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Sample records for cardiac electrical storm

  1. Successful treatment of cardiac electrical storm in dilated cardiomyopathy using esmolol: A case report.

    PubMed

    Li, L I; Zhou, Yuan-Li; Zhang, Xue-Jing; Wang, Hua-Ting

    2016-07-01

    The present study reports a case of electrical storm occurring in a 43-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy. The patient suffered from a cardiac electrical storm, with 98 episodes of ventricular tachycardia rapidly degenerating to ventricular fibrillation in hospital. The patient was converted with a total of 120 defibrillations. Recurrent ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation was initiated by premature ventricular beats. The patient did not respond to the use of amiodaronum. However, the administration of esmolol stabilized the patient's heart rhythm. A moderate dose of the β-blocker esmolol, administered as an 0.5-mg intravenous bolus injection followed by an infusion at a rate of 0.15 mg/kg/min, inhibited the recurrence of ventricular fibrillation and normalized the electrocardiographic pattern. The results suggest that esmolol may be able to improve the survival rate of patients with electrical storm in dilated cardiomyopathy and should be considered as a primary therapy in the management of cardiac electrical storms.

  2. Electrical storm: definitions, clinical importance, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dongsheng; Sapp, John L

    2013-01-01

    With increasing use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators, physicians are increasingly called upon to manage recurrent ventricular tachycardia, sometimes in the form of frequent recurrences known as electrical storm (or ventricular tachycardia storm). Standard antiarrhythmic drug therapy may suppress storms, but, when refractory, interventions such as catheter ablation or in some cases surgical cardiac denervation may be helpful. Earlier interventional management may confer better outcomes than persisting with antiarrhythmic pharmacologic therapy. The clinical syndrome of electrical storm has been defined empirically. An outcome-derived definition may better guide clinicians on when and how to treat this emergent problem. When available, an early interventional approach is preferred.

  3. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.; Rust, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Successful ground truth support of U-2 overflights was been accomplished. Data have been reduced for 4 June 1984 and some of the results have been integrated into some of MSFC's efforts. Staccato lightning (multiply branched, single stroke flash with no continuing current) is prevalent within the rainfree region around the main storm updraft and this is believed to be important, i.e., staccato flashes might be an important indicator of severe storm electrification. Results from data analysis from two stations appear to indicate that charge center heights can be estimated from a combination of intercept data with data from the fixed laboratory at NSSL. An excellent data base has been provided for determining the sight errors and efficiency of NSSL's LLP system. Cloud structures, observable in a low radar reflectivity region and on a scale smaller than is currently resolved by radar, which appear to be related to electrical activity are studied.

  4. Electrical storms and their prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Awan, Zahid Aslam; ul Hassan, Mahmood; Bangash, Kamran; Shah, Bakhtawar; Noor, Lubna

    2009-01-01

    Prevention of sudden cardiac death has always been a challenge for electrophysiologists and to date, automatic implantable cardiovertor defibrillator (AICD) is found to be the only remedy. This device delivers an intracardiac shock whenever it senses a fatal ventricular arrhythmia in order to achieve sinus rhythm. If the delivery of these intracardiac shocks becomes frequent, the situation is declared as an electrical storm. This article deals with the frequency, precipitating factors and prevention of electrical storms. One hundred and ten episodes of electrical storms (a total of 668 shocks) were retrospectively analysed in 25 recipients of automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators. ECG, echocardiography, serum electrolytes, urea and creatinine were done for all the patients, and they were hospitalized for a minimum of 24 hours. During the 3 year study period, all the 25 patients with an implantable cardiovertor defibrillator, on an average, received one shock per two years. However, 12 out of these 25 patients (50%) had more than two shocks within 24 hours. Most of these patients with electrical storms were having active ischemia, electrolytes imbalances or renal failure. Electrical storms are common in patients with coronary artery disease with impaired left ventricular functions. Ischemia, electrolytes imbalances and renal failure predispose to the electrical storms. Electrical Storms are predictors of poor prognosis.

  5. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Taylor, W.; Arnold, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Severe storms and lightning were measured with a NASA U2 and ground based facilities, both fixed base and mobile. Aspects of this program are reported. The following results are presented: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2. These measurements include flash type identification, electric field changes, optical waveforms, and ground strike location; (2) simultaneous extremely low frequency (ELF) waveforms for cloud to ground (CG) flashes; (3) the CG strike location system (LLP) using a combination of mobile laboratory and television video data are assessed; (4) continued development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques for processing lightning data from the U2, mobile laboratory, and NSSL sensors; (5) completion of an all azimuth TV system for CG ground truth; (6) a preliminary analysis of both IC and CG lightning in a mesocyclone; and (7) the finding of a bimodal peak in altitude lightning activity in some storms in the Great Plains and on the east coast. In the forms on the Great Plains, there was a distinct class of flash what forms the upper mode of the distribution. These flashes are smaller horizontal extent, but occur more frequently than flashes in the lower mode of the distribution.

  6. Cardiac sympathetic denervation in patients with refractory ventricular arrhythmias or electrical storm: intermediate and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vaseghi, Marmar; Gima, Jean; Kanaan, Christopher; Ajijola, Olujimi A; Marmureanu, Alexander; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2014-03-01

    Left and bilateral cardiac sympathetic denervation (CSD) have been shown to reduce burden of ventricular arrhythmias acutely in a small number of patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT) storm. The effects of this procedure beyond the acute setting are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intermediate and long-term effects of left and bilateral CSD in patients with cardiomyopathy and refractory VT or VT storm. Retrospective analysis of medical records for patients who underwent either left or bilateral CSD for VT storm or refractory VT between April 2009 and December 2012 was performed. Forty-one patients underwent CSD (14 left CSD, 27 bilateral CSD). There was a significant reduction in the burden of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks during follow-up compared to the 12 months before the procedure. The number of ICD shocks was reduced from a mean of 19.6 ± 19 preprocedure to 2.3 ± 2.9 postprocedure (P < .001), with 90% of patients experiencing a reduction in ICD shocks. At mean follow-up of 367 ± 251 days postprocedure, survival free of ICD shock was 30% in the left CSD group and 48% in the bilateral CSD group. Shock-free survival was greater in the bilateral group than in the left CSD group (P = .04). In patients with VT storm, bilateral CSD is more beneficial than left CSD. The beneficial effects of bilateral CSD extend beyond the acute postsympathectomy period, with continued freedom from ICD shocks in 48% of patients and a significant reduction in ICD shocks in 90% of patients. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrical storm: Incidence, Prognosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Proietti, Riccardo; Sagone, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Implantable defibrillators are lifesavers and have improved mortality rates in patients at risk of sudden death, both in primary and secondary prevention. However, they are unable to modify the myocardial substrate, which remains susceptible to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Electrical storm is a clinical entity characterized the recurrence of hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia and/or ventricular fibrillation, twice or more in 24 hours, requiring electrical cardioversion or defibrillation. With the arrival of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, this definition was broadened, and electrical storm is now defined as the occurrence of three or more distinct episodes of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation in 24 hours, requiring the intervention of the defibrillator (anti-tachycardia pacing or shock). Clinical presentation can be very dramatic, with multiple defibrillator shocks and hemodynamic instability. Managing its acute presentation is a challenge, and mortality is high both in the acute phase and in the long term. In large clinical trials involving patients implanted with a defibrillator both for primary and secondary prevention, electrical storm appears to be a harbinger of cardiac death, with notably high mortality soon after the event. In most cases, the storm can be interrupted by medical therapy, though transcatheter radiofrequency ablation of ventricular arrhythmias may be an effective treatment for refractory cases. This narrative literature review outlines the main clinical characteristics of electrical storm and emphasises critical points in approaching and managing this peculiar clinical entity. Finally focus is given to studies that consider transcatheter ablation therapy in cases refractory to medical treatment. PMID:21468247

  8. Electrical Storm: Incidence, Prognosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sagone, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The term "electrical storm" indicates a life-threatening clinical condition characterized by the recurrence of hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia and/or ventricular fibrillation, in particular in patients with ICD implanted for primary or secondary prevention. Although there isn't a shared definition of electrical storm, nowadays the most accepted definition refers to three or more separate arrhythmia episodes leading to ICD therapies including antitachycardia pacing or shock occurring over a single 24 hours' time period. Clinical presentation can be dramatic and triggering mechanism are not clear at all yet, but electrical storm is associated with high mortality rates and low patients quality of life, both in the acute phase and in the long term. The first line therapy is based on antiarrhythmic drugs to suppress electrical storm, but in refractory patients, interventions such as catheter ablation or in some cases surgical cardiac sympathetic denervation might be helpful. Anyhow, earlier interventional management can lead to better outcomes than persisting with antiarrhythmic pharmacologic therapy and, when available, an early interventional approach should be preferred.

  9. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    During FY-85, Researchers conducted a field program and analyzed data. The field program incorporated coordinated measurements made with a NASA U2. Results include the following: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2; (2) analysis of dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning mapping data from a supercell storm; (3) analysis of synoptic conditions during three simultaneous storm systems on 13 May 1983 when unusually large numbers of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) flashes occurred; (4) analysis of extremely low frequency (ELF) wave forms; and (5) an assessment of a cloud -ground strike location system using a combination of mobile laboratory and fixed-base TV video data.

  10. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    During FY-85, Researchers conducted a field program and analyzed data. The field program incorporated coordinated measurements made with a NASA U2. Results include the following: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2; (2) analysis of dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning mapping data from a supercell storm; (3) analysis of synoptic conditions during three simultaneous storm systems on 13 May 1983 when unusually large numbers of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) flashes occurred; (4) analysis of extremely low frequency (ELF) wave forms; and (5) an assessment of a cloud -ground strike location system using a combination of mobile laboratory and fixed-base TV video data.

  11. Electrical storm induced by cardiac resynchronization therapy is determined by pacing on epicardial scar and can be successfully managed by catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Roque, Carla; Trevisi, Nicola; Silberbauer, John; Oloriz, Teresa; Mizuno, Hiroya; Baratto, Francesca; Bisceglia, Caterina; Sora, Nicoleta; Marzi, Alessandra; Radinovic, Andrea; Guarracini, Fabrizio; Vergara, Pasquale; Sala, Simone; Paglino, Gabriele; Gulletta, Simone; Mazzone, Patrizio; Cireddu, Manuela; Maccabelli, Giuseppe; Della Bella, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    The mechanism of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)-induced proarrhythmia remains unknown. We postulated that pacing from a left ventricular (LV) lead positioned on epicardial scar can facilitate re-entrant ventricular tachycardia. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CRT-induced proarrhythmia and LV lead location within scar. Twenty-eight epicardial and 63 endocardial maps, obtained from 64 CRT patients undergoing ventricular tachycardia ablation, were analyzed. A positive LV lead/scar relationship, defined as a lead tip positioned on scar/border zone, was determined by overlaying fluoroscopic projections with LV electroanatomical maps. CRT-induced proarrhythmia occurred in 8 patients (12.5%). They all presented early with electrical storm (100% versus 39% of patients with no proarrhythmia; P<0.01), requiring temporary biventricular pacing discontinuation in half of cases. They more frequently presented with heart failure/cardiogenic shock (50% versus 7%; P<0.01), requiring intensive care management. Ventricular tachycardia was re-entrant in all. The LV lead location within epicardial scar was significantly more frequent in the proarrhythmia group (60% versus 9% P=0.03 on epicardial bipolar scar, 80% versus 17% P=0.02 on epicardial unipolar scar, and 80% versus 17% P=0.02 on any-epicardial scar). Ablation was performed within epicardial scar, close to the LV lead, and allowed CRT reactivation in all patients. CRT-induced proarrhythmia presented early with electrical storm and was associated with an LV lead positioning within epicardial scar. Catheter ablation allowed for resumption of biventricular stimulation in all patients. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Synergistic application of cardiac sympathetic decentralization and comprehensive psychiatric treatment in the management of anxiety and electrical storm

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Sahib S.; Shahabi, Leila; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Naliboff, Bruce D.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2014-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, two cases demonstrating a synergistic application of bilateral cardiac sympathetic decentralization and multimodal psychiatric treatment for the assessment and management of anxiety following recurrent Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) shocks. In a first case the combination of bilateral cardiac sympathetic decentralization (BCSD), cognitive behavioral psychotherapy and anxiolytic medication was sufficient to attenuate the patient's symptoms and maladaptive behaviors, with a maintained benefit at 1 year. Among the more prominent subjective changes in the post-lesion state we observed a decrease in aversive interoceptive sensations, particularly of the heartbeat. The patient continued to experience cognitive threat appraisals on a frequent basis, although these were no longer incapacitating. In a second case, we report the effect of BCSD on autonomic tone and subjective state. In the post-lesion state we observed attenuated sympathetic responses to the valsalva maneuver, isometric handgrip and mental arithmetic stressor, including decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and, decreased skin conductance. Collectively, these preliminary findings suggest that an integrative, multidisciplinary approach to treating anxiety disorders in the setting of ventricular arrhythmias and recurrent ICD shocks can result in sustained improvements in physical, psychological, and functional status. These findings raise the possibility of a potential role for the stellate ganglion in the modulation of emotional experience and afferent transmission of interoceptive information to the central nervous system. PMID:24427121

  13. A study of severe storm electricity via storm intercept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Roy T.; Horsburgh, Steven D.; Rust, W. David; Burgess, Don

    1985-01-01

    Storm electricity data, radar data, and visual observations were used both to present a case study for a supercell thunderstorm that occurred in the Texas Panhandle on 19 June 1980 and to search for insight into how lightning to ground might be related to storm dynamics in the updraft/downdraft couplet in supercell storms. It was observed that two-thirds of the lightning ground-strike points in the developing and maturing stages of a supercell thunderstorm occurred within the region surrounding the wall cloud (a cloud feature often characteristic of a supercell updraft) and on the southern flank of the precipitation. Electrical activity in the 19 June 1980 storm was atypical in that it was a right-mover. Lightning to ground reached a peak rate of 18/min and intracloud flashes were as frequent as 176/min in the final stages of the storm's life.

  14. The evaluation and management of electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Eifling, Michael; Razavi, Mehdi; Massumi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Electrical storm is an increasingly common and life-threatening syndrome that is defined by 3 or more sustained episodes of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or appropriate shocks from an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator within 24 hours. The clinical presentation can be dramatic. Electrical storm can manifest itself during acute myocardial infarction and in patients who have structural heart disease, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or an inherited arrhythmic syndrome. The presence or absence of structural heart disease and the electrocardiographic morphology of the presenting arrhythmia can provide important diagnostic clues into the mechanism of electrical storm. Electrical storm typically has a poor outcome.The effective management of electrical storm requires an understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms, therapeutic options, device programming, and indications for radiofrequency catheter ablation. Initial management involves determining and correcting the underlying ischemia, electrolyte imbalances, or other causative factors. Amiodarone and β-blockers, especially propranolol, effectively resolve arrhythmias in most patients. Nonpharmacologic treatment, including radiofrequency ablation, can control electrical storm in drug-refractory patients. Patients who have implantable cardioverter-defibrillators can present with multiple shocks and may require drug therapy and device reprogramming. After the acute phase of electrical storm, the treatment focus should shift toward maximizing heart-failure therapy, performing revascularization, and preventing subsequent ventricular arrhythmias. Herein, we present an organized approach for effectively evaluating and managing electrical storm.

  15. [Electrical storm in patients with prophylactic defibrillator implantation].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; González-Cambeiro, Cristina; Moreno-Arribas, Jose; Expósito-García, Víctor; Sánchez-Gómez, Juan Miguel; González-Torres, Luis; Arce-León, Álvaro; Arguedas-Jiménez, Hugo; Gaztañaga, Larraitz; Salvador-Montañés, Oscar; Iglesias-Bravo, Jose Antonio; Huerta, Ana Andrés La; Fernández-Armenta, Juan; Arias, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Sande, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of electrical storm, baseline characteristics and mortality implications of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator in primary prevention versus those patients without electrical storm. We sought to assess the prevalence, baseline risk profile and survival significance of electrical storm in patients with implantable defibrillator for primary prevention. Retrospective multicenter study performed in 15 Spanish hospitals. Consecutives patients referred for desfibrillator implantation, with or without left ventricular lead (at least those performed in 2010 and 2011), were included. Over all 1,174 patients, 34 (2,9%) presented an electrical storm, mainly due to ventricular tachycardia (82.4%). There were no significant baseline differences between groups, with similar punctuation in the mortality risk scores (SHOCKED, MADIT and FADES). A clear trigger was identified in 47% of the events. During the study period (38±21 months), long-term total mortality (58.8% versus 14.4%, p<0.001) and cardiac mortality (52.9% versus 8.6%, p<0.001) were both increased among electrical storm patients. Rate of inappropriate desfibrillator intervention was also higher (14.7 versus 8.6%, p<0.001). In the present study of patients with desfibrillator implantation for primary prevention, prevalence of electrical storm was 2.9%. There were no baseline differences in the cardiovascular risk profile versus those without electrical storm. However, all cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality was increased in these patients versus control desfibrillator patients without electrical storm, as was the rate of inappropriate desfibrillator intervention. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Left ventricular assist device in the management of refractory electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Pourdjabbar, A; Maze, R; Hibbert, B; Ruel, M; Haddad, H

    2015-05-01

    Electrical storm refers to a state of cardiac electrical instability characterized by multiple episodes of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) within a relatively short period of time and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The management of electrical storm involves a variety of strategies, including sedation, anti-arrhythmic and electrolyte replacement as well as revascularization and electrical ablation. However, the management strategy in patients with refractory storm is less clear and may require more invasive approaches. We present a case of severe ventricular tachycardia storm refractory to conservative management that was managed with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Electrical storm: A clinical and electrophysiological overview

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Sergio; Pala, Salvatore; Biagioli, Viviana; Del Giorno, Giuseppe; Zucchetti, Martina; Russo, Eleonora; Marino, Vittoria; Dello Russo, Antonio; Casella, Michela; Pizzamiglio, Francesca; Catto, Valentina; Tondo, Claudio; Carbucicchio, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Electrical storm (ES) is a clinical condition characterized by three or more ventricular arrhythmia episodes leading to appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapies in a 24 h period. Mostly, arrhythmias responsible of ES are multiple morphologies of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), but polymorphic VT and ventricular fibrillation can also result in ES. Clinical presentation is very dramatic in most cases, strictly related to the cardiac disease that may worsen electrical and hemodynamic decompensation. Therefore ES management is challenging in the majority of cases and a high mortality is the rule both in the acute and in the long-term phases. Different underlying cardiomyopathies provide significant clues into the mechanism of ES, which can arise in the setting of structural arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies or rarely in patients with inherited arrhythmic syndrome, impacting on pharmacological treatment, on ICD programming, and on the opportunity to apply strategies of catheter ablation. This latter has become a pivotal form of treatment due to its high efficacy in modifying the arrhythmogenic substrate and in achieving rhythm stability, aiming at reducing recurrences of ventricular arrhythmia and at improving overall survival. In this review, the most relevant epidemiological and clinical aspects of ES, with regard to the acute and long-term follow-up implications, were evaluated, focusing on these novel therapeutic strategies of treatment. PMID:26413232

  18. Electrical storm: A clinical and electrophysiological overview.

    PubMed

    Conti, Sergio; Pala, Salvatore; Biagioli, Viviana; Del Giorno, Giuseppe; Zucchetti, Martina; Russo, Eleonora; Marino, Vittoria; Dello Russo, Antonio; Casella, Michela; Pizzamiglio, Francesca; Catto, Valentina; Tondo, Claudio; Carbucicchio, Corrado

    2015-09-26

    Electrical storm (ES) is a clinical condition characterized by three or more ventricular arrhythmia episodes leading to appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapies in a 24 h period. Mostly, arrhythmias responsible of ES are multiple morphologies of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), but polymorphic VT and ventricular fibrillation can also result in ES. Clinical presentation is very dramatic in most cases, strictly related to the cardiac disease that may worsen electrical and hemodynamic decompensation. Therefore ES management is challenging in the majority of cases and a high mortality is the rule both in the acute and in the long-term phases. Different underlying cardiomyopathies provide significant clues into the mechanism of ES, which can arise in the setting of structural arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies or rarely in patients with inherited arrhythmic syndrome, impacting on pharmacological treatment, on ICD programming, and on the opportunity to apply strategies of catheter ablation. This latter has become a pivotal form of treatment due to its high efficacy in modifying the arrhythmogenic substrate and in achieving rhythm stability, aiming at reducing recurrences of ventricular arrhythmia and at improving overall survival. In this review, the most relevant epidemiological and clinical aspects of ES, with regard to the acute and long-term follow-up implications, were evaluated, focusing on these novel therapeutic strategies of treatment.

  19. Electric Dust Devils and Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, N. O.; Yana, C.

    2004-12-01

    Electrical fields measurements in terrestrial dust devils show that they maintain tremendous charge separation and that their electric fields exceeds the breakdown potential (~10 kV/m) of the Martian atmosphere (Farrell et al., 2002, 2003; Krauss et al., 2002; Renno et al., 2004). Typical Martian dust devils are be up to 100 times larger and much stronger than the small terrestrial analogues. Martian dust devils have higher dust content and may produce even stronger electrical fields. Indeed, the dust devils observed in the Pathfinder images have about 700 times the dust content of the local background atmosphere (Metzger et al., 1999). Thus, strong charge separations and electric-field breakdown are likely to occur on Martian dust devils and dust storms. Our theory (Renno et al., 2004) and laboratory experiments in a Mars chamber shows that collisions between sand and dust particles produce non-thermal microwave radiation. The non-thermal microwave emission allows not only the indirect detection of electric activity but also the determination of the physical properties of Martian sand and dust by remote sensing. Besides being geologically important, electrically charged Martian dust devils and dust storms are potential hazards to Landers and will be dangerous to future astronauts exploring its surface. Indeed, the design of adequate mechanical and electrical systems for these Landers cannot progress effectively without a better understanding of Martian dust devils and dust storms. Moreover, ancillary phenomena associated with electrically charged vortices can ionize atmospheric gases and might have important implications for atmosphere chemistry and even habitability.

  20. Cervical sympathetic blockade for the management of electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehan; Ciccone, Jeffrey; Tseng, Victor

    2017-02-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with dizziness and fatigue secondary to ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. He underwent an elective ablation but continued to suffer from ventricular tachycardia with cardiovascular instability despite antiarrhythmic therapy with multiple agents. The patient continued to develop episodes of ventricular tachycardia and an episode of ventricular fibrillation. Electrical storm encompasses a situation of cardiac instability which may present as several episodes of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation in a short period. We performed an ultrasound-guided left stellate ganglion block at the bedside which resulted in abolition of electrical storm. The patient demonstrated sinus rhythm with episodes of sinus tachycardia. Left stellate ganglion block has proven to be a successful mode of treatment for those patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmia resistant to medical management or those who fail atrioventricular node ablation. Ultrasound-guided left stellate ganglion block is a valuable and effective means to providing sympathectomy in the management of electrical storm or ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimal antiarrhythmic drug therapy for electrical storm

    PubMed Central

    Sorajja, Dan; Munger, Thomas M.; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Electrical storm, defined as 3 or more separate episodes of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation within 24 hours, carries significant morbidity and mortality. These unstable ventricular arrhythmias have been described with a variety of conditions including ischemic heart disease, structural heart disease, and genetic conditions. While implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation and ablation may be indicated and required, antiarrhythmic medication remains an important adjunctive therapy for these persons. PMID:25745472

  2. Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, W.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms on Mars are predicted to be capable of producing electrostatic fields and discharges, even larger than those in dust storms on Earth. Such electrical activity poses serious risks to any Human exploration of the planet and the lack of sufficient data to characterize any such activity has been identified by NASA's MEPAG as a key human safety knowledge gap. There are three key elements in the characterization of Martian electrostatic discharges: dependence on Martian environmental conditions, frequency of occurrence, and the strength of the generated electric fields. We will describe a proposed program using NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to carry out a long term monitoring campaign to search for and characterize the entire Mars hemisphere for powerful discharges during routine tracking of spacecraft at Mars on an entirely non-interfering basis. The resulting knowledge of Mars electrical activity would allow NASA to plan risk mitigation measures to ensure human safety during Mars exploration. In addition, these measurements will also allow us to place limits on presence of oxidants such as H2O2 that may be produced by such discharges, providing another measurement point for models describing Martian atmospheric chemistry and habitability. Because of the continuous Mars telecommunication needs of NASA's Mars-based assets, the DSN is the only instrument in the world that combines long term, high cadence, observing opportunities with large sensitive telescopes, making it a unique asset worldwide in searching for and characterizing electrostatic activity at Mars from the ground.

  3. Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, W.; Arabshahi, S.; Kocz, J.

    2016-12-01

    Dust storms on Mars are predicted to be capable of producing electrostatic fields and discharges, even larger than those in dust storms on Earth. Such electrical activity poses serious risks to any Human exploration of the planet and the lack of sufficient data to characterize any such activity has been identified by NASA's MEPAG as a key human safety knowledge gap. There are three key elements in the characterization of Martian electrostatic discharges: dependence on Martian environmental conditions, frequency of occurrence, and the strength of the generated electric fields. We will describe a recently deployed detection engine using NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to carry out a long term monitoring campaign to search for and characterize the entire Mars hemisphere for powerful discharges during routine tracking of spacecraft at Mars on an entirely non-interfering basis. The resulting knowledge of Mars electrical activity would allow NASA to plan risk mitigation measures to ensure human safety during Mars exploration. In addition, these measurements will also allow us to place limits on presence of oxidants such as H2O2 that may be produced by such discharges, providing another measurement point for models describing Martian atmospheric chemistry and habitability. Because of the continuous Mars telecommunication needs of NASA's Mars-based assets, the DSN is the only instrument in the world that combines long term, high cadence, observing opportunities with large sensitive telescopes, making it a unique asset worldwide in searching for and characterizing electrostatic activity at Mars from the ground.

  4. Association of time of occurrence of electrical heart storms with environmental physical activity.

    PubMed

    Stoupel, Eliiyahu; Kusniec, Jairo; Golovchiner, Gregory; Abramson, Evgeny; Kadmon, Udi; Strasberg, Boris

    2014-08-01

    Many publications in recent decades have reported a temporal link between medical events and environmental physical activity. The aim of this study was to analyze the time of occurrence of electrical heart storms against levels of cosmological parameters. The sample included 82 patients (71 male) with ischemic cardiomyopathy treated with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator at a tertiary medical center in 1999-2012 (5,114 days). The time of occurrence of all electrical heart storms, defined as three or more events of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation daily, was recorded from the defibrillator devices. Findings were analyzed against data on solar, geomagnetic, and cosmic ray (neutron) activity for the same time period obtained from space institutions in the United States and Russia. Electrical storms occurred in all months of the year, with a slight decrease in July, August, and September. Most events took place on days with lower-than-average levels of solar and geomagnetic activity and higher-than-average levels of cosmic ray (neutron) activity. There was a significant difference in mean daily cosmic ray activity between the whole observation period and the days of electrical storm activity (P = 0.0001). These data extend earlier findings on the association of the timing of cardiac events and space weather parameters to the most dangerous form of cardiac arrhythmia-electric storms. Further studies are needed to delineate the pathogenetic mechanism underlying this association. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Feasibility and safety of catheter ablation of electrical storm in ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dello Russo, Antonio; Casella, Michela; Pelargonio, Gemma; Santangeli, Pasquale; Bartoletti, Stefano; Bencardino, Gianluigi; Al-Mohani, Ghaliah; Innocenti, Ester; Di Biase, Luigi; Avella, Andrea; Pappalardo, Augusto; Carbucicchio, Corrado; Bellocci, Fulvio; Fiorentini, Cesare; Natale, Andrea; Tondo, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    Electrical storm is an emergency in 'implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator' carriers with ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and negatively impacts long-term prognosis. We evaluated the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in controlling electrical storm and its impact on survival and ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation recurrence. We enrolled 27 consecutive patients (25 men, age 73.1 ± 6.5 years) with ischemic DCM and an indication to RFCA for drug-refractory electrical storm. The immediate outcome was defined as failure or success, depending on whether the patient's clinical ventricular tachycardia could still be induced after RFCA; electrical storm resolution was defined as no sustained ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation in the next 7 days. Of the 27 patients, 1 died before RFCA; in the remaining 26 patients, a total of 33 RFCAs were performed. In all 26 patients, RFCA was successful, although in 6/26 patients (23.1%), repeated procedures were needed, including epicardial ablation in 3/26 (11.5%). In 23/26 patients (88.5%), electrical storm resolution was achieved. At a follow-up of 16.7 ± 8.1 months, 5/26 patients (19.2%) had died (3 nonsudden cardiac deaths, 2 noncardiac deaths) and 10/26 patients (38.5%) had ventricular tachycardia recurrence; none had electrical storm recurrence. A worse long-term outcome was associated with lower glomerular filtration rate, wider baseline QRS, and presence of atrial fibrillation before electrical storm onset. In patients with ischemic DCM, RFCA is well tolerated, feasible and effective in the acute management of drug-refractory electrical storm. It is associated with a high rate of absence of sustained ventricular tachycardia episodes over the subsequent 7 days. After successful ablation, long-term outcome was mainly predicted by baseline clinical variables.

  6. Geomagnetic storms: Potential economic impacts on electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1991-03-20

    Geomagnetic storms associated with sunspot and solar flare activity can disturb communications and disrupt electric power. A very severe geomagnetic storm could cause a major blackout with an economic impact of several billion dollars. The vulnerability of electric power systems in the northeast United States will likely increase during the 1990s because of the trend of transmitting large amounts of power over long distance to meet the electricity demands of this region. A comprehensive research program and a warning satellite to monitor the solar wind are needed to enhance the reliability of electric power systems under the influence of geomagnetic storms. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. [Electrical storm: definition, prevalence, causes and prognostic implications].

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Manegold, Johannes C

    2014-06-01

    Electrical storm (ES) represents a state of cardiac electrical instability which manifests by multiple episodes of ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT) within a short time. In patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), ES is best defined as ≥ 3 appropriate VT detections in 24 h, treated by antitachycardia pacing or shock. The number of shocks and inappropriate detections are irrelevant for the definition. Within a period of 3 years ES occurred in approximately 25 % of ICD patients with secondary prophylaxis indications of sudden cardiac death. Although the definition includes minor arrhythmic events, ES frequently consists of up to 50 VTs. Potential triggers found in 20-65 % of patients include new/deteriorated heart failure, diarrhea/hypokalemia, changes in antiarrhythmic medication, association with other illnesses, and psychological stress. In most patients ES consists of monomorphic VT indicating the presence of reentry while ventricular fibrillation indicating acute ischemia is rare. ES seems to have a low immediate mortality (1 %) but frequently (50-80 %) leads to hospitalization. Long-term prognostic implications of ES are unclear. The key intervention in ES is a reduction of the elevated sympathetic tone by beta blockers and also frequently sedation. Amiodarone i.v. is highly efficient in ES while class I antiarrhythmic drugs are usually unsuccessful. Substrate mapping and VT ablation may be useful in treatment and prevention of ES. Prevention of ES requires ICD programming systematically avoiding unnecessary shocks by long VT detection and numerous attempts of antitachycardia pacing before shock therapy which can fuel the sympathetic tone and prolong ES.

  8. Reducing uncertainty - responses for electricity utilities to severe solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Charles Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, electricity utilities in mid- and low-latitude regions believed that solar storms had no (or only insignificant) effect on their power systems. Then it was noticed that the onset of damage in several large transformers, leading to their failure, correlated very closely with the Halloween storm of 2003. Since then engineers have started to appreciate that a very severe storm could have serious consequences outside the high-latitude regions. There are many uncertainties in predicting the effects of solar storms on electrical systems. The severity and time of arrival of a storm are difficult to model; so are the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) expected to flow in the power networks. Published information about the responses of different types of transformers to GICs is contradictory. Measurements of the abnormal power flows in networks during solar storms generally do not take into account the effects of the current distortion and unbalance, potentially giving misleading signals to the operators. The normal requirement for optimum system management, while allowing for the possibility of faults caused by lightning, birds and other causes, limits the capacity of system operators to respond to the threats of GICs, which are not assessed easily by the N - 1 reliability criterion. A utility's response to the threat of damage by GICs depends on the expected frequency and magnitude of solar storms. Approaches to formulating a response are located in a system model incorporating space physics, network analysis, transformer engineering, network reliability and decision support and the benefits are identified. Approaches adopted in high-latitude regions might not be appropriate where fewer storms are expected to reach damaging levels. The risks of an extreme storm cannot be ignored, and understanding the response mechanisms suitable for low-latitude regions has the capacity to inform and reduce the uncertainty for power systems planners and operators

  9. Historically Large Geomagnetic Storms and Potential Electric Power Grid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappenman, J. G.

    2004-05-01

    While recent work has been done to examine the possible Dst Intensity of historically large geomagnetic storms, the impacts caused to modern day electric power grids from these storms occurs due to rapid rate-of-change of regional geomagnetic fields which in most cases are driven by large ionospheric electrojet current intensifications. These temporally and spatially dynamic disturbance morphologies are not well-characterized by Dst or other broad geomagnetic storm indices. For estimates of storm intensity that correctly scale the threat potential to electric power grids, it is necessary to describe the rate-of-change of geomagnetic field. The rate-of-change of the geomagnetic field (dB/dt usually measured in nT/min) creates at ground level a geoelectric field that causes the flow of geomagnetically-induced currents (GIC) through ground connection points in electric power grids. Therefore in general, the larger the dB/dt, the larger the resulting geo-electric field and GIC in exposed power grid infrastructures and the greater the operational impact these induced currents will have on the power grid. Both extensive modeling analysis and recent operational experience suggests that power grids are becoming more vulnerable to geomagnetic storms as they grow in size and complexity. Also, large power grid blackouts have occurred at relatively low geomagnetic storm intensities. For example, the regional disturbance intensity that triggered the Hydro Quebec collapse during the March 13, 1989 Superstorm only reached an intensity of 479 nT/min. Large numbers of power system impacts in the United States were also observed for intensities that ranged from 300 to 600 nT/min during this storm. Yet both recent and historical data indicate that storms with disturbance levels that range from 2000 nT/min to as much ~5000 nT/min may be possible over extensive regions at latitudes of concern for large continental power grids across North America and Europe. Large GIC have also been

  10. Exploratory Meeting on Atmospheric Electricity and Severe Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The meeting was arranged to discuss atmospheric electricity and its relationship to severe storms, the feasibility of developing a set of instruments for either a Space Shuttle or an unmanned satellite, and the scientific rationale which would warrant further in-depth assessment, involvement and development of supporting activities by NASA.

  11. Electric Activity in Dust Devils and Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, R. O.; Yana, C.; Covert, A.; Renno, K.; Wilson, J.

    2005-12-01

    Terrestrial dust devils produce charge separation and electric fields that exceeds the breakdown potential of the thin Martian atmosphere (Farrell et al., 2002, 2003; Krauss et al., 2002; Renno et al., 2004). Typical Martian dust devils are wider, taller and have larger dust content than terrestrial vortices. Thus, charge separation and electric-field breakdown are likely to occur in Martian dust devils and dust storms. We show that theory, laboratory experiments, and field measurements in Arizona suggests that collisions between sand and dust particles at the bottom of dust devils produce non-thermal microwave radiation. The non-thermal microwave emission allows not only the indirect detection of electric activity but could also allow the determination of the physical properties of Martian sand and dust by remote sensing. Besides being geologically important, electrically charged Martian dust devils and dust storms are potential hazards to Landers and at minimum would be an annoyance to future astronauts exploring the planet. Indeed, the design of adequate mechanical and electrical systems for these Landers cannot progress effectively without a better understanding of Martian dust devils and dust storms. Moreover, ancillary phenomena associated with electrically charged vortices can ionize atmospheric gases and might have important implications for atmosphere chemistry and even habitability.

  12. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  13. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nicole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-08-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 "Quebec" storm and the 2003 "Halloween" storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  14. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures.

  15. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures. PMID:19180087

  16. Polarimetric Radar and Electric Field Observations of a Multicell Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, E. C.; Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Schuur, T.; Straka, J.; Krehbiel, P.; Rison, W.

    2004-12-01

    Much prior thunderstorm electrification research uses one-dimensional analyses of vertical profiles of the thunderstorm electric field, often incorporating cloud-to-ground lighting strike data and radar reflectivity observations. New instrumentation has provided the opportunity to investigate thunderstorm electrification and lightning in greater spatial detail. We present data from the late stages of a multicellular storm occurring on 28-29 June 2004 during the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX) field program in central Oklahoma. Three-dimensional (3-D) vector electric field (measured by balloon sounding), total lighting mapping, and polarimetric radar are utilized. The maximum measured electric field exceeded -150 kV m-1. Preliminary charge analysis using the electric field vectors indicates a positive layer below 0\\deg C, followed by a large negative layer just above the melting level. Another positive and negative layer follow this. Polarimetric radar signatures within the melting layer are examined in the context of the electric field observations. Mapped lightning flashes are used to clarify and support the inferred charge structure. An interactive 3-D display is used to combine these data sources. Temporal evolution of the storm is also considered.

  17. Geomagnetic storm environments and effects on electrical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, F.M. , Dallas, TX ); Barnes, P.R. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the behavior of the earth's magnetic field during a geomagnetic storm. Temporal variations of the B-field on the earths surface can induce an electric field in the earth, and this E-field will induce currents to flow in long, grounded conductors. Previous experience with geomagnetic storms indicates that such geomagnetically-induced currents can cause damage to power system components, and at times, can cause power blackouts. This paper presents some recently measured geomagnetic field variations, and illustrates how the induced electric field can be calculated, assuming a simple model of the imperfectly conducting earth. This calculation may be performed either in the time or in the frequency domain. Approximations to the time dependence of the geomagnetic field permit an analytical evaluation of the corresponding E-field in the earth, and this results in a simple expression for the transient Enfield. A knowledge of this Enfield is important in understanding the effects of geomagnetic storms on the power system, and in devising protection methods.

  18. Geomagnetic storm environments and effects on electrical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, F.M.; Barnes, P.R.

    1992-11-01

    This paper briefly reviews the behavior of the earth`s magnetic field during a geomagnetic storm. Temporal variations of the B-field on the earths surface can induce an electric field in the earth, and this E-field will induce currents to flow in long, grounded conductors. Previous experience with geomagnetic storms indicates that such geomagnetically-induced currents can cause damage to power system components, and at times, can cause power blackouts. This paper presents some recently measured geomagnetic field variations, and illustrates how the induced electric field can be calculated, assuming a simple model of the imperfectly conducting earth. This calculation may be performed either in the time or in the frequency domain. Approximations to the time dependence of the geomagnetic field permit an analytical evaluation of the corresponding E-field in the earth, and this results in a simple expression for the transient Enfield. A knowledge of this Enfield is important in understanding the effects of geomagnetic storms on the power system, and in devising protection methods.

  19. Complicated Electrical Activities in Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Yuo-Hsien; Hsueh, Ming-Pin; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Yien, Huey-Wen

    It has become widely accepted that ventricular fibrillation, the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias, is a major cause of death in the industrialized world. Alternans and conduction block have recently been related to the progression from ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation. From the point of view in cellular electrophysiology, ventricular tachycardia is the formation of reentrant wave in cardiac tissue. And ventricular fibrillation arises from subsequent breakdown of reentrant wave into multiple drifting and meandering spiral waves. In this paper, we numerically study pulse and vortex dynamics in cardiac tissue. Our numerical results include 1:1 normal sinus rhythm, 2:1 conduction block, complete conduction block, spiral wave, and spiral breakup. All of our numerical findings can be corresponding to clinical measurements in electrocardiogram. Various electrical activities in cardiac tissue will be discussed in detail in the present manuscript.

  20. TRPM4 in cardiac electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Guinamard, Romain; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Hof, Thomas; Liu, Hui; Simard, Christophe; Sallé, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    TRPM4 forms a non-selective cation channel activated by internal Ca(2+). Its functional expression was demonstrated in cardiomyocytes of several mammalian species including humans, but the channel is also present in many other tissues. The recent characterization of the TRPM4 inhibitor 9-phenanthrol, and the availability of transgenic mice have helped to clarify the role of TRPM4 in cardiac electrical activity, including diastolic depolarization from the sino-atrial node cells in mouse, rat, and rabbit, as well as action potential duration in mouse cardiomyocytes. In rat and mouse, pharmacological inhibition of TRPM4 prevents cardiac ischaemia-reperfusion injuries and decreases the occurrence of arrhythmias. Several studies have identified TRPM4 mutations in patients with inherited cardiac diseases including conduction blocks and Brugada syndrome. This review identifies TRPM4 as a significant actor in cardiac electrophysiology.

  1. Low cardiac output thyroid storm in a girl with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Chantra, Marut; Limsuwan, Alisa; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat

    2016-10-01

    A 15-year-old girl with Graves' disease presented with hypotension after methimazole and propranolol were re-started for hyperthyroidism. She was found to have pulmonary artery hypertension resulting in obstructive shock. Thyroid storm was diagnosed according to Burch and Wartofsky score. She was promptly treated with anti-thyroid drugs, inorganic iodide, corticosteroid, and respiratory support. Pulmonary hypertension was treated with inhaled nitric oxide until the clinical status improved. Propranolol was withdrawn due to poor cardiac function. We herein present a unique case of a difficult-to-treat Graves' disease presenting with severe pulmonary hypertension resulting in low cardiac output thyroid storm. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Imaging of cardiac electrical excitation conduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D F; Jiang, S Q; Zhu, J C; Zhao, C; Yan, Y R; Gronemeyer, D; Van Leeuwen, P

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiple time windows beamformer (MTWB) method of solving the inverse problem of magnetic field and non-invasively imaging the cardiac electrical excitation conduction using the magnetocardiac signals acquired by a 61-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The MTWB constructs spatial filters for each location in source space, one for each component of the source moment based on the distributed source model, and estimates the cardiac equivalent current sources. The output of spatial filters is the source strength estimated in three-dimensional space and the weight matrix calculated with magnetocardiac signals in multiple time windows. A signal subspace projection technique is used to suppress noise. Then, the characteristics of cardiac electrical excitation conduction among two healthy subjects and two coronary vessel stenosis (CVS) patients are extracted from reconstructed current sources with maximum strength at each instant during QRS complex and ST-T segment, and a series of two-dimensional cardiac electrical excitation conduction maps (EECM) are obtained. It is demonstrated that two healthy subjects are of similar and the stronger electrical activities than those of two CVS patients. This technique can be used as an effective tool for the diagnosis of heart diseases.

  3. Computer Simulation of Electrical Propagation in Cardiac Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    model, that are cardiac action potential models with Hodgkin - Huxley like representation.[2][3] Each simulation models is two dimensional electric...ircuit network model where many electric circuit models of cardiac membrane action potential were connected with electric resistance...controlled the sodium current , IN a , and the potassium current, IK 1 , of the cardiac action potential models and investigated the obtained

  4. The NASA STORMS Sub-Payload electric field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J.; Swenson, C. M.; Barjatya, A.; Sanderson, W.

    2008-12-01

    The NASA STORMS sounding rocket, 36.218, was launched at 00:10 LT on October 30, 2007 into a mid- latitude spread-F condition over Wallops Island. The rocket deployed instrumented main and sub-payloads. The sub payload instrument complement included a plasma impedance probe for measuring plasma density, a Langmuir probe for relative plasma density and temperature measurements and the daughter electric field experiment. Unfortunately the sub-payload coned badly upon deployment complicating the data reduction. Within this paper we present a description of our data reduction techniques which are based upon an all magnetic attitude solution for the sub-payload's complex motion. The attitude solution is used to present preliminary density and electric field observations within this mid-latitude spread-F event.

  5. Electrical Discharges in the Overshooting Tops of Five Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGorman, D. R.; Elliott, M.

    2013-12-01

    Individual electrical discharges detected by VHF Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMAs) in the overshooting tops of strong storms typically occur continually at rates of roughly 1 - 10 per second and do not appear to cluster systematically in time or space as flashes. This study analyzed discharges relative to S-band polarimetric radar data and to GOES infrared imagery in the overshooting tops of five storms ranging from moderately strong multicell storms to supercell storms. Although the density of VHF sources in overshooting tops was much less than the maximum densities below the level of neutral bouyancy, the overshooting top typically contained a secondary maximum of density. The onset of discharges in an overshooting top corresponded to an increase in the maximum magnitude and height of reflectivity as the top substantially penetrated the level of neutral bouyancy. Once the discharges began, most were within reflectivities of at least 18 dBZ and formed a dome having geometry similar to that of the dome in reflectivity. Discharges persisted for approximately as long as the reflectivity dome persisted and could last anywhere from a few minutes for short-lived overshooting tops to a few hours for cases with an overlapping series of overshooting tops produced by a succession of updraft pulses. The 99.99th percentile in the height of VHF sources was well correlated (correlation coefficient of at least 0.8) with the height of 18 and 30 dBZ, and the timing of variations in height of these parameters agreed well. We suggest the discharges are caused by turbulent cells bringing negative screening layer charge close to positive charge in the updraft core. The onset of discharges in an overshooting top preceded the detection of overshooting tops in satellite imagery. The poorer performance probably was the result of the poorer spatiotemporal resolution of infrared cloud-top imagery in the present GOES constellation. Severe weather was either imminent or occurring when

  6. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-12-30

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently, block-and-replacement therapy had been discontinued to evaluate thyroid functioning. On admission, thyroid hormone levels were markedly elevated, suggesting thyroid storm due to residual Graves' disease. The patient was treated with propylthiouracil, hydrocortisone and Lugol solution. ECG showed repolarisation patterns suggestive of an underlying type 1 Brugada syndrome (BS). These findings were confirmed by an additional ajmaline test. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted to prevent future arrhythmias. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy 9 months later and recovered completely. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of BS unmasked by thyroid storm. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Atmospheric Electricity Effects of Eastern Mediterranean Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Shai; Yair, Yoav; Yaniv, Roy; Price, Colin

    2016-04-01

    We present atmospheric electrical measurements conducted at the Wise Observatory (WO) in Mizpe-Ramon (30035'N, 34045'E) and Mt. Hermon (30024'N, 35051'E), Israel, during two massive and unique dust storms that occurred over the Eastern Mediterranean region on February 10-11 and September 08-12, 2015. The first event transported Saharan dust from Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula in advance of a warm front of a Cyprus low pressure system. In the second event, dust particles were transported from the Syrian desert, which dominates the north-east border with Iraq, through flow associated with a shallow Persian trough system. In both events the concentrations of PM10 particles measured by the air-quality monitoring network of the Israeli Ministry of the Environment in Beer-Sheba reached values > 2200 μg m-3. Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) obtained from the AERONET station in Sde-Boker reached values up to 4.0. The gradual intensification of the first event reached peak values on the February 11th > 1200 μg m-3 and an AOT ~ 1.8, while the second dust storm commenced on September 8th with a sharp increase reaching peak values of 2225 μg m-3 and AOT of 4.0. Measurements of the fair weather vertical electric field (Ez) and of the vertical current density (Jz) were conducted continuously with a 1 minute temporal resolution. During the February event, very large fluctuations in the electrical parameters were measured at the WO. The Ez values changed between +1000 and +8000 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -10 and +20 pA m-2 (this is an order of magnitude larger compared to the fair weather current density of ~2 pA m-2. In contrast, during the September event, Ez values registered at WO were between -430 and +10 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -6 and +3 pA m2. For the September event the Hermon site showed Ez and Jz values fluctuating between -460 and +570 V m-1 and -14.5 and +18 pA m-2 respectively. The electric field and current variability, amplitude and the

  8. Electrical storm in patients with an implanted defibrillator: a matter of definition.

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Barold, S Serge

    2007-10-01

    The term "electrical storm" (ES) indicates a state of cardiac electrical instability manifested by several episodes of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTs) within a short time. In patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), ES is best defined as 3 appropriate VT detections in 24 h, treated by antitachycardia pacing, shock or eventually untreated but sustained in a VT monitoring zone. The number of shocks and inappropriate detections are irrelevant for the definition. ES occurs in approximately 25% of ICD patients within 3 years, with typically 5-55 individual VTs within one storm. Potential triggers can be found in approximately 66% of patients and include new/worsened heart failure, changes in antiarrhythmic medication, context with other illness, psychological stress, diarrhea, and hypokalemia. In most patients, ES consists of monomorphic VT indicating the presence of reentry while ventricular fibrillation indicating acute ischemia is rare. ES seems to have a low immediate mortality (1%) but frequently (50-80%) leads to hospitalization. Long-term prognostic implications of ES are unclear. The key intervention in ES is reduction of the elevated sympathetic tone by beta blockers and frequently benzodiazepines. Amiodarone i.v. has also been successful and azimilide seems promising while class I antiarrhythmic drugs are usually unsuccessful. Substrate mapping and VT ablation may be useful in treatment and prevention of ES. Prevention of ES requires ICD programming systematically avoiding unnecessary shocks (long VT detection, antitachycardia pacing where ever possible) which otherwise can fuel the sympathetic tone and prolong ES.

  9. Impacts of ionospheric electric fields on the GPS tropospheric delays during geomagnetic storms in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suparta, W.

    2017-05-01

    This paper aimed to overview the interaction of the thunderstorm with the ionospheric electric fields during major geomagnetic storms in Antarctica through the GPS tropospheric delays. For the purpose of study, geomagnetic activity and electric fields data for the period from 13 to 21 March 2015 representing the St. Patrick’s Day storm is analyzed. To strengthen the analysis, data for the period of 27 October to 1st November 2003 representing for the Halloween storm is also compared. Our analysis showed that both geomagnetic storms were severe (Ap ≥ 100 nT), where the intensity of Halloween storm is double compared to St. Patrick’s Day storm. For the ionospheric electric field, the peaks were dropped to -1.63 mV/m and -2.564 mV/m for St. Patrick and Halloween storms, respectively. At this time, the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component was significantly dropped to -17.31 nT with Ap > 150 nT (17 March 2015 at 19:20 UT) and -26.51 nT with Ap = 300 nT (29 October 2003 at 19:40 UT). For both geomagnetic storms, the electric field was correlated well with the ionospheric activity where tropospheric delays show a different characteristic.

  10. Investigations of Penetration Electric Fields and Low-Latitude Ionospheric Disturbances During Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-11

    Rayleigh - Taylor instability process over a large longitudinal range. These plasma bubbles grow and merge to form a wide bubble...Investigations of penetration electric fields and low-latitude ionospheric disturbances during intense geomagnetic storms Principal Investigator: Dr. Sunanda... ionospheric dynamics during intense geomagnetic storms. Summary of Progress: We have

  11. Successful treatment of thyroid storm presenting as recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiorgan failure by continuous renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Han Soo; Kwon, Su Kyoung; Kim, Ye Na

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and potentially life-threatening medical emergency. We experienced a case of thyroid storm associated with sepsis caused by pneumonia, which had a catastrophic course including recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF). A 22-year-old female patient with a 10-year history of Graves' disease was transferred to our emergency department (ED). She had a cardiac arrest at her home and a second cardiac arrest at the ED. Her heart recovered after 20 min of cardiac resuscitation. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm associated with hyperthyroidism complicated by pneumonia and sepsis. Although full conventional medical treatment was given, she had progressive MOF and hemodynamic instability consisting of hyperthermia, tachycardia and hypotension. Because of hepatic and renal failure with refractory hypotension, we reduced the patient's dose of beta-blocker and antithyroid drug, and she was started on continuous veno-venous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with intravenous albumin and plasma supplementation. Subsequently, her body temperature and pulse rate began to stabilize within 1 h, and her blood pressure reached 120/60 mmHg after 6 h. We discontinued antithyroid drug 3 days after admission because of aggravated hyperbilirubinemia. The patient exhibited progressive improvement in thyroid function even after cessation of antithyroid drug, and she successfully recovered from thyroid storm and MOF. This is the first case of thyroid storm successfully treated by CRRT in a patient considered unfit for antithyroid drug treatment. The presenting manifestations of thyroid storm vary and can include cardiac arrest with multiorgan failure in rare cases.In some patients with thyroid storm, especially those with severe complications, conventional medical treatment may be ineffective or inappropriate.During thyroid storm, the initiation of CRRT can immediately lower body temperature and subsequently stabilize vital signs

  12. Electrical storm in dilated cardiomyopathy treated using epicardial radiofrequency ablation as a first line therapy.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Massimiliano; Agricola, Tullio; Xyheri, Borejda; Di Girolamo, Enrico; Leonzio, Luigi; Pizzi, Carmine

    2016-09-01

    We report a patient with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy and low left ventricular systolic function (28%) presenting with an electrical storm originated in epicardial scar and ablated by radiofrequency. This case report suggests that a strategy of epicardial catheter ablation is reasonable for the patient presenting with electrical storm related to structural disease with a low left ventricular ejection fraction. Copyright © 2016 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of Electrical Stimulation Parameters for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile cardiac tissue constrcuts. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation, to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, and were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Cardiac tissues stimulated at 3V/cm amplitude and 3Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43, and the best developed contractile behavior. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21604379

  14. Optimization of electrical stimulation parameters for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-06-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile engineered cardiac tissues. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Engineered cardiac tissues stimulated at 3 V/cm amplitude and 3 Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43 and the best-developed contractile behaviour. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering.

  15. Brain responses to cardiac electrical stimulation: a new EEG method for evaluating cardiac sensation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hideaki; Hirose, Masanori; Watanabe, Satoshi; Fukuda, Koji; Fukudo, Shin; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Although cardiac sensation, such as palpitation or chest pain, is common and is sometimes a malignant sign of heart diseases, the mechanism by which the human brain responds to afferent signals from the heart remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether electrical stimulation of the heart provokes brain responses in humans. We examined 15 patients (age: 65.4 ± 3.1 years old, 11 males and 4 females) implanted with either a cardiac pacemaker or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was simultaneously recorded from the vertex during right ventricular pacing at 70-100 beats/min at baseline (1.5 V) and intense (6-8 V) stimulation sessions. We evaluated brain responses to cardiac electrical stimulation by measuring cerebral potentials that were obtained by subtracting the average of 100 EEG waves triggered by cardiac pacing during baseline stimulation from those during the intense stimulation. Intense stimulation of the cardiac pacemaker or CRT device reproducibly induced cardiac sensation in 6 out of the 15 patients; namely, the remaining 9 patients showed no reproducible response. Brain responses were evident by averaging cerebral potentials from all of the 15 patients and those from 6 patients with reproducible cardiac sensation. To the best our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates the brain responses to cardiac electrical stimulation in humans. This new method should be useful for examining pathophysiology of cardiac diseases with pathological cardiac sensation, including cardiac anxiety and silent myocardial ischemia.

  16. Combined Aircraft and Satellite-Derived Storm Electric Current and Lightning Rates Measurements and Implications for the Global Electric Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.

    2010-01-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of electrified shower clouds and thunderstorms spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. The measurements were made with the NASA ER-2 and the Altus-II high altitude aircrafts. Peak electric fields, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV/m to 16 kV/m, with a mean value of 0.9 kV/m. The median peak field was 0.29 kV/m. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean storms with lightning is 1.6 A while the mean current for land storms with lightning is 1.0 A. The mean current for oceanic storms without lightning (i.e., electrified shower clouds) is 0.39 A and the mean current for land storms without lightning is 0.13 A. Thus, on average, land storms with or without lightning have about half the mean current as their corresponding oceanic storm counterparts. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal lightning statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie

  17. Electrical Storm Simulation to Improve the Learning Physics Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Muñoz, Miriam; Jiménez Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Gutiérrez de Mesa, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a research project whose main objective is to understand the impact that the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has on the teaching and learning process on the subject of Physics. We will show that, with the use of a storm simulator, physics students improve their learning process on one hand they understand…

  18. Progress in utilization of a mobile laboratory for making storm electricity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. David

    1988-01-01

    A mobile atmospheric science laboratory has been used to intercept and track storms on the Great Plains region of the U.S., with the intention of combining the data obtained with those from Doppler and conventional radars, NASA U-2 aircraft overflights, balloon soundings, and fixed-base storm electricity measurements. The mobile lab has proven to be valuable in the gathering of ground truth verifications for the two commercially operated lightning ground-strike locating systems. Data acquisition has recently been expanded by means of mobile ballooning before and during storms.

  19. Progress in utilization of a mobile laboratory for making storm electricity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. David

    1988-01-01

    A mobile atmospheric science laboratory has been used to intercept and track storms on the Great Plains region of the U.S., with the intention of combining the data obtained with those from Doppler and conventional radars, NASA U-2 aircraft overflights, balloon soundings, and fixed-base storm electricity measurements. The mobile lab has proven to be valuable in the gathering of ground truth verifications for the two commercially operated lightning ground-strike locating systems. Data acquisition has recently been expanded by means of mobile ballooning before and during storms.

