariate analysis included age, surgeon, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery 1 (RACHS-1) category, preoperative hemoglobin, total bypass time, aortic crossclamp time, use and duration of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, lowest body core temperature, and cardiopulmonary bypass flow rate. Previous cardiac surgery was not a significant predictor. In multivariable analysis controlling for RACHS-1 category, surgeon, minimal core body temperature, and preoperative hemoglobin, indexed prime volume remained an independent predictor of transfusion (odds ratio, 1.006; 95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.007, P < .001). Perioperative need for transfusion in pediatric cardiac surgical patients is independently related to the prime volume of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. It therefore seems prudent to minimize circuit prime volumes to avoid unnecessary use of blood products. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The association of night-time systolic blood pressure with ultrasound markers of subclinical cardiac and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Emily; Dolan, Eamon; Curtin, Ronan J.; Kearney, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the association of night-time systolic blood pressure (BP) with subclinical cardiac dysfunction measured by global longitudinal strain (GLS) and subclinical vascular damage measured by carotid intima–media thickness (CIMT) and carotid plaques. Methods GLS was measured by speckle-tracking analysis of echocardiogram images. CIMT was measured at the distal 1 cm of the common carotid artery. The presence of carotid plaques was recorded. Philips QLAB cardiac and vascular ultrasound quantification software was used for analysis. The association of night-time systolic BP with GLS, CIMT and carotid plaques was assessed using linear and logistic regression. Results Fifty (response rate 63%) individuals took part in this study. In univariable models, night-time systolic BP was significantly associated with GLS [β coefficient 0.85 for every 10 mmHg increase, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.3–1.4] and carotid plaques (odds ratio 1.9 for every 10 mmHg increase, 95% CI: 1.1–3.2). Univariable analysis of daytime systolic BP did not show any statistically significant associations. In age-adjusted and sex-adjusted models, the association for night-time systolic BP and GLS remained significant (β coefficient 0.68 for every 10 mmHg increase, 95% CI: 0.1–1.3). The association for carotid plaques was no longer statistically significant. In multivariable models, findings were diminished. Discussion Our results suggest a trend towards an association between night-time systolic BP and subclinical cardiac and vascular disease. When assessing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring results, the absolute night-time systolic BP seems to be a better prognostic parameter than daytime systolic BP, but ultimately a large randomised controlled trial involving chronotherapy is necessary to fully address this. PMID:27845956

  13. Tonsillar application of killed Streptococcus mutans induces specific antibodies in rabbit saliva and blood plasma without inducing a cross-reacting antibody to human cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuizumi, T; Inoue, H; Tsujisawa, T; Uchiyama, C

    1997-01-01

    When Streptococcus mutans cells are injected into the skeletal muscle of rabbits, an antibody against human cardiac muscle, as well as an anti-S. mutans antibody, is induced in blood plasma. Our previous study showed that when sheep erythrocytes are applied to palatine tonsils, an antibody against the applied cells is induced both in blood plasma and saliva. This antibody has no activity against cardiac muscle. It is not clear, however, if S. mutans application to the tonsils evokes an antibody response against cardiac muscle. In this study, we immunized rabbits against S. mutans or Streptococcus sobrinus by tonsillar application or by intramuscular injection every 3 days for 6 weeks. Tonsillar applications of formalin-killed cells of S. mutans induced saliva immunoglobulin A (IgA) and blood plasma IgG to the applied cells. In contrast, intramuscular injection of such cells induced only blood plasma IgG. When the route of immunization was intramuscular injection, antibodies in blood plasma cross-reacted with cardiac muscle. By enzyme-immunohistochemistry and Ouchterlony immunodiffusion tests, no cross-reaction to cardiac muscle was observed with the antibody in saliva or in blood plasma after the tonsillar applications. Western blotting of the S. mutans antigen showed that blood plasma from rabbits injected with S. mutans reacted with antigens of 46, 52, 62, and 85 kDa, while that from rabbits subjected to tonsillar application of S. mutans did not react with these bands. Similar results were obtained for S. sobrinus applications. Thus, tonsillar applications of mutants group streptococci induce antibodies differing in antigen specificity and do not induce any cross-reacting antibody to cardiac muscle. PMID:9353033

  14. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    PubMed

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  15. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hindel, Stefan; Sauerbrey, Anika; Maaß, Marc; Maderwald, Stefan; Schlamann, Marc; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF) was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles, as measured by the

  16. Quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of experimental synovitis in the rabbit knee: comparison of macromolecular blood pool agents vs. Gadolinium-DOTA.

    PubMed

    Watrin-Pinzano, Astrid; Loeuille, Damien; Goebel, Jean-Christophe; Lapicque, Françoise; Walter, Fredéric; Robert, Philippe; Netter, Patrick; Corot, Claire; Gillet, Pierre; Blum, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess 2 Gd-based macromolecular intravascular contrast agents (P792, rapid clearance blood pool agent (rBPA) and P717, slow clearance blood pool agent (sBPA)) compared to Gd-DOTA (representative extracellular non specific agent) in MR imaging of knee rabbit experimental synovitis. Quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (qDCE-MRI) after intravascular injection of a low molecular weight contrast agent of 0.56 kDa (Gd-DOTA) and 2 high-molecular-weight contrast agents of 6.47 kDa (P792) and 52 kDa (P717) was performed in rabbits with carrageenan-induced synovitis of the right knee. P792 and P717 provided a progressive and persistent enhancement of arthritic synovial tissue while Gd-DOTA provided an early and rapidly declining enhancement with a concomitant diffusion in synovial fluid, thus limitating delineation of synovial pannus. P792 allowed acquisition of high-quality MR arthrograms, due to both a better diffusion in synovial pannus (vs. P717) and a concomitant restricted diffusion into the synovial fluid (vs. Gd-DOTA). In fact, experimental rabbit synovitis represent a specific entity that favors the T1 effect of high-molecular-weight agents, and especially rBPA P792, entrapped in synovial pannus, without diffusion in the synovial fluid. Due to this lack of arthrographic effect, P792 accumulation could be specifically sequentially analyzed by qDCE-MRI for detecting, characterizing and monitoring synovial vascular permeability changes during mono- or polysynovitis.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of a polydisulfide with Gd-DOTA monoamide side chains as a biodegradable macromolecular contrast agent for MR blood pool imaging.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhen; Wu, Xueming; Tan, Mingqian; Jesberger, Jack; Grisworld, Mark; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Macromolecular Gd(III)-based contrast agents are effective for contrast-enhanced blood pool and cancer MRI in preclinical studies. However, their clinical applications are impeded by potential safety concerns associated with slow excretion and prolonged retention of these agents in the body. To minimize the safety concerns of macromolecular Gd contrast agents, we have developed biodegradable macromolecular Gd contrast agents based on polydisulfide Gd(III) complexes. In this study, we designed and synthesized a new generation of the polydisulfide Gd(III) complexes containing a macrocyclic Gd(III) chelate, Gd-DOTA monoamide, to improve the in vivo kinetic inertness of the Gd(III) chelates. (N6-Lysyl)lysine-(Gd-DOTA) monoamide and 3-(2-carboxyethyldisulfanyl)propanoic acid copolymers (GODC) were synthesized by copolymerization of (N6-lysyl)lysine DOTA monoamide and dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate), followed by complexation with Gd(OAc)3. The GODC had an apparent molecular weight of 26.4 kDa and T1 relaxivity of 8.25 mM(-1) s(-1) per Gd at 1.5 T. The polymer chains of GODC were readily cleaved by L-cysteine and the chelates had high kinetic stability against transmetallation in the presence of an endogenous metal ion Zn(2+). In vivo MRI study showed that GODC produced strong and prolonged contrast enhancement in the vasculature and tumor periphery of mice with breast tumor xenografts. GODC is a promising biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agent with high kinetic stability for MR blood pool imaging.

  18. Myocardial blood flow quantification for evaluation of coronary artery disease by positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Waller, Alfonso H; Blankstein, Ron; Kwong, Raymond Y; Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2014-05-01

    The noninvasive detection of the presence and functional significance of coronary artery stenosis is important in the diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion can provide an objective and reproducible estimate of myocardial ischemia and risk prediction. Positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography perfusion are modalities capable of measuring myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. In this review, we will discuss the technical aspects of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography, and its emerging clinical applications.

  19. Myocardial Blood Flow Quantification for Evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease by Positron Emission Tomography, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Alfonso H.; Blankstein, Ron; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Di Carli, Marcelo F.

    2014-01-01

    The noninvasive detection of the presence and functional significance of coronary artery stenosis is important in the diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion can provide an objective and reproducible estimate of myocardial ischemia and risk prediction. Positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography perfusion are modalities capable of measuring myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve. In this review, we will discuss the technical aspects of quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, and its emerging clinical applications. PMID:24718671

  20. The effects of residual pump blood on patient plasma free haemoglobin levels post cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Schotola, H; Wetz, A J; Popov, A F; Bergmann, I; Danner, B C; Schöndube, F A; Bauer, M; Bräuer, A

    2016-09-01

    At the end of cardiopulmonary bypass, there are invariably several hundred millilitres of residual pump blood in the reservoir, which can either be re-transfused or discarded. The objective of this prospective observational study was to investigate the quality of the residual pump blood, focusing on plasma free haemoglobin (pfHb) and blood cell counts. Fifty-one consecutive patients were included in the study. Forty-nine units of residual pump blood and 58 units of transfused red blood cell (RBC) concentrates were analysed. The mean preoperative pfHb of the patients was 0.057 ± 0.062 g/l, which increased gradually to 0.55 ± 0.36 g/l on arrival in the intensive care unit postoperatively. On the first postoperative day, the mean pfHb had returned to within the normal range. Our data showed that haemoglobin, haematocrit, and erythrocyte counts of residual pump blood were approximately 40% of the values in standardised RBC concentrates. Plasma free haemoglobin was significantly higher in residual pump blood compared to RBC concentrates, and nearly twice as high as the pfHb in patient blood samples taken contemporaneously. Our findings indicate that residual pump blood pfHb levels are markedly higher compared to patients' blood and RBC concentrates, but that its administration does not significantly increase patients' pfHb levels.

  1. Decreased Bioenergetic Health Index in monocytes isolated from the pericardial fluid and blood of post-operative cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Philip A; Chacko, Balu K; George, David J; Zhi, Degui; Wei, Chih-Cheng; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Melby, Spencer J; George, James F; Darley-Usmar, Victor M

    2015-07-01

    Monitoring the bioenergetics of leucocytes is now emerging as an important approach in translational research to detect mitochondrial dysfunction in blood or other patient samples. Using the mitochondrial stress test, which involves the sequential addition of mitochondrial inhibitors to adherent leucocytes, we have calculated a single value, the Bioenergetic Health Index (BHI), which represents the mitochondrial function in cells isolated from patients. In the present report, we assess the BHI of monocytes isolated from the post-operative blood and post-operative pericardial fluid (PO-PCF) from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Analysis of the bioenergetics of monocytes isolated from patients' PO-PCF revealed a profound decrease in mitochondrial function compared with monocytes isolated from their blood or from healthy controls. Further, patient blood monocytes showed no significant difference in the individual energetic parameters from the mitochondrial stress test but, when integrated into the BHI evaluation, there was a significant decrease in BHI compared with healthy control monocytes. These data support the utility of BHI measurements in integrating the individual parameters from the mitochondrial stress test into a single value. Supporting our previous finding that the PO-PCF is pro-oxidant, we found that exposure of rat cardiomyocytes to PO-PCF caused a significant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). These findings support the hypothesis that integrated measures of bioenergetic health could have prognostic and diagnostic value in translational bioenergetics.

  2. Combination of acute preoperative plateletpheresis, cell salvage, and aprotinin minimizes blood loss and requirement during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Ji, Hongwen; Lin, Jing; Lenehan, Eric; Ji, Bingyang; Liu, Jinping; Liu, Jin; Long, Cun; Crane, Terry A

    2005-03-01

    Acute preoperative plateletpheresis (APP), cell salvage (CS) technique, and the use of aprotinin have been individually reported to be effective in reducing blood loss and blood component transfusion while improving hematological profiles in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In this prospective randomized clinical study, the efficacy of these combined approaches on reducing blood loss and transfusion requirements was evaluated. Seventy patients undergoing primary coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) were randomly divided into four groups: a control group (group I, n = 10) did not receive any of the previously mentioned approaches. An APP and CS group (group II, n = 20) experienced APP in which preoperative platelet-rich plasma was collected and reinfused after reversal of heparin, along with the cell salvage technique throughout surgery. The third group (group III, n = 22) received aprotinin in which 5,000,000 KIU Trasylol was applied during surgery, and a combination group (group IV, n = 18) was treated with all three approaches, i.e., APP, CS, and aprotinin. Compared with group I (896+/-278 mL), the postoperative total blood loss was significantly reduced in groups II, III, and IV (468+/-136, 388+/-122, 202+/-81 mL, respectively, p < 0.05). The requirements of packed red blood cells in the three approached groups (153+/-63, 105+/-178, 0+/-0 mL, respectively) also were reduced when compared with group I (343+/-118 mL, p < 0.05). In group I, six patients (6/10) received fresh-frozen plasma and three patients (3/10) received platelet transfusion, whereas no patients in the other three groups required fresh-frozen plasma and platelet. In conclusion, both plateletpheresis concomitant with cell salvage and aprotinin contribute to the improvement of postoperative hemostasis, and the combination of these two approaches could minimize postoperative blood loss and requirement.

  3. A liberal strategy of red blood cell transfusion reduces cardiogenic shock in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Rosana Ely; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Fukushima, Julia Tizue; de Almeida, Juliano Pinheiro; Franco, Rafael Alves; Lee Park, Clarice; Osawa, Eduardo Atsushi; Pinto Silva, Carolina Maria; Costa Auler, Jose Otavio; Landoni, Giovanni; Barbosa Gomes Galas, Filomena Regina; Filho, Roberto Kalil; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahao

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who are aged 60 years or more or less than 60 years after implementation of a restrictive or a liberal transfusion strategy. This is a substudy of the Transfusion Requirements After Cardiac Surgery (TRACS) randomized controlled trial. In this subgroup analysis, we separated patients into those aged 60 years or more (elderly) and those aged less than 60 years randomized to a restrictive or a liberal strategy of red blood cell transfusion. The primary outcome was a composite defined as a combination of 30-day all-cause mortality and severe morbidity. Of the 502 patients included in the Transfusion Requirements After Cardiac Surgery study, 260 (51.8%) were aged 60 years or more and 242 (48.2%) were aged less than 60 years and were included in this study. The primary end point occurred in 11.9% of patients in the liberal strategy group and 16.8% of patients in the restrictive strategy group (P = .254) for those aged 60 years or more and in 6.8% of patients in the liberal strategy group and 5.6% of patients in the restrictive strategy group for those aged less than 60 years (P = .714). However, in the older patients, cardiogenic shock was more frequent in patients in the restrictive transfusion group (12.8% vs 5.2%, P = .031). Thirty-day mortality, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and acute renal injury were similar in the restrictive and liberal transfusion groups in both age groups. Although there was no difference between groups regarding the primary outcome, a restrictive transfusion strategy may result in an increased rate of cardiogenic shock in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery compared with a more liberal strategy. Cardiovascular risk of anemia may be more harmful than the risk of blood transfusion in older patients. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Differential effects of Mas receptor deficiency on cardiac function and blood pressure in obese male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Shoemaker, Robin; Powell, David; Su, Wen; Thatcher, Sean; Cassis, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)] acts at Mas receptors (MasR) to oppose effects of angiotensin II (ANG II). Previous studies demonstrated that protection of female mice from obesity-induced hypertension was associated with increased systemic ANG-(1-7), whereas male obese hypertensive mice exhibited increased systemic ANG II. We hypothesized that MasR deficiency (MasR(-/-) ) augments obesity-induced hypertension in males and abolishes protection of females. Male and female wild-type (MasR(+/+) ) and MasR(-/-) mice were fed a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet for 16 wk. MasR deficiency had no effect on obesity. At baseline, male and female MasR(-/-) mice had reduced ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening than MasR(+/+) mice. Male, but not female, HF-fed MasR(+/+) mice had increased systolic and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures compared with LF-fed controls. In HF-fed females, MasR deficiency increased DBP compared with LF-fed controls. In contrast, male HF-fed MasR(-/-) mice had lower DBP than MasR(+/+) mice. We quantified cardiac function after 1 mo of HF feeding in males of each genotype. HF-fed MasR(-/-) mice had higher left ventricular (LV) wall thickness than MasR(+/+) mice. Moreover, MasR(+/+) , but not MasR(-/-) , mice displayed reductions in EF from HF feeding that were reversed by ANG-(1-7) infusion. LV fibrosis was reduced in HF-fed MasR(+/+) but not MasR(-/-) ANG-(1-7)-infused mice. These results demonstrate that MasR deficiency promotes obesity-induced hypertension in females. In males, HF feeding reduced cardiac function, which was restored by ANG-(1-7) in MasR(+/+) but not MasR(-/-) mice. MasR agonists may be effective therapies for obesity-associated cardiovascular conditions.NEW & NOTEWORTHY MasR deficiency abolishes protection of female mice from obesity-induced hypertension. Male MasR-deficient obese mice have reduced blood pressure and declines in cardiac function. ANG-(1-7) infusion restores obesity-induced cardiac dysfunction of wild

  5. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Marlies; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du; Singer, Oliver C.; Berkefeld, Joachim

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  6. Ultra High-Resolution In vivo Computed Tomography Imaging of Mouse Cerebrovasculature Using a Long Circulating Blood Pool Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Starosolski, Zbigniew; Villamizar, Carlos A; Rendon, David; Paldino, Michael J; Milewicz, Dianna M; Ghaghada, Ketan B; Annapragada, Ananth V

    2015-05-18

    Abnormalities in the cerebrovascular system play a central role in many neurologic diseases. The on-going expansion of rodent models of human cerebrovascular diseases and the need to use these models to understand disease progression and treatment has amplified the need for reproducible non-invasive imaging methods for high-resolution visualization of the complete cerebral vasculature. In this study, we present methods for in vivo high-resolution (19 μm isotropic) computed tomography imaging of complete mouse brain vasculature. This technique enabled 3D visualization of large cerebrovascular networks, including the Circle of Willis. Blood vessels as small as 40 μm were clearly delineated. ACTA2 mutations in humans cause cerebrovascular defects, including abnormally straightened arteries and a moyamoya-like arteriopathy characterized by bilateral narrowing of the internal carotid artery and stenosis of many large arteries. In vivo imaging studies performed in a mouse model of Acta2 mutations demonstrated the utility of this method for studying vascular morphometric changes that are practically impossible to identify using current histological methods. Specifically, the technique demonstrated changes in the width of the Circle of Willis, straightening of cerebral arteries and arterial stenoses. We believe the use of imaging methods described here will contribute substantially to the study of rodent cerebrovasculature.

  7. Ultra High-Resolution In vivo Computed Tomography Imaging of Mouse Cerebrovasculature Using a Long Circulating Blood Pool Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Starosolski, Zbigniew; Villamizar, Carlos A.; Rendon, David; Paldino, Michael J.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Ghaghada, Ketan B.; Annapragada, Ananth V.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in the cerebrovascular system play a central role in many neurologic diseases. The on-going expansion of rodent models of human cerebrovascular diseases and the need to use these models to understand disease progression and treatment has amplified the need for reproducible non-invasive imaging methods for high-resolution visualization of the complete cerebral vasculature. In this study, we present methods for in vivo high-resolution (19 μm isotropic) computed tomography imaging of complete mouse brain vasculature. This technique enabled 3D visualization of large cerebrovascular networks, including the Circle of Willis. Blood vessels as small as 40 μm were clearly delineated. ACTA2 mutations in humans cause cerebrovascular defects, including abnormally straightened arteries and a moyamoya-like arteriopathy characterized by bilateral narrowing of the internal carotid artery and stenosis of many large arteries. In vivo imaging studies performed in a mouse model of Acta2 mutations demonstrated the utility of this method for studying vascular morphometric changes that are practically impossible to identify using current histological methods. Specifically, the technique demonstrated changes in the width of the Circle of Willis, straightening of cerebral arteries and arterial stenoses. We believe the use of imaging methods described here will contribute substantially to the study of rodent cerebrovasculature. PMID:25985192

  8. [Intrathoracic blood volume versus pulmonary artery occlusion pressure as estimators of cardiac preload in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Tomicic, Vinko; Graf, Jerónimo; Echevarría, Ghislaine; Espinoza, Mauricio; Abarca, Juan; Montes, José Miguel; Torres, Javier; Núñez, Gastón; Guerrero, Julia; Luppi, Mario; Canals, Claudio

    2005-06-01

    Monitoring of cardiac preload by determination of pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) has been traditionally used to guide fluid therapy to optimize cardiac output (CO). Since factors such as intrathoracic pressure and ventricular compliance may modify PAOP, volumetric estimators of preload have been developed. The PiCCO system is able to measure CO and intrathoracic blood volume (ITBV) by transpulmonary thermodilution. To compare a volumetric (ITBV) versus a pressure (PAOP) determination to accurately estimate cardiac preload in severely ill patients. From June 2001 to October 2003, 22 mechanically ventilated patients with hemodynamic instability underwent hemodynamic monitoring with pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and PiCCO system. ITBV index (ITBVI), PAOP and CI were measured simultaneously by both methods. One hundred thirty eight deltas (D) were obtained from the difference of ITBVI, PAOP, CI-PAC and CI-PiCCO between 6-12 am and 6-12 pm. Linear regression analysis of DITBVI versus Eth CI-PiCCO and Eth PAOP versus DCI-PAC were made. Mean age of patients was 60.8 +/- 19.4 years. APACHE II was 23.9 +/- 7. Fifteen patients met criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Delta ITBVI significantly correlated with DCI-PiCCO (r=0.54; 95% confidence interval = 0.41-0.65; p <0.01). There was no correlation between DPAOP and DCI-PAC. ITBVI correlated better with CI than PAOP, and therefore it seems to be a more accurate estimator of preload in unstable, mechanically ventilated patients.

  9. Quantitative trait locus mapping in chickens by selective DNA pooling with dinucleotide microsatellite markers by using purified DNA and fresh or frozen red blood cells as applied to marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, E; Fulton, J; Cheng, H; Yonash, N; Soller, M

    2002-03-01

    Many large, half-sib sire families are an integral component of chicken genetic improvement programs. These family structures include a sufficient number of individuals for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) at high statistical power. However, realizing this statistical power through individual or selective genotyping is yet too costly to be feasible under current genotyping methodologies. Genotyping costs can be greatly reduced through selective DNA pooling, involving densitometric estimates of marker allele frequencies in pooled DNA samples. When using dinucleotide microsatellite markers, however, such estimates are often confounded by overlapping "shadow" bands and can be confounded further by differential amplification of alleles. In the present study a shadow correction procedure provided accurate densitometric estimates of allele frequency for dinucleotide microsatellite markers in pools made from chicken purified DNA samples, fresh blood samples, and frozen-thawed blood samples. In a retrospective study, selective DNA pooling with thawed blood samples successfully identified two QTL previously shown by selective genotyping to affect resistance in chickens to Marek's disease. It is proposed that use of selective DNA pooling can provide relatively low-cost mapping and use in marker-assisted selection of QTL that affect production traits in chickens.

  10. Heparin-coated extracorporeal circulation in combination with low dose systemic heparinization reduces early postoperative blood loss in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Mirow, N; Zittermann, A; Koertke, H; Maleszka, A; Knobl, H; Coskun, T; Kleesiek, K; Koerfer, R

    2008-04-01

    According to a recently performed meta-analysis, heparin-bonded circuits do not reduce blood loss in cardiac surgery patients compared to nonheparin-bonded circuits within the first 24 h postoperatively. We investigated the effects of heparin-coated circuits in combination with a reduced systemic heparin dose on early postoperative blood loss (first 12 h), platelet function, and postoperative complications. Patients who underwent their first coronary artery bypass graft surgery were included in a randomized prospective study. Group A (n=149) was perfused with an uncoated extracorporeal circulation (ECC)-set and groups B (n=152) and C (n=149) with heparin-coated ECC-sets. In groups A and B, conventional dose systemic heparin was given, whereas group C received low dose systemic heparin. Blood loss was assessed within the first 12 h postoperatively. Moreover, biochemical parameters of pro-coagulant activity and immunological function were measured. None of the pro-coagulant activity markers and immunological parameters measured differed preoperatively or postoperatively between study groups. However, intraoperative platelet counts and maximal intraoperative concentrations of platelet factor 4, ss-thromboglobulin, and poly-morpho-nuclear (PMN)-elastase were lowest in group C, whereas group C also had the highest concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin complex (P<0.018-0.001). Blood loss within the first 12 h postoperatively was 457 +/- 204 mL in group A, 431 +/- 178 mL in group B, and 382 +/- 188 mL in group C (P<0.01). Complication rates and 30-day mortality did not differ between study groups. The combined use of heparin-coated circuits and low dose systemic heparinization is able to reduce early postoperative blood loss without enhancing the risk of complications.