  20. Evaluation of the electrical properties of dust storms by multi-parameter observations and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huan; Bo, Tian-Li; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2017-03-01

    Dusty phenomena, such as wind-blown sand, dust devils, and dust storms, play key roles in Earth's climate and geological processes. Dust electrification considerably affects the lifting and transport of dust particles. However, the electrical properties of dust storms remain poorly understood. Here, we conducted multi-parameter measurements and theoretical calculations to investigate the electrical properties of dust storms and their application to dust storm prediction. The results show that the vertical electric field (E-field) decreases first, then increases, and finally decreases with the height above the ground, reversing its direction at two heights, ∼ 8- 12 and ∼ 24 m. This suggests that the charge polarity of dust particles changes from negative to positive and back to negative again as the height increases. By carefully analyzing the E-field and dust concentration data, we further found that there is a significant positive linear relationship between the measured E-field intensity and dust concentration at the given ambient conditions. In addition, measurements and calculations demonstrate that a substantial enhancement in the vertical E-field can be observed several hours before the arrival of the external-source dust storms, indicating that the E-field can be used to provide an early warning of external-source dust storms.

  1. Disturbance dynamo electric fields in response to geomagnetic storms occurring at different universal times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.

    2013-12-01

    Perturbed electric fields in the earth's ionosphere, resulting from the penetration electric fields from high latitudes and/or from the dynamo mechanism driven by the neutral disturbances, occurr in the storm periods. In general, the identification of the penetration electric fields is easier than that of the dynamo electric fields. At times, the latter becomes unperceivable or difficult to identify. This is an interesting problem which motivates a model study to investigate the possible reasons. Model runs made with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR/TIEGCM) will be presented. Theoretical studies of ionospheric responses to geomagnetic storms with model simulations indicate that the intensities of disturbance dynamo electric fields are highly dependent on various parameters such as solar activities, seasonal effects and universal times, etc. When geomagnetic storms commence at 01~07 UT in summer solstices with low solar fluxes, the disturbance dynamo electric fields become very small. As compared with the general daily variations, they seem to be unperceivable. This phenomenon can be explained by the model results which show that the positive charge accumulation at low latitudes will be weakened when the equatward neutral disturbances penetrate into the opposite hemisphere in the storm time. For other cases, the magnitudes of the dynamo electric fields are relatively larger under the same geomagnetic activity.

  2. Automated Identification of Initial Storm Electrification and End-of-Storm Electrification Using Electric Field Mill Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, Launa M.; Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2017-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operations are located in a region which experiences one of the highest lightning densities across the United States. As a result, on average, KSC loses almost 30 minutes of operational availability each day for lightning sensitive activities. KSC is investigating using existing instrumentation and automated algorithms to improve the timeliness and accuracy of lightning warnings. Additionally, the automation routines will be warning on a grid to minimize under-warnings associated with not being located in the center of the warning area and over-warnings associated with encompassing too large an area. This study discusses utilization of electric field mill data to provide improved warning times. Specifically, this paper will demonstrate improved performance of an enveloping algorithm of the electric field mill data as compared with the electric field zero crossing to identify initial storm electrification. End-of-Storm-Oscillation (EOSO) identification algorithms will also be analyzed to identify performance improvement, if any, when compared with 30 minutes after the last lightning flash.

  3. Successful treatment of thyroid storm presenting as recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiorgan failure by continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Han Soo; Kim, Ye Na

    2017-01-01

    Summary Thyroid storm is a rare and potentially life-threatening medical emergency. We experienced a case of thyroid storm associated with sepsis caused by pneumonia, which had a catastrophic course including recurrent cardiac arrest and subsequent multiple organ failure (MOF). A 22-year-old female patient with a 10-year history of Graves’ disease was transferred to our emergency department (ED). She had a cardiac arrest at her home and a second cardiac arrest at the ED. Her heart recovered after 20 min of cardiac resuscitation. She was diagnosed with thyroid storm associated with hyperthyroidism complicated by pneumonia and sepsis. Although full conventional medical treatment was given, she had progressive MOF and hemodynamic instability consisting of hyperthermia, tachycardia and hypotension. Because of hepatic and renal failure with refractory hypotension, we reduced the patient’s dose of beta-blocker and antithyroid drug, and she was started on continuous veno-venous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) with intravenous albumin and plasma supplementation. Subsequently, her body temperature and pulse rate began to stabilize within 1 h, and her blood pressure reached 120/60 mmHg after 6 h. We discontinued antithyroid drug 3 days after admission because of aggravated hyperbilirubinemia. The patient exhibited progressive improvement in thyroid function even after cessation of antithyroid drug, and she successfully recovered from thyroid storm and MOF. This is the first case of thyroid storm successfully treated by CRRT in a patient considered unfit for antithyroid drug treatment. Learning points: The presenting manifestations of thyroid storm vary and can include cardiac arrest with multiorgan failure in rare cases. In some patients with thyroid storm, especially those with severe complications, conventional medical treatment may be ineffective or inappropriate. During thyroid storm, the initiation of CRRT can immediately lower body temperature and

  4. Lightning Mapping and Electric Field Change Observations of a Stationary New Mexico Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Hunyady, S. J.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Aulich, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    On August 23, 2010 a classic airmass thunderstorm occurred over high plains immediately east of the Langmuir Laboratory mountaintop observatory in central New Mexico. The energetic storm developed around 2:30 pm MDT (2030 UTC) and remained essentially stationary over its complete lifetime of about 2 hours. The complete sequence of lightning was recorded both by the 16-station Langmuir Laboratory Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and by several electrostatic field change stations around and beneath the storm. The LMA and Delta-E data are both of very high quality and sensitivity. In this initial study we report on the lightning-inferred electrical structure of the storm and on estimated charging currents determined from a simple electrodynamic model of the storm. The electric field change measurements, in combination with the detailed 3-D mapping results, can be used to determine the amounts of charge involved in individual strokes and parts of flashes for comparison and improvement of the modeling. The LMA data regularly detected isolated attempted breakdown events at repeated locations at mid- to high altitudes in the storm that were clearly indicative of localized high-field regions. The attempted breakdown events were often exact pre-cursors of the initial breakdown of full-fledged IC flashes typically several seconds up to several tens of seconds later, but also often did not precurse a subsequent discharge. During both IC and CG flashes, numerous recoil-type, fast negative breakdown events were detected along otherwise undetected positive leader channels in the main, mid-level negative charge region. The localized fast events during IC flashes often repeatedly intensified in strength and number prior to upward negative leader K-events, and then temporarily ceased before starting up again prior to the next K-event. Many of the negative CG flashes in the storm produced strokes with long continuing currents (CCs). The overall electric field changes and hence total

  5. Dayside midlatitude ionospheric response to storm time electric fields: A case study for 7 September 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Liemohn, M. W.; Coster, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    With the storm of 7-8 September 2002 as a study case, we demonstrate that an ionospheric model driven by a suitable storm time convection electric field can reproduce the F region dayside density enhancements associated with the ionospheric storm positive phase. The ionospheric model in this case is the Utah State University Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM); the electric field model is the University of Michigan's Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI). Extensive ground truth is available throughout the study period from two independent sources: ground-based vertical TEC and ionosonde stations; our simulation results are in good agreement with these observations. We address the question of what is the source of the high-density plasma that is seen during the positive storm phase and show that in this case a magnetospheric electric field with an eastward component that penetrates to midlatitudes increases local production on the dayside to a degree that is sufficient to account for the storm time density increases that have been observed.

  6. Electrical and mechanical stimulation of cardiac cells and tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2016-01-15

    The field of cardiac tissue engineering has made significant strides over the last few decades, highlighted by the development of human cell derived constructs that have shown increasing functional maturity over time, particularly using bioreactor systems to stimulate the constructs. However, the functionality of these tissues is still unable to match that of native cardiac tissue and many of the stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes display an immature, fetal like phenotype. In this review, we seek to elucidate the biological underpinnings of both mechanical and electrical signaling, as identified via studies related to cardiac development and those related to an evaluation of cardiac disease progression. Next, we review the different types of bioreactors developed to individually deliver electrical and mechanical stimulation to cardiomyocytes in vitro in both two and three-dimensional tissue platforms. Reactors and culture conditions that promote functional cardiomyogenesis in vitro are also highlighted. We then cover the more recent work in the development of bioreactors that combine electrical and mechanical stimulation in order to mimic the complex signaling environment present in vivo. We conclude by offering our impressions on the important next steps for physiologically relevant mechanical and electrical stimulation of cardiac cells and engineered tissue in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Global Electric Circuit Implications of Combined Aircraft Storm Electric Current Measurements and Satellite-Based Diurnal Lightning Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, D. M.; Blakeslee, R.; Bateman, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of thunderstorms and electrified shower clouds (ESCs) spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean thunderstorms is 1.7 A while the mean current for land thunderstorms is 1.0 A. The mean current for ocean ESCs 0.41 A and the mean current for land ESCs is 0.13 A. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal flash rate statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie curve) to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Given our data and assumptions, mean contributions to the global electric circuit are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean) from thunderstorms, and 0.22 kA (ocean) and 0.04 (land) from ESCs, resulting in a mean total conduction current estimate for the global electric circuit of 2.0 kA. Mean storm counts are 1100 for land

  8. Global Electric Circuit Implications of Combined Aircraft Storm Electric Current Measurements and Satellite-Based Diurnal Lightning Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.

    2011-01-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of thunderstorms and electrified shower clouds (ESCs) spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean thunderstorms is 1.7 A while the mean current for land thunderstorms is 1.0 A. The mean current for ocean ESCs 0.41 A and the mean current for land ESCs is 0.13 A. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal flash rate statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie curve) to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Given our data and assumptions, mean contributions to the global electric circuit are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean) from thunderstorms, and 0.22 kA (ocean) and 0.04 (land) from ESCs, resulting in a mean total conduction current estimate for the global electric circuit of 2.0 kA. Mean storm counts are 1100 for land

  9. Global Electric Circuit Diurnal Variation Derived from Storm Overflight and Satellite Optical Lightning Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bateman, M. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We have combined analyses of over 1000 high altitude aircraft observations of electrified clouds with diurnal lightning statistics from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) to produce an estimate of the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit. Using basic assumptions about the mean storm currents as a function of flash rate and location, and the global electric circuit, our estimate of the current in the global electric circuit matches the Carnegie curve diurnal variation to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Mean contributions to the global electric circuit from land and ocean thunderstorms are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean). Contributions to the global electric circuit from ESCs are 0.22 kA for ocean storms and 0.04 kA for land storms. Using our analysis, the mean total conduction current for the global electric circuit is 2.0 kA.

  10. Design of electrical stimulation bioreactors for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, N; Marsano, A; Cannizzaro, C; Voldman, J; Vunjak-Novakovic, G

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and we identified a safety range of 0 to 8 V/cm by comparing excitation thresholds and maximum capture rates for neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured with electrical stimulation. We conclude with recommendations for studies involving carbon electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering.

  11. Design of Electrical Stimulation Bioreactors for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, N.; Marsano, A.; Cannizzaro, C.; Voldman, J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and we identified a safety range of 0 to 8 V/cm by comparing excitation thresholds and maximum capture rates for neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured with electrical stimulation. We conclude with recommendations for studies involving carbon electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:19163486

  12. In situ measurements and radar observations of a severe storm - Electricity, kinematics, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, G. J.; Few, A. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Conrad, A. C.; Torczon, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electric field measurements made inside a multicell severe storm in Oklahoma in 1983 with a balloon-borne instrument are presented. The properties of the electric charge regions, such as altitude, thickness, and charge concentrations, are studied. These measurements are analzyed with meteorological measurements of temperature and humidity, and balloon tracking and radar observations. The relation between the electric charge structure and the precipitation and kinematic features of the storm is examined. The data reveal that the cell exhibits a bipolar charge structure with negative charge below positive charge. The average charge concentrations of the two regions are estimated as -1.2 and 0.15 nC/cu m, respectively; the upper positive charge is about 6 km in vertical extent, and the lower negative charge is less than 1 km in vertical extent.

  13. In situ measurements and radar observations of a severe storm - Electricity, kinematics, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, G. J.; Few, A. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Conrad, A. C.; Torczon, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electric field measurements made inside a multicell severe storm in Oklahoma in 1983 with a balloon-borne instrument are presented. The properties of the electric charge regions, such as altitude, thickness, and charge concentrations, are studied. These measurements are analzyed with meteorological measurements of temperature and humidity, and balloon tracking and radar observations. The relation between the electric charge structure and the precipitation and kinematic features of the storm is examined. The data reveal that the cell exhibits a bipolar charge structure with negative charge below positive charge. The average charge concentrations of the two regions are estimated as -1.2 and 0.15 nC/cu m, respectively; the upper positive charge is about 6 km in vertical extent, and the lower negative charge is less than 1 km in vertical extent.

  14. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient's cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  15. Tests of Convection Electric Field Models For The January 10, 1997, Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V.; Boonsiriseth, A.; Thorne, R.; Dotan, Y.

    The January 10-11, 1997, geomagnetic storm was caused by the passage at Earth of a magnetic cloud with a negative to positive Bz variation extending for 1 day. The ge- omagnetic indices had values of minimum Dst=-83 nT and maximum Kp=6 during the period of southward IMF within the cloud. We simulate ring current development during this storm using our kinetic drift-loss model and compare the results inferred from Volland-Stern type, Weimer, and AMIE convection electric field models. A pen- etration electric field is added to the AMIE model [Boonsiriseth et al., 2001] in order to improve the agreement with measurements from the electric field instrument on Po- lar spacecraft. The ionospheric electric potentials are mapped to the equatorial plane using the Tsyganenko 1996 magnetic field model and the resulting equatorial poten- tial models are coupled with our ring current model. While the temporal evolution of the large-scale features is similar in all three convection models, detailed comparison indicates that AMIE model shows highly variable small-scale features not present in the Volland-Stern or Weimer convection models. Results from our kinetic ring current model are compared with energetic particle data from the HYDRA, TIMAS, IPS, and CAMMICE instruments on Polar to test the applicability of the convection electric field models for this storm period.

  16. A model of electrical conduction in cardiac tissue including fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, A P; Seemann, G; Abildskov, J A

    2009-05-01

    Fibroblasts are abundant in cardiac tissue. Experimental studies suggested that fibroblasts are electrically coupled to myocytes and this coupling can impact cardiac electrophysiology. In this work, we present a novel approach for mathematical modeling of electrical conduction in cardiac tissue composed of myocytes, fibroblasts, and the extracellular space. The model is an extension of established cardiac bidomain models, which include a description of intra-myocyte and extracellular conductivities, currents and potentials in addition to transmembrane voltages of myocytes. Our extension added a description of fibroblasts, which are electrically coupled with each other and with myocytes. We applied the extended model in exemplary computational simulations of plane waves and conduction in a thin tissue slice assuming an isotropic conductivity of the intra-fibroblast domain. In simulations of plane waves, increased myocyte-fibroblast coupling and fibroblast-myocyte ratio reduced peak voltage and maximal upstroke velocity of myocytes as well as amplitudes and maximal downstroke velocity of extracellular potentials. Simulations with the thin tissue slice showed that inter-fibroblast coupling affected rather transversal than longitudinal conduction velocity. Our results suggest that fibroblast coupling becomes relevant for small intra-myocyte and/or large intra-fibroblast conductivity. In summary, the study demonstrated the feasibility of the extended bidomain model and supports the hypothesis that fibroblasts contribute to cardiac electrophysiology in various manners.

  17. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  18. Novel anisotropic engineered cardiac tissues: studies of electrical propagation.

    PubMed

    Bursac, Nenad; Loo, Yihua; Leong, Kam; Tung, Leslie

    2007-10-05

    The goal of this study was to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with uniformly anisotropic architecture, and to evaluate their electrical function using multi-site optical mapping of cell membrane potentials. Anisotropic polymer scaffolds made by leaching of aligned sucrose templates were seeded with neonatal rat cardiac cells and cultured in rotating bioreactors for 6-14 days. Cells aligned and interconnected inside the scaffolds and when stimulated by a point electrode, supported macroscopically continuous, anisotropic impulse propagation. By culture day 14, the ratio of conduction velocities along vs. across cardiac fibers reached a value of 2, similar to that in native neonatal ventricles, while action potential duration and maximum capture rate, respectively, decreased to 120ms and increased to approximately 5Hz. The shorter culture time and larger scaffold thickness were associated with increased incidence of sustained reentrant arrhythmias. In summary, this study is the first successful attempt to engineer a cm(2)-size, functional anisotropic cardiac tissue patch.

  19. Characterization of electrical stimulation electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Chris; Figallo, Elisa; Voldman, Joel; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2006-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. The goal of this study was to assess the conditions of electrical stimulation with respect to the electrode geometry, material properties and charge-transfer characteristics at the electrode-electrolyte interface. We compared various biocompatible materials, including nanoporous carbon, stainless steel, titanium and titanium nitride, for use in cardiac tissue engineering bioreactors. The faradaic and non-faradaic charge transfer mechanisms were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), studying current injection characteristics, and examining surface properties of electrodes with scanning electron microscopy. Carbon electrodes were found to have the best current injection characteristics. However, these electrodes require careful handling because of their limited mechanical strength. The efficacy of various electrodes for use in 2-D and 3-D cardiac tissue engineering systems with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes is being determined by assessing cell viability, amplitude of contractions, excitation thresholds, maximum capture rate, and tissue morphology.

  20. Contribution of storm time substorms to the prompt electric field disturbances in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Debrup; Chakrabarty, D.; Sekar, R.; Reeves, G. D.; Yoshikawa, A.; Shiokawa, K.

    2017-05-01

    This study tries to bring out the fact that storm time substorms can compete and at times significantly contribute to the geomagnetically disturbed time prompt penetration electric field effects on low and equatorial latitudes. Observations of unusual equatorial plasma drift data from Jicamarca Unattended Long-term Investigations of the Ionosphere and Atmosphere during two space weather events show that substorms can induce both eastward and westward penetration electric fields under steady southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz) conditions. During the first event on 2 January 2005, the enhancement of the daytime eastward electric field over Jicamarca due to substorm is found to be comparable with the Sq and interplanetary electric field (IEFy) generated electric fields combined. During the second event on 19 August 2006, the substorm is seen to weaken the daytime eastward field thereby inducing a westward field in spite of the absence of northward turning of IMF Bz (overshielding). The westward electric field perturbation in the absence of any overshielding events is observationally sparse and contrary to the earlier results. Further, the substorm-induced field is found to be strong enough to compete or almost nullify the effects of storm time IEFy fields. This study also shows quantitatively that at times substorm contribution to the disturbed time prompt electric fields can be significant and thus should be taken into consideration in evaluating penetration events over low latitudes.

  1. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 2; Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Mach, D. M.; Christian, H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory and "pitch down method" developed in Part I of this study are applied to complete the calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m and a 5 V/m error in the mean fair weather field function, the 3-D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m, the method retrieves the 3-D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair weather field estimate is typically within 1 V/m of the true fair weather field. Using this side constraint and data from fair weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. The resulting calibration matrix was then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably with the results obtained from earlier calibration analyses that were based on iterative techniques.

  2. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircrfaft Field Mill Data: Part II: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Mach, D. M.; Christian H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman M. G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory developed in Part I of this study is applied to complete a relative calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the Lagrange multiplier method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -1) and a 5 V m(sup -1) error in the mean fair-weather field function, the 3D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair-weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -l), the method retrieves the 3D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair-weather field estimate is typically within 1 V m(sup -1) of the true fair-weather field. Using this type of side constraint and data from fair-weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. Absolute calibration was completed using the pitch down method developed in Part I, and conventional analyses. The resulting calibration matrices were then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably in many respects with results derived from earlier (iterative) techniques of calibration.

  3. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Melissa R; Fernandez, Steven J; Fu, Joshua S; Walker, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  4. Summary of Almost 20 Years of Storm Overflight Electric Field, Conductivity, Flash Rates, and Electric Current Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    We determined total conduction currents and flash rates for around 900 high-altitude aircraft overflights of electrified clouds over 17 years. The overflights include a wide geographical sample of storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive (i.e., upward-directed) and negative current. Peak electric field, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV m(sup -1) to 16. kV m(sup -1), with mean (median) of 0.9 kV m(sup -1) (0.29 kV m(sup -1)). Total conductivity at flight altitude ranged from 0.6 pS m(sup -1) to 3.6 pS m(sup -1), with mean and median of 2.2 pS m(sup -1). Peak current densities ranged from -2.0 nA m(sup -2) to 33.0 nA m(sup -2) with mean (median) of 1.9 nA m(sup -2) (0.6 nA m(sup -2)). Total upward current flow from storms in our dataset ranged from -1.3 to 9.4 A. The mean current for storms with lightning is 1.6 A over ocean and 1.0 A over land. The mean current for electrified shower clouds (i.e. electrified storms without lightning) is 0.39 A for ocean and 0.13 A for land. About 78% (43%) of the land (ocean) storms have detectable lightning. Land storms have 2.8 times the mean flash rate as ocean storms (2.2 versus 0.8 flashes min(sup -1), respectively). Approximately 7% of the overflights had negative current. The mean and median currents for positive (negative) polarity storms are 1.0 and 0.35 A (-0.30 and -0.26 A). We found no regional or latitudinal-based patterns in our storm currents, nor support for simple scaling laws between cloud top height and lightning flash rate.

  5. Storming the Bastille: the effect of electric fields on the ionospheric F-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rishbeth, H.; Heelis, R. A.; Makela, J. J.; Basu, S.

    2010-04-01

    We discuss different phenomena occurring during ionospheric F-region storms that in principle might be caused by electric fields and point out challenges that must be faced when considering the physical processes at work. We consider the transport of plasma across many degrees of latitude at sub-auroral latitudes, the origin of patches of so-called "storm enhanced density" at high mid-latitudes, and the very high reported heights of the F2 peak at low latitudes. We discuss the role that electric fields might play in changing locally the net production of ionization as well as transporting it. We suggest that the local change in ionization production should be considered as a more important process for producing plasma density enhancements than transport from a more remote source of enhanced density.

  6. [Geomagnetic storm decreases coherence of electric oscillations of human brain while working at the computer].

    PubMed

    Novik, O B; Smirnov, F A

    2013-01-01

    The effect of geomagnetic storms at the latitude of Moscow on the electric oscillations of the human brain cerebral cortex was studied. In course of electroencephalogram measurements it was shown that when the voluntary persons at the age of 18-23 years old were performing tasks using a computer during moderate magnetic storm or no later than 24 hrs after it, the value of the coherence function of electric oscillations of the human brain in the frontal and occipital areas in a range of 4.0-7.9 Hz (so-called the theta rhythm oscillations of the human brain) decreased by a factor of two or more, sometimes reaching zero, although arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and the electrocardiogram registered during electroencephalogram measurements remained within the standard values.

  7. Electrical stimulation to optimize cardioprotective exosomes from cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C R; Berman, A E; Weintraub, N L; Tang, Y L

    2016-03-01

    Injured or ischemic cardiac tissue has limited intrinsic capacity for regeneration. While stem cell transplantation is a promising approach to stimulating cardiac repair, its success in humans has thus far been limited. Harnessing the therapeutic benefits of stem cells requires a better understanding of their mechanisms of action and methods to optimize their function. Cardiac stem cells (CSC) represent a particularly effective cellular source for cardiac repair, and pre-conditioning CSC with electrical stimulation (EleS) was demonstrated to further enhance their function, although the mechanisms are unknown. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells primarily exert their effects through communicating with endogenous tissues via the release of exosomes containing cardioprotective molecules such as miRNAs, which upon uptake by recipient cells may stimulate survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Exosomes are also effective therapeutic agents in isolation and may provide a feasible alternative to stem cell transplantation. We hypothesize that EleS enhances CSC-mediated cardiac repair through its beneficial effects on production of cardioprotective exosomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that the beneficial effects of biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure may in part result from EleS-induced preconditioning of endogenous CSC to promote cardiac repair. With future research, our hypothesis may provide applications to optimize stem cell therapy and augment current pacing protocols, which may significantly advance the treatment of patients with heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Summary of Almost 20 Years of Storm Overflight Electric Field, Conductivity, Flash Rate, and Current Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    We present total conduction (Wilson) currents for more than 1000 high-altitude aircraft overflights of electrified clouds acquired over nearly two decades. The overflights include a wide geographical sample of storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive (i.e., upward-directed) and negative current. Peak electric field, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV/m to 16. kV/m, with mean (median) of 0.9 kV/m (0.29 kV/m). Total conductivity at flight altitude ranged from 0.6 pS/m to 3.6 pS/m, with mean and median of 2.2 pS/m. Peak current densities ranged from -2.0 nA m(exp -2) to 33.0 nA m(exp -2) with mean (median) of 1.9 nA m(exp -2) (0.6 nA m(exp -2)). Total upward current flow from storms in our dataset ranged from -1.3 to 9.4 A. The mean current for storms with lightning is 1.7 A over ocean and 1.0 A over land. The mean current for electrified shower clouds (i.e. electrified storms without lightning) is 0.41 A for ocean and 0.13 A for land. About 78% (43%) of the land (ocean) storms have detectable lightning. Land storms have 2.8 times the mean flash rate as ocean storms (2.2 versus 0.8 flashes min-1, respectively). Approximately 7% of the overflights had negative current. The mean and median currents for positive (negative) polarity storms are 1.0 and 0.35 A (-0.30 and -0.26 A). We found no regional or latitudinal-based patterns in our storm currents, nor support for simple scaling laws between cloud top height and lightning flash rate.

  9. Mid-Latitude Dayside Ionospheric Response to Storm-Time Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    One way in which a geomagnetic storm may impact the ionosphere is through an expansion of the magnetospheric electric field to mid-latitudes. This mechanism was explored in detail by Heelis et al [2009], where it was shown that an electric field with a magnitude of just 1 mV/m at mid-latitudes is sufficient to produce a large increase in TEC on the dayside. This effect is brought about by the lifting of the ionosphere as dayside plasma is transported poleward under the influence of the eastward component of the expanded electric field; the lifting occurs because of the inclination of the magnetic field lines. At the time the above-mentioned article was written, the authors lacked a physics-based modeling capability for the behavior of the storm-time electric field at mid-latitudes, so a simple modified form of the Volland 2-cell model was used. In the present work we use the University of Michigan’s Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) electric field model, along with the Utah State University Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM). The HEIDI model provides electric potential distributions spanning the northern mid-latitudes with a cadence of 30 minutes; these are used to drive the TDIM in carrying out mid-latitude simulations. The results are compared with model runs for the quiet-time ionosphere, as well as observations from ionosondes and ground-based GPS TEC receivers. ----------------- Heelis, R. A., J. J. Sojka, M. David, and R. W. Schunk (2009), Storm time density enhancements in the middle-latitude dayside ionosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 114, A03315, doi:10.1029/2008JA013690.

  10. Suppression by propranolol and amiodarone of an electrical storm refractory to metoprolol and amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Tsagalou, Eleftheria P; Kanakakis, John; Rokas, Stylianos; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria I

    2005-03-18

    A 60-year-old male patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy experienced an electrical storm 1 month after implantation of an internal cardioverter-defibrillator. Recurrent life-threatening episodes of ventricular tachycardia persisted despite maximal antiarrhythmic theraphy with amiodarone, metoprolol and mexiletine. After a total of more than 500 cardioversions, all antiarrhythmic medications were withdrawn, and the nonselective beta-blocker propranolol was initiated. Electrical stability was achieved and the patient was discharged on propranolol 400 mg/day. Two months later, a second arrhythmia cluster occurred that was controlled by the addition of amiodarone. The patient remains free of arrhythmia 15 months after the event with the combination of propranolol and amiodarone.

  11. Electrically Induced Calcium Handling in Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    For nearly a century, the heart was viewed as a terminally differentiated organ until the discovery of a resident population of cardiac stem cells known as cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). It has been shown that the regenerative capacity of CPCs can be enhanced by ex vivo modification. Preconditioning CPCs could provide drastic improvements in cardiac structure and function; however, a systematic approach to determining a mechanistic basis for these modifications founded on the physiology of CPCs is lacking. We have identified a novel property of CPCs to respond to electrical stimulation by initiating intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We used confocal microscopy and intracellular calcium imaging to determine the spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+ signal and the key proteins involved in this process using pharmacological inhibition and confocal Ca2+ imaging. Our results provide valuable insights into mechanisms to enhance the therapeutic potential in stem cells and further our understanding of human CPC physiology. PMID:27818693

  12. Summary of the NASA/MSFC FY-79 Severe Storm and Local Weather research review. [cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics reserach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Significant acomplishments, current focus of work, plans for FY-80, and recommendations for new research are outlined for 36 research projects proposed for technical monitoring by the Atmospheric Sciences Division at Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics of the investigations, which were reviewed at a two-day meeting, relate to cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics.

  13. Clinical and Electrocardiographic Characteristics of Electrical Storms Due to Monomorphic Ventricular Tachycardia Refractory to Intravenous Amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hiroshige; Miyauchi, Yasushi; Hayashi, Meiso; Iwasaki, Yu-Ki; Yodogawa, Kenji; Ueno, Akira; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Ippei; Uetake, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Kenta; Yamamoto, Teppei; Maruyama, Mitsunori; Akutsu, Koichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Keiji; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Katoh, Takao; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Few reports are available on the characteristics of electrical storms of ventricular tachycardia (VT storm) refractory to intravenous (IV) amiodarone. IV-amiodarone was administered to 60 patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmia between 2007 and 2012. VT storms, defined as 3 or more episodes of VT within 24 h, occurred in 30 patients (68±12 years, 7 female), with 12 having ischemic and 18 non-ischemic heart disease. We compared the clinical and electrocardiographic characteristics of the patients with VT storms suppressed by IV-amiodarone (Effective group) to those of patients not affected by the treatment (Refractory group). IV-amiodarone could not control recurrence of VT in 9 patients (30%). The Refractory group comprised 5 patients with acute myocardial infarctions. Although there was no difference in the VT cycle length, the QRS duration of both the VT and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) followed by VT was narrower in the Refractory group than in the Effective group (140±30 vs. 178±25 ms, P<0.01; 121±14 vs. 179±22 ms, P<0.01). In the Refractory group, additional administration of IV-mexiletine and/or Purkinje potential-guided catheter ablation was effective. IV-amiodarone-refractory VT exhibited a relatively narrow QRS tachycardia. The narrow triggering PVCs, suggesting a Purkinje fiber origin, may be treated by additional IV-mexiletine and endocardial catheter ablation.

  14. Influence of the convection electric field models on predicted plasmapause positions during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrard, V.; Khazanov, G. V.; Cabrera, J.; Lemaire, J.

    2008-08-01

    In the present work, we determine how three well documented models of the magnetospheric electric field, and two different mechanisms proposed for the formation of the plasmapause influence the radial distance, the shape and the evolution of the plasmapause during the geomagnetic storms of 28 October 2001 and of 17 April 2002. The convection electric field models considered are: McIlwain's E5D electric field model, Volland-Stern's model, and Weimer's statistical model compiled from low-Earth orbit satellite data. The mechanisms for the formation of the plasmapause to be tested are: (1) the MHD theory where the plasmapause should correspond to the last-closed-equipotential (LCE) or last-closed-streamline (LCS), if the E-field distribution is stationary or time-dependent respectively; (2) the interchange mechanism where the plasmapause corresponds to streamlines tangent to a Zero-Parallel-Force surface where the field-aligned plasma distribution becomes convectively unstable during enhancements of the E-field intensity in the nightside local time sector. The results of the different time dependent simulations are compared with concomitant EUV/IMAGE observations when available. The plasmatails or plumes observed after both selected geomagnetic storms are predicted in all simulations and for all E-field models. However, their shapes are quite different depending on the E-field models and the mechanisms that are used. Despite the partial success of the simulations to reproduce plumes during magnetic storms and substorms, there remains a long way to go before the detailed structures observed in the EUV observations during periods of geomagnetic activity can be accounted for very precisely by the existing E-field models. Furthermore, it cannot be excluded that the mechanisms currently identified to explain the formation of "Carpenter's knee" during substorm events, will have to be revised or complemented in the cases of geomagnetic storms.

  15. Influence of the Convection Electric Field Models on Predicted Plasmapause Positions During Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrard, V.; Khazanov, G.; Cabrera, J.; Lemaire, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, we determine how three well documented models of the magnetospheric electric field, and two different mechanisms proposed for the formation of the plasmapause influence the radial distance, the shape and the evolution of the plasmapause during the geomagnetic storms of 28 October 2001 and of 17 April 2002. The convection electric field models considered are: Mcllwain's E51) electric field model, Volland-Stern's model and Weimer's statistical model compiled from low-Earth orbit satellite data. The mechanisms for the formation of the plasmapause to be tested are: (i) the MHD theory where the plasmapause should correspond to the last-closed- equipotential (LCE) or last-closed-streamline (LCS), if the E-field distribution is stationary or time-dependent respectively; (ii) the interchange mechanism where the plasmapause corresponds to streamlines tangent to a Zero-Parallel-Force surface where the field-aligned plasma distribution becomes convectively unstable during enhancements of the E-field intensity in the nightside local time sector. The results of the different time dependent simulations are compared with concomitant EUV observations when available. The plasmatails or plumes observed after both selected geomagnetic storms are predicted in all simulations and for all E-field models. However, their shapes are quite different depending on the E-field models and the mechanisms that are used. Despite the partial success of the simulations to reproduce plumes during magnetic storms and substorms, there remains a long way to go before the detailed structures observed in the EUV observations during periods of geomagnetic activity can be accounted for very precisely by the existing E-field models. Furthermore, it cannot be excluded that the mechanisms currently identified to explain the formation of "Carpenter's knee" during substorm events, will', have to be revised or complemented in the cases of geomagnetic storms.

  16. Variability and diversity of the electrical cardiac systole

    PubMed Central

    Breijo-Marquez, Francisco R; Rios, Manuel Pardo

    2009-01-01

    The electrical cardiac systole originates from the beginning of the P wave (atrial depolarisation) until the end of the downward branch of the T wave (ventricular repolarisation). It includes, therefore, succession P-QRS-T and its corresponding intervals and segments: PQ, ST, and QT. The mathematical possibilities of variability in the length of the electrical systole of the heart may be diverse. It is well documented and established that such changes in length may make the myocardial cells more vulnerable and unstable, and may also cause serious cardiac arrhythmias and even sudden death. The current presentation illustrates these electrocardiographic entities with significant variations in the length of its waves and intervals: short PQ and QT intervals, short PQ and long QT, long PQ and long QT. All parameters appeared in young adult males. PMID:21686874

  17. Model of electrical activity in cardiac tissue under electromagnetic induction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuqiang; Wang, Chunni; Xu, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Complex electrical activities in cardiac tissue can set up time-varying electromagnetic field. Magnetic flux is introduced into the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model to describe the effect of electromagnetic induction, and then memristor is used to realize the feedback of magnetic flux on the membrane potential in cardiac tissue. It is found that a spiral wave can be triggered and developed by setting specific initials in the media, that is to say, the media still support the survival of standing spiral waves under electromagnetic induction. Furthermore, electromagnetic radiation is considered on this model as external stimuli, it is found that spiral waves encounter breakup and turbulent electrical activities are observed, and it can give guidance to understand the occurrence of sudden heart disorder subjected to heavily electromagnetic radiation.

  18. Model of electrical activity in cardiac tissue under electromagnetic induction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuqiang; Wang, Chunni; Xu, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-12-23

    Complex electrical activities in cardiac tissue can set up time-varying electromagnetic field. Magnetic flux is introduced into the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model to describe the effect of electromagnetic induction, and then memristor is used to realize the feedback of magnetic flux on the membrane potential in cardiac tissue. It is found that a spiral wave can be triggered and developed by setting specific initials in the media, that is to say, the media still support the survival of standing spiral waves under electromagnetic induction. Furthermore, electromagnetic radiation is considered on this model as external stimuli, it is found that spiral waves encounter breakup and turbulent electrical activities are observed, and it can give guidance to understand the occurrence of sudden heart disorder subjected to heavily electromagnetic radiation.

  19. Phase singularities in cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzelac, Ilija; Sidorov, Veniamin; Wikswo, John

    2010-03-01

    theory of topological spaces has its analogy in biological systems, one of which is the heart. The heart is an excitable medium that can be represented as a set of excitable elements (cardiomyocytes) that behave similarly to hourglasses. Excitable element needs external stimuli to be excited and after finite time goes back to its initial state, so its natural topological space is a ring. Topological space set (phases) can be simple set as ``rest,'' ``excited,'' ``refractory,'' ``relatively refractory'', but it can be as continuous as a set of angles on a 2π circle. In topological spaces topological charge is defined by: [ W=12πldθ (l) ] where l is the integration path and dθ is the change in phase. Non zero topological charge is called phase singularity of mapping. Practical application of topological charge analysis is a powerful method to quantify electrical dynamics during ventricular fibrillation (VF). Particularly by means of phase singularity detection it is possible to track wave breaks which relate to anatomical and electrophysiological heterogeneities.

  20. Atmospheric Electrical Modeling in Support of the NASA F-106 Storm Hazards Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A recently developed storm electrification model (SEM) is used to investigate the operating environment of the F-106 airplane during the NASA Storm Hazards Project. The model is 2-D, time dependent and uses a bulkwater microphysical parameterization scheme. Electric charges and fields are included, and the model is fully coupled dynamically, microphysically and electrically. One flight showed that a high electric field was developed at the aircraft's operating altitude (28 kft) and that a strong electric field would also be found below 20 kft; however, this low-altitude, high-field region was associated with the presence of small hail, posing a hazard to the aircraft. An operational procedure to increase the frequency of low-altitude lightning strikes was suggested. To further the understanding of lightning within the cloud environment, a parameterization of the lightning process was included in the SEM. It accounted for the initiation, propagation, termination, and charge redistribution associated with an intracloud discharge. Finally, a randomized lightning propagation scheme was developed, and the effects of cloud particles on the initiation of lightning investigated.

  1. Post-Storm Middle and Low-Latitude Ionospheric Electric Fields Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejer, B. G.; Blanc, M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere undergoes large and complex perturbations during and after geomagnetic storms. Thermospheric winds driven by enhanced energy and momentum due to geomagnetic activity generate large disturbance electric fields, plasma drifts and currents with a broad range of temporal and spatial scales from high to equatorial latitudes. This disturbance dynamo mechanism plays a fundamental role on the response of the middle and low-latitude ionosphere to geomagnetic activity. In this review, we initially describe the early evidence for the importance of this process and the first simulation study which already was able to explain its main effects on the electrodynamics of the middle and low-latitude ionosphere. We then describe the results of more recent simulations and the extensive experimental work that highlights the importance of this mechanism for ionospheric space weather studies extending to post-storms periods, and present some suggestions for future studies.

  2. Post-Storm Middle and Low-Latitude Ionospheric Electric Fields Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejer, B. G.; Blanc, M.; Richmond, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere undergoes large and complex perturbations during and after geomagnetic storms. Thermospheric winds driven by enhanced energy and momentum due to geomagnetic activity generate large disturbance electric fields, plasma drifts and currents with a broad range of temporal and spatial scales from high to equatorial latitudes. This disturbance dynamo mechanism plays a fundamental role on the response of the middle and low-latitude ionosphere to geomagnetic activity. In this review, we initially describe the early evidence for the importance of this process and the first simulation study which already was able to explain its main effects on the electrodynamics of the middle and low-latitude ionosphere. We then describe the results of more recent simulations and the extensive experimental work that highlights the importance of this mechanism for ionospheric space weather studies extending to post-storms periods, and present some suggestions for future studies.

  3. Interplanetary drivers of daytime penetration electric field into equatorial ionosphere during CIR-induced geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeeram, Thana

    2017-05-01

    Observations based on the magnetometer data of the response of the daytime equatorial electric field to the geomagnetic storms induced by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) during 2007-2010 reveal many events of striking long duration of multiple short-lived prompt penetration electric fields (PPEFs). The PPEFs essentially occurred in the main phase of the storms, which are associated with the ring current and magnetic reconnection of the southward z-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bz) in relation to the Alfvén waves. The behaviors of the electric field penetration during the storms are consistent with the shielding theory. Particularly, the PPEF is found to be complex due to transient variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure (SWDP) and the IMF Bz in the CIRs. The PPEF is temporary suppressed for about an hour under a shock in association with a drop in the SWDP. The interplanetary electric field Ey is the main driver of the PPEFs, when the solar wind speed, SWDP, and the symmetric ring current are nearly constant, even in the recovery phase. The PPEF is allowed under the condition of high and variable SWDP. The shocks with a northward IMF Bz shield the PPEFs when the SWDP is nearly constant. The partial ring current is strongest in the large and northward IMF Bz, where the shielding effect is greater than the undershielding caused by the large SWDP. The results may provide an important step to study equatorial and low latitude ionospheric electrodynamics in the solar minimum conditions.

  4. Electric Field Influence on Driving the Storm-Time Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharia, S. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; MacDonald, E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2013-05-01

    We present initial numerical simulation results of the storm-time near-Earth magnetosphere obtained with our newly improved self-consistent model, RAM-SCB. The model represents a 2-way coupling of the kinetic ring current-atmosphere interactions model (RAM) with an Euler potential-based 3D plasma equilibrium code. In our approach, the magnetic field is computed in force balance with the anisotropic pressures in RAM (anisotropy being critically important for wave excitation), and then returned to RAM to guide the particle dynamics. RAM-SCB thus properly treats both the kinetic drift physics crucial in the inner magnetosphere (where gradient/curvature drifts are important) and the self-consistent interaction between plasma and magnetic field (required due to the strong depressions in the field during storms that affect the plasma evolution). Recent improvements in RAM-SCB are the expansion of the boundary from geosynchronous location to 9 RE from Earth and the first-time inclusion of a self-consistent electric field, obtained by closing the field-aligned currents in the ionosphere. This extension makes RAM-SCB the most physically complete inner magnetosphere model in the community, with fully self-consistent 3D magnetic and electric fields. The presentation will analyze, using storm-time simulations of the near-Earth magnetosphere with the improved model, the effect of the self-consistent electric field on ring current dynamics, in comparison with empirical electric field models such as Weimer 01 and Volland/Stern models. We will also compare model results with observations (including global indices such as Dst, but also plasma and field data from available spacecraft, such as Polar, Cluster, GOES and the recently launched Van Allen Probes).

  5. Electrically conductive chitosan/carbon scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana M; Eng, George; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-02-10

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells.

  6. Electrically Conductive Chitosan/Carbon Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  7. Electrical and Mechanical Strategies to Enable Cardiac Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hung; Kang, Bong Jin; Lee, Chia-An; Shung, K. Kirk; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate replacement of lost ventricular myocardium from myocardial infarction leads to heart failure. Investigating the regenerative capacity of mammalian hearts represents an emerging direction for tissue engineering and cell-based therapy. Recent advances in stem cells hold promise to restore cardiac functions. However, embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes lack functional phenotypes of the native myocardium, and transplanted tissues are not fully integrated for synchronized electrical and mechanical coupling with the host. In this context, this review highlights the mechanical and electrical strategies to promote cardiomyocyte maturation and integration, and to assess the functional phenotypes of regenerating myocardium. Simultaneous micro-electrocardiogram and high-frequency ultrasound techniques will also be introduced to assess electrical and mechanical coupling for small animal models of heart regeneration. PMID:25974948

  8. Effects of disturbed electric fields in the low-latitude and equatorial ionosphere during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Jiawei; Liu, Libo; Liu, Jing; Sripathi, S.; Zhao, Biqiang; Chen, Yiding; Le, Huijun; Hu, Lianhuan

    2016-09-01

    The 2015 St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm with SYM-H value of -233 nT is an extreme space weather event in the current 24th solar cycle. In this work, we investigated the main mechanisms of the profound ionospheric disturbances over equatorial and low latitudes in the Asian-Australian sector and the American sector during this super storm event. The results reveal that the disturbed electric fields, which comprise penetration electric fields (PEFs) and disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEFs), play a decisive role in the ionospheric storm effects in low latitude and equatorial regions. PEFs occur on 17 March in both the American sector and the Asian-Australian sector. The effects of DDEFs are also remarkable in the two longitudinal sectors. Both the DDEFs and PEFs show the notable local time dependence, which causes the sector differences in the characteristics of the disturbed electric fields. This differences would further lead to the sector differences in the low-latitude ionospheric response during this storm. The negative storm effects caused by the long-duration DDEFs are intense over the Asian-Australian sector, while the repeated elevations of hmF2 and the equatorial ionization anomaly intensifications caused by the multiple strong PEFs are more distinctive over the American sector. Especially, the storm time F3 layer features are caught on 17 March in the American equatorial region, proving the effects of the multiple strong eastward PEFs.

  9. [A case of electrical storm in a patient with short-coupled variant of torsade de pointes].

    PubMed

    Conte, Giulio; Coppini, Lucia; Demola, Maria Antonietta; Ardissino, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Short-coupled variant of torsade de pointes (TdP) is an uncommon variant of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia with unknown etiology. It is initiated by a closely coupled premature ventricular complex (<300 ms) in the absence of QT prolongation and structural heart disease. Verapamil seems to be the only drug able to suppress the arrhythmia but, as it does not reduce the risk of sudden death, implantation of a cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is recommended. We describe the case of a 46-year-old woman referred to our Emergency Department because of palpitations. The initial ECG showed a non-sustained polymorphic ventricular tachycardia with a borderline QTc interval (450 ms). After admission, the patient experienced an episode of TdP that started after short-coupling interval (280 ms) between the last sinus beat and the ventricular premature beat (VPB). DC-shock restored sinus rhythm. Physical examination, exercise testing, echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance were all normal, and she had no family history of sudden cardiac death. Baseline ECG showed sinus rhythm and unifocal VPBs with the same morphology of the VPB of TdP. The patient received an ICD and was treated medically with verapamil. She was discharged from the hospital on oral therapy with verapamil (240 mg/day), and she was free of recurrence 12 months later when an electrical storm occurred. The verapamil dose was therefore increased to 480 mg/day. Unifocal VPBs disappeared from her body surface ECG, and the subsequent 3-year follow-up was uneventful.

  10. Effect of Precipitating Electrons on Stormtime Inner Magnetospheric Electric Fields during the 17 March 2013 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Lemon, C. L.; Sazykin, S. Y.; Wolf, R.; Hecht, J. H.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Boyd, A. J.; Turner, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate how scattering of electrons by waves in the plasma sheet and plasmasphere affects precipitating energy flux distributions and how the precipitating electrons modify the ionospheric conductivity and electric potentials during the large 17 March 2013 magnetic storm. Of particular interest is how electron precipitation in the evening sector affects the development of the Sub-auroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) electric field that is observed at sub-auroral latitudes in that sector. Our approach is to use the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model - Equilibrium (RCM-E) of the inner magnetosphere to simulate the stormtime precipitating electron distributions and the electric field. We use parameterized rates of whistler-generated electron pitch-angle scattering from Orlova and Shprits [JGR, 2014] that depend on equatorial radial distance, magnetic activity (Kp), and magnetic local time (MLT) outside the simulated plasmasphere. Inside the plasmasphere, parameterized scattering rates due to hiss [Orlova et al., GRL, 2014] are used. We compare simulated trapped and precipitating electron flux distributions with measurements from Van Allen Probes/MagEIS, POES/TED and MEPED, respectively, to validate the electron loss model. Ground-based (SuperDARN) and in-situ (Van Allen Probes/EFW) observations of electric fields are compared with the simulation results. We discuss the effect of precipitating electrons on the SAPS and inner magnetospheric electric field through the data-model comparisons.

  11. Practical aspects of cardiac tissue engineering with electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Christopher; Tandon, Nina; Figallo, Elisa; Park, Hyoungshin; Gerecht, Sharon; Radisic, Milica; Elvassore, Nicola; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2007-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in western society. Despite the success of heart transplantation, a chronic shortage of donor organs, along with the associated immunological complications of this approach, demands that alternative treatments be found. One such option is to repair, rather than replace, the heart with engineered cardiac tissue. Multiple studies have shown that to attain functional tissue, assembly signaling cues must be recapitulated in vitro. In their native environment, cardiomyocytes are directed to beat in synchrony by propagation of pacing current through the tissue. Recently, we have shown that electrical stimulation directs neonatal cardiomyocytes to assemble into native-like tissue in vitro. This chapter provides detailed methods we have employed in taking this "biomimetic" approach. After an initial discussion on how electric field stimulation can influence cell behavior, we examine the practical aspects of cardiac tissue engineering with electrical stimulation, such as electrode selection and cell seeding protocols, and conclude with what we feel are the remaining challenges to be overcome.

  12. Homeostatic regulation of electrical excitability in physiological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Foeger, Nicholas C; Marionneau, Céline; Jay, Patrick Y; McMullen, Julie R; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2010-01-01

    Pathological biomechanical stresses cause cardiac hypertrophy, which is associated with QT prolongation and arrhythmias. Previous studies have demonstrated that repolarizing K+ current densities are decreased in pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy, resulting in action potential and QT prolongation. Cardiac hypertrophy also occurs with exercise training, but this physiological hypertrophy is not associated with electrical abnormalities or increased arrhythmia risk, suggesting that repolarizing K+ currents are upregulated, in parallel with the increase in myocyte size, to maintain normal cardiac function. To explore this hypothesis directly, electrophysiological recordings were obtained from ventricular myocytes isolated from two mouse models of physiological hypertrophy, one produced by swim-training of wild-type mice and the other by cardiac-specific expression of constitutively active phosphoinositide-3-kinase-p110α (caPI3Kα). Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings revealed that repolarizing K+ current amplitudes were higher in ventricular myocytes isolated from swim-trained and caPI3Kα, compared with wild-type, animals. The increases in K+ current amplitudes paralleled the observed cellular hypertrophy, resulting in normalized or increased K+ current densities. Electrocardiographic parameters, including QT intervals, as well as ventricular action potential waveforms in swim-trained animals/myocytes were indistinguishable from controls, demonstrating preserved electrical function. Additional experiments revealed that inward Ca2+ current amplitudes/densities were also increased in caPI3Kα, compared with WT, left ventricular myocytes. The expression of transcripts encoding K+, Ca2+ and other ion channel subunits was increased in swim-trained and caPI3Kα ventricles, in parallel with the increase in myocyte size and with the global increases in total cellular RNA expression. In contrast to pathological hypertrophy, therefore, the functional

  13. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability. To obtain a comprehensive assessment, diverse biological models were employed. These involved cardiac electrical testing in the normal and ischemic heart in anesthetized and conscious dogs. The experimental plan was designed both to examine the direct effects of carbon monoxide exposure on the myocardium and to evaluate possible indirect influences through alterations in platelet aggregability or changes in central nervous system activity in the conscious animal. Our results indicate that exposure to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, is without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. It is important to note that the total exposure period was in the range of 90 to 124 minutes. The possibility that longer periods of exposure or exacerbation from nicotine in cigarette smoke could have a deleterious effect cannot be excluded. We also examined whether or not alterations in platelet aggregability due to carbon monoxide exposure could be a predisposing factor for cardiac arrhythmias. A model involving partial coronary artery stenosis was used to simulate the conditions under which platelet plugs could lead to myocardial ischemia and life-threatening arrhythmias. We found no changes either in the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Thus, carbon monoxide exposure does not appear to alter platelet aggregability or its effect on coronary blood flow during stenosis. In the final series of experiments, we examined the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state.

  14. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 1; Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of retrieving storm electric fields from an aircraft instrumented with several electric field mill sensors can be expressed in terms of a standard Lagrange multiplier optimization problem. The method naturally removes aircraft charge from the retrieval process without having to use a high voltage stinger and linearly combined mill data values. It allows a variety of user-supplied physical constraints (the so-called side constraints in the theory of Lagrange multipliers) and also helps improve absolute calibration. Additionally, this paper introduces an alternate way of performing the absolute calibration of an aircraft that has some benefits over conventional analyses. It is accomplished by using the time derivatives of mill and pitch data for a pitch down maneuver performed at high (greater than 1 km) altitude. In Part II of this study, the above methods are tested and then applied to complete a full calibration of a Citation aircraft.

  15. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part I: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of retrieving storm electric fields from an aircraft instrumented with several electric field mill sensors can be expressed in terms of a standard Lagrange multiplier optimization problem. The method naturally removes aircraft charge from the retrieval process without having to use a high voltage stinger and linearly combined mill data values. It also allows a variety of user-supplied physical constraints (the so-called side constraints in the theory of Lagrange multipliers). Additionally, this paper introduces a novel way of performing the absolute calibration of an aircraft that has several benefits over conventional analyses. In the new approach, absolute calibration is completed by inspecting the time derivatives of mill and pitch data for a pitch down maneuver performed at high (greater than 1 km) altitude. In Part II of this study, the above methods are tested and then applied to complete a full calibration of a Citation aircraft.

  16. Analysis of Van Allen Probes Data Showing Nonlinear Electric Field Feedback During a Magnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Katus, R. M.; Smith, L. K.; Skoug, R. M.; Niehof, J. T.; Spence, H.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Smith, C. W.; Kletzing, C.; Ilie, R.; Ganushkina, N.

    2013-12-01

    Van Allen Probes data was examined to assess the role of nonlinear feedback in relationship to the spatial structure of hot ions in the inner magnetosphere. During the magnetic storm that peaked on June 1, 2013, localized electric field perturbations from the EFW instrument were observed in relationship to the plasma pressure peak (as identified by the HOPE H+ and O+ fluxes in the 1-40 keV range, as well as magnetic field perturbations from EMFISIS) with a systematic sinusoidal perturbation. Near apogee, it takes the Van Allen Probes 30-60 minutes to traverse a peak in the ion fluxes. Therefore, the electric field was averaged over several minutes to remove the higher-frequency wave oscillations, revealing the longer-baseline perturbation associated with the pressure peak. While the fluxes indicate that the satellite is passing through a pressure peak, the magnetic field perturbation reveals the spatial location of the pressure extrema relative to the spacecraft location. The pattern of these electric fields relative to the location of the plasma pressure peak is in agreement with the hypothesis based on theory and numerical simulation results that an azimuthally localized pressure peak should create a systematic and predictable small-scale reconfiguration of the electric field. This electric field modification is because the field-aligned currents near each end of the pressure crescent close via Pedersen currents, perturbing the electric field in this region, as regulated by the ionospheric conductance. The level of this reconfiguration, relative to the expected dawn-dusk electric field within the magnetosphere, indicates the intensity of the nonlinear feedback.

  17. Prophylactic left thoracic sympathectomy to prevent electrical storms in CPVT patients needing ICD placement.

    PubMed

    Moray, Amol; Kirk, Edwin P; Grant, Peter; Camphausen, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT), a life threatening arrhythmia induced by sympathetic stimulation in susceptible individuals is often refractory to antiarrhythmic agents. First line of treatment, beta-blockers can be ineffective in up to 50% with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placement for refractory cases. Paradoxically ICD can be arryhthmogenic from shock-associated sympathetic stimulation, initiating more shocks and "electrical storms". This has led to the use of more effective beta blockade offered by left sympathectomy, now performed by minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Sympathectomy has been traditionally performed long after ICD placement, after the patient has experienced multiple shocks, thus necessitating two procedures. We report simultaneous ICD insertion and thoracoscopic sympathectomy in a 10 year-old boy with CPVT, and suggest it as a better approach than sequential procedures. To our knowledge this is first such reported case. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Subtle alternating electrocardiographic morphology as an indicator of decreased cardiac electrical stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Blue, B.; Clancy, E.; Valeri, C. R.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Observations from finite-element computer models, together with analytic developments based on percolation theory have suggested that subtle fluctuations of ECG morphology might serve as an indicator diminished cardiac electrical stability. With fixed-rate atrial pacing in canines, we have previously observed a pattern of alternation in T wave energy which correlated with cardiac electrical stability. We report here on a series of 20 canine experiments in which cardiac electrical stability (measured via Ventricular Fibrillation Threshold determination) was compared to a non-degenerate, multidimensional measurement of the degree of alternating activity present in the ECG complex morphology. The decrease in cardiac electrical stability brought on by both coronary artery occlusion and systemic hypothermia was consistently accompanied by subtle alternation in ECG morphology, with the absolute degree of alternating activity being significantly (negatively) correlated with cardiac electrical stability.

  19. Cardiac thrombus developing after an accidental high-voltage electric shock in a child.

    PubMed

    Akın, Alper; Bilici, Meki; Demir, Fikri; Gözü Pirinççioğlu, Ayfer; Yavuz, Celal

    2015-01-01

    Electric shock is a condition that may affect various organ systems and potentially cause death. Cardiac findings vary from asymptomatic mild injury to fatal myocardial involvement. Herein we present a five-year-old boy with a cardiac thrombus developing after an accidental electrical shock. Cardiac arrhythmias and evidence of ischemia have been reported after electric shock; we were, however, unable to identify an earlier case report of intracardiac thrombosis related to electric shock. Findings such as elevated cardiac enzymes and systolic dysfunction, which indicate myocardial damage following electric shock, were present in our patient. We think that the cardiac thrombus might have resulted from the myocardial damage and the slowed intracardiac blood flow related to systolic dysfunction. As the thrombus was thought to have been formed through known mechanisms, it was treated traditionally. However, further data regarding the etiology and management of such thrombi is needed.

  20. Subtle alternating electrocardiographic morphology as an indicator of decreased cardiac electrical stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Blue, B.; Clancy, E.; Valeri, C. R.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Observations from finite-element computer models, together with analytic developments based on percolation theory have suggested that subtle fluctuations of ECG morphology might serve as an indicator diminished cardiac electrical stability. With fixed-rate atrial pacing in canines, we have previously observed a pattern of alternation in T wave energy which correlated with cardiac electrical stability. We report here on a series of 20 canine experiments in which cardiac electrical stability (measured via Ventricular Fibrillation Threshold determination) was compared to a non-degenerate, multidimensional measurement of the degree of alternating activity present in the ECG complex morphology. The decrease in cardiac electrical stability brought on by both coronary artery occlusion and systemic hypothermia was consistently accompanied by subtle alternation in ECG morphology, with the absolute degree of alternating activity being significantly (negatively) correlated with cardiac electrical stability.