  11. Complex Cardiac Surgery on Patients with a Body Weight of Less Than 5 kg without Donor Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Wolfgang; Dehmel, Frank; Redlin, Mathias; Miera, Oliver; Musci, Michele; Cho, Mi-Young; Photiadis, Joachim

    2017-06-01

    Performing safe cardiac surgery in neonates or infants whose parents are Jehovah's Witnesses is only possible in a coordinated team approach. An unconditional prerequisite is a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit with a very low priming volume to minimize hemodilution. In the past decade, we have developed a functional blood-sparing approach at our institution. The extracorporeal circuit was miniaturized. This had to be recently adapted, faced with a challenge associated with the switch to high-volume crystalloid cardioplegia. A filtration circuit was added. Here, we report an open heart surgery on three consecutive children of Jehovah's Witness parents with a body weight of 2.7, 4.5, and 4.8 kg, respectively. Procedures consisted of one arterial switch operation and two repairs of complete atrioventricular septal defects. Our static priming volume of less than 90 mL resulted in a nadir hematocrit during CPB of 27.7% (Hb 8.9 g/dL) in a patient which happened to have the lowest body weight of 2.7 kg. The two other patients had their lowest hematocrit at 31.4% (Hb 10.2 g/dL). The three children could be treated without any kind of transfusion of blood which had left the circulation or its extensions, in accordance with the parents' wishes, and enjoy favorable outcomes without transfusion of blood products during their entire hospital stay.

  12. Effects of one minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration sevoflurane on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and CO2 reactivity in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Mielck, F; Stephan, H; Weyland, A; Sonntag, H

    1999-08-01

    We investigated the cerebral hemodynamic effects of 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) sevoflurane anesthesia in nine male patients scheduled for elective coronary bypass grafting. For measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF), a modified Kety-Schmidt saturation technique was used with argon as an inert tracer gas. Measurements of CBF were performed before the induction of anesthesia and 30 min after induction under normocapnic, hypocapnic, and hypercapnic conditions. Compared with the awake state under normocapnic conditions, sevoflurane reduced the mean cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by 47% and the mean cerebral metabolic rate of glucose by 39%. Concomitantly, CBF was reduced by 38%, although mean arterial pressure was kept constant. Significant changes in jugular venous oxygen saturation were absent. Hypocapnia and hypercapnia caused a 51% decrease and a 58% increase in CBF, respectively. These changes in CBF caused by variation of Paco2 indicate that cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity persists during 1 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia. We used a modified Kety-Schmidt saturation technique to investigate the effects of 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) sevoflurane on cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and CO2 reactivity in cardiac patients. We found that the global cerebral blood flow and global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen remained coupled and that cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity is not impaired by the administration of 1 MAC sevoflurane.

  13. Assessment of drug-induced increases in blood pressure during drug development: report from the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Sager, Philip; Heilbraun, Jeffrey; Turner, J Rick; Gintant, Gary; Geiger, Mary J; Kowey, Peter R; Mansoor, George A; Mendzelevski, Boaz; Michelson, Eric L; Stockbridge, Norman; Weber, Michael A; White, William B

    2013-04-01

    This White Paper, prepared by members of the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium, discusses several important issues regarding the evaluation of blood pressure (BP) responses to drugs being developed for indications not of a direct cardiovascular (CV) nature. A wide range of drugs are associated with off-target BP increases, and both scientific attention and regulatory attention to this topic are increasing. The article provides a detailed summary of scientific discussions at a Cardiac Safety Research Consortium-sponsored Think Tank held on July 18, 2012, with the intention of moving toward consensus on how to most informatively collect and analyze BP data throughout clinical drug development to prospectively identify unacceptable CV risk and evaluate the benefit-risk relationship. The overall focus in on non-CV drugs, although many of the points also pertain to CV drugs. Brief consideration of how clinical assessment can be informed by nonclinical investigation is also outlined. These discussions present current thinking and suggestions for furthering our knowledge and understanding of off-target drug-induced BP increases and do not represent regulatory guidance. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiac and Metabolic Effects of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Abuse on Lipids, Blood Pressure, Left Ventricular Dimensions, and Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Achar, Suraj; Rostamian, Armand; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent surveys and reports suggest that many athletes and bodybuilders abuse anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). However, scientific data on the cardiac and metabolic complications of AAS abuse are divergent and often conflicting. A total of 49 studies describing 1,467 athletes were reviewed to investigate the cardiovascular effects of the abuse of AAS. Although studies were typically small and retrospective, some associated AAS abuse with unfavorable effects. Otherwise healthy young athletes abusing AAS may show elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein and low levels of high-density lipoprotein. Although data are conflicting, AAS have also been linked with elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure and with left ventricular hypertrophy that may persist after AAS cessation. Finally, in small case studies, AAS abuse has been linked with acute myocardial infarction and fatal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, recognition of these adverse effects may improve the education of athletes and increase vigilance when evaluating young athletes with cardiovascular abnormalities. PMID:20816133

  15. Evaluation of blood pressure and heart rate in patients with hypertension who received tapentadol extended release for chronic pain: a post hoc, pooled data analysis.

    PubMed

    Biondi, David M; Xiang, Jim; Etropolski, Mila; Moskovitz, Bruce

    2014-08-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common co-existing conditions in patients with chronic pain, and the potential effects of an analgesic on heart rate and blood pressure are of particular concern for patients with hypertension. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate changes in blood pressure and heart rate with tapentadol extended release (ER) treatment in patients with hypertension. We performed a post hoc analysis of data pooled from three randomized, placebo- and active-controlled, phase III studies of tapentadol ER for managing chronic osteoarthritis knee (NCT00421928, NCT00486811) or low back (NCT00449176) pain (15-week, double-blind treatment period). Data were independently analyzed for patients with a listed medical history of hypertension at baseline and patients with at least one listed concomitant antihypertensive medication at baseline. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured at each visit. In patients with a listed medical history of hypertension (n = 1,464), least-squares mean (LSM [standard error (SE)]) changes from baseline to endpoint with placebo, tapentadol ER, and oxycodone HCl controlled release (CR), respectively, were -0.7 (0.44), 0.2 (0.43), and -0.9 (0.45) beats per minute (bpm) for heart rate; -2.4 (0.64), -2.7 (0.64), and -3.7 (0.67) mmHg for SBP; and -1.0 (0.39), -1.3 (0.39), and -2.3 (0.41) mmHg for DBP; in patients with at least one listed concomitant antihypertensive medication (n = 1,376), the LSM (SE) changes from baseline to endpoint were -0.6 (0.45), 0.1 (0.44), and -0.7 (0.47) bpm for heart rate; -1.8 (0.66), -3.3 (0.65), and -3.7 (0.69) mmHg for SBP; and -0.7 (0.40), -1.4 (0.40), and -2.3 (0.42) mmHg for DBP. No clinically meaningful mean changes in heart rate or blood pressure were observed for the evaluated cohorts of patients with hypertension who were treated with tapentadol ER (100-250 mg twice daily).

  16. Cardiac and arterial target organ damage in adults with elevated ambulatory and normal office blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, J E; Roman, M J; Pini, R; Schwartz, J E; Pickering, T G; Devereux, R B

    1999-10-19

    Ambulatory blood pressure may be higher or lower than clinic blood pressure. Attention has focused on "white coat hypertension" (normal ambulatory blood pressure elevated in the clinic). The converse phenomenon of high ambulatory blood pressure but normal office blood pressure-"white coat normotension"-has not been studied. To assess whether white coat normotension (awake ambulatory blood pressure > 134/90 mm Hg and clinic blood pressure < 140/90 mm Hg) is associated with target organ damage. Cross-sectional observational study. University hospital hypertension center and participant work sites. 295 clinically normotensive adults and 64 patients with sustained hypertension (elevated clinic and ambulatory blood pressure). Target organ abnormalities were measured by echocardiography and arterial ultrasonography in 61 patients with white coat normotension, 234 with sustained normotension (normal clinic and ambulatory blood pressure), and 64 with sustained hypertension. Patients with white coat normotension were older; had higher body mass indices, serum creatinine concentrations, and glucose levels; and a higher prevalence of current smokers. Left ventricular mass index and relative wall thickness were higher by 13 g/m2 (CI, 8 to 18 g/m2) and by 0.03 (CI, 0.01 to 0.04), respectively, in patients with white coat normotension compared with those who had sustained normotension. Patients with white coat normotension and those with sustained hypertension did not differ significantly for left ventricular mass index (4 g/m2 [CI, - 3 to 10 g/m2) or relative wall thickness (0.01 [CI, -0.01 to 0.03]). The prevalence of discrete atherosclerotic plaques was similar in patients with white coat normotension (17 of 61, or 28% [CI, 17% to 39%]) and those with sustained hypertension (17 of 64, or 27% [CI, 16% to 38%]), but the difference lost significance after adjustment for age. White coat normotension is associated with left ventricular mass and carotid wall thickness similar to

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of colour Doppler ultrasonography, CT angiography and blood-pool-enhanced MR angiography in assessing carotid stenosis: a comparative study with DSA in 170 patients.

    PubMed

    Anzidei, M; Napoli, A; Zaccagna, F; Di Paolo, P; Saba, L; Cavallo Marincola, B; Zini, C; Cartocci, G; Di Mare, L; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2012-02-01

    This study was undertaken to prospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance of colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS), first-pass (FP) and steady-state (SS) contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the carotid arteries using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference standard. A total of 170 patients with previous cerebrovascular events and suspected carotid artery stenoses underwent CDUS, blood-pool MRA, CTA and DSA. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for CDUS, FP MRA, SS MRA and CTA. The McNemar and Wilcoxon tests and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were used to determine significant differences (p<0.05) between the diagnostic performances of the four modalities, and the degree of stenosis was compared using linear regression. A total of 336 carotid bifurcations were studied. The area under the curve (AUC) for degree of stenosis was: CDUS 0.85±0.02, FP MRA 0.982±0.005, SS MRA 0.994±0.002 and CTA 0.997±0.001. AUC analysis showed no statistically significant difference between CTA and MRA (p=0.0174) and a statistically significant difference between CDUS and the other techniques (p<0.001). Plaque morphology analysis showed no significant difference between CTA and SS MRA; a significant difference was seen between CTA and SS MRA versus FP MRA (p=0.04) and CDUS (p=0.038). Plaque ulceration analysis showed a statistically significant difference between MRA and CTA (0.04< p<0.046) versus CDUS (p=0.019). CTA is the most accurate technique for evaluating carotid stenoses, with a slightly better performance than MRA (97% vs. 95% for SS MRA and 92% for FP MRA) and a greater accuracy than CDUS (97% vs. 76%). Blood-pool contrast-enhanced SS sequences offer improved evaluation of degree of stenosis and plaque morphology with accuracy substantially identical to CTA.

  18. Prognostic values of blood pH and lactate levels in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, Yukihiko; Yamada, Wataru; Miyata, Koutaro; Miura, Koutarou; Fukuda, Tadashi; Fuse, Jun; Kikuno, Takaaki

    2017-01-01

    Early prediction of prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains difficult. High blood lactate or low pH levels may be associated with poor prognosis in OHCA patients, but these associations remain controversial. We compared blood lactate and pH levels in OHCA patients transferred to our hospital to measure their prognostic performance. We investigated the associations between blood lactate and pH levels on admission and neurological outcomes in 372 OHCA patients who had a return of spontaneous circulation. Of the 372 OHCA patients, 31 had a favorable neurological outcome. Blood lactate levels were lower in patients with a favorable outcome than in those with an unfavorable outcome, but this difference did not reach statistical significance (82 ± 49 vs. 96 ± 41 mg/dL). However, pH levels were significantly higher in patients with a favorable outcome than in those with an unfavorable outcome (7.26 ± 0.16 vs. 6.93 ± 0.19, P < 0.001). The relative cumulative frequency distribution curve analysis showed the optimal cut-off points of lactate and pH to be approximately 80 mg/dL and 7.05, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity to predict a favorable outcome were 61% and 64% for lactate <80 mg/dL and 84% and 80% for pH >7.05, respectively. Areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves were significantly larger for pH than for lactate levels (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, pH >7.05 was an independent predictor for a favorable outcome. After OHCA, patients with a favorable outcome had lower lactate and higher pH levels than those with an unfavorable outcome, but pH level was a much better predictor for neurological outcome than lactate levels.

  19. Early Post-Operative Outcomes and Blood Product Utilization in Adult Cardiac Surgery- The Post Aprotinin Era

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis, Stacia; Toole, J. Matthew; Kratz, John M.; Uber, Walter E.; Wheat, Margaret J.; Stroud, Martha R.; Ikonomidis, John S.; Spinale, Francis G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Aprotinin was a commonly utilized pharmacological agent for homeostasis in cardiac surgery but was discontinued resulting in the extensive use of lysine analogues. This study tested the hypothesis that early post-operative adverse events and blood product utilization would affected in this post-aprotinin era. Methods/Results Adult patients (n=781) undergoing coronary artery bypass (CABG), valve replacement, or both from November 1, 2005-October 31, 2008 at a single institution were included. Multiple logistic regression modeling and propensity scoring were performed on 29 pre-operative and intra-operative variables in patients receiving aprotinin (n=325) or lysine analogues (n=456). The propensity adjusted relative risk (RR;95% confidence interval;CI) for the intra-operative use of packed red blood cells (RR:0.75;CI:0.57–0.99), fresh frozen plasma (RR:0.37;0.21–0.64), and cryoprecipitate (RR:0.06;CI:0.02–0.22) were lower in the aprotinin versus lysine analogue group (all p<0.05). The risk for mortality (RR:0.53;CI:0.16–1.79) and neurological events (RR:0.87;CI:0.35–2.18) remained similar between groups, whereas a trend for reduced risk for renal dysfunction was observed in the aprotinin group. Conclusions In the post-aprotinin era with the exclusive use of lysine analogues, the relative risk of early post-operative outcomes such as mortality and renal dysfunction have not improved, but the risk for the intra-operative use of blood products has increased. Thus, improvements in early post-operative outcomes have not been realized with the discontinued use of aprotinin, but rather increased blood product utilization has occurred with the attendant costs and risks inherent with this strategy. PMID:21911820

  20. Remifentanil Prevents Increases of Blood Glucose and Lactate Levels during Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Tomohiro; Nawa, Yuko; Tamashiro, Keishi; Mizuno, Eri; Hirata, Naoyuki; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can cause stress response that increases levels of cytokine and catecholamine in plasma, resulting in hyperglycemia. In adults, it has been demonstrated that remifentanil infusion during CPB could prevent increases of cytokine, catecholamine, and blood glucose levels, but such effects of remifentanil in children have not been elucidated. Aim: In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of remifentanil on blood glucose and lactate levels during CPB in children. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included children who underwent ventricular septal defect or atrial septal defect closure. Data for patients who did not receive, during CPB period, remifentanil infusion (non-Remi group) and patients who received remifentanil infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/min (Remi group) during CPB were used for analysis. Primary outcomes were lactate and blood glucose levels just before and after CPB. Data are presented as medians and interquartile ranges. Data were analyzed by the Mann–Whitney U-test and Chi-square test. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: During CPB, 13 and 11 patients were allocated into Remi and non-Remi groups, respectively. Pre-CPB lactate and blood glucose levels were not significantly different between the two groups, but post-CPB lactate and blood glucose levels in the Remi group were significantly lower than that in the non-Remi group. Conclusion: 0.5 μg/kg/min remifentanil infusion during CPB suppresses the increases of blood glucose and lactate levels in children. PMID:28074792

  1. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... helpful? Formal name: Cardiac Risk Assessment Related tests: Lipid Profile , VLDL Cholesterol , hs-CRP , Lp(a) Overview | Common ... on Coronary artery disease: Tests and diagnosis .) The lipid profile is the most important blood test for cardiac ...

  2. Cardiac Rehabilitation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercising are other risk factors. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Cardiac Rehabilitation (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Cardiac Rehabilitation (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? (American Heart Association) - ...

  3. For assessment of changes in intraoperative red blood cell transfusion practices over time, the pooled incidence of transfusion correlates highly with total units transfused.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-06-01

    Multiple studies nationwide and at single hospitals have examined changes over time in the incidence of perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. However, the cost of RBC transfusions is related to the number of RBC units transfused, not to the incidence. We evaluate whether the readily available incidence of RBC transfusion can be used as a valid surrogate measure. Observational retrospective study. One tertiary, academic hospital. 394,789 cases of 1885 procedures over N=42 quarters of the year. None. Incidence and number of RBC units transfused intraoperatively. The number of RBC units transfused per case did not follow a Poisson distribution, confirming that the number of units and incidence of transfusion are not interchangeable for analyzing decisions by case. However, with all cases of each quarter combined, the Spearman correlation was 0.98±0.01 between each quarter's incidence of RBC transfusion and mean RBC units transfused per case (P<0.0001). For assessment of changes in intraoperative RBC transfusion practices over years, it is sufficient to analyze the pooled incidence of transfusion, rather than to calculate the number of units transfused. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Thuan-Son T; Keijzers, Guido; Hansen, Åse M; Desler, Claus; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander; Rasmussen, Lene J; Waldemar, Gunhild; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-10-01

    Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics and DNA damage, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of AD and control participants, for biomarker discovery. PBMCs were isolated from 53 patients with AD of mild to moderate degree and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Tests were performed on the PBMCs from as many of these participants as possible. We measured glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration fluxes using the Seahorse Bioscience flux analyzer, mitochondrial ROS production using flow cytometry, dNTP levels by way of a DNA polymerization assay, DNA strand breaks using the Fluorometric detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding (FADU) assay, and APE1 incision activity (in cell lysates) on a DNA substrate containing an AP site (to estimate DNA repair efficiency). In the PBMCs of AD patients, we found reduced basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption, reduced proton leak, higher dATP level, and lower AP endonuclease 1 activity, depending on adjustments for gender and/or age. This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD.

  5. Detection of Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair: Comparison Between Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Blood-Pool Contrast Agent and Dual-Phase Computed Tomography Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wieners, Gero; Meyer, Frank; Halloul, Zuhir; Peters, Nils; Ruehl, Ricarda; Dudeck, Oliver; Tautenhahn, Joerg; Ricke, Jens; Pech, Maciej

    2010-12-15

    PurposeThis prospective study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with blood-pool contrast agent (gadofosveset) in the detection of type-II endoleak after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR).MethodsThirty-two patients with aortic aneurysms who had undergone EVAR were included in this study. All patients were examined by dual-phase computed tomography angiography (CTA) as well as MRA with gadofosveset in the first-pass and steady-state phases. Two independent readers evaluated the images of CTA and MRA in terms of endoleak type II, feeding vessel, and image quality.ResultsMedian follow-up-time after EVAR was 22 months (range 4 to 59). Endoleak type II was detected by CTA in 12 of 32 patients (37.5%); MRA detected endoleak in all of these patients as well as in another 9 patients (n = 21, 65.6%), of whom the endoleaks in 6 patients showed an increasing diameter. Most endoleaks were detected in the steady-state phase (n = 14). The decrease in diameter of the aneurysmal sac was significantly greater in the patients without a visible endoleak that was visible on MRA (P = 0.004). In the overall estimation of diagnostic accuracy, MRA was judged superior to CTA in 66% of all examinations.ConclusionMRA with gadofosveset appeared superior to CTA, and has higher diagnostic accuracy, in the detection of endoleak after EVAR.

  6. Hierarchical modeling of patient and physician determinants of blood pressure outcomes in adherent vs nonadherent hypertensive patients: pooled analysis of 6 studies with 14,646 evaluable patients.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ivo; Van Camp, Yoleen; Villa, Lorenzo; Denhaerynck, Kris; Sun, Diana; Vancayzeele, Stefaan; Brié, Heidi; Aerts, Ann; Hermans, Christine; MacDonald, Karen

    2013-09-01

    The authors used pooled data from 6 valsartan-related studies including 3983 adherent and 10,663 nonadherent patients to evaluate blood pressure (BP) outcomes in both groups after 90 days of treatment, applying hierarchical linear and logistic regression to identify determinants of BP outcomes. The principal findings were that: (1) BP outcomes were consistently better in adherent patients; (2) approximately a quarter of the variance in 90-day BP values was attributable to a physician class effect; (3) common and unique patient- and physician-related variables were associated with BP outcomes in both groups; (4) physician vigilance was associated with better outcomes, especially in adherent patients; and (5) adherent patients were more likely to exhibit target organ damage and associated events while being prescribed more complex medication regimens. Adherence to antihypertensive medication may be a function of prior line treatment failure, severity of illness, and sequelae, and the ensuing patient resolution to change medication behavior. ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cardiac Reactivity and Elevated Blood Pressure Levels among Young African Americans: The Importance of Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Ivor Lensworth; Marshall, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the racial differences in elevated arterial blood pressure between African American youth, especially adolescents, and their White counterparts. Argues that African American adolescents' perception of day-to-day stress is an important contributor to this condition. Considers a conceptual model of the sociopsychophysiological stress…

  8. Factors associated with excessive postoperative blood loss and hemostatic transfusion requirements: a multivariate analysis in cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Despotis, G J; Filos, K S; Zoys, T N; Hogue, C W; Spitznagel, E; Lappas, D G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether heparin and protamine doses administered using a standardized protocol based on body weight and activated clotting time values are associated with either transfusion of hemostatic blood products (HBPs) or excessive postoperative bleeding. Analysis using 10 multiple logistic or linear regression models in 487 cardiac surgical patients included perioperative variables that may have an association with either transfusion of HBP and/or excessive postoperative chest tube drainage (CTD). Prolonged duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), lower pre-CPB heparin dose, lower core body temperature in the intensive care unit, combined procedures, older age, repeat procedures, a larger volume of salvaged red cells reinfused intraoperatively and abnormal laboratory coagulation results (prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and platelet count) after CPB were associated with both transfusion of HBP and increased CTD. Female gender, lower total heparin dose, preoperative aspirin use and the number of HBPs administered intraoperatively were associated only with increased CTD, whereas a larger total protamine dose was associated only with perioperative transfusion of HBPs. Preoperative use of warfarin or heparin was not associated with excessive blood loss of perioperative transfusion of HBPs. In contrast to previous studies using bovine heparin, data from the present study do not support the use of reduced doses of porcine heparin during CPB.

  9. Outcomes and biochemical parameters following cardiac surgery: effects of transfusion of residual blood using centrifugation and multiple-pass hemoconcentration.

    PubMed

    McNair, Erick; McKay, William; Qureshi, Abdul Mohamed; Rosin, Mark; Gamble, Jon; Dalshaug, Greg; Mycyk, Taras; Prasad, Kailash

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether or not there was a significant difference between the methods of centrifugation (CF) and multiple-pass hemoconcentration (MPH) of the residual cardiopulmonary-bypass volume in relation to biochemical measurements and patient outcomes. Prospective, randomized, and controlled. Conducted at a western Canadian tertiary care hospital. Consisted of 61 consecutive male and female patients from ages 40 to 80 who were scheduled for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Either the centrifugation or multiple-pass hemoconcentration method was used to process the residual blood from the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. The 12-hour postoperative levels of serum hemoglobin were not significantly different in the centrifugation group as compared to the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group. However, the serum levels of total protein and albumin were significantly higher in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to the centrifugation group. Additionally, after 12-hours postoperatively, the serum fibrinogen and platelet counts were significantly higher in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to those of the centrifugation group. The allogeneic product transfusion index and the chest-tube blood drainage indices were lower in the multiple-pass hemoconcentration group as compared to the centrifugation group. Although the CF method provided a product in a shorter turnaround time, with consistent clearance of heparin, the MPH method trended towards enhanced biochemical and clinical patient outcomes over the 12-hour postoperative period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of hematopoietic progenitor cells' temperature on cardiac arrhythmias in patients given peripheral blood progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Donmez, Ayhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Cagirgan, Seckin; Acarlar, Ceylan; Tombuloglu, Murat

    2006-06-01

    Infusion of cryopreserved and non-cryopreserved hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) is associated with a broad variety of symptoms. In this study, we have investigated infusion-related toxicity regarding temperature of cryopreserved autologous peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) transplanted in 31 and allogeneic non-cryopreserved PBPCs in 4 patients receiving high dose chemotherapy and stem cells transplantation for hematological malignancies. A 24h ECG-Holter recording system was used to obtain cardiac arrhythmias. Two milliliters HPC were collected from entrance site of venous access to evaluate the temperature of infused HPC. We have detected arrhythmias in 17 (48.58%) of our patients before, during and after infusion. Median temperature of the infusat was 21 degrees C (18-28.2). Arrhythmias during infusion were detected in 8 (22.85%) patients. The temperatures of infused HPCs were not statistically different in group with and without arrhythmias as 22 degrees C and 21 degrees C, respectively (P>0.05). And also, volume, contents [dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), red blood cells (RBC), platelet (PLT), and total nucleated cell (TNC)] of product, and rate of infusion speed did not have any effect on arrhythmias. As a result of this study, we have concluded that the temperature of HPC does not cause any systemic hypothermia and does not have any relation to arrhythmias detected during infusion.