  1. Electrical storm originating from a left ventricular epicardial scar in a patient with completely normal endocardial voltage.

    PubMed

    Sternick, Eduardo Back; Piorkowski, Christopher; Hindricks, Gerhard; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sommer, Philipp

    2011-11-01

    We report a patient with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy presenting with an electrical storm because of a poorly tolerated monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. Electroanatomical mapping revealed a scar restricted to the epicardium, whereas the endocardial voltage map was completely normal. Epicardial catheter ablation based on substrate mapping and limited pace and entrainment mapping eliminated the tachycardia.

  2. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  3. Rabbit models of cardiac mechano-electric and mechano-mechanical coupling.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac auto-regulation involves integrated regulatory loops linking electrics and mechanics in the heart. Whereas mechanical activity is usually seen as 'the endpoint' of cardiac auto-regulation, it is important to appreciate that the heart would not function without feed-back from the mechanical environment to cardiac electrical (mechano-electric coupling, MEC) and mechanical (mechano-mechanical coupling, MMC) activity. MEC and MMC contribute to beat-by-beat adaption of cardiac output to physiological demand, and they are involved in various pathological settings, potentially aggravating cardiac dysfunction. Experimental and computational studies using rabbit as a model species have been integral to the development of our current understanding of MEC and MMC. In this paper we review this work, focusing on physiological and pathological implications for cardiac function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulseless electrical activity in cardiac arrest: electrocardiographic presentations and management considerations based on the electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Chris; Brady, William

    2012-01-01

    Pulseless electrical activity (PEA), a cardiac arrest rhythm scenario with an associated poor prognosis, is defined as cardiac electrical activity without a palpable pulse. Considering both outpatient and inpatient cardiac arrest presentations, PEA as a rhythm group has been increasing over the past 10 to 20 years with a corresponding decrease in the "shockable" rhythms, such as pulseless ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on electrocardiographic findings encountered in PEA cardiac arrest presentations with an emphasis on recognition of patients with a potential opportunity for successful resuscitation.

  5. Storm-time electric fields in the mid-latitude ionosphere observed by ground magnetometers and the Akebono satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Y.; Shinbori, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Matsuoka, A.

    2008-12-01

    The mid-latitude ionosphere electromagnetically connected to the inner magnetosphere via magnetic field lines is an important region for understanding storm-time magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In order to clarify distributions of electric fields and currents in the mid- and low-latitude ionosphere during storms, we investigated latitudinal and local time dependence of magnetic field variations for six storms using a ground magnetometer network covering from high to equatorial latitudes. The analysis results suggested that competition between convection and shielding electric fields controlled characteristics of magnetic disturbances caused by mid-latitude ionospheric currents. However, a quantitative relationship between ground magnetic disturbances and in-situ ionospheric electric fields has not been clarified yet because of difficulties in deducing electric fields from magnetic field variations. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed ground magnetic disturbances and electric field mapped onto the ionosphere observed by the Akebono satellite during the storm occurred on February 21-22, 1994, with a minimum SYM-H value of -152 nT. During the main phase of the storm, the satellite passed through a region from 73 degrees invariant latitude (ILAT) and 10 magnetic local time (MLT) to 49 degrees ILAT and 18 MLT from 0055 to 0148 UT. The poleward electric field changed negative to positive values at 65.5 degrees ILAT (15 MLT). The electric field signature indicates that the center of region-1 field-aligned currents (R-1 FACs) was located at this latitude. Subsequently, the electric field profile showed two peaks at 62-63 degrees ILAT (15.5 MLT) and 55 degrees ILAT (17 MLT). The former corresponds to the auroral oval identified by the lower energy particle instrument of the Akebono. On the other hand, during the same period, we also investigated the latitudinal distribution of the northward magnetic field variation measured on the ground (16.5-19.5 MLT). The

  6. Preliminary Optical And Electric Field Pulse Statistics From Storm Overflights During The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. A.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect high resolution optical pulse and electric field data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses with associated electric field changes. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We found filtered mean and median 10-10% optical pulse widths of 875 and 830 microns respectively while the 50-50% mean and median optical pulse widths are 422 and 365 microns respectively. These values are similar to previous results as are the 10-90% mean and median rise times of 327 and 265 microns. The peak electrical to optical pulse delay mean and median were 209 and 145 microns which is longer than one would expect from theoretical results. The results of the pulse analysis will contribute to further validation of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellites. Pre-launch estimates of the flash detection efficiency were based on a small sample of optical pulse measurements associated with less than 350 lightning discharges collected by NASA U-2 aircraft in the early 1980s. Preliminary analyses of the ACES measurements show that we have greatly increased the number of optical pulses available for validation of the LIS and other orbital lightning optical sensors. Since the Altus was often close to the cloud tops, many of the optical pulses are from low-energy pulses. From these low-energy pulses, we can determine the fraction of optical lightning pulses below the thresholds of LIS, OTD, and any future satellite-based optical sensors such as the geostationary Lightning Mapping Sensor.

  7. Preliminary Optical And Electric Field Pulse Statistics From Storm Overflights During The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. A.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect high resolution optical pulse and electric field data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses with associated electric field changes. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We found filtered mean and median 10-10% optical pulse widths of 875 and 830 microns respectively while the 50-50% mean and median optical pulse widths are 422 and 365 microns respectively. These values are similar to previous results as are the 10-90% mean and median rise times of 327 and 265 microns. The peak electrical to optical pulse delay mean and median were 209 and 145 microns which is longer than one would expect from theoretical results. The results of the pulse analysis will contribute to further validation of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellites. Pre-launch estimates of the flash detection efficiency were based on a small sample of optical pulse measurements associated with less than 350 lightning discharges collected by NASA U-2 aircraft in the early 1980s. Preliminary analyses of the ACES measurements show that we have greatly increased the number of optical pulses available for validation of the LIS and other orbital lightning optical sensors. Since the Altus was often close to the cloud tops, many of the optical pulses are from low-energy pulses. From these low-energy pulses, we can determine the fraction of optical lightning pulses below the thresholds of LIS, OTD, and any future satellite-based optical sensors such as the geostationary Lightning Mapping Sensor.

  8. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue.

  9. Analysis of electric field stimulation of single cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, L; Borderies, J R

    1992-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of cardiac cells by imposed extracellular electric fields results in a transmembrane potential which is highly nonuniform, with one end of the cell depolarized and the other end hyperpolarized along the field direction. To date, the implications of the close proximity of oppositely polarized membranes on excitability have not been explored. In this work we compare the biophysical basis for field stimulation of cells at rest with that for intracellular current injection, using three Luo-Rudy type membrane patches coupled together as a lumped model to represent the cell membrane. Our model shows that cell excitation is a function of the temporal and spatial distribution of ionic currents and transmembrane potential. The extracellular and intracellular forms of stimulation were compared in greater detail for monophasic and symmetric biphasic rectangular pulses, with duration ranging from 0.5 to 10 ms. Strength-duration curves derived for field stimulation show that over a wide range of pulse durations, biphasic waveforms can recruit and activate membrane patches about as effectively as can monophasic waveforms having the same total pulse duration. We find that excitation with biphasic stimulation results from a synergistic, temporal summation of inward currents through the sodium channel in membrane patches at opposite ends of the cell. Furthermore, with both waveform types, a net inward current through the inwardly rectifying potassium channel contributes to initial membrane depolarization. In contrast, models of stimulation by intracellular current injection do not account for the nonuniformity of transmembrane potential and produce substantially different (even contradictory) results for the case of stimulation from rest. PMID:1420884

  10. Van Allen Probes based investigation of storm time plasmasphere erosion and earthward penetration of the convection electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Dai, L.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Bonnell, J. W.; De Pascuale, S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Bounds, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Using the Van Allen Probes we investigate the erosion of the plasmasphere as well as the evolution in location of the plasmapause during large storms (Dst < -100 nT). In addition, we also examine the penetration of the large scale storm-time convection electric field to low L ( < 3 RE) and its role in erosion of the plasmasphere. The enhanced convection electric field penetrates to low L during large storms, and a tangible effect on plasmasphere erosion is observed at low L. The plasmaspause is identified through the UHR line in EMFISIS high frequency spectral data and plasma densities determined from calibration fits to the spacecraft potential from the EFW instrument; such fits are also presented herein. During large storms the plasmapause can move to within L~1.9 RE of the earth. The erosion of the plasmasphere and consequent inward movement of the plasmapause to low L from quite time locations (4-5 RE) occurs within less than one orbit period (~9hr).

  11. Reconstruction of the electrical activity of cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, R E; Noble, D; Tsien, R W

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical activity of Cardiac Purkinje fibres was reconstructed using a mathematical model of the membrane current. The individual components of ionic curent were described by equations which wee based as closely as possible on previous experiments using the voltage clamp technique. 2. Membrane action potentials and pace-maker activity were calculated and compared with time course of underlying changes in two functionally distinct outeard currents, iX1 and iK2. 3. The repolarization of the theoretical action potential is triggered by the onset of iX1, which becomes activated over the plateau range of potentials. iK2 also activates during the plateau but does not play a controlling role in the repolarization. Hwever, iK2 does govern the slow pace-maker depolarization through its subsequent deactivation at negative potentials. 4. The individual phases of the calculated action potential and their 'experimental' modifications were compared with published records. The upstroke is generated by a Hodgkin-Huxley type sodium conductance (gNa), and rises with a maximum rate of 478 V/sec, somewhat less than experimentally observed values ( up to 800 V/sec). The discrepancy is discussed in relation to experimental attempts at measuring gNa. 5. The ole of the transient outward chloride current (called igr) was studied in calculations of the rapid phase of repolarization and 'notch' configuration... PMID:1185607

  12. Suppression of the cardiac electric field artifact from the heart action evoked potential.

    PubMed

    Pérez, J J; Guijarro, E; Barcia, J A

    2005-09-01

    The study of heart action-related brain potentials is strongly disrupted by the presence of an inherent cardiac electric artifact. The hypothesis is presented that most of the electric current coupled to the cardiac field surrounds the skull and flows through the scalp tissue without crossing the cranial cavity. This pseudo two-dimensional conduction model contrasts with the volumetric conduction of the brain electrical activity, and this property is exploited to cancel the cardiac electric artifact. QRS loop vector-cardiographic projections on saggital planes were recorded in 11 healthy subjects in the head and neck areas. Comparative analysis of the projection eccentricities, estimated by the correlation coefficients of the paired data on each area, supported the hypothesis and allowed the handling of the cardiac electric field at the scalp as if enclosed in a two-dimensional wrapped space. This approach permitted the combination of different heart action-related brain potentials recorded at different electrode positions to cancel the cardiac electric artifact. The cancellation method, applied to the subjects' EEG data, yielded a slow cortical potential with a negligible cardiac electric residue and an amplitude of about 1.5-2 microV, with a maximum around 150 ms and a minimum at 400 ms post-R wave.

  13. Reproducing electric field observations during magnetic storms by means of rigorous 3-D modelling and distortion matrix co-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2014-12-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth by geomagnetic disturbances drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines, which can cause service disruptions. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we revisit a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a magnetospheric source model described by low-degree spherical harmonics from observatory magnetic data. The actual electric field, however, is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and modelled electric fields. Using data of six magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimate distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Reliable estimates are obtained, and the modellings are found to explain up to 90% of the measurements. We further find that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of the shape of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the method relies on precomputed responses of a 3-D Earth to geomagnetic disturbances, which can be recycled for each storm, the required computational resources are negligible. Our approach is thus suitable for real-time prediction of geomagnetically induced currents by combining it with reliable forecasts of the source field.

  14. Electrical Stimulation Promotes Cardiac Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Damián; Millard, Rodney; Sivakumaran, Priyadharshini; Wong, Raymond C. B.; Crombie, Duncan E.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Liang, Helena; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Pébay, Alice; Shepherd, Robert K.; Dusting, Gregory J.; Lim, Shiang Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are an attractive source of cardiomyocytes for cardiac repair and regeneration. In this study, we aim to determine whether acute electrical stimulation of human iPSCs can promote their differentiation to cardiomyocytes. Methods. Human iPSCs were differentiated to cardiac cells by forming embryoid bodies (EBs) for 5 days. EBs were then subjected to brief electrical stimulation and plated down for 14 days. Results. In iPS(Foreskin)-2 cell line, brief electrical stimulation at 65 mV/mm or 200 mV/mm for 5 min significantly increased the percentage of beating EBs present by day 14 after plating. Acute electrical stimulation also significantly increased the cardiac gene expression of ACTC1, TNNT2, MYH7, and MYL7. However, the cardiogenic effect of electrical stimulation was not reproducible in another iPS cell line, CERA007c6. Beating EBs from control and electrically stimulated groups expressed various cardiac-specific transcription factors and contractile muscle markers. Beating EBs were also shown to cycle calcium and were responsive to the chronotropic agents, isoproterenol and carbamylcholine, in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that brief electrical stimulation can promote cardiac differentiation of human iPS cells. The cardiogenic effect of brief electrical stimulation is dependent on the cell line used. PMID:26788064

  15. Response of the Fair Weather Atmospheric Electrical Current to Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Elhalal, Gal

    2013-04-01

    The Global Electric Circuit (GEC) is a conceptual model that integrates the observed electrical properties of the atmosphere in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. An average potential difference of 250 kV exists between these two conducting layers, leading to a surface electric field (Ez, sometimes also named the Potential Gradient or PG) of ~130 V/m, and a nearly constant downward flowing direct current density (Jz) of ~2 pA m-2. This is known as the DC component of the GEC. The Jz is an extremely sensitive parameter whose magnitude and fluctuations can be used for monitoring local and global conductivity changes due to aerosols, air-pollution and solar activity. The AC part of the circuit is driven by ~50 lightning flashes per second generating the global Schumann resonances (SR) in the ELF range. There are two time-scales for identifying solar effects on the GEC. On the longer scale, an 11-year modulation by solar activity, likely due to changes in ionization, was reported by several authors. For example, Satori et al. (2005) noted a decrease in the frequency of the first 3 modes of the SR band in conjunction with the solar minimum of 1995-6. On shorter time scales typical of solar activity (e.g. CMEs, solar flares and SEP events), observations show marked perturbations in Jz and in the ionospheric potential at the surface. Cobb (1967) observed an increase of Jz by 75% for ~ 6 h in measurements made at Mauna Loa in Hawaii, during a period of multiple solar flares. Reiter (1989) observed an increase in Jz of about 50%-60% following large solar flares, persisting for 4 days (at the Zungspietze station in the Alps). Belova et al. (2001) reported increased Jz for about 2 hours before T=0 (time of minimum in Bx) as well as enhanced average fluctuations. This talk will review the effects of solar storms on the GEC, and present new results from continuous measurements of Jz conducted at the Wise Observatory in Mitzpe-Ramon, Israel (30°35'N, 34°45'E). During 3 different

  16. The impact of solar flares and magnetic storms on the Earth's atmospheric electrical parameters and VLF electromagnetic waves propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, Alexey; Poklad, Yuri; Rybakov, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Boris; Ermak, Vladimir; Ryakhovskiy, Ilya; Soloviev, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Changes in solar activity lead to fluctuations in the speed of the solar wind, the appearance of cosmic rays flare and perturbations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Streams of solar cosmic rays directly alter profile of the atmospheric ionization rate and modulate the flux of galactic cosmic rays penetrating into the atmosphere. Changes in the conduction profile lead to increased atmospheric electric field at altitudes of 15 km and below, where formed and electrified clouds. In addition, the change in resistance of the air column above the thunderstorm generators of the global electric circuit leads to a change in the potential difference between the surface of the Earth and the ionosphere. The "Mikhnevo" observatory near Moscow, Russia carried out monitoring measurements of amplitude and phase characteristics of VLF radio signals, the near surface electric field and the vertical current of the atmosphere. Variation of the electric field and currents modulated by solar flares were revealed. The effect of the temporary increase in the electrical parameters noticeable on smooth curves. During strong magnetic storm of March 17, 2015 perturbation of amplitudes and the phases of VLF radio signals were recorded that associated with the disturbance D-layer of the ionosphere on the paths of radio signals propagation. Analysis of the amplitude and phase characteristics of the VLF radio signals for the 2014-2016 has showed perturbations during geomagnetic storms and substorms with Kp=7 or below. Such perturbations are usually have local or regional character.

  17. Non-invasive determination of cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography and electrical bioimpedance.

    PubMed Central

    Northridge, D B; Findlay, I N; Wilson, J; Henderson, E; Dargie, H J

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac output measured by thermodilution in 25 patients within 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction was compared with cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (24 patients) and electrical bioimpedance (25 patients). The mean (range) cardiac outputs measured by Doppler (4.03 (2.2-6.0) 1/min) and electrical bioimpedance (3.79 (1.1-6.2) 1/min) were similar to the mean thermodilution value (3.95 (2.1-6.2) 1/min). Both non-invasive techniques agreed closely with thermodilution in most patients. None the less, three results with each method disagreed with thermodilution by more than 1 1/min. Both non-invasive techniques were reproducible and accurate in most patients with acute myocardial infarction. Doppler echocardiography was time consuming and technically demanding. Electrical bioimpedance was simple to use and had the additional advantage of allowing continuous monitoring of the cardiac output. PMID:2317415

  18. Three dimensional graphene scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering and in-situ electrical recording.

    PubMed

    Ameri, S K; Singh, P K; D'Angelo, R; Stoppel, W; Black, L; Sonkusale, S R

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional graphene foam made of few layers of CVD grown graphene as a scaffold for growing cardiac cells and recording their electrical activity. Our results show that graphene foam not only provides an excellent extra-cellular matrix (ECM) for the culture of such electrogenic cells but also enables recording of its extracellular electrical activity in-situ. Recording is possible due to graphene's excellent conductivity. In this paper, we present our results on the fabrication of the graphene scaffold and initial studies on the culture of cardiac cell lines such as HL-1 and recording of their real-time electrical activity.

  19. Roles of electric field and fiber structure in cardiac electric stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Knisley, S B; Trayanova, N; Aguel, F

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated roles of the variation of extracellular voltage gradient (VG) over space and cardiac fibers in production of transmembrane voltage changes (DeltaV(m)) during shocks. Eleven isolated rabbit hearts were arterially perfused with solution containing V(m)-sensitive fluorescent dye (di-4-ANEPPS). The epicardium received shocks from symmetrical or asymmetrical electrodes to produce nominally uniform or nonuniform VGs. Extracellular electric field and DeltaV(m) produced by shocks in the absolute refractory period were measured with electrodes and a laser scanner and were simulated with a bidomain computer model that incorporated the anterior left ventricular epicardial fiber field. Measurements and simulations showed that fibers distorted extracellular voltages and influenced the DeltaV(m). For both uniform and nonuniform shocks, DeltaV(m) depended primarily on second spatial derivatives of extracellular voltages, whereas the VGs played a smaller role. Thus, 1) fiber structure influences the extracellular electric field and the distribution of DeltaV(m); 2) the DeltaV(m) depend on second spatial derivatives of extracellular voltage. PMID:10465752

  20. The 17 March 2013 storm: Synergy of observations related to electric field modes and their ionospheric and magnetospheric Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Gallardo-Lacourt, B.; Zou, S.; Weygand, J. M.; Nishimura, Y.; Li, W.; Gkioulidou, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E. F.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Shepherd, S. G.; Nishitani, N.

    2016-11-01

    The main phase of the 17 March 2013 storm had excellent coverage from ground-based instruments and from low- and high-altitude spacecraft, allowing for evaluation of the relations between major storm time phenomena that are often considered separately. The shock impact with its concurrent southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) immediately drove dramatic poleward expansion of the poleward boundary of the auroral oval (implying strong nightside reconnection), strong auroral activity, and strong penetrating midlatitude convection and ionospheric currents. This was followed by periods of southward IMF driving of electric fields that were at first relatively smooth as often employed in storm modeling but then became extremely bursty and structured associated with equatorward extending auroral streamers. The auroral oval did not expand much further poleward during these two latter periods, suggesting a lower overall nightside reconnection rate than that during the first period and approximate balance with dayside reconnection. Characteristics of these three modes of driving were reflected in horizontal and field-aligned currents. Equatorward expansion of the auroral oval occurred predominantly during the structured convection mode, when electric fields became extremely bursty. The period of this third mode also approximately corresponded to the time of largest equatorward motion of the ionospheric trough, of apparent transport of high total electron content (TEC) features into the auroral oval from the polar cap, and of largest earthward injection of ions and electrons into the ring current. The enhanced responses of the aurora, currents, TEC, and the ring current indicate a common driving of all these storm time features during the bursty convection mode period.

  1. Simultaneous electrical recording of cardiac electrophysiology and contraction on chip

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, Fang; Huang, Chao; Lin, Yi-Dong; ...

    2017-04-18

    Prevailing commercialized cardiac platforms for in vitro drug development utilize planar microelectrode arrays to map action potentials, or impedance sensing to record contraction in real time, but cannot record both functions on the same chip with high spatial resolution. We report a novel cardiac platform that can record cardiac tissue adhesion, electrophysiology, and contractility on the same chip. The platform integrates two independent yet interpenetrating sensor arrays: a microelectrode array for field potential readouts and an interdigitated electrode array for impedance readouts. Together, these arrays provide real-time, non-invasive data acquisition of both cardiac electrophysiology and contractility under physiological conditions andmore » under drug stimuli. Furthermore, we cultured human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes as a model system, and used to validate the platform with an excitation–contraction decoupling chemical. Preliminary data using the platform to investigate the effect of the drug norepinephrine are combined with computational efforts. Finally, this platform provides a quantitative and predictive assay system that can potentially be used for comprehensive assessment of cardiac toxicity earlier in the drug discovery process.« less

  2. Outcomes of ventricular tachycardia ablation in patients with structural heart disease: The impact of electrical storm

    PubMed Central

    Aldhoon, Bashar; Wichterle, Dan; Peichl, Petr; Čihák, Robert; Kautzner, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Aims To investigate predictors of long-term outcomes after catheter ablation (CA) for ventricular tachycardia (VT) and the impact of electrical storm (ES) prior to index ablation procedures. Methods We studied consecutive patients with structural heart disease and VT (n = 328; age: 63±12 years; 88% males; 72% ischaemic cardiomyopathy; LVEF: 32±12%) who had undergone CA. According to presenting arrhythmia at baseline, they were divided into ES (n = 93, 28%) and non-ES groups. Clinical predictors of all-cause mortality were investigated and a clinically useful risk score (SCORE) was constructed. Results During a median follow-up of 927 days (IQR: 564–1626), 67% vs. 60% of patients (p = 0.05) experienced VT recurrence in the ES vs. the non-ES group, respectively; and 41% vs. 32% patients died (p = 0.02), respectively. Five factors were independently associated with mortality: age >70 years (hazard ratio (HR): 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1–2.4, p = 0.01), NYHA class ≥3 (HR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–2.9, p = 0.005), a serum creatinine level >1.3 mg/dL (HR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1–2.3, p = 0.02), LVEF ≤25% (HR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.6–3.5, p = 0.00004), and amiodarone therapy (HR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0–2.2, p = 0.03). A risk SCORE ranging from 0–4 (1 point for either high-risk age, NYHA, creatinine, or LVEF) correlated with mortality. ES during index ablation independently predicted mortality only in patients with a SCORE ≤1. Conclusions Advanced LV dysfunction, older age, higher NYHA class, renal dysfunction, and amiodarone therapy, but not ES, were predictors of poor outcomes after CA for VT in the total population. However, ES did predict mortality in a low-risk sub-group of patients. PMID:28187168

  3. Reversible cardiac conduction block and defibrillation with high-frequency electric field.

    PubMed

    Tandri, Harikrishna; Weinberg, Seth H; Chang, Kelly C; Zhu, Renjun; Trayanova, Natalia A; Tung, Leslie; Berger, Ronald D

    2011-09-28

    Electrical impulse propagation is an essential function in cardiac, skeletal muscle, and nervous tissue. Abnormalities in cardiac impulse propagation underlie lethal reentrant arrhythmias, including ventricular fibrillation. Temporary propagation block throughout the ventricular myocardium could possibly terminate these arrhythmias. Electrical stimulation has been applied to nervous tissue to cause reversible conduction block, but has not been explored sufficiently in cardiac tissue. We show that reversible propagation block can be achieved in cardiac tissue by holding myocardial cells in a refractory state for a designated period of time by applying a sustained sinusoidal high-frequency alternating current (HFAC); in doing so, reentrant arrhythmias are terminated. We demonstrate proof of concept using several models, including optically mapped monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, Langendorff-perfused guinea pig and rabbit hearts, intact anesthetized adult rabbits, and computer simulations of whole-heart impulse propagation. HFAC may be an effective and potentially safer alternative to direct current application, currently used to treat ventricular fibrillation.

  4. [Despite medication, overdrive pacing is required to stabilize the electrical storm associated with acute coronary syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masanobu; Morimoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Kaori; Tateishi, Emi; Makino, Kanako; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nakagawa, Yoko; Fukuhara, Shinya; Takase, Eiji

    2007-10-01

    A 75-year-old female complained of severe chest pain and was emergently admitted to our hospital because of anterior acute myocardial infarction. Emergent coronary angiography was performed and revealed occlusion in segment 7, so a stent was implanted. Lidocaine, carvedilol, amiodarone, magnesium, and nifekalant were administered successively because non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) frequently appeared like an electrical storm. After nifekalant administration, QTc was significantly prolonged and torsades de pointes was induced. Overdrive pacing was performed and finally the NSVT was completely controlled. If fatal arrhythmias such as NSVT show resistance to medication, overdrive pacing should be considered to stabilize the arrhythmia associated with acute coronary syndrome.

  5. Impact of Penetration Electric Fields on the Mid and Low Latitude Ionosphere during some Magnetic Storms in Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Basu, Santimay; Gardner, Larry; Valladares, Cesar; Scherliess, Ludger; Ruohoniemi, J. Michael; Schunk, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Analysis of GPS phase fluctuations in conjunction with regional total electron content (TEC) maps, in-situ measurements of sub-auroral polarization streams (SAPS) from several DMSP spacecraft supported by ground-based SuperDARN measurements in North America indicate the considerable impact of even moderate magnetic storms in 2010-2011 on the mid and low latitude ionosphere. The prompt penetration of the magnetospheric electric field is found to reach the magnetic equator in the main phase of the storm as monitored by the C/NOFS in-situ measurements and the array of GPS receivers forming part of the Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) in South America. At mid latitudes the prompt penetration, if occurring during photo-production in the afternoon hours, is associated with storm enhanced density (SED) and TEC plumes that usually travel from the SE to NW across North America. The USU Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements (GAIM) Model is utilized to model these SEDs so that their impact on space-based navigation systems such as the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) can be estimated. It is found that SAPS, mostly occurring around dusk and containing regions of large westward flows, can also have a substantial impact on the WAAS system by generating large phase fluctuations at GPS frequencies.

  6. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  7. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-08-25

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence.

  8. [Efficacy and safety of the coronary intervention therapy to prevent electrical storm in patients with coronary artery disease but without myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng-jun; Lü, Shu-zheng; Yan, Fang-ming; Jiang, Teng-yong; Li, Hai-yan; Zhang, Jin-rong

    2005-09-01

    To study the efficacy and safety of the coronary interventional therapy to prevent electrical storm (ES) in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) but without myocardial infarction or ischemic cardiomyopathy. Coronary angiography and stent implantation were performed in CAD patients with ES as major symptom, according to the standardized methods. Holter Electrocardiography was recorded regularly during follow-up. Six patients, five male and one female, with mean age of 49.5 +/- 9.1 year-old, were hospitalized. In 2 patients with repetitive syncope, multiple episodes of ventricular tachycardia and/or ventricular fibrillation (VF) were documented by Holter recording. One patient developed VF during exercise test. Three patients experienced chest pain and multiple episodes of cardiac arrest. Before procedure, averaged 16.5 +/- 5.3 episodes of syncope or VF were documented in 6 patients. Coronary angiography revealed severe one or multi-vessel diseases. Total 8 stents, including 3 drug-eluting stents, were implanted in 6 patients. Symptom, ST-T changes and ES disappeared after coronary stenting. During 4 month to 6.5 year follow-up (mean 47.7 +/- 30.7 months), ES was not documented, no appropriated shock occurred in patients with implantable defibrillator for 6.5 years. In CAD patients without myocardial infarction, coronary stenting can relieve the ischemic substrate of ES, hence prevents sudden death effectively.

  9. Control of cardiac alternans by mechanical and electrical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapari, Felicia; Deshpande, Dipen; Belhamadia, Youssef; Dubljevic, Stevan

    2014-07-01

    A persistent alternation in the cardiac action potential duration has been linked to the onset of ventricular arrhythmia, which may lead to sudden cardiac death. A coupling between these cardiac alternans and the intracellular calcium dynamics has also been identified in previous studies. In this paper, the system of PDEs describing the small amplitude of alternans and the alternation of peak intracellular Ca2+ are stabilized by optimal boundary and spatially distributed actuation. A simulation study demonstrating the successful annihilation of both alternans on a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells by utilizing the full-state feedback controller is presented. Complimentary to these studies, a three variable Nash-Panfilov model is used to investigate alternans annihilation via mechanical (or stretch) perturbations. The coupled model includes the active stress which defines the mechanical properties of the tissue and is utilized in the feedback algorithm as an independent input from the pacing based controller realization in alternans annihilation. Simulation studies of both control methods demonstrate that the proposed methods can successfully annihilate alternans in cables that are significantly longer than 1 cm, thus overcoming the limitations of earlier control efforts.

  10. The effect of electrical conductivity of myocardium on cardiac pumping efficacy: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Yuniarti, Ana Rahma; Lim, Ki Moo

    2017-01-10

    The existence of non-excitable cells in the myocardium leads to the increasing conduction non-uniformity and decreasing myocardial electrical conductivity. Slowed myocardial conduction velocity (MCV) believed to enhance the probability of cardiac arryhthmia and alter the cardiac mechanical pumping efficacy, even in sinus rhythm. Though several studies on the correlation between MCV and cardiac electrical instabilities exist, there has been no study concerning correlation or causality between MCV and cardiac mechanical pumping efficacy, due to the limitation in clinical methods to document and evaluate cardiac mechanical responses directly. The goal of this study was to examine quantitatively the cardiac pumping efficacy under various MCV conditions using three-dimensional (3D) electromechanical model of canine's failing ventricle. The electromechanical model used in this study composed of the electrical model coupled with the mechanical contraction model along with a lumped model of the circulatory system. The electrical model consisted of 241,725 nodes and 1,298,751 elements of tetrahedral mesh, whereas the mechanical model consisted of 356 nodes and 172 elements of hexahedral mesh with Hermite basis. First, we performed the electrical simulation for five different MCV conditions, from 30 to 70 cm/s with 10 cm/s interval during sinus pacing. Then, we compared the cardiac electrical and mechanical responses of each MCV condition, such as the electrical activation time (EAT), pressure, volume, and energy consumption of the myocardium. The energy consumption of the myocardium was calculated by integrating ATP consumption rate of each node in myofilament model. The result showed that under higher MCV conditions, the EAT, energy consumption, end diastolic and systolic volume are gradually decreased. Meanwhile, the systolic pressure, stroke volume, stroke work, and stroke work to ATP are increased as the MCV values increased. The cardiac functions and performances are

  11. Biphasic Electrical Field Stimulation Aids in Tissue Engineering of Multicell-Type Cardiac Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Loraine L.Y.; Iyer, Rohin K.; King, John-Paul

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of current work were (1) to compare the effects of monophasic or biphasic electrical field stimulation on structure and function of engineered cardiac organoids based on enriched cardiomyocytes (CM) and (2) to determine if electrical field stimulation will enhance electrical excitability of cardiac organoids based on multiple cell types. Organoids resembling cardiac myofibers were cultivated in Matrigel-coated microchannels fabricated of poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. We found that field stimulation using symmetric biphasic square pulses at 2.5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 1 ms (per pulse phase) was an improved stimulation protocol, as compared to no stimulation and stimulation using monophasic square pulses of identical total amplitude and duration (5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 2 ms). This was supported by the highest success rate for synchronous contractions, low excitation threshold, the highest cell density, and the highest expression of Connexin-43 in the biphasic group. Subsequently, enriched CM were seeded on the networks of (1) cardiac fibroblasts (FB), (2) D4T endothelial cells (EC), or (3) a mixture of FB and EC that were precultured for 2 days prior to the addition of enriched CM. Biphasic field stimulation was also effective at improving electrical excitability of these cardiac organoids by improving the three-dimensional organization of the cells, increasing cellular elongation and enhancing Connexin-43 presence. PMID:18783322

  12. Biphasic electrical field stimulation aids in tissue engineering of multicell-type cardiac organoids.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; Iyer, Rohin K; King, John-Paul; Radisic, Milica

    2011-06-01

    The main objectives of current work were (1) to compare the effects of monophasic or biphasic electrical field stimulation on structure and function of engineered cardiac organoids based on enriched cardiomyocytes (CM) and (2) to determine if electrical field stimulation will enhance electrical excitability of cardiac organoids based on multiple cell types. Organoids resembling cardiac myofibers were cultivated in Matrigel-coated microchannels fabricated of poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. We found that field stimulation using symmetric biphasic square pulses at 2.5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 1 ms (per pulse phase) was an improved stimulation protocol, as compared to no stimulation and stimulation using monophasic square pulses of identical total amplitude and duration (5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 2 ms). This was supported by the highest success rate for synchronous contractions, low excitation threshold, the highest cell density, and the highest expression of Connexin-43 in the biphasic group. Subsequently, enriched CM were seeded on the networks of (1) cardiac fibroblasts (FB), (2) D4T endothelial cells (EC), or (3) a mixture of FB and EC that were precultured for 2 days prior to the addition of enriched CM. Biphasic field stimulation was also effective at improving electrical excitability of these cardiac organoids by improving the three-dimensional organization of the cells, increasing cellular elongation and enhancing Connexin-43 presence.

  13. Vortex shedding as a precursor of turbulent electrical activity in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cabo, C; Pertsov, A M; Davidenko, J M; Baxter, W T; Gray, R A; Jalife, J

    1996-01-01

    In cardiac tissue, during partial blockade of the membrane sodium channels, or at high frequencies of excitation, inexcitable obstacles with sharp edges may destabilize the propagation of electrical excitation waves, causing the formation of self-sustained vortices and turbulent cardiac electrical activity. The formation of such vortices, which visually resembles vortex shedding in hydrodynamic turbulent flows, was observed in sheep epicardial tissue using voltage-sensitive dyes in combination with video-imaging techniques. Vortex shedding is a potential mechanism leading to the spontaneous initiation of uncontrolled high-frequency excitation of the heart. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 PMID:8785270

  14. Fractional diffusion models of cardiac electrical propagation: role of structural heterogeneity in dispersion of repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Kay, David; Grau, Vicente; Rodriguez, Blanca; Burrage, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Impulse propagation in biological tissues is known to be modulated by structural heterogeneity. In cardiac muscle, improved understanding on how this heterogeneity influences electrical spread is key to advancing our interpretation of dispersion of repolarization. We propose fractional diffusion models as a novel mathematical description of structurally heterogeneous excitable media, as a means of representing the modulation of the total electric field by the secondary electrical sources associated with tissue inhomogeneities. Our results, analysed against in vivo human recordings and experimental data of different animal species, indicate that structural heterogeneity underlies relevant characteristics of cardiac electrical propagation at tissue level. These include conduction effects on action potential (AP) morphology, the shortening of AP duration along the activation pathway and the progressive modulation by premature beats of spatial patterns of dispersion of repolarization. The proposed approach may also have important implications in other research fields involving excitable complex media. PMID:24920109

  15. Prompt penetration electric fields and the extreme topside ionospheric response to the June 22-23, 2015 geomagnetic storm as seen by the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, Elvira; Zakharenkova, Irina; Alken, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Using data from the three Swarm satellites, we study the ionospheric response to the intense geomagnetic storm of June 22-23, 2015. With the minimum SYM-H excursion of -207 nT, this storm is so far the second strongest geomagnetic storm in the current 24th solar cycle. A specific configuration of the Swarm satellites allowed investigation of the evolution of the storm-time ionospheric alterations on the day- and the nightside quasi-simultaneously. With the development of the main phase of the storm, a significant dayside increase of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) and electron density Ne was first observed at low latitudes on the dayside. From ~22 UT of 22 June to ~1 UT of 23 June, the dayside experienced a strong negative ionospheric storm, while on the nightside an extreme enhancement of the topside VTEC occurred at mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Our analysis of the equatorial electrojet variations obtained from the magnetic Swarm data indicates that the storm-time penetration electric fields were, most likely, the main driver of the observed ionospheric effects at the initial phase of the storm and at the beginning of the main phase. The dayside ionosphere first responded to the occurrence of the strong eastward equatorial electric fields. Further, penetration of westward electric fields led to gradual but strong decrease of the plasma density on the dayside in the topside ionosphere. At this stage, the disturbance dynamo could have contributed as well. On the nightside, the observed extreme enhancement of the Ne and VTEC in the northern hemisphere (i.e., the summer hemisphere) in the topside ionosphere was most likely due to the combination of the prompt penetration electric fields, disturbance dynamo and the storm-time thermospheric circulation. From ~2.8 UT, the ionospheric measurements from the three Swarm satellites detected the beginning of the second positive storm on the dayside, which was not clearly associated with electrojet

  16. Quantifying the Accuracy of Inner Magnetospheric Electric Field Descriptions With Data- Model Comparisons for All Intense Storms of Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Jazowski, M.; Ilie, R.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    All of the intense magnetic storms (minimum Dst value of < -100 nT) from solar cycle 23 (1996 - 2005) were simulated using the hot electron and ion drift integrator (HEIDI) model. The simulations were run using two electric field descriptions: a Kp-driven shielded Volland-Stern electric field and a self-consistent electric field calculated from the HEIDI-generated field-aligned currents. Of the 90 events, 69 had acceptable boundary condition inputs (nightside plasma data from LANL and upstream solar wind data during the main phase), and are included in the analysis. Storms were classified according to their solar wind driver and means and correlations were examined. Data-model comparisons are made against Dst* time series and dayside LANL plasma data (plasmaspheric plume, hot ion moments and fluxes). It is found, for example, with Dst* comparisons, that the self-consistent electric field simulations are, on average, more accurate than the Volland-Stern-driven simulations. This is especially true for magnetic cloud-driven storm events. For other storm driver categories, the self-consistent results are, on average, more precise than the Volland-Stern results, with less variability in the data-model comparisons from one storm to the next. Other aspects of the data-model comparisons are presented and discussed.

  17. An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons using a swine comparative cardiac safety model.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald M; Ho, Jeffrey D; Moore, Johanna C; Laudenbach, Andrew P; Reardon, Robert F; Miner, James R

    2014-09-01

    Arrest-related deaths proximate to the use of a conducted electrical weapon (CEW) continue to generate controversy despite a better understanding of the multi-factorial nature of many of these deaths. With the rapid adoption of this technology by law enforcement, and the proliferation of companies entering the marketplace, it is important to have a method to assess the relative safety of these weapons. We had previously developed a model to assess the relative cardiac safety of CEWs. In this study, we use this model to compare the TASER X2 and the Karbon Arms MPID. Our results suggest that the TASER X2 may have an improved cardiac safety margin over the Karbon Arms MPID as determined by a smaller area of cardiac pacing on the anterior chest in our model. This model seems to offer a reproducible means of comparing the cardiac effects of CEWs.

  18. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total

  19. ALTERATION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY BY WATER-LEACHABLE COMPONENTS OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of cardiac electrical activity by water-leachable components
    of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)

    Desuo Wang, Yuh-Chin T. Huang*, An Xie, Ting Wang

    *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA
    104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
    Department of Basic ...

  20. ALTERATION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY BY WATER-LEACHABLE COMPONENTS OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of cardiac electrical activity by water-leachable components
    of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)

    Desuo Wang, Yuh-Chin T. Huang*, An Xie, Ting Wang

    *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA
    104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
    Department of Basic ...

  1. Learning the Cardiac Cycle: Simultaneous Observations of Electrical and Mechanical Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Richard Alec; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for integrating electrical and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle by measuring systolic time intervals, which involves simultaneous recording of the ECG, a phonocardiogram, and the contour of the carotid pulse. Both resting and stress change data are provided as bases for class discussion. (CS)

  2. Learning the Cardiac Cycle: Simultaneous Observations of Electrical and Mechanical Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Richard Alec; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for integrating electrical and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle by measuring systolic time intervals, which involves simultaneous recording of the ECG, a phonocardiogram, and the contour of the carotid pulse. Both resting and stress change data are provided as bases for class discussion. (CS)

  3. Wave Science with the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Acuna, M. H.; Torbert, R. B.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rpwlamd, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2008-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields of waves which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts. We discuss of the key scientific goals of the EMFISIS investigation with particular attention to the wave physics of the radiation belts.

  4. Presentation of untreated systemic mastocytosis as recurrent, pulseless-electrical-activity cardiac arrests resistant to cardiac pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Joseph H; Weiler, Catherine R

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent, pulseless-electrical-activity (PEA) cardiac arrests were the novel presentation of untreated systemic mastocytosis in an 85-year-old woman who lacked cutaneous findings of mastocytosis. Despite prior implantation of a dual-chamber cardiac pacemaker 3 weeks previously for similar spells, she experienced a PEA arrest accompanied by flushing, increased urinary N-methylhistamine excretion and serum tryptase values on the day of presentation to our clinic. Bone marrow biopsy findings conducted to rule out breast cancer metastases showed 30% mast cell infiltration, aberrant expression of CD25 and a positive c-kit Asp816Val mutation. Treatment with a combination of H1 and H2 receptor blockers reduced flushing and eliminated hypotension. Maintenance medication included aspirin, cetirizine, ranitidine, montelukast, oral cromolyn sodium and an epinephrine autoinjector (as needed). At 6-month follow-up, the patient remained free of PEA arrests, flushing, or any clinical signs of mastocytosis or mast cell degranulation. PEA cardiac arrests may therefore be a presenting sign of untreated systemic mastocytosis.

  5. The interference threshold of cardiac pacemakers in electric 50 Hz fields.

    PubMed

    Scholten, A; Silny, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine a 'worst-case' and a 'real-case' interference threshold for implanted cardiac pace-makers (CPM) in electric 50 Hz fields as they appear in high-voltage plants, e.g. beneath high voltage overhead lines. For this purpose the resulting electrical potential distribution within the thorax area of volunteers from an external homogeneous electrical 50 Hz field was measured. Different factors such as different body geometries as well as inspiration and expiration of the lung were considered. Measurements showed that 1 per 1 kV m(-1) unimpaired electrical field strength (RMS) an interference voltage of about 180 microVpp as real-case value an 400 microVpp as worst-case value would occur at the input of a unipolar ventricularly controlled, left pectorally implanted cardiac pacemaker. Therefore, it is possible under worst-case conditions but unlikely under practice-relevant conditions that an implanted cardiac pacemaker is disturbed by present electric 50 Hz fields beneath high voltage overhead lines.

  6. The role of inductive electric fields in the ring current enhancement during the March 17th, 2013 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, R.; Toth, G.; Liemohn, M. W.; Chan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    The terrestrial magnetosphere has the capability to rapidly accelerate charged particles up to very high energies over relatively short times and distances. These energetic particles are injected from the magnetotail into the inner magnetosphere through two primary mechanisms. One transport method is the potential-driven convection during periods of southward IMF, which allows part of the dawn-to-dusk solar wind electric field to effectively map down to the polar ionosphere. The second transport process involves a sudden reconfiguration of the magnetic field and the creation of transient induced electric fields. However, it is not possible to distinguish the two terms by only measuring the electric field. Assessing the relative contribution of potential versus inductive electric fields at the energization of the hot ion population in the inner magnetosphere is only possible by thorough examination of the time varying magnetic field and current systems using global modeling of the entire system. We developed a novel method to calculate the inductive and potential components of electric field in the entire magnetosphere domain. This approach removes the need to trace independent field lines and lifts the assumption that the magnetic field lines can be treated as frozen in a stationary ionosphere. We quantify the relative contributions of potential and inductive electric fields at driving plasma sheet ions into the inner magnetosphere during the March 17th, 2103 geomagnetic storm. The consequence of these injections on the distortion of the near-Earth magnetic field and current systems have been rarely separated in order to determine their relative effectiveness from a global perspective.

  7. Theory and cardiac applications of electrical impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Penney, B C

    1986-01-01

    The methodology of the two-electrode, four-electrode, and guard-ring techniques is presented following a brief history of impedance plethysmography. The theoretical basis for predicting the sampling fields for conductivity and volume changes is presented. Theoretical and experimental studies of the sampling field associated with various electrode arrays are reviewed. With this background, the use of impedance plethysmography for cardiac monitoring and diagnosis is reviewed. The basic methodology is presented and models used to interpret the signal are reviewed. Theoretical and experimental studies of what is sampled are summarized. The accuracy of impedance stroke volume estimates is evaluated by surveying the results of human studies and examining critical animal studies. The usefulness of impedance cardiography for ventricular performance evaluation is also reviewed. Additional uses for cardiopulmonary diagnosis are briefly presented.

  8. Electrical coupling of single cardiac rat myocytes to field-effect and bipolar transistors.

    PubMed

    Kind, Thomas; Issing, Matthias; Arnold, Rüdiger; Müller, Bernt

    2002-12-01

    A novel bipolar transistor for extracellular recording the electrical activity of biological cells is presented, and the electrical behavior compared with the field-effect transistor (FET). Electrical coupling is examined between single cells separated from the heart of adults rats (cardiac myocytes) and both types of transistors. To initiate a local extracellular voltage, the cells are periodically stimulated by a patch pipette in voltage clamp and current clamp mode. The local extracellular voltage is measured by the planar integrated electronic sensors: the bipolar and the FET. The small signal transistor currents correspond to the local extracellular voltage. The two types of sensor transistors used here were developed and manufactured in the laboratory of our institute. The manufacturing process and the interfaces between myocytes and transistors are described. The recordings are interpreted by way of simulation based on the point-contact model and the single cardiac myocyte model.

  9. Functional assembly of engineered myocardium by electrical stimulation of cardiac myocytes cultured on scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Radisic, Milica; Park, Hyoungshin; Shing, Helen; Consi, Thomas; Schoen, Frederick J; Langer, Robert; Freed, Lisa E; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2004-12-28

    The major challenge of tissue engineering is directing the cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the tissue being replaced across different hierarchical scales. To engineer myocardium, biophysical regulation of the cells needs to recapitulate multiple signals present in the native heart. We hypothesized that excitation-contraction coupling, critical for the development and function of a normal heart, determines the development and function of engineered myocardium. To induce synchronous contractions of cultured cardiac constructs, we applied electrical signals designed to mimic those in the native heart. Over only 8 days in vitro, electrical field stimulation induced cell alignment and coupling, increased the amplitude of synchronous construct contractions by a factor of 7, and resulted in a remarkable level of ultrastructural organization. Development of conductive and contractile properties of cardiac constructs was concurrent, with strong dependence on the initiation and duration of electrical stimulation.

  10. Rainfall yield characteristics of electrical storm observed in the Spanish Basque Country area during the period 1992 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezcurra, A.; Saenz, J.; Ibarra-Berastegi, G.; Areitio, J.

    2008-08-01

    This paper is focused on the study of rainfall yield characteristics of electrical storms observed over the Northern Iberian Peninsula during 1992-1996. To this aim Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) method have been used. The SOM method is a group of artificial neural networks based on the topological properties of the human brain. Results clearly suggest that there exist three different meteorological patterns that are linked to the characteristics of electrical events found in the study area. In winter, most of the electrical events are formed under oceanic advection (NW air fluxes). On these cases, mean rainfall yield estimates reach values of 700 10 4 m 3 per cloud to ground lightning flash (CG flash). During summer most frequent electrical storms are associated to local instability shooting by surface heating with advection of humidity coming from the Iberian Peninsula. Under these meteorological situations, rain is scarcer if compared with oceanic events but lightning CG counts reach the maximum values found in the area (about 10 CG counts per 20 × 20 km 2 and day) giving this way the smallest rainfall yield with a mean value of 15 10 4 m 3 per CG flash. Iberian air fluxes associated with cold air in upper parts of the atmosphere represent the third meteorological pattern found. This pattern is most common in spring and autumn but is not unusual in the rest of the seasons. In those cases mean rainfall yield in the area is about 150 10 4 m 3 per CG flash. In all electrical episodes K instability index is greater than 15 °C but in the most lightning producing events, this index reaches in the area values greater than 24 °C. PCA results pointed out that there exists a relationship between rain and CG counts expressed by the first principal component computed from standardized data. However, we must notice that no event is solely linked to this axis, since a seasonal influence which decreases lightning production when rain

  11. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  12. Hemodynamic sensor in cardiac implantable electric devices: the endocardial accelaration technology.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Stefania; Contardi, Danilo; Pieragnoli, Paolo; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Giomi, Andrea; Padeletti, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    There have been substantial progresses in the technology of cardiac implantable electric devices (CIEDs) during the past decades. One of the progresses is represented by the development of a hemodynamic sensor embedded at the tip of a pacing lead that measures myocardial contractility by the analysis of myocardial mechanical vibrations occurring during the cardiac cycle. This sensor, providing continuous hemodynamic monitoring, could play an important role in clinical practice because of several clinical applications in CIEDs recipients. The objectives of this work are to report how this sensor operates and to review the main findings about its clinical applications.

  13. Electrical storm in the brain and in the heart: epilepsy and Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sandorfi, Gabor; Clemens, Bela; Csanadi, Zoltan

    2013-10-01

    We describe a patient with the coincidence of 2 ion channel disorders with autosomal dominant inheritance: Brugada syndrome, a potentially fatal cardiac condition, and cryptogenic focal epilepsy, likely due to a neurologic channelopathy. Although Brugada syndrome was discovered incidentally, most of the clinical features of epilepsy in this patient shared the risk factor characteristics of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy syndrome. This case provides additional information on the potential interaction between ion channel abnormalities in the heart and in the brain. Furthermore, it may suggest that patients with epilepsy at increased risk for sudden unexplained death in epilepsy syndrome should undergo a careful cardiac evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prototype development of an electrical impedance based simultaneous respiratory and cardiac monitoring system for gated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Kirpal; Liu, Jeff; Schellenberg, Devin; Karvat, Anand; Parameswaran, Ash; Grewal, Parvind; Thomas, Steven

    2014-10-14

    In radiotherapy, temporary translocations of the internal organs and tumor induced by respiratory and cardiac activities can undesirably lead to significantly lower radiation dose on the targeted tumor but more harmful radiation on surrounding healthy tissues. Respiratory and cardiac gated radiotherapy offers a potential solution for the treatment of tumors located in the upper thorax. The present study focuses on the design and development of simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac signal using electrical impedance technology for use in dual gated radiotherapy. An electronic circuitry was developed for monitoring the bio-impedance change due to respiratory and cardiac motions and extracting the cardiogenic ECG signal. The system was analyzed in terms of reliability of signal acquisition, time delay, and functionality in a high energy radiation environment. The resulting signal of the system developed was also compared with the output of the commercially available Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) system in both time and frequency domains. The results demonstrate that the bioimpedance-based method can potentially provide reliable tracking of respiratory and cardiac motion in humans, alternative to currently available methods. When compared with the RPM system, the impedance-based system developed in the present study shows similar output pattern but different sensitivities in monitoring different respiratory rates. The tracking of cardiac motion was more susceptible to interference from other sources than respiratory motion but also provided synchronous output compared with the ECG signal extracted. The proposed hardware-based implementation was observed to have a worst-case time delay of approximately 33 ms for respiratory monitoring and 45 ms for cardiac monitoring. No significant effect on the functionality of the system was observed when it was tested in a radiation environment with the electrode lead wires directly exposed to high-energy X

  15. Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jung; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yi; Yeager, Keith; Konofagou, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue, but due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation, and unconstrained (i.e., not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate in concert these three key factors. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modeling studies. We then culture cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channeled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After eight days of culture, constructs grown with the simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23±0.10% vs. 0.14±0.05, 0.13±0.08, or 0.09±0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization than either control group. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. PMID:22170772

  16. Biomimetic perfusion and electrical stimulation applied in concert improved the assembly of engineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Maidhof, Robert; Tandon, Nina; Lee, Eun Jung; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yi; Yeager, Keith; Konofagou, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-11-01

    Maintenance of normal myocardial function depends intimately on synchronous tissue contraction, driven by electrical activation and on adequate nutrient perfusion in support thereof. Bioreactors have been used to mimic aspects of these factors in vitro to engineer cardiac tissue but, due to design limitations, previous bioreactor systems have yet to simultaneously support nutrient perfusion, electrical stimulation and unconstrained (i.e. not isometric) tissue contraction. To the best of our knowledge, the bioreactor system described herein is the first to integrate these three key factors in concert. We present the design of our bioreactor and characterize its capability in integrated experimental and mathematical modelling studies. We then cultured cardiac cells obtained from neonatal rats in porous, channelled elastomer scaffolds with the simultaneous application of perfusion and electrical stimulation, with controls excluding either one or both of these two conditions. After 8 days of culture, constructs grown with simultaneous perfusion and electrical stimulation exhibited substantially improved functional properties, as evidenced by a significant increase in contraction amplitude (0.23 ± 0.10% vs 0.14 ± 0.05%, 0.13 ± 0.08% or 0.09 ± 0.02% in control constructs grown without stimulation, without perfusion, or either stimulation or perfusion, respectively). Consistently, these constructs had significantly improved DNA contents, cell distribution throughout the scaffold thickness, cardiac protein expression, cell morphology and overall tissue organization compared to control groups. Thus, the simultaneous application of medium perfusion and electrical conditioning enabled by the use of the novel bioreactor system may accelerate the generation of fully functional, clinically sized cardiac tissue constructs. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Comparison of cardiac and 60 Hz magnetically induced electric fields measured in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Creim, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields interact with an animal by inducing internal electric fields, which are in addition to the normal endogenous fields present in living animals. Male rats weighing about 560 g each were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine. Small incisions were made in the ventral body wall at the chest and upper abdomen to position a miniature probe for measuring internal electric fields. The calibration constant for the probe size was 5.7 mm, with a flat response from at least 12 Hz to 20 kHz. A cardiac signal, similar to the normal electrocardiogram with a heart rate of about 250 bpm, was readily obtained at the chest. Upon analysis of its spectrum, the cardiac field detected by the probe had a broad maximum at 32--95 Hz. When the rates were exposed to a 1 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field, a spike appeared in the spectrum at 60 Hz. The peak-to-peak magnitudes of electric fields associated with normal heart function were comparable to fields induced by a 1 mT magnetic field at 60 Hz for those positions measured on the body surface. Within the body, or in different directions relative to the applied field, the induced fields were reduced. The cardiac field increased near the heart, becoming much larger than the induced field. Thus, the cardiac electric field, together with the other endogenous fields, combine with induced electric fields and help to provide reference levels for the induced-field dosimetry of ELF magnetic field exposures of living animals.

  18. Atmospheric electrical modeling in support of the NASA F106 Storm Hazards Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    With the use of composite (non-metallic) and microelectronics becoming more prevalent in the construction of both military and commercial aircraft, the control systems have become more susceptible to damage or failure from electromagnetic transients. One source of such transients is the lightning discharge. In order to study the effects of the lightning discharge on the vital components of an aircraft, NASA Langley Research Center has undertaken a Storm Hazards Program in which a specially instrumented F106B jet aircraft is flown into active thunderstorms with the intention of being struck by lightning. One of the specific purposes of the program is to quantify the environmental conditions which are conductive to aircraft lightning strikes.