  11. Black-blood Steady State Free Precession (SSFP) coronary wall MRI for cardiac allografts: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kai; Bi, Xiaoming; Liu, Ying; Taimen, Kirsi; Lu, Biao; Li, Debiao; Carr, James

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the hypothesis that steady-state free procession (SSFP) allows for imaging of the coronary wall under the conditions of fast heart rate in patients of heart transplantation (HTx). Materials and methods With the approval of our institutional review board, 28 HTx patients were scanned with a 1.5T scanner. Cross-sectional black-blood images of the proximal portions of the left main artery, left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery were acquired with both two-dimensional (2D), double inversion recovery (DIR) prepared TSE sequence and 2D DIR SSFP sequence. Image quality (scored 0–3), vessel wall area, thickness, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, vessel wall) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, wall-lumen) were compared between TSE and SSFP. Results The overall image quality of SSFP was higher than TSE (1.23 ± 0.95 vs. 0.88 ± 0.69, P < 0.001). SSFP had a higher coronary wall SNR (20.1 ± 8.5 vs. 14.9 ± 4.8, P < 0.001) and wall-lumen CNR (8.2 ± 4.6 vs. 6.8 ± 3.7, P = 0.005) than TSE. Conclusion Black-blood SSFP coronary wall MRI provides higher image quality, SNR and CNR than traditional TSE does in HTx recipients. It has the potential to become an alternative means to noninvasive imaging of cardiac allografts. PMID:22282170

  12. Reduced peripheral arterial blood flow with preserved cardiac output during submaximal bicycle exercise in elderly heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Older heart failure (HF) patients exhibit exercise intolerance during activities of daily living. We hypothesized that reduced lower extremity blood flow (LBF) due to reduced forward cardiac output would contribute to submaximal exercise intolerance in older HF patients. Methods and Results Twelve HF patients both with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (aged 68 ± 10 years) without large (aorta) or medium sized (iliac or femoral artery) vessel atherosclerosis, and 13 age and gender matched healthy volunteers underwent a sophisticated battery of assessments including a) peak exercise oxygen consumption (peak VO2), b) physical function, c) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) submaximal exercise measures of aortic and femoral arterial blood flow, and d) determination of thigh muscle area. Peak VO2 was reduced in HF subjects (14 ± 3 ml/kg/min) compared to healthy elderly subjects (20 ± 6 ml/kg/min) (p = 0.01). Four-meter walk speed was 1.35 ± 0.24 m/sec in healthy elderly verses 0.98 ± 0.15 m/sec in HF subjects (p < 0.001). After submaximal exercise, the change in superficial femoral LBF was reduced in HF participants (79 ± 92 ml/min) compared to healthy elderly (222 ± 108 ml/min; p = 0.002). This occurred even though submaximal stress-induced measures of the flow in the descending aorta (5.0 ± 1.2 vs. 5.1 ± 1.3 L/min; p = 0.87), and the stress-resting baseline difference in aortic flow (1.6 ± 0.8 vs. 1.7 ± 0.8 L/min; p = 0.75) were similar between the 2 groups. Importantly, the difference in submaximal exercise induced superficial femoral LBF between the 2 groups persisted after accounting for age, gender, body surface area, LVEF, and thigh muscle area (p ≤ 0.03). Conclusion During CMR submaximal bike exercise in the elderly with heart failure, mechanisms other than low cardiac output are responsible for reduced lower extremity blood flow. PMID:19922666

  13. [Forensic medical expertise of sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy in the subjects having a low ethanol concentration in the blood and urine].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O V; Petrova, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cases of sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy of the subjects having a low ethanol concentration in the blood and urine; the second objective was the statistical analysis of the data thus obtained. It was shown that sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy occurs in the men more frequently than in the women despite rather low ethanol levels in the blood and urine of both genders or even in the cases of complete absence of ethanol in these fluids. It is concluded that ethanol concentration in the blood and urine of the subjects who died from the alcohol-induced heart injury depends on their age and sex.

  14. Cerebral oximetry monitoring during preoperative phlebotomy to limit allogeneic blood use in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Elisabeth; Winch, Peter; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Tobias, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative phlebotomy can minimize the need for allogenic blood products. Frequently, removed blood is replaced with intravenous fluids to maintain euvolemia (acute normovolemic hemodilution [ANH]). During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), ANH may present problems when the circuit prime causes further hemodilution and unacceptably low hemoglobin. This investigation aimed to demonstrate that minimum volume replacement after preoperative phlebotomy can be used safely when guided by cerebral oxygenation (rSO(2)) measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). This prospective study included patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. After preoperative phlebotomy, fluid replacement was guided by mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate, and rSO(2), which were measured at baseline, immediately after phlebotomy, and 15 and 30 min after phlebotomy. This study enrolled 38 patients ages 3 months to 50 years. Preoperative phlebotomy removed 9.3 ± 2.9 mL/kg of blood, and 5.6 ± 5.1 mL/kg of crystalloid was administered intraoperatively. Within 30 min after phlebotomy, 23 patients had a MAP decrease of 20 % or more from baseline. This fall in MAP coincided with a decrease in rSO(2) of 20 or more at 2 of 114 measured points. Initially, rSO(2) decreased from 74 ± 9 to 68 ± 10 but thereafter remained constant. On five occasions, rSO(2) decreased 20 or more from baseline, but no patient's NIRS value was less than 45. A decrease in rSO(2) occurred more commonly in younger patients and those who had a larger volume of blood removed. Preoperative phlebotomy without significant volume replacement can be performed safely before CPB. Volume replacement may be more appropriately guided by rSO(2) than by hemodynamic variables.

  15. Iron and cardiac ischemia: a natural, quasi-random experiment comparing eligible with disqualified blood donors.

    PubMed

    Germain, Marc; Delage, Gilles; Blais, Claudia; Maunsell, Elizabeth; Décary, Francine; Grégoire, Yves

    2013-06-01

    The theory that elevated iron stores can induce vascular injury and ischemia remains controversial. We conducted a cohort study of the effect of blood donation on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by taking advantage of the quasi-random exclusion of donors who obtained a falsely reactive test for a transmissible disease (TD) marker. Whole blood donors who were permanently disqualified because of a false-reactive test between 1990 and 2007 in the province of Quebec were compared to donors who remained eligible, matched for baseline characteristics. The incidence of CHD after entry into the study was determined through hospitalization and death records. We compared eligible and disqualified donors using an "intention-to-treat" framework. Overall, 12,357 donors who were permanently disqualified were followed for 124,123 person-years of observation, plus 50,889 donors who remained eligible (516,823 person-years). On average, donors who remained eligible made 0.36 donation/year during follow-up and had an incidence of hospitalizations or deaths attributable to CHD of 3.60/1000 person-years, compared to 3.52 among permanently disqualified donors (rate ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.13). Donors who remained eligible did not have a lower risk of CHD, compared to donors who were permanently disqualified due to a false-reactive TD marker. Because of the quasi-random nature of false-reactive screening tests, this natural experiment has a level of validity approaching that of a randomized trial evaluating the effect of regular blood donation on CHD risk. These results do not support the iron hypothesis. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Effect of spontaneous running on blood pressure, heart rate and cardiac dimensions in developing and established spontaneous hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, P; Friberg, P; Ely, D; Thorén, P

    1987-04-01

    The effect of chronic voluntary exercise on resting blood pressure and heart rate was measured in two different age groups of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In the younger group, left ventricular dimensions were also measured. The younger group was 9 weeks old at the start of the experiment and was in a period of rapid blood-pressure rise. The older group, 13 weeks old at the start of the experiment, already had established hypertension. During a period of 6 weeks, the animals ran spontaneously in wheels mounted in their cages and reached a maximum of 6-7 km per 24 h. Age-matched, sedentary SHR were used as controls. Both groups of runners showed a decrease in body weight in comparison to controls. The younger runners exhibited a delayed onset of hypertension. They also showed a significantly increased left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume for every measured end-diastolic pressure between 7.5 mmHg and 20 mmHg (P less than 0.05). This suggests the development of a structural growth-dependent increase of the internal LV radius while LV weight and wall-to-lumen ratio were largely unaltered in younger runners compared with controls. In SHR with established hypertension, physical training did not reduce arterial blood pressure but heart rate was significantly lower than in the controls. These results thus indicate that an early onset of physical exercise in SHR may delay the development of hypertension. In addition, a more favourable cardiac design could also be seen.

  17. Impact of perioperative blood pressure variability on health resource utilization after cardiac surgery: an analysis of the ECLIPSE trials.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Solomon; Levy, Jerrold H; Lumb, Philip D; Fontes, Manuel; Wang, Yamei; Crothers, Tracy A; Sulham, Katherine A; Navetta, Marco S

    2014-06-01

    To examine the impact of blood pressure control on hospital health resource utilization using data from the ECLIPSE trials. Post-hoc analysis of data from 3 prospective, open-label, randomized clinical trials (ECLIPSE trials). Sixty-one medical centers in the United States. Patients 18 years or older undergoing cardiac surgery. Clevidipine was compared with nitroglycerin, sodium nitroprusside, and nicardipine. The ECLIPSE trials included 3 individual randomized open-label studies comparing clevidipine to nitroglycerin, sodium nitroprusside, and nicardipine. Blood pressure control was assessed as the integral of the cumulative area under the curve (AUC) outside specified systolic blood pressure ranges, such that lower AUC represents less variability. This analysis examined surgery duration, time to extubation, as well as intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS) in patients with AUC≤10 mmHg×min/h compared to patients with AUC>10 mmHg×min/h. One thousand four hundred ten patients were included for analysis; 736 patients (52%) had an AUC≤10 mmHg×min/h, and 674 (48%) had an AUC>10 mmHg×min/h. The duration of surgery and ICU LOS were similar between groups. Time to extubation and postoperative LOS were both significantly shorter (p = 0.05 and p<0.0001, respectively) in patients with AUC≤10. Multivariate analysis demonstrates AUC≤10 was significantly and independently associated with decreased time to extubation (hazard ratio 1.132, p = 0.0261) and postoperative LOS (hazard ratio 1.221, p = 0.0006). Based on data derived from the ECLIPSE studies, increased perioperative BP variability is associated with delayed time to extubation and increased postoperative LOS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole blood transcriptomics in cardiac surgery identifies a gene regulatory network connecting ischemia reperfusion with systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liangos, Orfeas; Domhan, Sophie; Schwager, Christian; Zeier, Martin; Huber, Peter E; Addabbo, Francesco; Goligorsky, Michael S; Hlatky, Lynn; Jaber, Bertrand L; Abdollahi, Amir

    2010-10-27

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CS/CPB) is associated with increased risk for postoperative complications causing substantial morbidity and mortality. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying CS/CPB-induced pathophysiology we employed an integrative systems biology approach using the whole blood transcriptome as the sentinel organ. Total RNA was isolated and globin mRNA depleted from whole blood samples prospectively collected from 10 patients at time points prior (0), 2 and 24 hours following CS/CPB. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis revealed differential expression of 610 genes after CS/CPB (p<0.01). Among the 375 CS/CPB-upregulated genes, we found a gene-regulatory network consisting of 50 genes, reminiscent of activation of a coordinated genetic program triggered by CS/CPB. Intriguingly, the highly connected hub nodes of the identified network included key sensors of ischemia-reperfusion (HIF-1alpha and C/EBPbeta). Activation of this network initiated a concerted inflammatory response via upregulation of TLR-4/5, IL1R2/IL1RAP, IL6, IL18/IL18R1/IL18RAP, MMP9, HGF/HGFR, CalgranulinA/B, and coagulation factors F5/F12 among others. Differential regulation of 13 candidate genes including novel, not hitherto CS/CBP-associated genes, such as PTX3, PGK1 and Resistin, was confirmed using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. In support of the mRNA data, differential expression of MMP9, MIP1alpha and MIP1beta plasma proteins was further confirmed in 34 additional patients. Analysis of blood transcriptome uncovered critical signaling pathways governing the CS/CPB-induced pathophysiology. The molecular signaling underlying ischemia reperfusion and inflammatory response is highly intertwined and includes pro-inflammatory as well as cardioprotective elements. The herein identified candidate genes and pathways may provide promising prognostic biomarker and therapeutic targets.

  19. Particulate matter air pollution and ambient temperature: opposing effects on blood pressure in high-risk cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, Paolo; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Das, Ritabrata; Gracik, Theresa; Wang, Lu; Morishita, Masako; Bard, Robert L; Jackson, Elizabeth A; Fitzner, Craig A; Ferri, Claudio; Brook, Robert D

    2015-10-01

    Fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) and extreme temperatures have both been associated with alterations in blood pressure (BP). However, few studies have evaluated their joint haemodynamic actions among individuals at high risk for cardiovascular events. We assessed the effects of short-term exposures during the prior week to ambient PM2.5 and outdoor temperature levels on resting seated BP among 2078 patients enrolling into a cardiac rehabilitation programme at the University of Michigan (from 2003 to 2011) using multiple linear regression analyses adjusting for age, sex, BMI, ozone and the same-day alternate environmental factor (i.e. PM2.5 or temperature). Mean PM2.5 and temperature levels were 12.6 ± 8.2 μg/m and 10.3 ± 10.4°C, respectively. Each standard deviation elevation in PM2.5 concentration during lag days 4-6 was associated with significant increases in SBP (2.1-3.5 mmHg) and DBP (1.7-1.8 mmHg). Conversely, higher temperature levels (per 10.4°C) during lag days 4-6 were associated with reductions in both SBP (-3.6 to -2.3 mmHg) and DBP (-2.5 to -1.8 mmHg). There was little evidence for consistent effect modification by other covariates (e.g. demographics, seasons, medication usage). Short-term exposures to PM2.5, even at low concentrations within current air quality standards, are associated with significant increases in BP. Contrarily, higher ambient temperatures prompt the opposite haemodynamic effect. These findings demonstrate that both ubiquitous environmental exposures have clinically meaningful effects on resting BP among high-risk cardiac patients.

  20. Aetiology of preoperative anaemia in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery-the challenge of pillar one of Patient Blood Management.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J; Sinha, R; Robinson, K; Scotland, V; Cardone, D

    2017-01-01

    Preoperative anaemia is common in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Whilst there is a strong association with increased morbidity and mortality, it is currently unclear whether treatment of anaemia leads to patient benefit. This retrospective study aimed to determine the aetiology of preoperative anaemia in a cohort of patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery over two years at a tertiary hospital. Laboratory data obtained at the preoperative assessment clinic visit were assessed to stratify patients into four groups-iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), possible IDA, anaemia of chronic disease (ACD) and non-anaemic patients with low ferritin according to the 'Preoperative haemoglobin assessment and optimisation template' of the Australian Patient Blood Management (PBM) Guidelines. Of patients with preoperative anaemia, 23.1% had IDA, 6.6% had possible IDA and 70.3% had possible ACD. Of the patients with possible ACD, 30% had a ferritin <100 µg/l, representing limited iron stores or coexisting absolute iron deficiency in the setting of chronic disease. In addition, 46.2% of those with possible ACD had iron studies indicative of functional iron deficiency. Time between assessment and surgery was as little as one day in a third of patients and in only 7% was it more than seven days. Our findings indicate that about one-third of our patients with preoperative anaemia had evidence of iron deficiency, a potentially reversible cause of anaemia. In addition, a significant number had either limited iron stores that may render them iron deficient by surgery, or a functional iron deficiency.

  1. Accuracy of predicted haemoglobin concentration on cardiopulmonary bypass in paediatric cardiac surgery: effect of different formulae for estimating patient blood volume.

    PubMed

    Redlin, Matthias; Boettcher, Wolfgang; Dehmel, Frank; Cho, Mi-Young; Kukucka, Marian; Habazettl, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    When applying a blood-conserving approach in paediatric cardiac surgery with the aim of reducing the transfusion of homologous blood products, the decision to use blood or blood-free priming of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit is often based on the predicted haemoglobin concentration (Hb) as derived from the pre-CPB Hb, the prime volume and the estimated blood volume. We assessed the accuracy of this approach and whether it may be improved by using more sophisticated methods of estimating the blood volume. Data from 522 paediatric cardiac surgery patients treated with CPB with blood-free priming in a 2-year period from May 2013 to May 2015 were collected. Inclusion criteria were body weight <15 kg and available Hb data immediately prior to and after the onset of CPB. The Hb on CPB was predicted according to Fick's principle from the pre-CPB Hb, the prime volume and the patient blood volume. Linear regression analyses and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the accuracy of the Hb prediction. Different methods to estimate the blood volume were assessed and compared. The initial Hb on CPB correlated well with the predicted Hb (R(2)=0.87, p<0.001). A Bland-Altman plot revealed little bias at 0.07 g/dL and an area of agreement from -1.35 to 1.48 g/dL. More sophisticated methods of estimating blood volume from lean body mass did not improve the Hb prediction, but rather increased bias. Hb prediction is reasonably accurate, with the best result obtained with the simplest method of estimating the blood volume at 80 mL/kg body weight. When deciding for or against blood-free priming, caution is necessary when the predicted Hb lies in a range of ± 2 g/dL around the transfusion trigger.

  2. The Impact of Roller Pump vs. Centrifugal Pump on Homologous Blood Transfusion in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Datt, Bharat; Nguyen, Moui B; Plancher, Gary; Ruzmetov, Mark; O'Brien, Michael; Kube, Alicia; Munro, Hamish M; Pourmoghadam, Kamal K; DeCampli, William M

    2017-03-01

    Centrifugal pumps are considered to be less destructive to blood elements (1) when compared to roller pumps. However, their large prime volumes render them unsuitable as arterial pumps in heart lung machine (HLM) circuitry for children. In November of 2014, the circuit at Arnold Palmer Hospital, a Biomedicus BP-50 with kinetic assist venous drainage (KAVD) and 1/4″ tubing was converted to a roller pump in the arterial position with gravity drainage. Vacuum-assisted venous drainage (VAVD) was mounted on the HLM as a backup, but not used. Tubing was changed to 3/16″ in the arterial line in patients <13 kg. A retrospective study with a total of 140 patients compared patients placed on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with Biomedicus centrifugal pumps and KAVD (Centrifugal Group, n = 40) to those placed on CPB with roller pumps and gravity drainage (Roller Group, n = 100). Patients requiring extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)/cardio-pulmonary support (CPS) or undergoing a hybrid procedure were excluded. Re-operation or circulatory arrest patients were not excluded. Prime volumes decreased by 57% from 456 ± 34 mL in the Centrifugal Group to 197 ± 34 mL in the Roller Group (p < .001). There was a corresponding increase in hematocrit (HCT) of blood primes and also on CPB. Intraoperative homologous blood transfusions also decreased 55% from 422 mL in the Centrifugal Group to 231 mL in the Roller Group (p < .001). The Society of Thoracic Surgeons--European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (STAT) categorized intubation times and hospital length of stay (LOS) for all infants showed a trend toward reduction, but was not statistically significant. Overall mortality was 5% utilizing the centrifugal configuration and 0% in the roller pump cohort. We demonstrated that the transition to roller pumps in the arterial position of the HLM considerably reduced our priming volume and formed a basis for a comprehensive blood conservation program. By maintaining higher

  3. The Impact of Roller Pump vs. Centrifugal Pump on Homologous Blood Transfusion in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Datt, Bharat; Nguyen, Moui B.; Plancher, Gary; Ruzmetov, Mark; O'Brien, Michael; Kube, Alicia; Munro, Hamish M.; Pourmoghadam, Kamal K.; DeCampli, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Centrifugal pumps are considered to be less destructive to blood elements (1) when compared to roller pumps. However, their large prime volumes render them unsuitable as arterial pumps in heart lung machine (HLM) circuitry for children. In November of 2014, the circuit at Arnold Palmer Hospital, a Biomedicus BP-50 with kinetic assist venous drainage (KAVD) and 1/4″ tubing was converted to a roller pump in the arterial position with gravity drainage. Vacuum-assisted venous drainage (VAVD) was mounted on the HLM as a backup, but not used. Tubing was changed to 3/16″ in the arterial line in patients <13 kg. A retrospective study with a total of 140 patients compared patients placed on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with Biomedicus centrifugal pumps and KAVD (Centrifugal Group, n = 40) to those placed on CPB with roller pumps and gravity drainage (Roller Group, n = 100). Patients requiring extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)/cardio-pulmonary support (CPS) or undergoing a hybrid procedure were excluded. Re-operation or circulatory arrest patients were not excluded. Prime volumes decreased by 57% from 456 ± 34 mL in the Centrifugal Group to 197 ± 34 mL in the Roller Group (p < .001). There was a corresponding increase in hematocrit (HCT) of blood primes and also on CPB. Intraoperative homologous blood transfusions also decreased 55% from 422 mL in the Centrifugal Group to 231 mL in the Roller Group (p < .001). The Society of Thoracic Surgeons--European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (STAT) categorized intubation times and hospital length of stay (LOS) for all infants showed a trend toward reduction, but was not statistically significant. Overall mortality was 5% utilizing the centrifugal configuration and 0% in the roller pump cohort. We demonstrated that the transition to roller pumps in the arterial position of the HLM considerably reduced our priming volume and formed a basis for a comprehensive blood conservation program. By maintaining

  4. Intracoronary melatonin increases coronary blood flow and cardiac function through β-adrenoreceptors, MT1/MT2 receptors, and nitric oxide in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Molinari, Claudio; Uberti, Francesca; Mary, David A S G; Vacca, Giovanni; Caimmi, Philippe P

    2011-09-01

    Melatonin is involved in the regulation of the cardiovascular system through the modulation of sympathetic function and the nitric oxide (NO)-related pathway and interaction with MT1/MT2 receptors. However, information regarding its direct actions on coronary blood flow and cardiac function is scarce. This study therefore determined the primary in vivo effect of melatonin on cardiac function and perfusion and the involvement of the autonomic nervous system, MT1/MT2 receptors, and NO. In 35 pigs, melatonin infused into the coronary artery at 70 pg for each mL/min of coronary blood flow while preventing changes in heart rate and arterial pressure increased coronary blood flow, dP/dt(max), segmental shortening, and cardiac output by about 12%, 14%, 8%, and 23% of control values (P < 0.05), respectively. These effects were accompanied by an increase in coronary NO release of about 46% (P < 0.05) of control values. The aforementioned responses were graded in a further five pigs. Moreover, the blockade of muscarinic cholinoreceptors (n = 5) and α-adrenoreceptors (n = 5) did not abolish the observed responses to melatonin. After β(1)-adrenoreceptors blocking (n = 5), melatonin failed to affect cardiac function, whereas β(2)-adrenoreceptors (n = 5) and NO synthase inhibition (n = 5) prevented the coronary response and the effect of melatonin on NO release. Finally, all effects were prevented by MT1/MT2 receptor inhibitors (n = 10). In conclusion, melatonin primarily increased coronary blood flow and cardiac function through the involvement of MT1/MT2 receptors, β-adrenoreceptors, and NO release. These findings add new information about the mechanisms through which melatonin physiologically modulates cardiovascular function and exerts cardioprotective effects. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. In vivo two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy reveals cardiac- and respiration-dependent pulsatile blood flow in cortical blood vessels in mice.

    PubMed

    Santisakultarm, Thom P; Cornelius, Nathan R; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schafer, Andrew I; Silver, Richard T; Doerschuk, Peter C; Olbricht, William L; Schaffer, Chris B

    2012-04-01

    Subtle alterations in cerebral blood flow can impact the health and function of brain cells and are linked to cognitive decline and dementia. To understand hemodynamics in the three-dimensional vascular network of the cerebral cortex, we applied two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy to measure the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) in individual microvessels throughout the vascular hierarchy in anesthetized mice. To resolve heartbeat- and respiration-dependent flow dynamics, we simultaneously recorded the electrocardiogram and respiratory waveform. We found that centerline RBC speed decreased with decreasing vessel diameter in arterioles, slowed further through the capillary bed, and then increased with increasing vessel diameter in venules. RBC flow was pulsatile in nearly all cortical vessels, including capillaries and venules. Heartbeat-induced speed modulation decreased through the vascular network, while the delay between heartbeat and the time of maximum speed increased. Capillary tube hematocrit was 0.21 and did not vary with centerline RBC speed or topological position. Spatial RBC flow profiles in surface vessels were blunted compared with a parabola and could be measured at vascular junctions. Finally, we observed a transient decrease in RBC speed in surface vessels before inspiration. In conclusion, we developed an approach to study detailed characteristics of RBC flow in the three-dimensional cortical vasculature, including quantification of fluctuations in centerline RBC speed due to cardiac and respiratory rhythms and flow profile measurements. These methods and the quantitative data on basal cerebral hemodynamics open the door to studies of the normal and diseased-state cerebral microcirculation.