  19. Role of TGF-β on cardiac structural and electrical remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Mondragón, Roberto; Galindo, Carlos A; Avila, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    The type β transforming growth factors (TGF-βs) are involved in a number of human diseases, including heart failure and myocardial arrhythmias. In fact, during the last 20 years numerous studies have demonstrated that TGF-β affects the architecture of the heart under both normal and pathological conditions. Moreover, TGF-β signaling is currently under investigation, with the aim of discovering potential therapeutic roles in human disease. In contrast, only few studies have investigated whether TGF-β affects electrophysiological properties of the heart. This fact is surprising since electrical remodeling represents an important substrate for cardiac disease. This review discusses the potential role of TGF-β on cardiac excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, action potentials, and ion channels. We also discuss the effects of TGF-β on cardiac development and disease from structural and electrophysiological points of view. PMID:19337543

  20. A TASER conducted electrical weapon with cardiac biomonitoring capability: Proof of concept and initial human trial.

    PubMed

    Stopyra, Jason P; Ritter, Samuel I; Beatty, Jennifer; Johnson, James C; Kleiner, Douglas M; Winslow, James E; Gardner, Alison R; Bozeman, William P

    2016-10-01

    Despite research demonstrating the overall safety of Conducted Electrical Weapons (CEWs), commonly known by the brand name TASER(®), concerns remain regarding cardiac safety. The addition of cardiac biomonitoring capability to a CEW could prove useful and even lifesaving in the rare event of a medical crisis by detecting and analyzing cardiac rhythms during the period immediately after CEW discharge. To combine an electrocardiogram (ECG) device with a CEW to detect and store ECG signals while still allowing the CEW to perform its primary function of delivering an incapacitating electrical discharge. This work was performed in three phases. In Phase 1 standard law enforcement issue CEW cartridges were modified to demonstrate transmission of ECG signals. In Phase 2, a miniaturized ECG recorder was combined with a standard issue CEW and tested. In Phase 3, a prototype CEW with on-board cardiac biomonitoring was tested on human volunteers to assess its ability to perform its primary function of electrical incapacitation. Bench testing demonstrated that slightly modified CEW cartridge wires transmitted simulated ECG signals produced by an ECG rhythm generator and from a human volunteer. Ultimately, a modified CEW incorporating ECG monitoring successfully delivered incapacitating current to human volunteers and successfully recorded ECG signals from subcutaneous CEW probes after firing. An ECG recording device was successfully incorporated into a standard issue CEW without impeding the functioning of the device. This serves as proof-of-concept that safety measures such as cardiac biomonitoring can be incorporated into CEWs and possibly other law enforcement devices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of model error on cardiac electrical wave state reconstruction using data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaVigne, Nicholas S.; Holt, Nathan; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.

    2017-09-01

    Reentrant electrical scroll waves have been shown to underlie many cardiac arrhythmias, but the inability to observe locations away from the heart surfaces and the restriction of observations to only one or two state variables have made understanding arrhythmia mechanisms challenging. Recently, we showed that data assimilation from spatiotemporally sparse surrogate observations could be used to reconstruct a reliable time series of state estimates of reentrant cardiac electrical waves including unobserved variables in one and three spatial dimensions. However, real cardiac tissue is unlikely to be described accurately by mathematical models because of errors in model formulation and parameterization as well as intrinsic but poorly described spatial heterogeneity of electrophysiological properties in the heart. Here, we extend our previous work to assess how model error affects the accuracy of cardiac state estimates achieved using data assimilation with the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter. We focus on one-dimensional states of discordant alternans characterized by significant wavelength oscillations. We demonstrate that data assimilation can provide high-quality estimates under a wide range of model error conditions, ranging from varying one or more parameter values to using an entirely different model to generate the truth state. We illustrate how multiplicative and additive inflation can be used to reduce error in the state estimates. Even when the truth state contains underlying spatial heterogeneity, we show that using a homogeneous model in the data assimilation algorithm can achieve good results. Overall, we find data assimilation to be a robust approach for reconstructing complex cardiac electrical states corresponding to arrhythmias even in the presence of model error.

  2. Numerically simulated cardiac exposure to electric current densities induced by TASER X-26 pulses in adult men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitgeb, N.; Niedermayr, F.; Neubauer, R.; Loos, G.

    2010-10-01

    There is still an ongoing debate whether or not electronic stun devices (ESDs) induce cardiac fibrillation. To assess the ventricular fibrillation risk of law enforcing electronic control devices, quantitative estimates of cardiac electric current densities induced by delivered electric pulses are essential. Numerical simulations were performed with the finite integration technique and the anatomical model of a standardized European man (NORMAN) segmented into 2 mm voxels and 35 different tissues. The load-dependent delivery of TASER X-26 pulses has been taken into account. Cardiac exposure to electric current densities of vertically and horizontally aligned dart electrodes was quantified and different hit scenarios compared. Since fibrillation thresholds critically depend on exposed volume, the provided quantitative data are essential for risk assessment. The maximum cardiac rms current densities amounted to 7730 A m-2. Such high current densities and exposed cardiac volumes do not exclude ventricular fibrillation.

  3. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field regimes are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to 400 kHz. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. The instruments are integrated through a Central Data Processor Unit (CDPU) which provides for flexible instrument operations in both burst and survey telemetry modes that can be optimized to address the specific physics of the many radiation belt processes. The EMFISIS multi-institution team comprises a group of knowledgeable space physics investigators, both experimental and theoretical with the requisite capability, desire, and experience to accomplish the goals of the RBSP mission to further space weather capability. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts.

  4. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite with Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W.; Acuna, M.; Torbert, R.; Thorne, R.; Jordanova, V.; Bounds, S.; Smith, C.; Santolik, O.; Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Hospodarsky, G.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Puhl-Quinn, P.

    2006-12-01

    The physics of the creation and loss of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field dynamics and time scales are involved in this physics from ring current magnetic fields to microscopic kinetic interactions such as whistler-mode chorus waves with energetic electrons. To measure these key field interactions, NASA has selected the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). EMFISIS is an integrated set of instruments consisting of a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer (MAG) and a Waves instrument which includes a tri-axial search coil magnetometer and measures AC electric and magnetic fields from 10 Hz to MHz frequencies. The broad frequency range of the Waves instrument enables the identification of resonances and cutoffs from Waves to achieve high cadence, accurate plasma density measurements that are essential to RBSP theory and modeling efforts. The instruments are integrated through a Central Data Processor Unit (CDPU) which provides for flexible instrument operations in both burst and survey telemetry modes that can be optimized to address the specific physics of the many radiation belt processes. The EMFISIS multi-institution team comprises a group of knowledgeable space physics investigators, both experimental and theoretical, with the requisite capability, desire, and experience to accomplish the goals of the RBSP mission to further our nation's space weather capability. In combination with the selected double probe electric field and particle investigations on RBSP, EMFISIS will provide the essential measurements necessary to open the frontier of predictive capability for the Earth's highly variable radiation belts.

  5. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability. Research report, Sep 85-Jul 88

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability in the normal and ischemic heart of anesthetized and conscious dogs. Exposure (90 to 120 minutes) to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, was without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability in laboratory dogs. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. Using a model involving partial coronary artery stenosis, no changes were found in either the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Also examined were the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state in order to take into consideration possible adverse consequences mediated by the central nervous system. The study found no adverse effects on the cardiac-excitable properties in response to either a 2-hour- or 24-hour-exposure paradigm.

  6. Temperature, geometry, and bifurcations in the numerical modeling of the cardiac mechano-electric feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, A.; Bragard, J.; Dauby, P. C.

    2017-09-01

    This article characterizes the cardiac autonomous electrical activity induced by the mechanical deformations in the cardiac tissue through the mechano-electric feedback. A simplified and qualitative model is used to describe the system and we also account for temperature effects. The analysis emphasizes a very rich dynamics for the system, with periodic solutions, alternans, chaotic behaviors, etc. The possibility of self-sustained oscillations is analyzed in detail, particularly in terms of the values of important parameters such as the dimension of the system and the importance of the stretch-activated currents. It is also shown that high temperatures notably increase the parameter ranges for which self-sustained oscillations are observed and that several attractors can appear, depending on the location of the initial excitation of the system. Finally, the instability mechanisms by which the periodic solutions are destabilized have been studied by a Floquet analysis, which has revealed period-doubling phenomena and transient intermittencies.

  7. The Electric Field Wave Instrument on the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Dombeck, J.; Bonnell, J.; Mozer, F.; Bale, S.; Chaston, C.; Ergun, B.; Baker, D.; Li, X.; Hudson, M. K.; Strangeway, R.; Alpert, J.; Brautigam, D.; Mann, I.; Foster, J.

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of the Electric Field-Wave Instrument on the two RBSP spacecraft is to investigate the role of plasma structures and waves in the physical processes responsible for the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. Some of these processes include: prompt acceleration induced by powerful interplanetary shocks, acceleration by the large scale convection electric field, abrupt energization by intense substorm injection fronts propagating in from the tail, coherent and stochastic radial transport by large scale MHD fluctuations, multi-step local energization and cattering by whistler waves, and scattering and energization by kinetic Alfven waves, ion cycltron waves, and other small scale waves and structures. In order to understand the role of these processes in accelerating particles, the EFW instrument measures the three dimensional electric field from dc to greater than 500 kHz. The spin plane electric field vector is obtained from spherical sensors at the ends of two pair of orthogonal booms with tip-to- tip separations of 80 and 100 m. The spin axis measurement is obtained by opposed stacer booms with a tip- to-tip separation of 12 meters or greater. The electric field below 12 Hz is telemetered continuously while higher time resolution is obtained from a programmable burst memory with a maximum sampling rate for six quantities of greater 30,000 samples/s each. DC magnetic fields from the fluxgate magnetometer and wave magnetic fields from the search coil, both associated with the University of Iowa Instrument are input into the EFW instrument for processing in the burst memory and in the Digital Signal Processing Board (DSP). The DSP provides wave spectra and cross spectra of electric and magnetic field data over the frequency range between 50 Hz and 10 kHz with a typical cadence of once per 12 seconds with a maximum rate of ~ 1 Hz in order to provide continuous information on wave properties

  8. Monitoring of regional lung ventilation using electrical impedance tomography after cardiac surgery in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Krause, Ulrich; Becker, Kristin; Hahn, Günter; Dittmar, Jörg; Ruschewski, Wolfgang; Paul, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive method to monitor regional lung ventilation in infants and children without using radiation. The objective of this prospective study was to determine the value of EIT as an additional monitoring tool to assess regional lung ventilation after pediatric cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease in infants and children. EIT monitoring was performed in a prospective study comprising 30 pediatric patients who were mechanically ventilated after cardiac surgery. Data were analyzed off-line with respect to regional lung ventilation in different clinical situations. EIT data were correlated with respirator settings and arterial carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pressure in the blood. In 29 of 30 patients, regional ventilation of the lung could sufficiently and reliably be monitored by means of EIT. The effects of the transition from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous breathing after extubation on regional lung ventilation were studied. After extubation, a significant decrease of relative impedance changes was evident. In addition, a negative correlation of arterial CO2 partial pressure and relative impedance changes could be shown. EIT was sufficient to discriminate differences of regional lung ventilation in children and adolescents after cardiac surgery. EIT reliably provided additional information on regional lung ventilation in children after cardiac surgery. Neither chest tubes nor pacemaker wires nor the intensive care unit environment interfered with the application of EIT. EIT therefore may be used as an additional real-time monitoring tool in pediatric cardiac intensive care because it is noninvasive.

  9. Cardiac mechano-electric coupling research: fifty years of progress and scientific innovation.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter; Ravens, Ursula

    2014-08-01

    With its conceptualisation nearly fifty years ago, cardiac mechano-electric coupling (MEC) has developed from a collection of anecdotal reports into a field of research that - in spite of early scepticism - is now an accepted part of cardiac structure-function considerations. Throughout this development, MEC studies have been both driver and beneficiary of technological innovation: from sharp electrode recordings for the study of in situ cell responses to cell isolation and patch clamp; from early approaches to mechanical stimulation of tissue using photographic diaphragms to modern force-length feedback systems for isolated cells; and from strain gauge force recordings to genetically encodes stress probes. While much is now known about subcellular contributors to cardiac MEC, including stretch-activated ion channels and mechanical modulation of cell calcium handling, their integration at higher levels of structural complexity, and the generation of clinically-translatable knowledge, have remained challenging. This short review provides a brief summary of past achievements, current activities, and potentially rewarding future directions of cardiac MEC research. We highlight challenges and opportunities on the way to an integrated understanding of how external and intrinsic mechanical factors affect the heartbeat in health and disease, and how such understanding may improve the ways in which we prevent and/or treat cardiac pathology.

  10. Cardiac effects of varying pulse charge and polarity of TASER conducted electrical weapons.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Mark W; Panescu, Dorin; Carver, Matthew; Kroll, Ryan M; Hinz, Andrew F

    2009-01-01

    The TASER(R) CEW (Conducted Electrical Weapon) is rapidly replacing the club in the English-speaking world for assisting in the arrest of resistant subjects and is now used by the majority of law enforcement agencies in the USA, Canada, and the UK. Animal safety studies of the CEW have focused on the risk of VF. We sought to determine the difference in cardiac capture and VF risk between the approximately 102 +/- 8 microC of the ubiquitous X26 and a me-tered 72 microC charge from an experimental device. It is well established from the bidomain theory and experimental data that a pacing electrode will capture the heart with significantly lower charge when the electrode touching the cardiac tissue is a cathode However, experimental data show that there is no difference in the ability of the anode vs the cathode to induce VF. We sought to evaluate the effect of polarity changes on cardiac capture and the induction of VF. Small swine ( approximately 20.0 kg) were anesthetized and ventilated. The apex of the heart was located via echocar-diography and a CEW probe was fully inserted towards the apex. Echocardiography was used to monitor cardiac contractions to determine cardiac capture. Both the X26 and the 72 microC pulses were delivered at both polarities to test for cardiac capture. Higher charge pulses (375 microC) were then delivered with both polarities to test for VF risk. The 72 microC experimental unit was unable to cause cardiac capture even in small swine with fully inserted probes directly over the apex of the heart. We found no polarity effect in the risk of VF in small swine with larger charge ( approximately 5x) pulses.

  11. Duskside enhancement of equatorial zonal electric field response to convection electric fields during the St. Patrick's Day storm on 17 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Sripathi, S.; Veenadhari, B.; Heelis, R.; Ajith, K. K.; Gowtam, V. S.; Gurubaran, S.; Supnithi, P.; Le Huy, M.

    2016-01-01

    The equatorial zonal electric field responses to prompt penetration of eastward convection electric fields (PPEF) were compared at closely spaced longitudinal intervals at dusk to premidnight sectors during the intense geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015. At dusk sector (Indian longitudes), a rapid uplift of equatorial F layer to >550 km and development of intense equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were observed. These EPBs were found to extend up to 27.13°N and 25.98°S magnetic dip latitudes indicating their altitude development to ~1670 km at apex. In contrast, at few degrees east in the premidnight sector (Thailand-Indonesian longitudes), no significant height rise and/or EPB activity has been observed. The eastward electric field perturbations due to PPEF are greatly dominated at dusk sector despite the existence of background westward ionospheric disturbance dynamo (IDD) fields, whereas they were mostly counter balanced by the IDD fields in the premidnight sector. In situ observations from SWARM-A and SWARM-C and Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellites detected a large plasma density depletion near Indian equatorial region due to large electrodynamic uplift of F layer to higher than satellite altitudes. Further, this large uplift is found to confine to a narrow longitudinal sector centered on sunset terminator. This study brings out the significantly enhanced equatorial zonal electric field in response to PPEF that is uniquely confined to dusk sector. The responsible mechanisms are discussed in terms of unique electrodynamic conditions prevailing at dusk sector in the presence of convection electric fields associated with the onset of a substorm under southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz.

  12. Study of Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms with the Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Majid, W. A.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Tamppari, L. K.; Renno, N. O.; Ruf, C.; Trinh, J. T.

    2012-09-01

    Evidence for non-thermal emission produced by electrostatic discharges in a deep Martian dust storm has been reported by Ruf et al. 2009 [1]. Such discharges had been detected with an innovative kurtosis detector installed in a 34m radio telescope of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in June of 2006. The kurtosis (the fourth central moment of the signal normalized by the square of the second central moment) is extremely sensitive to the presence of non-thermal radiation, but is insensitive to variations in the intensity of the thermal radiation and instrument gain. The non-thermal radiation was detected while a 35 Km deep Martian dust storm was within the field of view of the radio telescope and presented signatures of modulation by the Martian Schumann Resonance. Encouraged by this discovery, several attempts have been made within the DSN to confirm the detection using the R&D antenna (DSS-13) and other antennas in the Madrid and Goldstone complexes, but using a very limited receiver, in terms of recorded data rates, the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (VSR). We are planning to initiate an extensive monitoring of Mars emission in a noninterfering basis while our antennas are tracking various Mars probes, using the Wideband Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (WVSR). The WVSR is a very flexible open-loop digital backend that is used for radio science and spacecraft navigation support in the DSN. This instrument allows us to sample a larger bandwidth than with previously used detectors. The processing to look for the kurtosis signature will be performed in software, limited only by the computer capacity. Additionally there are plans to develop an even more powerful custom-built detector based in CASPER technology and Graphic Processing Units for enhance computational power. This contribution will describe how we plan to select the target Mars tracking passes from the DSN schedule. An automated process will generate

  13. Unpinning of rotating spiral waves in cardiac tissues by circularly polarized electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Pan, De-Bei; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Spiral waves anchored to obstacles in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmia. To unpin these anchored spirals, comparing to high-voltage side-effect traditional therapies, wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by the uniform electric field (UEF) has provided a low-voltage alternative. Here we provide a new approach using WEH induced by the circularly polarized electric field (CPEF), which has higher success rate and larger application scope than UEF, even with a lower voltage. And we also study the distribution of the membrane potential near an obstacle induced by CPEF to analyze its mechanism of unpinning. We hope this promising approach may provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmia.

  14. The Electric Fields and Waves Instrument on the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, John

    The purpose of the Electric Field-Wave (EFW) Instrument on the two RBSP spacecraft is to investigate the role of electric field structures and waves in the physical processes responsible for the acceleration, transport, and loss of energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. The RBSP spacecraft apogee will be at about 5.8 Re near the equatorial plane. Perigee will be at about 400 kms altitude. Some of processes that will be investigated by the RBSP-EFW instrument include: prompt acceleration induced by powerful interplanetary shocks, acceleration by the large scale convection electric field, abrupt energization by intense substorm injection fronts propagating in from the tail, coherent and stochastic radial transport by large scale MHD fluctuations, and multi-step local energization and loss by whistler waves. In order to understand the role of these processes in accelerating particles, the EFW instrument measures the three dimensional electric field and cold plasma density estimates from the spacecraft potential all over a frequency range from dc to ˜500 kHz. Measurements from the spatially separated spacecraft will provide information on azimuthal and radial spatial scales and propagation velocities of large scale structures. The spin plane electric field vector is obtained from spherical sensors at the ends of two pair of orthogonal booms with tip to tip separations of 80 and 100 m. The spin axis measurement is obtained from a pair of stace booms with a tip to tip separation of ˜12 meters. The electric field below 12 Hz is telemetered continuously while higher time resolution is obtained from a programmable burst memory with a maximum sampling rate for six quantities of ˜ 30,000 samples/s. High time resolution data includes interferometric timing measurements between individual probe at the ends of the booms which provide information on small scale structures and phase velocities. DC magnetic fields from the fluxgate magnetometer and wave

  15. Quantification of cardiac autonomic nervous activities in ambulatory dogs by eliminating cardiac electric activities using cubic smoothing spline.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Choi, Eue Keun; Chung, Gih Sung; Oh, Seil; Park, Kwang Suk

    2012-02-01

    With the development of an implantable radio transmitter system, direct measurement of cardiac autonomic nervous activities (CANAs) became possible for ambulatory animals for a couple of months. However, measured CANAs include not only CANA but also cardiac electric activity (CEA) that can affect the quantification of CANAs. In this study, we propose a novel CEA removal method using moving standard deviation and cubic smoothing spline. This method consisted of two steps of detecting CEA segments and eliminating CEAs in detected segments. Using implanted devices, we recorded stellate ganglion nerve activity (SGNA), vagal nerve activity (VNA) and superior left ganglionated plexi nerve activity (SLGPNA) directly from four ambulatory dogs. The CEA-removal performance of the proposed method was evaluated and compared with commonly used high-pass filtration (HPF) for various heart rates and CANA amplitudes. Results tested with simulated CEA and simulated true CANA revealed stable and excellent performance of the suggested method compared to the HPF method. The averaged relative error percentages of the proposed method were less than 0.67%, 0.65% and 1.76% for SGNA, VNA and SLGPNA, respectively.

  16. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle.

  17. Cardiac troponin I: A potent biomarker for myocardial damage assessment following high voltage electric burn

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arindam; Chhabra, Chandra B.; Chamania, Shobha; Hemvani, Nanda; Chitnis, Dhananjay S.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) following high voltage electric burn is very rare, and its pathogenesis remains controversial. Electrical burns represent only 4% of all burns. Hence, clinical managements have taken a slow pace in developing. The recent guidelines laid down by the cardiology societies include cardiac troponin I (cTnI) as the gold standard marker for the assessment of myocardial damage assessment. Two patients were admitted to our hospital at the different time with the same kind of high voltage electric burn. Both patients had complained with chest discomfort during admission, and cardiac parameter assessment was done for both the patients. cTnI was also measured for both patients, and marked increase in the values was seen within 5 h of onset of myocardial damage and got into normal range within 72 h. Myocardial damage following electric burn needs to be suspected and assessed as early as possible. Hence, cTnI should be the valuable tool to detect the severity of myocardial damage incurred in the electric burn cases. PMID:28216824

  18. The induction of reentry in cardiac tissue. The missing link: How electric fields alter transmembrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Krassowska, Wanda

    1998-03-01

    This review examines the initiation of reentry in cardiac muscle by strong electric shocks. Specifically, it concentrates on the mechanisms by which electric shocks change the transmembrane potential of the cardiac membrane and create the physiological substrate required by the critical point theory for the initiation of rotors. The mechanisms examined include (1) direct polarization of the tissue by the stimulating current, as described by the one-dimensional cable model and its two- and three-dimensional extensions, (2) the presence of virtual anodes and cathodes, as described by the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios of the intra- and extracellular spaces, (3) polarization of the tissue due to changing orientation of cardiac fibers, and (4) polarization of individual cells or groups of cells by the electric field ("sawtooth potential"). The importance of these mechanisms in the initiation of reentry is examined in two case studies: the induction of rotors using successive stimulation with a unipolar electrode, and the induction of rotors using cross-field stimulation. These cases reveal that the mechanism by which a unipolar stimulation induces arrhythmias can be explained in the framework of the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios. In contrast, none of the examined mechanisms provide an adequate explanation for the induction of rotors by cross-field stimulation. Hence, this study emphasizes the need for further experimental and theoretical work directed toward explaining the mechanism of field stimulation.

  19. Risk of electromagnetic interference induced by dental equipment on cardiac implantable electrical devices.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Rius, Jaume; Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Brunet-Llobet, Lluís; Sabaté de la Cruz, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Patients with cardiac implantable electrical devices should take special precautions when exposed to electromagnetic fields. Proximity to equipment used in clinical dentistry may cause interference. This study evaluated in vitro the risks associated with different types/makes of cardiac devices and types of dental equipment. Six electronic dental tools were tested on three implantable cardioverter defibrillators and three pacemakers made by different manufacturers. Overall, the risk of interference with the pacemakers was 37% lower than with the implantable cardioverter defibrillators. Regarding the types/makes of cardiac devices analysed, that from Boston Scientific had a five-fold greater risk of interference than did that from Biotronik [prevalence ratio (PR) = 5.58]; there was no difference between that from Biotronik and that from Medtronic. Among the dental equipment, the electric pulp tester had the greatest risk of inducing interference and therefore this device was used as the benchmark. The electronic apex locator (PR = 0.29), Periotest M (PR = 0.47), and the ultrasonic dental scaler (PR = 0.59) were less likely to induce interference than the electric pulp tester. The risk was lowest with the electronic apex locator. Pacemakers presented a lower risk of light to moderate interference (PR = 0.63). However, the risk of severe electromagnetic interference was 3.5 times higher with pacemakers than with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (PR = 3.47).

  20. Electric impedance for evaluation of body fluid balance in cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Perko, M J; Jarnvig, I L; Højgaard-Rasmussen, N; Eliasen, K; Arendrup, H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate whether electric impedance can be used to monitor body fluid balance and fluid distribution in cardiac surgical patients. Prospective clinical study. Heart Center, Rigshospital, Copenhagen. Sixteen consecutive patients scheduled for cardiac surgery. Body weight, fluid balance, central hemodynamics, and total and segmental body impedance were examined perioperatively. During semisupine rest before surgery, changes in impedance indicated relocation of fluid from the legs to the thorax, mostly in the extracellular space. After surgery, weight and fluid balance increased by 3.87 +/- 0.35 kg and 1.86 +/- 0.16 L (mean +/- SE, p < 0.01) and remained elevated through the next 2 days. Impedance decreased by 30% over the thorax, by 24% over the abdomen, by 2% over the leg, and by 4% over the entire body. Changes in total and thoracoabdominal impedances had the highest correlation to the fluid balance (r = -0.86 and r = -0.87). After correction of impedance values by the constant from the regression model, the mean difference in estimation of fluid changes obtained by electric impedance and by fluid balance was 0 +/- 0.1 L at the range of changes of 4.6 L. Alterations in electric impedance closely follow changes in fluid balance during the perioperative period. This method can be used in clinical practice to control postoperative body fluid balance in cardiac surgical patients.

  1. A coordinated study of a storm system over the South American continent. 1. Weather information and quasi-DC stratospheric electric field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, O.; Pinto, I. R. C. A.; Gin, R. B. B.; Mendes, O.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports on a coordinated campaign conducted in Brazil, December 13, 1989, to study the electrical signatures associated with a large storm system over the South American continent. Inside the storm, large convective cells developed extending up to the tropopause, as revealed from meteorological balloon soundings. Quasi-DC vertical electric field and temperature were measured by zero-pressure balloon-borne payload launched from Cachoeira Paulista, Brazil. The data were supported by radar and GOES satellite observations, as well as by a lightning position and tracking system (LPATS). The analysis of infrared imagery supports the general tendency for lightning strikes to be near to but not exactly under the coldest cloud tops. In turn, the radar maps located the strikes near to but outside of the most intense areas of precipitation (reflectivity levels above 40 dBz). The balloon altitude and stratospheric temperature show significant variations in association with the storm. The quasi-DC vertical electric field remained almost during the whole flight in a reversed direction relative to the usual fair weather downward orientation with values as large as 4 V/m. A simple calculation based on a static dipole model of electrical cloud structure gives charges of some tens of coulombs. In contrast with most electric field measurements in other regions, no indication of an intensification of the vertical field in the downward fair weather orientation was observed. This fact is in agreement with past observations in the South American region and seems to be related to a particular type of storm that would occur with more frequency in this region. If so, such a difference may have an important role in the global atmospheric electrical circuit, considering that South America is believed to give a significant current contribution to the global circuit.

  2. The impact of geomagnetic storms on the US electric power grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, C.; Mitchell, S.; Title, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Large solar explosions are responsible for space weather that can impact technological infrastructure on and around Earth. We study the impacts of geomagnetic activity on the U.S. electric power grid for the period from 1992 through 2010. We find, with more than 3-sigma significance, that approximately 4% of the disturbances in the U.S. power grid reported to the U.S. Department of Energy are attributable to geomagnetic activity. The combination of our results with an economic assessment study by the electric power industry suggests that the average cost to the U.S. economy of non-catastrophic grid disturbances in which space weather conditions are a contributing factor exceeds $3 billion per year. The magnitude of this apparent economic impact warrants extensive follow-up studies to validate, understand, and mitigate against the weak but significant contribution of space weather in power grid disturbances.

  3. Spatiotemporally controlled cardiac conduction block using high-frequency electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dura, Burak; Kovacs, Gregory T A; Giovangrandi, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Methods for the electrical inhibition of cardiac excitation have long been sought to control excitability and conduction, but to date remain largely impractical. High-amplitude alternating current (AC) stimulation has been known to extend cardiac action potentials (APs), and has been recently exploited to terminate reentrant arrhythmias by producing reversible conduction blocks. Yet, low-amplitude currents at similar frequencies have been shown to entrain cardiac tissues by generation of repetitive APs, leading in some cases to ventricular fibrillation and hemodynamic collapse in vivo. Therefore, an inhibition method that does not lead to entrainment - irrespective of the stimulation amplitude (bound to fluctuate in an in vivo setting) - is highly desirable. We investigated the effects of broader amplitude and frequency ranges on the inhibitory effects of extracellular AC stimulation on HL-1 cardiomyocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays, using both sinusoidal and square waveforms. Our results indicate that, at sufficiently high frequencies, cardiac tissue exhibits a binary response to stimulus amplitude with either prolonged APs or no effect, thereby effectively avoiding the risks of entrainment by repetitive firing observed at lower frequencies. We further demonstrate the ability to precisely define reversible local conduction blocks in beating cultures without influencing the propagation activity in non-blocked areas. The conduction blocks were spatiotemporally controlled by electrode geometry and stimuli duration, respectively, and sustainable for long durations (300 s). Inhibition of cardiac excitation induced by high-frequency AC stimulation exhibits a binary response to amplitude above a threshold frequency, enabling the generation of reversible conduction blocks without the risks of entrainment. This inhibition method could yield novel approaches for arrhythmia modeling in vitro, as well as safer and more efficacious tools for in vivo cardiac mapping and

  4. The link between abnormal calcium handling and electrical instability in acquired long QT syndrome--Does calcium precipitate arrhythmic storms?

    PubMed

    Němec, Jan; Kim, Jong J; Salama, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Release of Ca(2+) ions from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) into myocyte cytoplasm and their binding to troponin C is the final signal form myocardial contraction. Synchronous contraction of ventricular myocytes is necessary for efficient cardiac pumping function. This requires both shuttling of Ca(2+) between SR and cytoplasm in individual myocytes, and organ-level synchronization of this process by means of electrical coupling among ventricular myocytes. Abnormal Ca(2+) release from SR causes arrhythmias in the setting of CPVT (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia) and digoxin toxicity. Recent optical mapping data indicate that abnormal Ca(2+) handling causes arrhythmias in models of both repolarization impairment and profound bradycardia. The mechanisms involve dynamic spatial heterogeneity of myocardial Ca(2+) handling preceding arrhythmia onset, cell-synchronous systolic secondary Ca(2+) elevation (SSCE), as well as more complex abnormalities of intracellular Ca(2+) handling detected by subcellular optical mapping in Langendorff-perfused hearts. The regional heterogeneities in Ca(2+) handling cause action potential (AP) heterogeneities through sodium-calcium exchange (NCX) activation and eventually overwhelm electrical coupling of the tissue. Divergent Ca(2+) dynamics among different myocardial regions leads to temporal instability of AP duration and - on the patient level - in T wave lability. Although T-wave alternans has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias, non-alternans lability is observed in pre-clinical models of the long QT syndrome (LQTS) and CPVT, and in LQTS patients. Analysis of T wave lability may provide a real-time window on the abnormal Ca(2+) dynamics causing specific arrhythmias such as Torsade de Pointes (TdP).

  5. Laser-patterned stem-cell bridges in a cardiac muscle model for on-chip electrical conductivity analyses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen; Liu, Qiuying; Liu, Honghai; Yang, Huaxiao; Yun, Julie X; Eisenberg, Carol; Borg, Thomas K; Xu, Meifeng; Gao, Bruce Z

    2012-02-07

    Following myocardial infarction there is an irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes that results in the alteration of electrical propagation in the heart. Restoration of functional electrical properties of the damaged heart muscle is essential to recover from the infarction. While there are a few reports that demonstrate that fibroblasts can form junctions that transmit electrical signals, a potential alternative using the injection of stem cells has emerged as a promising cellular therapy; however, stem-cell electrical conductivity within the cardiac muscle fiber is unknown. In this study, an in vitro cardiac muscle model was established on an MEA-based biochip with multiple cardiomyocytes that mimic cardiac tissue structure. Using a laser beam, stem cells were inserted adjacent to each muscle fiber (cell bridge model) and allowed to form cell-cell contact as determined by the formation of gap junctions. The electrical conductivity of stem cells was assessed and compared with the electrical conductivities of cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts. Results showed that stem cell-myocyte contacts exhibited higher and more stable conduction velocities than myocyte-fibroblast contacts, which indicated that stem cells have higher electrical compatibility with native cardiac muscle fibers than cardiac fibroblasts.

  6. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut; Baki, Elif Dogan; Kavakli, Ali Sait; Sahin, Ayca Sultan; Ayoglu, Raif Umut; Karaveli, Arzu; Emmiler, Mustafa; Inanoglu, Kerem; Karsli, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229.

  7. Coordinating electrical activity of the heart: ankyrin polypeptides in human cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Curran, Jerry; Mohler, Peter J

    2011-07-01

    Over the past ten years, ankyrin polypeptides have emerged as players in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Once thought to solely play a structural role, loss-of-function variants of genes encoding ankyrin polypeptides have highlighted how this protein mediates subcellular localization of various electrical components of the excitation-contraction coupling machinery. Evidence has revealed how disruption of this localization is the primary cause of various cardiomyopathies, ranging from long-QT syndrome 4, to sinus node disease, to more common forms of arrhythmias. The roles of ankyrin polypeptides in excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and the development of ankyrin-specific cardiomyopathies. How ankyrin polypeptides may be involved in structural and electrical remodeling of the heart, post-myocardial infarct. How ankyrin interactions with membrane-bound ion channels may regulate these channels' response to stimuli. New data, which offers the potential for unique therapies, for not only combating heart disease, but also for wider applications to various disease states. The ankyrin family of adapter proteins is emerging as an intimate player in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Until recently, these proteins have gone largely unappreciated for their importance in proper cardiac function. New insights into how these proteins function within the heart are offering potentially new avenues for therapies against cardiomyopathy.

  8. Coordinating Electrical Activity of the Heart: Ankyrin Polypeptides in Human Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Jerry; Mohler, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Over the past ten years, ankyrin polypeptides have emerged as critical players in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Once thought to solely play only a structural role, loss-of-function variants in genes encoding ankyrin polypeptides have highlighted how this protein mediates the proper subcellular localization of the various electrical components of the excitation-contraction coupling machinery. A large body of evidence has revealed how the disruption of this localization is the primary cause of various cardiomyopathies, ranging from long QT syndrome 4, to sinus node disease, to more common forms of arrhythmias. Areas Covered This review details the varied roles that ankyrin polypeptides play in excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and the development of ankyrin-specific cardiomyopathies. It will further discuss how ankyrin polypeptides may be involved in structural and electrical remodeling of the heart, post-myocardial infarct. Attention is given to how ankyrin interactions with membrane bound ion channels may regulate these channels’ response to stimuli. Special attention is given to exciting new data, which may offer the potential for unique therapies, for not only combating heart disease, but which also holds promise for wider applications to various disease states. Expert Opinion The ankyrin family of adapter proteins is emerging as an intimate player in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. Until recently, these proteins have gone largely unappreciated for their importance in proper cardiac function. New insights into how these proteins function within the heart are offering potentially new avenues for therapies against cardiomyopathy. PMID:21457127

  9. Myocardial scaffold-based cardiac tissue engineering: application of coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M; Williams, Lakiesha N; de Jongh Curry, Amy L; Liao, Jun

    2013-09-03

    Recently, we developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserve the natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates and also show good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multistimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulation for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (10(6) cells/mL) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that after 2 days of culturing with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed a cardiomyocyte-like phenotype by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2 days of bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2 day and 4 day tissue constructs were comparable to those of the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2 weeks of static culturing, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios.

  10. Mind the Gap: A Semicontinuum Model for Discrete Electrical Propagation in Cardiac Tissue.

    PubMed

    Costa, Caroline Mendonca; Silva, Pedro Andre Arroyo; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber

    2016-04-01

    Electrical propagation in cardiac tissue is a discrete or discontinuous phenomenon that reflects the complexity of the anatomical structures and their organization in the heart, such as myocytes, gap junctions, microvessels, and extracellular matrix, just to name a few. Discrete models or microscopic and discontinuous models are, so far, the best options to accurately study how structural properties of cardiac tissue influence electrical propagation. These models are, however, inappropriate in the context of large scale simulations, which have been traditionally performed by the use of continuum and macroscopic models, such as the monodomain and the bidomain models. However, continuum models may fail to reproduce many important physiological and physiopathological aspects of cardiac electrophysiology, for instance, those related to slow conduction. In this study, we develop a new mathematical model that combines characteristics of both continuum and discrete models. The new model was evaluated in scenarios of low gap-junctional coupling, where slow conduction is observed, and was able to reproduce conduction block, increase of the maximum upstroke velocity and of the repolarization dispersion. None of these features can be captured by continuum models. In addition, the model overcomes a great disadvantage of discrete models, as it allows variation of the spatial resolution within a certain range.

  11. Short-duration transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Gregorini, Cristie; Cipriano Junior, Gerson; Aquino, Leticia Moraes de; Branco, João Nelson Rodrigues; Bernardelli, Graziella França

    2010-03-01

    Respiratory muscle strength has been related to the postoperative outcome of cardiac surgeries. The main documented therapeutic purpose of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is the reduction of pain, which could bring secondary benefits to the respiratory muscles and, consequently, to lung capacities and volumes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of short-duration transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the reduction of pain and its possible influence on respiratory muscle strength and lung capacity and volumes of patients in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery. Twenty five patients with mean age of 59.9 +/- 10.3 years, of whom 72% were men, and homogeneous as regards weight and height, were randomly assigned to two groups. One group received therapeutic TENS (n = 13) and the other, placebo TENS (n = 12), for four hours on the third postoperative day of cardiac surgery. Pain was analyzed by means of a visual analogue scale, and of respiratory muscle strength as measured by maximum respiratory pressures and lung capacity and volumes before and after application of TENS. Short-duration TENS significantly reduced pain of patients in the postoperative period (p < 0.001). Respiratory muscle strength (p < 0.001), tidal volume (p < 0.001) and vital capacity (p < 0.05) significantly improved after therapeutic TENS, unlike in the placebo group. Short-duration TENS proved effective for the reduction of pain and improvement of respiratory muscle strength, as well as of lung volumes and capacity.

  12. Myocardial Scaffold-based Cardiac Tissue Engineering: Application of Coordinated Mechanical and Electrical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J. Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M.; Williams, Lakiesha N.; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Liao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserved natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates, and also showed good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multi-stimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (106 cells/ml) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that, after 2-day culture with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed cardiomyocyte-like phenotype, by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2-day bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2-day and 4-day tissue constructs were comparable to the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2-week static culture, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development, but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios. PMID:23923967

  13. Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS composites for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Rai, Ranjana; Dippold, Dirk; Roether, Judith E; Schubert, Dirk W; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially myocardial infarction, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, also resulting in huge economic burdens on national economies. A cardiac patch strategy aims at regenerating an infarcted heart by providing healthy functional cells to the injured region via a carrier substrate, and providing mechanical support, thereby preventing deleterious ventricular remodeling. In the present work, polyaniline (PANI) was doped with camphorsulfonic acid and blended with poly(glycerol-sebacate) at ratios of 10, 20 and 30vol.% PANI content to produce electrically conductive composite cardiac patches via the solvent casting method. The composites were characterized in terms of their electrical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. The in vitro biodegradability of the composites was also evaluated. Electrical conductivity increased from 0Scm(-1) for pure PGS to 0.018Scm(-1) for 30vol.% PANI-PGS samples. Moreover, the conductivities were preserved for at least 100h post fabrication. Tensile tests revealed an improvement in the elastic modulus, tensile strength and elasticity with increasing PANI content. The degradation products caused a local drop in pH, which was higher in all composite samples compared with pure PGS, hinting at a buffering effect due to the presence of PANI. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the composites was confirmed when C2C12 cells attached and proliferated on samples with varying PANI content. Furthermore, leaching of acid dopants from the developed composites did not have any deleterious effect on the viability of C2C12 cells. Taken together, these results confirm the potential of PANI-PGS composites for use as substrates to modulate cellular behavior via electrical stimulation, and as biocompatible scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of Electrical Activation and Conduction in the Gastrointestinal System: Lessons from Cardiac Electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Tse, Gary; Lai, Eric Tsz Him; Yeo, Jie Ming; Tse, Vivian; Wong, Sunny Hei

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an electrically excitable organ system containing multiple cell types, which coordinate electrical activity propagating through this tract. Disruption in its normal electrophysiology is observed in a number of GI motility disorders. However, this is not well characterized and the field of GI electrophysiology is much less developed compared to the cardiac field. The aim of this article is to use the established knowledge of cardiac electrophysiology to shed light on the mechanisms of electrical activation and propagation along the GI tract, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to motility disorders and suggest better treatment options based on this improved understanding. In the first part of the article, the ionic contributions to the generation of GI slow wave and the cardiac action potential (AP) are reviewed. Propagation of these electrical signals can be described by the core conductor theory in both systems. However, specifically for the GI tract, the following unique properties are observed: changes in slow wave frequency along its length, periods of quiescence, synchronization in short distances and desynchronization over long distances. These are best described by a coupled oscillator theory. Other differences include the diminished role of gap junctions in mediating this conduction in the GI tract compared to the heart. The electrophysiology of conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroparesis, and functional problems such as irritable bowel syndrome are discussed in detail, with reference to ion channel abnormalities and potential therapeutic targets. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis and physiological mechanisms underlying GI motility disorders will enable the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools and the advancement of this field.

  15. Mechanisms of Electrical Activation and Conduction in the Gastrointestinal System: Lessons from Cardiac Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Lai, Eric Tsz Him; Yeo, Jie Ming; Tse, Vivian; Wong, Sunny Hei

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an electrically excitable organ system containing multiple cell types, which coordinate electrical activity propagating through this tract. Disruption in its normal electrophysiology is observed in a number of GI motility disorders. However, this is not well characterized and the field of GI electrophysiology is much less developed compared to the cardiac field. The aim of this article is to use the established knowledge of cardiac electrophysiology to shed light on the mechanisms of electrical activation and propagation along the GI tract, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to motility disorders and suggest better treatment options based on this improved understanding. In the first part of the article, the ionic contributions to the generation of GI slow wave and the cardiac action potential (AP) are reviewed. Propagation of these electrical signals can be described by the core conductor theory in both systems. However, specifically for the GI tract, the following unique properties are observed: changes in slow wave frequency along its length, periods of quiescence, synchronization in short distances and desynchronization over long distances. These are best described by a coupled oscillator theory. Other differences include the diminished role of gap junctions in mediating this conduction in the GI tract compared to the heart. The electrophysiology of conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroparesis, and functional problems such as irritable bowel syndrome are discussed in detail, with reference to ion channel abnormalities and potential therapeutic targets. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis and physiological mechanisms underlying GI motility disorders will enable the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools and the advancement of this field. PMID:27303305

  16. A guide to modelling cardiac electrical activity in anatomically detailed ventricles.

    PubMed

    Clayton, R H; Panfilov, A V

    2008-01-01

    One of the most recent trends in cardiac electrophysiology is the development of integrative anatomically accurate models of the heart, which include description of cardiac activity from sub-cellular and cellular level to the level of the whole organ. In order to construct this type of model, a researcher needs to collect a wide range of information from books and journal articles on various aspects of biology, physiology, electrophysiology, numerical mathematics and computer programming. The aim of this methodological article is to survey recent developments in integrative modelling of electrical activity in the ventricles of the heart, and to provide a practical guide to the resources and tools that are available for work in this exciting and challenging area.

  17. Modeling storm-time electrodynamics of the low-latitude ionosphere thermosphere system: Can long lasting disturbance electric fields be accounted for?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Naomi; Sazykin, Stanislav; Spiro, Robert W.; Anderson, David; Anghel, Adela; Wolf, Richard A.; Toffoletto, Frank R.; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Codrescu, Mihail V.; Richmond, Arthur D.; Millward, George H.

    2007-07-01

    Storm-time ionospheric disturbance electric fields are studied for two large geomagnetic storms, March 31, 2001 and April 17 18, 2002, by comparing low-latitude observations of ionospheric plasma drifts with results from numerical simulations based on a combination of first-principles models. The simulation machinery combines the Rice convection model (RCM), used to calculate inner magnetospheric electric fields, and the coupled thermosphere ionosphere plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe) model, driven, in part, by RCM-computed electric fields. Comparison of model results with measured or estimated low-latitude vertical drift velocities (zonal electric fields) shows that the coupled model is capable of reproducing measurements under a variety of conditions. In particular, our model results suggest, from theoretical grounds, a possibility of long-lasting penetration of magnetospheric electric fields to low latitudes during prolonged periods of enhanced convection associated with southward-directed interplanetary magnetic field, although the model probably overestimates the magnitude and duration of such penetration during extremely disturbed conditions. During periods of moderate disturbance, we found surprisingly good overall agreement between model predictions and data, with penetration electric fields accounting for early main phase changes and oscillations in low-latitude vertical drift, while the disturbance dynamo mechanism becomes increasingly important later in the modeled events. Discrepancies between the model results and the observations indicate some of the difficulties in validating these combined numerical models, and the limitations of the available experimental data.

  18. Electrically conductive gold nanoparticle-chitosan thermosensitive hydrogels for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Baei, Payam; Jalili-Firoozinezhad, Sasan; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels that resemble electromechanical properties of the myocardium are crucial for cardiac tissue engineering prospects. We have developed a facile approach that uses chitosan (CS) to generate a thermosensitive conductive hydrogel with a highly porous network of interconnected pores. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were evenly dispersed throughout the CS matrix in order to provide electrical cues. The gelation response and electrical conductivity of the hydrogel were controlled by different concentrations of GNPs. The CS-GNP hydrogels were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cultivated for up to 14 days in the absence of electrical stimulations. CS-GNP scaffolds supported viability, metabolism, migration and proliferation of MSCs along with the development of uniform cellular constructs. Immunohistochemistry for early and mature cardiac markers showed enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of MSCs within the CS-GNP compared to the CS matrix alone. The results of this study demonstrate that incorporation of nanoscale electro-conductive GNPs into CS hydrogels enhances the properties of myocardial constructs. These constructs could find utilization for regeneration of other electroactive tissues.

  19. Cardiac pacemakers in electric and magnetic fields of 400-kV power lines.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Elovaara, Jarmo; Virtanen, Vesa

    2012-04-01

    The cardiac pacemaker (PM) implantation rate per million is high. Earlier studies have found interference to PMs by electromagnetic fields. The aim of the study is to investigate disturbances in cardiac PM using a human-shaped phantom in electric and magnetic fields of 400-kV power lines. The phantom was used in the following manner: isolated from the ground, grounded from left or right foot, or grounded from left or right hand. Out of the tested PMs one had such a disturbance that it set the pace 60 times per minute, when the electric field was 6.7-7.5 kV/m and the magnetic field was 2.4-2.9 μT. The electrode configuration of the PM was unipolar. In bipolar configuration, the same PM had no disturbance. During the test period, other PMs only had minor disturbances or none at all. Some PMs do not record time information for minor disturbances. In such cases, it was impossible to link the disturbances to the exposure under the power line. The electric field under a 400-kV power line may disturb a PM. However, only one type out of several tested PMs showed a major disturbance and that was only with a unipolar electrode configuration. The risk of disturbances is therefore not deemed to be high. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Echocardiography integrated ACLS protocol versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients with pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Chardoli, Mojtaba; Heidari, Farhad; Rabiee, Helaleh; Sharif-Alhoseini, Mahdi; Shokoohi, Hamid; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2012-01-01

    To examine the utility of bedside echocardiography in detecting the reversible causes of pulseless electrical activity (PEA) cardiac arrest and predicting the resuscitation outcomes. In this prospective interventional study, patients presenting with PEA cardiac arrest were randomized into two groups. In Group A, ultrasound trained emergency physicians performed echocardiography evaluating cardiac activity, right ventricle dilation, left ventricle function, pericardial effusion/tamponade and IVC size along with the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) protocol. Patients in Group B solely underwent ACLS protocol without applying echocardiography. The presence or absence of mechanical ventricular activity (MVA) and evidences of PEA reversible causes were recorded. The return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death were evaluated in both groups. One hundred patients with the mean age of (58+/-6.1) years were enrolled in this study. Fifty patients (Group A) had echocardiography detected in parallel with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Among them, 7 patients (14%) had pericardial effusion, 11 (22%) had hypovolemia, and 39 (78%) were revealed the presence of MVA. In the pseudo PEA subgroup (presence of MVA), 43% had ROSC (positive predictive value) and in the true PEA subgroup with cardiac standstill (absence of MVA), there was no recorded ROSC (negative predictive value). Among patients in Group B, no reversible etiology was detected. There was no significant difference in resuscitation results between Groups A and B observed (P equal to 0.52). Bedside echocardiography can identify some reversible causes of PEA. However, there are no significant changes in survival outcome between the echo group and those with traditional CPR.

  1. Multiple mechanisms of spiral wave breakup in a model of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Hastings, Harold M.; Evans, Steven J.

    2002-09-01

    It has become widely accepted that the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias are due to reentrant waves, i.e., electrical wave(s) that recirculate repeatedly throughout the tissue at a higher frequency than the waves produced by the heart's natural pacemaker (sinoatrial node). However, the complicated structure of cardiac tissue, as well as the complex ionic currents in the cell, have made it extremely difficult to pinpoint the detailed dynamics of these life-threatening reentrant arrhythmias. A simplified ionic model of the cardiac action potential (AP), which can be fitted to a wide variety of experimentally and numerically obtained mesoscopic characteristics of cardiac tissue such as AP shape and restitution of AP duration and conduction velocity, is used to explain many different mechanisms of spiral wave breakup which in principle can occur in cardiac tissue. Some, but not all, of these mechanisms have been observed before using other models; therefore, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate them using just one framework model and to explain the different parameter regimes or physiological properties necessary for each mechanism (such as high or low excitability, corresponding to normal or ischemic tissue, spiral tip trajectory types, and tissue structures such as rotational anisotropy and periodic boundary conditions). Each mechanism is compared with data from other ionic models or experiments to illustrate that they are not model-specific phenomena. Movies showing all the breakup mechanisms are available at http://arrhythmia.hofstra.edu/breakup and at ftp://ftp.aip.org/epaps/chaos/E-CHAOEH-12-039203/ INDEX.html. The fact that many different breakup mechanisms exist has important implications for antiarrhythmic drug design and for comparisons of fibrillation experiments using different species, electromechanical uncoupling drugs, and initiation protocols.

  2. Integration of mechanical, structural and electrical imaging to understand response to cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Etelvino; Bijnens, Bart; Berruezo, Antonio; Mont, Lluis; Doltra, Adelina; Andreu, David; Brugada, Josep; Sitges, Marta

    2014-10-01

    There is extensive controversy exists on whether cardiac resynchronization therapy corrects electrical or mechanical asynchrony. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a correlation between electrical and mechanical sequences and if myocardial scar has any relevant impact. Six patients with normal left ventricular function and 12 patients with left ventricular dysfunction and left bundle branch block, treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy, were studied. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography and electroanatomical mapping were performed in all patients and, where applicable, before and after therapy. Magnetic resonance was performed for evaluation of myocardial scar. Images were postprocessed and mechanical and electrical activation sequences were defined and time differences between the first and last ventricular segment to be activated were determined. Response to therapy was defined as a reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume ≥ 15% after 12 months of follow-up. Good correlation between electrical and mechanical timings was found in patients with normal left ventricular function (r(2) = 0.88; P = .005) but not in those with left ventricular dysfunction (r(2) = 0.02; P = not significant). After therapy, both timings and sequences were modified and improved, except in those with myocardial scar. Despite a close electromechanical relationship in normal left ventricular function, there is no significant correlation in patients with dysfunction. Although resynchronization therapy improves this correlation, the changes in electrical activation may not yield similar changes in left ventricular mechanics particularly depending on the underlying myocardial substrate. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Portable bioreactor for perfusion and electrical stimulation of engineered cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Taubman, Alanna; Cimetta, Elisa; Saccenti, Laetitia; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering aims to create functional tissue constructs that can reestablish the structure and function of injured myocardium. Although bioreactors have facilitated the engineering of cardiac patches of clinically relevant size in vitro, a major drawback remains the transportation of the engineered tissues from a production facility to a medical operation facility while maintaining tissue viability and preventing contamination. Furthermore, after implantation, most of the cells are endangered by hypoxic conditions that exist before vascular flow is established. We developed a portable device that provides the perfusion and electrical stimulation necessary to engineer cardiac tissue in vitro, and to transport it to the site where it will be implantated. The micropump-powered perfusion apparatus may additionally function as an extracorporeal active pumping system providing nutrients and oxygen supply to the graft post-implantation. Such a system, through perfusion of oxygenated media and bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors), could transiently support the tissue construct until it connects to the host vasculature and heart muscle, after which it could be taken away or let biodegrade.

  4. Cardiac Pacemaker Battery Discharge After External Electrical Cardioversion for Broad QRS Complex Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Annamaria, Martino; Andrea, Scapigliati; Michela, Casella; Tommaso, Sanna; Gemma, Pelargonio; Antonio, Dello Russo; Roberto, Zamparelli; Stefano, De Paulis; Fulvio, Bellocci; Rocco, Schiavello

    2008-01-01

    External electrical cardioversion or defibrillation may be necessary in patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker (PM) or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Sudden discharge of high electrical energy employed in direct current (DC) transthoracic countershock may damage the PM/ICD system resulting in a series of possible device malfunctions. For this reason, when defibrillation or cardioversion must be attempted in a patient with a PM or ICD, some precautions should be taken, particularly in PM dependent patients, in order to prevent damage to the device. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman with a dual chamber PM implanted in the right subclavicular region, who received two consecutive transthoracic DC shocks to treat haemodynamically unstable broad QRS complex tachycardia after cardiac surgery performed with a standard sternotomic approach. Because of the sternal wound and thoracic drainage tubes together with the severe clinical compromise, the anterior paddle was positioned near the pulse generator. At the following PM test, a complete battery discharge was detected. PMID:18679527

  5. Soft tissue modelling of cardiac fibres for use in coupled mechano-electric simulations.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Jonathan P; Bishop, Martin J; Gavaghan, David J

    2007-10-01

    The numerical solution of the coupled system of partial differential and ordinary differential equations that model the whole heart in three dimensions is a considerable computational challenge. As a consequence, it is not computationally practical--either in terms of memory or time--to repeat simulations on a finer computational mesh to ensure that convergence of the solution has been attained. In an attempt to avoid this problem while retaining mathematical rigour, we derive a one dimensional model of a cardiac fibre that takes account of elasticity properties in three structurally defined axes within the myocardial tissue. This model of a cardiac fibre is then coupled with an electrophysiological cell model and a model of cellular electromechanics to allow us to simulate the coupling of the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. We demonstrate that currently used numerical methods for coupling electrical and mechanical activity do not work in this case, and identify appropriate numerical techniques that may be used when solving the governing equations. This allows us to perform a series of simulations that: (i) investigate the effect of some of the assumptions inherent in other models; and (ii) reproduce qualitatively some experimental observations.

  6. Capacity of dental equipment to interfere with cardiac implantable electrical devices.

    PubMed

    Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Miranda-Rius, Jaume; Brunet-Llobet, Lluís; Sabaté de la Cruz, Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Patients with cardiac implantable electrical devices should take precautions when exposed to electromagnetic fields. Possible interference as a result of proximity to electromagnets or electricity flow from electronic tools employed in clinical odontology remains controversial. The objective of this study was to examine in vitro the capacity of dental equipment to provoke electromagnetic interference in pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators. Six electronic dental instruments were tested on three implantable cardioverter defibrillators and three pacemakers from different manufacturers. A simulator model, submerged in physiological saline, with elements that reproduced life-size anatomic structures was used. The instruments were analyzed at differing distances and for different time periods of application. The dental instruments studied displayed significant differences in their capacity to trigger electromagnetic interference. Significant differences in the quantity of registered interference were observed with respect to the variables manufacturer, type of cardiac implant, and application distance but not with the variable time of application. The electronic dental equipment tested at a clinical application distance (20 cm) provoked only slight interference in the pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators employed, irrespective of manufacturer. © 2015 Eur J Oral Sci.

  7. Electrical velocimetry for measuring cardiac output in children with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Norozi, K; Beck, C; Osthaus, W A; Wille, I; Wessel, A; Bertram, H

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the agreement of cardiac output measurements obtained by electrical velocimetry (CO(EV)) and those that derived from the direct Fick-oxygen principle (CO(F)) in infants and children with congenital heart defects. Simultaneous measurements of CO(EV) and CO(F) were compared in 32 paediatric patients, aged 11 days to 17.8 yr, undergoing diagnostic right and left heart catheterization. For non-invasive measurements of cardiac output by electrical velocimetry, which is a variation of impedance cardiography, standard surface electrodes were applied to the left side of the neck and the left side of the thorax at the level of the xiphoid process. Cardiac output determined using direct Fick-oxygen principle was calculated by direct measurement of oxygen consumption (VO2) and invasive determination of the arterio-venous oxygen content difference. An excellent correlation (r=0.97) was found between CO(EV) and CO(F) (P<0.001). The slope of the regression equation [0.96 (SD 0.04)] was not significantly different from the line of identity. The bias between the two methods (CO(EV)-CO(F)) was 0.01 litre min(-1) and the limits of agreement, defined as the bias (2 SD), were -0.47 and +0.45 litre min(-1). CO(EV) demonstrates acceptable agreement with data derived from CO(F) in infants and children with congenital heart disease. The new technique is simple, completely non-invasive, and provides beat-to-beat estimation of CO.

  8. Study of simultaneous presence of DD and PP electric fields during the geomagnetic storm of November 7-8, 2004 and resultant TEC variation over the Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galav, P.; Sharma, Shweta; Rao, S. S.; Veenadhari, B.; Nagatsuma, T.; Pandey, R.

    2014-04-01

    During very intense geomagnetic storm of November 7-8, 2004 simultaneous presence of storm time disturbance dynamo and eastward and westward directed prompt penetration electric fields inferred from the ground based magnetometer data in the 75∘ E sector is presented. Magnetometer observations show that, on the whole, average Δ H variation on 8 November remains below the night time level compared to its quiet day variation. A number of upward and downward excursions have been observed between 0130 UT and 0800 UT in the Δ H variation on 8 November. These excursions in Δ H have been attributed to the episodes of eastward and westward prompt penetrating electric fields. Ionospheric response in the equatorial ionization anomaly region along 75∘ E has also been studied using the total electron content data recorded at five GPS stations, namely Udaipur, Bengaluru (IISC), Hyderabad (HYDE), Maldives (MALD) and Diego Garcia (DGAR). Observation of markedly suppressed EIA, in conjunction with Δ H variation which was m negative during the daytime on 8 November, indicates the presence of an external field of opposite polarity (the disturbance dynamo electric field) that either undermined, or overshadowed the daytime ambient (eastward) electric field to the extent that the equatorial plasma fountain could not become effective.

  9. Prediction and prognosis of ventricular tachycardia recurrence after catheter ablation with remote magnetic navigation for electrical storm in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qi; Jacobsen, Peter Karl; Pehrson, Steen; Chen, Xu

    2017-08-17

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) recurrence after catheter ablation for electrical storm is commonly seen in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). We hypothesized that VT recurrence can be predicted and be related to the all-cause death after VT storm ablation guided by remote magnetic navigation (RMN) in patients with ICM. A total of 54 ICM patients (87% male; mean age, 65 ± 7.1 years) presenting with VT storm undergoing acute ablation using RMN were enrolled. Acute complete ablation success was defined as noninducibility of any sustained monomorphic VT at the end of the procedure. Early VT recurrence was defined as the occurrence of sustained VT within 1 month after the first ablation. After a mean follow-up of 17.1 months, 27 patients (50%) had freedom from VT recurrence. Sustained VT recurred in 12 patients (22%) within 1 month following the first ablation. In univariate analysis, VT recurrence was associated with incomplete procedural success (hazard ratio [HR]: 6.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20-32.47, P = 0.029), lack of amiodarone usage before ablation (HR: 4.71, 95% CI: 1.12-19.7, P = 0.034), and a longer procedural time (HR: 1.023, 95% CI: 1.00-1.05, P = 0.05). The mortality of patients with early VT recurrence was higher than that of patients without recurrence (P < 0.01). Inducibility of any VT at the end of procedure for VT storm guided by RMN is the strongest predictor of VT recurrence. ICM patients who have early recurrences after VT storm ablation are at high risk of all-cause death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Thyroid storm and arrhythmic storm: a potentially fatal combination.

    PubMed

    Anjo, Diana; Maia, José; Carvalho, André Couto; Castro, Heloísa; Aragão, Irene; Vieira, António Pinheiro; Reis, António Hipólito; Borges, Fátima; Torres, Severo

    2013-09-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare clinical emergency with a mortality rate between 20% and 30%. Cardiac arrhythmias associated with thyrotoxicosis are usually supraventricular. Ventricular arrhythmias are rarely associated with this entity and tend to occur in patients with intrinsic cardiac disease. We present a 35-year-old woman with Graves disease and a thyroid storm manifested with multiple malignant dysrhythmic episodes, without underlying cardiac disease. The mechanism for ventricular arrhythmia is not clear but seems to be due to the increased myocardial excitability directly caused by the thyroid hormones. The presence of myocarditis lesions may constitute an arrhythmogenic substratum and contribute further to this manifestation. This case emphasizes the importance of cardiac monitoring in patients with thyroid storm.

  11. Assessment of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Bartz, B; Collins, M; Stoddard, G; Appleton, A; Livingood, R; Sobcynski, H; Vogel, K D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest on veal calf welfare, veal quality, and blood yield. Ninety calves from the same farm were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups in a balanced unpaired comparison design. The first treatment group (the "head-only" method-application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating stun to the frontal plate of the skull at the intersection of 2 imaginary lines extending from the lateral canthus to the opposite poll [CONTROL]) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun ( = 45). The second group ( = 45) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun followed by secondary electrical induction of cardiac arrest (the "head/heart" method-initial application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating captive bolt stun followed by 1 s application of an electrical stun to the ventral region of the ribcage directly caudal to the junction of the humerus and scapula while the stunned calf was in lateral recumbence [HEAD/HEART]). Stunning efficacy was the indicator of animal welfare used in this study. All calves were instantly rendered insensible by the initial stun and did not display common indicators of return to consciousness. For meat quality evaluation, all samples were collected from the 12th rib region of the longissimus thoracis. Meat samples were evaluated for color, drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The L* values (measure of meat color lightness) were darker ( < 0.05) in the HEAD/HEART group (45.08 ± 0.72) than the CONTROL group (47.10 ± 0.72). There were no differences ( > 0.05) observed in a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values between treatments. No differences ( > 0.05) were observed in drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The blood yield from the CONTROL group (7,217.9 ± 143.5 g) was greater ( < 0.05) than that from the HEAD/HEART group (6,656.4 ± 143.5 g

  12. How the effects of winds and electric fields in F2-layer storms vary with latitude and longitude - A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, M.; He, X.-Q.; Rishbeth, H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of thermospheric winds and electric fields on the ionospheric F2-layer are controlled by the geometry of the magnetic field, and so vary with latitude and longitude. A simple model of the daytime F2-layer is adopted and the effects at midlatitudes (25-65 deg geographic) of three processes that accompany geomagnetic storms: (1) thermospheric changes due to auroral heating; (2) equatorward winds that tend to cancel the quiet-day poleward winds; and (3) the penetration of magnetospheric electric fields are studied. At +/- 65 deg, the effects of heating and electric fields are strongest in the longitudes toward which the geomagnetic dipole is tilted, i.e., the North American and the South Indian Ocean sectors. Because of the proximity of the geomagnetic equator to the East Asian and South American sectors, the reverse is true at +/- 25 deg.

  13. Effects of muscle electrical stimulation on peak VO2 in cardiac transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, A F; Chicharro, J L; Gil, L; Ruiz, M P; Sánchez, V; Lucía, A; Urrea, S; Gómez, M A

    1998-07-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) has become a critical component in the evaluation of heart transplant recipients (HTR). In these patients, peak VO2 remains low after cardiac transplantation mainly because of persisting peripheral limitations in the working muscles. Muscular electrical stimulation, on the other hand, has been shown to enhance the oxidative capacity of healthy muscle. It was the purpose of our investigation to study the effects of ES on the peak VO2 of HTR. Fourteen (11 males and 3 females) HTR (age: 57+/-7yr, mean +/- SD; height: 163+/-7 cm, weight: 70.5+/-8.6 kg) were selected as subjects and each of them was randomly assigned to one of two groups: (a) group EXP (n = 7), receiving electrical stimulation on both quadriceps muscles during a period of 8 weeks, and (b) group CONT (n = 7), not receiving electrical stimulation. Before (PRE) and after (POST) the aforementioned 8-week period, respectively, all the subjects performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test (ramp protocol) on a cycle ergometer for peak VO2 determination. PRE values of peak VO2 were similar in both groups (17.1+/-2.0 vs 16.9+/-3.8ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) in EXP and CONT, respectively). However, peak values of VO2 significantly increased in EXP (p < 0.05) after the period of electrical stimulation (POST peak VO2: 18.7+/-2.0ml x kg(-1)), whereas no change was observed in CONT (POST peak VO2: 16.2+/-3.2 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)). In conclusion, electrical stimulation could therefore be used to improve the functional capacity of HTR, and might be included in the rehabilitation programs of this population group.

  14. Simulation method for cardiac stroke volume estimation by intracardiac electrical impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Barak, C; Leviatan, Y; Inbar, G F; Hoekstein, K N

    1992-09-01

    Using the electrical impedance measurement technique to investigate stroke volume estimation, three models of the ventricle were simulated. A four-electrode impedance catheter was used; two electrodes to set up an electric field in the model and the other two to measure the potential difference. A new approach, itself an application of the quasi-static case of a method used to solve electromagnetic field problems, was used to solve the electric field in the model. The behaviour of the estimation is examined with respect to the electrode configuration on the catheter and to catheter location with respect to the ventricle walls. Cardiac stroke volume estimation was found to be robust to catheter location generating a 10 per cent error for an offset of 40 per cent of the catheter from the chamber axis and rotation of 20 degrees with respect to the axis. The electrode configuration has a dominant effect on the sensitivity and accuracy of the estimation. Certain configurations gave high accuracy, whereas in others high sensitivity was found with lower accuracy. This led to the conclusion that the electrode configuration should be carefully chosen according to the desired criteria.

  15. Bioreactor for modulation of cardiac microtissue phenotype by combined static stretch and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W; Nunes, Sara S; Sofla, Aarash; Reis, Lewis A; Pahnke, Aric; Xiao, Yun; Laschinger, Carol; Radisic, Milica

    2014-01-01

    We describe here a bioreactor capable of simultaneously applying mechanical and electrical field stimulation in conjunction with static strain and on-line force of contraction measurements. It consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tissue chamber and a pneumatically driven stretch platform. The chamber contained eight tissue microwells (8.05 mm in length and 2.5 mm in width) with a pair of posts (2.78 mm in height and 0.8 mm in diameter) in each well to serve as fixation points and for measurements of contraction force. Carbon rods, stimulating electrodes, were placed into the PDMS chamber such that one pair stimulated four microwells. For feasibility studies, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded in collagen gels into the microwells. Following three days of gel compaction, electrical field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm and 1Hz, mechanical stimulation of 5% static strain or electromechanical stimulation (field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm, 1Hz and 5% static strain) were applied for 3 days. Cardiac microtissues subjected to electromechanical stimulation exhibited elevated amplitude of contraction and improved sarcomere structure as evidenced by sarcomeric α-actinin, actin and troponin T staining compared to microtissues subjected to electrical or mechanical stimulation alone or non-stimulated controls. The expression of atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide was also elevated in the electromechanically stimulated group. PMID:24876342

  16. Electric impedance platelet aggregometry in cardiac surgery patients: A comparative study of two technologies.

    PubMed

    Ranucci, Marco; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina; Crapelli, Giulia Beatrice; Ranucci, Matteo; Meloni, Silvia; Pistuddi, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Platelet function tests are suggested to assess platelet reactivity before cardiac and major non-cardiac surgery. Different point-of-care platelet function tests are available. Among these, electric impedance platelet aggregometry (EIPA) (Multiplate®, MP) is one of the most widely used techniques. Recently, a new EIPA system (Rotem Platelet®, RP) was released. This is a comparative study of platelet function measured with MP and RP. Fifty cardiac surgery patients were admitted to this study. All the patients received a preoperative platelet function test with both the MP and the RP; for each technology, two tests were performed: the ADPtest (investigating P2Y12 receptor platelet reactivity) and the TRAPtest (investigating the thrombin-dependent platelet reactivity). ADP-based platelet reactivity values demonstrated a significant (p = 0.019) correlation between the MP and the RP; and a marginally significant (p = 0.042) correlation for TRAP-based tests. The Bland-Altman analysis of the ADPtest demonstrated a positive bias of 5.94 units (MP > RP) and a percentage error of 88%. For the TRAPtest, there was a positive bias of 12 units (MP > RP) and a percentage error of 89%. In patients who were preoperatively treated with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, only the MP ADPtest was positively associated with the days from drug discontinuation (p = 0.003). Platelet function assessment with RP greatly differs from the equivalent MP measure, and no correction value can be applied due to the low level of precision. This applies both to ADPtest and TRAPtest. The MP ADPtest is more reliable for platelet reactivity after discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor inhibitors.

  17. Cardiac Mean Electrical Axis in Thoroughbreds—Standardization by the Dubois Lead Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Cássia Fré; Samesima, Nelson; Pastore, Carlos Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Background Different methodologies for electrocardiographic acquisition in horses have been used since the first ECG recordings in equines were reported early in the last century. This study aimed to determine the best ECG electrodes positioning method and the most reliable calculation of mean cardiac axis (MEA) in equines. Materials and Methods We evaluated the electrocardiographic profile of 53 clinically healthy Thoroughbreds, 38 males and 15 females, with ages ranging 2–7 years old, all reared at the São Paulo Jockey Club, in Brazil. Two ECG tracings were recorded from each animal, one using the Dubois lead positioning system, the second using the base-apex method. QRS complex amplitudes were analyzed to obtain MEA values in the frontal plane for each of the two electrode positioning methods mentioned above, using two calculation approaches, the first by Tilley tables and the second by trigonometric calculation. Results were compared between the two methods. Results There was significant difference in cardiac axis values: MEA obtained by the Tilley tables was +135.1° ± 90.9° vs. -81.1° ± 3.6° (p<0.0001), and by trigonometric calculation it was -15.0° ± 11.3° vs. -79.9° ± 7.4° (p<0.0001), base-apex and Dubois, respectively. Furthermore, Dubois method presented small range of variation without statistical or clinical difference by either calculation mode, while there was a wide variation in the base-apex method. Conclusion Dubois improved centralization of the Thoroughbreds' hearts, engendering what seems to be the real frontal plane. By either calculation mode, it was the most reliable methodology to obtain cardiac mean electrical axis in equines. PMID:28095442

  18. Arrhythmias in Patients with Cardiac Implantable Electrical Devices after Implantation of a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Andrew N; Kremers, Walter K; Duval, Sue; Sakaguchi, Scott; John, Ranjit; Eckman, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) for advanced heart failure is increasing, and the role of cardiac implantable electrical devices (CIED) is unclear. Prior studies of the incidence of arrhythmias and shocks are frequently limited by ascertainment. One hundred and seventy-eight patients were examined with a previous CIED who were implanted with a CF-LVAD. Medical history, medications, and CIED data from device interrogations were gathered. A cardiac surgery control group (n = 38) was obtained to control for surgical factors. Several clinically significant events increased after LVAD implantation: treated-zone ventricular arrhythmias (VA; p < 0.01), monitored-zone VA (p < 0.01), antitachycardia pacing (ATP)-terminated episodes (p < 0.01), and shocks (p = 0.01), although administered shocks later decreased (p < 0.01). Presence of a preimplant VA was associated with postoperative VA (odds ratio [OR]: 4.31; confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-12.3, p < 0.01). Relative to cardiac surgery, LVAD patients experienced more perioperative events (i.e., monitored VAs and shocks, p < 0.01 and p = 0.04). Neither implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks before implant nor early or late postimplant arrhythmias or shocks predicted survival (p = 0.07, p = 0.55, and p = 0.55). Our experience demonstrates time-dependent effects on clinically significant arrhythmias after LVAD implantation, including evidence that early LVAD-related arrhythmias may be caused by the unique arrhythmogenic effects of VAD implant.

  19. Cardiac Mean Electrical Axis in Thoroughbreds-Standardization by the Dubois Lead Positioning System.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Cássia Fré; Samesima, Nelson; Pastore, Carlos Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Different methodologies for electrocardiographic acquisition in horses have been used since the first ECG recordings in equines were reported early in the last century. This study aimed to determine the best ECG electrodes positioning method and the most reliable calculation of mean cardiac axis (MEA) in equines. We evaluated the electrocardiographic profile of 53 clinically healthy Thoroughbreds, 38 males and 15 females, with ages ranging 2-7 years old, all reared at the São Paulo Jockey Club, in Brazil. Two ECG tracings were recorded from each animal, one using the Dubois lead positioning system, the second using the base-apex method. QRS complex amplitudes were analyzed to obtain MEA values in the frontal plane for each of the two electrode positioning methods mentioned above, using two calculation approaches, the first by Tilley tables and the second by trigonometric calculation. Results were compared between the two methods. There was significant difference in cardiac axis values: MEA obtained by the Tilley tables was +135.1° ± 90.9° vs. -81.1° ± 3.6° (p<0.0001), and by trigonometric calculation it was -15.0° ± 11.3° vs. -79.9° ± 7.4° (p<0.0001), base-apex and Dubois, respectively. Furthermore, Dubois method presented small range of variation without statistical or clinical difference by either calculation mode, while there was a wide variation in the base-apex method. Dubois improved centralization of the Thoroughbreds' hearts, engendering what seems to be the real frontal plane. By either calculation mode, it was the most reliable methodology to obtain cardiac mean electrical axis in equines.

  20. Storm Front

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-21

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey captures storm clouds that are moving towards the crater in the bottom of this image. Storms like this are common during the spring and early summer near the north pole.

  1. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR category:  ... Sep 22, 2009 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Australia and New Zealand ...

  2. Magnetic storms and induction hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Pulkkinen, Antti; Balch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storms are potentially hazardous to the activities and technological infrastructure of modern civilization. This reality was dramatically demonstrated during the great magnetic storm of March 1989, when surface geoelectric fields, produced by the interaction of the time-varying geomagnetic field with the Earth's electrically conducting interior, coupled onto the overlying Hydro-Québec electric power grid in Canada. Protective relays were tripped, the grid collapsed, and about 9 million people were temporarily left without electricity [Bolduc, 2002].

  3. Role of the basement membrane in regulation of cardiac electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaxiao; Borg, Thomas K; Wang, Zhonghai; Ma, Zhen; Gao, Bruce Z

    2014-06-01

    In the heart muscle, each adult cardiomyocyte is enclosed by a basement membrane (BM). This innermost extracellular matrix is a layered assembly of laminin, collagen IV, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans. In this study, the role of the BM network in regulation of the electrical properties of neonatal cardiomyocytes (NCMs) cultured on an aligned collagen I gel was investigated using a multielectrode array (MEA). A laminin antibody was added to the culture medium for 48-120 h to conjugate newly secreted laminin. Then, morphology of the NCMs on an MEA was monitored using a phase contrast microscope, and the BM network that was immunocytostained for laminin was imaged using a fluorescence microscope. When the BM laminin was absent in this culture model, dramatic changes in NCM morphology were observed. Simultaneously, the MEA-recorded cardiac field potential showed changes compared to that from the control groups: The period of contraction shortened to 1/2 of that from the control groups, and the waveform of the calcium influx shifted from a flat plateau to a peak-like waveform, indicating that the electrical properties of the NCMs were closely related to the components and distribution of the BM network.

  4. Feasibility and efficacy of electrical cardioversion after cardiac resynchronization implantation in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Turco, Pietro; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Stabile, Giuseppe; Solimene, Francesco; La Rocca, Vincenzo; Vecchione, Filippo; Iuliano, Assunta; Marrazzo, Natale; De Vivo, Stefano; Cavallaro, Ciro; Bianchi, Valter; Agresta, Alessia; Ciardiello, Carmine; De Simone, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) who undergo cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) may spontaneously recover sinus rhythm during follow-up. We tested the feasibility and efficacy of electrical cardioversion attempted after 3 months of CRT in patients with permanent AF and measured the long-term maintenance of sinus rhythm. Twenty-eight consecutive patients with permanent AF in whom CRT defibrillators had been implanted were scheduled for internal electrical cardioversion after 3 months (group A) and were compared with a control group of 27 patients (group B). In group A, 22 patients (79 %) were eligible for cardioversion; sinus rhythm was restored in 18 (82 %) of these, with no procedural complications. After 12 months, 16 patients (58 %) in group A were in sinus rhythm, compared with one group B patient who spontaneously recovered sinus rhythm (4 %, p < 0.001). On 12-month evaluation, ejection fraction had improved in both groups, but a reduction in left ventricular end-systolic volume was recorded only in group A patients (p = 0.018 versus baseline). In patients with permanent AF, the rhythm control strategy consisting of internal cardioversion, performed by means of the implanted cardioverter-defibrillator after 3 months of CRT, was associated with a high rate of sinus rhythm resumption on long-term follow-up and with a better echocardiographic response to CRT than that seen in patients treated according to a rate control strategy.

  5. A generalized finite difference method for modeling cardiac electrical activation on arbitrary, irregular computational meshes.

    PubMed

    Trew, Mark L; Smaill, Bruce H; Bullivant, David P; Hunter, Peter J; Pullan, Andrew J

    2005-12-01

    A generalized finite difference (GFD) method is presented that can be used to solve the bi-domain equations modeling cardiac electrical activity. Classical finite difference methods have been applied by many researchers to the bi-domain equations. However, these methods suffer from the limitation of requiring computational meshes that are structured and orthogonal. Finite element or finite volume methods enable the bi-domain equations to be solved on unstructured meshes, although implementations of such methods do not always cater for meshes with varying element topology. The GFD method solves the bi-domain equations on arbitrary and irregular computational meshes without any need to specify element basis functions. The method is useful as it can be easily applied to activation problems using existing meshes that have originally been created for use by finite element or finite difference methods. In addition, the GFD method employs an innovative approach to enforcing nodal and non-nodal boundary conditions. The GFD method performs effectively for a range of two and three-dimensional test problems and when computing bi-domain electrical activation moving through a fully anisotropic three-dimensional model of canine ventricles.

  6. Cell number per spheroid and electrical conductivity of nanowires influence the function of silicon nanowired human cardiac spheroids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan; Coyle, Robert C; Yao, Jenny; Xu, Ruoyu; Gou, Wenyu; Wang, Hongjun; Menick, Donald R; Tian, Bozhi; Mei, Ying

    2017-03-15

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) provide an unlimited cell source to treat cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of death worldwide. However, current hiPSC-CMs retain an immature phenotype that leads to difficulties for integration with adult myocardium after transplantation. To address this, we recently utilized electrically conductive silicon nanowires (e-SiNWs) to facilitate self-assembly of hiPSC-CMs to form nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids. Our previous results showed addition of e-SiNWs effectively enhanced the functions of the cardiac spheroids and improved the cellular maturation of hiPSC-CMs. Here, we examined two important factors that can affect functions of the nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids: (1) cell number per spheroid (i.e., size of the spheroids), and (2) the electrical conductivity of the e-SiNWs. To examine the first factor, we prepared hiPSC cardiac spheroids with four different sizes by varying cell number per spheroid (∼0.5k, ∼1k, ∼3k, ∼7k cells/spheroid). Spheroids with ∼3k cells/spheroid was found to maximize the beneficial effects of the 3D spheroid microenvironment. This result was explained with a semi-quantitative theory that considers two competing factors: 1) the improved 3D cell-cell adhesion, and 2) the reduced oxygen supply to the center of spheroids with the increase of cell number. Also, the critical role of electrical conductivity of silicon nanowires has been confirmed in improving tissue function of hiPSC cardiac spheroids. These results lay down a solid foundation to develop suitable nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids as an innovative cell delivery system to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Overexpression of connexin 43 using a retroviral vector improves electrical coupling of skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Ma, Yu-Ling; Themis, Michael; Patel, Pravina; Spohr, Hilmar; MacLeod, Kenneth T; Ullrich, Nina D; Kienast, Yvonne; Coutelle, Charles; Peters, Nicholas S

    2006-01-01

    Background Organ transplantation is presently often the only available option to repair a damaged heart. As heart donors are scarce, engineering of cardiac grafts from autologous skeletal myoblasts is a promising novel therapeutic strategy. The functionality of skeletal muscle cells in the heart milieu is, however, limited because of their inability to integrate electrically and mechanically into the myocardium. Therefore, in pursuit of improved cardiac integration of skeletal muscle grafts we sought to modify primary skeletal myoblasts by overexpression of the main gap-junctional protein connexin 43 and to study electrical coupling of connexin 43 overexpressing myoblasts to cardiac myocytes in vitro. Methods To create an efficient means for overexpression of connexin 43 in skeletal myoblasts we constructed a bicistronic retroviral vector MLV-CX43-EGFP expressing the human connexin 43 cDNA and the marker EGFP gene. This vector was employed to transduce primary rat skeletal myoblasts in optimised conditions involving a concomitant use of the retrovirus immobilising protein RetroNectin® and the polycation transduction enhancer Transfectam®. The EGFP-positive transduced cells were then enriched by flow cytometry. Results More than four-fold overexpression of connexin 43 in the transduced skeletal myoblasts, compared with non-transduced cells, was shown by Western blotting. Functionality of the overexpressed connexin 43 was demonstrated by microinjection of a fluorescent dye showing enhanced gap-junctional intercellular transfer in connexin 43 transduced myoblasts compared with transfer in non-transduced myoblasts. Rat cardiac myocytes were cultured in multielectrode array culture dishes together with connexin 43/EGFP transduced skeletal myoblasts, control non-transduced skeletal myoblasts or alone. Extracellular field action potential activation rates in the co-cultures of connexin 43 transduced skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes were significantly higher than

  8. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the thighs in cardiac patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Cenik, Fadime; Schoberwalter, Dieter; Keilani, Mohammad; Maehr, Bruno; Wolzt, Michael; Marhold, Maximilian; Crevenna, Richard

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to update scientific knowledge concerning the safety of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to increase exercise capacity and prevent cardiac cachexia in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). A systematic review including the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, and SCOPUS was conducted for the time period from 1966 to March 31, 2016. Only four articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria (three original articles/safety studies and one case report). The three (safety) studies used NMES to increase muscle strength and/or endurance capacity of the thighs. NMES did not show electromagnetic interference (EMI) with ICD function. EMI was described in a case report of 2 patients with subpectoral ICDs and application of NMES on abdominal muscles. This review indicates that NMES may be applied in cardiac ICD patients if 1) individual risks (e. g., pacing dependency, acute heart failure, unstable angina, ventricular arrhythmic episode in the last 3 months) are excluded by performing a safety check before starting NMES treatment and 2) "passive" exercise using NMES is performed only for thighs and gluteal muscles in 3) compliant ICD patients (especially for home-based NMES) and 4) the treatment is regularly supervised by a physician and the device is examined after the first use of NMES to exclude EMI. Nevertheless, further studies including larger sample sizes are necessary to exclude any risk when NMES is used in this patient group.

  9. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  10. On the performance of an implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta method in models of cardiac electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Raymond J; Dean, Ryan C

    2008-05-01

    Mathematical models of electric activity in cardiac tissue are becoming increasingly powerful tools in the study of cardiac arrhythmias. Considered here are mathematical models based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that describe the ionic currents at the myocardial cell level. Generating an efficient numerical solution of these ODEs is a challenging task, and, in fact, the physiological accuracy of tissue-scale models is often limited by the efficiency of the numerical solution process. In this paper, we examine the efficiency of the numerical solution of four cardiac electrophysiological models using implicit--explicit Runge-Kutta (IMEX-RK) splitting methods. We find that variable step-size implementations of IMEX-RK methods (ARK3 and ARK5) that take advantage of Jacobian structure clearly outperform the methods commonly used in practice.

  11. Cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity associated with methylphenidate in an adolescent with a normal baseline echocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Daly, Michael W; Custer, Geoffrey; McLeay, Peter D

    2008-11-01

    Recent concerns of adverse cardiac events associated with drugs used to treat attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have prompted debate over whether these drugs are truly safe. We describe a 17-year-old boy with a normal baseline echocardiogram who had been taking methylphenidate for ADHD for 18 months and experienced cardiac arrest. Emergency personnel attempted to resuscitate him, performing defibrillation twice for ventricular fibrillation, with subsequent pulseless electrical activity. The patient was immediately taken to the hospital where he received continued resuscitation, intravenous boluses of cardiac drugs, and additional defibrillation. A persistent pulsatile rhythm returned about 2 minutes after arrival. Overall, the patient was pulseless for 22 minutes. Emergency cardiac catheterization revealed wall motion abnormalities without coronary lesions. He was mechanically ventilated and was transferred to the intensive care unit, where he remained comatose. Neurologic studies performed the next day revealed diffuse encephalopathy due to anoxic brain injury. An echocardiogram on day 3 showed slightly improved left ventricular systolic function, which improved further by day 15. As the patient did not regain purposeful movement, he was discharged to a rehabilitation facility on day 33. The patient's methylphenidate therapy had been started at an appropriate dose of 18 mg/day and titrated over a period of 3 months up to 36 mg/day, which he continued until the event. The drug had been discontinued on admission, was not restarted, and for the next 2 years, the patient experienced no further cardiac events, although his severe mental deficiencies persisted. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 6) between the patient's adverse cardiac event and methylphenidate. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with documentation of a normal baseline echocardiogram who

  12. [Influence of sexual maturity and gonadectomy on cardiac electrical activity in male and female rabbits].

    PubMed

    Eizikovits, Gabriela Y; Casal, Carolina; Arini, Pedro D; Bertrán, Guillermo C

    2010-01-01

    Sex-associated differences in cardiac electrical activity have already been document noted. Even though these differences are usually associated with the effect of maturity and sex hormones, there are still some controversial points to this respect. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of maturity and gonadectomy on the different parameters of surface electrocardiogram and the duration of the action potential in young and adult rabbits. The differences obtained in females were observed in late repolarization, whereas in males took place in early repolarization. There was a relationship between the differences observed in the duration from the peak to the end of the T wave and those observed in the duration of the action potential to 90% of repolarization in females, whereas in males the relationship exists between the duration from the point J to the peak of the T wave and the duration of the action potential at 30 and 50% of repolarization. Differences could be related to hormonal or non-hormonal factors.

  13. The Electrical Activity of Canine Cardiac Purkinje Fibers in Sodium-Free, Calcium-Rich Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Ronald S.; Cranefield, Paul F.

    1973-01-01

    Propagated action potentials can be obtained in canine cardiac Purkinje fibers exposed to Na-free solutions containing no inorganic cation other than Ca and K. Essentially similar action potentials are obtained if Na is replaced by tetraethylammonium (TEA), tetramethylammonium (TMA), or choline. In a solution containing 128 mM TEA and 16.2 mM Ca the characteristics of these electrical responses were: maximum diastolic potential, -59 ± 3.3 mV; overshoot, 20 ± 6.8 mV; maximum upstroke velocity, 3.7 ± 2.3 V/s; conduction velocity, 0.1 m/s; and action potential duration, 360 ± 45 ms. The magnitude of the overshoot varied with log Cao with a slope of about 30 mV/10-fold concentration change. The upstroke velocity was an approximately linear function of Cao. The active response was greatly diminished or abolished by Mn and D-600 but was unaffected by tetrodotoxin. These Ca-dependent responses appeared in a region of transmembrane potential (about -50 mV) at which the rapid Na-dependent upstroke is abolished even when Na is present. PMID:4708407

  14. Focal extracellular potential: a means to monitor electrical activity in single cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Riemer, T L; Tung, L

    2000-04-01

    The focal extracellular potential (FEP) described in this study is an electrophysiological signal related to the transmembrane potential (V(m)) of cardiac myocytes that avoids the mechanical fragility, interference with contraction, and intracellular contact associated with conventional whole cell recording. One end of a frog ventricular myocyte was secured into a glass holding pipette. The FEP was measured differentially between this pipette and a bath pipette while the cell was voltage- or current-clamped by a third whole cell pipette. The FEP appeared as an amplitude-truncated action potential, while FEP duration accurately reflected the action potential duration (APD) at 90% repolarization (APD(90)). FEP magnitude increased as the holding pipette K(+) concentration ([K(+)]) was increased. The FEP-voltage relation was quasi-linear at negative V(m) with a slope that increased with elevated holding pipette [K(+)]. Increasing the membrane conductance inside the holding pipette by adding amphotericin B or cromakalim linearized the FEP-voltage relation across all V(m). The FEP accurately reported electrical activation and APD(90) during changes of stimulation frequency and episodes of cellular stretch.

  15. Regulation of Ca2+ and electrical alternans in cardiac myocytes: role of CAMKII and repolarizing currents.

    PubMed

    Livshitz, Leonid M; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-06-01

    Alternans of cardiac repolarization is associated with arrhythmias and sudden death. At the cellular level, alternans involves beat-to-beat oscillation of the action potential (AP) and possibly Ca(2+) transient (CaT). Because of experimental difficulty in independently controlling the Ca(2+) and electrical subsystems, mathematical modeling provides additional insights into mechanisms and causality. Pacing protocols were conducted in a canine ventricular myocyte model with the following results: 1) CaT alternans results from refractoriness of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release system; alternation of the L-type calcium current has a negligible effect; 2) CaT-AP coupling during late AP occurs through the sodium-calcium exchanger and underlies AP duration (APD) alternans; 3) increased Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity extends the range of CaT and APD alternans to slower frequencies and increases alternans magnitude; its decrease suppresses CaT and APD alternans, exerting an antiarrhythmic effect; and 4) increase of the rapid delayed rectifier current (I(Kr)) also suppresses APD alternans but without suppressing CaT alternans. Thus CaMKII inhibition eliminates APD alternans by eliminating its cause (CaT alternans) while I(Kr) enhancement does so by weakening CaT-APD coupling. The simulations identify combined CaMKII inhibition and I(Kr) enhancement as a possible antiarrhythmic intervention.

  16. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1.

  17. Groundwater discharge to wetlands driven by storm and flood events: Quantification using continuous Radon-222 and electrical conductivity measurements and dynamic mass-balance modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfedder, B. S.; Frei, S.; Hofmann, H.; Cartwright, I.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic response of groundwater discharge to external influences such as rainfall is an often neglected part of water and solute balances in wetlands. Here we develop a new field platform for long-term continuous 222Rn and electrical conductivity (EC) measurements at Sale Wetland, Australia to study the response of groundwater discharge to storm and flood events. The field measurements, combined with dynamic mass-balance modelling, demonstrate that the groundwater flux can increase from 3 to ∼20 mm d-1 following storms and up to 5 mm d-1 on the receding limb of floods. The groundwater pulses are likely produced by activation of local groundwater flow paths by water ponding on the surrounding flood plains. While 222Rn is a sensitive tracer for quantifying transient groundwater discharge, the mass-balance used to estimate fluxes is sensitive to parameterisation of gas exchange (k) with the atmosphere. Comparison of six equations for calculating k showed that, based on parameterisation of k alone, the groundwater flux estimate could vary by 58%. This work shows that neglecting transient processes will lead to errors in water and solute flux estimates based on infrequent point measurements. This could be particularly important for surface waters connected to contaminated or saline groundwater systems.

  18. Mobile intercept of storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The primary goal was to acquire lightning data to serve as ground truth for U2 overflights. Researchers were successful in instrumenting the Univ. of Mississippi/National Severe Storms Lab. (UM/NSSL) mobile laboratory and in coordinating storm intercept through communication to the U2 provided by airplane guidance at NSSL and through direct communication with the U2 pilot from a portable transceiver in the mobile lab. A demonstration showed that a mobile laboratory can be directed within a large geographical area and used to collect ground truth data for comparison with airborne data on a routine basis with proper utilization of forecasts, nowcasts, and communication among all participants. After the U2 flights, researchers turned their attention solely to intercepting severe storms within the area of Oklahoma with good Doppler radar coverage. They incorporated a second vehicle, which followed the mobile lab and from which they released instrumented balloons. This project utilized a standard meteorological rawinsonde and a balloon-borne electric field meter. They were successful in flying, tracking, and receiving data from mobily launched balloons on several days. Researchers believe that they have demonstrated the ability to obtain meteorological and electrical data in severe storms using instrumented balloons. This also includes the capability to launch into the mesocyclone region and for multiple launches in the same storm.

  19. Development of Electrically Conductive Double-Network Hydrogels via One-Step Facile Strategy for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Boguang; Yao, Fanglian; Hao, Tong; Fang, Wancai; Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yabin; Wang, Yan; Li, Junjie; Wang, Changyong

    2016-02-18

    Cardiac tissue engineering is an effective method to treat the myocardial infarction. However, the lack of electrical conductivity of biomaterials limits their applications. In this work, a homogeneous electronically conductive double network (HEDN) hydrogel via one-step facile strategy is developed, consisting of a rigid/hydrophobic/conductive network of chemical crosslinked poly(thiophene-3-acetic acid) (PTAA) and a flexible/hydrophilic/biocompatible network of photo-crosslinking methacrylated aminated gelatin (MAAG). Results suggest that the swelling, mechanical, and conductive properties of HEDN hydrogel can be modulated via adjusting the ratio of PTAA network to MAAG network. HEDN hydrogel has Young's moduli ranging from 22.7 to 493.1 kPa, and its conductivity (≈10(-4) S cm(-1)) falls in the range of reported conductivities for native myocardium tissue. To assess their biological activity, the brown adipose-derived stem cells (BADSCs) are seeded on the surface of HEDN hydrogel with or without electrical stimulation. Our data show that the HEDN hydrogel can support the survival and proliferation of BADSCs, and that it can improve the cardiac differentiation efficiency of BADSCs and upregulate the expression of connexin 43. Moreover, electrical stimulation can further improve this effect. Overall, it is concluded that the HEDN hydrogel may represent an ideal scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering.

  20. Electrical velocimetry for noninvasive cardiac output and stroke volume variation measurements in dogs undergoing cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazumasu; Mutoh, Tatsushi; Mutoh, Tomoko; Kawashima, Ryuta; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2017-01-01

    To compare electrical velocimetry (EV) noninvasive measures of cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume variation (SVV) in dogs undergoing cardiovascular surgery with those obtained with the conventional thermodilution technique using a pulmonary artery catheter. Prospective experimental trial. Seven adult Beagle dogs with a median weight of 13.6 kg. Simultaneous, coupled cardiac index (CI; CO indexed to body surface area) measurements by EV (CIEV) and the reference pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution method (CIPAC) were obtained in seven sevoflurane-anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated dogs undergoing experimental open-chest cardiovascular surgery for isolated right ventricular failure. Relationships between SVV or central venous pressure (CVP) and stroke volume (SV) were analysed to estimate fluid responsiveness. Haemodynamic data were recorded intraoperatively and before and after fluid challenge. Bland-Altman analysis of 332 matched sets of CI data revealed an overall bias and precision of - 0.22 ± 0.52 L minute(-1) m(-2) for CIEV and CIPAC (percentage error: 30.4%). Trend analysis showed a concordance of 88% for CIEV. SVV showed a significant positive correlation (r(2) = 0.442, p < 0.0001) with SV changes to a volume loading of 200 mL, but CVP did not (r(2) = 0.0002, p = 0.94). Better prediction of SV responsiveness (rise of SV index of ≥ 10%) was observed for SVV (0.74 ± 0.09; p = 0.014) with a significant area under the receiver operating characteristic curve in comparison with CVP (0.53 ± 0.98; p = 0.78), with a cut-off value of 14.5% (60% specificity and 83% sensitivity). In dogs undergoing cardiovascular surgery, EV provided accurate CO measurements compared with CIPAC, although its trending ability was poor. Further, SVV by EV, but not CVP, reliably predicted fluid responsiveness during mechanical ventilation in dogs. Copyright © 2016 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia

  1. A working hypothesis for connections between electrically-induced changes in cloud microphysics and storm vorticity, with possible effects on circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, Brian A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper outlines, and explores the uncertainties in, hypothesized connections between a series of processes that could explain two long-standing puzzles; those of (1) the observed winter storm vorticity responses to atmospheric energy inputs that change the ionosphere-earth current density, Jz, that appear to involve storm invigoration, and (2) changes in anti-cyclonic blocking and circulation that include the observed colder winters in Great Britain and western Europe at solar minima, and especially at extended solar minima. A working hypothesis for the mechanism responsible for (1) is that the flow of Jz through conductivity gradients, as in stratified cloud layers and fog, especially with sea-salt aerosol haze over the high latitude winter oceans, deposits electric changes on droplets and aerosol particles; most importantly on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). These electric charges modulate scavenging of the particles in clouds and haze layers, increasing the concentration of small CCN and decreasing the concentration of large CCN. When further cloud formation occurs there is increased concentration of small droplets and decreased concentration of large ones, reducing coalescence and the production of rain. Thus updrafts carry more liquid water above the freezing level, and there the increased production of ice releases more latent heat and invigorates the updraft (the Rosenfeld mechanism), leading to increased vorticity. Here we explore the major uncertainties for the reality of the above chain of physical processes. A consequence of cumulative cyclonic vorticity increases is increases in downstream anti-cyclonic blocking. A further working hypothesis for (2) is that the invigoration may be large enough to contribute to the observed increases in blocking in winters at solar minima (high Jz) in the North Atlantic, that result in colder winters in the UK and northern Europe.

  2. Influence of magnetically-induced E-fields on cardiac electric activity during MRI: A modeling study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Xia, Ling; Crozier, Stuart

    2003-12-01

    In modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), patients are exposed to strong, time-varying gradient magnetic fields that may be able to induce electric fields (E-fields)/currents in tissues approaching the level of physiological significance. In this work we present theoretical investigations into induced E-fields in the thorax, and evaluate their potential influence on cardiac electric activity under the assumption that the sites of maximum E-field correspond to the myocardial stimulation threshold (an abnormal circumstance). Whole-body cylindrical and planar gradient coils were included in the model. The calculations of the induced fields are based on an efficient, quasi-static, finite-difference scheme and an anatomically realistic, whole-body model. The potential for cardiac stimulation was evaluated using an electrical model of the heart. Twelve-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) signals were simulated and inspected for arrhythmias caused by the applied fields for both healthy and diseased hearts. The simulations show that the shape of the thorax and the conductive paths significantly influence induced E-fields. In healthy patients, these fields are not sufficient to elicit serious arrhythmias with the use of contemporary gradient sets. However, raising the strength and number of repeated switching episodes of gradients, as is certainly possible in local chest gradient sets, could expose patients to increased risk. For patients with cardiac disease, the risk factors are elevated. By the use of this model, the sensitivity of cardiac pathologies, such as abnormal conductive pathways, to the induced fields generated by an MRI sequence can be investigated. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Detection of acute myocardial ischemic injury by gender using a novel cardiac electrical biomarker.

    PubMed

    Schreck, David M; Fishberg, Robert D

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study us to stratify by gender a new cardiac electrical biomarker (CEB) diagnostic accuracy for detection of acute myocardial ischemic injury (AMII). This is a noninferiority retrospective, case-control, blinded study of 310 archived measured electrocardiograms (ECGs) acquired from 218 men and 92 women. The CEB is constructed from the derived ECG (dECG) synthesized from 3 leads. Electrocardiograms were included if acquired less than or equal to 1 day from patient presentation. Electrocardiograms were interpreted by 2 blinded physicians and adjudicated by consensus. Standard ST analyses and computerized ECG interpretations were active controls. Electrocardiograms were excluded for noise and baseline wander, age younger than 18 years, and ectopic beats in the 10-second ECG acquisition. Diagnostic accuracy measures of sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratios were stratified by gender. Measured vs derived ECG correlations were quantitatively compared using Pearson correlation and qualitatively by percent agreement methodology. The CEB sensitivities for AMII detection in men and women were 93.9% and 90.5%, respectively, and CEB specificities were 90.7% and 95.2%, respectively, and were superior to active controls. Derived and measured ECGs showed high correlation for both men and women with r = 0.857 and r = 0.893, respectively. Reference standard intra-agreement analysis for measured ECGs and dECGs with AMII was 99.4%. The CEB demonstrates high diagnostic accuracy for detection of AMII in men and women. The ECG can be derived with accuracy from 3 leads. This technology is an efficient real-time method of identifying patients with AMII who are being monitored in acute care settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Single-center experience with percutaneous extraction of cardiac implantable electric devices.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ayako; Shoda, Morio; Tabata, Hiroaki; Shoin, Wataru; Kobayashi, Hideki; Okano, Takahiro; Yoshie, Koji; Oguchi, Yasutaka; Takeuchi, Takahiro; Kato, Ken; Kuwahara, Koichiro

    2017-09-13

    The estimated incidence of infected cardiac implantable electric devices (CIED) has recently increased to 1-2% in Japan. Extraction of long-term implanted devices is generally difficult. There are few reports about lead extraction in Japan. We describe our experience with and outcomes of lead extraction using excimer lasers, mechanical sheaths, and manual extraction. We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics, types of devices, and indications for extraction in 29 patients with 67 leads who required CIED lead extraction at Shinshu University Hospital between April 2014 and October 2016. Mean patient age was 71 years and 25 patients were male. The indications for device extraction were infections (n=25) and non-functioning leads (n=4). A total of 67 leads (active fixation lead, n=28; passive fixation lead, n=39) had been implanted for a median duration of 6.3±5.6 years. Extractions were performed using an excimer laser sheath (n=26), laser with mechanical sheath (n=7), only mechanical sheath (Cook Vascular Inc., Leechburg, PA, USA) (n=1), and manually (n=1). The procedure was successful in all patients. There were no major or minor complications during extraction. There was no recurrence of infection after infected device extraction. Two patients were implanted with subcutaneous implantable defibrillators after extraction of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). CIED lead extraction, especially of those that are adherent to the subclavian vein, can be successfully performed in Japanese subjects using an excimer laser and mechanical sheath, without complications. Copyright © 2017 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sudden cardiac arrest recorded during Holter monitoring: prevalence, antecedent electrical events, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiichi; Tanabe, Teruhisa; Osaka, Motohisa; Chishaki, Akiko; Takase, Bonpei; Niwano, Shinichi; Watanabe, Ichiro; Sugi, Kaoru; Katoh, Takao; Takayanagi, Kan; Mawatari, Koushi; Horie, Minoru; Okumura, Ken; Inoue, Hiroshi; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Yamaguchi, Iwao; Nagasawa, Susumu; Moroe, Kazuo; Kodama, Itsuo; Sugimoto, Tsuneaki; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2014-08-01

    Causative arrhythmias of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) are changing in this age of improved coronary care. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of terminal arrhythmias and the electrical events prior to SCA. We analyzed 24-hour Holter recordings of 132 patients enrolled from 41 institutions who either died (n = 88) or had an aborted death (n = 44). The Holter recordings were obtained for diagnosing and evaluating diseases and arrhythmias in those without any episodes suggestive of SCA. In 97 patients (73%), SCA was associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias and in 35 (27%) with bradyarrhythmias. The bradyarrhythmia-related SCA patients were older than those with a tachyarrhythmia-related SCA (70 ± 13 years vs. 58 ± 19 years, P < .001). The most common arrhythmia for a tachyarrhythmia-related SCA was ventricular tachycardia degenerating to ventricular fibrillation (45%). The bradyarrhythmia-related SCA was caused by asystole (74%) or AV block (26%). Spontaneous conversion was observed in 37 patients (38%) with ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Of those, 62% of the patients experienced symptoms including syncope, chest pain, or convulsion. Multivariate logistic analysis revealed that independent predictors of mortality for tachyarrhythmia-related SCAs were advanced age (odds ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.08) and ST elevation within the hour before SCA (odds ratio 3.54, 95% confidence interval 1.07-13.5). In contrast, the presence of preceding torsades de pointes was associated with spontaneous conversion (odds ratio 0.20, 95% confidence interval 0.05-0.66). The most frequent cause of SCA remains ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Advanced age and ST elevation before SCA are risk factors for mortality in tachyarrhythmia-related SCAs. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Storming ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Fourteen tropical storms, nine hurricanes, and four intense hurricanes with winds above 111 mph. That's the forecast for hurricane activity in the Atlantic Basin for the upcoming hurricane season which extends from June 1 through November 30, 1999, according to a Colorado State Hurricane Forecast team led by William Gray, professor of atmospheric science. The forecast supports an earlier report by the team.Hurricane activity, said Gray will be similar to 1998—which yielded 14 tropical storms, 10 hurricanes, and 3 intense storms. These numbers are significantly higher than the long-term statistical averages of 9.3, 5.8, and 2.2, annually.

  7. The Dragon Storm

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-02-24

    A large, bright and complex convective storm that appeared in Saturn's southern hemisphere in mid-September 2004 was the key in solving a long-standing mystery about the ringed planet. Saturn's atmosphere and its rings are shown here in a false color composite made from Cassini images taken in near infrared light through filters that sense different amounts of methane gas. Portions of the atmosphere with a large abundance of methane above the clouds are red, indicating clouds that are deep in the atmosphere. Grey indicates high clouds, and brown indicates clouds at intermediate altitudes. The rings are bright blue because there is no methane gas between the ring particles and the camera. The complex feature with arms and secondary extensions just above and to the right of center is called the Dragon Storm. It lies in a region of the southern hemisphere referred to as "storm alley" by imaging scientists because of the high level of storm activity observed there by Cassini in the last year. The Dragon Storm was a powerful source of radio emissions during July and September of 2004. The radio waves from the storm resemble the short bursts of static generated by lightning on Earth. Cassini detected the bursts only when the storm was rising over the horizon on the night side of the planet as seen from the spacecraft; the bursts stopped when the storm moved into sunlight. This on/off pattern repeated for many Saturn rotations over a period of several weeks, and it was the clock-like repeatability that indicated the storm and the radio bursts are related. Scientists have concluded that the Dragon Storm is a giant thunderstorm whose precipitation generates electricity as it does on Earth. The storm may be deriving its energy from Saturn's deep atmosphere. One mystery is why the radio bursts start while the Dragon Storm is below the horizon on the night side and end when the storm is on the day side, still in full view of the Cassini spacecraft. A possible explanation is

  8. Myocardial infarction does not preclude electrical and hemodynamic benefits of cardiac resynchronization therapy in dyssynchronous canine hearts.

    PubMed

    Rademakers, Leonard M; van Kerckhoven, Roeland; van Deursen, Caroline J M; Strik, Marc; van Hunnik, Arne; Kuiper, Marion; Lampert, Anniek; Klersy, Catherine; Leyva, Francisco; Auricchio, Angelo; Maessen, Jos G; Prinzen, Frits W

    2010-08-01

    Several studies suggest that patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy benefit less from cardiac resynchronization therapy. In a novel animal model of dyssynchronous ischemic cardiomyopathy, we investigated the extent to which the presence of infarction influences the short-term efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy. Experiments were performed in canine hearts with left bundle branch block (LBBB, n=19) and chronic myocardial infarction, created by embolization of the left anterior descending or left circumflex arteries followed by LBBB (LBBB+left anterior descending infarction [LADi; n=11] and LBBB+left circumflex infarction [LCXi; n=7], respectively). Pacing leads were positioned in the right atrium and right ventricle and at 8 sites on the left ventricular (LV) free wall. LV pump function was measured using the conductance catheter technique, and synchrony of electrical activation was measured using epicardial mapping and ECG. Average and maximal improvement in electric resynchronization and LV pump function by right ventricular+LV pacing was similar in the 3 groups; however, the site of optimal electrical and mechanical benefit was LV apical in LBBB hearts, LV midlateral in LBBB+LCXi hearts and LV basal-lateral in LBBB+LADi hearts. The best site of pacing was not the site of latest electrical activation but that providing the largest shortening of the QRS complex. During single-site LV pacing the range of atrioventricular delays yielding > or =70% of maximal hemodynamic effect was approximately 50% smaller in infarcted than noninfarcted LBBB hearts (P<0.05). Cardiac resynchronization therapy can improve resynchronization and LV pump function to a similar degree in infarcted and noninfarcted hearts. Optimal lead positioning and timing of LV stimulation, however, require more attention in the infarcted hearts.

  9. Mild electrical pulse current stimulation upregulates S100A4 and promotes cardiogenesis in MSC and cardiac myocytes coculture monolayer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lei; Zhang, Changhai; Nong, Yaoming; Yao, Qing; Song, Zhiyuan

    2013-01-01

    Parietal endoderm-secreted S100A4 promotes early cardiomyogenesis in embryoid bodies [1]. After an acute ischemic event, S100A4 protein appears in cardiac myocytes only in the border zone in rat and human hearts [2]. In wound research, a large outward current of 4 μA/cm(2) was always measured at the wound edges of rat cornea and human skin [3]. We hypothesize that a special electrical circumstance at the border zone may contribute to the phenomenon. An electric stimulation system was designed to give the cells electric pulse current stimulation (EPCS), the feature of the signal is pulse polarity altered one after another, rectangular 2 ms, 2 Hz, 40 μA. This intensity of stimulation is proved to be safe to cardiac myocytes (both in structure and beating behavior compared with the cardiac myocytes which do not receive stimulation) and MSCs (in cell vitality, proliferation, cell cycle, and gap junction generation potential) through our previous work. Canine MSCs are capable of generating voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channel and Na(+) channels and generating the Ca(2+) handling system during differentiation. We found that CD44 was reduced in the MSCs monolayer treated with EPCS, compared with non-stimulated MSCs; and EPCS MSCs (3 h/day, 6 h/day, 5 days) showed an 14.04 ± 3.44 and 14.55 ± 3.97 % reduction in CD44, compared with the cotemporary MSCs; these reveal that CD44 reduction amplitude is not correlated with time for EPCS disposure and CD29 (integrin β1) expression is not affected by EPCS exposure. EPCS was given to the MSCs and cardiac myocytes coculture monolayer (ratio 3:1) for different time (1, 3, and 6 h/day) for 4 days to see the biological effects. Gap junction protein and troponin T show an increase after EPCS. We found that the gap junction protein Cx43 increased with treating time-in the EPCS group, it exhibited 1.5 and 1.7 fold in the 3 h/day group and 6 h/day group (P < 0.01), and troponin T exhibited to about 3.6 and 4.4 fold in the 3 h/day group (P

  10. Removal of pinned scroll waves in cardiac tissues by electric fields in a generic model of three-dimensional excitable media

    PubMed Central

    Pan, De-Bei; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Spirals or scroll waves pinned to heterogeneities in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmias. To unpin these life-threatening spiral waves, methods of wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by low-voltage pulsed DC electric fields (PDCEFs) and circularly polarized electric fields (CPEFs) have been used in two-dimensional (2D) cardiac tissues. Nevertheless, the unpinning of scroll waves in three-dimensional (3D) cardiac systems is much more difficult than that of spiral waves in 2D cardiac systems, and there are few reports on the removal of pinned scroll waves in 3D cardiac tissues by electric fields. In this article, we investigate in detail the removal of pinned scroll waves in a generic model of 3D excitable media using PDCEF, AC electric field (ACEF) and CPEF, respectively. We find that spherical waves can be induced from the heterogeneities by these electric fields in initially quiescent excitable media. However, only CPEF can induce spherical waves with frequencies higher than that of the pinned scroll wave. Such higher-frequency spherical waves induced by CPEF can be used to drive the pinned scroll wave out of the cardiac systems. We hope this remarkable ability of CPEF can provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmias caused by pinned scroll waves. PMID:26905367

  11. Removal of pinned scroll waves in cardiac tissues by electric fields in a generic model of three-dimensional excitable media.

    PubMed

    Pan, De-Bei; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2016-02-24

    Spirals or scroll waves pinned to heterogeneities in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmias. To unpin these life-threatening spiral waves, methods of wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by low-voltage pulsed DC electric fields (PDCEFs) and circularly polarized electric fields (CPEFs) have been used in two-dimensional (2D) cardiac tissues. Nevertheless, the unpinning of scroll waves in three-dimensional (3D) cardiac systems is much more difficult than that of spiral waves in 2D cardiac systems, and there are few reports on the removal of pinned scroll waves in 3D cardiac tissues by electric fields. In this article, we investigate in detail the removal of pinned scroll waves in a generic model of 3D excitable media using PDCEF, AC electric field (ACEF) and CPEF, respectively. We find that spherical waves can be induced from the heterogeneities by these electric fields in initially quiescent excitable media. However, only CPEF can induce spherical waves with frequencies higher than that of the pinned scroll wave. Such higher-frequency spherical waves induced by CPEF can be used to drive the pinned scroll wave out of the cardiac systems. We hope this remarkable ability of CPEF can provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmias caused by pinned scroll waves.

  12. Removal of pinned scroll waves in cardiac tissues by electric fields in a generic model of three-dimensional excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, De-Bei; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Spirals or scroll waves pinned to heterogeneities in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmias. To unpin these life-threatening spiral waves, methods of wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by low-voltage pulsed DC electric fields (PDCEFs) and circularly polarized electric fields (CPEFs) have been used in two-dimensional (2D) cardiac tissues. Nevertheless, the unpinning of scroll waves in three-dimensional (3D) cardiac systems is much more difficult than that of spiral waves in 2D cardiac systems, and there are few reports on the removal of pinned scroll waves in 3D cardiac tissues by electric fields. In this article, we investigate in detail the removal of pinned scroll waves in a generic model of 3D excitable media using PDCEF, AC electric field (ACEF) and CPEF, respectively. We find that spherical waves can be induced from the heterogeneities by these electric fields in initially quiescent excitable media. However, only CPEF can induce spherical waves with frequencies higher than that of the pinned scroll wave. Such higher-frequency spherical waves induced by CPEF can be used to drive the pinned scroll wave out of the cardiac systems. We hope this remarkable ability of CPEF can provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmias caused by pinned scroll waves.

  13. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  14. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  15. The Cause of Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuma, T.

    2001-12-01

    Although the cause of magnetic storms is important issue, the exact mechanism of the storm development is still controversial. Two mechanisms of storm development are considered. One is that the frequent substorm activity injects high-energy particles to the inner magnetosphere; the other is that the enhanced convection plays a role. Further, Iyermori and Rao [1996] shows that the substorm reduces the development of storms. On the contrary, magnetospheric convections and magnetic storms correspond different solar wind parameter. It is well known that the variations of the magnetospheric convection correspond to merging electric field (Em) by Kan and Lee [1979]. However, the variations of the magenetic storm correspond Ey [e.g. Burton et al., 1975]. This suggests that magnetospheric convection and magnetic storm are independent phenomena. However, we cannot discuss the independency of two phenomena since the difference between Em and Ey is small, under usual solar wind condition. We have analyzed Nov. 8, 1998 storm event, since the big difference between Em and Ey exists during 6 hours. The enhancement of Ey terminates first, and Em continues to enhance more than 6 hours after that. Although the variation of the storm estimated from SYM-H(Dst) index corresponds to Ey, that of the magnetospheric convection estimated from PC index corresponds to Em. This shows that the development of the storm terminate although the magnetospheric convection still enhances. This result suggests that the development of magnetic storms is independent from enhanced convection and the magnetic storm is directly caused by the enhancement of Ey in the solar wind.