  6. In vivo two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy reveals cardiac- and respiration-dependent pulsatile blood flow in cortical blood vessels in mice

    PubMed Central

    Santisakultarm, Thom P.; Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schafer, Andrew I.; Silver, Richard T.; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Olbricht, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Subtle alterations in cerebral blood flow can impact the health and function of brain cells and are linked to cognitive decline and dementia. To understand hemodynamics in the three-dimensional vascular network of the cerebral cortex, we applied two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy to measure the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) in individual microvessels throughout the vascular hierarchy in anesthetized mice. To resolve heartbeat- and respiration-dependent flow dynamics, we simultaneously recorded the electrocardiogram and respiratory waveform. We found that centerline RBC speed decreased with decreasing vessel diameter in arterioles, slowed further through the capillary bed, and then increased with increasing vessel diameter in venules. RBC flow was pulsatile in nearly all cortical vessels, including capillaries and venules. Heartbeat-induced speed modulation decreased through the vascular network, while the delay between heartbeat and the time of maximum speed increased. Capillary tube hematocrit was 0.21 and did not vary with centerline RBC speed or topological position. Spatial RBC flow profiles in surface vessels were blunted compared with a parabola and could be measured at vascular junctions. Finally, we observed a transient decrease in RBC speed in surface vessels before inspiration. In conclusion, we developed an approach to study detailed characteristics of RBC flow in the three-dimensional cortical vasculature, including quantification of fluctuations in centerline RBC speed due to cardiac and respiratory rhythms and flow profile measurements. These methods and the quantitative data on basal cerebral hemodynamics open the door to studies of the normal and diseased-state cerebral microcirculation. PMID:22268102

  7. Improved red blood cell survival after cardiac operations with administration of urea during cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.; Bake, B.; William-Olsson, G.

    1985-01-01

    The plasma hemoglobin and red blood cell survival (half-life of /sup 51/Cr) was studied in 48 patients undergoing single valve replacement or coronary artery bypass graft. Urea or placebo was administered during cardiopulmonary bypass in a prospective, randomized, double-blind manner to test the potential effect on mechanical hemolysis. The mean plasma hemoglobin level at the end of extracorporeal circulation was significantly lower in the urea-treated groups (coronary artery bypass 342 mg/L; valve replacement 364 mg/L) than in the control groups (coronary artery bypass 635 mg/L, valve replacement 518 mg/L. The half-life of /sup 51/Cr was significantly longer in the urea-treated patients (coronary artery bypass 18 days; valve replacement 16 days) than in the control groups (coronary artery bypass 12.4 days; valve replacement 12.7 days) but still below the normal reference value (29 +/- 4 days). The plasma hemoglobin returned to near normal values (50 mg/L) the day after operation (day 1) and remained low with no differences between control and urea-treated groups. The total blood hemoglobin was followed for 2 weeks after operation and showed significantly less anemia in the urea-treated group. The lowest mean blood hemoglobin level was noted between days 5 and 9-114 (coronary artery bypass) and 107 (valve replacement) gm/L in the urea-treated patients compared to 92.3 gm/L in the control subjects. The reduction in the severity of the anemia led to less transfusion in the urea-treated patients (approximately 0.5 unit/patient) than in the control subjects (approximately 1 unit/patient) between days 3 and 14.

  8. Age- and sex-based resource utilisation and costs in patients with acute chest pain undergoing cardiac CT angiography: pooled evidence from ROMICAT II and ACRIN-PA trials.

    PubMed

    Bamberg, Fabian; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Ferencik, Maros; Bittner, Daniel O; Hallett, Travis R; Janjua, Sumbal; Schlett, Christopher L; Nagurney, John T; Udelson, James E; Truong, Quynh A; Woodard, Pamela K; Hollander, Judd E; Litt, Harold; Hoffmann, Udo

    2017-09-05

    To determine resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups in two large randomized diagnostic trials. We pooled patient-specific data from ACRIN-PA 4005 and ROMICAT II that enrolled subjects with acute chest pain at 14 US sites. Subjects were randomized between a standard work-up and a pathway utilizing cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and followed for the occurrence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and resource utilisation during index hospitalisation and 1-month follow-up. Study endpoints included diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of ACS as well as resource utilisation. Among 1240 patients who underwent CCTA, negative predictive value of CCTA to rule out ACS remained very high (≥99.4%). The proportion of patients undergoing additional diagnostic testing and cost increased with age for both sexes (p < 0.001), and was higher in men as compared to women older than 60 years (43.1% vs. 23.4% and $4559 ± 3382 vs. $3179 ± 2562, p < 0.01; respectively). Cost to rule out ACS was higher in men (p < 0.001) and significantly higher for patients older than 60 years ($2860-5935 in men, p < 0.001). CCTA strategy in patients with acute chest pain results in varying resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups, mandating improved selection for advanced imaging. • In this analysis, CAD and ACS increased with age and male gender. • CCTA in patients with acute chest pain results in varying resource utilisation. • Significant increase of diagnostic testing and cost with age for both sexes. • Cost to rule out ACS is higher in men and patients >60 years. • Improved selection of subjects for cardiac CTA result in more resource-driven implementation.

  9. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  10. A strategic approach for cardiac MR left ventricle segmentation.

    PubMed

    Dakua, Sarada Prasad; Sahambi, J S

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative evaluation of cardiac function from cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images requires the identification of the myocardial walls. This generally requires the clinician to view the image and interactively trace the contours. Especially, detection of myocardial walls of left ventricle is a difficult task in CMR images that are obtained from subjects having serious diseases. An approach to automated outlining the left ventricular contour is proposed. In order to segment the left ventricle, in this paper, a combination of two approaches is suggested. Difference of Gaussian weighting function (DoG) is newly introduced in random walk approach for blood pool (inner contour) extraction. The myocardial wall (outer contour) is segmented out by a modified active contour method that takes blood pool boundary as the initial contour. Promising experimental results in CMR images demonstrate the potentials of our approach.

  11. High-resolution blood-pool-contrast-enhanced MR angiography in glioblastoma: tumor-associated neovascularization as a biomarker for patient survival. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Puig, Josep; Blasco, Gerard; Daunis-I-Estadella, Josep; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Essig, Marco; Jain, Rajan; Remollo, Sebastián; Hernández, David; Puigdemont, Montserrat; Sánchez-González, Javier; Mateu, Gloria; Wintermark, Max; Pedraza, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether tumor-associated neovascularization on high-resolution gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a useful biomarker for predicting survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastomas. Before treatment, 35 patients (25 men; mean age, 64 ± 14 years) with glioblastoma underwent MRI including first-pass dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion and post-contrast T1WI sequences with gadobutrol (0.1 mmol/kg) and, 48 h later, high-resolution MRA with gadofosveset (0.03 mmol/kg). Volumes of interest for contrast-enhancing lesion (CEL), non-CEL, and contralateral normal-appearing white matter were obtained, and DSC perfusion and DWI parameters were evaluated. Prognostic factors were assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards model. Eighteen (51.42 %) glioblastomas were hypervascular on high-resolution MRA. Hypervascular glioblastomas were associated with higher CEL volume and lower Karnofsky score. Median survival rates for patients with hypovascular and hypervascular glioblastomas treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy were 15 and 9.75 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Tumor-associated neovascularization was the best predictor of survival at 5.25 months (AUC = 0.794, 81.2 % sensitivity, 77.8 % specificity, 76.5 % positive predictive value, 82.4 % negative predictive value) and yielded the highest hazard ratio (P < 0.001). Tumor-associated neovascularization detected on high-resolution blood-pool-contrast-enhanced MRA of newly diagnosed glioblastoma seems to be a useful biomarker that correlates with worse survival.

  12. Coronary MR angiography using citrate-coated very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles as blood-pool contrast agent: initial experience in humans.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Moritz; Wagner, Susanne; Schnorr, Jörg; Schellenberger, Eyk; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Krug, Lasse; Dewey, Marc; Laule, Michael; Hamm, Bernd; Taupitz, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (VSOP-C184) as blood-pool contrast agent for coronary MR angiography (CMRA) in humans. Six healthy volunteers and 14 patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent CMRA after administration of VSOP-C184 at the following doses: 20 μmol Fe/kg (4 patients), 40 μmol Fe/kg (5 patients), 45 μmol Fe/kg (6 healthy volunteers), and 60 μmol Fe/kg (5 patients). In healthy volunteers, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and vessel edge definition (VED) of contrast-enhanced CMRA were compared with non-contrast-enhanced CMRA. In patients, a per-segment intention-to-diagnose evaluation of contrast-enhanced CMRA for detection of significant coronary stenosis (≥50%) was performed. Three healthy volunteers (45 μmol Fe/kg VSOP-C184) and two patients (60 μmol Fe/kg VSOP-C184) had adverse events of mild or moderate intensity. VSOP-C184 significantly increased CNR (15.1 ± 4.6 versus 6.9 ± 1.9; P = 0.010), SNR (21.7 ± 5.3 versus 15.4 ± 1.6; P = 0.048), and VED (2.3 ± 0.6 versus 1.2 ± 0.2; P < 0.001) compared with non-contrast-enhanced CMRA. In patients, contrast-enhanced CMRA yielded sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy for detection of significant coronary stenosis of 86.7%, 71.0%, 73.1%, respectively. CMRA using VSOP-C184 was feasible and yielded moderate diagnostic accuracy for detection of significant coronary stenosis within this proof-of-concept setting. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of gated blood pool single photon emission computed tomography using low-energy high-resolution and SMARTZOOM collimation.

    PubMed

    Erwin, William D; Jessop, Aaron C; Mar, Martha V; Macapinlac, Homer A; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of IQ-SPECT gated blood pool (MUGA) under conditions of decreased scan time (ST). Ten patients underwent routine 26-min, two-view planar, followed by LEHR and IQ-SPECT MUGA, on a Siemens dual-head Symbia scanner. Six 'back and forth' 4-min SPECT scans were summed into 4-, 8-, 12-, 16-, 20-, and 24-min equivalent scans, and reconstructed iteratively (IQ-SPECT and LEHR) and with FBP (LEHR). Uniformity, contrast, and wall motion were scored on a five-point scale. Linear regressions of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) were performed between FBP, Flash 3D, and IQ-SPECT versus planar and Flash 3D and IQ-SPECT versus FBP. Agreement tables between Flash 3D and IQ-SPECT versus FBP LV EF were generated using a normal versus cardiotoxicity threshold of 50%. IQ-SPECT had the best scores for all STs, and 4, 8, and 16 min IQ-SPECT were judged to be similar to 24-min LEHR FBP, Flash 3D, and planar, respectively. The average LV EF correlation coefficients were 0.69, 0.71, and 0.63 between IQ-SPECT, Flash 3D, and FBP versus planar, respectively; 0.70 between IQ-SPECT and FBP; and 0.88 between Flash 3D and FBP, and all were statistically significant (P<0.05), except for 16-min FBP LEHR versus planar. Agreement tables showed diagnostic equivalence of IQ-SPECT, Flash 3D, and FBP. These preliminary results suggest that IQ-SPECT is equivalent to LEHR Flash 3D and FBP for MUGA SPECT, and better at reduced ST. A larger patient population study is necessary for a more definitive assessment.

  14. Bone Scintigraphy in the Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Is There Additional Value of Bone Scintigraphy with Blood Pool Phase over Conventional Bone Scintigraphy?

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Chan Woo; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Yoo, Dae-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the value of bone scintigraphy with additional blood pool phase (BSBP), compared with conventional bone scintigraphy (CBS), in the assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 242 patients (43 males, 199 females; 14-78 years) with arthralgia, and underwent BSBP were retrospectively analyzed. On the first physical examination, active arthritis was found in 128 of the 242 patients. Clinical diagnosis was made by a rheumatologist on the basis of the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, which are considered to be the gold standard. The diagnostic performances and prognostic value of BSBP and CBS were analyzed in the total patients with arthralgia and in the patients with arthritis. The sensitivity of BSBP (84.2%, 80/95) were significantly higher than that of CBS (74.8%, 72/95) in the patients with arthralgia (P = 0.039). When BSBP was interpreted with the results of elevated/positive anti-CCP antibody, its accuracy over CBS also became significantly higher (86.0%, 208/242 vs. 83.1%, 201/242 respectively, P = 0.021). The diagnostic odds ratio of BSBP positivity was higher than CBS positivity in the patients with arthralgia (26.0, 12.9-52.4 vs. 21.1, 10.8-41.3) and with arthritis (12.0, 4.9-29.4 vs. 10.0, 4.2-23.4). Both BSBP and CBS appear to provide acceptable accuracy and comparable diagnostic performance for diagnosis of RA. However, in the patients with arthralgia, BSBP was found to be more sensitive than CBS and more accurate when interpreted with the result of anti-CCP antibody. This could help physicians diagnose RA in daily clinical practice.

  15. [The multiple organ failure syndrome after cardiac surgery with artificial blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Babaev, M A; Eremenko, A A; Minbolatova, N M; Dzemeshkevich, S L

    2013-01-01

    The 10-year study of etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic, treatment and prevention of the multiple organ failure syndrome (MOFS) after cardiovascular operations with artificial blood circulation was conducted in the SCS. 4383 patients, aged 16-75 years, were observed. Of them, MOFS was diagnosed in 206 (4.7%) patients. Extracorporal detoxication was used in 385 patients. When used in patients with complicated postoperative period, the extracorporal detoxication prevents MOFS and decreases lethality in 3 times (from 59.3 to 19.2%). The method is indicated to patients with MOFS severity estimated of 13.5 points and damage of 5-6 organ systems. Herewith the duration of veno-venous ultrahemodiafiltration should not exceed 80 hours and the number of sessions should not be more then 3.

  16. Cardiac-Gated En Face Doppler Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography at 100,000 Axial Scans per Second

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ByungKun; Choi, WooJhon; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Schuman, Joel S.; Wollstein, Gadi; Duker, Jay S.; Waheed, Nadia K.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop and demonstrate a cardiac gating method for repeatable in vivo measurement of total retinal blood flow (TRBF) in humans using en face Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) at commercially available imaging speeds. Methods. A prototype swept-source OCT system operating at 100-kHz axial scan rate was developed and interfaced with a pulse oximeter. Using the plethysmogram measured from the earlobe, Doppler OCT imaging of a 1.5- × 2-mm area at the optic disc at 1.8 volumes/s was synchronized to cardiac cycle to improve sampling of pulsatile blood flow. Postprocessing algorithms were developed to achieve fully automatic calculation of TRBF. We evaluated the repeatability of en face Doppler OCT measurement of TRBF in 10 healthy young subjects using three methods: measurement at 100 kHz with asynchronous acquisition, measurement at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition, and a control measurement using a 400-kHz instrument with asynchronous acquisition. Results. The median intrasubject coefficients of variation (COV) of the three methods were 8.0%, 4.9%, and 6.1%, respectively. All three methods correlated well, without a significant bias. Mean TRBF measured at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition was 40.5 ± 8.2 μL/min, and the range was from 26.6 to 55.8 μL/min. Conclusions. Cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT can achieve smaller measurement variability than previously reported methods. Although further validation in older subjects and diseased subjects is required, precise measurement of TRBF using cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT at commercially available imaging speeds should be feasible. PMID:25744974

  17. Effects of levosimendan on glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and renal oxygenation after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: a randomized placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Ricksten, Sven-Erik

    2013-10-01

    Acute kidney injury develops in a large proportion of patients after cardiac surgery because of the low cardiac output syndrome. The inodilator levosimendan increases cardiac output after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, but a detailed analysis of its effects on renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, and renal oxygenation in this group of patients is lacking. We therefore evaluated the effects of levosimendan on renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, renal oxygen consumption, and renal oxygen demand/supply relationship, i.e., renal oxygen extraction, early after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Prospective, placebo-controlled, and randomized trial. Cardiothoracic ICU of a tertiary center. Postcardiac surgery patients (n=30). The patients were randomized to receive levosimendan, 0.1 µg/kg/min after a loading dose of 12 µg/kg (n=15), or placebo (n=15). The experimental procedure started 4-6 hours after surgery in the ICU during propofol sedation and mechanical ventilation. Systemic hemodynamic were evaluated by a pulmonary artery thermodilution catheter. Renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate were measured by the renal vein retrograde thermodilution technique and by renal extraction of Cr-EDTA, respectively. Central venous pressure was kept constant by colloid/crystalloid infusion. Compared to placebo, levosimendan increased cardiac index (22%), stroke volume index (15%), and heart rate (7%) and decreased systemic vascular resistance index (21%), whereas mean arterial pressure was not affected. Levosimendan induced significant increases in renal blood flow (12%, p<0.05) and glomerular filtration rate (21%, p<0.05), decreased renal vascular resistance (18%, p<0.05) but caused no significant changes in filtration fraction, renal oxygen consumption, or renal oxygen extraction, compared to placebo. After cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, levosimendan induces a vasodilation, preferentially of preglomerular resistance

  18. Expression of lymphocyte coding genes in peripheral blood and lymphocyte infiltration in cardiac tissues influenced by cyclosporin A in heterotopic heart transplantation model in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiu-fang; Xin, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Yi-min; Li, Wen-bin; Li, Na; Lin, Zheng; Zhou, Yu-jie; Zhang, Zhao-guang

    2013-12-01

    To systematically compare the expression of coding genes with pathological changes of transplanted cardiac tissue and peripheral blood lymphocytes in an allo-heterotopic rat cardiac transplant model. Using SD rats as donors and Wistar rats as recipients, animals were divided into two groups, control and cyclosporine A intervention plus heart transplant groups. After transplant at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 12d, we assessed the ability of lymphocytes to infiltrate into cardiac tissues and levels of leukocyte coding genes in peripheral blood. Histopathological changes were monitored in cardiac tissue to determine the level of transplant rejection. (1) 24h after transplant peripheral blood lymphocytes' transcription and expression were temporarily reduced. (2) CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes infiltrate into cardiac tissue and Grade 1R pathological changes were observed 3d-7d after heart transplant. (3)Cyclosporine A was not able to completely block heart transplant rejection.(4) Although cyclosporine A was not able to effectively suppress CD4(+) T cell gene expression, it did suppress CD8(+) T cell gene transcription. (5) Cyclosporine A did not effectively reduce the rapid infiltration of CD4(+) or CD8(+) infiltration in 3d, but significantly reduced the degree of CD4(+) T cell infiltration in cardiac tissues between 3 and 7d. (6) Differential display (DD-PCR): Graft control group: there were differences in 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, ribosomal protein S25, 12S ribosomal, gig18, MHC-III and ATPase H(+), which occurred 24h before CD4/CD8 surface protein expression. Cyclosporine A group: there were differences in thrombospondin-1, TCR, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate, sodium channel beta-1, gig18 and TCR. In the cyclosporine A group 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate positive expression was observed 24h after the control group, which indicates that cyclosporine A slowed down the 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate transcription rate in peripheral lymphocytes and delayed its expression time. Cyclosporine A also

  19. Differences in perioperative femoral and radial arterial blood pressure in neonates and infants undergoing pediatric cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hwa Jin; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jeong, In Seok; Yoon, Nam Sik; Ma, Jae Sook; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2017-08-30

    Several reports claim that blood pressure (BP) in the radial artery may underestimate the accurate BP in critically ill patients. Here, the authors evaluated differences in mean blood pressure (MBP) between the radial and femoral artery during pediatric cardiac surgery to determine the effectiveness of femoral arterial BP monitoring. The medical records of children under 1 year of age who underwent open-heart surgery between 2007 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Radial and femoral BP were measured simultaneously, and the differences between these values were analyzed at various times: after catheter insertion, after the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB-on), after aortic cross clamping (ACC), after the release of ACC, after weaning from CPB, at arrival in the intensive care unit (ICU), and every 6h during the first day in the ICU. A total of 121 patients who underwent open-heart surgery met the inclusion criteria. During the intraoperative period, from the beginning to the end of CPB, radial MBPs were significantly lower than femoral MBPs at each time-point measured (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that longer CPB time (>60min, odds ratio: 7.47) was a risk factor for lower radial pressure. However, discrepancies between these two values disappeared after arrival in the ICU. There was no incidence of ischemic complications associated with the catheterization of both arteries. The authors suggest that femoral arterial pressure monitoring can be safely performed, even in neonates, and provides more accurate BP values during CPB-on periods, and immediately after weaning from CPB, especially when CPB time was greater than 60min. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute hypoxia diminishes the relationship between blood pressure and subarachnoid space width oscillations at the human cardiac frequency

    PubMed Central

    Wszedybyl-Winklewska, Magdalena; Wolf, Jacek; Swierblewska, Ewa; Kunicka, Katarzyna; Gruszecka, Agnieszka; Gruszecki, Marcin; Kucharska, Wieslawa; Winklewski, Pawel J.; Zabulewicz, Joanna; Guminski, Wojciech; Pietrewicz, Michal; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F.; Bieniaszewski, Leszek; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute hypoxia exerts strong effects on the cardiovascular system. Heart-generated pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid motion is recognised as a key factor ensuring brain homeostasis. We aimed to assess changes in heart-generated coupling between blood pressure (BP) and subarachnoid space width (SAS) oscillations during hypoxic exposure. Methods Twenty participants were subjected to a controlled decrease in oxygen saturation (SaO2 = 80%) for five minutes. BP and heart rate (HR) were measured using continuous finger-pulse photoplethysmography, oxyhaemoglobin saturation with an ear-clip sensor, end-tidal CO2 with a gas analyser, and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), pulsatility and resistive indices with Doppler ultrasound. Changes in SAS were recorded with a recently-developed method called near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and SAS oscillations. Results Gradual increases in systolic, diastolic BP and HR were observed immediately after the initiation of hypoxic challenge (at fifth minute +20.1%, +10.2%, +16.5% vs. baseline, respectively; all P<0.01), whereas SAS remained intact (P = NS). Concurrently, the CBFV was stable throughout the procedure, with the only increase observed in the last two minutes of deoxygenation (at the fifth minute +6.8% vs. baseline, P<0.05). The cardiac contribution to the relationship between BP and SAS oscillations diminished immediately after exposure to hypoxia (at the fifth minute, right hemisphere -27.7% and left hemisphere -26.3% vs. baseline; both P<0.05). Wavelet phase coherence did not change throughout the experiment (P = NS). Conclusions Cerebral haemodynamics seem to be relatively stable during short exposure to normobaric hypoxia. Hypoxia attenuates heart-generated BP SAS coupling. PMID:28241026

  1. Classification of physiologically significant pumping states in an implantable rotary blood pump: effects of cardiac rhythm disturbances.

    PubMed

    Karantonis, Dean M; Lovell, Nigel H; Ayre, Peter J; Mason, David G; Cloherty, Shaun L

    2007-06-01

    Methods of speed control for implantable rotary blood pumps (iRBPs) are vital for providing implant recipients with sufficient blood flow to cater for their physiological requirements. The detection of pumping states that reflect the physiological state of the native heart forms a major component of such a control method. Employing data from a number of acute animal experiments, five such pumping states have been previously identified: regurgitant pump flow, ventricular ejection (VE), nonopening of the aortic valve (ANO), and partial collapse (intermittent [PVC-I] and continuous [PVC-C]) of the ventricle wall. An automated approach that noninvasively detects such pumping states, employing a classification and regression tree (CART), has also been developed. An extension to this technique, involving an investigation into the effects of cardiac rhythm disturbances on the state detection process, is discussed. When incorporating animal data containing arrhythmic events into the CART model, the strategy showed a marked improvement in detecting pumping states as compared to the model devoid of arrhythmic data: state VE--57.4/91.7% (sensitivity/specificity) improved to 97.1/100.0%; state PVC-I--66.7/83.1% improved to 100.0/88.3%, and state PVC-C--11.1/66.2% changed to 0.0/100%. With a simplified binary scheme differentiating suction (PVC-I, PVC-C) and nonsuction (VE, ANO) states, suction was initially detected with 100/98.5% sensitivity/specificity, whereas with the subsequent improved model, both these states were detected with 100% sensitivity. The accuracy achieved demonstrates the robustness of the technique presented, and substantiates its inclusion into any iRBP control methodology.

  2. Acute hypoxia diminishes the relationship between blood pressure and subarachnoid space width oscillations at the human cardiac frequency.

    PubMed

    Wszedybyl-Winklewska, Magdalena; Wolf, Jacek; Swierblewska, Ewa; Kunicka, Katarzyna; Gruszecka, Agnieszka; Gruszecki, Marcin; Kucharska, Wieslawa; Winklewski, Pawel J; Zabulewicz, Joanna; Guminski, Wojciech; Pietrewicz, Michal; Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Bieniaszewski, Leszek; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Acute hypoxia exerts strong effects on the cardiovascular system. Heart-generated pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid motion is recognised as a key factor ensuring brain homeostasis. We aimed to assess changes in heart-generated coupling between blood pressure (BP) and subarachnoid space width (SAS) oscillations during hypoxic exposure. Twenty participants were subjected to a controlled decrease in oxygen saturation (SaO2 = 80%) for five minutes. BP and heart rate (HR) were measured using continuous finger-pulse photoplethysmography, oxyhaemoglobin saturation with an ear-clip sensor, end-tidal CO2 with a gas analyser, and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), pulsatility and resistive indices with Doppler ultrasound. Changes in SAS were recorded with a recently-developed method called near-infrared transillumination/backscattering sounding. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and SAS oscillations. Gradual increases in systolic, diastolic BP and HR were observed immediately after the initiation of hypoxic challenge (at fifth minute +20.1%, +10.2%, +16.5% vs. baseline, respectively; all P<0.01), whereas SAS remained intact (P = NS). Concurrently, the CBFV was stable throughout the procedure, with the only increase observed in the last two minutes of deoxygenation (at the fifth minute +6.8% vs. baseline, P<0.05). The cardiac contribution to the relationship between BP and SAS oscillations diminished immediately after exposure to hypoxia (at the fifth minute, right hemisphere -27.7% and left hemisphere -26.3% vs. baseline; both P<0.05). Wavelet phase coherence did not change throughout the experiment (P = NS). Cerebral haemodynamics seem to be relatively stable during short exposure to normobaric hypoxia. Hypoxia attenuates heart-generated BP SAS coupling.

  3. The Impact of Exercising During Haemodialysis on Blood Pressure, Markers of Cardiac Injury and Systemic Inflammation--Preliminary Results of a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Dungey, Maurice; Bishop, Nicolette C; Young, Hannah M L; Burton, James O; Smith, Alice C

    2015-01-01

    Patients requiring haemodialysis have cardiovascular and immune dysfunction. Little is known about the acute effects of exercise during haemodialysis. Exercise has numerous health benefits but in other populations has a profound impact upon blood pressure, inflammation and immune function; therefore having the potential to exacerbate cardiovascular and immune dysfunction in this vulnerable population. Fifteen patients took part in a randomised-crossover study investigating the effect of a 30-min bout of exercise during haemodialysis compared to resting haemodialysis. We assessed blood pressure, plasma markers of cardiac injury and systemic inflammation and neutrophil degranulation. Exercise increased blood pressure immediately post-exercise; however, 1 hour after exercise blood pressure was lower than resting levels (106±22 vs. 117±25 mm Hg). No differences in h-FABP, cTnI, myoglobin or CKMB were observed between trial arms. Exercise did not alter circulating concentrations of IL-6, TNF-α or IL-1ra nor clearly suppress neutrophil function. This study demonstrates fluctuations in blood pressure during haemodialysis in response to exercise. However, since the fall in blood pressure occurred without evidence of cardiac injury, we regard it as a normal response to exercise superimposed onto the haemodynamic response to haemodialysis. Importantly, exercise did not exacerbate systemic inflammation or immune dysfunction; intradialytic exercise was well tolerated. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Influence of circulating levels of fibrinogen and perioperative coagulation parameters on predicting postoperative blood loss in cardiac surgery: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Ravi C; Fraser, John F; Ziegenfuss, Marc; Bhaskar, Balu

    2014-03-01

    Fibrinogen, the major clotting protein in blood plasma, plays key roles in blood coagulation and thrombosis. In this prospective cohort study, we measured patient's fibrinogen levels and common coagulation parameters before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and examined their relationships with postoperative blood loss. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB who did not have pre-existing coagulopathy were eligible. Standard blood and coagulation testing were performed before and after CPB. The association of these variables with postoperative blood loss (estimated blood loss from CPB) was assessed with Spearman's ranked correlation and multivariable linear regression models. Two hundred and fifty patients were enrolled in the study. The median blood loss was 780 mL (range 320-2340 mL). Variables independently associated with increasing blood loss were lower post-CPB platelet counts (p<0.001), lower postoperative fibrinogen levels (p<0.001), and larger percent decrease in fibrinogen levels (p<0.05). There was no correlation between preoperative fibrinogen levels and preoperative coagulation tests with postoperative bleeding. The only significant independent predictors of transfusion in a logistic regression model were postoperative fibrinogen concentration. Postoperative fibrinogen, the larger percent decrease in fibrinogen, and postoperative platelet levels are markers of bleeding and blood transfusion requirements after CPB than preoperative standard screening tests. Postoperative fibrinogen had the best predictive value of all tests of postoperative blood loss.

  5. Polynitroxyl albumin and albumin therapy after pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest: effects on cerebral blood flow and neurologic outcome.

    PubMed

    Manole, Mioara D; Kochanek, Patrick M; Foley, Lesley M; Hitchens, T Kevin; Bayır, Hülya; Alexander, Henry; Garman, Robert; Ma, Li; Hsia, Carleton J C; Ho, Chien; Clark, Robert S B

    2012-03-01

    Postresuscitation cerebral blood flow (CBF) disturbances and generation of reactive oxygen species likely contribute to impaired neurologic outcome after pediatric cardiac arrest (CA). Hence, we determined the effects of the antioxidant colloid polynitroxyl albumin (PNA) versus albumin or normal saline (NS) on CBF and neurologic outcome after asphyxial CA in immature rats. We induced asphyxia for 9 minutes in male and female postnatal day 16 to 18 rats randomized to receive PNA, albumin, or NS at resuscitation from CA or sham surgery. Regional CBF was measured serially from 5 to 150 minutes after resuscitation by arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging. We assessed motor function (beam balance and inclined plane), spatial memory retention (water maze), and hippocampal neuronal survival. Polynitroxyl albumin reduced early hyperemia seen 5 minutes after CA. In contrast, albumin markedly increased and prolonged hyperemia. In the delayed period after resuscitation (90 to 150 minutes), CBF was comparable among groups. Both PNA- and albumin-treated rats performed better in the water maze versus NS after CA. This benefit was observed only in males. Hippocampal neuron survival was similar between injury groups. Treatment of immature rats with PNA or albumin resulted in divergent acute changes in CBF, but both improved spatial memory retention in males after asphyxial CA.

  6. Preclinical Evaluation of the Immunomodulatory Properties of Cardiac Adipose Tissue Progenitor Cells Using Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Direct Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Gil, Isaac; Monguió-Tortajada, Marta; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Borràs, Francesc E.; Roura, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based strategies to regenerate injured myocardial tissue have emerged over the past decade, but the optimum cell type is still under scrutiny. In this context, human adult epicardial fat surrounding the heart has been characterized as a reservoir of mesenchymal-like progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) with potential clinical benefits. However, additional data on the possibility that these cells could trigger a deleterious immune response following implantation are needed. Thus, in the presented study, we took advantage of the well-established low immunogenicity of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to comparatively assess the immunomodulatory properties of cardiac ATDPCs in an in vitro allostimulatory assay using allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Similar to UCBMSCs, increasing amounts of seeded cardiac ATDPCs suppressed the alloproliferation of T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, TNFα, and IFNγ) was also specifically modulated by the different numbers of cardiac ATDPCs cocultured. In summary, we show that cardiac ATDPCs abrogate T cell alloproliferation upon stimulation with allogeneic mature MDDCs, suggesting that they could further regulate a possible harmful immune response in vivo. Additionally, UCBMSCs can be considered as valuable tools to preclinically predict the immunogenicity of prospective regenerative cells. PMID:25861626

  7. From cardiac output to blood flow auto-regulation in shock.

    PubMed

    Aya, Hollmann D; Carsetti, Andrea; Bazurro, Simone; Bastoni, Davide; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Cecconi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Shock is defined as a state in which the circulation is unable to deliver sufficient oxygen to meet the demands of the tissues, resulting in cellular dysoxia and organ failure. In this process, the factors that govern the circulation at a haemodynamic level and oxygen delivery at a microcirculatory level play a major role. This manuscript aims to review the blood flow regulation from macro- and micro-haemodynamic point of view and to discuss new potential therapeutic approaches for cardiovascular instability in patients in cardiovascular shock. Despite the recent advances in haemodynamics, the mechanisms that control the vascular resistance and the venous return are not fully understood in critically ill patients. The physical properties of the vascular wall, as well as the role of the mean systemic filling pressure are topics that require further research. However, the haemodynamics do not totally explain the physiopathology of cellular dysoxia, and several factors such as inflammatory changes at the microcirculatory level can modify vascular resistance and tissue perfusion. Cellular vasoactive mediators and endothelial and glucocalix damage are also involved in microcirculatory impairment. All the levels of the circulatory system must be taken into account. Evaluation of microcirculation may help one to detect under-diagnosed shock, and together with classic haemodynamics, guide one towards the appropriate therapy. Restoration of classic haemodynamic parameters is essential but not sufficient to detect and treat patients in cardiovascular shock.

  8. Washing red blood cells and platelets transfused in cardiac surgery reduces post-operative inflammation and number of transfusions: Results of a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Cholette, Jill M; Henrichs, Kelly F; Alfieris, George M; Powers, Karen S.; Phipps, Richard; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Swartz, Michael; Gensini, Francisco; Daugherty, L. Eugene; Nazarian, Emily; Rubenstein, Jeffrey S.; Sweeney, Dawn; Eaton, Michael; Lerner, Norma B; Blumberg, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Objective Children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are susceptible to additional inflammatory and immunogenic insults from blood transfusions. We hypothesize that washing red blood cells (RBC) and platelets transfused to these patients will reduce post-operative transfusion-related immune modulation and inflammation. Design Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting University hospital pediatric cardiac intensive care unit. Patients Children from birth to 17 years old undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. Interventions Children were randomized to an unwashed or washed RBC and platelet transfusion protocol for their surgery and postoperative care. All blood was leukoreduced, irradiated, and ABO identical. Plasma was obtained for laboratory analysis: pre-op, immediately, six and 12 hours after CPB. Primary outcome was the 12-hour post-CPB interleukin (IL)-6: IL-10 ratio. Secondary measures were IL levels, C-reactive protein (CRP), and clinical outcomes. Measurements and main results 162 subjects were studied, 81 per group. 34 subjects (17 per group) did not receive any blood transfusions. Storage duration of blood products was similar between groups. Among transfused subjects, the 12-hour IL ratio was significantly lower in the washed group (3.8 v. 4.8; p=0.04) secondary to lower IL-6 levels (post-CPB: 65 v.100 pg/ml; p = 0.06; 6 hour: 89 v.152 pg/ml; p = 0.02; 12-hour: 84 v.122 pg/ml; p = 0.09). Post-operative CRP was lower in subjects receiving washed blood (38 v. 43 mg/L; p = 0.03). There was a numerical, but not statistically significant decrease in total blood product transfusions (203 v. 260) and mortality (2 v. 6 deaths) in the washed group compared to the unwashed group. Conclusions Washed blood transfusions in cardiac surgery reduced inflammatory biomarkers, number of transfusions, donor exposures, and were associated with a non-significant trend towards reduced mortality. A larger study powered to test for clinical

  9. Understanding the decline of mean systolic blood pressure in Japan: an analysis of pooled data from the National Nutrition Survey, 1986-2002.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Nayu; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Hasegawa, Toshihiko; Murray, Christopher J L

    2008-12-01

    To assess the relationships between the observed drop in mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) in Japan in 1986-2002 and the use of antihypertensive treatment and lifestyle factors. A nationally representative sample of 90,554 men and 101,903 women aged 20 years and over was obtained from pooled data of annual cross-sectional surveys in Japan during 1986-2002. Using two-stage least squares with an instrumental variable, we examined the association between SBP and antihypertensive medication and lifestyle factors, including body mass index (BMI), physical activity, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and dietary salt intake. In the surveys, regular exercise was defined as exercise for more than 30 minutes at a time more than twice a week for over 1 year. Current smoking was defined as either daily or occasional cigarette use. Current drinking was defined as an intake of more than one standard cup of Japanese sake, one large bottle of regular beer, or one double measure of whisky at a time more than three times a week. Changes in mean predicted SBP in each sex and age group between 1986 and 2002 were decomposed into the respective contributions of these explanatory variables. Age-specific means of predicted SBP declined during this period by 1.8 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2-2.5) to 3.0 (95% CI: 2.4-3.6) mmHg in men and 3.7 (95% CI: 3.4-4.1) to 5.1 (95% CI: 4.5-5.7) mmHg in women. These reductions were partly explained by the increased use of medications across all sex and age groups and decreased mean BMI in women in their 30s and 40s. The contributions of treatment effects increased with age. Elevated mean BMI in men and elderly women offset part of the decline of their mean SBP. Declining mean SBP in Japan between 1986 and 2002 was partly attributable to the increased use of antihypertensive medications, especially in the older population, and lowered mean BMI in young women. However, a substantial part of the decline was left unexplained and needs to be

  10. Predictive Value of Pooled Cerebral Blood Volume Mapping for Final Infarct Volume in Patients with Major Artery Occlusions. A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ava, Lauma; Berkefeld, Joachim; Lauer, Arne; Seiler, Alexander; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud; Müller-Eschner, Monika; You, Se-Jong; Weidauer, Stefan; Pilatus, Ulrich; Wagner, Marlies

    2017-03-13

    Detection of ischemic core and collateral status is helpful to predict clinical success of thrombectomy in acute cerebral artery occlusion. Angiographic flat panel detector computed tomography (CT) with pooled blood volume (PBV) data acquisition was described to be helpful to estimate ischemic core in stroke patients prior to thrombectomy and to depict cerebral vessels. We therefore retrospectively evaluated preinterventional PBV data of a large collective of ischemic stroke patients prior to thrombectomy to test its predictive value on final infarct considering PBV maps and collateral status. We used PBV data from 101 patients with acute cerebral artery occlusion prior to successful thrombectomy to reconstruct PBV maps and collateral status maps. Suspected ischemic core and collateral status were correlated to final infarct on follow-up multislice CT. Furthermore, the influence of time window and patient age was taken into consideration. In 75.2% (95% confidence interval CI 66-82%), suspected ischemic core (PBV) matched with final infarct and in 24.8% (95% CI 17-34%) final infarct was overestimated. In all patients, collateral status could be evaluated, and the better the collateral status, the smaller the final infarct (p = 0.016). Although not statistically significant, poor collaterals seem to be a risk factor for overestimation of final infarct on PBV maps. In patients >80 years old predictive value of PBV and collateral status is better than in patients ≤80 years old (p = 0.04). Increasing time window did not have significant impact on predictive value of PBV and collateral status. The PBV data are useful to expeditiously exclude infarct growth and estimate collateral status prior to thrombectomy after a longer interval between initial multislice CT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intervention. However, because of overestimating final infarct in 25% of patients, PBV data presuming large infarct should not be used as the only basis for excluding

  11. Cost-effectiveness of a novel blood-pool contrast agent in the setting of chest pain evaluation in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Gabriela; Annapragada, Ananth

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated three diagnostic strategies with the objective of comparing the current standard of care for individuals presenting acute chest pain and no history of coronary artery disease (CAD) with a novel diagnostic strategy using an emerging technology (blood-pool contrast agent [BPCA]) to identify the potential benefits and cost reductions. A decision analytic model of diagnostic strategies and outcomes using a BPCA and a conventional agent for CT angiography (CTA) in patients with acute chest pain was built. The model was used to evaluate three diagnostic strategies: CTA using a BPCA followed by invasive coronary angiography (ICA), CTA using a conventional agent followed by ICA, and ICA alone. The use of the two CTA-based triage tests before ICA in a population with a CAD prevalence of less than 47% was predicted to be more cost-effective than ICA alone. Using the base-case values and a cost premium for BPCA over the conventional CT agent (cost of BPCA ≈ 5× that of a conventional agent) showed that CTA with a BPCA before ICA resulted in the most cost-effective strategy; the other strategies were ruled out by simple dominance. The model strongly depends on the rates of complications from the diagnostic tests included in the model. In a population with an elevated risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN), a significant premium cost per BPCA dose still resulted in the alternative whereby CTA using BPCA was more cost-effective than CTA using a conventional agent. A similar effect was observed for potential complications resulting from the BPCA injection. Conversely, in the presence of a similar complication rate from BPCA, the diagnostic strategy of CTA using a conventional agent would be the optimal alternative. BPCAs could have a significant impact in the diagnosis of acute chest pain, in particular for populations with high incidences of CIN. In addition, a BPCA strategy could garner further savings if currently excluded phenomena including renal disease

  12. Phase analysis of gated blood pool SPECT for multiple stress testing assessments of ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in a tachycardia-induced dilated cardiomyopathy canine model.

    PubMed

    Salimian, Samaneh; Thibault, Bernard; Finnerty, Vincent; Grégoire, Jean; Harel, François

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induced dyssynchrony has been shown to be independently correlated with clinical outcomes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and narrow QRS complexes. However, the extent to which stress levels affect inter- and intraventricular dyssynchrony parameters remains unknown. Ten large dogs were submitted to tachycardia-induced DCM by pacing the right ventricular apex for 3-4 weeks to reach a target ejection fraction (EF) of 35% or less. Stress was then induced in DCM dogs by administering intravenous dobutamine up to a maximum of 20 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1). Hemodynamic and ventricular dyssynchrony data were analyzed by left ventricular (LV) pressure measurements and gated blood pool SPECT (GBPS) imaging. In order to assess mechanical dyssynchrony in DCM subjects and compare it with that of 8 normal counterparts, we extracted the following data: count-based indices of LV contraction homogeneity index (CHI), entropy and phase standard deviation, and interventricular dyssynchrony index. A significant LV intraventricular dyssynchrony (CHI: 96.4 ± 1.3% in control vs 78.6% ± 10.9% in DCM subjects) resulted in an intense LV dysfunction in DCM subjects (EF: 49.5% ± 8.4% in control vs 22.6% ± 6.0% in DCM), compared to control subjects. However, interventricular dyssynchrony did not vary significantly between the two groups. Under stress, DCM subjects showed a significant improvement in ventricular functional parameters at each level (EF: 22.6% ± 6.0% at rest vs 48.1% ± 5.8% at maximum stress). All intraventricular dyssynchrony indices showed a significant increase in magnitude of synchrony from baseline to stress levels of greater than or equal to 5 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1) dobutamine. There were individual differences in the magnitude and pattern of change in interventricular dyssynchrony during the various levels of stress. Based on GBPS analyses, different levels of functional stress, even in close intervals, can have a significant impact on

  13. Perioperative optimal blood pressure as determined by ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy and its association with postoperative acute kidney injury in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Hori, Daijiro; Hogue, Charles; Adachi, Hideo; Max, Laura; Price, Joel; Sciortino, Christopher; Zehr, Kenton; Conte, John; Cameron, Duke; Mandal, Kaushik

    2016-04-01

    Perioperative blood pressure management by targeting individualized optimal blood pressure, determined by cerebral blood flow autoregulation monitoring, may ensure sufficient renal perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the optimal blood pressure for individual patients, determined during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and during early postoperative period in intensive care unit (ICU). A secondary aim was to examine if excursions below optimal blood pressure in the ICU are associated with risk of cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI). One hundred and ten patients undergoing cardiac surgery had cerebral blood flow monitored with a novel technology using ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy (UT-NIRS) during CPB and in the first 3 h after surgery in the ICU. The correlation flow index (CFx) was calculated as a moving, linear correlation coefficient between cerebral flow index measured using UT-NIRS and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Optimal blood pressure was defined as the MAP with the lowest CFx. Changes in optimal blood pressure in the perioperative period were observed and the association of blood pressure excursions (magnitude and duration) below the optimal blood pressure [area under the curve (AUC) < OptMAP mmHgxh] with incidence of CSA-AKI (defined using Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria) was examined. Optimal blood pressure during early ICU stay and CPB was correlated (r = 0.46, P < 0.0001), but was significantly higher in the ICU compared with during CPB (75 ± 8.7 vs 71 ± 10.3 mmHg, P = 0.0002). Thirty patients (27.3%) developed CSA-AKI within 48 h after the surgery. AUC < OptMAP was associated with CSA-AKI during CPB [median, 13.27 mmHgxh, interquartile range (IQR), 4.63-20.14 vs median, 6.05 mmHgxh, IQR 3.03-12.40, P = 0.008], and in the ICU (13.72 mmHgxh, IQR 5.09-25.54 vs 5.65 mmHgxh, IQR 1.71-13.07, P = 0.022). Optimal blood pressure during CPB and in the ICU was correlated. Excursions

  14. Perioperative optimal blood pressure as determined by ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy and its association with postoperative acute kidney injury in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Daijiro; Hogue, Charles; Adachi, Hideo; Max, Laura; Price, Joel; Sciortino, Christopher; Zehr, Kenton; Conte, John; Cameron, Duke; Mandal, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Perioperative blood pressure management by targeting individualized optimal blood pressure, determined by cerebral blood flow autoregulation monitoring, may ensure sufficient renal perfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the optimal blood pressure for individual patients, determined during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and during early postoperative period in intensive care unit (ICU). A secondary aim was to examine if excursions below optimal blood pressure in the ICU are associated with risk of cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI). METHODS One hundred and ten patients undergoing cardiac surgery had cerebral blood flow monitored with a novel technology using ultrasound tagged near infrared spectroscopy (UT-NIRS) during CPB and in the first 3 h after surgery in the ICU. The correlation flow index (CFx) was calculated as a moving, linear correlation coefficient between cerebral flow index measured using UT-NIRS and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Optimal blood pressure was defined as the MAP with the lowest CFx. Changes in optimal blood pressure in the perioperative period were observed and the association of blood pressure excursions (magnitude and duration) below the optimal blood pressure [area under the curve (AUC) < OptMAP mmHgxh] with incidence of CSA-AKI (defined using Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria) was examined. RESULTS Optimal blood pressure during early ICU stay and CPB was correlated (r = 0.46, P < 0.0001), but was significantly higher in the ICU compared with during CPB (75 ± 8.7 vs 71 ± 10.3 mmHg, P = 0.0002). Thirty patients (27.3%) developed CSA-AKI within 48 h after the surgery. AUC < OptMAP was associated with CSA-AKI during CPB [median, 13.27 mmHgxh, interquartile range (IQR), 4.63–20.14 vs median, 6.05 mmHgxh, IQR 3.03–12.40, P = 0.008], and in the ICU (13.72 mmHgxh, IQR 5.09–25.54 vs 5.65 mmHgxh, IQR 1.71–13.07, P = 0.022). CONCLUSIONS Optimal blood pressure during

  15. Organizational Contributors to the Variation in Red Blood Cell Transfusion Practices in Cardiac Surgery: Survey Results From the State of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Camaj, Anton; Zahuranec, Darin B; Paone, Gaetano; Benedetti, Barbara R; Behr, Warren D; Zimmerman, Marc A; Zhang, Min; Kramer, Robert S; Penn, Jason; Theurer, Patricia F; Paugh, Theron A; Engoren, Milo; DeLucia, Alphonse; Prager, Richard L; Likosky, Donald S

    2017-09-01

    While large volumes of red blood cell transfusions are given to preserve life for cardiac surgical patients, indications for lower volume transfusions (1-2 units) are less well understood. We evaluated the relationship between center-level organizational blood management practices and center-level variability in low volume transfusion rates. All 33 nonfederal, Michigan cardiac surgical programs were surveyed about their blood management practices for isolated, nonemergent coronary bypass procedures, including: (1) presence and structure of a patient blood management program, (2) policies and procedures, and (3) audit and feedback practices. Practices were compared across low (N = 14, rate: 0.8%-10.1%) and high (N = 18, rate: 11.0%-26.3%) transfusion rate centers. Thirty-two (97.0%) of 33 institutions participated in this study. No statistical differences in organizational practices were identified between low- and high-rate groups, including: (1) the membership composition of patient blood management programs among those reporting having a blood management committee (P= .27-1.0), (2) the presence of available red blood cell units within the operating room (4 of 14 low-rate versus 2 of 18 high-rate centers report that they store no units per surgical case, P= .36), and (3) the frequency of internal benchmarking reporting about blood management audit and feedback practices (low rate: 8 of 14 versus high rate: 9 of 18; P= .43). We did not identify meaningful differences in organizational practices between low- and high-rate intraoperative transfusion centers. While a larger sample size may have been able to identify differences in organizational practices, efforts to reduce variation in 1- to 2-unit, intraoperative transfusions may benefit from evaluating other determinants, including organizational culture and provider transfusion practices.

  16. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  17. A pilot assessment of alpha-stat vs pH-stat arterial blood gas analysis after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Glenn M; Suzuki, Satoshi; Lluch, Cristina; Schneider, Antoine G; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2015-02-01

    Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) patients typically receive therapeutic hypothermia, but arterial blood gases (ABGs) are often assessed after adjustment to 37°C (alpha-stat) instead of actual body temperature (pH-stat). We sought to compare alpha-stat and pH-stat assessment of PaO2 and PaCO2 in such patients. Using ABG data obtained during the first 24 hours of intensive care unit admission, we determined the impact of measured alpha vs calculated pH-stat on PaO2 and PaCO2 on patient classification and outcomes for CA patients. We assessed 1013 ABGs from 120 CA patients with a median age of patients 66 years (interquartile range, 50-76). Median alpha-stat PaO2 changed from 122 (95-156) to 107 (82-143) mm Hg with pH-stat and median PaCO2 from 39 (34-46) to 35 (30-41) mm Hg (both P < .001). Using the categories of hyperoxemia, normoxemia, and hypoxemia, pH-stat estimation of PaO2 reclassified approximately 20% of patients. Using the categories of hypercapnia, normocapnia, and hypocapnia, pH stat estimation of PaCO2 reclassified approximately 40% of patients. The mortality of patients in different PaO2 and PaCO2 categories was similar for pH-stat and alpha-stat. Using the pH-stat method, fewer resuscitated CA patients admitted to intensive care unit were classified as hyperoxemic or hypercapnic compared with alpha-stat. These findings suggest an impact of ABG assessment methodology on PaO2, PaCO2 , and patient classification but not on associated outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radial artery applanation tonometry for continuous noninvasive arterial blood pressure monitoring in the cardiac intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Langwieser, Nicolas; Prechtl, Luisa; Meidert, Agnes S; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Bradaric, Christian; Ibrahim, Tareq; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Schmid, Roland M; Wagner, Julia Y; Saugel, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring plays a pivotal role in the treatment of patients in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU). The innovative radial artery applanation tonometry technology allows for continuous noninvasive arterial blood pressure (AP) measurement. By closing the gap between continuous invasive AP monitoring (arterial catheter) and intermittent noninvasive AP monitoring (oscillometry) this technology might improve CICU patient monitoring. We therefore aimed to evaluate the measurement performance of radial artery applanation tonometry in comparison with a radial arterial catheter in CICU patients. In this prospective method comparison study, we simultaneously recorded AP noninvasively with radial artery applanation tonometry (T-line 200 pro device; Tensys Medical Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) and invasively with an arterial catheter (criterion standard) in 30 patients treated in the CICU of a German university hospital. We statistically analyzed 7,304 averaged 10-beat epochs of measurements of mean AP, systolic AP, and diastolic AP by using Bland-Altman analysis for repeated measurements. Our study revealed a mean difference ± standard deviation (95% limits of agreement; percentage error) between radial artery applanation tonometry and the criterion standard method (radial arterial catheter) of +2 ± 6 mmHg (-10 to +14 mmHg; 17%) for mean AP, -6 ± 11 mmHg (-28 to +15 mmHg; 20%) for systolic AP, and +4 ± 7 mmHg (-9 to +17 mmHg; 23%) for diastolic AP. In CICU patients, continuous noninvasive measurement of AP using radial artery applanation tonometry is feasible. The technology showed reasonable accuracy and precision in comparison with radial arterial catheter-derived AP values.