  16. Factors associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with pulseless electric activity: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dennis T; Qiu, Feng; Koh, Maria; Dorian, Paul; Cheskes, Sheldon; Austin, Peter C; Scales, Damon C; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Verbeek, P Richard; Drennan, Ian; Ng, Tiffany; Tu, Jack V; Morrison, Laurie J

    2016-07-01

    Many patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest present with pulseless electric activity (PEA) rather than shockable rhythm. Despite improvements in resuscitation care, survival of PEA patients remains dismal. Our main objective was to characterize out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients by initial presenting rhythm and to evaluate independent determinants of PEA. A population-based study was conducted using the Toronto Rescu Epistry database with linkage to administrative data in Ontario, Canada. We included patients older than 20 years who had nontraumatic cardiac arrests from 2005 to 2010. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to determine factors predicting the occurrence of PEA vs shockable rhythm vs asystole. Of the 9,882 included patients who received treatment, 24.5% had PEA, 26.3% had shockable rhythm, and 49.2% had asystole. Patients with PEA had a mean age of 72 years, 41.2% were female and had multiple comorbidities, and 53.4% were hospitalized in the past year. As compared with shockable rhythm, PEA patients were older, were more likely to be women, and had more comorbidities. As compared with asystole, PEA patients had similar baseline and clinical characteristics, but were substantially more likely to have an arrest witnessed by emergency medical services (odds ratio 13) or by bystander (odds ratio 3.24). Mortality at 30 days was 95.5%, 77.9%, and 98.9% for patients with PEA, shockable rhythm, asystole, respectively. Patient characteristics differed substantially in those presenting with PEA and shockable rhythm. In contrast, the main distinguishing factor between PEA and asystole cardiac arrest related mainly to factors at the time of the cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Electrical cardioversion in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy--case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Gałczyński, Krzysztof; Marciniak, Beata; Kudlicki, Janusz; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczukz, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias is estimated et 1.2 per 1000 pregnancies, usually in the third trimester and 50% of them are asymptomatic. They may appear for the first time in pregnancy or have a recurring character An important risk factor related to their appearance is the presence of structural heart disease, which complicates < 1% of pregnancies. Generally the symptoms are mild and the treatment is not necessary but in some cases pharmacotherapy is necessary Pharmacotherapy must be a compromise between the potentially adverse effects of drugs on the fetus and the beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system of the mother. Due to the development of cardiac surgery many women with heart defects reach reproductive age and become pregnant. Therefore this problem will be faced more and more often in clinical practice. In addition to pharmacological methods some cardiac arrhythmias may require urgent, life-saving procedures. External electrical cardioversion is associated with the application of certain amount of energy via two electrodes placed on the thorax. It is used to treat hemodynamically unstable supraventricular tachycardias, including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter Also in hemodynamically stable patients in whom drug therapy was ineffective elective electrical cardioversion can be use to convert cardiac arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. We present a case of a 33 years old patient with congenital heart disease surgically corrected in childhood who had first incident of atrial flutter in pregnancy. Arrhytmia occured in 26th week of gestation. The patient was hemodynamically stable and did not approve electrical cardioversion as a method of treatment therefore pharmacotherapy was started. Heart rate was controled with metoprolol and digoxin, warfarin was used to anticoagulation. Calcium and potassium were also given. Described therapy did not convert atrial flutter to sinus rhythm therefore in 33rd week of gestation after patient's approval

  18. Cardiac melanocytes influence atrial reactive oxygen species involved with electrical and structural remodeling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hayoung; Liu, Fang; Petrenko, Nataliya B; Huang, Jianhe; Schillinger, Kurt J; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac melanocyte-like cells (CMLCs) contribute to atrial arrhythmias when missing the melanin synthesis enzyme dopachrome tautomerase (Dct). While scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Dct-null mice partially suppressed atrial arrhythmias, it remains unclear if CMLCs influence atrial ROS and structure or if the electrical response of CMLCs to ROS differs from that of atrial myocytes. This study is designed to determine if CMLCs contribute to overall atrial oxidative stress or structural remodeling, and if ROS affects the electrophysiology of CMLCs differently than atrial myocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis showed higher expression of the oxidative marker 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in Dct-null atria versus Dct-heterozygous (Dct-het) atria. Exposing isolated CMLCs from Dct-het and Dct-null mice to hydrogen peroxide increased superoxide anion more in Dct-null CMLCs. Trichrome staining showed increased fibrosis in Dct-null atria, and treating Dct-null mice with the ROS scavenger Tempol reduced atrial fibrosis. Action potential recordings from atrial myocytes and isolated Dct-het and Dct-null CMLCs in response to hydrogen peroxide showed that the EC50 for action potential duration (APD) prolongation of Dct-null CMLCs was 8.2 ± 1.7 μmol/L versus 16.8 ± 2.0 μmol/L for Dct-het CMLCs, 19.9 ± 2.1 μmol/L for Dct-null atrial myocytes, and 20.5 ± 1.9 μmol/L for Dct-het atrial myocytes. However, APD90 was longer in CMLCs versus atrial myocytes in response to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide also induced more afterdepolarizations in CMLCs compared to atrial myocytes. These studies suggest that Dct within CMLCs contributes to atrial ROS balance and remodeling. ROS prolongs APD to a greater extent and induces afterdepolarizations more frequently in CMLCs than in atrial myocytes. PMID:26400986

  19. Storm severity detection (RF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Smith, G. A.; Goodman, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurement of lightning location data which occur together with continental thunderstorms and hurricanes was examined, and a second phase linear interferometer was deployed. Electrical emission originating from tropical storms in the Gulf of Mexico were monitored. The time span between hurricane ALLEN (10 August 1980) and hurricane ALICIA (18 August 1983) represents the longest period that the United States has gone without hurricane landfall. Both systems were active and data were acquired during the landfall period of hurricane ALICIA.

  20. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a safe...

  1. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a safe...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a safe...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a safe...

  4. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a safe...

  5. What is a geomagnetic storm?

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, W.D.; Joselyn, J.A.; Kamide, Y.

    1994-04-01

    The authors present a review of geomagnetic storm research. They examine the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere. They argue that a storm results from the extended interaction of the solar wind/magnetosphere when a strong convection electric field is generated, which is able to perturb the ring current above some threshold level, triggering the event. They touch on interrelationships of the solar wind/magnetosphere/ionosphere as it bears on this problem, and offer ideas for continuing research directions to address the origin of geomagnetic storms.

  6. [Parameters of cardiac muscle repolarization on the electrocardiogram when changing anatomical and electric position of the heart].

    PubMed

    Chaĭkovskiĭ, I A; Baum, O V; Popov, L A; Voloshin, V I; Budnik, N N; Frolov, Iu A; Kovalenko, A S

    2014-01-01

    While discussing the diagnostic value of the single channel electrocardiogram a set of theoretical considerations emerges inevitably, one of the most important among them is the question about dependence of the electrocardiogram parameters from the direction of electrical axis of heart. In other words, changes in what of electrocardiogram parameters are in fact liable to reflect pathological processes in myocardium, and what ones are determined by extracardiac factors, primarily by anatomic characteristics of patients. It is arguable that while analyzing electrocardiogram it is necessary to orient to such physiologically based informative indexes as ST segment displacement. Also, symmetry of the T wave shape is an important parameter which is independent of patients anatomic features. The results obtained are of interest for theoretical and applied aspects of the biophysics of the cardiac electric field.

  7. Electrical Wave Propagation in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle Based on Analytical Description of Cardiac Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergey F.; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B.; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher–Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  8. An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons and two probe designs using a swine comparative cardiac safety model.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald Murray; Ho, Jeffrey D; Moore, Johanna C; Miner, James R

    2013-09-01

    Despite human laboratory and field studies that have demonstrated a reasonable safety profile for TASER brand conducted electrical weapons (CEW), the results of some swine studies and arrest related deaths temporal to the use of the CEWs continue to raise questions regarding cardiac safety. TASER International, Inc., has released a new CEW, the TASER X2, touted to have a better safety profile than its long-standing predecessor, the TASER X26. We have developed a model to assess the relative cardiac safety of CEWs and used it to compare the TASER X2 and the TASER X26. This safety model was also used to assess the relative safety of an experimental probe design as compared to the standard steel probe. Our results suggest that the TASER X2 has an improved safety margin over the TASER X26. The new probe design also has promise for enhanced cardiac safety, although may have some disadvantages when compared to the existing design which would make field use impractical.

  9. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your body can lead to cardiac arrest. This can include trauma, electrical shock, or major blood loss. Recreational drugs. Using certain drugs, such as cocaine ...

  10. The electrical heart: 25 years of discovery in cardiac electrophysiology, arrhythmias and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Corradi, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes progress in the fields of cardiac electrophysiology, arrhythmias and sudden death made in the 25-year interval between 1992 and 2016 during which time Cardiovascular Pathology has been published. Organized along clinical lines, it considers the major heart rhythm disorders underlying atrial, atrioventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. There is a strong focus on the remarkable advances in understanding the genetic basis for cardiac rhythm disturbances and elucidating fundamental mechanisms of abnormal conduction and impulse formation. During this 25-year period, our understanding of how altered tissue structure (classical pathology) contributes to arrhythmias and sudden death has undergone continuous refinement as new insights have been gained about arrhythmia mechanisms and the dynamic interplay between anatomic substrates and triggers of the major heart rhythm disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficient simulation of cardiac electrical propagation using high order finite elements.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, Christopher J; Bishop, Martin J; Kay, David

    2012-05-20

    We present an application of high order hierarchical finite elements for the efficient approximation of solutions to the cardiac monodomain problem. We detail the hurdles which must be overcome in order to achieve theoretically-optimal errors in the approximations generated, including the choice of method for approximating the solution to the cardiac cell model component. We place our work on a solid theoretical foundation and show that it can greatly improve the accuracy in the approximation which can be achieved in a given amount of processor time. Our results demonstrate superior accuracy over linear finite elements at a cheaper computational cost and thus indicate the potential indispensability of our approach for large-scale cardiac simulation.

  12. Efficient simulation of cardiac electrical propagation using high order finite elements

    PubMed Central

    Arthurs, Christopher J.; Bishop, Martin J.; Kay, David

    2012-01-01

    We present an application of high order hierarchical finite elements for the efficient approximation of solutions to the cardiac monodomain problem. We detail the hurdles which must be overcome in order to achieve theoretically-optimal errors in the approximations generated, including the choice of method for approximating the solution to the cardiac cell model component. We place our work on a solid theoretical foundation and show that it can greatly improve the accuracy in the approximation which can be achieved in a given amount of processor time. Our results demonstrate superior accuracy over linear finite elements at a cheaper computational cost and thus indicate the potential indispensability of our approach for large-scale cardiac simulation. PMID:24976644

  13. Frontal brain electrical asymmetry and cardiac vagal tone predict biased attention to social threat.

    PubMed

    Miskovic, Vladimir; Schmidt, Louis A

    2010-03-01

    Individual differences in attention biases for motivationally significant stimuli have been reported in clinical and normative populations. Few studies, however, have attempted to examine potential biological mechanisms underlying differences in the cognitive processing of emotional stimuli. The present study examined the extent to which two well-validated psychophysiological vulnerability markers of affective style [i.e., frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry and cardiac vagal tone] predicted biased attention toward rapid presentations (approximately 250 ms) of angry and happy facial expressions. We found that right frontal EEG asymmetry and low cardiac vagal tone, taken together, predicted approximately 37% of the variability in attentional vigilance for angry faces. Frontal EEG asymmetry and cardiac vagal tone did not predict attention for happy faces, independently of each other. Our results provide preliminary evidence that two well established psychophysiological indicators of affective style bias early processing of motivationally salient stimuli.

  14. Nonlinear diffusion and thermo-electric coupling in a two-variable model of cardiac action potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizzi, A.; Loppini, A.; Ruiz-Baier, R.; Ippolito, A.; Camassa, A.; La Camera, A.; Emmi, E.; Di Perna, L.; Garofalo, V.; Cherubini, C.; Filippi, S.

    2017-09-01

    This work reports the results of the theoretical investigation of nonlinear dynamics and spiral wave breakup in a generalized two-variable model of cardiac action potential accounting for thermo-electric coupling and diffusion nonlinearities. As customary in excitable media, the common Q10 and Moore factors are used to describe thermo-electric feedback in a 10° range. Motivated by the porous nature of the cardiac tissue, in this study we also propose a nonlinear Fickian flux formulated by Taylor expanding the voltage dependent diffusion coefficient up to quadratic terms. A fine tuning of the diffusive parameters is performed a priori to match the conduction velocity of the equivalent cable model. The resulting combined effects are then studied by numerically simulating different stimulation protocols on a one-dimensional cable. Model features are compared in terms of action potential morphology, restitution curves, frequency spectra, and spatio-temporal phase differences. Two-dimensional long-run simulations are finally performed to characterize spiral breakup during sustained fibrillation at different thermal states. Temperature and nonlinear diffusion effects are found to impact the repolarization phase of the action potential wave with non-monotone patterns and to increase the propensity of arrhythmogenesis.

  15. Possible mechanisms of cardiac contractile dysfunction and electrical changes in ammonium chloride induced chronic metabolic acidosis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lasheen, N N; Mohamed, G F

    2016-12-13

    Metabolic acidosis could occur due to either endogenous acids accumulation or bicarbonate loss from the gastrointestinal tract or commonly from the kidney. This study aimed to investigate the possible underlying mechanism(s) of chronic acidosis-induced cardiac contractile and electrical changes in rats. Twenty four adult Wistar rats, of both sexes, were randomly divided into control group and chronic metabolic acidosis group, which received orally 0.28 M NH(4)Cl in the drinking water for 2 weeks. At the end of experimental period, systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were measured. On the day of sacrifice, rats were anesthetized by i.p. pentobarbitone (40 mg/kg b.w.), transthoracic echocardiography and ECG were performed. Blood samples were obtained from abdominal aorta for complete blood count and determination of pH, bicarbonate, chloride, sodium, potassium, troponin I, CK-MB, IL-6, renin and aldosterone levels. Hearts from both groups were studied for cardiac tissue IL-6 and aldosterone in addition to histopathological examination. Compared to control group, chronic metabolic acidosis group showed anemia, significant systolic and diastolic hypotension accompanied by significant reduction of ejection fraction and fraction of shortening, significant bradycardia, prolonged QTc interval and higher widened T wave as well as significantly elevated plasma levels of renin, aldosterone, troponin I, CK-MB and IL-6, and cardiac tissue aldosterone and IL-6. The left ventricular wall of the acidosis group showed degenerated myocytes with fibrosis and apoptosis. Thus, chronic metabolic acidosis induced negative inotropic and chronotropic effects and cardiomyopathy, possibly by elevated aldosterone and IL-6 levels released from the cardiac tissue.

  16. Enhanced Cardiac Differentiation of Human Cardiovascular Disease Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Applying Unidirectional Electrical Pulses Using Aligned Electroactive Nanofibrous Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi Amirabad, Leila; Massumi, Mohammad; Shamsara, Mehdi; Shabani, Iman; Amari, Afshin; Mossahebi Mohammadi, Majid; Hosseinzadeh, Simzar; Vakilian, Saeid; Steinbach, Sarah K; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Soleimani, Masoud; Barzin, Jalal

    2017-03-01

    In the embryonic heart, electrical impulses propagate in a unidirectional manner from the sinus venosus and appear to be involved in cardiogenesis. In this work, aligned and random polyaniline/polyetersulfone (PANI/PES) nanofibrous scaffolds doped by Camphor-10-sulfonic acid (β) (CPSA) were fabricated via electrospinning and used to conduct electrical impulses in a unidirectional and multidirectional fashion, respectively. A bioreactor was subsequently engineered to apply electrical impulses to cells cultured on PANI/PES scaffolds. We established cardiovascular disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (CVD-iPSCs) from the fibroblasts of patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgeries. The CVD-iPSCs were seeded onto the scaffolds, cultured in cardiomyocyte-inducing factors, and exposed to electrical impulses for 1 h/day, over a 15-day time period in the bioreactor. The application of the unidirectional electrical stimulation to the cells significantly increased the number of cardiac Troponin T (cTnT+) cells in comparison to multidirectional electrical stimulation using random fibrous scaffolds. This was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction for cardiac-related transcription factors (NKX2.5, GATA4, and NPPA) and a cardiac-specific structural gene (TNNT2). Here we report for the first time that applying electrical pulses in a unidirectional manner mimicking the unidirectional wave of electrical stimulation in the heart, could increase the derivation of cardiomyocytes from CVD-iPSCs.

  17. Geomagnetic storms: historical perspective to modern view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The history of geomagnetism is more than 400 years old. Geomagnetic storms as we know them were discovered about 210 years ago. There has been keen interest in understanding Sun-Earth connection events, such as solar flares, CMEs, and concomitant magnetic storms in recent times. Magnetic storms are the most important component of space weather effects on Earth. We give an overview of the historical aspects of geomagnetic storms and the progress made during the past two centuries. Super magnetic storms can cause life-threatening power outages and satellite damage, communication failures and navigational problems. The data for such super magnetic storms that occurred in the last 50 years during the space era is sparce. Research on historical geomagnetic storms can help to create a database for intense and super magnetic storms. New knowledge of interplanetary and solar causes of magnetic storms gained from spaceage observations will be used to review the super magnetic storm of September 1-2, 1859. We discuss the occurrence probability of such super magnetic storms, and the maximum possible intensity for the effects of a perfect ICME: extreme super magnetic storm, extreme magnetospheric compression, and extreme magnetospheric electric fields.

  18. Turbulent electrical activity at sharp-edged inexcitable obstacles in a model for human cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rupamanjari; Pandit, Rahul; Panfilov, A V

    2014-10-01

    Wave propagation around various geometric expansions, structures, and obstacles in cardiac tissue may result in the formation of unidirectional block of wave propagation and the onset of reentrant arrhythmias in the heart. Therefore, we investigated the conditions under which reentrant spiral waves can be generated by high-frequency stimulation at sharp-edged obstacles in the ten Tusscher-Noble-Noble-Panfilov (TNNP) ionic model for human cardiac tissue. We show that, in a large range of parameters that account for the conductance of major inward and outward ionic currents of the model [fast inward Na(+) current (INa), L-type slow inward Ca(2+) current (ICaL), slow delayed-rectifier current (IKs), rapid delayed-rectifier current (IKr), inward rectifier K(+) current (IK1)], the critical period necessary for spiral formation is close to the period of a spiral wave rotating in the same tissue. We also show that there is a minimal size of the obstacle for which formation of spirals is possible; this size is ∼2.5 cm and decreases with a decrease in the excitability of cardiac tissue. We show that other factors, such as the obstacle thickness and direction of wave propagation in relation to the obstacle, are of secondary importance and affect the conditions for spiral wave initiation only slightly. We also perform studies for obstacle shapes derived from experimental measurements of infarction scars and show that the formation of spiral waves there is facilitated by tissue remodeling around it. Overall, we demonstrate that the formation of reentrant sources around inexcitable obstacles is a potential mechanism for the onset of cardiac arrhythmias in the presence of a fast heart rate.

  19. Interventional electrophysiology and cardiac resynchronization therapy: delivering electrical therapies for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, J David; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2007-04-24

    Implantable devices have become a readily available option for patients with heart failure. Not only do these patients develop bradycardia and ventricular tachycardia, but their ventricular dysfunction can often improve with cardiac resynchronization therapy. However, this is a complex and rapidly developing clinical science for which the physician chooses techniques and selects patients on the basis of the results of clinical trials, clinical experience, and rapidly evolving tools. The results depend on the interplay of these complex variables. Placement of the left ventricular lead has forced the device physician to develop new skills and/or interdisciplinary relationships with physicians with vascular intervention, imaging, and surgical skills. Familiarity with the cardiac venous anatomy, occlusive venography, venoplasty, guide wire tools, guiding catheters, stenting, and new intracardiac visualization and magnetic intracardiac lead positioning tools are examples of just a few of the novel skills that are useful in the delivery of cardiac resynchronization therapy. Beyond implantation, these patients and devices require specialized follow-up with continued medical therapy and echo-guided adjustments of device programming. Finally, there are ongoing controversies and many as yet unanswered questions that are the subject of ongoing and planned clinical trials.

  20. Thyroid storm and lymphocytic myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Yang, Gee-Gwo; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac failure is the leading cause of mortality in patients with thyroid storm. But the underlying cardiac pathology is unclear. Here, we report a 46-year-old woman who presented with hyperpyrexia and sinus tachycardia subsequent to accidental neck contusion. Her hyperthyroidism was verified by abnormal biochemical changes. Despite vigorous antithyroid treatment including a beta-blocker, glucocorticoid and potassium iodide, the patient eventually succumbed to refractory congestive heart failure in 4 days. Autopsy revealed lymphocytic myocarditis. We propose that lymphocytic myocarditis played a prominent role in her demise.

  1. A Conductive Polymer Hydrogel Supports Cell Electrical Signaling and Improves Cardiac Function After Implantation into Myocardial Infarct.

    PubMed

    Mihic, Anton; Cui, Zhi; Wu, Jun; Vlacic, Goran; Miyagi, Yasuo; Li, Shu-Hong; Lu, Sun; Sung, Hsing-Wen; Weisel, Richard D; Li, Ren-Ke

    2015-08-25

    Efficient cardiac function requires synchronous ventricular contraction. After myocardial infarction, the nonconductive nature of scar tissue contributes to ventricular dysfunction by electrically uncoupling viable cardiomyocytes in the infarct region. Injection of a conductive biomaterial polymer that restores impulse propagation could synchronize contraction and restore ventricular function by electrically connecting isolated cardiomyocytes to intact tissue, allowing them to contribute to global heart function. We created a conductive polymer by grafting pyrrole to the clinically tested biomaterial chitosan to create a polypyrrole (PPy)-chitosan hydrogel. Cyclic voltammetry showed that PPy-chitosan had semiconductive properties lacking in chitosan alone. PPy-chitosan did not reduce cell attachment, metabolism, or proliferation in vitro. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes plated on PPy-chitosan showed enhanced Ca(2+) signal conduction in comparison with chitosan alone. PPy-chitosan plating also improved electric coupling between skeletal muscles placed 25 mm apart in comparison with chitosan alone, demonstrating that PPy-chitosan can electrically connect contracting cells at a distance. In rats, injection of PPy-chitosan 1 week after myocardial infarction decreased the QRS interval and increased the transverse activation velocity in comparison with saline or chitosan, suggesting improved electric conduction. Optical mapping showed increased activation in the border zone of PPy-chitosan-treated rats. Echocardiography and pressure-volume analysis showed improvement in load-dependent (ejection fraction, fractional shortening) and load-independent (preload recruitable stroke work) indices of heart function 8 weeks after injection. We synthesized a biocompatible conductive biomaterial (PPy-chitosan) that enhances biological conduction in vitro and in vivo. Injection of PPy-chitosan better maintained heart function after myocardial infarction than a nonconductive polymer.

  2. Quantifying Power Grid Risk from Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homeier, N.; Wei, L. H.; Gannon, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    We are creating a statistical model of the geophysical environment that can be used to quantify the geomagnetic storm hazard to power grid infrastructure. Our model is developed using a database of surface electric fields for the continental United States during a set of historical geomagnetic storms. These electric fields are derived from the SUPERMAG compilation of worldwide magnetometer data and surface impedances from the United States Geological Survey. This electric field data can be combined with a power grid model to determine GICs per node and reactive MVARs at each minute during a storm. Using publicly available substation locations, we derive relative risk maps by location by combining magnetic latitude and ground conductivity. We also estimate the surface electric fields during the August 1972 geomagnetic storm that caused a telephone cable outage across the middle of the United States. This event produced the largest surface electric fields in the continental U.S. in at least the past 40 years.

  3. What is a geomagnetic storm?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Joselyn, J. A.; Kamide, Y.; Kroehl, H. W.; Rostoker, G.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Vasyliunas, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    After a brief review of magnetospheric and interplanetary phenomena for intervals with enhanced solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, an attempt is made to define a geomagnetic storm as an interval of time when a sufficiently intense and long-lasting interplanetary convection electric field leads, through a substantial energization in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system, to an intensified ring current sufficiently strong to exceed some key threshold of the quantifying storm time Dst index. The associated storm/substorm relationship problem is also reviewed. Although the physics of this relationship does not seem to be fully understood at this time, basic and fairly well established mechanisms of this relationship are presented and discussed. Finally, toward the advancement of geomagnetic storm research, some recommendations are given concerning future improvements in monitoring existing geomagnetic indices as well as the solar wind near Earth.

  4. Nanosecond pulsed platelet-rich plasma (nsPRP) improves mechanical and electrical cardiac function following myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Barbara; Varghese, Frency; Barabutis, Nektarios; Catravas, John; Zemlin, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) of the heart is associated with biochemical and ionic changes that result in cardiac contractile and electrical dysfunction. In rabbits, platelet-rich plasma activated using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPRP) has been shown to improve left ventricular pumping. Here, we demonstrate that nsPRP causes a similar improvement in mouse left ventricular function. We also show that nsPRP injection recovers electrical activity even before reperfusion begins. To uncover the mechanism of nsPRP action, we studied whether the enhanced left ventricular function in nsPRP rabbit and mouse hearts was associated with increased expression of heat-shock proteins and altered mitochondrial function under conditions of oxidative stress. Mouse hearts underwent 30 min of global ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion in situ. Rabbit hearts underwent 30 min of ischemia in vivo and were reperfused for 14 days. Hearts treated with nsPRP expressed significantly higher levels of Hsp27 and Hsp70 compared to hearts treated with vehicle. Also, pretreatment of cultured H9c2 cells with nsPRP significantly enhanced the "spare respiratory capacity (SRC)" also referred to as "respiratory reserve capacity" and ATP production in response to the uncoupler FCCP. These results suggest a cardioprotective effect of nsPRP on the ischemic heart during reperfusion.

  5. The mechanism of PDT-induced electrical blockade: the measurement of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration changes in cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Hosokawa, S.; Hakomori, S.; Miyoshi, S.; Soejima, K.; Arai, T.

    2008-02-01

    We propose the application of early state photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treatment of atrial fibrillation, which is a kind of arrhythmia characterized by irregular rapid beating of heart. We had demonstrated that our PDT can block the propagation of electrical excitation in cardiac myocytes. However, the mechanism of the PDT-induced electrical blockade was not clear. In order to clarify this mechanism, changes in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration during the PDT with Talaporfin sodium (water soluble photosensitizer) were measured by fluorescence Ca 2+ indicator, fluo-4 AM. The PDT led to the rapid increase of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration and the changes in cell shapes. These results indicated that extracellular Ca 2+ flowed into the cells mediated by cell membrane. Moreover, we found bubble generation in the cells after the PDT. In conclusion, the PDT-induced electrical blockade in myocytes can be caused by cell death following the bubble generation, which is accompanied by the increase in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration due to the cell membrane malfunction with the PDT.

  6. The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instrument on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes: Science Operations Center, Operational Modes, and Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Ergun, R. E.; Schroeder, P. C.; Rachelson, W.; Tao, J.; Vernetti, J.; Mozer, F.; Kersten, K.; Breneman, A. W.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; MacDowall, R. J.; Smith, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument on the NASA Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) observatories provides measurement of 3D DC and AC E-fields, as well as 3D AC magnetic fields as provided on board from the EMFISIS tri-axial searchcoil magnetometer (MSC). Two 100-m tip-to-tip spin plane and 12 to 14-m tip-to-tip axial E-field antennas are deployed on each of the two RBSP observatories, with all instrument operations controlled on board via the EFW Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU). Both continuous waveform and spectral data products from DC up to 8 kHz, as well as high-rate burst waveforms (E-field and interferometric modes) are produced on-board through a highly-configurable digital signal processing system. A large-capacity waveform burst memory (32 GB) with human-in-the-loop playback selection is also included in the EFW instrument, allowing for days to tens of days of lookback and playback of selected time intervals of burst data. EFW also provides higher-frequency 3D E-field signals to the EMFISIS suite, providing waveform coverage up to 12 kHz and spectral coverage to over 400 kHz. A description of all the EFW operational modes and data products is presented. Access tot he ISTP-compliant CDF datasets served from the primary EFW Science Operations Center (SOC) at the University of California, Berkeley is shown, along with support for data acquisition and analysis under the IDL THEMIS Data Analysis Software (TDAS) and Science Data Tool (SDT) packages.

  7. Spatiotemporal Regulation of an Hcn4 Enhancer Defines a Role for Mef2c and HDACs in Cardiac Electrical Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Vasanth; Evangelista, Melissa; Huang, Yu; Srivastava, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Regional differences in cardiomyocyte automaticity permit the sinoatrial node (SAN) to function as the leading cardiac pacemaker and the atrioventricular (AV) junction as a subsidiary pacemaker. The regulatory mechanisms controlling the distribution of automaticity within the heart are not understood. To understand regional variation in cardiac automaticity, we carried out an in vivo analysis of cis-regulatory elements that control expression of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated ion channel 4 (Hcn4). Using transgenic mice, we found that spatial and temporal patterning of Hcn4 expression in the AV conduction system required cis-regulatory elements with multiple conserved fragments. One highly conserved region, which contained a myocyte enhancer factor 2C (Mef2C) binding site previously described in vitro, induced reporter expression specifically in the embryonic non-chamber myocardium and the postnatal AV bundle in a Mef2c-dependent manner in vivo. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in cultured transgenic embryos showed expansion of reporter activity to working myocardium. In adult animals, hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction, which causes translocation of HDACs out of the nucleus, resulted in ectopic activation of the Hcn4 enhancer in working myocardium, recapitulating pathological electrical remodeling. These findings reveal mechanisms that control the distribution of automaticity among cardiomyocytes during development and in response to stress. PMID:23085412

  8. Influence of heart motion on cardiac output estimation by means of electrical impedance tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Rapin, Michael; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Bohm, Stephan H; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can measure cardiac-related intra-thoracic impedance changes. EIT-based cardiac output estimation relies on the assumption that the amplitude of the impedance change in the ventricular region is representative of stroke volume (SV). However, other factors such as heart motion can significantly affect this ventricular impedance change. In the present case study, a magnetic resonance imaging-based dynamic bio-impedance model fitting the morphology of a single male subject was built. Simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of heart motion and its influence on EIT-based SV estimation. Myocardial deformation was found to be the main contributor to the ventricular impedance change (56%). However, motion-induced impedance changes showed a strong correlation (r = 0.978) with left ventricular volume. We explained this by the quasi-incompressibility of blood and myocardium. As a result, EIT achieved excellent accuracy in estimating a wide range of simulated SV values (error distribution of 0.57 ± 2.19 ml (1.02 ± 2.62%) and correlation of r = 0.996 after a two-point calibration was applied to convert impedance values to millilitres). As the model was based on one single subject, the strong correlation found between motion-induced changes and ventricular volume remains to be verified in larger datasets.

  9. Effect of electric and magnetic fields near an HVDC converter terminal on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.J.

    1980-08-01

    The electromagnetic fields associated with HVDC converters and transmission lines constitute a unique environment for persons with implanted cardiac pacemakers. A measurement program has been conducted to assess the potential interfering effects of these harmonically rich fields on implanted pacemakers. The experimental procedures that were employed take into account the combined effects of the electric and magnetic fields. The effect of the resulting body current on the response of six pacemakers was assessed in the laboratory, using a previously developed model to relate body current to pacemaker pickup voltage. The results show that R-wave pacemaker reversion can be expected at some locations within the converter facility, but that a large safety margin for unperturbed pacemaker operation exists beneath the transmission lines.

  10. Why QRS Duration Should Be Replaced by Better Measures of Electrical Activation to Improve Patient Selection for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy.

    PubMed

    Engels, Elien B; Mafi-Rad, Masih; van Stipdonk, Antonius M W; Vernooy, Kevin; Prinzen, Frits W

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a well-known treatment modality for patients with a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction accompanied by a ventricular conduction delay. However, a large proportion of patients does not benefit from this therapy. Better patient selection may importantly reduce the number of non-responders. Here, we review the strengths and weaknesses of the electrocardiogram (ECG) markers currently being used in guidelines for patient selection, e.g., QRS duration and morphology. We shed light on the current knowledge on the underlying electrical substrate and the mechanism of action of CRT. Finally, we discuss potentially better ECG-based biomarkers for CRT candidate selection, of which the vectorcardiogram may have high potential.

  11. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  12. Deletion of Kvβ1.1 subunit leads to electrical and haemodynamic changes causing cardiac hypertrophy in female murine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Tur, Jared; Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Padawer, Timothy; Badole, Sachin L.; Kilfoil, Peter J.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and debility in women in the USA, and cardiac arrhythmias are a major concern. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels along with the binding partners; Kvβ subunits are major regulators of the action potential (AP) shape and duration (APD). The regulation of Kv channels by the Kvβ1 subunit is unknown in female hearts. In the present study, we hypothesized that the Kvβ1 subunit is an important regulator of female cardiac physiology. To test this hypothesis, we ablated (knocked out; KO) the KCNAB1 isoform 1 (Kvβ1.1) subunit in mice and evaluated cardiac function and electrical activity by using ECG, monophasic action potential recordings and echocardiography. Our results showed that the female Kvβ1.1 KO mice developed cardiac hypertrophy, and the hearts were structurally different, with enlargement and increased area. The electrical derangements caused by Kvβ1.1 KO in female mice included long QTc and QRS intervals along with increased APD (APD20–90% repolarization). The male Kvβ1.1 KO mice did not develop cardiac hypertrophy, but they showed long QTc and prolonged APD. Molecular analysis showed that several genes that support cardiac hypertrophy were significantly altered in Kvβ1.1 KO female hearts. In particular, myosin heavy chain αexpression was significantly elevated in Kvβ1.1 KO mouse heart. Using a small interfering RNA strategy, we identified that knockdown of Kvβ1 increases myosin heavy chain αexpression in H9C2 cells. Collectively, changes in molecular and cell signalling pathways clearly point towards a distinct electrical and structural remodelling consistent with cardiac hypertrophy in the Kvβ1.1 KO female mice. PMID:27038296

  13. Lumped Element Electrical Model based on Three Resistors for Electrical Impedance in Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation: Estimations from Analytical Calculations and Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Berjano, Enrique; d'Avila, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The electrical impedance measured during radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) is widely used in clinical studies to predict the heating evolution and hence the success of the procedure. We hypothesized that a model based on three resistors in series can mimic the total electrical impedance measured during RFCA. The three resistors or impedances are given by: impedance associated with the tissue around the active electrode (myocardium and circulating blood) (Z-A), that associated with the tissue around the dispersive electrode (Z-DE) and that associated with the rest of the body (Z-B). Our objective was to quantify the values associated with these three impedance types by an analytical method, after which the values obtained would be compared to those estimated from clinical data from previous studies. The results suggest that an RFCA using a 7 Fr 4-mm electrode would give a Z-A of around 75 ohms, a Z-DE around 20 ohms, and Z-B would be 15±10 ohms (for body surface area variations between 1.5 and 2.5 m^2). Finally, adaptations of the proposed model were used to explain the results of previous clinical studies using a different electrode arrangement, such as in bipolar ablation of the ventricular septum. PMID:23961299

  14. Fluorescence imaging of electrical activity in cardiac cells using an all-solid-state system.

    PubMed

    Entcheva, Emilia; Kostov, Yordan; Tchernev, Elko; Tung, Leslie

    2004-02-01

    Tracking spatial and temporal determinants of cardiac arrhythmogenesis at the cellular level presents challenges to the optical mapping techniques employed. In this paper, we describe a compact system combining two nontraditional low-cost solutions for excitation light sources and emission filters in fluorescence measurements of transmembrane potentials, Vm, or intracellular calcium, [Ca2+]i in cardiac cell networks. This is the first reported use of high-power blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs), to excite cell monolayers stained with Vm - (di-8-ANEPPS) or [Ca2+]i - (Fluo-3) sensitive dyes. In addition, we use simple techniques for fabrication of suitable thin emission filters with uniform properties, no auto-fluorescence, high durability and good flexibility for imaging Vm or [Ca2+]i. The battery-operated LEDs and the fabricated emission filters, integrated with a fiber-optic system for contact fluorescence imaging, were used as tools to characterize conduction velocity restitution at the macro-scale. The versatility of the LEDs for illumination is further emphasized through 1) demonstration of their usage for epi-illumination recordings at the single-cell level, and 2) demonstration of their unique high-frequency light modulation ability. The LEDs showed excellent stability as excitation light sources for fluorescence measurements; acceptable signal-to-noise ratio and negligible cell photodamage and indicator dye photobleaching were observed.

  15. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system's electrical activity in the heart.

  16. Electrical injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage, especially to the heart, muscles, or brain. Electric current can cause injury in three ways: Cardiac arrest ... How long you were in contact with the electricity How the electricity moved through your body Your ...

  17. Evaluation of the effects of electric fields on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, A.J.; Carstensen, E.

    1985-02-01

    The effects of extra high voltage (EHV) transmission line electric fields on pacemaker function were evaluated in 11 patients with seven different implanted pacemaker models from four manufacturers. Alteration in pacemaker function was demonstrated in five unipolar units (three different models) from two manufacturers during exposure to electric fields ranging from 2 to 9 kV/m, with total body currents from 47 to 175 ..mu..A. These electric fields and body currents are representative of values that can be encountered by individuals standing beneath EHV transmission lines. Transient alterations in pacemaker function observed in this study included inappropriate triggered activity, inhibition of impulse generation, reduction in rate, and reversion from demand to asynchronous mode. Electromagnetic interference from high voltage transmission lines can induce alterations in pacemaker function in certain designs of these devices. However, pacemaker manufacturers can incorporate appropriate circuits in the pacemaker design to eliminate this problem. 8 references.

  18. On the watch for geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Arthur W.; Brown, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms, induced by solar activity, pose significant hazards to satellites, electrical power distribution systems, radio communications, navigation, and geophysical surveys. Strong storms can expose astronauts and crews of high-flying aircraft to dangerous levels of radiation. Economic losses from recent geomagnetic storms have run into hundreds of millions of dollars. With the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as the lead agency, an international network of geomagnetic observatories monitors the onset of solar-induced storms and gives warnings that help diminish losses to military and commercial operations and facilities.

  19. Mechanical Stress Conditioning and Electrical Stimulation Promote Contractility and Force Maturation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Human Cardiac Tissue.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jia-Ling; Tulloch, Nathaniel L; Razumova, Maria V; Saiget, Mark; Muskheli, Veronica; Pabon, Lil; Reinecke, Hans; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles E

    2016-11-15

    Tissue engineering enables the generation of functional human cardiac tissue with cells derived in vitro in combination with biocompatible materials. Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes provide a cell source for cardiac tissue engineering; however, their immaturity limits their potential applications. Here we sought to study the effect of mechanical conditioning and electric pacing on the maturation of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac tissues. Cardiomyocytes derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells were used to generate collagen-based bioengineered human cardiac tissue. Engineered tissue constructs were subjected to different mechanical stress and electric pacing conditions. The engineered human myocardium exhibits Frank-Starling-type force-length relationships. After 2 weeks of static stress conditioning, the engineered myocardium demonstrated increases in contractility (0.63±0.10 mN/mm(2) vs 0.055±0.009 mN/mm(2) for no stress), tensile stiffness, construct alignment, and cell size. Stress conditioning also increased SERCA2 (Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase 2) expression, which correlated with a less negative force-frequency relationship. When electric pacing was combined with static stress conditioning, the tissues showed an additional increase in force production (1.34±0.19 mN/mm(2)), with no change in construct alignment or cell size, suggesting maturation of excitation-contraction coupling. Supporting this notion, we found expression of RYR2 (Ryanodine Receptor 2) and SERCA2 further increased by combined static stress and electric stimulation. These studies demonstrate that electric pacing and mechanical stimulation promote maturation of the structural, mechanical, and force generation properties of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac tissues. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Thermal--electrical finite element modelling for radio frequency cardiac ablation: effects of changes in myocardial properties.

    PubMed

    Tungjitkusolmun, S; Woo, E J; Cao, H; Tsai, J Z; Vorperian, V R; Webster, J G

    2000-09-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis has been utilised as a numerical tool to determine the temperature distribution in studies of radio frequency (RF) cardiac ablation. However, none of the previous FE analyses clarified such computational aspects as software requirements, computation time or convergence test. In addition, myocardial properties included in the previous models vary greatly. A process of FE modelling of a system that included blood, myocardium, and an ablation catheter with a thermistor embedded at the tip is described. The bio-heat equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution in myocardium using a commercial software application (ABAQUS). A Cauchy convergence test (epsilon = 0.1 degree C) was performed and it is concluded that the optimal number of elements for the proposed system is 24610. The effects of changes in myocardial properties (+/- 50% electric conductivity, +100%/-50% thermal conductivity, and +100%/-50% specific heat capacity) in both power-controlled (PCRFA) and temperature-controlled RF ablation (TCRFA) were studied. Changes in myocardial properties affect the results of the FE analyses of PCRFA more than those of TCRFA, and the maximum changes in lesion volumes were -58.6% (-50% electric conductivity), -60.7% (+100% thermal conductivity), and +43.2% (-50% specific heat).

  1. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the {ital Dst} variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of

  2. Vulnerability to re-entry in simulated two-dimensional cardiac tissue: Effects of electrical restitution and stimulation sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Diana X.; Yang, Ming-Jim; Weiss, James N.; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin

    2007-12-01

    Ventricular fibrillation is a lethal arrhythmia characterized by multiple wavelets usually starting from a single or figure-of-eight re-entrant circuit. Understanding the factors regulating vulnerability to the re-entry is essential for developing effective therapeutic strategies to prevent ventricular fibrillation. In this study, we investigated how pre-existing tissue heterogeneities and electrical restitution properties affect the initiation of re-entry by premature extrastimuli in two-dimensional cardiac tissue models. We studied two pacing protocols for inducing re-entry following the "sinus" rhythm (S1) beat: (1) a single premature (S2) extrastimulus in heterogeneous tissue; (2) two premature extrastimuli (S2 and S3) in homogeneous tissue. In the first case, the vulnerable window of re-entry is determined by the spatial dimension and extent of the heterogeneity, and is also affected by electrical restitution properties and the location of the premature stimulus. The vulnerable window first increases as the action potential duration (APD) difference between the inside and outside of the heterogeneous region increases, but then decreases as this difference increases further. Steeper APD restitution reduces the vulnerable window of re-entry. In the second case, electrical restitution plays an essential role. When APD restitution is flat, no re-entry can be induced. When APD restitution is steep, re-entry can be induced by an S3 over a range of S1S2 intervals, which is also affected by conduction velocity restitution. When APD restitution is even steeper, the vulnerable window is reduced due to collision of the spiral tips.

  3. Vulnerability to re-entry in simulated two-dimensional cardiac tissue: effects of electrical restitution and stimulation sequence.

    PubMed

    Tran, Diana X; Yang, Ming-Jim; Weiss, James N; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin

    2007-12-01

    Ventricular fibrillation is a lethal arrhythmia characterized by multiple wavelets usually starting from a single or figure-of-eight re-entrant circuit. Understanding the factors regulating vulnerability to the re-entry is essential for developing effective therapeutic strategies to prevent ventricular fibrillation. In this study, we investigated how pre-existing tissue heterogeneities and electrical restitution properties affect the initiation of re-entry by premature extrastimuli in two-dimensional cardiac tissue models. We studied two pacing protocols for inducing re-entry following the "sinus" rhythm (S1) beat: (1) a single premature (S2) extrastimulus in heterogeneous tissue; (2) two premature extrastimuli (S2 and S3) in homogeneous tissue. In the first case, the vulnerable window of re-entry is determined by the spatial dimension and extent of the heterogeneity, and is also affected by electrical restitution properties and the location of the premature stimulus. The vulnerable window first increases as the action potential duration (APD) difference between the inside and outside of the heterogeneous region increases, but then decreases as this difference increases further. Steeper APD restitution reduces the vulnerable window of re-entry. In the second case, electrical restitution plays an essential role. When APD restitution is flat, no re-entry can be induced. When APD restitution is steep, re-entry can be induced by an S3 over a range of S1S2 intervals, which is also affected by conduction velocity restitution. When APD restitution is even steeper, the vulnerable window is reduced due to collision of the spiral tips.

  4. Spatial heterogeneity of transmembrane potential responses of single guinea-pig cardiac cells during electric field stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vinod; Tung, Leslie

    2002-01-01

    Changes in transmembrane voltage (Vm) of cardiac cells during electric field stimulation have a complex spatial- and time-dependent behaviour that differs significantly from electrical stimulation of space-clamped membranes by current pulses. A multisite optical mapping system was used to obtain 17 or 25 μm resolution maps of Vm along the long axis of guinea-pig ventricular cells (n = 57) stained with voltage-sensitive dye (di-8-ANEPPS) and stimulated longitudinally with uniform electric field (2, 5 or 10 ms, 3–62 V cm−1) pulses (n = 201). The initial polarizations of Vm responses (Vmr) varied linearly along the cell length and reversed symmetrically upon field reversal. The remainder of the Vm responses had parallel time courses among the recording sites, revealing a common time-varying signal component (Vms). Vms was depolarizing for pulses during rest and hyperpolarizing for pulses during the early plateau phase. Vms varied in amplitude and time course with increasing pulse amplitude. Four types of plateau response were observed, with transition points between the different responses occurring when the maximum polarization at the ends of the cell reached values estimated as 60, 110 and 220 mV. Among the cells that had a polarization change of > 200 mV at their ends (for fields > 45 V cm−1), some (n = 17/25) had non-parallel time courses among Vm recordings of the various sites. This implied development of an intracellular field (Ei) that was found to increase exponentially with time (τ = 7.2 ± 3.2 ms). Theoretical considerations suggest that Vms represents the intracellular potential (φi) as well as the average polarization of the cell, and that Vmr is the manifestation of the extracellular potential gradient resulting from the field stimulus. For cells undergoing field stimulation, φi acts as the cellular physiological state variable and substitutes for Vm, which is the customary variable for space-clamped membranes. PMID:12122146

  5. Deletion of Kvβ1.1 subunit leads to electrical and haemodynamic changes causing cardiac hypertrophy in female murine hearts.

    PubMed

    Tur, Jared; Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C; Padawer, Timothy; Badole, Sachin L; Kilfoil, Peter J; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Tipparaju, Srinivas M

    2016-04-01

    What is the central question of this study? The goal of this study was to evaluate sex differences and the role of the potassium channel β1 (Kvβ1) subunit in the heart. What is the main finding and its importance? Genetic ablation of Kvβ1.1 in females led to cardiac hypertrophy characterized by increased heart size, prolonged monophasic action potentials, elevated blood pressure and increased myosin heavy chain α (MHCα) expression. In contrast, male mice showed only electrical changes. Kvβ1.1 binds the MHCα isoform at the protein level, and small interfering RNA targeted knockdown of Kvβ1.1 upregulated MHCα. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and debility in women in the USA, and cardiac arrhythmias are a major concern. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels along with the binding partners; Kvβ subunits are major regulators of the action potential (AP) shape and duration (APD). The regulation of Kv channels by the Kvβ1 subunit is unknown in female hearts. In the present study, we hypothesized that the Kvβ1 subunit is an important regulator of female cardiac physiology. To test this hypothesis, we ablated (knocked out; KO) the KCNAB1 isoform 1 (Kvβ1.1) subunit in mice and evaluated cardiac function and electrical activity by using ECG, monophasic action potential recordings and echocardiography. Our results showed that the female Kvβ1.1 KO mice developed cardiac hypertrophy, and the hearts were structurally different, with enlargement and increased area. The electrical derangements caused by Kvβ1.1 KO in female mice included long QTc and QRS intervals along with increased APD (APD20-90% repolarization). The male Kvβ1.1 KO mice did not develop cardiac hypertrophy, but they showed long QTc and prolonged APD. Molecular analysis showed that several genes that support cardiac hypertrophy were significantly altered in Kvβ1.1 KO female hearts. In particular, myosin heavy chain α expression was significantly elevated in Kvβ1.1 KO mouse

  6. Vagal control of cardiac electrical activity and wall motion during ventricular fibrillation in large animals.

    PubMed

    Naggar, Isaac; Nakase, Ko; Lazar, Jason; Salciccioli, Louis; Selesnick, Ivan; Stewart, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Vagal inputs control pacemaking and conduction systems in the heart. Anatomical evidence suggests a direct ventricular action, but functional evidence that separates direct and indirect (via the conduction system) vagal actions is less well established. We studied vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) during sinus rhythm and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in pigs and sheep to determine: 1) the range of unilateral and bilateral actions (inotropic and chronotropic) and 2) whether VNS alters left ventricular motion and/or electrical activity during VF, a model of abnormal electrical conduction of the left ventricle that excludes sinus and atrioventricular nodal function. Adult pigs (N=8) and sheep (N=10) were anesthetized with urethane and mechanically ventilated. VNS was performed in animals at 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100Hz for 20s. VF was induced with direct current to the ventricles or occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. In 4 pigs and 3 sheep, left ventricular wall motion was assessed from endocardial excursion in epicardial echocardiography. In sheep and pigs, the best frequency among those tested for VNS during sinus rhythm to produce sustained electrical and mechanical ventricular standstill was 50Hz for unilateral or bilateral stimulation. When applied during VF, bilateral VNS increased the variability of the dominant VF frequency, indicating a direct impact on the excitability of ventricular myocytes, and decreased endocardial excursion by more than 50% during VF. We conclude that the vagus nerve directly modulates left ventricular function independently from its effects on the conduction system.

  7. Effects of acupuncture at the acupoints of 12 meridians on gastrointestinal and cardiac electricity in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiao-Rong; Yan, Jie; Shen, Jing; Liu, Mi; Wang, Xiao-Juan

    2010-09-01

    The effect of acupuncture at the acupoints of 12 meridians on gastrointestinal and cardiac electricity in healthy adults was studied. Specific regulation between meridian points and viscera was also investigated. An electrogastrogram (EGG), electrointestinogram (EIG), carotid pulse graph, phonocardiogram and electrocardiogram were obtained in 30 healthy adults before and after acupuncture at various acupoints of 12 meridians. The effects of acupuncture on the amplitude and frequency of the EGG, EIG, pre-ejection period and the left ventricular ejection time were then analyzed. Acupuncture revealed that LR3 decreased the amplitude of the EGG while LI11 (Quchi), SJ5 (Waiguan), ST36 (Zusanli), SP9 (Yinlingquan) and SI6 (Yanglao) increased the amplitude. Multiple comparisons among the latter five acupoints indicated that there were significant differences between SP9, LI11, SJ5 and ST36 (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.05) and SI6, LI11 and SJ5 (p < 0.01, p < 0.05). SP9 effected EGG amplitude the most, followed by SI6, ST36, SJ5 and LI11. Four acupoints increased the amplitude of the EIG (p < 0.05), including HT5 (Tongli), GB34 (Yanglingquan), SP9 and SI6. No significant differences were observed between these acupoints, but SI6 showed the most obvious effect on EIG amplitude, followed by GB34, SP9 and HT5. No significant effects on the frequency of the gastrointestinal slow wave or on cardiac function indexes were observed. Effects were observed, however, on pre-ejection period and left ventricular ejection time. Routine acupuncture had no detrimental effects on the stomach, intestine and heart in healthy adults, but instead regulated physiological function within a normal range. These findings demonstrate the existence of specific connections between the meridian points and the viscera. The results suggest that multiple meridians control the same viscus, and the same meridian can regulate the functions of multiple viscera. Copyright © 2010 Korean Pharmacopuncture

  8. Correlations between the Signal Complexity of Cerebral and Cardiac Electrical Activity: A Multiscale Entropy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Feng; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tsao, Jenho; Chang, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun

    2014-01-01

    The heart begins to beat before the brain is formed. Whether conventional hierarchical central commands sent by the brain to the heart alone explain all the interplay between these two organs should be reconsidered. Here, we demonstrate correlations between the signal complexity of brain and cardiac activity. Eighty-seven geriatric outpatients with healthy hearts and varied cognitive abilities each provided a 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) and a 19-channel eye-closed routine electroencephalography (EEG). Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis was applied to three epochs (resting-awake state, photic stimulation of fast frequencies (fast-PS), and photic stimulation of slow frequencies (slow-PS)) of EEG in the 1–58 Hz frequency range, and three RR interval (RRI) time series (awake-state, sleep and that concomitant with the EEG) for each subject. The low-to-high frequency power (LF/HF) ratio of RRI was calculated to represent sympatho-vagal balance. With statistics after Bonferroni corrections, we found that: (a) the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the awake RRI (scales 11–20, RRI-MSE-coarse) were inversely correlated with the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the resting-awake EEG (scales 6–20, EEG-MSE-coarse) at Fp2, C4, T6 and T4; (b) the awake RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the fast-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at O1, O2 and C4; (c) the sleep RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the slow-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at Fp2; (d) the RRI-MSE-coarse and LF/HF ratio of the awake RRI were correlated positively to each other; (e) the EEG-MSE-coarse at F8 was proportional to the cognitive test score; (f) the results conform to the cholinergic hypothesis which states that cognitive impairment causes reduction in vagal cardiac modulation; (g) fast-PS significantly lowered the EEG-MSE-coarse globally. Whether these heart-brain correlations could be fully explained by the central autonomic network is unknown and needs further exploration. PMID:24498375

  9. Morphological and functional state of the heart during magnetic storm.

    PubMed

    Chibisov, S M; Breus, T K; Illarionova, T S

    2001-12-01

    Magnetic storm modulates morphological and functional state of the heart and the related systems. Changes in cardiomyocyte ultrastructure induced by changes in geomagnetic activity were studied in experiments on rabbits. We describe a possible mechanism underlying changes in cardiac activity in intact animals induced by geomagnetic perturbations. The most pronounced alterations of cardiomyocyte ultrastructure were observed during the major phase of magnetic storm.

  10. Electronegative LDL-mediated cardiac electrical remodeling in a rat model of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, An-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chung, Ching-Hu; Peng, Hsien-Yu; Chang, Chia-Ming; Su, Ming-Jai; Chen, Chu-Huang; Chang, Kuan-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying chronic kidney disease (CKD)–associated higher risks for life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmias remain poorly understood. In rats subjected to unilateral nephrectomy (UNx), we examined cardiac electrophysiological remodeling and relevant mechanisms predisposing to ventricular arrhythmias. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent UNx (n = 6) or sham (n = 6) operations. Eight weeks later, the UNx group had higher serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and a longer electrocardiographic QTc interval than did the sham group. Patch-clamp studies revealed epicardial (EPI)-predominant prolongation of the action potential duration (APD) at 50% and 90% repolarization in UNx EPI cardiomyocytes compared to sham EPI cardiomyocytes. A significant reduction of the transient outward potassium current (Ito) in EPI but not in endocardial (ENDO) cardiomyocytes of UNx rats led to a decreased transmural gradient of Ito. The reduction of Ito currents in UNx EPI cardiomyocytes was secondary to downregulation of KChIP2 but not Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and Kv1.4 protein expression. Incubation of plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from UNx rats with normal EPI and ENDO cardiomyocytes recapitulated the electrophysiological phenotype of UNx rats. In conclusion, CKD disrupts the physiological transmural gradient of Ito via downregulation of KChIP2 proteins in the EPI region, which may promote susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Electronegative LDL may underlie downregulation of KChIP2 in CKD. PMID:28094801

  11. [Optimal electrode array for ambulatory measuring of cardiac output based on the electrical impedance method].

    PubMed

    Song, Yilin; Gao, Shumei; Ikrashi, Akira; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2011-02-01

    Principle of ambulatory cardiac output (CO) measuring technique is introduced in this paper. A lot of experimental studies of the current distribution on the thorax under the condition that the current injection electrodes were adhered to different positions were carried out by using a developed multi-channel impedance mapping system. The static impedance contour maps (Zo-map) and its pulsatile component contour maps (deltaZ-map) under different measuring conditions were analyzed, and the applicability of a two-compartment coaxial cylindrical model using a spot-electrode array instead of the conventional band-electrode array for ambulatory CO measurement, as well as the optimal spot-electrode array, were discussed. Based on the experimental results and the daily use of the ambulatory CO measuring technique, the optimal spot-electrode array meeting the condition of the two-compartment coaxial cylindrical model was determined as that a pair of spot-electrodes for current injection was located on the positions behind the ears and on the right lower abdomen, and a pair of spot-electrodes for voltage pick-up places on the medial portion at the level of clavicle and on the portion above the xiphisternum.