  19. [Cardiac arrhythmias in hypertensive subjects with and without left ventricular hypertrophy compared to the circadian profile of the blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Novo, S; Barbagallo, M; Abrignani, M G; Alaimo, G; Longo, B; Corrao, S; Nardi, E; Liquori, M; Forte, G; Raineri, A

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate possible correlations between cardiac arrhythmias and circadian pattern of blood pressure (BP) and of heart rate (HR), we studied 2 groups of 20 males with stable arterial hypertension of mild to moderate entity, with (Group I) or without (Group II) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). In patients with LVH the mean age (56 vs 46 years), the duration of the hypertensive state (48.1 vs 15.7 months), the thickening of interventricular septum (IVS; 13.7 vs 9.6 mm) and of the posterior wall of the left ventricle (13.2 vs 9.2 mm) and the mass of LV (149.8 vs 99.7 g/m2) were significantly greater (p less than 0.01). On the contrary, the 2 groups did not show significant differences concerning casual BP determined in the morning (178.3/108.4 vs 171.5/106.2 mmHg). After a pharmacological washout of 2 weeks, patients underwent a noninvasive, intermittent, monitoring of BP (every 15 min during daytime and every 30 min from 11 pm to 7 am), using a pressure meter II Del Mar Avionics, and a continuous monitoring of ECG for 24 hours, employing an instrument 445/B Del Mar Avionics. Mean 24-hour BP was not different in the 2 groups of patients (161.7/99.0 vs 158.2/98.3 mmHg); however, patients with LVH showed a significantly greater variability of BP in the morning (7 am-3 pm), while mean 24-hour HR was significantly less (71.6 vs 78.2 b/min).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Characterized by “Double Trouble” Higher Pulse Pressure plus Night-Time Systolic Blood Pressure and More Severe Cardiac Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fedecostante, Massimiliano; Spannella, Francesco; Cola, Giovanna; Espinosa, Emma; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension plays a key role in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but CKD itself affects the blood pressure (BP) profile. The aim of this study was to assess the association of BP profile with CKD and the presence of cardiac organ damage. Methods We studied 1805 patients, referred to our Hypertension Centre, in whom ABPM, blood tests, and echocardiography were clinically indicated. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR) using the MDRD equation and CKD was defined as eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Cardiac organ damage was evaluated by echocardiography. Results Among patients with CKD there were higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) during the night-time, greater prevalence of non-dippers (OR: 1.8) and increased pulse pressure (PP) during 24-hour period, daytime and night-time (all p<0.001). Patients with CKD had a greater LVM/h2.7 index, and a higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction (all p<0.001). Nocturnal SBP and PP correlated more strongly with cardiac organ damage (p<0.001). Patients with CKD had a greater Treatment Intensity Score (p<0.001) in the absence of a significantly greater BP control. Conclusions CKD patients have an altered night-time pressure profile and higher PP that translate into a more severe cardiac organ damage. In spite of a greater intensity of treatment in most patients with CKD, BP control was similar to patients without CKD. Our findings indicate the need of a better antihypertensive therapy in CKD, better selected drugs, dosages and posology to provide optimal coverage of 24 hours and night-time BP. PMID:24465931

  1. Are lower levels of red blood cell transfusion more cost-effective than liberal levels after cardiac surgery? Findings from the TITRe2 randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, E A; Wordsworth, S; Bargo, D; Pike, K; Rogers, C A; Brierley, R C M; Angelini, G D; Murphy, G J; Reeves, B C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the incremental cost and cost-effectiveness of a restrictive versus a liberal red blood cell transfusion threshold after cardiac surgery. Design A within-trial cost-effectiveness analysis with a 3-month time horizon, based on a multicentre superiority randomised controlled trial from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) and personal social services in the UK. Setting 17 specialist cardiac surgery centres in UK NHS hospitals. Participants 2003 patients aged >16 years undergoing non-emergency cardiac surgery with a postoperative haemoglobin of <9 g/dL. Interventions Restrictive (transfuse if haemoglobin <7.5 g/dL) or liberal (transfuse if haemoglobin <9 g/dL) threshold during hospitalisation after surgery. Main outcome measures Health-related quality of life measured using the EQ-5D-3L to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Results The total costs from surgery up to 3 months were £17 945 and £18 127 in the restrictive and liberal groups (mean difference is −£182, 95% CI −£1108 to £744). The cost difference was largely attributable to the difference in the cost of red blood cells. Mean QALYs to 3 months were 0.18 in both groups (restrictive minus liberal difference is 0.0004, 95% CI −0.0037 to 0.0045). The point estimate for the base-case cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that the restrictive group was slightly more effective and slightly less costly than the liberal group and, therefore, cost-effective. However, there is great uncertainty around these results partly due to the negligible differences in QALYs gained. Conclusions We conclude that there is no clear difference in the cost-effectiveness of restrictive and liberal thresholds for red blood cell transfusion after cardiac surgery. Trial registration number ISRCTN70923932; Results. PMID:27481621

  2. Detraining differentially preserved beneficial effects of exercise on hypertension: effects on blood pressure, cardiac function, brain inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Deepmala; Dange, Rahul B; Vila, Jorge; Otamendi, Arturo J; Francis, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of physical detraining on blood pressure (BP) and cardiac morphology and function in hypertension, and on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (PICs and AIC) and oxidative stress within the brain of hypertensive rats. Hypertension was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by delivering AngiotensinII for 42 days using implanted osmotic minipumps. Rats were randomized into sedentary, trained, and detrained groups. Trained rats underwent moderate-intensity exercise (ExT) for 42 days, whereas, detrained groups underwent 28 days of exercise followed by 14 days of detraining. BP and cardiac function were evaluated by radio-telemetry and echocardiography, respectively. At the end, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was analyzed by Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. ExT in AngII-infused rats caused delayed progression of hypertension, reduced cardiac hypertrophy, and improved diastolic function. These results were associated with significantly reduced PICs, increased AIC (interleukin (IL)-10), and attenuated oxidative stress in the PVN. Detraining did not abolish the exercise-induced attenuation in MAP in hypertensive rats; however, detraining failed to completely preserve exercise-mediated improvement in cardiac hypertrophy and function. Additionally, detraining did not reverse exercise-induced improvement in PICs in the PVN of hypertensive rats; however, the improvements in IL-10 were abolished. These results indicate that although 2 weeks of detraining is not long enough to completely abolish the beneficial effects of regular exercise, continuing cessation of exercise may lead to detrimental effects.

  3. Comparison of the effects of albumin 5%, hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 6%, and Ringer's lactate on blood loss and coagulation after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze, K; Base, E M; Lassnigg, A; Kaider, A; Linke, S; Dworschak, M; Hiesmayr, M J

    2014-02-01

    Infusion of 5% human albumin (HA) and 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) during cardiac surgery expand circulating volume to a greater extent than crystalloids and would be suitable for a restrictive fluid therapy regimen. However, HA and HES may affect blood coagulation and could contribute to increased transfusion requirements. We randomly assigned 240 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery to receive up to 50 ml kg(-1) day(-1) of either HA, HES, or Ringer's lactate (RL) as the main infusion fluid perioperatively. Study solutions were supplied in identical bottles dressed in opaque covers. The primary outcome was chest tube drainage over 24 h. Blood transfusions, thromboelastometry variables, perioperative fluid balance, renal function, mortality, intensive care unit, and hospital stay were also assessed. The median cumulative blood loss was not different between the groups (HA: 835, HES: 700, and RL: 670 ml). However, 35% of RL patients required blood products, compared with 62% (HA) and 64% (HES group; P=0.0003). Significantly, more study solution had to be administered in the RL group compared with the colloid groups. Total perioperative fluid balance was least positive in the HA group [6.2 (2.5) litre] compared with the HES [7.4 (3.0) litre] and RL [8.3 (2.8) litre] groups (P<0.0001). Both colloids affected clot formation and clot strength and caused slight increases in serum creatinine. Despite equal blood loss from chest drains, both colloids interfered with blood coagulation and produced greater haemodilution, which was associated with more transfusion of blood products compared with crystalloid use only.

  4. Comprehensive blood conservation program in a new congenital cardiac surgical program allows bloodless surgery for the Jehovah Witness and a reduction for all patients.

    PubMed

    Olshove, Vincent; Berndsen, Nicole; Sivarajan, Veena; Nawathe, Pooja; Phillips, Alistair

    2017-10-01

    Cardiac surgery on Jehovah's Witnesses (JW) can be challenging, given the desire to avoid blood products. Establishment of a blood conservation program involving the pre-, intra- and post-operative stages for all patients may lead to a minimized need for blood transfusion in all patients. Pre-operatively, all JW patients were treated with high dose erythropoietin 500 IU/kg twice a week. JW patients were compared to matching non-JW patients from the congenital cardiac database, two per JW to serve as control. Blood use, ventilation time, bypass time, pre-operative hematocrit, first in intensive care unit (ICU) and at discharge and 24 hour chest drainage were compared. Pre-operative huddle, operating room huddle and post-operative bedside handoff were done with the congenital cardiac surgeon, perfusionist, anesthesiologist and intensive care team in all patients for goal alignment. Five JW patients (mean weight 24.4 ± 25.0 Kg, range 6.3 - 60 Kg) were compared to 10 non-JW patients (weight 22.0 ± 22.8 Kg, range 6.2 - 67.8 Kg). There was no difference in bypass, cross-clamp, time to extubation (0.8 vs. 2.1 hours), peak inotrope score (2.0 vs. 2.3) or chest drainage. No JW patient received a blood product compared to 40% of non-JW. The pre-operative hematocrit (Hct) was statistically greater for the JW patients (46.1 ± 3.3% vs. 36.3 ± 4.7%, p<0.001) and both ICU and discharge Hct were higher for the JW (37 ± 1.8% vs 32.4 ± 8.0% and 41 ± 8.1% vs 34.8 ± 7.9%), but did not reach statistical significance. All patients had similar blood draws during the hospitalization (JW x 18 mL/admission vs non-JW 20 mL/admission). The continuous application and development of blood conservation techniques across the continuum of care allowed bloodless surgery for JW and non-JW patients alike. Blood conservation is a team sport and to make significant strides requires participation and input by all care providers.

  5. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac rehabilitation... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes...

  6. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac rehabilitation... prescribed exercise, cardiac risk factor modification, psychosocial assessment, and outcomes...

  7. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  8. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  9. Regulation of central blood volume and cardiac filling in endurance athletes: the Frank-Starling mechanism as a determinant of orthostatic tolerance.

    PubMed

    Levine, B D

    1993-06-01

    Orthostatic intolerance may result from either an abnormally large postural decrease in central blood volume, cardiac filling pressures, and stroke volume, or inadequate neurohumoral responses to orthostasis. Endurance athletes have been reported as having a high incidence of orthostatic intolerance, which has been attributed primarily to abnormalities in baroreflex regulation of heart rate and peripheral resistance. In this review, we present evidence that athletes also have structural changes in the cardiovascular system that although beneficial during exercise, lead to an excessively large decrease in stroke volume during orthostasis and contribute to orthostatic intolerance. A unifying hypothesis based on cardiac mechanics that may explain the divergence of findings in conditions such as bed rest or spaceflight, and short- and long-term endurance training is presented.

  10. Electromagnetic Interference in a Private Swimming Pool

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Sandia; Lavu, Madhav; Atoui, Moustapha; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2016-01-01

    Although current lead design and filtering capabilities have greatly improved, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) from environmental sources has been increasingly reported in patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device (CIED) [1]. Few cases of inappropriate intracardiac Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) associated with swimming pool has been described [2]. Here we present a case of 64 year old male who presented with an interesting EMI signal that was subsequently identified to be related to AC current leak in his swimming pool. PMID:27479205

  11. The effect of lidocaine on regional blood flows and cardiac output in the non-stressed and the stressed foetal lamb.

    PubMed

    Friesen, C; Yarnell, R; Bachman, C; Meatheral, R; Biehl, D

    1986-03-01

    Lidocaine has been used in obstetrical anaesthesia for many years but there are still concerns about possible adverse affects of this drug on the foetus in utero. To examine in greater detail the effects of lidocaine in the foetus, the following two-part study was done. In Part A, seven pregnant ewes were surgically prepared with maternal and foetal arterial and venous catheters. After recovery from surgery lidocaine was infused intravenously, initially into the ewe and then into both ewe and foetus. Blood lidocaine concentrations were monitored and foetal regional blood flows were determined by the radioactive microsphere method. In Part B, 14 ewes were prepared as in Part A with the addition of an inflatable loop around the umbilical cord. During each study the loop was inflated to partially compress the cord and produce foetal acidosis. In all animals this cord compression was maintained for 30 minutes. In seven animals a lidocaine infusion was given, to examine the effect of lidocaine in the acidotic foetus. Organ blood flows were measured and cardiac outputs calculated. The normal foetuses in Part A showed no change in organ blood flow or cardiac output with arterial lidocaine concentrations of 1.5-3.4 mg X ml-1. In the acidotic foetuses, lidocaine concentrations of 1.4-1.5 mg X ml-1 produced a tachycardia and an increase in cerebral blood flow compared to the control acidotic foetuses. There were no other significant changes. We conclude that arterial lidocaine concentrations of less than 3.5 mg X ml-1 do not produce significant alterations in organ blood flow in normal foetal lambs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Cannon, P.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references.

  13. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... that die or are lost from the body. White Blood Cells White blood cells (WBCs, and also ... of severe pain. previous continue Diseases of the White Blood Cells Neutropenia (pronounced: new-truh-PEE-nee- ...

  14. Deletion of interleukin-6 prevents cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and dysfunction without affecting blood pressure in angiotensin II-high salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    González, Germán E.; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; D’ambrosio, Martin A.; Nakagawa, Pablo; Liu, Yunhe; Leung, Pablo; Dai, Xiangguo; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Peterson, Edward L.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inflammation has been proposed as a key component in the development of hypertension and cardiac remodeling associated with different cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in the chronic stage of hypertension is not well defined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that deletion of interleukin-6 protects against the development of hypertension, cardiac inflammation, fibrosis, remodeling and dysfunction induced by high salt diet and angiotensin II (Ang II). Methods Male C57BL/6J and interleukin-6-knock out (KO) mice were implanted with telemetry devices for blood pressure (BP) measurements, fed a 4% NaCl diet, and infused with either vehicle or Ang II (90 ng/min per mouse subcutaneously) for 8 weeks. We studied BP and cardiac function by echocardiography at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Results Myocyte cross-sectional area (MCSA), macrophage infiltration, and myocardial fibrosis were also assessed. BP increased similarly in both strains when treated with Ang II and high salt (Ang II-high salt); however, C57BL/6J mice developed a more severe decrease in left ventricle ejection fraction, fibrosis, and macrophage infiltration compared with interleukin-6-KO mice. No differences between strains were observed in MCSA, capillary density and MCSA to capillary density ratio. Conclusion In conclusion, absence of interleukin -6 did not alter the development of Ang II-high salt-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but it prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction, myocardial inflammation, and fibrosis. This indicates that interleukin-6 plays an important role in hypertensive heart damage but not in the development of hypertension. PMID:25304471

  15. Deletion of interleukin-6 prevents cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and dysfunction without affecting blood pressure in angiotensin II-high salt-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    González, Germán E; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; D'Ambrosio, Martin A; Nakagawa, Pablo; Liu, Yunhe; Leung, Pablo; Dai, Xiangguo; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has been proposed as a key component in the development of hypertension and cardiac remodeling associated with different cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in the chronic stage of hypertension is not well defined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that deletion of interleukin-6 protects against the development of hypertension, cardiac inflammation, fibrosis, remodeling and dysfunction induced by high salt diet and angiotensin II (Ang II). Male C57BL/6J and interleukin-6-knock out (KO) mice were implanted with telemetry devices for blood pressure (BP) measurements, fed a 4% NaCl diet, and infused with either vehicle or Ang II (90 ng/min per mouse subcutaneously) for 8 weeks. We studied BP and cardiac function by echocardiography at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Myocyte cross-sectional area (MCSA), macrophage infiltration, and myocardial fibrosis were also assessed. BP increased similarly in both strains when treated with Ang II and high salt (Ang II-high salt); however, C57BL/6J mice developed a more severe decrease in left ventricle ejection fraction, fibrosis, and macrophage infiltration compared with interleukin-6-KO mice. No differences between strains were observed in MCSA, capillary density and MCSA to capillary density ratio. In conclusion, absence of interleukin -6 did not alter the development of Ang II-high salt-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but it prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction, myocardial inflammation, and fibrosis. This indicates that interleukin-6 plays an important role in hypertensive heart damage but not in the development of hypertension.

  16. Oesophageal Doppler guided optimization of cardiac output does not increase visceral microvascular blood flow in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Heinink, Thomas P; Read, David J; Mitchell, William K; Bhalla, Ashish; Lund, Jonathan N; Phillips, Bethan E; Williams, John P

    2017-02-06

    Oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM) is used clinically to optimize cardiac output (CO) and guide fluid therapy. Despite limited experimental evidence, it is assumed that increasing CO increases visceral microvascular blood flow (MBF). We used contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to assess whether ODM-guided optimization of CO altered MBF. Sixteen healthy male volunteers (62 ± 3·4 years) were studied. Baseline measurements of CO were recorded via ODM. Hepatic and renal MBF was assessed via CEUS. Saline 0·9% was administered to optimize CO according to a standard protocol and repeat CEUS performed. Time-intensity curves were constructed, allowing organ perfusion calculation via time to 5% perfusion (TT5). MBF was assessed via organ perfusion rise time (RT) (5-95%). CO increased (4535 ± 241 ml/min versus 5442 ± 329 ml/min, P<0·0001) following fluid administration, whilst time to renal (22·48 ± 1·19 s versus 20·79 ± 1·31 s; P = 0·03), but not hepatic (28·13 ± 4·48 s versus 26·83 ± 1·53 s; P = 0·15) perfusion decreased. Time to renal perfusion was related to CO (renal: r = -0·43, P = 0·01). Hepatic nor renal RT altered following fluid administration (renal: 9·03 ± 0·86 versus 8·93 ± 0·85 s P = 0·86; hepatic: 27·86 ± 1·60 s versus 30·71 ± 2·19 s, P = 0·13). No relationship was observed between changes in CO and MBF in either organ (renal: r = -0·17, P = 0·54; hepatic: r = -0·07, P = 0·80). ODM-optimized CO reduces time to renal perfusion but does not alter renal or hepatic MBF. A lack of relationship between microvascular visceral perfusion and CO following ODM-guided optimization may explain the absence of improved clinical outcome with ODM monitoring. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. High intensity interval training (HIIT) improves resting blood pressure, metabolic (MET) capacity and heart rate reserve without compromising cardiac function in sedentary aging men.

    PubMed

    Grace, Fergal; Herbert, Peter; Elliott, Adrian D; Richards, Jo; Beaumont, Alexander; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F

    2017-05-13

    This study examined a programme of pre-conditioning exercise with subsequent high intensity interval training (HIIT) on blood pressure, echocardiography, cardiac strain mechanics and maximal metabolic (MET) capacity in sedentary (SED) aging men compared with age matched masters athletes (LEX). Using a STROBE compliant observational design, 39 aging male participants (SED; n=22, aged 62.7±5.2yrs) (LEX; n=17, aged=61.1±5.4yrs) were recruited to a study that necessitated three distinct assessment phases; enrolment (Phase A), following pre-conditioning exercise in SED (Phase B), then following 6weeks of HIIT performed once every five days by both groups before reassessment (Phase C). Hemodynamic, echocardiographic and cardiac strain mechanics were obtained at rest and maximal cardiorespiratory and chronotropic responses were obtained at each measurement phase. The training intervention improved systolic, mean arterial blood pressure, rate pressure product and heart rate reserve (each P<0.05) in SED and increased MET capacity in both SED and LEX (P<0.01) which was amplified by HIIT. Echocardiography and cardiac strain measures were unremarkable apart from trivial increase to intra-ventricular septum diastole (IVSd) (P<0.05) and decrease to left ventricular internal dimension diastole (LVId) (P<0.05) in LEX following HIIT. A programme of preconditioning exercise with HIIT induces clinically relevant improvements in blood pressure, rate pressure product and encourages recovery of heart rate reserve in SED, while improving maximal MET capacity in both SED and LEX without inducing any pathological cardiovascular remodeling. These data add to the emerging repute of HIIT as a safe and promising exercise prescription to improve cardiovascular function and metabolic capacity in sedentary aging. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... dying from a second SCA. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here About Cardiac Arrest (American Heart ... Society) What Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Latest News How Devices in Public Places ...

  19. Effect of Fibrinogen Concentrate on Intraoperative Blood Loss Among Patients With Intraoperative Bleeding During High-Risk Cardiac Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bilecen, Süleyman; de Groot, Joris A H; Kalkman, Cor J; Spanjersberg, Alexander J; Brandon Bravo Bruinsma, George J; Moons, Karel G M; Nierich, Arno P

    2017-02-21

    Fibrinogen concentrate might partly restore coagulation defects and reduce intraoperative bleeding. To determine whether fibrinogen concentrate infusion dosed to achieve a plasma fibrinogen level of 2.5 g/L in high-risk cardiac surgery patients with intraoperative bleeding reduces intraoperative blood loss. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial conducted in Isala Zwolle, the Netherlands (February 2011-January 2015), involving patients undergoing elective, high-risk cardiac surgery (ie, combined coronary artery bypass graft [CABG] surgery and valve repair or replacement surgery, the replacement of multiple valves, aortic root reconstruction, or reconstruction of the ascending aorta or aortic arch) with intraoperative bleeding (blood volume between 60 and 250 mL suctioned from the thoracic cavity in a period of 5 minutes) were randomized to receive either fibrinogen concentrate or placebo. Intravenous, single-dose administration of fibrinogen concentrate (n = 60) or placebo (n = 60), targeted to achieve a postinfusion plasma fibrinogen level of 2.5 g/L. The primary outcome was blood loss in milliliters between intervention (ie, after removal of cardiopulmonary bypass) and closure of chest. Safety variables (within 30 days) included: in-hospital mortality, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident or transient ischemic attack, renal insufficiency or failure, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, and operative complications. Among 120 patients (mean age; 71 [SD, 10] years, 37 women [31%]) included in the study, combined CABG and valve repair or replacement surgery comprised 72% of procedures and had a mean (SD) cardiopulmonary bypass time of 200 minutes (83) minutes. For the primary outcome, median blood loss in the fibrinogen group was 50 mL (interquartile range [IQR], 29-100 mL) compared with 70 mL (IQR, 33-145 mL) in the control group (P = .19), the absolute difference 20 mL (95% CI, -13 to 35 mL). There were 6 cases

  20. Efficacy of intraoperative cell salvage in decreasing perioperative blood transfusion rates in first-time cardiac surgery patients: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Claudia L.; Yip, Alexandra M.; MacLeod, Jeffrey B.; O’Reilly, Bill; Murray, Joshua; Ouzounian, Maral; Brown, Craig D.; Forgie, Rand; Pelletier, Marc P.; Hassan, Ansar

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of intraoperative cell salvage (ICS) in transfusion reduction during cardiac surgery remains conflicting. We sought to evaluate the impact of routine ICS on outcomes following cardiac surgery. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent nonemergent, first-time cardiac surgery 18 months before and 18 months after the implementation of routine ICS. Perioperative transfusion rates, postoperative bleeding, clinical and hematological outcomes, and overall cost were examined. We used multivariable logistic regression modelling to determine the risk-adjusted effect of ICS on likelihood of perioperative transfusion. Results A total of 389 patients formed the final study population (186 undergoing ICS and 203 controls). Patients undergoing ICS had significantly lower perioperative transfusion rates of packed red blood cells (pRBCs; 33.9% v. 45.3% p = 0.021), coagulation products (16.7% v. 32.5% p < 0.001) and any blood product (38.2% v. 52.7%, p = 0.004). Patients receiving ICS had decreased mediastinal drainage at 12 h (mean 320 [range 230–550] mL v. mean 400 [range 260–690] mL, p = 0.011) and increased postoperative hemoglobin (mean 104.7 ± 13.2 g/L v. 95.0 ± 11.9 g/L, p < 0.001). Following adjustment for other baseline and intraoperative covariates, ICS emerged as an independent predictor of lower perioperative transfusion rates of pRBCs (odds ratio [OR] 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.31–0.87), coagulation products (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.24–0.71) and any blood product (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.29–0.77). Additionally, ICS was associated with a cost benefit of $116 per patient. Conclusion Intraoperative cell salvage could represent a clinically cost-effective way of reducing transfusion rates in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Further research on systematic ICS is required before recommending it for routine use. PMID:27668331

  1. Are lower levels of red blood cell transfusion more cost-effective than liberal levels after cardiac surgery? Findings from the TITRe2 randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stokes, E A; Wordsworth, S; Bargo, D; Pike, K; Rogers, C A; Brierley, R C M; Angelini, G D; Murphy, G J; Reeves, B C

    2016-08-01

    To assess the incremental cost and cost-effectiveness of a restrictive versus a liberal red blood cell transfusion threshold after cardiac surgery. A within-trial cost-effectiveness analysis with a 3-month time horizon, based on a multicentre superiority randomised controlled trial from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) and personal social services in the UK. 17 specialist cardiac surgery centres in UK NHS hospitals. 2003 patients aged >16 years undergoing non-emergency cardiac surgery with a postoperative haemoglobin of <9 g/dL. Restrictive (transfuse if haemoglobin <7.5 g/dL) or liberal (transfuse if haemoglobin <9 g/dL) threshold during hospitalisation after surgery. Health-related quality of life measured using the EQ-5D-3L to calculate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The total costs from surgery up to 3 months were £17 945 and £18 127 in the restrictive and liberal groups (mean difference is -£182, 95% CI -£1108 to £744). The cost difference was largely attributable to the difference in the cost of red blood cells. Mean QALYs to 3 months were 0.18 in both groups (restrictive minus liberal difference is 0.0004, 95% CI -0.0037 to 0.0045). The point estimate for the base-case cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that the restrictive group was slightly more effective and slightly less costly than the liberal group and, therefore, cost-effective. However, there is great uncertainty around these results partly due to the negligible differences in QALYs gained. We conclude that there is no clear difference in the cost-effectiveness of restrictive and liberal thresholds for red blood cell transfusion after cardiac surgery. ISRCTN70923932; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Effect of increased cardiac output on liver blood flow, oxygen exchange and metabolic rate during longterm endotoxin-induced shock in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Šantak, Borislav; Radermacher, Peter; Adler, Jens; Iber, Thomas; Rieger, Karen M; Wachter, Ulrich; Vogt, Josef; Georgieff, Michael; Träger, Karl

    1998-01-01

    We investigated hepatic blood flow, O2 exchange and metabolism in porcine endotoxic shock (Control, n=8; Endotoxin, n=10) with administration of hydroxyethylstarch to maintain arterial pressure (MAP)>60 mmHg. Before and 12, 18 and 24 h after starting continuous i.v. endotoxin we measured portal venous and hepatic arterial blood flow, intracapillary haemoglobin O2 saturation (Hb-O2%) of the liver surface and arterial, portal and hepatic venous lactate, pyruvate, glyercol and alanine concentrations. Glucose production rate was derived from the plasma isotope enrichment during infusion of [6,6-2H2]-glucose. Despite a sustained 50% increase in cardiac output endotoxin caused a progressive, significant fall in MAP. Liver blood flow significantly increased, but endotoxin affected neither hepatic O2 delivery and uptake nor mean intracapillary Hb-O2% and Hb-O2% frequency distributions. Endotoxin nearly doubled endogenous glucose production rate while hepatic lactate, alanine and glycerol uptake rates progressively decreased significantly. The lactate uptake rate even became negative (P<0.05 vs Control). Endotoxin caused portal and hepatic venous pH to fall significantly concomitant with significantly increased arterial, portal and hepatic venous lactate/pyruvate ratios. During endotoxic shock increased cardiac output achieved by colloid infusion maintained elevated liver blood flow and thereby macro- and microcirculatory O2 supply. Glucose production rate nearly doubled with complete dissociation of hepatic uptake of glucogenic precursors and glucose release. Despite well-preserved capillary oxygenation increased lactate/pyruvate ratios reflecting impaired cytosolic redox state suggested deranged liver energy balance, possibly due to the O2 requirements of gluconeogenesis. PMID:9756385

  3. Nucleated Red Blood Cells as Predictors of All-Cause Mortality in Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Júnior, José Gildo de Moura; Torres, Dilênia de Oliveira Cipriano; da Silva, Maria Cleide Freire Clementino; Ramos, Tadzia Maria de Brito; Alves, Marilene Leite; Filho, Wellington Jorge Nunes; Damasceno, Edgar Paulo; Brunet, Antônio Fernandes; Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer; Pedrosa, Rodrigo Pinto; Filho, Dário Celestino Sobral

    2015-01-01

    Background The presence of nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) in the peripheral blood of critically ill patients is associated with a poorer prognosis, though data on cardiovascular critical care patients is lacking. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of NRBCs as a predictor of intensive care unit (ICU) and in hospital all-cause mortality among cardiologic patients. Methods NRBCs were measured daily in consecutive cardiac ICU patients, including individuals with both coronary and non-coronary acute cardiac care. We excluded patients younger than 18 years, with cancer or hematological disease, on glucocorticoid therapy, those that were readmitted after hospital discharge and patients who died in the first 24 hours after admission. We performed a multiple logistic analysis to identify independent predictors of mortality. Results We included 152 patients (60.6 ± 16.8 years, 51.8% female, median ICU stay of 7 [4–11] days). The prevalence of NRBCs was 54.6% (83/152). The presence of NRBC was associated with a higher ICU mortality (49.4% vs 21.7%, P<0.001) as well as in-hospital mortality (61.4% vs 33.3%, p = 0.001). NRBC were equally associated with mortality among coronary disease (64.71% vs 32.5% [OR 3.80; 95%CI: 1.45–10.0; p = 0.007]) and non-coronary disease patients (61.45% vs 33.3% [OR 3.19; 95%CI: 1.63–6.21; p<0.001]). In a multivariable model, the inclusion of NRBC to the APACHE II score resulted in a significant improvement in the discrimination (p = 0.01). Conclusions NRBC are predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality in patients admitted to a cardiac ICU. This predictive value is independent and complementary to the well validated APACHE II score. PMID:26713613

  4. Relation of blood pressure and all-cause mortality in 180,000 Japanese participants: pooled analysis of 13 cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshitaka; Hozawa, Atsushi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2008-06-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of death because of cardiovascular disease and predominantly affects total mortality. To reduce avoidable deaths from hypertension, we need to collect blood pressure data and assess their impact on total mortality. To examine this issue, a meta-analysis of 13 cohort studies was conducted in Japan. Poisson regression was used for estimating all-cause mortality rates and ratios. In the model, blood pressure data were treated as continuous (10-mm Hg increase) and categorical (every 10 mm Hg) according to recommendations of the Seventh Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of Hypertension. Potential confounders included body mass index, smoking, drinking, and cohort. The impact of hypertension was measured by the population-attributable fraction. After excluding participants with cardiovascular disease history, 176 389 participants were examined in the analysis. Adjusted mortality rates became larger as the blood pressure increased, and these were more distinct in younger men and women. Hazard ratios also showed the same trends, and these trends were more apparent in younger men (hazard ratio [unit: 10-mm Hg increase] aged 40 to 49 years: systolic blood pressure 1.37 (range: 1.15 to 1.62); diastolic blood pressure 1.46 [range: 1.05 to 2.03]) than older ones (hazard ratio: aged 80 to 89 years: systolic blood pressure 1.09 [range: 1.05 to 1.13]and diastolic blood pressure 1.12 [range: 1.03 to 1.22]). Population-attributable fraction of hypertension was approximately 20% when the normal category was used as a reference level and was 10% when we included the prehypertension group in the reference level. In conclusion, high blood pressure raised the risk of total mortality, and this trend was higher in the younger Japanese population.

  5. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  6. Inverse Relationship of Blood Pressure to Long-Term Outcomes and Benefit of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Patients With Mild Heart Failure: A Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Long-Term Follow-Up Substudy.

    PubMed

    Biton, Yitschak; Moss, Arthur J; Kutyifa, Valentina; Mathias, Andrew; Sherazi, Saadia; Zareba, Wojciech; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Barsheshet, Alon; Brown, Mary W; Goldenberg, Ilan

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that low blood pressure is associated with increased mortality and heart failure (HF) in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) was shown to increase systolic blood pressure (SBP). Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with CRT would provide incremental benefit in patients with lower SBP values. The independent contribution of SBP to outcome was analyzed in 1267 patients with left bundle brunch block enrolled in Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial With Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (MADIT-CRT). SBP was assessed as continuous measures and further categorized into approximate quintiles. The risk of long-term HF or death and CRT with defibrillator versus implantable cardioverter defibrillator benefit was assessed in multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models. Multivariate analysis showed that in the implantable cardioverter defibrillator arm, each 10-mm Hg decrement of SBP was independently associated with a significant 21% (P<0.001) increased risk for HF or death, and patients with lower quintile SBP (<110 mm Hg) experienced a corresponding >2-fold risk-increase. CRT with defibrillator provided the greatest HF or mortality risk reduction in patients with SBP<110 mm Hg hazard ratio of 0.34, P<0.001, when compared with hazard ratio of 0.52, P<0.001, in those with 110>SBP≥136 mm Hg and hazard ratio of 0.94, P=0.808, with SBP>136 mm Hg (P for trend=0.001). In patients with mild HF, prolonged QRS, and left bundle brunch block, low SBP is related to higher risk of mortality or HF with implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy alone. Treatment with CRT is associated with incremental clinical benefits in patients with lower baseline SBP values. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00180271. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. First Autologous Cell Therapy of Cerebral Palsy Caused by Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Damage in a Child after Cardiac Arrest—Individual Treatment with Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, A.; Hamelmann, E.

    2013-01-01

    Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75 × 10e8 mononuclear cells) intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy) was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy's motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words). This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage. PMID:23762741

  8. First autologous cell therapy of cerebral palsy caused by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in a child after cardiac arrest-individual treatment with cord blood.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A; Hamelmann, E

    2013-01-01

    Each year, thousands of children incur brain damage that results in lifelong sequelae. Therefore, based on experimental evidence, we explored the therapeutic potential of human cord blood, known to contain stem cells, to examine the functional neuroregeneration in a child with cerebral palsy after cardiac arrest. The boy, whose cord blood was stored at birth, was 2.5 years old and normally developed when global ischemic brain damage occurred resulting in a persistent vegetative state. Nine weeks later, he received autologous cord blood (91.7 mL, cryopreserved, 5.75 × 10e8 mononuclear cells) intravenously. Active rehabilitation (physio- and ergotherapy) was provided daily, follow-up at 2, 5, 12, 24, 30, and 40 months. At 2-months follow-up the boy's motor control improved, spastic paresis was largely reduced, and eyesight was recovered, as did the electroencephalogram. He smiled when played with, was able to sit and to speak simple words. At 40 months, independent eating, walking in gait trainer, crawling, and moving from prone position to free sitting were possible, and there was significantly improved receptive and expressive speech competence (four-word sentences, 200 words). This remarkable functional neuroregeneration is difficult to explain by intense active rehabilitation alone and suggests that autologous cord blood transplantation may be an additional and causative treatment of pediatric cerebral palsy after brain damage.

  9. Selectively engaging β-arrestins at the angiotensin II type 1 receptor reduces blood pressure and increases cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; DeWire, Scott M; Yamashita, Dennis; Rominger, David H; Nguyen, Lisa; Schiller, Kevin; Whalen, Erin J; Gowen, Maxine; Lark, Michael W

    2010-12-01

    Biased G protein-coupled receptor ligands engage subsets of the receptor signals normally stimulated by unbiased agonists. However, it is unclear whether ligand bias can elicit differentiated pharmacology in vivo. Here, we describe the discovery of a potent, selective β-arrestin biased ligand of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. TRV120027 (Sar-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-D-Ala-OH) competitively antagonizes angiotensin II-stimulated G protein signaling, but stimulates β-arrestin recruitment and activates several kinase pathways, including p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Src, and endothelial nitric-oxide synthase phosphorylation via β-arrestin coupling. Consistent with β-arrestin efficacy, and unlike unbiased antagonists, TRV120027 increased cardiomyocyte contractility in vitro. In rats, TRV120027 reduced mean arterial pressure, as did the unbiased antagonists losartan and telmisartan. However, unlike the unbiased antagonists, which decreased cardiac performance, TRV120027 increased cardiac performance and preserved cardiac stroke volume. These striking differences in vivo between unbiased and β-arrestin biased ligands validate the use of biased ligands to selectively target specific receptor functions in drug discovery.

  10. Disturbance in venous outflow from the cerebral circulation intensifies the release of blood-brain barrier injury biomarkers in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Czajkowski, Marek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Stadnik, Adam; Olszewski, Krysztof; Rybojad, Beata; Dabrowski, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    Disturbances in venous outflow from the cerebral circulation may result in brain injury. Severe increases in brain venous pressure lead to brain ischemia and, subsequently, brain edema and intracranial hemorrhages. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of changes in jugular venous bulb pressure (JVBP) on plasma blood brain-barrier biomarkers concentration and disturbances in arteriovenous total and ionized magnesium (a-vtMg and a-viMg) in brain circulation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Prospective observational study. Department of Cardiac Surgery at a Medical University Hospital. Ninety-two adult patients undergoing elective CABG with CPB under general anaesthesia were studied. Central venous pressure (CVP) was measured using a pulmonary artery catheter. The right jugular vein was cannulized retrogradely for jugular venous bulb pressure (JVBP) measurement. Concentrations of plasma S100β protein, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), creatine kinase isoenzyme BB (CK-BB) a-vtMg and a-viMg were measured as the markers of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. All of them were analyzed in comparison with JVBP during surgery and the early postoperative period. Elevated JVBP was noted after CPB and after surgery. Its increase above 12 mmHg intensified release of S100β, MMP-9 and CK-BB as well as disorders in a-vtMg and a-viMg. CVP correlated with JVBP, S100β, and MMP-9. Moreover, JVBP correlated with S100β and MMP-9. Cardiac surgery increased JVBP, and JVBP elevated above 12 mmHg intensified an increase in biomarkers of plasma blood-brain barrier disruption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of ultraviolet-B-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusions and peritransplant immunosuppression with cyclosporine on rat cardiac allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Lau, H.T.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that pretreatment of ACI recipients with ultraviolet-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion (UV-DST) leads to permanent cardiac allograft survival without further host immunosuppression (ACI rats are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes in mixed-lymphocyte reaction). This study examines the effect of UV-DST and the timing of transfusions on ACI cardiac allograft survival in Lewis recipients with and without the addition of peritransplant cyclosporine (CsA) (20 mg/kg i.m.) given on days 0, +1, and +2 in relation to the time of transplantation. The mean survival time (MST) of ACI cardiac allografts in Lewis recipients was significantly increased to 33.6 +/- 5.7 days (P less than 0.001) by CsA treatment alone as compared to 6.5 +/- 0.5 days survival in control. When DST was given on day -3 combined with CsA, graft survival was increased to 42.0 +/- 9.3 days (P less than 0.01), as compared to 5.8 +/- 1.3 days when DST alone was used. When DST was irradiated with ultraviolet B (UV-DST) and administered on day -3 combined with peritransplant CsA, the MST was increased to 68.83 +/- 16.1 days as compared to an MST of 10.0 +/- 1.0 days in controls treated with UV-DST alone. When UV-DST was given on day -7 and combined with peritransplant CsA immunosuppression, the results were similar. However, when UV-DST was peritransplant CsA course, 4 of 6 recipients maintained their ACI heart allografts indefinitely (greater than 300 days) in contrast to the effect of UV-DST alone (MST of 13.5 days). Third-party (W/F) UV-irradiated blood transfusions were ineffective in prolonging ACI cardiac allografts in Lewis rats, regardless of whether the transfusions were given alone or in combination with peritransplant immunosuppression with CsA.

  12. T2-weighted cardiac MR assessment of the myocardial area-at-risk and salvage area in acute reperfused myocardial infarction: comparison of state-of-the-art dark blood and bright blood T2-weighted sequences.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Magalie; Mewton, Nathan; Thuny, Franck; Guehring, Jens; O'Donnell, Thomas; Stemmer, Alto; Bi, Xiaoming; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Revel, Didier; Croisille, Pierre

    2012-02-01

    To compare different state-of-the-art T2-weighted (T2w) imaging sequences combined with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) for myocardial salvage area (MSA) assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). T2w imaging has been used to assess the myocardial area at risk (AAR) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but its clinical application is challenging due to technical and physical limitations. Thirty patients with reperfused AMI underwent complete CMR imaging 2-5 days after hospital admission. Myocardial AAR and MSA were quantified on four different T2w sequences: (a) free-breathing T2-prepared single-shot balanced steady-state free precession (T2p_ssbSSFP); (b) breathhold T2-weighted acquisition for cardiac unified T2 edema (ACUTE); (c) breathhold T2w dark-blood inversion recovery turbo-spin echo (IR-TSE) (short-term inversion recovery: STIR); and (d) free-breathing high-resolution T2 dark-blood navigated BLADE. The diagnostic performance of each technique was also assessed. Quantitative analysis showed significant differences in myocardial AAR extent as quantified by the four T2w sequences (P < 0.05). There were also significant differences in sensitivity, specificity and overall diagnostic performance. Detection and quantification of AAR, and thus of MSA, by T2wCMR in reperfused AMI patients varied significantly between different T2w sequences in the same clinical setting. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Detection of rejection of canine orthotopic cardiac allografts with indium-111 lymphocytes and gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, H.J.; Rosenbloom, M.; Laschinger, J.C.; Saffitz, J.E.; Cox, J.L.; Sobel, B.E.; Bolman, R.M. III; Bergmann, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting canine heterotopic cardiac allograft rejection scintigraphically after administration of 111In lymphocytes. To determine whether the approach is capable of detecting rejection in orthotopic cardiac transplants in which labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool may reduce sensitivity, the present study was performed in which canine orthotopic cardiac transplants were evaluated in vivo. Immunosuppression was maintained with cyclosporine A (10-20 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for 2 wk after transplantation. Subsequently, therapy was tapered. Five successful allografts were evaluated scintigraphically every 3 days after administration of 100-350 microCi 111In autologous lymphocytes. Correction for labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool, but not actively sequestered in the allografts was accomplished by administering 3-6 mCi 99mTc autologous erythrocytes and employing a previously validated blood-pool activity correction technique. Cardiac infiltration of labeled lymphocytes was quantified as percent indium excess (%IE), scintigraphically detectable 111In in the transplant compared with that in blood, and results were compared with those of concomitantly performed endomyocardial biopsy. Scintigraphic %IE for hearts not undergoing rejection manifest histologically was 0.7 +/- 0.4. Percent IE for rejecting hearts was 6.8 +/- 4.0 (p less than 0.05). Scintigraphy detected each episode of rejection detected by biopsy. Scintigraphic criteria for rejection (%IE greater than 2 s.d. above normal) were not manifest in any study in which biopsies did not show rejection. Since scintigraphic results with 111In-labeled lymphocytes were concordant with biopsy results in orthotopic cardiac transplants, noninvasive detection of graft rejection in patients should be attainable with the approach developed.

  14. Primary hemochromatosis: anatomic and physiologic characteristics of the cardiac ventricles and their response to phlebotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Dabestani, A.; Child, J.S.; Henze, E.; Perloff, J.K.; Schon, H.; Figueroa, W.G.; Schelbert, H.R.; Thessomboon, S.

    1984-07-01

    M-mode and 2-dimensional echocardiography and gated equilibrium blood pool imaging (rest and exercise) were used in 10 patients with primary hemochromatosis to characterize the spectrum of pathophysiologic abnormalities of the cardiac ventricles and to determine the response to chronic therapeutic phlebotomy. Dilated and restrictive cardiomyopathic patterns were identified in 1 patient each, but our data do not permit conclusions on when in the natural history a given pattern becomes overt. On entry into study, 3 patients had normal ventricles and 7 had ventricular abnormalities on echocardiography and blood pool angiography. In 2 of the latter patients, biventricular dysfunction and increased left ventricular (LV) mass normalized after phlebotomy; 1 patient achieved a normal LV response to exercise. Of the 4 patients with isolated abnormal LV ejection fraction responses to exercise, the EF normalized in 2 after phlebotomy. In 1 patient, isolated right ventricular enlargement and dysfunction (echocardiographic and radionuclide imaging) normalized after phlebotomy. Thus, primary hemochromatosis can effect LV and RV size and function; clinically occult cardiac involvement can be identified by echocardiography and equilibrium blood pool imaging; therapeutic phlebotomy can ameliorate or reverse the deleterious effects of excess cardiac iron deposition which appears to exert its harm, at least in part, by a mechanism other than irreversible connective tissue replacement.

  15. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac responses to phobia-relevant and disgust-specific emotion provocation in blood-injection-injury phobia with and without fainting history.

    PubMed

    Simon, Erica; Meuret, Alicia E; Ritz, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    The autonomic regulation in blood-injection-injury (BII) phobia has received particular attention due to the unique link between fear and fainting in this anxiety disorder. However, systematic exploration of sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity during exposure to phobia-relevant emotional stimuli has remained rare and inconclusive, including with regard to disgust, a frequent response to BII stimuli. Existing studies using respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) as a noninvasive index of parasympathetic cardiac activity also have not accounted sufficiently for effects of respiration. We compared 60 participants with BII phobia (27 with and 33 without history of loss of consciousness) and 20 healthy controls during emotion induction with films, including a disgust and a BII-relevant surgery film. Cardiorespiratory activity was measured continuously, with RSA (controlled for respiration) and T-wave amplitude (TWA; as a noninvasive index of sympathetic cardiac activity) extracted. Significant increases in RSA during the surgery film were observed for participants with a history of loss of consciousness compared to others, but controlling for respiration eliminated these differences. Sympathetic effects with heart rate accelerations, which were most pronounced for the disgust film, did not differentiate groups. However, substantial increases in RSA and TWA, suggesting parasympathetic excitation and sympathetic withdrawal, were observed in five participants that became presyncopal during the surgery film. Thus, parasympathetic excitation and sympathetic withdrawal appear to be cardinal autonomic features in BII phobia, but larger studies of participants reaching presyncopal states in BII-relevant stimulus exposure are needed to consolidate these findings. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  16. Activation of angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis in the brain lowers blood pressure and attenuates cardiac remodeling in hypertensive transgenic (mRen2)27 rats.

    PubMed

    Kangussu, Lucas M; Guimaraes, Priscila S; Nadu, Ana Paula; Melo, Marcos B; Santos, Robson A S; Campagnole-Santos, Maria Jose

    2015-10-01

    Activation of the peripheral angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas axis of the renin-angiotensin system produces important cardioprotective actions, counterbalancing the deleterious actions of an overactivity of Ang II/AT1 axis. In the present study we evaluated whether the chronic increase in Ang-(1-7) levels in the brain could ameliorate cardiac disorders observed in transgenic (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats through actions on Mas receptor. Sprague Dawley (SD) and transgenic (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats, instrumented with telemetry probe for arterial pressure (AP) measurement were subjected to 14 days of ICV infusion of Ang-(1-7) (200 ng/h) or Ang-(1-7) associated with Mas receptor antagonist (A779, 1 μg/h) or 0.9% sterile saline (0.5 μl/h) through osmotic mini-pumps. Ang-(1-7) infusion in (mRen2)27 rats reduced blood pressure, normalized the baroreflex control of HR, restored cardiac autonomic balance, reduced cardiac hypertrophy and pre-fibrotic alterations and decreased the altered imbalance of Ang II/Ang-(1-7) in the heart. In addition, there was an attenuation of the increased levels of atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide, collagen I, fibronectin and TGF-β in the heart of (mRen2)27 rats. Furthermore, most of these effects were mediated in the brain by Mas receptor, since were blocked by its selective antagonist, A779. These data indicate that increasing Ang-(1-7) levels in the brain can attenuate cardiovascular disorders observed in (mRen2)27 hypertensive rats, probably by improving the autonomic balance to the heart due to centrally-mediated actions on Mas receptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Safety and feasibility for pediatric cardiac regeneration using epicardial delivery of autologous umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells established in a porcine model system.

    PubMed

    Cantero Peral, Susana; Burkhart, Harold M; Oommen, Saji; Yamada, Satsuki; Nyberg, Scott L; Li, Xing; O'Leary, Patrick W; Terzic, Andre; Cannon, Bryan C; Nelson, Timothy J

    2015-02-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) requiring surgical palliation mandate new treatment strategies to optimize long-term outcomes. Despite the mounting evidence of cardiac regeneration, there are no long-term safety studies of autologous cell-based transplantation in the pediatric setting. We aimed to establish a porcine pipeline to evaluate the feasibility and long-term safety of autologous umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCB-MNCs) transplanted into the right ventricle (RV) of juvenile porcine hearts. Piglets were born by caesarean section to enable UCB collection. Upon meeting release criteria, 12 animals were randomized in a double-blinded fashion prior to surgical delivery of test article (n=6) or placebo (n=6). The UCB-MNC (3×10(6) cells per kilogram) or control (dimethyl sulfoxide, 10%) products were injected intramyocardially into the RV under direct visualization. The cohorts were monitored for 3 months after product delivery with assessments of cardiac performance, rhythm, and serial cardiac biochemical markers, followed by terminal necropsy. No mortalities were associated with intramyocardial delivery of UCB-MNCs or placebo. Two animals from the placebo group developed local skin infection after surgery that responded to antibiotic treatment. Electrophysiological assessments revealed no arrhythmias in either group throughout the 3-month study. Two animals in the cell-therapy group had transient, subclinical dysrhythmia in the perioperative period, likely because of an exaggerated response to anesthesia. Overall, this study demonstrated that autologous UCB-MNCs can be safely collected and surgically delivered in a pediatric setting. The safety profile establishes the foundation for cell-based therapy directed at the RV of juvenile hearts and aims to accelerate cell-based therapies toward clinical trials for CHD. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Safety and Feasibility for Pediatric Cardiac Regeneration Using Epicardial Delivery of Autologous Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mononuclear Cells Established in a Porcine Model System

    PubMed Central

    Cantero Peral, Susana; Burkhart, Harold M.; Oommen, Saji; Yamada, Satsuki; Nyberg, Scott L.; Li, Xing; O’Leary, Patrick W.; Terzic, Andre; Cannon, Bryan C.; Edgerton, Sarah L.; Suddendorf, Scott H.; Krage, Steve; Rice, Mindy; Rysavy, Joseph A.; Powers, Joanna M.; Rasmussen, Boyd W.; Miller, Jennifer M.; Paulson, Traci L.; Lindquist, Rebecca K.; Reece, Chelsea L.; Miller, Angela R.; Padley, Douglas J.; Wentworth, Mark A.; Greene, Alexander C.; Andrews, Amy G.; O’Leary, Patrick W.; Olson, Timothy M.; Terzic, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases (CHDs) requiring surgical palliation mandate new treatment strategies to optimize long-term outcomes. Despite the mounting evidence of cardiac regeneration, there are no long-term safety studies of autologous cell-based transplantation in the pediatric setting. We aimed to establish a porcine pipeline to evaluate the feasibility and long-term safety of autologous umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCB-MNCs) transplanted into the right ventricle (RV) of juvenile porcine hearts. Piglets were born by caesarean section to enable UCB collection. Upon meeting release criteria, 12 animals were randomized in a double-blinded fashion prior to surgical delivery of test article (n = 6) or placebo (n = 6). The UCB-MNC (3 × 106 cells per kilogram) or control (dimethyl sulfoxide, 10%) products were injected intramyocardially into the RV under direct visualization. The cohorts were monitored for 3 months after product delivery with assessments of cardiac performance, rhythm, and serial cardiac biochemical markers, followed by terminal necropsy. No mortalities were associated with intramyocardial delivery of UCB-MNCs or placebo. Two animals from the placebo group developed local skin infection after surgery that responded to antibiotic treatment. Electrophysiological assessments revealed no arrhythmias in either group throughout the 3-month study. Two animals in the cell-therapy group had transient, subclinical dysrhythmia in the perioperative period, likely because of an exaggerated response to anesthesia. Overall, this study demonstrated that autologous UCB-MNCs can be safely collected and surgically delivered in a pediatric setting. The safety profile establishes the foundation for cell-based therapy directed at the RV of juvenile hearts and aims to accelerate cell-based therapies toward clinical trials for CHD. PMID:25561683

  19. Low thyroid function leads to cardiac atrophy with chamber dilatation, impaired myocardial blood flow, loss of arterioles, and severe systolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Da; Kuzman, James A; Said, Suleman; Anderson, Brent E; Wang, Xuejun; Gerdes, A Martin

    2005-11-15

    Although thyroid dysfunction has been linked to heart failure, it is not clear whether hypothyroidism alone can cause heart failure. Hypothyroidism was induced in adult rats by treatment with 0.025% propylthiouracil (PTU) for 6 weeks (PTU-S) and 1 year (PTU-L). Echocardiographic measurements, left ventricular (LV) hemodynamics, isolated myocyte length (KOH method), myocardial blood flow (fluorescent microspheres), arteriolar morphometry, and gene expression (Western blot) were determined. Heart weight, heart rate, LV systolic blood pressure, LV ejection fraction, LV fractional shortening, and systolic wall thickness were reduced in PTU-S and PTU-L rats. LV internal diameter in systole increased by 40% in PTU-S and 86% in PTU-L. LV internal dimension in diastole was increased in PTU-S and PTU-L rats, but only PTU-L rats showed a significant increase in myocyte length due to series sarcomere addition. Resting and maximum (adenosine) myocardial blood flow were reduced in both PTU-S and PTU-L rats. Impaired blood flow was due to a large reduction in arteriolar length density and small arterioles in PTU-S and PTU-L (P<0.05 or greater for all of the above comparisons). Expression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)-2a and alpha-myosin heavy chain were reduced in hypothyroidism, whereas phospholamban and beta-myosin heavy chain were increased. Hypothyroidism led to severe, progressive systolic dysfunction and increased chamber diameter/wall thickness ratio despite a reduction in cardiac mass. Chamber dilatation in PTU-L rats was due to series sarcomere addition, typical of heart failure. Hypothyroidism resulted in impaired myocardial blood flow due to a dramatic loss of arterioles. Thus, we have identified 2 important new mechanisms by which low thyroid function may lead to heart failure.

  20. Brain hyperperfusion during cardiac operations. Cerebral blood flow measured in man by intra-arterial injection of xenon 133: evidence suggestive of intraoperative microembolism

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, L.; Hjelms, E.; Lindeburgh, T.

    1983-08-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by intra-arterial injection of xenon 133 in 29 patients during cardiac operations. Marked changes occurred in all patients. A normal and significant correlation with temperature and plasma pCO/sub 2/ (p less than 0.01) support the reliability of the method. Mean CBF measured between sternotomy and the onset of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was 38 ml/100 gm . min. The first minute of ECC was associated with a decrease in CBF in nine of 12 patients (p less than 0.02). During steady-state hypothermic ECC (temperature 29 degrees C), CBF increased unexpectedly to 64 ml/100 gm . min (p less than 0.01). Following rewarming steady-state normothermic ECC, mean CBF decreased to 42 ml/100 gm . min with signs of impairment of cerebral autoregulation. Ten and 20 minutes after termination of ECC, mean CBF was 40 and 41 ml/100 gm . min, respectively. Arterial PCO2 was found to be important in regulating CBF. The cerebral autoregulation maintained CBF down to arterial pressures of around 55 mm Hg. Below this level, CBF was significantly correlated with perfusion pressure (p less than 0.01). Multiple small emboli with a hyperemic border zone could cause a brain hyperperfusion, as seen in our patients during bypass. Measurements of CBF during ECC hold promise as a guide toward safer cardiac operations.

  1. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid Inhibition by HET0016 Offers Neuroprotection, Decreases Edema, and Increases Cortical Cerebral Blood Flow in a Pediatric Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Jafar Sadik B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Kochanek, Patrick M; Alexander, Henry; Tudorascu, Dana L; Clark, Robert Sb; Manole, Mioara D

    2015-11-01

    Vasoconstrictive and vasodilatory eicosanoids generated after cardiac arrest (CA) may contribute to cerebral vasomotor disturbances and neurodegeneration. We evaluated the balance of vasodilator/vasoconstrictor eicosanoids produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolism, and determined their role on cortical perfusion, functional outcome, and neurodegeneration after pediatric asphyxial CA. Cardiac arrest of 9 and 12 minutes was induced in 16- to 18-day-old rats. At 5 and 120 minutes after CA, we quantified the concentration of CYP eicosanoids in the cortex and subcortical areas. In separate rats, we inhibited 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthesis after CA and assessed cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF), neurologic deficit score, neurodegeneration, and edema. After 9 minutes of CA, vasodilator eicosanoids markedly increased versus sham. Conversely, after 12 minutes of CA, vasoconstrictor eicosanoid 20-HETE increased versus sham, without compensatory increases in vasodilator eicosanoids. Inhibition of 20-HETE synthesis after 12 minutes of CA decreased cortical 20-HETE levels, increased CBF, reduced neurologic deficits at 3 hours, and reduced neurodegeneration and edema at 48 hours versus vehicle-treated rats. In conclusion, cerebral vasoconstrictor eicosanoids increased after a pediatric CA of 12 minutes. Inhibition of 20-HETE synthesis improved cortical perfusion and short-term neurologic outcome. These results suggest that alterations in CYP eicosanoids have a role in cerebral hypoperfusion and neurodegeneration after CA and may represent important therapeutic targets.

  2. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-21

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise

  3. End-expiration Respiratory Gating for a High Resolution Stationary Cardiac SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual-respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or 8 cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p<0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p<0.05) compared to EXG SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on the

  4. End-expiration respiratory gating for a high-resolution stationary cardiac SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chung; Harris, Mark; Le, Max; Biondi, James; Grobshtein, Yariv; Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2014-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions can degrade myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) image quality and reduce defect detection and quantitative accuracy. In this study, we developed a dual respiratory and cardiac gating system for a high-resolution fully stationary cardiac SPECT scanner in order to improve the image quality and defect detection. Respiratory motion was monitored using a compressive sensor pillow connected to a dual respiratory-cardiac gating box, which sends cardiac triggers only during end-expiration phases to the single cardiac trigger input on the SPECT scanners. The listmode data were rebinned retrospectively into end-expiration frames for respiratory motion reduction or eight cardiac gates only during end-expiration phases to compensate for both respiratory and cardiac motions. The proposed method was first validated on a motion phantom in the presence and absence of multiple perfusion defects, and then applied on 11 patient studies with and without perfusion defects. In the normal phantom studies, the end-expiration gated SPECT (EXG-SPECT) reduced respiratory motion blur and increased myocardium to blood pool contrast by 51.2% as compared to the ungated images. The proposed method also yielded an average of 11.2% increase in myocardium to defect contrast as compared to the ungated images in the phantom studies with perfusion defects. In the patient studies, EXG-SPECT significantly improved the myocardium to blood pool contrast (p < 0.005) by 24% on average as compared to the ungated images, and led to improved perfusion uniformity across segments on polar maps for normal patients. For a patient with defect, EXG-SPECT improved the defect contrast and definition. The dual respiratory-cardiac gating further reduced the blurring effect, increased the myocardium to blood pool contrast significantly by 36% (p < 0.05) compared to EXG-SPECT, and further improved defect characteristics and visualization of fine structures at the expense of increased noise on

  5. Congenital heart disease in adults: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of IR FLASH and IR SSFP MRA techniques using a blood pool contrast agent in the steady state and comparison to first pass MRA.

    PubMed

    Febbo, Jennifer A; Galizia, Mauricio S; Murphy, Ian G; Popescu, Andrada; Bi, Xiaoming; Turin, Alexander; Collins, Jeremy; Markl, Michael; Edelman, Robert R; Carr, James C

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate magnetic resonance angiography sequences during the contrast steady-state (SS-MRA) using inversion recovery (IR) with fast low-angle shot (IR-FLASH) or steady-state free precession (IR-SSFP) read-outs, following the injection of a blood-pool contrast agent, and compare them to first-pass MR angiography (FP-MRA) in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Twenty-three adult patients with CHD who underwent both SS-MRA and FP-MRA using a 1.5-T scanner were retrospectively identified. Signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained at eight locations within the aorta and pulmonary vessels.. Image quality and the presence of artifacts were subjectively assessed by two radiologists. The presence of pathology was noted and given a confidence score. There was no difference in vessel dimensions among the sequences. IR-SSFP showed better image quality and fewer artifacts than IR-FLASH and FP-MRA. Confidence scores were significantly higher for SS-MRA compared to FP-MRA. Seven cases (30.4%) had findings detected at SS-MRA that were not detected at FP-MRA, and 2 cases (8.7%) had findings detected by IR-SSFP only. SS-MRA of the thoracic vasculature using a blood pool contrast agent offers superior image quality and reveals more abnormalities compared to standard FP-MRA in adults with CHD, and it is best achieved with an IR-SSFP sequence. These sequences could lead to increased detection rates of abnormalities and provide a simpler protocol image acquisition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Absence of association between whole blood viscosity and delirium after cardiac surgery: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    CheheiliSobbi, Shokoufeh; van den Boogaard, Mark; Slooter, Arjen J C; van Swieten, Henry A; Ceelen, Linda; Pop, Gheorghe; Abdo, Wilson F; Pickkers, Peter

    2016-08-05

    Delirium after cardiothoracic surgery is common and associated with impaired outcomes. Although several mechanisms have been proposed (including changes in cerebral perfusion), the pathophysiology of postoperative delirium remains unclear. Blood viscosity is related to cerebral perfusion and thereby might contribute to the development of delirium after cardiothoracic surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether whole blood viscosity differs between cardiothoracic surgery patients with and without delirium. In this observational study postoperative whole blood viscosity of patients that developed delirium (cases) were compared with non-delirious cardiothoracic surgery patients (controls). Cases were matched with the controls, yielding a 1:4 case-control study. Serial hematocrit, fibrinogen, and whole blood viscosity were determined pre-operatively and at each postoperative day. Delirium was assessed using the validated Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit or Delirium Screening Observation scale. In total 80 cardiothoracic surgery patients were screened of whom 12 delirious and 48 matched non-delirious patients were included. No significant difference was found between both groups in fibrinogen (p = 0.36), hematocrit (p = 0.23) and the area under curve of the whole blood viscosity between shear rates 0.02 and 50 s(-1) (p = 0.80) or between shear rates 0.02 and 5 s(-1) (p = 0.78). In this case control study in cardiothoracic surgery patients changes in whole blood viscosity were not associated with the development of delirium.

  7. Dietary nitrate attenuates oxidative stress, prevents cardiac and renal injuries, and reduces blood pressure in salt-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Carlström, Mattias; Persson, A Erik G; Larsson, Erik; Hezel, Michael; Scheffer, Peter G; Teerlink, Tom; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O

    2011-02-15

    Reduced bioavailability of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) is a central pathophysiological event in hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it was demonstrated that inorganic nitrate from dietary sources is converted in vivo to form nitrite, NO, and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. We tested the hypothesis that dietary inorganic nitrate supplementation may have therapeutic effects in a model of renal and cardiovascular disease. Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to unilateral nephrectomy and chronic high-salt diet from 3 weeks of age developed hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, proteinuria, and histological as well as biochemical signs of renal damage and oxidative stress. Simultaneous nitrate treatment (0.1 or 1 mmol nitrate kg⁻¹ day⁻¹), with the lower dose resembling the nitrate content of a diet rich in vegetables, attenuated hypertension dose-dependently with no signs of tolerance. Nitrate treatment almost completely prevented proteinuria and histological signs of renal injury, and the cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were attenuated. Mechanistically, dietary nitrate restored the tissue levels of bioactive nitrogen oxides and reduced the levels of oxidative stress markers in plasma (malondialdehyde) and urine (Class VI F2-isoprostanes and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine). In addition, the increased circulating and urinary levels of dimethylarginines (ADMA and SDMA) in the hypertensive rats were normalized by nitrate supplementation. Dietary inorganic nitrate is strongly protective in this model of renal and cardiovascular disease. Future studies will reveal if nitrate contributes to the well-known cardioprotective effects of a diet rich in vegetables.

  8. Therapeutic efficacy and safety of red blood cells treated with a chemical process (S-303) for pathogen inactivation: a Phase III clinical trial in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Richard J; McCullough, Jeffrey; Mintz, Paul D; Snyder, Edward; Spotnitz, William D; Rizzo, Robert J; Wages, David; Lin, Jin-Sying; Wood, Lindsey; Corash, Laurence; Conlan, Maureen G

    2005-11-01

    A randomized, double-blind trial is reported of the clinical efficacy of red blood cells (RBCs) treated for pathogen inactivation with S-303, a synthetic labile alkylating agent. Patients undergoing complex cardiac surgeries were randomly assigned to receive either S-303-treated (test) or conventional (control) RBC transfusion during surgery and for 6 days thereafter. Efficacy was evaluated by comparing the occurrence of a composite primary endpoint of treatment-related morbidity (myocardial infarction and renal failure) and mortality. Two-hundred twenty-three patients were randomly assigned and 148 patients who received transfusions (74 with S-303-treated RBCs and 74 with control RBCs) were evaluable. The incidence of the primary endpoint was equivalent between the two groups (22 and 21% in the S-303-treated and control RBC groups, respectively). Secondary endpoints, including hemoglobin increment (mean, 1.4 vs. 1.5 g/dL), number of RBC transfusions (mean, 4.4 vs. 3.8 units), and other blood product support, were also comparable. The adverse event profile was similar between groups; however, patients who received S-303 RBCs were significantly more likely to develop constipation and less likely to suffer supraventricular extrasystoles. Four patients (2 test and 2 control) demonstrated positive indirect antiglobulin tests with reactivity for S-303 RBCs at one or more time points before or after transfusion, without evidence of hemolysis. S-303-treated and conventional RBCs were equivalent with respect to clinical efficacy and safety in supporting the transfusion needs of cardiac surgery patients. Investigations are under way to ascertain the significance of S-303 RBC antibodies and to prevent their occurrence.

  9. Dogs infected with the blood trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi display an increase expression of cytokines and chemokines plus an intense cardiac parasitism during acute infection.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Sheler Martins; Vieira, Paula Melo de Abreu; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Reis, Levi Eduardo Soares; da Silva Fonseca, Kátia; Nogueira, Nívia Carolina; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2014-03-01

    The recent increase in immigration of people from areas endemic for Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) to the United States and Europe has raised concerns about the transmission via blood transfusion and organ transplants in these countries. Infection by these pathways occurs through blood trypomastigotes (BT), and these forms of T. cruzi are completely distinct of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT), released by triatomine vector, in relation to parasite-host interaction. Thus, research comparing infection with these different infective forms is important for explaining the potential impacts on the disease course. Here, we investigated tissue parasitism and relative mRNA expression of cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in the heart during acute infection by MT or BT forms in dogs. BT-infected dogs presented a higher cardiac parasitism, increased relative mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines and of the chemokines CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL5/RANTES, and the chemokine receptor CCR5 during the acute phase of infection, as compared to MT-infected dogs. These results suggest that infection with BT forms may lead to an increased immune response, as revealed by the cytokines ratio, but this kind of immune response was not able to control the cardiac parasitism. Infection with the MT form presented an increase in the relative mRNA expression of IL-12p40 as compared to that of IL-10 or TGF-β1. Correlation analysis showed increased relative mRNA expression of IFN-γ as well as IL-10, which may be an immunomodulatory response, as well as an increase in the correlation of CCL5/RANTES and its CCR5 receptor. Our findings revealed a difference between inoculum sources of T. cruzi, as vectorial or transfusional routes of T. cruzi infection may trigger distinct parasite-host interactions during the acute phase, which may influence immunopathological aspects of Chagas disease.

  10. Storage time of intraoperative transfused allogeneic red blood cells is not associated with new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiwei; Skals, Regitze Kuhr; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan; Bæch, John; Petersen, Mikkel Steen

    2017-01-01

    Background Allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion has been associated with new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) following cardiac surgery. Prolonged storage time of RBC may increase the risk. The primary aim of the study was to evaluate whether the storage time of RBC is associated with development of POAF. Materials and methods Pre-, per- and postoperative data were retrieved from the Western Denmark Heart Registry and local blood banks regarding patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, valve surgery or combined procedures in Aalborg or Aarhus University Hospital during 2010–2014. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the risk of POAF according to transfusion of RBC on the day of surgery. Furthermore, we determined trend in storage time of RBC according to risk of POAF using restricted cubic splines. Patients with a history of preoperative atrial fibrillation, patients who received transfusions preoperative and patients who died at the day of surgery were among excluded patients. Results A total of 2,978 patients with a mean age of 66.4 years were included and 609 patients (21%) received RBC transfusion on the day of surgery. POAF developed in 752 patients (25%) and transfused patients were at an increased risk compared with non-transfused patients (adjusted Odds Ratios for patients receiving RBC: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.11–1.69, P-value = 0.004). However, RBC transfusion was not necessarily the cause of POAF and may only be a marker for development of POAF. There was no significant association between storage time of RBC and POAF. Conclusions In contrast to intraoperative allogeneic RBC transfusion in general, increased storage time of RBC is not associated with development of POAF in cardiac surgery. PMID:28225837

  11. 42 CFR 410.49 - Cardiac rehabilitation program and intensive cardiac rehabilitation program: Conditions of coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... heart-lung transplant. (vii) For cardiac rehabilitation only, other cardiac conditions as specified...) Body mass index. (iv) Systolic blood pressure. (v) Diastolic blood pressure. (vi) The need for cholesterol, blood pressure, and diabetes medications. (3) A list of approved intensive cardiac...

  12. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... spans vary from a few days to months. New cells are constantly being formed in the bone marrow. ... the bloodstream and are constantly being replaced by new cells. Blood also contains important proteins called clotting factors , ...

  13. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates: results of a prospective multicenter study comparing pooled whole blood-derived platelets and apheresis platelets.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Walther-Wenke, Gabriele; Müller, Thomas H; Weinauer, Franz; Younis, Adelheid; Holland-Letz, Tim; Geis, Gabriele; Asmus, Jens; Bauerfeind, Ursula; Burkhart, Jürgen; Deitenbeck, Robert; Förstemann, Elisabeth; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Höchsmann, Britta; Karakassopoulos, Apostolos; Liebscher, Ute-Maja; Sänger, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Schunter, Friedrich; Sireis, Walid; Seifried, Erhard

    2007-04-01

    The GERMS Group initiated a prospective multicenter study to assess prevalence and nature of bacterial contamination of pooled buffy-coat platelet concentrates (PPCs) and apheresis platelet concentrates (APCs) by routine screening with a bacterial culture system. In nine centers overall, 52,243 platelet (PLT) concentrates (15,198 APCs, 37,045 PPCs) were analyzed by aerobic and anaerobic cultures (BacT/ALERT, bioMérieux). In 135 PLT concentrates (PCs; 0.26%), bacteria could be identified in the first culture (0.4% for APCs vs. 0.2% for PPCs; p < 0.001). In 37 (0.07%) of these PC units, the same bacteria strain could be identified in a second culture from the sample bag and/or the PC unit. The rate of confirmed-positive units did not differ significantly between APC (0.09%; 1/1169) and PPC units (0.06%; 1/1544). Bacteria from skin flora (Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis) were the most prevalent contaminants. Median times to first positive culture from start of incubation were 0.7 and 3.7 days in aerobic and anaerobic cultures for confirmed-positive units. With a "negative-to-date" issue strategy, most PC units (55%) had already been issued by time of the first positive culture. The rate of confirmed bacterial contamination of PC units was low. Nevertheless, clinicians must be aware of this risk. The risk of bacterial contamination does not warrant universal preference of APCs. It must be questioned whether routine bacterial screening by a culture method can sufficiently prevent contaminated products from being transfused due to the delay until a positive signal in the culture system and due to false-negative results.

  14. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  15. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  16. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  17. Evaluation of blood pressure reduction response and responder characteristics to fixed-dose combination treatment of amlodipine and losartan: a post hoc analysis of pooled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Unniachan, Sreevalsa; Wu, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Hanson, Mary E; Fujita, Kenji P

    2014-09-01

    Data from four clinical trials compared reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) among patients treated with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs 5/100 mg and amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg and 10 mg. Response rate was assessed as reduction in SBP or DBP (>20/10 mm Hg) and proportion of patients achieving SBP <140 mm Hg or DBP <90 mm Hg. Patients were grouped into quartiles based on baseline SBP and DBP. Mean SBP and DBP were reduced in amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg (n=182) and amlodipine/losartan 5/100 mg (n=95) users across all baseline quartiles. Patients using amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg had significantly greater SBP and DBP reductions vs amlodipine 5 mg (P=.001 and P=.02, respectively). Amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg users had significantly greater SBP reduction vs amlodipine 10 mg (SBP P=.02; DBP P=not significant). The odds of responding to therapy were significantly greater with amlodipine/losartan 5/50 mg vs amlodipine 5 mg (odds ratio, 5.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-25.5) and were similar vs amlodipine 10 mg (odds ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.017-9.51). These results support the use of combination therapy early in the treatment of hypertension.

  18. Characterization of t1 relaxation and blood-myocardial contrast enhancement of NC100150 injection in cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Wagenseil, J E; Johansson, L O; Lorenz, C H

    1999-11-01

    A new ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (Clariscan; NC100150 Injection) was studied in domestic farm pigs. The T1 effects were characterized for blood and myocardium and the blood-myocardial contrast was measured in T1-weighted cine images. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured at baseline and contrast doses of 1 and 5 mg Fe/kg body weight (bw) at end diastole and late systole. The T1 values for