  12. Nonuniform responses of transmembrane potential during electric field stimulation of single cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, D K; Tung, L; Sobie, E A

    1999-07-01

    The response of cellular transmembrane potentials (V(m)) to applied electric fields is a critical factor during electrical pacing, cardioversion, and defibrillation, yet the coupling relationship of the cellular response to field intensity and polarity is not well documented. Isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes were stained with a voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye, di-8-ANEPPS (10 microM). A green helium-neon laser was used to excite the fluorescent dye with a 15-micrometers-diameter focused spot, and subcellular V(m) were recorded optically during field stimulation directed along the long axis of the cell. The membrane response was measured at the cell end with the use of a 30-ms S1-S2 coupling interval and a 10-ms S2 pulse with strength of up to approximately 500-mV half-cell length potential (field strength x one-half the cell length). The general trends show that 1) the response of V(m) at the cell end occurs in two stages, the first being very rapid (<1 ms) and the second much slower in time scale, 2) the rapid response consists of hyperpolarization when the cell end faces the anode and depolarization when the cell end faces the cathode, 3) the rapid response varies nonlinearly with field strengths and polarity, being relatively larger for the hyperpolarizing responses, and 4) the slower, time-dependent response has a time course that varies in slope with field strength. Furthermore, the linearity of the dye response was confirmed over a voltage range of -280 to +140 mV by simultaneous measurements of optically and electrically recorded V(m). These experimental findings could not be reproduced by the updated, Luo-Rudy dynamic model but could be explained with the addition of two currents that activate outside the physiological range of voltages: a hypothetical outward current that activates strongly at positive potentials and a second current that represents electroporation of the cell membrane.

  13. Regulation of Ca2+ and electrical alternans in cardiac myocytes: Role of CaMKII and repolarizing currents

    PubMed Central

    Livshitz, Leonid M.; Rudy, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    Alternans of cardiac repolarization is associated with arrhythmias and sudden death. At the cellular level, alternans involves beat-to-beat oscillation of the action potential (AP) and possibly Ca2+ transient (CaT). Because of experimental difficulty in independently controlling the Ca2+ and electrical subsystems, mathematical modelling provides additional insights into mechanisms and causality. Pacing protocols were conducted in a canine ventricular myocyte model with the following results: 1. (I) CaT alternans results from refractoriness of the SR Ca2+ release system; alternation of the L-type calcium current (ICa(L)) has a negligible effect; (II) CaT-AP coupling during late AP occurs through the sodium-calcium exchanger (INaCa) and underlies APD alternans; (III) Increased Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity extends the range of CaT and APD alternans to slower frequencies and increases alternans magnitude; its decrease suppresses CaT and APD alternans, exerting an antiarrhythmic effect; (IV). Increase of the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr) also suppresses APD alternans, but without suppressing CaT alternans. Thus, CaMKII inhibition eliminates APD alternans by eliminating its cause (CaT alternans), while IKr enhancement does so by weakening CaT-APD coupling. The simulations identify combined CaMKII inhibition and IKr enhancement as a possible antiar-rhythmic intervention. PMID:17277017

  14. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  15. Cardiac contractility modulation with nonexcitatory electric signals improves left ventricular function in dogs with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hideaki; Suzuki, George; Haddad, Walid; Mika, Yuval; Tanhehco, Elaine J; Sharov, Victor G; Goldstein, Sidney; Ben-Haim, Shlomo; Sabbah, Hani N

    2003-02-01

    Nonexcitatory electrical, signals termed cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) have been shown to improve contractile force of isolated papillary muscles. In this study, we examined the effects of CCM signal delivery on left ventricular function in dogs with chronic heart failure (HF). Chronic HF (ejection fraction

  16. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, S.; Pammler, K.; Silny, J.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  17. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields.

    PubMed

    Joosten, S; Pammler, K; Silny, J

    2009-02-07

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  18. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  19. Thyroid storm following suicide attempt by hanging

    PubMed Central

    Shrum, J M; Byers, B; Parhar, K

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 19-year-old woman with asphyxiation complicated by cardiac arrest, following an unsuccessful suicide attempt by hanging, developed an uncommon complication of trauma-induced thyroid storm. She was initially admitted to the intensive care unit intubated and mechanically ventilated for postcardiac arrest management. Investigation of thyroid storm was pursued after the patient was noted to be persistently hypertensive, tachycardic and agitated despite high levels of sedation. Thyroid function tests confirmed the clinical suspicion of progressive thyrotoxicosis, with associated imaging consistent with thyroid inflammation secondary to band-like traumatic pressure to the lower half of the thyroid gland. Treatment with β-blockers and a thionamide resulted in the eventual resolution of her thyroid storm state and normalisation of her thyroid function. We conclude that traumatically induced thyroid storm should be considered in all hypermetabolic patients following blunt neck injuries including hanging, and that traditional treatment of hyperthyroidism can be successfully applied. PMID:25008337

  20. Thyroid storm following suicide attempt by hanging.

    PubMed

    Shrum, J M; Byers, B; Parhar, K

    2014-07-09

    Summary A 19-year-old woman with asphyxiation complicated by cardiac arrest, following an unsuccessful suicide attempt by hanging, developed an uncommon complication of trauma-induced thyroid storm. She was initially admitted to the intensive care unit intubated and mechanically ventilated for postcardiac arrest management. Investigation of thyroid storm was pursued after the patient was noted to be persistently hypertensive, tachycardic and agitated despite high levels of sedation. Thyroid function tests confirmed the clinical suspicion of progressive thyrotoxicosis, with associated imaging consistent with thyroid inflammation secondary to band-like traumatic pressure to the lower half of the thyroid gland. Treatment with β-blockers and a thionamide resulted in the eventual resolution of her thyroid storm state and normalisation of her thyroid function. We conclude that traumatically induced thyroid storm should be considered in all hypermetabolic patients following blunt neck injuries including hanging, and that traditional treatment of hyperthyroidism can be successfully applied. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn...

  2. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn...

  3. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn...

  5. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn...

  6. Ordinary surface ECG electrodes accurately reflect cardiac electric activity at hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Benedict; Yoshida, Ken; Christensen, Trine; Tosato, Marco

    2008-10-01

    It has been claimed that needle electrodes can be a useful means to detect weak ECG signals in cases of accidental hypothermia. Four pigs were cooled by immersion in ice water, followed by direct cooling of the blood through an extracorporeal circulation system until the core temperature was lowered to 12 degrees C and surface-measured ECG indicated asystole. Following cooling, the pigs were rewarmed and weaned from extracorporeal circulation if possible. ECG and interelectrode impedance were measured between surface electrodes, needle electrodes and electrodes sewn to the epicardium during the cooling and rewarming procedure. Needle and surface electrodes showed exactly the same ECG whatever the temperature of the skin or the core was. The impedance varied only slightly with temperature and could not explain the disappearance of surface ECG. The QRS wave amplitude showed the greatest sensitivity to temperature, disappearing completely before the P-wave disappeared. The P-wave showed the least sensitivity, and was the last wave to disappear, indicating that the sinus node is the most resistant part of the heart to cooling. Between 19 and 17 degrees C, a commercial monitor indicated asystole although P-waves could be seen in the ECG and atrial contractions could be visually observed on the heart. Surface electrodes had a similar high accuracy to indicate electric activity as needle electrodes. Higher amplification and reduction of the timebase made it possible to detect ECG in a situation where asystole was indicated by commercial monitors.

  7. Propagation of Electrical Excitation in a Ring of Cardiac Cells: A Computer Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, B. Y.; Karplus, W. J.; Karpoukhin, M. G.; Roizen, I. M.; Chudin, E.; Qu, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The propagation of electrical excitation in a ring of cells described by the Noble, Beeler-Reuter (BR), Luo-Rudy I (LR I), and third-order simplified (TOS) mathematical models is studied using computer simulation. For each of the models it is shown that after transition from steady-state circulation to quasi-periodicity achieved by shortening the ring length (RL), the action potential duration (APD) restitution curve becomes a double-valued function and is located below the original ( that of an isolated cell) APD restitution curve. The distributions of APD and diastolic interval (DI) along a ring for the entire range of RL corresponding to quasi-periodic oscillations remain periodic with the period slightly different from two RLs. The 'S' shape of the original APD restitution curve determines the appearance of the second steady-state circulation region for short RLs. For all the models and the wide variety of their original APD restitution curves, no transition from quasi-periodicity to chaos was observed.

  8. [Cardiac electric field at the period of depolarization and repolarization of the frog heart ventricle].

    PubMed

    Vaĭkshnoraĭte, M A; Belogolova, A S; Vitiazev, V A; Azarov, Ia E; Shmakov, D N

    2008-01-01

    Multichannel mapping of electrical field on heart ventricle epicardium and the body surface in frogs Rana esculenta and Rana temporaria was performed at periods of the ventricular myocardium depolarization and repolarization. The zone of the epicardium early depolarization is located on epicardium of the ventricle base posterior wall, while the late depolarization zone--on its apex and on the base anterior wall. The total vector of sequence of the ventricle epicardium depolarization is directed from the base to the apex. The zone of the early repolarization is located in the apical area, while that of the late one--in the area of the base. On the frog body surface the cardioelectric field with the cranial zone of negative and the caudal zone of positive potentials is formed before the appearance of the QRS complex on ECG. At the period of the heart ventricle repolarization the zone of the cardioelectric field negative potentials is located in the cranial, while that of the positive ones--in the body surface caudal parts. The cardioelectric field on the frog body surface at the periods of depolarization and repolarization of the ventricle myocardium reflects adequately the projection of sequence of involvement with excitation and of distribution of potentials on epicardium.

  9. Iron Deposition following Chronic Myocardial Infarction as a Substrate for Cardiac Electrical Anomalies: Initial Findings in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xunzhang; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Tang, Richard L. Q.; Thajudeen, Anees; Shehata, Michael; Amorn, Allen M.; Liu, Enzhao; Stewart, Brian; Bennett, Nathan; Harlev, Doron; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.; Jackman, Warren M.; Chugh, Sumeet S.; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Iron deposition has been shown to occur following myocardial infarction (MI). We investigated whether such focal iron deposition within chronic MI lead to electrical anomalies. Methods Two groups of dogs (ex-vivo (n = 12) and in-vivo (n = 10)) were studied at 16 weeks post MI. Hearts of animals from ex-vivo group were explanted and sectioned into infarcted and non-infarcted segments. Impedance spectroscopy was used to derive electrical permittivity () and conductivity (). Mass spectrometry was used to classify and characterize tissue sections with (IRON+) and without (IRON-) iron. Animals from in-vivo group underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) for estimation of scar volume (late-gadolinium enhancement, LGE) and iron deposition (T2*) relative to left-ventricular volume. 24-hour electrocardiogram recordings were obtained and used to examine Heart Rate (HR), QT interval (QT), QT corrected for HR (QTc) and QTc dispersion (QTcd). In a fraction of these animals (n = 5), ultra-high resolution electroanatomical mapping (EAM) was performed, co-registered with LGE and T2* CMR and were used to characterize the spatial locations of isolated late potentials (ILPs). Results Compared to IRON- sections, IRON+ sections had higher, but no difference in. A linear relationship was found between iron content and (p<0.001), but not (p = 0.34). Among two groups of animals (Iron (<1.5%) and Iron (>1.5%)) with similar scar volumes (7.28%±1.02% (Iron (<1.5%)) vs 8.35%±2.98% (Iron (>1.5%)), p = 0.51) but markedly different iron volumes (1.12%±0.64% (Iron (<1.5%)) vs 2.47%±0.64% (Iron (>1.5%)), p = 0.02), QT and QTc were elevated and QTcd was decreased in the group with the higher iron volume during the day, night and 24-hour period (p<0.05). EAMs co-registered with CMR images showed a greater tendency for ILPs to emerge from scar regions with iron versus without iron. Conclusion The electrical behavior of infarcted hearts with iron appears to

  10. Iron deposition following chronic myocardial infarction as a substrate for cardiac electrical anomalies: initial findings in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Cokic, Ivan; Kali, Avinash; Wang, Xunzhang; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Tang, Richard L Q; Thajudeen, Anees; Shehata, Michael; Amorn, Allen M; Liu, Enzhao; Stewart, Brian; Bennett, Nathan; Harlev, Doron; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A; Jackman, Warren M; Chugh, Sumeet S; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    Iron deposition has been shown to occur following myocardial infarction (MI). We investigated whether such focal iron deposition within chronic MI lead to electrical anomalies. Two groups of dogs (ex-vivo (n = 12) and in-vivo (n = 10)) were studied at 16 weeks post MI. Hearts of animals from ex-vivo group were explanted and sectioned into infarcted and non-infarcted segments. Impedance spectroscopy was used to derive electrical permittivity ([Formula: see text]) and conductivity ([Formula: see text]). Mass spectrometry was used to classify and characterize tissue sections with (IRON+) and without (IRON-) iron. Animals from in-vivo group underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) for estimation of scar volume (late-gadolinium enhancement, LGE) and iron deposition (T2*) relative to left-ventricular volume. 24-hour electrocardiogram recordings were obtained and used to examine Heart Rate (HR), QT interval (QT), QT corrected for HR (QTc) and QTc dispersion (QTcd). In a fraction of these animals (n = 5), ultra-high resolution electroanatomical mapping (EAM) was performed, co-registered with LGE and T2* CMR and were used to characterize the spatial locations of isolated late potentials (ILPs). Compared to IRON- sections, IRON+ sections had higher[Formula: see text], but no difference in[Formula: see text]. A linear relationship was found between iron content and [Formula: see text] (p<0.001), but not [Formula: see text] (p = 0.34). Among two groups of animals (Iron (<1.5%) and Iron (>1.5%)) with similar scar volumes (7.28% ± 1.02% (Iron (<1.5%)) vs 8.35% ± 2.98% (Iron (>1.5%)), p = 0.51) but markedly different iron volumes (1.12% ± 0.64% (Iron (<1.5%)) vs 2.47% ± 0.64% (Iron (>1.5%)), p = 0.02), QT and QTc were elevated and QTcd was decreased in the group with the higher iron volume during the day, night and 24-hour period (p<0.05). EAMs co-registered with CMR images showed a greater tendency for ILPs to emerge from scar regions with iron versus without iron

  11. Impact of Additional Transthoracic Electrical Cardioversion on Cardiac Function and Atrial Fibrillation Recurrence in Patients with Persistent Atrial Fibrillation Who Underwent Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deguo; Zhang, Fengxiang; Wang, Ancai

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objective. During the procession of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) in persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), transthoracic electrical cardioversion (ECV) is required to terminate AF. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of additional ECV on cardiac function and recurrence of AF. Methods and Results. Persistent AF patients received extensive encircling pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) and additional line ablation. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether they need transthoracic electrical cardioversion to terminate AF: electrical cardioversion (ECV group) and nonelectrical cardioversion (NECV group). Among 111 subjects, 35 patients were returned to sinus rhythm after ablation by ECV (ECV group) and 76 patients had AF termination after the ablation processions (NECV group). During the 12-month follow-ups, the recurrence ratio of patients was comparable in ECV group (15/35) and NECV group (34/76) (44.14% versus 44.74%, P = 0.853). Although left atrial diameters (LAD) decreased significantly in both groups, there were no significant differences in LAD and left ventricular cardiac function between ECV group and NECV group. Conclusions. This study revealed that ECV has no significant impact on the maintenance of SR and the recovery of cardiac function. Therefore, ECV could be applied safely to recover SR during the procedure of catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation.

  12. Intracellular angiotensin-(1–12) changes the electrical properties of intact cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Itallia, L. J.; Varagic, J.; Ferrario, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, the influence of intracellular injection of angiotensin-(1–12) [Ang-(1–12)] on the electrical properties of the intact left ventricle of Wistar Kyoto rats was investigated with electrophysiological methods. Particular attention was given to the role of chymostatin on the effect of the peptide. The results indicated that intra-cellular administration of the peptide elicited a depolarization of the surface cell membrane and an increase of duration of the action potential followed by the generation of early afterdepolarizations. The increment of action potential duration caused by Ang-(1–12) (100 nM) was due to a decrease of total potassium current recorded from single cardiomyocytes using the whole cell configuration of pCAMP. The decrease of potassium current was related to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) because the specific inhibitor of kinase C, Bis-1 (10−9 M), abolished Ang-(1–12) effects on the potassium current. The question of whether the effect of Ang-(1–12) was related to the formation of Ang II by chymase was investigated. The results revealed that the intracellular administration of chymostatin, a chymase inhibitor (10−9 M) abolished the effect of intracellular Ang-(1–12) on the potassium current. Moreover, intracellular Ang II (100 nM), by itself, reduced the potassium current, an effect decreased by intracellular valsartan (100 nM). Valsartan (10–9 M) dialyzed into the cell abolished the effect of Ang-(1–12) (100 nM). These observations demonstrate that the effect of Ang-(1–12) on potassium current was related to the formation of Ang II and that the peptide has arrhythmogenic properties. PMID:27590241

  13. Novel measure of electrical dyssynchrony predicts response in cardiac resynchronization therapy: Results from the SMART-AV Trial.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenko, Larisa G; Cheng, Alan; Park, Jason; Wold, Nicholas; Meyer, Timothy E; Gold, Michael R; Mittal, Suneet; Singh, Jagmeet; Stein, Kenneth M; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces mortality and morbidity in selected heart failure patients. However, not all patients respond to CRT. We hypothesized that a novel measure of electrical dyssynchrony, sum absolute QRST integral (SAI QRST), predicts CRT response independent of QRS duration and morphology. We retrospectively analyzed baseline 12-lead electrocardiograms of SmartDelay Determined AV Optimization: A comparison to other AV delay methods used in cardiac resynchronization therapy (SMART-AV) trial study participants (N = 234; mean age 67 years; 163 (70%) men; 140 (60%) ischemic cardiomyopathy; mean left ventricular ejection fraction 25%; mean QRS duration 152 ms; 179 (77%) had left bundle branch block). Baseline pre-implant electrocardiograms were digitized, transformed into orthogonal XYZ, and analyzed automatically by customized MATLAB software. SAI QRST was measured as an averaged arithmetic sum of absolute areas under the QRST curve. Patients were followed prospectively 6 months after CRT-defibrillator implantation. Patients with a decrease in left ventricular end-systolic volume ≥15 mL after 6 months of CRT were considered responders. The logistic regression model was adjusted for age, sex, bundle branch block morphology, left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiomyopathy type, and QRS duration. Patients with the high mean SAI QRST (third tertile) had 2.5 times greater odds of response than those with the low mean SAI QRST (first tertile: odds ratio [OR] 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.0; P = .010) and 1.9 times greater than the lower 2 tertiles combined (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-3.5; P = .03). Adjustment for renal function (OR 2.33; 95% CI 1.32-4.11; P = .003) and left ventricular lead position in right anterior oblique and left anterior oblique views (OR 1.7; 95% CI 0.9-3.2; P = .087) did not attenuate association of SAI QRST with outcome. High SAI QRST independently predicts CRT response in the SMART-AV study. Copyright © 2015

  14. Nuclear magnetohydrodynamic EMP, solar storms, and substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. ); Meliopoulous, A.P.S.; Glytsis, E.N. . School of Electrical Engineering); Cokkinides, G.J. )

    1992-10-20

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS-GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E [approx lt] 10[sup [minus] 1] V/m and lasts [approx lt] 10[sup 2] sec, whereas for solar storms E [approx gt] 10[sup [minus] 2] V/m and lasts [approx gt] 10[sup 3] sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS-GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  15. Novel measure of electrical dyssynchrony predicts response in cardiac resynchronization therapy: Results from the SMART-AV Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tereshchenko, Larisa G.; Cheng, Alan; Park, Jason; Wold, Nicholas; Meyer, Timothy E.; Gold, Michael R.; Mittal, Suneet; Singh, Jagmeet; Stein, Kenneth M.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) reduces mortality and morbidity in selected heart failure (HF) patients. However, not all patients respond to CRT. Objective We hypothesized that a novel measure of electrical dyssynchrony, sum absolute QRST integral (SAI), predicts CRT response independent of QRS duration and morphology. Methods We retrospectively analyzed baseline 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) of SMART-AV study participants [N=234, mean age 67 y, 70% male, 60% ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 25%, mean QRS duration 152ms, 77% had left bundle branch block (LBBB)]. Baseline pre-implant ECGs were digitized, transformed into orthogonal XYZ, and analyzed automatically by customized Matlab software. SAI was measured as an averaged arithmetic sum of absolute areas under the QRST curve. Patients were followed prospectively 6 months after CRT-D implantation. Patients with a decrease in left ventricular end-systolic volume ≥ 15mls after 6 months of CRT were considered responders. Logistic regression model was adjusted for age, gender, BBB morphology, LVEF, type of cardiomyopathy and QRS duration. Results Patients with the high mean SAI (3rd tertile) had 2.5 times greater odds of response than those with low mean SAI (1st tertile; OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3–5.0, p=0.010), and 1.9 times greater than the lower two tertiles combined (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.1–3.5; P=0.03). Adjustment for renal function (OR 2.33 (95%CI 1.32, 4.11); P=0.003) and LV lead position in RAO/LAO (OR 1.7 (95%CI 0.9, 3.2); P=0.087) did not attenuate association of SAI with outcome. Conclusion High SAI QRST independently predicts CRT response in the SMART-AV study. PMID:26272523

  16. Use of Preprocedural MDCT for Cardiac Implantable Electric Device Lead Extraction: Frequency of Findings That Change Management.

    PubMed

    Ehieli, Wendy L; Boll, Daniel T; Marin, Daniele; Lewis, Robert; Piccini, Jonathan P; Hurwitz, Lynne M

    2017-04-01

    Five percent of cardiac implantable electric devices (CIEDs) are removed each year. Percutaneous extraction is preferred but can be complicated if the leads adhere to the vasculature or perforate. The goal of this study is to assess the frequency of findings on dedicated MDCT that alter preprocedural planning for percutaneous CIED extraction. One hundred patients with CIEDs who underwent MDCT before percutaneous lead extraction were analyzed. Major findings that could preclude percutaneous removal, including lead course and termination, were distinguished from moderately significant findings that could alter but not preclude percutaneous removal, including endofibrosis of leads to the vasculature, lead termination abnormalities, central vein stenosis, or thrombus. Incidental findings were characterized separately. Findings were correlated with preprocedural decisions, the extraction procedure performed, and procedural outcomes. Twenty-six women and 74 men with 125 right ventricular leads, 84 right atrial leads, and 26 coronary venous leads were evaluated. Major findings were present in 7% of patients, including six patients with lead perforation and one with a lead coursing outside a tricuspid annuloplasty ring. Moderately significant findings of endothelial fibrosis were found in 78% of patients. The central veins were narrowed or occluded in 42% of patients, and thrombus was present in 2% of patients. Thirty-six percent of patients had incidental findings, and 4% of patients had unexpected findings requiring immediate inpatient attention. MDCT performed before CIED lead extraction is able to identify major and moderately significant findings that can alter either percutaneous extraction or preprocedural planning. The use of dedicated preprocedural MDCT can help to stratify patient risk, guide decision making by the proceduralist, and identify non-catheter-related findings that affect patient management.

  17. Geomagnetic storm fields near a synchronous satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S. I.

    1971-01-01

    An apparent early recovery of the main phase of geomagnetic storms at the distance of the synchronous satellite is examined in terms of changing electric current distributions in the magnetosphere during magnetic storms. It is suggested that a rapid recession of the edge of the plasma sheet (after the advance toward the earth during an early epoch of the main phase) is partly responsible for the early recovery. Relevant plasma sheet variations during geomagnetic storms are found to be in agreement with the inferred variations.

  18. [Cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial diseases].

    PubMed

    Ritzenthaler, Thomas; Luis, David; Hullin, Thomas; Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are multi-system disorders in relation with mitochondrial DNA and/or nuclear DNA abnormalities. Clinical pictures are heterogeneous, involving endocrine, cardiac, neurologic or sensory systems. Cardiac involvements are morphological and electrical disturbances. Prognosis is worsened in case of cardiac impairment. Treatments are related to the type of cardiac dysfunction including medication or pacemaker implantation.

  19. Spotting Saturn Northern Storm

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-06

    NASA Cassini spacecraft captures a composite near-true-color view of the largest and most intense storm observed on Saturn. The storm is seen churning through the atmosphere in Saturn northern hemisphere.

  20. Tropical Storm Bud

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  A Strengthening Eastern Pacific Storm     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying toward hurricane status, which it acquired ...

  1. Crib death: further support for the concept of fatal cardiac electrical instability as the final common pathway.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Matturri, Luigi; Rossi, Lino; James, Thomas N

    2003-11-01

    This work intends to be a review of the current status of knowledge on the cardiac conduction system in the crib death as well as remaining challenges, including reflections upon authors' personal works as well as many studies by others. The cardiac conduction system findings of resorptive degeneration, His bundle dispersion, Mahaim fibers, cartilaginous meta-hyperplasia, persistent fetal dispersion, left sided His bundle, hemorrhage of the atrio-ventricular junction, septation of the bifurcation, atrio-ventricular node dispersion, sinus node hypoplasia, Zahn node, His bundle hypoplasia, atrio-ventricular node and His bundle dualism are hereby discussed by the authors. The cardiac hypotheses postulating that crib death could be due to lethal cardiac arrhythmias or heart block were considered of great interest in the 1970s. After a general abandon of the conduction studies in crib death, the cardiac concept of crib death is gathering a renewed interest, as well as the occurrence of infantile junctional tachycardia. Both the morphological and functional derangement underlying crib death remain poorly understood, assuring that it remains to be a major medical and social problem. Despite the non-specificity of most of the cardiac conduction findings in crib death, we believe that they, in association with altered neurovegetative stimuli, could underlie potentially malignant arrhythmias, providing a morphologic support for the cardiac concept of crib death.

  2. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  3. Two Pairs of Storms

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-06-04

    Two pairs of dark spots, or storms, in Saturn atmosphere squeeze past each other as they dance around the planet. In this group of four storms, the top left and lower right storms are fringed with white clouds as seen by NASA Cassini spacecraft.

  4. In the eye of the storm: iodinated contrast medium induced thyroid storm presenting as cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Alkhuja, Samer; Pyram, Ronald; Odeyemi, Olutunde

    2013-01-01

    The administration of iodinated contrast medium may lead to excess free thyroid hormone release and cause thyroid storm. A woman presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, hemoptysis, and intermittent bilateral lower extremities edema. Physical examination revealed mildly enlarged thyroid. Patient underwent a computed tomography scan of the chest with intravenous iodinated contrast medium to rule out pulmonary embolism, the patient developed a thyroid storm second to iodinated contrast medium injection. Proper treatment was provided and the patient had a good outcome. We present this case of an unusual presentation of a thyroid storm with cardiac arrest. This case illustrates that evaluating thyroid function tests in patients with an enlarged thyroid prior to the administration of iodinated contrast medium could prevent the development of thyroid storm.

  5. Extreme Geoelectric Fields Induced By Magnetic Storm Sudden Impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. J.; Rigler, E. J.; Swidinsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    Large magnetic storms, as quantified by the Dst index, can produce geoelectric fields that are hazardous for the operation of electric power grids. The great storm of March 1989, for example, had the highest -Dst value of the 20th century. During the main phase of this storm, rapid magnetic variation induced geoelectric fields in the Earth's lithosphere that caused the complete collapse of the Canadian Hydro-Québec electric-power grid. In this study, we focus specifically on how sudden impulses in geomagnetic activity, those that occur during large storms, can induce geoelectric fields. These impulses can be seen during storm main phases, but they are most usually recognized as storm sudden commencements corresponding to the arrival, at Earth, of coronal mass ejections. We use a newly developed algorithm for estimating induced geoelectric fields from magnetic field variation recorded at ground-based observatories. We train the algorithm on 1-sec geomagnetic and geoelectric field data collected at Japanese observatories during the October 2003 Halloween storm. We then postdict geoelectric fields that would have been realized (but not directly measured at 1-sec resolution) in Japan during the 1989 Québec storm and during another intense storm that occurred in March 1991. The later storm is noteworthy, not because of its intense main phase, but because it commenced with a sudden impulse of enormous magnitude. For the first half minute of the 1991 storm, induced geoelectric fields far exceeded those realized during the 1989 storm. Recognizing the potential hazard, we also analyze a scenario geomagnetic time series of an extreme event sudden commencement, and we calculate the geoelectric fields that this scenario event might plausibly induce. Results show that substantial geoelectric field induction, possibly hazardous for electric power grids, can occur briefly but very abruptly as soon as a magnetic storm commences.

  6. Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, B.

    1983-01-01

    Historical aspects of electricity are reviewed with individual articles on hydroelectric dams, coal-burning power plants, nuclear power plants, electricity distribution, and the energy future. A glossary is included. (PSB)

  7. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  8. Storm Surge Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morss, R. E.; Fossell, K.; Ahijevych, D.; Davis, C. A.; Snyder, C.

    2016-12-01

    Storm surge is one of the most dangerous hazards of hurricanes; it results in devastating flooding and billions of dollars in damage to coastal regions and is one of the primary hurricane threats for loss of life. As such it is of great interest to better understand the probability of significant storm surge occurrence and the potential extent of impact at longer lead times to give emergency managers adequate time to plan for necessary evacuation and protective measures. This work aims to quantify the practical predictability of storm surge at various lead times and the sensitivity of the storm surge to storm parameters such as track, strength, size, and translation speed. This study also draws a distinction between inundation of a fixed region and inundation following the storm landfall location as the track varies. The latter is not usually considered, but is important for identifying particularly dangerous scenarios within the envelope of possible realizations. We quantify the predictability of storm surge from both the local and storm-following perspectives. The ADCIRC model is used to produce an ensemble of storm surge simulations. The ensemble is generated in an idealized context where the model is driven by best track data and perturbations from the best track (e.g. storm track, maximum wind, storm speed, and storm size). Inundation metrics are computed for both storm-following inundation and location-based inundation to better understand the predictive nature. While the magnitude of maximum inundation at a point is often emphasized in storm surge prediction studies, this study focuses on integrated metrics such as inundation volume and spatial extent of inundation along the coast and inland. Results will be presented from simulations of Hurricane Ike, Hurricane Charley, and a hypothetical storm that combines the size and intensity of Hurricane Charley over the track of Hurricane Ike, to demonstrate the sensitivity of inundation to a certain storm of certain

  9. Subtropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The circling clouds of an intense low-pressure system sat off the southeast coast of the United States on May 8, 2007, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image. By the following morning, the storm developed enough to be classified as a subtropical storm, a storm that forms outside of the tropics, but has many of the characteristics--hurricane-force winds, driving rains, low pressure, and sometimes an eye--of a tropical storm. Although it arrived several weeks shy of the official start of the hurricane season (June 1), Subtropical Storm Andrea became the first named storm of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season. The storm has the circular shape of a tropical cyclone in this image, but lacks the tight organization seen in more powerful storms. By May 9, the storm's winds reached 75 kilometers per hour (45 miles per hour), and the storm was not predicted to get any stronger, said the National Hurricane Center. Though Subtropical Storm Andrea was expected to remain offshore, its strong winds and high waves pummeled coastal states, prompting a tropical storm watch. The winds fueled wild fires (marked with red boxes) in Georgia and Florida. The wind-driven flames generated thick plumes of smoke that concentrated in a gray-brown mass over Tampa Bay, Florida. Unfortunately for Georgia and Florida, which are experiencing moderate to severe drought, Subtropical Storm Andrea was not predicted to bring significant rain to the region right away, according to reports on the Washington Post Website.

  10. Contactless magnetocardiographic mapping in anesthetized Wistar rats: evidence of age-related changes of cardiac electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, Donatella; Caristo, Maria Emiliana; Fenici, Riccardo

    2006-07-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) is the recording of the magnetic field (MF) generated by cardiac electrophysiological activity. Because it is a contactless method, MCG is ideal for noninvasive cardiac mapping of small experimental animals. The aim of this study was to assess age-related changes of cardiac intervals and ventricular repolarization (VR) maps in intact rats by means of MCG mapping. Twenty-four adult Wistar rats (12 male and 12 female) were studied, under anesthesia, with the same unshielded 36-channel MCG instrumentation used for clinical recordings. Two sets of measurements were obtained from each animal: 1) at 5 mo of age (297.5 +/- 21 g body wt) and 2) at 14 mo of age (516.8 +/- 180 g body wt). RR and PR intervals, QRS segment, and QTpeak, QTend, JTpeak, JTend, and Tpeak-end were measured from MCG waveforms. MCG imaging was automatically obtained as MF maps and as inverse localization of cardiac sources with equivalent current dipole and effective magnetic dipole models. After 300 s of continuous recording were averaged, the signal-to-noise ratio was adequate for study of atrial and ventricular MF maps and for three-dimensional localization of the underlying cardiac sources. Clear-cut age-related differences in VR duration were demonstrated by significantly longer QTend, JTend, and Tpeak-end in older Wistar rats. Reproducible multisite noninvasive cardiac mapping of anesthetized rats is simpler with MCG methodology than with ECG recording. In addition, MCG mapping provides new information based on quantitative analysis of MF and equivalent sources. In this study, statistically significant age-dependent variations in VR intervals were found.

  11. Characterizing Extreme Ionospheric Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ionospheric storms consist of disturbances of the upper atmosphere that generate regions of enhanced electron density typically lasting several hours. Depending upon the storm magnitude, gradients in electron density can sometimes become large and highly localized. The existence of such localized, dense irregularities is a major source of positioning error for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Consequently, satellite-based augmentation systems have been implemented to improve the accuracy and to ensure the integrity of user position estimates derived from GPS measurements. Large-scale irregularities generally do not pose a serious threat to estimate integrity as they can be readily detected by such systems. Of greater concern, however, are highly localized irregularities that interfere with the propagation of a signal detected by a user measurement but are poorly sampled by the receivers in the system network. The most challenging conditions have been found to arise following disturbances of large magnitude that occur only rarely over the course of a solar cycle. These extremely disturbed conditions exhibit behavior distinct from moderately disturbed conditions and, hence, have been designated "extreme storms". In this paper we examine and compare the behavior of the extreme ionospheric storms of solar cycle 23 (or, more precisely, extreme storms occurring between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2008), as represented in maps of vertical total electron content. To identify these storms, we present a robust means of quantifying the regional magnitude of an ionospheric storm. Ionospheric storms are observed frequently to occur in conjunction with magnetic storms, i.e., periods of geophysical activity as measured by magnetometers. While various geomagnetic indices, such as the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the planetary Kp index, have long been used to rank the magnitudes of distinct magnetic storms, no comparable, generally recognized index exists for

  12. Transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells improves cardiac contractile function and electrical stability in a rat myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Milan; Fujita, Daiki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Ichikawa, Hinako; Izawa, Atsushi; Hirose, Masamichi; Kashihara, Toshihide; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Shiba, Yuji

    2015-04-01

    The transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) improves cardiac contractility after myocardial infarction (MI); however, little is known about the electrophysiological consequences of transplantation. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the transplantation of ADSCs increases or decreases the incidence of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) in a rat model of MI. MI was induced experimentally by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending artery of Lewis rats. ADSCs were harvested from GFP-transgenic rats, and were cultured until passage four. ADSCs (10×10(6)) resuspended in 100μL saline or pro-survival cocktail (PSC), which enhances cardiac graft survival, were injected directly into syngeneic rat hearts 1week after MI. The recipients of ADSCs suspended in PSC had a larger graft area compared with those receiving ASDCs suspended in saline at 1week post-transplantation (number of graft cells/section: 148.7±10.6 vs. 22.4±3.4, p<0.05, n=5/group). Thereafter, all ADSC recipients were transplanted with ASDCs in PSC. ADSCs were transplanted into infarcted hearts, and the mechanical and electrophysiological functions were assessed. Echocardiography revealed that ADSC recipients had improved contractile function compared with those receiving PSC vehicle (fractional shortening: 21.1±0.9 vs. 14.1±1.2, p<0.05, n≥12/group). Four weeks post-transplantation, VT was induced via in vivo programmed electrical stimulation. The recipients of ADSCs showed a significantly lower incidence of induced VT compared with the control (31.3% vs. 83.3%, p<0.05, n≥12/group). To understand the electrical activity following transplantation, we performed ex vivo optical mapping using a voltage sensitive dye, and found that ADSC transplantation decreased conduction velocity and its dispersion in the peri-infarct area. These results suggest that ADSC transplantation improved cardiac mechanical and electrophysiological functions in subacute MI.

  13. Beneficial triple-site cardiac resynchronization in a patient supported with an intra-aortic balloon pump for end-stage heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ciszewski, Jan; Maciąg, Aleksander; Gepner, Katarzyna; Smolis-Bąk, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 62-year-old male patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and end-stage heart failure supported with an intra-aortic balloon pump. Implantation of a triple-site cardiac resynchronization system and complex heart failure treatment brought a significant improvement, return to home activity and 17-month survival. The patient died due to heart failure aggravation. Within this time he was rehospitalized and successfully treated twice for an electrical storm. PMID:24799927

  14. Beneficial triple-site cardiac resynchronization in a patient supported with an intra-aortic balloon pump for end-stage heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ciszewski, Jan; Maciąg, Aleksander; Gepner, Katarzyna; Smolis-Bąk, Edyta; Sterliński, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 62-year-old male patient with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator and end-stage heart failure supported with an intra-aortic balloon pump. Implantation of a triple-site cardiac resynchronization system and complex heart failure treatment brought a significant improvement, return to home activity and 17-month survival. The patient died due to heart failure aggravation. Within this time he was rehospitalized and successfully treated twice for an electrical storm.

  15. Tropical Storm Ana

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    ISS043E182261 (05/08/2015) --- This image of Tropical Storm Anna taken from the International Space Station displays the view looking south-southeastward from western Virginia towards storm about 200 miles east of Savannah, Georgia, Bahamas and Florida in the distance. Expedition 43 NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and his crewmates captured many images of the Earth showing the storms progression onto the Carolina's and other east coast states.

  16. Coastal Storm Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-30

    MILL IBARS I ~ 1022.8. 0 SEA I LND 0’ 100 A-STORM TRACK 200 :km. NORTH; B-STORM TRACK 0_____. T% WO - X00 SHORE SITEI C-STORM TRACK 300 SOU 00 .) -400 0...SCOTIA CANADA PRUF. C. . A. M._KING D PARTMENT IF GFOGRAPHY JR. H. J. SCHOEMAKER _1,NIVELSITY UF NOTT INGHAM . ... W ATFRLOUPKUNDIG LARIORATORIUM TE

  17. Global ionospheric disturbances during super magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Foster, J.; Rideout, W.; Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L.

    2005-12-01

    Magnetic storms represent the largest disturbances in the magnetosphere and ionosphere. We will present the ionospheric observations by the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar, global GPS network, and TIMED GUVI instrument during two super storms. The sudden commencement (SSC) of the 15 July 2000 storm occurred at 19 UT, and the minimum Dst reached -301 nT. The dayside midlatitude ionospheric F region electron density showed a sudden decrease at Millstone Hill and Eglin in response to the SSC. The elevation scan measurements of the Millstone HIll radar show that the sudden decrease in the ionospheric electron density was related to an electron density trough which had an equatorward boundary at Eglin (magnetic latitude 41 degree) at 16 MLT. The formation of the trough may be related to equatorward incursion of the disturbance SAPS electric field. The dayside TEC decreased significantly at the equatorial and upper midlatitudes, and an enhanced TEC band occurred between the depleted regions. The SSC of the 29 October 2003 storm occurred at 07 UT, the storm was further enhanced at 18 UT, and the minimum Dst reached -363 nT. The Millstone Hill radar also detected a sudden decrease of the dayside F region electron density immediately after the storm enhancement. The simultaneous TIMED GUVI measurements show a significant decrease in the O/N2 ratio over the Atlantic sector from the auroral zone to anomaly latitudes, and large TEC depletions occurred coincidentally with the O/N2 decrease. In this second case, both the enhanced electric field and decrease of O/N2 ratio contributed to the depletion of the dayside midlatitude F-region electron density and TEC. The multiple measurements during the two storms reveal the distinct properties and mechanisms of the global ionospheric disturbances.

  18. Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric storms can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. Storm time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric storms are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the storm of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous storm of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the storms. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting storm time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.

  19. Tropical Storm Ana

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-05-08

    ISS043E182270 (05/08/2015) --- NASA astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted this image of Subtropical Storm Anna as it moved toward the US east coast on May 8th, 2015. Scott added this comment to his tweet: "Subtropical Storm #Ana churns off the East coast of USA. #Wx from @Space_Station. #YearInSpace."

  20. Tropical Storm Katrina

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-25

    Tropical Storm Katrina is shown here as observed by NASA QuikScatsatellite on August 25, 2005, at 08:37 UTC 4:37 a.m. in Florida. At this time, the storm had 80 kilometers per hour 50 miles per hour; 43 knots sustained winds.

  1. Cardiac electrical defects in progeroid mice and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome patients with nuclear lamina alterations.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, José; Calvo, Conrado J; Llach, Anna; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Caballero, Ricardo; González-Gómez, Cristina; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis J; Guadix, Juan A; Osorio, Fernando G; López-Otín, Carlos; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benítez, Raul; Gordon, Leslie B; Jalife, José; Pérez-Pomares, José M; Tamargo, Juan; Delpón, Eva; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Andrés, Vicente

    2016-11-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disease caused by defective prelamin A processing, leading to nuclear lamina alterations, severe cardiovascular pathology, and premature death. Prelamin A alterations also occur in physiological aging. It remains unknown how defective prelamin A processing affects the cardiac rhythm. We show age-dependent cardiac repolarization abnormalities in HGPS patients that are also present in the Zmpste24(-/-) mouse model of HGPS. Challenge of Zmpste24(-/-) mice with the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol did not trigger ventricular arrhythmia but caused bradycardia-related premature ventricular complexes and slow-rate polymorphic ventricular rhythms during recovery. Patch-clamping in Zmpste24(-/-) cardiomyocytes revealed prolonged calcium-transient duration and reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium loading and release, consistent with the absence of isoproterenol-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Zmpste24(-/-) progeroid mice also developed severe fibrosis-unrelated bradycardia and PQ interval and QRS complex prolongation. These conduction defects were accompanied by overt mislocalization of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43). Remarkably, Cx43 mislocalization was also evident in autopsied left ventricle tissue from HGPS patients, suggesting intercellular connectivity alterations at late stages of the disease. The similarities between HGPS patients and progeroid mice reported here strongly suggest that defective cardiac repolarization and cardiomyocyte connectivity are important abnormalities in the HGPS pathogenesis that increase the risk of arrhythmia and premature death.

  2. Cardiac electrical defects in progeroid mice and Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome patients with nuclear lamina alterations

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, José; Calvo, Conrado J.; Llach, Anna; Guzmán-Martínez, Gabriela; Caballero, Ricardo; González-Gómez, Cristina; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis J.; Guadix, Juan A.; Osorio, Fernando G.; López-Otín, Carlos; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benítez, Raul; Gordon, Leslie B.; Pérez-Pomares, José M.; Tamargo, Juan; Delpón, Eva; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Andrés, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disease caused by defective prelamin A processing, leading to nuclear lamina alterations, severe cardiovascular pathology, and premature death. Prelamin A alterations also occur in physiological aging. It remains unknown how defective prelamin A processing affects the cardiac rhythm. We show age-dependent cardiac repolarization abnormalities in HGPS patients that are also present in the Zmpste24−/− mouse model of HGPS. Challenge of Zmpste24−/− mice with the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol did not trigger ventricular arrhythmia but caused bradycardia-related premature ventricular complexes and slow-rate polymorphic ventricular rhythms during recovery. Patch-clamping in Zmpste24−/− cardiomyocytes revealed prolonged calcium-transient duration and reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium loading and release, consistent with the absence of isoproterenol-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Zmpste24−/− progeroid mice also developed severe fibrosis-unrelated bradycardia and PQ interval and QRS complex prolongation. These conduction defects were accompanied by overt mislocalization of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43). Remarkably, Cx43 mislocalization was also evident in autopsied left ventricle tissue from HGPS patients, suggesting intercellular connectivity alterations at late stages of the disease. The similarities between HGPS patients and progeroid mice reported here strongly suggest that defective cardiac repolarization and cardiomyocyte connectivity are important abnormalities in the HGPS pathogenesis that increase the risk of arrhythmia and premature death. PMID:27799555

  3. Effects of a geomagnetic storm on thermospheric circulation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The motions of the thermosphere and its interactions with the ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm are of current interest to space scientists. A two-dimensional model was used to simulate the thermospheric response to the impulsive high-latitude heating associated with a geomagnetic storm. The storm-induced motions can be characterized by an initial period of transient waves followed by the development of a mean circulation. These motions generate an electrical-current system that is on the same order of magnitude as, and in the opposite sense to the normal s/sub q/ current system. Model-simulated winds and electrical currents were then compared to observations.

  4. Gamma Rays from Martian Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, Shahab; Majid, Walid; Dwyer, Joseph; Rassoul, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    Martian dust storms are suggested to be able to generate electric fields close to the breakdown values for Mars' atmosphere, i.e. 25 kV/m [Farrel et al. 2006]. Such electric fields could initiate large electrostatic discharges on Mars [Ruf et al. 2009]. Additionally, similar to terrestrial thunderstorms, they might also be able to produce bright bursts of X-rays and gamma rays. On Earth, thunderstorm electric fields could produce avalanche of energetic electrons from single seed electron, through Møller scattering with air atoms and molecules. The process is called Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA), and can then generate large flux of X-rays and gamma rays through bremsstrahlung scattering. In this presentation, we have used detailed Monte Carlo simulations to study the possibility of producing large flux of energetic photon from a RREA-like mechanism inside Martian dust storms.

  5. Dust storms: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Dust storms have a number of impacts upon the environment including radiative forcing, and biogeochemical cycling. They transport material over many thousands of kilometres. They also have a range of impacts on humans, not least on human health. In recent years the identification of source areas for dust storms has been an important area or research, with the Sahara (especially Bodélé) and western China being recognised as the strongest sources globally. Another major development has been the recognition of the degree to which dust storm activity has varied at a range of time scales, millennial, century, decadal, annual and seasonal.

  6. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  7. Feline thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Ward, Cynthia R

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid storm is a syndrome described in human medicine to define a multisystemic disorder resulting from organ exposure to excessive levels of thyroid hormone. This form of acute thyrotoxicosis, although uncommon, can be life threatening and is a significant cause of mortality in human emergency rooms. Although thyroid storm is a well-recognized clinical entity in human medicine, it has not been described in veterinary medicine. This article discusses the human syndrome and defines a similar syndrome in hyperthyroid veterinary patients. The clinical signs of and treatment modalities for feline thyroid storm are also presented.

  8. Decameter storm radiation. I. [solar radio bursts and noise storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gergely, T. E.; Erickson, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the evolution of six decametric storms which took place during the period from January to August, 1971. The storms described were observed with a swept frequency interferometer. The array consists of sixteen log-periodic antennas, equally spaced on a two mile east-west baseline. The association of storms with optical activity and photospheric fields is considered along with the relation of decametric storms to coronal magnetic fields and the association of storms with decimeter and meter wavelength activity. It is shown that decametric storms are always associated with storms at the meter and decimeter wavelengths.

  9. Lightning parameterization in a storm electrification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Farley, Richard D.; Wu, Gang

    1988-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in our Storm Electrification Model. The initiation, propagation direction, termination and charge redistribution of the discharge are approximated assuming overall charge neutrality. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred have been done. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges, electric field components and electrical energy depend strongly on the charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge show favorable agreement.

  10. When the storm passes unnoticed--a case series of thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Su Yin Adeline; Chew, Huck Chin

    2007-06-01

    Thyroid crisis is an acute manifestation of thyrotoxicosis. Approximately 1-2% of patients progress to a thyroid storm, often precipitated by a physiologically stressful event. If unrecognized or left untreated, thyroid storm may result in cardiovascular collapse and death. We describe three patients who presented to the Emergency Department of Singapore General Hospital in a thyroid storm. They had complications of thyrocardiac disease with heart failure and arrhythmias. An analysis of case records of patients presenting to the emergency department of Singapore General Hospital with a primary diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis was made over the period of 2004-2005. Three patients with thyroid storm were identified. All the patients presented heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias (1 atrial flutter, 2 atrial fibrillation). Thyroid storm is a rare manifestation of thyrotoxicosis, usually occurring in females during the third to sixth decades of life. Serious complications such as heart failure and hypotension resulting in cardiovascular collapse and death may occur. Our case series consists of young males presenting with thyrocardiac failure. One patient was treated with beta-blockers and another with calcium channel blockers. Both developed cardiovascular collapse. The third patient was managed with digoxin with a good outcome. The current pathophysiology and therapeutic options are explored. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in young males presenting with heart failure and arrhythmia.

  11. Tropical Storm Faxai

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite provided data of developing Tropical Storm Faxai to make this 3-D image that showed some towering thunderstorms in the area were reaching altitudes of up to 15.5km/~9.6 m...

  12. Tropical Storm Dolly Develops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Aug. 31-Sept. 2 shows the movement of a low pressure area from the western Caribbean Sea over the Yucatan Peninsula as it becomes Tropical Storm ...

  13. Autumn Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-405, 28 June 2003

    Autumn on the martian northern plains means clouds and dust storms. As autumn got underway in early May 2003, large dust storms began to form on the northern plains and sweep their way eastward--and sometimes southward--bringing colder air down from the north polar cap, now shrouded in darkness and clouds. This early autumn view, assembled from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global images, shows an eastward-moving dust storm on the plains north of Cydonia and western Arabia Terra. The storm is nearly as big as the continental United States are wide, from west to east. In this image, north is toward the top, east to the right, and sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  14. Powerful Midwest Storm System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation of imagery from NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite shows themovement of storm systems in the south central United States on May 20,2013. Warm, moist gulf air flowing across Texas, Oklahoma...

  15. 2001 Leonid Meteoroid Storm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    and discuss their possible consequences and mitigation strategies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Meteors , Leonids, Meteoroids, Spacecraft, Meteor showers , Impact...release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We present the latest predictions about the November 2001 Leonid Meteor storms

  16. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Radio noise continuum emission observed in metric and decametric wave frequencies is discussed. The radio noise is associated with actively varying sunspot groups accompanied by the S-component of microwave radio emissions. It is shown that the S-component emission in microwave frequencies generally occurs several days before the emission of the noise continuum storms of lower frequencies. It is likely that energetic electrons, 10 to 100 Kev, accelerated in association with the variation of sunspot magnetic fields, are the sources of the radio emissions. A model is considered to explain the relation of burst storms on radio noise. An analysis of the role of energetic electrons on the emissions of both noise continuum and type III burst storms is presented. It is shown that instabilities associated with the electrons and their relation to their own stabilizing effects are important in interpreting both of these storms.

  17. Tropical Storm Debbie

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-27

    iss050e060444 (03/27/2017) --- Tropical Cyclone Debbie as photographed by crewmembers aboard the International Space Station on March 27, 2017. The large storm made landfall across the northeastern coast of Australia on March 28.

  18. Tropical Storm Don

    NASA Image and Video Library

    GOES-13 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the development of Tropical Storm Don in the southern Gulf of Mexico, west of Cuba. The animation run...

  19. Storm surge and tidal range energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew; Angeloudis, Athanasios; Robins, Peter; Evans, Paul; Neill, Simon

    2017-04-01

    The need to reduce carbon-based energy sources whilst increasing renewable energy forms has led to concerns of intermittency within a national electricity supply strategy. The regular rise and fall of the tide makes prediction almost entirely deterministic compared to other stochastic renewable energy forms; therefore, tidal range energy is often stated as a predictable and firm renewable energy source. Storm surge is the term used for the non-astronomical forcing of tidal elevation, and is synonymous with coastal flooding because positive storm surges can elevate water-levels above the height of coastal flood defences. We hypothesis storm surges will affect the reliability of the tidal range energy resource; with negative surge events reducing the tidal range, and conversely, positive surge events increasing the available resource. Moreover, tide-surge interaction, which results in positive storm surges more likely to occur on a flooding tide, will reduce the annual tidal range energy resource estimate. Water-level data (2000-2012) at nine UK tide gauges, where the mean tidal amplitude is above 2.5m and thus suitable for tidal-range energy development (e.g. Bristol Channel), were used to predict tidal range power with a 0D modelling approach. Storm surge affected the annual resource estimate by between -5% to +3%, due to inter-annual variability. Instantaneous power output were significantly affected (Normalised Root Mean Squared Error: 3%-8%, Scatter Index: 15%-41%) with spatial variability and variability due to operational strategy. We therefore find a storm surge affects the theoretical reliability of tidal range power, such that a prediction system may be required for any future electricity generation scenario that includes large amounts of tidal-range energy; however, annual resource estimation from astronomical tides alone appears sufficient for resource estimation. Future work should investigate water-level uncertainties on the reliability and

  20. Science and Measurement of Global Ionospheric Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    2007-12-01

    Recent observations are revealing surprising features of global ionospheric storms that defy simple explanation. We review new and recently published results that define new science questions regarding these storms. Geomagnetic storms have been studied for decades and possible physical mechanisms for the observed ionospheric variability have been proposed. The increased availability of data from numerous Global Positioning System receivers has revealed new qualtitative and quantitative behavior that earlier observations did not resolve. This has led to new science questions ranging from fundamental physics to collective behavior of the ionosphere as part of the larger geospace "system." Analysis of multiple storms reveals new patterns of commonality across multiple events, but also variations in response that are not easily explained. Certain aspects of the global dynamics are a manifestation of long-range electromagnetic forces at work on planetary scales. Energy and mass coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere are significant, suggesting that understanding geospace cannot be achieved by focusing on a single regime (such as ionosphere alone, or magnetosphere alone). The interface between the magnetosphere and the solar wind is clearly important also and influenced by ionospheric dynamics. Observations show that spatial and temporal dynamics encompass all scales (from minutes to days, from tens of meters to planetary scale). The neutral thermosphere dynamics strongly influences the storm time response, but understanding of the many possible responses is incomplete. The wide variety of phenomena exhibited during geospace storms has renewed the debate about basic physical processes that might be operating. Not surprisingly, fundamental physical mechanisms are being reexamined such as: shielding of electric fields by the conducting ionosphere, and the role of electric fields in plasma drift. Recent modeling work suggests that the role of the complex plasma

  1. Merging Saturnian Storms

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-08

    Three months before its scheduled arrival at Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft has observed two storms in the act of merging. With diameters close to 1,000 kilometers (621 miles), both storms, which appear as spots in the southern hemisphere, were seen moving west, relative to the rotation of Saturn's interior, for about a month before they merged on March 19 through 20, 2004. This set of eight images was taken between Feb. 22 and March 22, 2004. The top four frames span 26 days. They are portions of images from the narrow angle camera taken through a filter accepting light in the near-infrared region of the spectrum centered at 619 nanometers, and they show two storms approaching each other. Both storms are located at 36 degrees south latitude and sit in an anti-cyclonic shear zone, which means that the flow to the north is westward relative to the flow to the south. Consequently, the northern storm moves westward at a slightly greater rate than the southern one, 11 meters versus 6 meters per second (25 and 13 mph), respectively. The storms drift with these currents and engage in a counterclockwise dance before merging with each other. The bottom four frames are from images taken on March 19, 20, 21 and 22, in a region of the spectrum visible to the human eye; they illustrate the storms' evolution. Just after the merger, on March 20, the new feature is elongated in the north-south direction, with bright clouds on either end. Two days later, on March 22, the storm has settled into a more circular shape, and the bright clouds have spread around the circumference to form a halo. Whether the bright clouds are particles of a different composition or simply at a different altitude is uncertain. The new storm is a few tenths of a degree farther south than either of its progenitors. There, its westward velocity is weaker, and it is almost stationary relative to the planet's rotation. Although these particular storms move slowly west, storms at Saturn's equator move east at

  2. Enhanced inotropic state of the failing left ventricle by cardiac contractility modulation electrical signals is not associated with increased myocardial oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Butter, Christian; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Schlegl, Michael; Winbeck, Georgia; Fleck, Eckart; Sabbah, Hani N

    2007-03-01

    Previous studies in patients and in dogs with experimentally induced heart failure (HF) showed that electrical signals applied to the failing myocardium during the absolute refractory period improved left ventricular (LV) function. We examined the effects these same cardiac contractility modulating (CCM) electrical signals on myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO(2)) in both patients and dogs with chronic HF. Six dogs with microembolizations-induced HF and 9 HF patients underwent CCM leads and generator (OPTIMIZER II) implantation. After baseline measurements, CCM signals were delivered continuously for 2 hours in dogs and for 30 minutes in patients. MVO(2) was measured before and after CCM therapy. In dogs, CCM therapy increased LV ejection fraction at 2 hours (26 +/- 1 versus 31 +/- 2 %, P = .001) without increasing MVO(2) (257 +/- 41 versus 180 +/- 34 micromol/min). In patients, CCM therapy increased LV peak +dP/dt by 10.1 +/- 1.5 %. As with dogs, the increase in LV function after 30 minutes of CCM therapy was not associated with increased MVO(2) (13.6 +/- 9.7 versus 12.5 +/- 7.2 mL O(2)/min). The study results suggest that unlike cAMP-dependent positive inotropic drugs, the increase in LV function during CCM therapy is elicited without increasing MVO(2).

  3. Control of a rotary pulsatile cardiac assist pump driven by an electric motor without a pressure sensor to avoid collapse of the pump inlet.

    PubMed

    Trinkl, J; Havlik, P; Mesana, T; Mitsui, N; Morita, S; Demunck, J L; Tourres, J L; Monties, J R

    1993-01-01

    Our ventricular assist device uses a valveless volumetric pump operating on the Maillard-Wankel rotary principle. It is driven by an electric motor and provides a semi pulsatile flow. At each cycle, blood is actively aspirated into the device, and overpumping results in collapse at the pump inlet. To prevent overpumping, it is necessary to ensure that pump intake does not exceed venous return. Poor long-term reliability rules out the use of current implantable pressure sensors for this purpose. To resolve this problem, we have developed a method of control based on monitoring of the intensity of electric current consumed by the motor. The method consists of real time monitoring of current intensity at the beginning of each pump cycle. A sudden change in intensity indicates underfilling, and motor speed is reduced to prevent collapse. The current consumed by the motor also depends on the afterload, but the form of the signal remains the same when afterload changes. After demonstrating the feasibility of this technique in a simulator, we are now testing it in animals. We were able to detect and prevent collapse due to overpumping by the cardiac assist device. This system also enables us to know the maximum possible assistance and to thus adapt assistance to the user.

  4. Cardiac optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Entcheva, Emilia

    2013-05-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart.

  5. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  6. Longer Left Ventricular Electric Delay Reduces Mitral Regurgitation After Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: Mechanistic Insights From the SMART-AV Study (SmartDelay Determined AV Optimization: A Comparison to Other AV Delay Methods Used in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Neal A; Gold, Michael R; Waggoner, Alan D; Picard, Michael H; Stein, Kenneth M; Yu, Yinghong; Meyer, Timothy E; Wold, Nicholas; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Singh, Jagmeet P

    2016-11-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is associated with worse survival in those undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Left ventricular (LV) lead position in CRT may ameliorate mechanisms of MR. We examine the association between a longer LV electric delay (QLV) at the LV stimulation site and MR reduction after CRT. QLV was assessed retrospectively in 426 patients enrolled in the SMART-AV study (SmartDelay Determined AV Optimization: A Comparison to Other AV Delay Methods Used in CRT). QLV was defined as the time from QRS onset to the first large peak of the LV electrogram. Linear regression and logistic regression were used to assess the association between baseline QLV and MR reduction at 6 months (absolute change in vena contracta width and odds of ≥1 grade reduction in MR). At baseline, there was no difference in MR grade, LV dyssynchrony, or LV volumes in those with QLV above versus below the median (95 ms). After multivariable adjustment, increasing QLV was an independent predictor of MR reduction at 6 months as reflected by an increased odds of MR response (odds ratio: 1.13 [1.03-1.25]/10 ms increase QLV; P=0.02) and a decrease in vena contracta width (P<0.001). At 3 months, longer QLV (≥median) was associated with significant decrease in LV end-systolic volume (ΔLV end-systolic volume -28.2±38.9 versus -4.9±33.8 mL, P<0.001). Adjustment for 3-month ΔLV end-systolic volume attenuated the association between QLV and 6-month MR reduction. In patients undergoing CRT, longer QLV was an independent predictor of MR reduction at 6 months and associated with interval 3-month LV reverse remodeling. These findings provide a mechanistic basis for using an electric-targeting LV lead strategy at the time of CRT implant. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Cardiac contractility modulation by electric currents applied during the refractory period in patients with heart failure secondary to ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pappone, Carlo; Rosanio, Salvatore; Burkhoff, Daniel; Mika, Yuval; Vicedomini, Gabriele; Augello, Giuseppe; Shemer, Itzhak; Prutchi, David; Haddad, Walid; Aviv, Ricardo; Snir, Yehuda; Kronzon, Itzhak; Alfieri, Ottavio; Ben-Haim, Shlomo A

    2002-12-15

    We assessed the feasibility of cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) by electric currents applied during the refractory period in patients with heart failure (HF). Extracellular electric currents modulating action potential and calcium transients have been shown to potentiate myocardial contractility in vitro and in animal models of chronic HF. CCM signals were biphasic square-wave pulses with adjustable amplitude, duration, and time delay from sensing of local electric activity. Signals were applied to the left ventricle through an epicardial vein (in 12 patients) or to the right ventricular (RV) aspect of the septum endocardially (in 6 patients). Simultaneous left ventricular (LV) and aortic pressure measurements were performed using a Millar catheter (Millar Instruments, Houston, Texas). Hemodynamics during RV temporary dual-chamber pacing was regarded as the control condition. Both LV and RV CCM stimulation increased dP/dt(max) to a similar degree (9.1 +/- 4.5% and 7.1 +/- 0.8%, respectively; p <0.01 vs controls), with associated aortic pulse pressure changes of 10.3 +/- 7.2% and 10.8 +/- 1.1% (p <0.01 vs controls). Regional systolic wall motion assessed quantitatively by color kinesis echocardiography was markedly enhanced near the CCM electrode, and the area of increased contractility involved 4.6 +/- 1.2 segments per patient. In 6 patients with HF with left bundle branch block, CCM signals delivered during biventricular pacing (BVP) produced an additional 16.1 +/- 3.7% increase in dP/dt(max) and a 17.0 +/- 7.5% increase in pulse pressure compared with BVP alone (p <0.01). CCM stimulation in patients with HF enhanced regional and global measures of LV systolic function, regardless of the varied delivery chamber or whether modulation was performed during RV pacing or BVP.

  8. Genetics of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Bezzina, Connie R; Lahrouchi, Najim; Priori, Silvia G

    2015-06-05

    Sudden cardiac death occurs in a broad spectrum of cardiac pathologies and is an important cause of mortality in the general population. Genetic studies conducted during the past 20 years have markedly illuminated the genetic basis of the inherited cardiac disorders associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review the genetic basis of sudden cardiac death with a focus on the current knowledge on the genetics of the primary electric disorders caused primarily by mutations in genes encoding ion channels, and the cardiomyopathies, which have been attributed to mutations in genes encoding a broader category of proteins, including those of the sarcomere, the cytoskeleton, and desmosomes. We discuss the challenges currently faced in unraveling genetic factors that predispose to sudden cardiac death in the setting of sequela of coronary artery disease and present the genome-wide association studies conducted in recent years on electrocardiographic parameters, highlighting their potential in uncovering new biological insights into cardiac electric function.

  9. The relationship of storm severity to directionally resolved radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to provide continuous observation of atmospheric electrical activity occurring in association with tropical storms in the Gulf of Mexico. The observations were to include the location of all detected intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning activity occurring in the storm. To provide synoptic scale coverage, a phase linear interferometer high frequency direction finder (HFDF) system was constructed and developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This was used in concert with the existing HFDF interferometer at the southwest research institute to provide lightning location data through triangulation. Atmospheric electrical events were synchronized through the use of satellite receivers at each site. The intent of the data analysis was to correlate the location of electrical centers of activity with radar and satellite imagry to identify areas of intense convection within the tropical storm system. Analysis of the hurricane Alicia data indicate a center of atmospheric electrical activity associated with the vortex of the storm. The center appears to rotate from the Northern side of the vortex to the Southern side during the period of observation. An analysis of the atmospheric electrical burst rates associated with hurrican Alicia indicates that the electrical activity appears to maximize at the time of greatest storm intensity, i.e., maximum winds and lowest central pressure.

  10. Coastal storm monitoring in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.; Bennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Coastal communities in Virginia are prone to flooding, particularly during hurricanes, nor’easters, and other coastal low-pressure systems. These weather systems affect public safety, personal and public property, and valuable infrastructure, such as transportation, water and sewer, and electric-supply networks. Local emergency managers, utility operators, and the public are tasked with making difficult decisions regarding evacuations, road closures, and post-storm recovery efforts as a result of coastal flooding. In coastal Virginia these decisions often are made on the basis of anecdotal knowledge from past events or predictions based on data from monitoring sites located far away from the affected area that may not reflect local conditions. Preventing flood hazards, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, from becoming human disasters requires an understanding of the relative risks that flooding poses to specific communities. The risk to life and property can be very high if decisions about evacuations and road closures are made too late or not at all.

  11. Inter-individual variability and modeling of electrical activity: a possible new approach to explore cardiac safety?

    PubMed Central

    Le Guennec, Jean-Yves; Thireau, Jérôme; Ouillé, Aude; Roussel, Julien; Roy, Jérôme; Richard, Serge; Richard, Sylvain; Martel, Eric; Champéroux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Safety pharmacology aims to predict rare side effects of new drugs. We explored whether rare pro-arrhythmic effects could be linked to the variability of the effects of these drugs on ion currents and whether taking into consideration this variability in computational models could help to better detect and predict cardiac side effects. For this purpose, we evaluated how intra- and inter-individual variability influences the effect of hERG inhibition on both the action potential duration and the occurrence of arrhythmias. Using two computer simulation models of human action potentials (endocardial and Purkinje cells), we analyzed the contribution of two biological parameters on the pro-arrhythmic effects of several hERG channel blockers: (i) spermine concentration, which varies with metabolic status, and (ii) L-type calcium conductance, which varies due to single nucleotide polymorphisms or mutations. By varying these parameters, we were able to induce arrhythmias in 1 out of 16 simulations although conventional modeling methods to detect pro-arrhythmic molecules failed. On the basis of our results, taking into consideration only 2 parameters subjected to intra- and inter-individual variability, we propose that in silico computer modeling may help to better define the risks of new drug candidates at early stages of pre-clinical development. PMID:27901061

  12. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  13. [Clinical functional assessment of electric cardiac instability in diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle in patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Tatarchenko, I P; Pozdniakova, N V; Morozova, O I; Petrushin, I A; Solov'eva, K V

    2011-01-01

    To study parameters characterizing electric myocardial unstability in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with different variants of diastolic dysfunction (DD) of the left ventricle (LV). The study included 86 outpatients (26 females, 60 males, mean age 57.3 +/- 5.6 years) who had myocardial infarction (MI) more than 1 year before the trial with stable course of CHD during a previous month, LV ejection fraction more than 45% and with a stable sinus rhythm. Group 1 consisted of 36 patients with abnormal LV relaxation, group 2--of 28 patients with pseudo-normal LV DD, group 3--22 patients with a restrictive type of LV DD. The following examinations were made: Holter ECG monitoring, echocardiography, signal-average ECG with isolation of late ventricular potentials (LVP), estimation of heart rate variability, ventricular repolarization (Q-T interval dispersion, corrected interval Q-T). The following variants of LV DD were detected: type 1--42%, type 2--32.5%, type 3--25.5%. LV DD progression was accompanied with enhancing vegetative imbalance and sympathetic activity: in the group with abnormal relaxation--in 52.5% patients, in the group with a restrictive type--in 93.3%. CHD patients with restrictive DD had more frequent LVP (chi-square = 4.1; p < 0.05) and visualization of anomalous contractility zones (60%), ventricular extrasystole (VE) was registered in 100% cases (VE of grade IV-V in 43.3%), QT(c) and QT(d) were higher than threshold--450.2 +/- 5.4 and 71.2 +/- 6.5 ms. Because of multifactorial genesis of electric unstability, perfection of diagnosis and prognosis of risk in CHD patients with aggravation of LV DD demands a complex analysis of parameters respecting functional condition of the myocardium, relations between electric and structural-geometric remodeling of the heart.

  14. Jupiter Swirling Pearl Storm

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-30

    This image, taken by the JunoCam imager on NASA's Juno spacecraft, highlights a swirling storm just south of one of the white oval storms on Jupiter. The image was taken on March 27, 2017, at 2:12 a.m. PDT (5:12 a.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed a close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 12,400 miles (20,000 kilometers) from the planet. Citizen scientist Jason Major enhanced the color and contrast in this image, turning the picture into a Jovian work of art. He then cropped it to focus our attention on this beautiful example of Jupiter's spinning storms. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21387

  15. Great magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Lee, Yen T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Tang, Frances

    1992-01-01

    The five largest magnetic storms that occurred between 1971 to 1986 are studied to determine their solar and interplanetary causes. All of the events are found to be associated with high speed solar wind streams led by collisionless shocks. The high speed streams are clearly related to identifiable solar flares. It is found that: (1) it is the extreme values of the southward interplanetary magnetic fields rather than solar wind speeds that are the primary causes of great magnetic storms, (2) shocked and draped sheath fields preceding the driver gas (magnetic cloud) are at least as effective in causing the onset of great magnetic storms (3 of 5 events) as the strong fields within the driver gas itself, and (3) precursor southward fields ahead of the high speed streams allow the shock compression mechanism (item 2) to be particularly geoeffective.

  16. Storms and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 2-millisecond exposure of Jupiter at 04:41:04 UTC on January 24, 2007. The spacecraft was 57 million kilometers (35.3 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. At right are the moons Io (bottom) and Ganymede; Ganymede's shadow creeps toward the top of Jupiter's northern hemisphere.

    Two of Jupiter's largest storms are visible; the Great Red Spot on the western (left) limb of the planet, trailing the Little Red Spot on the eastern limb, at slightly lower latitude. The Great Red Spot is a 300-year old storm more than twice the size of Earth. The Little Red Spot, which formed over the past decade from the merging of three smaller storms, is about half the size of its older and 'greater' counterpart.

  17. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  18. Superposed Epoch Analysis of Current Systems During Intense Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Katus, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    A statistical approach to investigating the intensity and timing of storm-time current systems is conducted and presented. The Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model was used to simulate all of the intense storms (Dstmin < -100 nT) from solar cycle 23 (1996-2005). Five different HEIDI input combinations were used to create a large collection of numerical results, varying the plasma outer boundary condition and electric field description in the model. The simulation results are then combined with a normalized superposed epoch analysis, where each phase of each storm is prorated to the average duration of that phase and then all of the storms are averaged together. The azimuthal currents in the HEIDI simulation domain are classified as westward and eastward symmetric ring current, partial ring current, banana current, and tail current. The average behavior of these current systems with respect to the HEIDI plasma and electric field boundary conditions are then presented and discussed. It is found that the Volland-Stern electric field produces an earlier increase in the inner magnetospheric current systems because of the usage of the 3-h Kp index. A self-consistent electric field develops the current systems a few hours later, but produces much stronger asymmetric current systems (partial, banana, and tail currents), especially in the main phase of the storm. Applying a nonuniform local time distribution for the plasma outer boundary condition slightly increases the magnitudes of the current systems, but this effect is smaller than the electric field influence.

  19. Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A Huntsville meteorologist of Baron Services, Inc. has formed a commercial weather advisory service. Weather information is based on data from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) collected from antennas in Alabama and Tennessee. Bob Baron refines and enhances MSFC's real time display software. Computer data is changed to audio data for radio transmission, received by clients through an antenna and decoded by computer for display. Using his service, clients can monitor the approach of significant storms and schedule operations accordingly. Utilities and emergency management officials are able to plot a storm's path. A recent agreement with two other companies will promote continued development and marketing.

  20. Mechano-electrical feedback explains T-wave morphology and optimizes cardiac pump function: insight from a multi-scale model.

    PubMed

    Hermeling, Evelien; Delhaas, Tammo; Prinzen, Frits W; Kuijpers, Nico H L

    2012-01-01

    In the ECG, T- and R-wave are concordant during normal sinus rhythm (SR), but discordant after a period of ventricular pacing (VP). Experiments showed that the latter phenomenon, called T-wave memory, is mediated by a mechanical stimulus. By means of a mathematical model, we investigated the hypothesis that slow acting mechano-electrical feedback (MEF) explains T-wave memory. In our model, electromechanical behavior of the left ventricle (LV) was simulated using a series of mechanically and electrically coupled segments. Each segment comprised ionic membrane currents, calcium handling, and excitation-contraction coupling. MEF was incorporated by locally adjusting conductivity of L-type calcium current (g(CaL)) to local external work. In our set-up, g(CaL) could vary up to 25%, 50%, 100% or unlimited amount around its default value. Four consecutive simulations were performed: normal SR (with MEF), acute VP, sustained VP (with MEF), and acutely restored SR. MEF led to T-wave concordance in normal SR and to discordant T-waves acutely after restoring SR. Simulated ECGs with a maximum of 25-50% adaptation closely resembled those during T-wave memory experiments in vivo and also provided the best compromise between optimal systolic and diastolic function. In conclusion, these simulation results indicate that slow acting MEF in the LV can explain a) the relatively small differences in systolic shortening and mechanical work during SR, b) the small dispersion in repolarization time, c) the concordant T-wave during SR, and d) T-wave memory. The physiological distribution in electrophysiological properties, reflected by the concordant T-wave, may serve to optimize cardiac pump function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimation of Observatory Geoelectric Fields Induced during Great Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. J.; Swidinsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    In support of a project for monitoring hazards for electric power grids, we present a new method for estimating electric fields that are induced in the Earth's interior at a particular site during magnetic storms. For this, we adopt a model of the electrical conductivity of the lithosphere that is simple but sufficient to model most variation in the induced geoelectric field: two horizontal layers, each with uniform electrical conductivity properties that can be parameterized by a galvanic distortion tensor. After Laplace transformation of the induction equations into the complex frequency domain, we obtain an electromagnetic impedance function. Upon inverse transformation back to the time domain, convolution of the impedance tensor with a geomagnetic time series yields an estimated geoelectric time series. We optimize the model conductivity parameters using 1-sec resolution magnetic and electric field data collected at the Kakioka magnetic observatory during the October 2003 Halloween storm. We validate the algorithm against Kakioka magnetic and electric field data for the July 2000 Bastille-Day storm. Finally, we infer 1-sec geoelectric fields that were realized (but not directly measured) in Japan during the 1989 Quebec storm. Results highlight the need for improved ground-level monitoring of geomagnetic and geoelectric fields. They also reveal the need for accommodating the galvanic distortion of three-dimensional conductivity when predicting geoelectric fields in the lithosphere and geomagnetically induced currents in electric power grids.

  2. Should we revisit anticoagulation guidelines during thyroid storm?

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrew W; Puig-Carrión, Gisela D; López-Candales, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially catastrophic disease expression of thyrotoxicosis with well-recognized cardiovascular manifestations such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Even through some studies have found an increased risk of cardiac thrombus formation and subsequent thromboembolism in these patients, the use of anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic sequelae of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation remains unclear. We present a patient presenting with new onset dilated cardiomyopathy and resistant atrial fibrillation with thyroid storm that had a large left atrial appendage clot. Case particulars are discussed and the literature reviewed.

  3. Tropical Storm Lee to Newfoundland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video shows Tropical Storm Lee as it made landfall in Louisiana and Mississippi on September 4, 2011. This storm produced flooding and tornadoes to the southern states all the way to flooding ...

  4. [Effect of geomagnetic storms on the state of heart mitochondria and their role in providing energy for myocardial contraction].

    PubMed

    Frolov, V A; Pukhlianko, V P; Kazanskaia, T A; Chibisov, S M; Siatkin, S P

    1986-05-01

    The experiments on intact rabbits have shown that geomagnetic storm breaks the relationship between the size of myocardial mitochondria and the degree of cardiac contractility, causes swelling and further destruction of mitochondria. Geomagnetic storm leads to a decline in the left ventricular contractility. The development of geomagnetic storm is associated with a significant strong positive correlation between the size of mitochondria and the blood level of free fatty acids.

  5. California's Perfect Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  6. California's Perfect Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  7. STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

  8. STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

  9. Recovery from major storms

    SciTech Connect

    Holeman, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Public Service Company of Oklahoma's transmission and distribution system is in tornado alley, and it seems the number of tornados hitting some part of the system is increasing each year. In the past 30 years, Tulsa his been hit 7 times, and experienced 3 very wide and destructive tornado storm systems between 1971 and 1975.

  10. Severe storms forecast systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M.; Zack, J.

    1980-01-01

    Two research tasks are described: (1) the improvement and enhancement of an existing mesoscale numerical simulation system, and (2) numerical diagnostic studies associated with an individual case of severe storm development (April 10, 1979 in the Red River Valley of Texas and Oklahoma).

  11. Weathering the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1993-02-01

    When Hurricane Andrew struck, thousands were displaced from their homes in Florida and Louisiana. Now, months after the winds ceased blowing, the storm is causing hardship once again. Insurance companies sustaining large losses in recent months from a number of natural disasters - including the hurricane - are now passing those losses on to their customers. Independent power companies are no exception.

  12. WEATHER RADAR RESEARCH AND STORM DYNAMICS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    METEOROLOGICAL RADAR, STORMS), (*WEATHER FORECASTING, METEOROLOGICAL RADAR), (*STORMS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), TORNADOES , CYCLONES, METEOROLOGY, ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATION, RAINFALL, WIND, TROPICAL CYCLONES, HAIL

  13. A Case of Thyroid Storm Associated with Cardiomyopathy and Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Underland, Lisa J; Villeda, Gerson A Vallencia; Pal, Abhijeet; Lam, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid storm has a high mortality rate and is often associated with a precipitating factor such as intercurrent illness or infection. It is rare in pediatric patients. Cardiac disease in hyperthyroidism mostly manifests itself as tachycardia but more serious cardiac findings have also been described. A 5-year-old male with recent strep throat infection presented with dilated cardiomyopathy, hematuria, and symptoms and lab findings consistent with severe hyperthyroidism. He was diagnosed with thyroid storm secondary to concurrent Graves' disease and poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN). After starting the treatment with methimazole and a beta-blocker, his cardiac disease gradually improved and the PSGN resolved over time. There are no specific pediatric criteria for thyroid storm. Adult criteria can be difficult to apply to pediatric cases. Criteria for diagnosis of thyroid storm are less clear for pediatric patients. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a rare cardiac manifestation of hyperthyroidism. PSGN is due to glomerular immune complexes and can complicate group A strep infection. Providers should be aware of cardiac disease as a complication of hyperthyroidism. PSGN should not mechanistically be related to hyperthyroidism but can precipitate the signs of thyroid storm such as hypertension. This association has not been previously reported in the literature.

  14. Devastation of aquifers from tsunami-like storm surge by Supertyphoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Bennett, P. C.; Zamora, P. B.; Befus, K. M.; Rodolfo, R. S.; Cabria, H. B.; Lapus, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The northwest Pacific Ocean is a hot spot for sea level rise and increasing frequency of stronger storms. It is where Supertyphoon Haiyan formed, the strongest storm to hit land, which provided a window into the hydrologic impacts of an extreme storm. Through detailed documentation of flood levels, groundwater table elevations and salinity, electrical resistivity, and modeling, we found that Haiyan's storm surge reached 7 m above sea level along Samar Island, Philippines, which led to contamination of crucial aquifers by infiltrating seawater. A contaminated surficial aquifer will take years to recover. Groundwater in an underlying deeper aquifer saw widespread contamination immediately after the storm, but here salinity has decreased significantly after 8 months. However, this deeper aquifer remains vulnerable to seawater slowly percolating through the surficial aquifer. As warmer seas generate more powerful storms, the vulnerability of aquifers to persistent contamination from intense storm surges is a growing concern for coastal communities.

  15. Historic and Future Ice Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Ice storm losses from business interruption as well as transportation and health damages can range into billions of dollars. For instance, the December 2008 New England and Upstate New York ice storm caused four deaths and monetary damages between 2.5 and 3.7 billion, and the 2008 Chinese winter storms resulted in over 130 deaths and over 20 billion in damages. Informal discussions with ice storm experts indicate that due to competing temperature and precipitation effects as well as local topographic effects, it is unclear how exactly climate change will affect ice storms. Here we ask how incident frequencies might change in a future climate at four weather stations prone to ice storms. Using historical atmospheric soundings, we conduct a thought experiment where we perturb the temperatures as might be expected in a future climate. We then discuss changes in monthly frequency of ice storms.

  16. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  17. How Ionospheric Ions Populate the Magnetosphere during a Magnetic Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, T. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Slinker, S. P.; Fedder, J. A.; Delcourt, D. C.

    2008-01-01

    Ionospheric oxygen ions have been observed throughout the magnetosphere, from the plasma sheet to the ring current region. I t has been found that the O+ /H+ density ratio in the magnetosphere increases with geomagnetic activity and varies with storm phases. During the magnetic storm in late September to earIy October 2002, Cluster was orbiting in the plasma sheet and ring current regions. At prestorm time, Cluster observed high H+ density and low O+ density in the plasma sheet and lobes. During the storm main phase, 0+ density has increased by 10 times over the pre-storm level. Strong field-aligned beams of O+ were observed in the lobes. O+ fluxes were significantly reduced in the central plasma sheet during the storm recovery. However, 0+ was still evident on the boundaries of the plasma sheet and in the lobes. In order to interpret the Cluster observations and to understand how O+ ions populate the magnetosphere during a magnetic storm, we model the storm in early October 2002 using our global ion kinetic simulation (GIK). We use the LFN global simulation model to produce electric and magnetic fields in the outer magnetosphere, the Strangeway outflow scaling with Delcourt ion trajectories to include ionospheric outflows, and the Fok inner magnetospheric model for the plasmaspheric and ring current response to all particle populations. We find that the observed composition features are qualitatively reproduced by the simulations, with some quantitative differences that point to future improvements in the models.

  18. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  19. Morphology of Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestine, E. H.

    1961-01-01

    This publication is a product of the continuing study of the properties of charged particles and fields in space being conducted by The RAND Corporation under contract No. NAS5-276 for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Magnetic storms, revealed by world-wide changes in the intensity of the earth's magnetic field, and emphasized by disturbances in electromagnetic communication channels, form detectable patterns on the surface of the earth and above it. The author draws together data from various times, places, and altitudes and, coupling these with what is known or inferred about the aurora, the ionosphere, and the relationship between them and the earth's radiation belts, creates a picture of what is believed to occur during a magnetic storm.

  20. Dust Storm, Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Aral Sea has shrunk to less than half its size since 1985. The Aral Sea receives little water (sometimes no water) from the two major rivers that empty into it-the Syr Darya and Amu Darya. Instead, the river water is diverted to support irrigation for the region's extensive cotton fields. Recently, water scarcity has increased due to a prolonged drought in Central Asia. As the Aral Sea recedes, its former sea bed is exposed. The Aral's sea bed is composed of fine sediments-including fertilizers and other agricultural chemicals-that are easily picked up by the region's strong winds, creating thick dust storms. The International Space Station crew observed and recorded a large dust storm blowing eastward from the Aral Sea in late June 2001. This image illustrates the strong coupling between human activities (water diversions and irrigation), and rapidly changing land, sea and atmospheric processes-the winds blow across the

  1. Long-term effects of non-excitatory cardiac contractility modulation electric signals on the progression of heart failure in dogs.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hideaki; Suzuki, George; Haddad, Walid; Mika, Yuval; Tanhehco, Elaine J; Goldstein, Sidney; Ben-Haim, Shlomo; Sabbah, Hani N

    2004-03-01

    We previously showed that acute delivery of non-excitatory cardiac contractility modulation (CCM) electric signal during the absolute refractory period improved LV function in dogs with chronic heart failure (HF). In the present study we examined the long-term effects of CCM signal delivery on the progression of LV dysfunction and remodeling in dogs with chronic HF. Chronic HF was produced in 12 dogs by multiple sequential intracoronary microembolizations. The CCM signal was delivered using a lead implanted in the distal anterior coronary vein. A right ventricular and a right atrial lead were implanted and used for timing of CCM signal delivery. In six dogs, CCM signals were delivered continuously for 6 h daily with an average amplitude of 3.3 V for 3 months. Six HF dogs did not have leads implanted and served as controls. In control dogs, LV end-diastolic volume (EDV) and LV end-systolic volume (ESV) increased (64+/-5 ml vs. 75+/-6 ml, P=0.003; 46+/-4 ml vs. 57+/-4 ml, P=0.003; respectively), and ejection fraction (EF) decreased (28+/-1% vs. 23+/-1%, P=0.001) over the course of 3 months of follow-up. In contrast, CCM-treated dogs showed a smaller increase in EDV (66+/-4 vs. 73+/-5 ml, P=0.01), no change in ESV, and an increase in EF from 31+/-1 to 34+/-2% (P=0.04) after 3 months of therapy. In dogs with HF, long-term CCM therapy prevents progressive LV dysfunction and attenuates global LV remodeling. These findings provide compelling rationale for exploring the use of CCM for the treatment of patients with chronic HF.

  2. Endogenous endothelin 1 mediates angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy in electrically paced cardiac myocytes through EGFR transactivation, reactive oxygen species and NHE-1.

    PubMed

    Correa, María V; Nolly, Mariela B; Caldiz, Claudia I; de Cingolani, Gladys E Chiappe; Cingolani, Horacio E; Ennis, Irene L

    2014-09-01

    Emerging evidence supports a key role for endothelin-1 (ET-1) and the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in angiotensin II (Ang II) action. We aim to determine the potential role played by endogenous ET-1, EGFR transactivation and redox-dependent sodium hydrogen exchanger-1 (NHE-1) activation in the hypertrophic response to Ang II of cardiac myocytes. Electrically paced adult cat cardiomyocytes were placed in culture and stimulated with 1 nmol l(-1) Ang II or 5 nmol l(-1) ET-1. Ang II increased ~45 % cell surface area (CSA) and ~37 % [(3)H]-phenylalanine incorporation, effects that were blocked not only by losartan (Los) but also by BQ123 (AT1 and ETA receptor antagonists, respectively). Moreover, Ang II significantly increased ET-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. ET-1 similarly increased myocyte CSA and protein synthesis, actions prevented by the reactive oxygen species scavenger MPG or the NHE-1 inhibitor cariporide (carip). ET-1 increased the phosphorylation of the redox-sensitive ERK1/2-p90(RSK) kinases, main activators of the NHE-1. This effect was prevented by MPG and the antagonist of EGFR, AG1478. Ang II, ET-1 and EGF increased myocardial superoxide production (187 ± 9 %, 149 ± 8 % and 163.7 ± 6 % of control, respectively) and AG1478 inhibited these effects. Interestingly, Los inhibited only Ang II whilst BQ123 cancelled both Ang II and ET-1 actions, supporting the sequential and unidirectional activation of AT1, ETA and EGFR. Based on the present evidence, we propose that endogenous ET-1 mediates the hypertrophic response to Ang II by a mechanism that involves EGFR transactivation and redox-dependent activation of the ERK1/2-p90(RSK) and NHE-1 in adult cardiomyocytes.

  3. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  4. Development in the STORM

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Huang, Bo

    2012-01-01

    The recent invention of super-resolution microscopy has brought up much excitement in the biological research community. Here, we will focus on Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy/Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (STORM/PALM) to discuss the challenges in applying super-resolution microscopy to the study of developmental biology, including tissue imaging, sample preparation artifacts, and image interpretation. We will also summarize new opportunities that super-resolution microscopy could bring to the field of developmental biology. PMID:23237944

  5. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. Tropical Storm Arthur

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-02

    ISS040-E-031651 (2 July 2014) --- One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, some 227 nautical miles above Earth, photographed this image of Tropical Storm Arthur moving northerly near the east coast of the USA late on July 2, 2014. The crew had photographed imagery which showed Arthur churning in Atlantic waters off of Florida some eight hours prior to this picture.

  7. Weather radar research at the USA's storm laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doviak, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Radar research that is directed toward improving storm forecasts and hazard warnings and studying lightning is discussed. The two moderately sensitive Doppler weather radars in central Oklahoma, with their wide dynamic range, have demonstrated the feasibility of mapping wind fields in all weather conditions from the clear skies of quiescent air and disturbed prestorm air near the earth's surface to the optically opaque interior of severe and sometimes tornadic thunderstorms. Observations and analyses of Doppler weather radar data demonstrate that improved warning of severe storm phenomena and improved short-term forecast of storms may be available when Doppler techniques are well integrated into the national network of weather radars. When used in combination with other sensors, it provides an opportunity to learn more about the complex interrelations between the wind, water, and electricity in storms.

  8. Weather radar research at the USA's storm laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doviak, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Radar research that is directed toward improving storm forecasts and hazard warnings and studying lightning is discussed. The two moderately sensitive Doppler weather radars in central Oklahoma, with their wide dynamic range, have demonstrated the feasibility of mapping wind fields in all weather conditions from the clear skies of quiescent air and disturbed prestorm air near the earth's surface to the optically opaque interior of severe and sometimes tornadic thunderstorms. Observations and analyses of Doppler weather radar data demonstrate that improved warning of severe storm phenomena and improved short-term forecast of storms may be available when Doppler techniques are well integrated into the national network of weather radars. When used in combination with other sensors, it provides an opportunity to learn more about the complex interrelations between the wind, water, and electricity in storms.

  9. A case study of ionospheric storm effects in the Chinese sector during the October 2013 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tian

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the ionospheric storm effects in the Chinese sector during 2 October 2013 geomagnetic storm. The TEC map over China sector (1°×1°) and eight ionosondes data along the longitude of 110°E are used to show significant positive ionospheric phases (enhancements in TEC and ionospheric peak electron density NmF2) in the high-middle latitude region and the negative effects at the low latitude and equatorial region during the storm. A wave structure with periods about 1-2 h and horizontal speed about 680 m/s, propagating from the high latitudes to the low latitudes is observed in electron densities within the height region from 200 to 400 km, which is caused by the combined effects of neutral wind and the large-scale traveling disturbances (LSTIDs). In the low latitude regions, compared with those in the quiet day, the ionospheric peak heights of the F2 layer (hmF2) in the storm day obviously increase accom- panying a notably decrease in TEC and NmF2, which might be as a result of the eastward prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) evi- denced by the two magnetometers and the subsequent westward disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEF). The storm-time TEC enhancement mainly occurs in the topside ionosphere, as revealed from the topside TEC, bottomside TEC and GPS TEC. Keywords: Ionospheric storm; Neutral wind; LSTIDs; PPEF; DDEF

  10. Defining Coastal Storm and Quantifying Storms Applying Coastal Storm Impulse Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudpour, Nader

    2014-05-01

    What defines a storm condition and what would initiate a "storm" has not been uniquely defined among scientists and engineers. Parameters that have been used to define a storm condition can be mentioned as wind speed, beach erosion and storm hydrodynamics parameters such as wave height and water levels. Some of the parameters are storm consequential such as beach erosion and some are not directly related to the storm hydrodynamics such as wind speed. For the purpose of the presentation, the different storm conditions based on wave height, water levels, wind speed and beach erosion will be discussed and assessed. However, it sounds more scientifically to have the storm definition based on the hydrodynamic parameters such as wave height, water level and storm duration. Once the storm condition is defined and storm has initiated, the severity of the storm would be a question to forecast and evaluate the hazard and analyze the risk in order to determine the appropriate responses. The correlation of storm damages to the meteorological and hydrodynamics parameters can be defined as a storm scale, storm index or storm parameter and it is needed to simplify the complexity of variation involved developing the scale for risk analysis and response management. A newly introduced Coastal Storm Impulse (COSI) parameter quantifies storms into one number for a specific location and storm event. The COSI parameter is based on the conservation of linear, horizontal momentum to combine storm surge, wave dynamics, and currents over the storm duration. The COSI parameter applies the principle of conservation of momentum to physically combine the hydrodynamic variables per unit width of shoreline. This total momentum is then integrated over the duration of the storm to determine the storm's impulse to the coast. The COSI parameter employs the mean, time-averaged nonlinear (Fourier) wave momentum flux, over the wave period added to the horizontal storm surge momentum above the Mean High

  11. Statistical analysis of geomagnetic storm driver and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katus, R. M.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    Geomagnetic storms are investigated statistically with respect to the solar wind driver and the intensity of the events. The Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model was used to simulate all of the intense storms (minimum Dst < - 100 nT) from solar cycle 23 (1996-2005). Four different configurations of HEIDI were used to investigate the outer boundary condition and electric field description. The storms are then classified as being a coronal mass ejection (CME) or corotating interaction region (CIR) driven event and binned based on the magnitude of the minimum Dst. The simulation results as well as solar wind and geomagnetic data sets are then analyzed along a normalized epoch timeline. The average behavior of each storm type and the corresponding HEIDI configurations are then presented and discussed. It is found that while the self-consistent electric field better reproduces stronger CME driven storms, the Volland-Stern electric field does well reproducing the results for CIR driven events.

  12. On the return period statistics of magnetic storms and their implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M. P.; Horne, R. B.; Daws, M.; Wilson, P. S.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic storms are globally coherent non-secular variations of the geomagnetic field that have been identified as a natural environmental hazard with adverse effects on radio communications, satellite operations, electrical power distribution, etc. Thus it is desirable to forecast the occurrence of magnetic storms to mitigate their impact. To this end, we have analysed the probability density function (PDF) of magnetic storm duration, non-storm duration, and waiting time between storm onsets, for two objective definitions of a magnetic storm based on historical precedent. In the first definition, a magnetic storm is defined as a classic extreme event - the interval for which a relevant geomagnetic measure (the -Dst index) is above a given threshold, c. The PDF of storm duration, non-storm duration, and waiting time between storm onsets are all found to be truncated power laws, independent of threshold. Thus, under this definition, magnetic storms have no characteristic duration or recurrence time between ˜ 1 h and ˜ 100 h. In the second definition, we show evidence that the extreme events of the first definition are part of a longer coherent structure in the time series such that a magnetic storm can alternatively be defined as the interval for which the -Dst index is above a given threshold b and the maximum -Dst is above a second, higher threshold c. Over a region of the two-threshold parameter space \\{b, c\\}, the PDF of waiting times between storm onsets in 3-year samples is found to be a random stationary (Poisson) process with a Poisson statistic that varies with the solar cycle, and the PDF of storm durations is peaked at 20-30 h. The analysis raises an interesting general question as to the occurrence properties of abstract extrema (e.g., gale force winds) compared to those of physical extreme events (e.g., hurricanes?). Moreover, an interesting similarity between the occurrence pattern of repeatable magnetic storms and of solar flares is noted.

  13. [Assessment of the effect of a geomagnetic storm on the frequency of appearance of acute cardiovascular pathology].

    PubMed

    Gurfinkel', Iu I; Kuleshova, V P; Oraevskiĭ, V N

    1998-01-01

    The massif of data about acute coronary pathology and deaths of Central Railway Hospital (Moscow) is analysed during 1992-1993. The geomagnetic storms are characterised by their intensity and duration. The quantitative values of biotropic of the geomagnetic storms are given to different diseases. It is shown that during geomagnetic storms the number of cases of myocardial infraction increase to 2.5 times, the acute cerebral insult to 2 times, the angina pectoris and cardiac arrhythmia to 1.5 times and deaths to 1.2 times in regarding to the periods without the geomagnetic storms.

  14. Storm-Substorm Relations Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Joe

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic storms in the magnetosphere can cause damage to communication satellites and large-scale power outages. The concept that a magnetic storm is a compilation of a series of substorms was proposed by Akasofu [1968]. However, Kamide [1992] showed that substorms are not a necessary condition for the occurrence of a magnetic storm. This controversy initiated a new era of research on the storm-substorm relation, which was the subject of a recent workshop in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The main topics discussed during the meeting included a brief overview of what a substorm is, how quasiperiodic substorm events and steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events without substorms contribute to storms, and how plasma flows enhanced by magnetic reconnection in the plasma sheet contribute to substorms and storms.

  15. Toward storm-time ionosphere forecast using GNSS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Charles; Chen, Chia-Hung; Liu, Tiger J. Y.; Chen, Wei-Han

    2016-04-01

    Previous theoretical simulations of the mid- and low-latitude ionospheric responses to space weather events have indicated general features of electron density disturbances. The magnetic storm produced penetration electric field and neutral wind disturbances lead to formation of various storm-time ionospheric electron density structures, such as super plasma fountain, equatorial electron density trough and F3 layer, as well as long-lasting global ionosphere suppression. We attempt to model these storm-related ionospheric electron density structures using the global assimilative ionospheric model that assimilates electron densities taken from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC and TEC from ground-based GNSS receivers. Using the ensemble Kalman filter with consideration of ion densities, electric potential, thermospheric neutral wind and compositions as update variables, we study the performance and forecast capability of the assimilative model. The assimilative model could be utilized for ionosphere forecast in near future.

  16. Desert Shield/Storm Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Wc This document may not be retee for open publiarion until it has bm deaed by the Vproprnite military service or gmeanen agency. DESERT SHIELD /STORM...capture what had occurred during Operations DESERT SHIELD and STORM, the commanders of the Division Support Command of the 24th Infantry Division...Mechanized) held a ful. day of discussion centering on what occurted during Operation DESERT STORM and its preceding operation, DESERT SHIELD . The entire

  17. Tropical Storm Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The Atlantic Ocean 210 miles south of Galveston, Texas Categorization: Tropical Storm Sustained Winds: 40 mph (60 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue

  18. Empirical STORM-E Model. [I. Theoretical and Observational Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Xu, Xiaojing; Bilitza, Dieter; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III

    2013-01-01

    Auroral nighttime infrared emission observed by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument onboard the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite is used to develop an empirical model of geomagnetic storm enhancements to E-region peak electron densities. The empirical model is called STORM-E and will be incorporated into the 2012 release of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI). The proxy for characterizing the E-region response to geomagnetic forcing is NO+(v) volume emission rates (VER) derived from the TIMED/SABER 4.3 lm channel limb radiance measurements. The storm-time response of the NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER is sensitive to auroral particle precipitation. A statistical database of storm-time to climatological quiet-time ratios of SABER-observed NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER are fit to widely available geomagnetic indices using the theoretical framework of linear impulse-response theory. The STORM-E model provides a dynamic storm-time correction factor to adjust a known quiescent E-region electron density peak concentration for geomagnetic enhancements due to auroral particle precipitation. Part II of this series describes the explicit development of the empirical storm-time correction factor for E-region peak electron densities, and shows comparisons of E-region electron densities between STORM-E predictions and incoherent scatter radar measurements. In this paper, Part I of the series, the efficacy of using SABER-derived NO+(v) VER as a proxy for the E-region response to solar-geomagnetic disturbances is presented. Furthermore, a detailed description of the algorithms and methodologies used to derive NO+(v) VER from SABER 4.3 lm limb emission measurements is given. Finally, an assessment of key uncertainties in retrieving NO+(v) VER is presented

  19. Dust storm in Alaska

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Dust storm in Alaska captured by Aqua/MODIS on Nov. 17, 2013 at 21:45 UTC. When glaciers grind against underlying bedrock, they produce a silty powder with grains finer than sand. Geologists call it “glacial flour” or “rock flour.” This iron- and feldspar-rich substance often finds its ways into rivers and lakes, coloring the water brown, grey, or aqua. When river or lake levels are low, the flour accumulates on drying riverbanks and deltas, leaving raw material for winds to lift into the air and create plumes of dust. Scientists are monitoring Arctic dust for a number of reasons. Dust storms can reduce visibility enough to disrupt air travel, and they can pose health hazards to people on the ground. Dust is also a key source of iron for phytoplankton in regional waters. Finally, there is the possibility that dust events are becoming more frequent and severe due to ongoing recession of glaciers in coastal Alaska. To read more about dust storm in this region go to: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=79518 Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jeff Schmaltz/MODIS Land Rapid Response Team NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  20. Storm impact for barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H.

    2000-01-01

    A new scale is proposed that categorizes impacts to natural barrier islands resulting from tropical and extra-tropical storms. The proposed scale is fundamentally different than existing storm-related scales in that the coupling between forcing processes and the geometry of the coast is explicitly included. Four regimes, representing different levels of impact, are defined. Within each regime, patterns and relative magnitudes of net erosion and accretion are argued to be unique. The borders between regimes represent thresholds defining where processes and magnitudes of impacts change dramatically. Impact level 1 is the 'swash' regime describing a storm where runup is confined to the foreshore. The foreshore typically erodes during the storm and recovers following the storm; hence, there is no net change. Impact level 2 is the 'collision' regime describing a storm where the wave runup exceeds the threshold of the base of the foredune ridge. Swash impacts the dune forcing net erosion. Impact level 3 is the 'overwash' regime describing a storm where wave runup overtops the berm or, if present, the foredune ridge. The associated net landward sand transport contributes to net migration of the barrier landward. Impact level 4 is the 'inundation' regime describing a storm where the storm surge is sufficient to completely and continuously submerge the barrier island. Sand undergoes net landward transport over the barrier island; limited evidence suggests the quantities and distance of transport are much greater than what occurs during the 'overwash' regime.

  1. Communicating Storm Surge Forecast Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, J. A.; Rhome, J.

    2015-12-01

    When it comes to tropical cyclones, storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property along the coastal United States. The coastal population density has dramatically increased over the past 20 years, putting more people at risk. Informing emergency managers, decision-makers and the public about the potential for wind driven storm surge, however, has been extremely difficult. Recently, the Storm Surge Unit at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida has developed a prototype experimental storm surge watch/warning graphic to help communicate this threat more effectively by identifying areas most at risk for life-threatening storm surge. This prototype is the initial step in the transition toward a NWS storm surge watch/warning system and highlights the inundation levels that have a 10% chance of being exceeded. The guidance for this product is the Probabilistic Hurricane Storm Surge (P-Surge) model, which predicts the probability of various storm surge heights by statistically evaluating numerous SLOSH model simulations. Questions remain, however, if exceedance values in addition to the 10% may be of equal importance to forecasters. P-Surge data from 2014 Hurricane Arthur is used to ascertain the practicality of incorporating other exceedance data into storm surge forecasts. Extracting forecast uncertainty information through analyzing P-surge exceedances overlaid with track and wind intensity forecasts proves to be beneficial for forecasters and decision support.

  2. Storm Warnings for Cuba

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Chapter Three. ൓FBIS-LAT-93-249, December 30, 1993, p. 7. 12Ibid., pp. 4-5. i2 18 Storm Warnings for Cuba Corps General Abelardo Colom6, Cuba’s Minister...analysis of the grim state of the Cuban economy by the Assistant Director of CEA. See also the brief but illuminating article by another CEA economist, Pedro ...The principal difference between the current model and the fidelista system of the past lies in the regime’s economic policies. According to Pedro

  3. Seeing the Storm

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-08

    This beautiful look at Saturn's south polar atmosphere shows the hurricane-like polar storm swirling there. Sunlight highlights its high cloud walls, especially around the 10 o'clock position. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 939 nanometers. The image was taken on Jan. 30, 2007 at a distance of approximately 1.1 million kilometers (700,000 miles) from Saturn. Image scale is 61 kilometers (38 miles) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA08892

  4. Cardiac Electrophysiology: Normal and Ischemic Ionic Currents and the ECG

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klabunde, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Basic cardiac electrophysiology is foundational to understanding normal cardiac function in terms of rate and rhythm and initiation of cardiac muscle contraction. The primary clinical tool for assessing cardiac electrical events is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which provides global and regional information on rate, rhythm, and electrical…

  5. Cardiac Electrophysiology: Normal and Ischemic Ionic Currents and the ECG

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klabunde, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Basic cardiac electrophysiology is foundational to understanding normal cardiac function in terms of rate and rhythm and initiation of cardiac muscle contraction. The primary clinical tool for assessing cardiac electrical events is the electrocardiogram (ECG), which provides global and regional information on rate, rhythm, and electrical…

  6. Kvβ1.1 (AKR6A8) senses pyridine nucleotide changes in the mouse heart and modulates cardiac electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Tur, Jared; Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C; Katnik, Christopher; Cuevas, Javier; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Tipparaju, Srinivas M

    2017-03-01

    The present study investigates the physiological role of Kvβ1 subunit for sensing pyridine nucleotide (NADH/NAD+) changes in the heart. We used Kvβ1.1 knockout (KO) or wild-type (WT) mice and established that Kvβ1.1 preferentially binds with Kv4.2 and senses the pyridine nucleotide changes in the heart. The cellular action potential duration (APD) obtained from WT cardiomyocytes showed longer APDs with lactate perfusion, which increases intracellular NADH levels, while the APDs remained unaltered in the Kvβ1.1 KO. Ex vivo monophasic action potentials showed a similar response, in which the APDs were prolonged in WT mouse hearts with lactate perfusion; however, the Kvβ1.1 KO mouse hearts did not show APD changes upon lactate perfusion. COS-7 cells coexpressing Kv4.2 and Kvβ1.1 were used for whole cell patch-clamp recordings to evaluate changes caused by NADH (lactate). These data reveal that Kvβ1.1 is required in the mediated inactivation of Kv4.2 currents, when NADH (lactate) levels are increased. In vivo, isoproterenol infusion led to increased NADH in the heart along with QTc prolongation in wild-type mice; regardless of the approach, our data show that Kvβ1.1 recognizes NADH changes and modulates Kv4.2 currents affecting AP and QTc durations. Overall, this study uses multiple levels of investigation, including the heterologous overexpression system, cardiomyocyte, ex vivo, and ECG, and clearly depicts that Kvβ1.1 is an obligatory sensor of NADH/NAD changes in vivo, with a physiological role in the heart.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Cardiac electrical activity is mediated by ion channels, and Kv4.2 plays a significant role, along with its binding partner, the Kvβ1.1 subunit. In the present study, we identify Kvβ1.1 as a sensor of pyridine nucleotide changes and as a modulator of Kv4.2 gating, action potential duration, and ECG in the mouse heart. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Control of acute postoperative pain by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after open cardiac operations: a randomized placebo-controlled prospective study.

    PubMed

    Emmiler, Mustafa; Solak, Ozlem; Kocogullari, Cevdet; Dundar, Umit; Ayva, Ercument; Ela, Yuksel; Cekirdekci, Ahmet; Kavuncu, Vural

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy on pain during the first 24 hours after a cardiac surgical procedure. A total of 60 patients who had undergone median sternotomy (MS) for coronary artery bypass graft (n = 55) or valve repair surgery (n = 5) were randomized to receive TENS and pharmacologic analgesia, placebo TENS and pharmacologic analgesia, or pharmacologic analgesia alone (control group). For each group we recorded severity of pain, analgesic intake, and pulmonary complications. Pethidine HCL and metamizol sodium were administered for postsurgical analgesia. Pain after MS was measured on a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS). Mean scores in the TENS, placebo TENS, and control groups, respectively, were 5.70 +/- 1.78, 5.75 +/- 1.83, and 5.95 +/- 1.63 before treatment (P >.05); 2.40 +/- 1.18, 3.90 +/- 1.48, and 3.55 +/- 1.60 on the 12th hour of the intervention (P < .05); and 1.25 +/- 0.91, 2.30 +/- 1.34, and 2.15 +/- 1.13 on the 24th hour of the intervention (P < .05). The mean VAS scores decreased within each group (P < .05). However, the mean VAS scores decreased much more significantly in the TENS group (P < .05). Metamizol sodium intake was 1.05 +/- 0.39 g, 2.30 +/- 1.08 g, and 2.90 +/- 1.20 g and pethidine HCL intake was 17 +/- 16.25 mg, 57 +/- 21.54 mg, and 51.50 +/- 18.99 mg, respectively, in the TENS, placebo TENS, and control groups. Metamizol sodium and pethidine HCL intake was least in the TENS group (P < .05). Postoperative complications were observed in 6 (10%) of patients. The most frequent complication was atelectasia. TENS was more effective than placebo TENS or control treatments in decreasing pain and limiting opioid and nonopioid medication intake during the first 24-hour period following MS.

  8. Influence of storm characteristics on soil erosion and storm runoff

    Treesearch

    Johnny M. III Grace

    2008-01-01

    Unpaved forest roads can be major sources of sediment from forested watersheds. Storm runoff from forest roads are a concern due to their potential delivery of sediments and nutrients to stream systems resulting in degraded water quality. The volume and sediment concentrations of stormwater runoff emanating from forest roads can be greatly influenced by storm...

  9. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of research on solar radio continuum emissions from metric to hectometric wave frequencies, emphasizing the role of energetic electrons in the 10-100 keV range in these emissions. It is seen that keV-energy electrons generated in active sunspot groups must be the sources of radio continuum storm emissions for wide frequency bands. These electrons excite plasma oscillations in the medium, which in turn are converted to electromagnetic radiation. The radio noise continuum sources are usually associated with type III burst activity observed above these sources. Although the mechanism for the release of the energetic electrons is not known, it seems they are ejected from storm source regions in association with rapid variation of associated sunspot magnetic fields due to their growth into complex types. To explain some of the observed characteristics, the importance of two-stream instability and the scattering of ambient plasma ions on energetic electron streams is pointed out.

  10. Coronal Rain, Solar Storm

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Explanation: In this picture, the Sun's surface is quite dark. A frame from a movie recorded on November 9th by the orbiting TRACE telescope, it shows coronal loops lofted over a solar active region. Glowing brightly in extreme ultraviolet light, the hot plasma entrained above the Sun along arching magnetic fields is cooling and raining back down on the solar surface. Hours earlier, on November 8th, astronomers had watched this particular active region produce a not so spectacular solar flare. Still, the M-class flare spewed forth an intense storm of particles, suddenly showering satellites near the Earth with high energy protons. The flare event was also associated with a large coronal mass ejection, a massive cloud of material which impacted our fair planet's magnetic field about 31 hours later. The result ... a strong geomagnetic storm. Credit: NASA/GSFC/TRACE To learn more go to: nasascience.nasa.gov/missions/trace To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  11. [Updated ESC guideline: innovations for the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and recommendations for prevention of sudden cardiac death].

    PubMed

    Eckardt, L; Deneke, T

    2016-09-01

    The 2015 European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death is an update of the former 2006 European/American guidelines. This new consensus document gives a detailed overview on prevention and therapy of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This includes detailed discussion of channelopathies and various cardiomyopathies. Gaps in evidence are identified and also discussed. DNA analysis and postmortem assessment in sudden cardiac death victims is for the first time part of these new recommendations. In addition, for the first time recommendations on subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and the wearable defibrillator are given. The guidelines strengthen the role of ICD therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death although data used as the basis for these recommendations are 10-15 years old and patients' characteristics including therapeutic options have changed during that time. Systematic reassessment of left ventricular function 6-12 weeks after infarction is also included as a new recommendation. The role of catheter ablation in electrical storm and for those presenting with a first episode of sustained ventricular tachycardia has also been upgraded in the new guidelines. Hopefully, the new guidelines will reach not only cardiologists and help to improve patient care, but also contribute to reducing the high number sudden cardiac deaths in Europe.

  12. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  14. Dynamics of SAPS/SAID During Non-Storm Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Shepherd, S. G.; Baker, J. B. H.; Thomas, E. G.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that SAPS is a prominent feature of the storm-time ionosphere with connection to the dynamics of the disturbed inner magnetosphere. Somewhat surprisingly SAPS are also observed under non-storm conditions. These events of SAPS/SAID are distinguished by extreme narrowness in latitude (<2°) moderately enhanced westward plasma velocity ( 1 km/s), relatively higher latitude of occurrence, and association with a very narrow trough feature in GPS/TEC observations. Recent improvements in coverage with ground-based radar make it possible to observe the SAPS phenomenon as it initiates and evolves over periods of typically several hours duration and across many hours of MLT. We report on an analysis of non-storm SAPS/SAID events during the periods selected by the CEDAR Grand Challenge "Storms and Substorms without Borders" focus study, in particular June 16 and 17, 2015, 06-10 UT. The results elucidate the interplay between field-aligned currents, ionospheric electric fields, and ionospheric conductivity and plasma structuring during non-storm SAPS/SAID. We summarize the challenge to modelers and theorists for objectively accounting for the occurrence and characteristics of the observed features and for developing an ability to nowcast or forecast non-storm SAPS/SAID generally.

  15. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  16. At the eye of the storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The great storm now going on in the atmosphere of Saturn is discussed. Observational results are summarized, and possible explanations for the storm's origin are addressed. The potential for ongoing observations to clarify the storm's causes is considered.

  17. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms.

    PubMed

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-12-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<-100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3-6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow.

  18. Northern Storm in Full Force

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-31

    This mosaic of images from NASA Cassini spacecraft shows the trail of a great northern storm on Saturn raging in full force. The contrast in the images has been enhanced to make the turbulent parts of the storm in white stand out.

  19. Thyroid storm induced by strangulation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Jesús I; Petrone, Patrizio; Kuncir, Eric J; Asensio, Juan A

    2004-06-01

    Thyroid storm most often occurs in patients with known thyrotoxicosis. This report discusses a severe case of thyroid storm developing as a direct result of strangulation in a patient without a preexisting history of thyroid disease. Classification and treatment of this entity are discussed.

  20. Geospace system responses to the St. Patrick's Day storms in 2013 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shun-Rong; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Wenbin; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.

    2017-06-01

    This special collection includes 31 research papers investigating geospace system responses to the geomagnetic storms during the St. Patrick's Days of 17 March 2013 and 2015. It covers observation, data assimilation, and modeling aspects of the storm time phenomena and their associated physical processes. The ionosphere and thermosphere as well as their coupling to the magnetosphere are clearly the main subject areas addressed. This collection provides a comprehensive picture of the geospace response to these two major storms. We provide some highlights of these studies in six specific areas: (1) global and magnetosphere/plasmasphere perspectives, (2) high-latitude responses, (3) subauroral and midlatitude processes, (4) effects of prompt penetration electric fields and disturbance dynamo electric fields, (5) effects of neutral dynamics and perturbation, and (6) storm effects on plasma bubbles and irregularities. We also discuss areas of future challenges and the ways to move forward in advancing our understanding of the geospace storm time behavior and space weather effects.

  1. Thyroid storm: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chiha, Maguy; Samarasinghe, Shanika; Kabaker, Adam S

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency first described in 1926, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. No laboratory abnormalities are specific to thyroid storm, and the available scoring system is based on the clinical criteria. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of thyroid storm from uncomplicated hyperthyroidism are not well understood. A heightened response to thyroid hormone is often incriminated along with increased or abrupt availability of free hormones. Patients exhibit exaggerated signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and varying degrees of organ decompensation. Treatment should be initiated promptly targeting all steps of thyroid hormone formation, release, and action. Patients who fail medical therapy should be treated with therapeutic plasma exchange or thyroidectomy. The mortality of thyroid storm is currently reported at 10%. Patients who have survived thyroid storm should receive definite therapy for their underlying hyperthyroidism to avoid any recurrence of this potentially fatal condition.

  2. Clouds and Dust Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed