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Sample records for cardiac electrical storm

  1. [Cardiac resynchronisation therapy as a cause of the electrical storm].

    PubMed

    Krupa, Wojciech; Lackowski, Jacek; Sielski, Sławomir; Dobosiewicz, Ryszard; Kubica, Jacek

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of young patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and implanted cardioverter-defibrillator in which resynchronisation therapy (CRT-D) induced an electrical storm. One month after implantation of a cardiac resynchronisation pacemaker (CRT-P) the patient suffered from ventricular tachycardia with poor haemodynamic status and was treated by implantation of a CRT-D with a Y adaptor. After replacement of the CRT-D due to Y adaptor damage (new device without a Y adaptor) we observed an electrical storm during ventricular pacing (biventricular, right and left ventricular pacing respectively). Changing pacing mode from DDDR to AAIR resolved ventricular tachycardias in that patient.

  2. Short-coupled variant of Torsade de Pointes as a cause of electrical storm and aborted sudden cardiac death: insights into mechanism and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chiladakis, John A; Spiroulias, Georgios; Koutsogiannis, Nikolaos; Zagli, Fani; Alexopoulos, Dimritrios

    2008-01-01

    This case report describes a 50-year-old woman with normal repolarization duration who survived multiple electrical storms and cardiac arrest related to recurrent short-coupled torsade de pointes (TdP). Overdrive ventricular pacing could not prevent malignant TdP, but exposed a pause-related TdP initiation pattern. Isoproterenol and atrial pacing completely suppressed TdP, suggesting that ventricular pacing may entail vulnerability to this condition.

  3. Electrical storm of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia after a cardiac-resynchronization-therapy-defibrillator upgrade.

    PubMed

    Kantharia, Bharat K; Patel, Jigar A; Nagra, Bipinpreet S; Ledley, Gary S

    2006-08-01

    In patients with significant left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure despite optimal medical therapy, implantation of cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillation (CRT-D) devices has been shown to improve symptoms and mortality. In this report, we describe a case of a patient with ischaemic cardiomyopathy who developed incessant ventricular tachycardia (VT) after undergoing an upgrade from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to a CRT-D device. The patient required multiple anti-arrhythmic agents, removal of the coronary sinus lead, and radiofrequency ablation to control VT. Thus, in rare patients, the CRT devices may potentially cause 'proarrhythmia' with serious consequences.

  4. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. T.; Rust, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Successful ground truth support of U-2 overflights was been accomplished. Data have been reduced for 4 June 1984 and some of the results have been integrated into some of MSFC's efforts. Staccato lightning (multiply branched, single stroke flash with no continuing current) is prevalent within the rainfree region around the main storm updraft and this is believed to be important, i.e., staccato flashes might be an important indicator of severe storm electrification. Results from data analysis from two stations appear to indicate that charge center heights can be estimated from a combination of intercept data with data from the fixed laboratory at NSSL. An excellent data base has been provided for determining the sight errors and efficiency of NSSL's LLP system. Cloud structures, observable in a low radar reflectivity region and on a scale smaller than is currently resolved by radar, which appear to be related to electrical activity are studied.

  5. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Taylor, W.; Arnold, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Severe storms and lightning were measured with a NASA U2 and ground based facilities, both fixed base and mobile. Aspects of this program are reported. The following results are presented: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2. These measurements include flash type identification, electric field changes, optical waveforms, and ground strike location; (2) simultaneous extremely low frequency (ELF) waveforms for cloud to ground (CG) flashes; (3) the CG strike location system (LLP) using a combination of mobile laboratory and television video data are assessed; (4) continued development of analog-to-digital conversion techniques for processing lightning data from the U2, mobile laboratory, and NSSL sensors; (5) completion of an all azimuth TV system for CG ground truth; (6) a preliminary analysis of both IC and CG lightning in a mesocyclone; and (7) the finding of a bimodal peak in altitude lightning activity in some storms in the Great Plains and on the east coast. In the forms on the Great Plains, there was a distinct class of flash what forms the upper mode of the distribution. These flashes are smaller horizontal extent, but occur more frequently than flashes in the lower mode of the distribution.

  6. Electrical storm after CRT implantation treated by AV delay optimization.

    PubMed

    Combes, Nicolas; Marijon, Eloi; Boveda, Serge; Albenque, Jean-Paul

    2010-02-01

    We present a case of symptomatic ischemic heart failure with an indication for cardiac resynchronization and implantable cardiac defibrillator therapy in primary prevention. After implantation, the patient developed a severe electrical storm with multiple shocks. Hemodynamic improvement based only on AV delay, guided by echocardiography and ECG, brought about a dramatic improvement in the situation. We discuss the pathophysiology of electrical storm occurring immediately after LV pacing.

  7. Severe storm electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    During FY-85, Researchers conducted a field program and analyzed data. The field program incorporated coordinated measurements made with a NASA U2. Results include the following: (1) ground truth measurements of lightning for comparison with those obtained by the U2; (2) analysis of dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning mapping data from a supercell storm; (3) analysis of synoptic conditions during three simultaneous storm systems on 13 May 1983 when unusually large numbers of positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) flashes occurred; (4) analysis of extremely low frequency (ELF) wave forms; and (5) an assessment of a cloud -ground strike location system using a combination of mobile laboratory and fixed-base TV video data.

  8. Synergistic application of cardiac sympathetic decentralization and comprehensive psychiatric treatment in the management of anxiety and electrical storm

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Sahib S.; Shahabi, Leila; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Bystritsky, Alexander; Naliboff, Bruce D.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2014-01-01

    We report here, for the first time, two cases demonstrating a synergistic application of bilateral cardiac sympathetic decentralization and multimodal psychiatric treatment for the assessment and management of anxiety following recurrent Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) shocks. In a first case the combination of bilateral cardiac sympathetic decentralization (BCSD), cognitive behavioral psychotherapy and anxiolytic medication was sufficient to attenuate the patient's symptoms and maladaptive behaviors, with a maintained benefit at 1 year. Among the more prominent subjective changes in the post-lesion state we observed a decrease in aversive interoceptive sensations, particularly of the heartbeat. The patient continued to experience cognitive threat appraisals on a frequent basis, although these were no longer incapacitating. In a second case, we report the effect of BCSD on autonomic tone and subjective state. In the post-lesion state we observed attenuated sympathetic responses to the valsalva maneuver, isometric handgrip and mental arithmetic stressor, including decreased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and, decreased skin conductance. Collectively, these preliminary findings suggest that an integrative, multidisciplinary approach to treating anxiety disorders in the setting of ventricular arrhythmias and recurrent ICD shocks can result in sustained improvements in physical, psychological, and functional status. These findings raise the possibility of a potential role for the stellate ganglion in the modulation of emotional experience and afferent transmission of interoceptive information to the central nervous system. PMID:24427121

  9. A study of severe storm electricity via storm intercept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Roy T.; Horsburgh, Steven D.; Rust, W. David; Burgess, Don

    1985-01-01

    Storm electricity data, radar data, and visual observations were used both to present a case study for a supercell thunderstorm that occurred in the Texas Panhandle on 19 June 1980 and to search for insight into how lightning to ground might be related to storm dynamics in the updraft/downdraft couplet in supercell storms. It was observed that two-thirds of the lightning ground-strike points in the developing and maturing stages of a supercell thunderstorm occurred within the region surrounding the wall cloud (a cloud feature often characteristic of a supercell updraft) and on the southern flank of the precipitation. Electrical activity in the 19 June 1980 storm was atypical in that it was a right-mover. Lightning to ground reached a peak rate of 18/min and intracloud flashes were as frequent as 176/min in the final stages of the storm's life.

  10. The evaluation and management of electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Eifling, Michael; Razavi, Mehdi; Massumi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Electrical storm is an increasingly common and life-threatening syndrome that is defined by 3 or more sustained episodes of ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, or appropriate shocks from an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator within 24 hours. The clinical presentation can be dramatic. Electrical storm can manifest itself during acute myocardial infarction and in patients who have structural heart disease, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, or an inherited arrhythmic syndrome. The presence or absence of structural heart disease and the electrocardiographic morphology of the presenting arrhythmia can provide important diagnostic clues into the mechanism of electrical storm. Electrical storm typically has a poor outcome.The effective management of electrical storm requires an understanding of arrhythmia mechanisms, therapeutic options, device programming, and indications for radiofrequency catheter ablation. Initial management involves determining and correcting the underlying ischemia, electrolyte imbalances, or other causative factors. Amiodarone and β-blockers, especially propranolol, effectively resolve arrhythmias in most patients. Nonpharmacologic treatment, including radiofrequency ablation, can control electrical storm in drug-refractory patients. Patients who have implantable cardioverter-defibrillators can present with multiple shocks and may require drug therapy and device reprogramming. After the acute phase of electrical storm, the treatment focus should shift toward maximizing heart-failure therapy, performing revascularization, and preventing subsequent ventricular arrhythmias. Herein, we present an organized approach for effectively evaluating and managing electrical storm.

  11. Left ventricular assist device in the management of refractory electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Pourdjabbar, A; Maze, R; Hibbert, B; Ruel, M; Haddad, H

    2015-05-01

    Electrical storm refers to a state of cardiac electrical instability characterized by multiple episodes of ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) within a relatively short period of time and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The management of electrical storm involves a variety of strategies, including sedation, anti-arrhythmic and electrolyte replacement as well as revascularization and electrical ablation. However, the management strategy in patients with refractory storm is less clear and may require more invasive approaches. We present a case of severe ventricular tachycardia storm refractory to conservative management that was managed with a HeartMate II left ventricular assist device.

  12. Electrical storm: A clinical and electrophysiological overview

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Sergio; Pala, Salvatore; Biagioli, Viviana; Del Giorno, Giuseppe; Zucchetti, Martina; Russo, Eleonora; Marino, Vittoria; Dello Russo, Antonio; Casella, Michela; Pizzamiglio, Francesca; Catto, Valentina; Tondo, Claudio; Carbucicchio, Corrado

    2015-01-01

    Electrical storm (ES) is a clinical condition characterized by three or more ventricular arrhythmia episodes leading to appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) therapies in a 24 h period. Mostly, arrhythmias responsible of ES are multiple morphologies of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT), but polymorphic VT and ventricular fibrillation can also result in ES. Clinical presentation is very dramatic in most cases, strictly related to the cardiac disease that may worsen electrical and hemodynamic decompensation. Therefore ES management is challenging in the majority of cases and a high mortality is the rule both in the acute and in the long-term phases. Different underlying cardiomyopathies provide significant clues into the mechanism of ES, which can arise in the setting of structural arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies or rarely in patients with inherited arrhythmic syndrome, impacting on pharmacological treatment, on ICD programming, and on the opportunity to apply strategies of catheter ablation. This latter has become a pivotal form of treatment due to its high efficacy in modifying the arrhythmogenic substrate and in achieving rhythm stability, aiming at reducing recurrences of ventricular arrhythmia and at improving overall survival. In this review, the most relevant epidemiological and clinical aspects of ES, with regard to the acute and long-term follow-up implications, were evaluated, focusing on these novel therapeutic strategies of treatment. PMID:26413232

  13. Optimal antiarrhythmic drug therapy for electrical storm

    PubMed Central

    Sorajja, Dan; Munger, Thomas M.; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Electrical storm, defined as 3 or more separate episodes of ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation within 24 hours, carries significant morbidity and mortality. These unstable ventricular arrhythmias have been described with a variety of conditions including ischemic heart disease, structural heart disease, and genetic conditions. While implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation and ablation may be indicated and required, antiarrhythmic medication remains an important adjunctive therapy for these persons. PMID:25745472

  14. Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, W.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms on Mars are predicted to be capable of producing electrostatic fields and discharges, even larger than those in dust storms on Earth. Such electrical activity poses serious risks to any Human exploration of the planet and the lack of sufficient data to characterize any such activity has been identified by NASA's MEPAG as a key human safety knowledge gap. There are three key elements in the characterization of Martian electrostatic discharges: dependence on Martian environmental conditions, frequency of occurrence, and the strength of the generated electric fields. We will describe a proposed program using NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to carry out a long term monitoring campaign to search for and characterize the entire Mars hemisphere for powerful discharges during routine tracking of spacecraft at Mars on an entirely non-interfering basis. The resulting knowledge of Mars electrical activity would allow NASA to plan risk mitigation measures to ensure human safety during Mars exploration. In addition, these measurements will also allow us to place limits on presence of oxidants such as H2O2 that may be produced by such discharges, providing another measurement point for models describing Martian atmospheric chemistry and habitability. Because of the continuous Mars telecommunication needs of NASA's Mars-based assets, the DSN is the only instrument in the world that combines long term, high cadence, observing opportunities with large sensitive telescopes, making it a unique asset worldwide in searching for and characterizing electrostatic activity at Mars from the ground.

  15. Geomagnetic storms: Potential economic impacts on electric utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1991-03-20

    Geomagnetic storms associated with sunspot and solar flare activity can disturb communications and disrupt electric power. A very severe geomagnetic storm could cause a major blackout with an economic impact of several billion dollars. The vulnerability of electric power systems in the northeast United States will likely increase during the 1990s because of the trend of transmitting large amounts of power over long distance to meet the electricity demands of this region. A comprehensive research program and a warning satellite to monitor the solar wind are needed to enhance the reliability of electric power systems under the influence of geomagnetic storms. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Reducing uncertainty - responses for electricity utilities to severe solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, Charles Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, electricity utilities in mid- and low-latitude regions believed that solar storms had no (or only insignificant) effect on their power systems. Then it was noticed that the onset of damage in several large transformers, leading to their failure, correlated very closely with the Halloween storm of 2003. Since then engineers have started to appreciate that a very severe storm could have serious consequences outside the high-latitude regions. There are many uncertainties in predicting the effects of solar storms on electrical systems. The severity and time of arrival of a storm are difficult to model; so are the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) expected to flow in the power networks. Published information about the responses of different types of transformers to GICs is contradictory. Measurements of the abnormal power flows in networks during solar storms generally do not take into account the effects of the current distortion and unbalance, potentially giving misleading signals to the operators. The normal requirement for optimum system management, while allowing for the possibility of faults caused by lightning, birds and other causes, limits the capacity of system operators to respond to the threats of GICs, which are not assessed easily by the N - 1 reliability criterion. A utility's response to the threat of damage by GICs depends on the expected frequency and magnitude of solar storms. Approaches to formulating a response are located in a system model incorporating space physics, network analysis, transformer engineering, network reliability and decision support and the benefits are identified. Approaches adopted in high-latitude regions might not be appropriate where fewer storms are expected to reach damaging levels. The risks of an extreme storm cannot be ignored, and understanding the response mechanisms suitable for low-latitude regions has the capacity to inform and reduce the uncertainty for power systems planners and operators

  17. Oxidant enhancement in martian dust devils and storms: storm electric fields and electron dissociative attachment.

    PubMed

    Delory, Gregory T; Farrell, William M; Atreya, Sushil K; Renno, Nilton O; Wong, Ah-San; Cummer, Steven A; Sentman, Davis D; Marshall, John R; Rafkin, Scot C R; Catling, David C

    2006-06-01

    Laboratory studies, numerical simulations, and desert field tests indicate that aeolian dust transport can generate atmospheric electricity via contact electrification or "triboelectricity." In convective structures such as dust devils and dust storms, grain stratification leads to macroscopic charge separations and gives rise to an overall electric dipole moment in the aeolian feature, similar in nature to the dipolar electric field generated in terrestrial thunderstorms. Previous numerical simulations indicate that these storm electric fields on Mars can approach the ambient breakdown field strength of approximately 25 kV/m. In terrestrial dust phenomena, potentials ranging from approximately 20 to 160 kV/m have been directly measured. The large electrostatic fields predicted in martian dust devils and storms can energize electrons in the low pressure martian atmosphere to values exceeding the electron dissociative attachment energy of both CO2 and H2O, which results in the formation of the new chemical products CO/O- and OH/H-, respectively. Using a collisional plasma physics model, we present calculations of the CO/O- and OH/H- reaction and production rates. We demonstrate that these rates vary geometrically with the ambient electric field, with substantial production of dissociative products when fields approach the breakdown value of approximately 25 kV/m. The dissociation of H2O into OH/H- provides a key ingredient for the generation of oxidants; thus electrically charged dust may significantly impact the habitability of Mars. PMID:16805701

  18. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures. PMID:19180087

  19. Electrical stimulation systems for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Chao, Pen-Hsiu Grace; Maidhof, Robert; Marsano, Anna; Au, Hoi Ting Heidi; Radisic, Milica; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    We describe a protocol for tissue engineering of synchronously contractile cardiac constructs by culturing cardiac cells with the application of pulsatile electrical fields designed to mimic those present in the native heart. Tissue culture is conducted in a customized chamber built to allow for cultivation of (i) engineered three-dimensional (3D) cardiac tissue constructs, (ii) cell monolayers on flat substrates or (iii) cells on patterned substrates. This also allows for analysis of the individual and interactive effects of pulsatile electrical field stimulation and substrate topography on cell differentiation and assembly. The protocol is designed to allow for delivery of predictable electrical field stimuli to cells, monitoring environmental parameters, and assessment of cell and tissue responses. The duration of the protocol is 5 d for two-dimensional cultures and 10 d for 3D cultures.

  20. Electrical consequences of cardiac myocyte: fibroblast coupling.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Lisa; Chilton, Lisa; Smith, Godfrey L; Nicklin, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Gap junctions are channels which allow electrical signals to propagate through the heart from the sinoatrial node and through the atria, conduction system and onwards to the ventricles, and hence are essential for co-ordinated cardiac contraction. Twelve connexin (Cx) proteins make up one gap junction channel, of which there are three main subtypes in the heart; Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45. In the cardiac myocyte, gap junctions are present mainly at the intercalated discs between neighbouring myocytes, and assist in rapid electrical conduction throughout the ventricular myocardium. Fibroblasts provide the structural skeleton of the myocardium and fibroblast numbers significantly increase in heart disease. Fibroblasts also express connexins and this may facilitate heterocellular electrical coupling between myocytes and fibroblasts in the setting of cardiac disease. Interestingly, cardiac fibroblasts have been demonstrated to increase Cx43 expression in experimental models of myocardial infarction and functional gap junctions between myocytes and fibroblasts have been reported. Therefore, in the setting of heart disease enhanced cardiac myocyte: fibroblast coupling may influence the electrical activity of the myocyte and contribute to arrhythmias.

  1. Exploratory Meeting on Atmospheric Electricity and Severe Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The meeting was arranged to discuss atmospheric electricity and its relationship to severe storms, the feasibility of developing a set of instruments for either a Space Shuttle or an unmanned satellite, and the scientific rationale which would warrant further in-depth assessment, involvement and development of supporting activities by NASA.

  2. On the Variations of Electricity, Lightning and Storm Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, M. J.; Deierling, W.; Liu, C.; Mach, D. M.; Kalb, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Electrified clouds -thunderstorms if lightning is detected, and electrified shower clouds otherwise - produce various currents that contribute to the Global Electric Circuit (GEC). This study aims to use observations of storm properties and lightning characteristics, as well as passive microwave estimates of above-cloud electric fields to compare possible current contributions from a wide variety of storms including isolated thunderstorms, Mesoscale Convective Systems, and otherwise similar storms that occur over land or over the ocean. Variations in Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) optical flash properties are also considered in the context of how they relate to the properties of the parent storm and why they differ substantially between land and ocean. This study relies on observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite that include radar profiles from the Precipitation Radar (PR), passive microwave observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI), infrared imagery from the Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS), and optical lightning observations from LIS. Observations and derived parameters such as rain rates and electric field estimates are integrated into two databases: a Precipitation Feature (PF) database that summarizes the properties of storms defined by near surface rainfall, and an Illuminated Cloud Feature (ICF) database that summarizes the properties of the storm region illuminated by LIS lightning flashes. The ICF database is built to examine factors that are related to how optical energy can be distributed across the flash footprint in different types of clouds and different viewing conditions that will have consequences for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) onboard the upcoming GOES-R satellite.

  3. Sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of Brugada syndrome unmasked by thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    Korte, Anna K M; Derde, Lennie; van Wijk, Jeroen; Tjan, David H

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old man suffered a sudden cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation and was successfully resuscitated. He had neither a medical nor family history of cardiac disease/sudden death, but was known to have Graves' disease, for which he was treated with radioactive iodine. Recently, block-and-replacement therapy had been discontinued to evaluate thyroid functioning. On admission, thyroid hormone levels were markedly elevated, suggesting thyroid storm due to residual Graves' disease. The patient was treated with propylthiouracil, hydrocortisone and Lugol solution. ECG showed repolarisation patterns suggestive of an underlying type 1 Brugada syndrome (BS). These findings were confirmed by an additional ajmaline test. An implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted to prevent future arrhythmias. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy 9 months later and recovered completely. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a sudden cardiac arrest as a presentation of BS unmasked by thyroid storm. PMID:26718704

  4. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  5. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nicole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-08-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 "Quebec" storm and the 2003 "Halloween" storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  6. Finite Element Model of Cardiac Electrical Conduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, John Zhihao

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, we develop mathematical models to study electrical conduction of the heart. One important pattern of wave propagation of electrical excitation in the heart is reentry which is believed to be the underlying mechanism of some dangerous cardiac arhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. We present in this thesis a new ionic channel model of the ventricular cardiac cell membrane to study the microscopic electrical properties of myocardium. We base our model on recent single channel experiment data and a simple physical diffusion model of the calcium channel. Our ionic channel model of myocardium has simpler differential equations and fewer parameters than previous models. Further more, our ionic channel model achieves better results in simulating the strength-interval curve when we connect the membrane patch model to form a one dimensional cardiac muscle strand. We go on to study a finite element model which uses multiple states and non-nearest neighbor interactions to include curvature and dispersion effects. We create a generalized lattice randomization to overcome the artifacts generated by the interaction between the local dynamics and the regularities of the square lattice. We show that the homogeneous model does not display spontaneous wavefront breakup in a reentrant wave propagation once the lattice artifacts have been smoothed out by lattice randomization with a randomization scale larger than the characteristic length of the interaction. We further develop a finite 3-D 3-state heart model which employs a probability interaction rule. This model is applied to the simulation of Body Surface Laplacian Mapping (BSLM) using a cylindrical volume conductor as the torso model. We show that BSLM has a higher spatial resolution than conventional mapping methods in revealing the underlying electrical activities of the heart. The results of these studies demonstrate that mathematical modeling and computer simulation are very

  7. Intractable Electrical Storm After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Originating in Abnormal Purkinje Fibers.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Chiho; Tsukada, Toru; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Kentaro; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Imai, Akito; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Hiramatsu, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Electrical storm is a rare but critical complication following revascularization in patients with ischemic heart disease. We report the case of a 67-year-old man who developed drug refractory intractable electrical storm after emergent coronary artery bypass grafting for ischemic cardiomyopathy. The electrical storm was successfully eliminated by percutaneous endocardial radiofrequency catheter ablation targeting the abnormal Purkinje-related triggering ventricular premature contractions in a low-voltage zone.

  8. [Future of implantable electrical cardiac devices].

    PubMed

    Daubert, Jean-Claude; Behaghel, Albin; Leclercq, Christophe; Mabo, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Major improvements in implantable electrical cardiac devices have been made during the last two decades, notably with the advent of automatic internal defibrillation (ICD) to prevent sudden arrhythmic death, and cardiac resynchronisation (CRT) to treat the discoordinated failing heart. They now constitute a major therapeutic option and may eventually supersede drug therapy. The coming era will be marked by a technological revolution, with improvements in treatment delivery, safety and efficacy, and an expansion of clinical indications. Leadless technologyfor cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators is already in the pipeline, endovascular leads currently being responsible for most long-term complications (lead failure, infection, vein thrombosis, etc.). Miniaturized pacemakers based on nanotechnology can now be totally implanted inside the right ventricle through the transvenous route, thus eliminating leads, pockets and scarring In the same way, totally subcutaneous ICD systems are now available, although they are currently only capable of delivering shocks, without pacing (including antitachycardia pacing). In CRT optimised delivery is important to improve clinical responses and to reduce the non-response rate (around 30 % with current technology). Endocardial left ventricular pacing could be a solution if it can be achieved at an acceptable risk. Multisite ventricular pacing is an alternative. Besides CRT neuromodulation, especially by vagal stimulation, is another important field of device researchfor heart failure. Preliminary clinical results are encouraging. PMID:26427291

  9. Electrical Discharges in the Overshooting Tops of Five Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGorman, D. R.; Elliott, M.

    2013-12-01

    Individual electrical discharges detected by VHF Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMAs) in the overshooting tops of strong storms typically occur continually at rates of roughly 1 - 10 per second and do not appear to cluster systematically in time or space as flashes. This study analyzed discharges relative to S-band polarimetric radar data and to GOES infrared imagery in the overshooting tops of five storms ranging from moderately strong multicell storms to supercell storms. Although the density of VHF sources in overshooting tops was much less than the maximum densities below the level of neutral bouyancy, the overshooting top typically contained a secondary maximum of density. The onset of discharges in an overshooting top corresponded to an increase in the maximum magnitude and height of reflectivity as the top substantially penetrated the level of neutral bouyancy. Once the discharges began, most were within reflectivities of at least 18 dBZ and formed a dome having geometry similar to that of the dome in reflectivity. Discharges persisted for approximately as long as the reflectivity dome persisted and could last anywhere from a few minutes for short-lived overshooting tops to a few hours for cases with an overlapping series of overshooting tops produced by a succession of updraft pulses. The 99.99th percentile in the height of VHF sources was well correlated (correlation coefficient of at least 0.8) with the height of 18 and 30 dBZ, and the timing of variations in height of these parameters agreed well. We suggest the discharges are caused by turbulent cells bringing negative screening layer charge close to positive charge in the updraft core. The onset of discharges in an overshooting top preceded the detection of overshooting tops in satellite imagery. The poorer performance probably was the result of the poorer spatiotemporal resolution of infrared cloud-top imagery in the present GOES constellation. Severe weather was either imminent or occurring when

  10. Electrical storm in patients with an implanted defibrillator: a matter of definition.

    PubMed

    Israel, Carsten W; Barold, S Serge

    2007-10-01

    The term "electrical storm" (ES) indicates a state of cardiac electrical instability manifested by several episodes of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VTs) within a short time. In patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), ES is best defined as 3 appropriate VT detections in 24 h, treated by antitachycardia pacing, shock or eventually untreated but sustained in a VT monitoring zone. The number of shocks and inappropriate detections are irrelevant for the definition. ES occurs in approximately 25% of ICD patients within 3 years, with typically 5-55 individual VTs within one storm. Potential triggers can be found in approximately 66% of patients and include new/worsened heart failure, changes in antiarrhythmic medication, context with other illness, psychological stress, diarrhea, and hypokalemia. In most patients, ES consists of monomorphic VT indicating the presence of reentry while ventricular fibrillation indicating acute ischemia is rare. ES seems to have a low immediate mortality (1%) but frequently (50-80%) leads to hospitalization. Long-term prognostic implications of ES are unclear. The key intervention in ES is reduction of the elevated sympathetic tone by beta blockers and frequently benzodiazepines. Amiodarone i.v. has also been successful and azimilide seems promising while class I antiarrhythmic drugs are usually unsuccessful. Substrate mapping and VT ablation may be useful in treatment and prevention of ES. Prevention of ES requires ICD programming systematically avoiding unnecessary shocks (long VT detection, antitachycardia pacing where ever possible) which otherwise can fuel the sympathetic tone and prolong ES.

  11. Empirical models of storm time equatorial zonal electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejer, Bela G.; Scherliess, Ludger

    1997-10-01

    Ionospheric plasma drifts often show highly complex and variable signatures during geomagnetically active periods due to the effects of different disturbance processes. We describe initially a methodology for the study of storm time dependent ionospheric electric fields. We present empirical models of equatorial disturbance zonal electric fields obtained using extensive F region vertical plasma drift measurements from the Jicamarca Observatory and auroral electrojet indices. These models determine the plasma drift perturbations due to the combined effects of short-lived prompt penetration and longer lasting disturbance dynamo electric fields. We show that the prompt penetration drifts obtained from a high time resolution empirical model are in excellent agreement with results from the Rice Convection Model for comparable changes in the polar cap potential drop. We also present several case studies comparing observations with results obtained by adding model disturbance drifts and season and solar cycle dependent average quiet time drift patterns. When the disturbance drifts are largely due to changes in magnetospheric convection and to disturbance dynamo effects, the measured and modeled drift velocities are generally in good agreement. However, our results indicate that the equatorial disturbance electric field pattern can be strongly affected by variations in the shielding efficiency, and in the high-latitude potential and energy deposition patterns which are not accounted for in the model. These case studies and earlier results also suggest the possible importance of additional sources of plasmaspheric disturbance electric fields.

  12. Atmospheric Electricity Effects of Eastern Mediterranean Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Shai; Yair, Yoav; Yaniv, Roy; Price, Colin

    2016-04-01

    We present atmospheric electrical measurements conducted at the Wise Observatory (WO) in Mizpe-Ramon (30035'N, 34045'E) and Mt. Hermon (30024'N, 35051'E), Israel, during two massive and unique dust storms that occurred over the Eastern Mediterranean region on February 10-11 and September 08-12, 2015. The first event transported Saharan dust from Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula in advance of a warm front of a Cyprus low pressure system. In the second event, dust particles were transported from the Syrian desert, which dominates the north-east border with Iraq, through flow associated with a shallow Persian trough system. In both events the concentrations of PM10 particles measured by the air-quality monitoring network of the Israeli Ministry of the Environment in Beer-Sheba reached values > 2200 μg m-3. Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) obtained from the AERONET station in Sde-Boker reached values up to 4.0. The gradual intensification of the first event reached peak values on the February 11th > 1200 μg m-3 and an AOT ~ 1.8, while the second dust storm commenced on September 8th with a sharp increase reaching peak values of 2225 μg m-3 and AOT of 4.0. Measurements of the fair weather vertical electric field (Ez) and of the vertical current density (Jz) were conducted continuously with a 1 minute temporal resolution. During the February event, very large fluctuations in the electrical parameters were measured at the WO. The Ez values changed between +1000 and +8000 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -10 and +20 pA m-2 (this is an order of magnitude larger compared to the fair weather current density of ~2 pA m-2. In contrast, during the September event, Ez values registered at WO were between -430 and +10 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -6 and +3 pA m2. For the September event the Hermon site showed Ez and Jz values fluctuating between -460 and +570 V m-1 and -14.5 and +18 pA m-2 respectively. The electric field and current variability, amplitude and the

  13. Optimization of Electrical Stimulation Parameters for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2010-01-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile cardiac tissue constrcuts. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation, to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, and were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Cardiac tissues stimulated at 3V/cm amplitude and 3Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43, and the best developed contractile behavior. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:21604379

  14. Optimization of electrical stimulation parameters for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Wan, Leo; Park, Hyoungshin; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-06-01

    In vitro application of pulsatile electrical stimulation to neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured on polymer scaffolds has been shown to improve the functional assembly of cells into contractile engineered cardiac tissues. However, to date, the conditions of electrical stimulation have not been optimized. We have systematically varied the electrode material, amplitude and frequency of stimulation to determine the conditions that are optimal for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes, exhibiting the highest charge-injection capacity and producing cardiac tissues with the best structural and contractile properties, were thus used in tissue engineering studies. Engineered cardiac tissues stimulated at 3 V/cm amplitude and 3 Hz frequency had the highest tissue density, the highest concentrations of cardiac troponin-I and connexin-43 and the best-developed contractile behaviour. These findings contribute to defining bioreactor design specifications and electrical stimulation regime for cardiac tissue engineering.

  15. A less aggressive therapeutic option for electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Bertero, G; Agosti, S; Brunelli, C

    2013-01-01

    Electrical storm (ES) describes the rapidly clustering ventricular fibrillation (VF) that requires multiple cardioversions. Emerging evidence suggests that Purkinje arborization and sympathetic nerve regeneration play a major role in initiating malignant arrhythmias. We report the case of two patients who, after having survived an acute myocardial infarction (MI), developed repetitive episodes of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and VF one week after percutaneous revascularization, triggered by monomorphic premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). Owing to repetitive and drug-refractory VF episodes, temporary atrial overdrive pacing was attempted with complete suppression of VF. In the following month, recurrence of ventricular arrhythmia was inversely related to the atrial pacing rate. Although antiarrhythmic drugs other than beta-blockers had been discontinued, neither PVCs nor ventricular arrhythmias recurred at one-month follow-up when the lower pacing rate was set at 60 bpm. In conclusion in these patients, ES was likely related to nerve sprouting after ischemic injury. This chaotic phenomenon occurs early after tissue damage and shows a peak seven days after acute MI with degeneration of superfluous axon branches. High pacing rates can reduce early after depolarizations and suppress PVCs, thus preventing ES. On these grounds, ES patients may be treated with temporary overdrive pacing rather than early radiofrequency ablation.

  16. New electrical plethysmograph monitors cardiac output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubicek, W. B.; Patterson, R. P.; Witsoe, D. A.

    1968-01-01

    Four-electrode impedance plethysmograph measures ventricular stroke volume of cardiac output of humans. The instrument is automatic, operates with only one recording channel, and minimizes patient discomfort.

  17. Combined Aircraft and Satellite-Derived Storm Electric Current and Lightning Rates Measurements and Implications for the Global Electric Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.

    2010-01-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of electrified shower clouds and thunderstorms spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. The measurements were made with the NASA ER-2 and the Altus-II high altitude aircrafts. Peak electric fields, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV/m to 16 kV/m, with a mean value of 0.9 kV/m. The median peak field was 0.29 kV/m. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean storms with lightning is 1.6 A while the mean current for land storms with lightning is 1.0 A. The mean current for oceanic storms without lightning (i.e., electrified shower clouds) is 0.39 A and the mean current for land storms without lightning is 0.13 A. Thus, on average, land storms with or without lightning have about half the mean current as their corresponding oceanic storm counterparts. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal lightning statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie

  18. Electrical Storm Simulation to Improve the Learning Physics Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Muñoz, Miriam; Jiménez Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Gutiérrez de Mesa, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a research project whose main objective is to understand the impact that the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has on the teaching and learning process on the subject of Physics. We will show that, with the use of a storm simulator, physics students improve their learning process on one hand they understand…

  19. Progress in utilization of a mobile laboratory for making storm electricity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. David

    1988-01-01

    A mobile atmospheric science laboratory has been used to intercept and track storms on the Great Plains region of the U.S., with the intention of combining the data obtained with those from Doppler and conventional radars, NASA U-2 aircraft overflights, balloon soundings, and fixed-base storm electricity measurements. The mobile lab has proven to be valuable in the gathering of ground truth verifications for the two commercially operated lightning ground-strike locating systems. Data acquisition has recently been expanded by means of mobile ballooning before and during storms.

  20. Electrical and mechanical stimulation of cardiac cells and tissue constructs.

    PubMed

    Stoppel, Whitney L; Kaplan, David L; Black, Lauren D

    2016-01-15

    The field of cardiac tissue engineering has made significant strides over the last few decades, highlighted by the development of human cell derived constructs that have shown increasing functional maturity over time, particularly using bioreactor systems to stimulate the constructs. However, the functionality of these tissues is still unable to match that of native cardiac tissue and many of the stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes display an immature, fetal like phenotype. In this review, we seek to elucidate the biological underpinnings of both mechanical and electrical signaling, as identified via studies related to cardiac development and those related to an evaluation of cardiac disease progression. Next, we review the different types of bioreactors developed to individually deliver electrical and mechanical stimulation to cardiomyocytes in vitro in both two and three-dimensional tissue platforms. Reactors and culture conditions that promote functional cardiomyogenesis in vitro are also highlighted. We then cover the more recent work in the development of bioreactors that combine electrical and mechanical stimulation in order to mimic the complex signaling environment present in vivo. We conclude by offering our impressions on the important next steps for physiologically relevant mechanical and electrical stimulation of cardiac cells and engineered tissue in vitro.

  1. Design of electrical stimulation bioreactors for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, N; Marsano, A; Cannizzaro, C; Voldman, J; Vunjak-Novakovic, G

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and we identified a safety range of 0 to 8 V/cm by comparing excitation thresholds and maximum capture rates for neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured with electrical stimulation. We conclude with recommendations for studies involving carbon electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering.

  2. Design of Electrical Stimulation Bioreactors for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, N.; Marsano, A.; Cannizzaro, C.; Voldman, J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and we identified a safety range of 0 to 8 V/cm by comparing excitation thresholds and maximum capture rates for neonatal rat cardiomyocytes cultured with electrical stimulation. We conclude with recommendations for studies involving carbon electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:19163486

  3. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient's cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  4. Novel anisotropic engineered cardiac tissues: studies of electrical propagation

    PubMed Central

    Bursac, Nenad; Loo, Yihua; Leong, Kam; Tung, Leslie

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with uniformly anisotropic architecture, and to evaluate their electrical function using multi-site optical mapping of cell membrane potentials. Anisotropic polymer scaffolds made by leaching of aligned sucrose templates were seeded with neonatal rat cardiac cells and cultured in rotating bioreactors for 6-14 days. Cells aligned and interconnected inside the scaffolds and when stimulated by a point electrode, supported macroscopically continuous, anisotropic impulse propagation. By culture day 14, the ratio of conduction velocities along vs. across cardiac fibers reached a value of 2, similar to that in native neonatal ventricles, while action potential duration and maximum capture rate respectively decreased to 120 ms and increased to ~5 Hz. The shorter culture time and larger scaffold thickness were associated with increased incidence of sustained reentrant arrhythmias. In summary, this study is the first successful attempt to engineer a cm2-size, functional anisotropic cardiac tissue patch. PMID:17689494

  5. Characterization of electrical stimulation electrodes for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Nina; Cannizzaro, Chris; Figallo, Elisa; Voldman, Joel; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2006-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. The goal of this study was to assess the conditions of electrical stimulation with respect to the electrode geometry, material properties and charge-transfer characteristics at the electrode-electrolyte interface. We compared various biocompatible materials, including nanoporous carbon, stainless steel, titanium and titanium nitride, for use in cardiac tissue engineering bioreactors. The faradaic and non-faradaic charge transfer mechanisms were assessed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), studying current injection characteristics, and examining surface properties of electrodes with scanning electron microscopy. Carbon electrodes were found to have the best current injection characteristics. However, these electrodes require careful handling because of their limited mechanical strength. The efficacy of various electrodes for use in 2-D and 3-D cardiac tissue engineering systems with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes is being determined by assessing cell viability, amplitude of contractions, excitation thresholds, maximum capture rate, and tissue morphology.

  6. Lightning Mapping and Electric Field Change Observations of a Stationary New Mexico Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Hunyady, S. J.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Aulich, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    On August 23, 2010 a classic airmass thunderstorm occurred over high plains immediately east of the Langmuir Laboratory mountaintop observatory in central New Mexico. The energetic storm developed around 2:30 pm MDT (2030 UTC) and remained essentially stationary over its complete lifetime of about 2 hours. The complete sequence of lightning was recorded both by the 16-station Langmuir Laboratory Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and by several electrostatic field change stations around and beneath the storm. The LMA and Delta-E data are both of very high quality and sensitivity. In this initial study we report on the lightning-inferred electrical structure of the storm and on estimated charging currents determined from a simple electrodynamic model of the storm. The electric field change measurements, in combination with the detailed 3-D mapping results, can be used to determine the amounts of charge involved in individual strokes and parts of flashes for comparison and improvement of the modeling. The LMA data regularly detected isolated attempted breakdown events at repeated locations at mid- to high altitudes in the storm that were clearly indicative of localized high-field regions. The attempted breakdown events were often exact pre-cursors of the initial breakdown of full-fledged IC flashes typically several seconds up to several tens of seconds later, but also often did not precurse a subsequent discharge. During both IC and CG flashes, numerous recoil-type, fast negative breakdown events were detected along otherwise undetected positive leader channels in the main, mid-level negative charge region. The localized fast events during IC flashes often repeatedly intensified in strength and number prior to upward negative leader K-events, and then temporarily ceased before starting up again prior to the next K-event. Many of the negative CG flashes in the storm produced strokes with long continuing currents (CCs). The overall electric field changes and hence total

  7. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  8. Modeling of the Storm time Electric Fields and the Response of the Ionosphere- Plasmasphere-Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, N.; Fuller-Rowell, T.; Codrescu, M.; Anderson, D.; Richmond, A.; Maute, A.; Sazykin, S.; Toffoletto, F.; Spiro, R.; Wolf, R.; Millward, G.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a self-consistent first-principles model of the coupled inner magnetosphere- thermosphere- ionosphere- plasmasphere system in order to understand the storm time electrodynamic coupling of the magnetosphere and ionosphere and its consequences for the ionosphere, plasmasphere, and thermosphere. The model involves electrodynamic coupling of the Rice Convection Model (RCM) and the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Plasmasphere electrodynamics (CTIPe) model: RCM provides the region 2 field aligned currents resulting from pressure gradients in the inner magnetosphere, which are important for modeling electric-field penetration and the shielding processes, while CTIPe provides time-dependent conductivity and neutral wind fields that are key to modeling the disturbance dynamo. A newly developed potential solver takes into account all these inputs to derive the global pattern of ionospheric electric fields. We found that the storm time vertical ExB drifts from the coupled model provided a better agreement with those from the observations for the March 2001 storm as compared to the predictions from the stand-alone RCM and CTIPe. Our simulation results suggest that the temporal variation of the magnetospheric magnetic field plays a significant role in the storm time variation of the drifts, especially for super storms such as March 2001 and November 2004 storm events. As responses of the ionosphere, plasmasphere and thermosphere to the storm time disturbance drifts, we found that daytime and evening upward enhancement of the ExB drift caused by the penetration electric field modifies the electron density and zonal neutral wind, leading to the zonal drift disturbances near the terminator through the F-region dynamo process. In this paper, we will address the role of the combined effect of the vertical and zonal drift disturbances as possible drivers to reproduce the massive restructuring of TEC.

  9. Electrical stimulation to optimize cardioprotective exosomes from cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C R; Berman, A E; Weintraub, N L; Tang, Y L

    2016-03-01

    Injured or ischemic cardiac tissue has limited intrinsic capacity for regeneration. While stem cell transplantation is a promising approach to stimulating cardiac repair, its success in humans has thus far been limited. Harnessing the therapeutic benefits of stem cells requires a better understanding of their mechanisms of action and methods to optimize their function. Cardiac stem cells (CSC) represent a particularly effective cellular source for cardiac repair, and pre-conditioning CSC with electrical stimulation (EleS) was demonstrated to further enhance their function, although the mechanisms are unknown. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells primarily exert their effects through communicating with endogenous tissues via the release of exosomes containing cardioprotective molecules such as miRNAs, which upon uptake by recipient cells may stimulate survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Exosomes are also effective therapeutic agents in isolation and may provide a feasible alternative to stem cell transplantation. We hypothesize that EleS enhances CSC-mediated cardiac repair through its beneficial effects on production of cardioprotective exosomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that the beneficial effects of biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure may in part result from EleS-induced preconditioning of endogenous CSC to promote cardiac repair. With future research, our hypothesis may provide applications to optimize stem cell therapy and augment current pacing protocols, which may significantly advance the treatment of patients with heart disease. PMID:26880625

  10. Acute outcome of treating patients admitted with electrical storm in a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Mukund A.; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Prasad BV, Srinivas; Abhilash, S.P.; Thajudeen, Anees; Ajith, Kumar V.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrical storm (ES) is a life threatening emergency. There is little data available regarding acute outcome of ES. Aims The study aimed to analyze the acute outcome of ES, various treatment modalities used, and the factors associated with mortality. Methods This is a retrospective observational study involving patients admitted with ES at our centre between 1/1/2007 and 31/12/2013. Results 41 patients (mean age 54.61 ± 12.41 years; 86.7% males; mean ejection fraction (EF) 44.51 ± 16.48%) underwent treatment for ES. Hypokalemia (14.63%) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (14.63%) were the commonest identifiable triggers. Only 9 (21.95%) patients already had an ICD implanted. Apart from antiarrhythmic drugs (100%), deep sedation (87.8%), mechanical ventilation (24.39%) and neuraxial modulation using left sympathetic cardiac denervation (21.95%) were the common treatment modalities used. Thirty-three (80.49%) patients could be discharged after a mean duration of 14.2 ± 2.31 days. Eight (19.5%) patients died in hospital. The mortality was significantly higher in those with EF < 35% compared to those with a higher EF (8 (42.11% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.03)). There was no significant difference in mortality between those with versus without a structural heart disease (8 (21.1% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.32)). Comparison of mortality an ACS with ES versus ES of other aetiologies (3 (50%) vs 5 (14.29) %, p = 0.076)) showed a trend towards significance. Conclusion With comprehensive treatment, there is reasonable acute survival rate of ES. Hypokalemia and ACS are the commonest triggers of ES. Patients with low EF and ACS have higher mortality. PMID:27479203

  11. Rescue peri-operative management of the patient with giant electrical storm and severe left ventricular dysfunction: support by levosimendan and intraaortic balloon counterpulsation.

    PubMed

    Vanek, Tomas; Kolesar, Miroslav; Nejedly, Michal; Jirmar, Radovan

    2008-08-01

    We present a case of a 62-year-old male patient (coronary heart disease, and stenosis of aortic valve) with severe left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction 20%, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter 80 mm, end-diastolic volume 329 ml) who developed giant electrical storm (on the whole 115 episodes of pulseless ventricular tachycardia treated by antiarrhythmics and electrical discharges) with low-elevation of cardiac biomarkers. The patient was referred to emergent cardiac surgery (double coronary bypass grafting, aortic valve replacement, and implantation of left ventricular epicardial electrode). Levosimendan and intraaortic balloon counterpulsation were used for successful weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass; no other arrhythmia appeared in the post-bypass period. Postoperatively no arrhythmic events were detected, and repeated echocardiographic examinations of the patient in good general condition showed gradual improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction (30-35%), likewise in other parameters (left ventricular end-diastolic diameter 72 mm, end-diastolic volume 285 ml).

  12. Successful management of a case of electrical storm due to invasive endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Hottkowitz, Christoph; Ammann, Peter; Kleger, Gian Reto; Künzli, Andreas; Hack, Dietrich; Rickli, Hans; Maeder, Micha T

    2012-01-01

    We present a 44-year-old man with invasive aortic and tricuspid valve endocarditis complicated by electrical storm, which was immediately diagnosed and successfully treated due to the patient's telemetry electrocardiogram (ECG). This case highlights a rare but potentially fatal complication in patients with invasive endocarditis and the need for very careful clinical evaluation and monitoring of these patients.

  13. Massive Electrical Storm at Disease Onset in a Patient with Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pallisgaard, Jannik L.; Gang, Uffe; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Hansen, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 49 Final Diagnosis: — Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Rare disease Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is a genetic arrhythmogenic disease characterized by ST-segment elevations in the right precordial leads of the electrocardiogram (ECG). These ECG changes may be concealed and BrS may present with electrical storm characterized by recurrent ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Case Report: A 49-year-old previously healthy man was admitted with electrical storm. The patient received direct current (DC) cardioversion shocks and only after intravenous lidocaine did the electrical storm slowly subside with a total of 255 DC shocks administered during the first 24 h after admission. He fully recovered and received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Subsequent drug challenge with flecainide revealed type 1 BrS. Conclusions: Massive electrical storm can be the first symptom of BrS and the diagnostic ECG changes may be concealed at presentation. Although hundreds of DC shocks may be required during initial treatment, full recovery can be achieved. PMID:25528772

  14. Electrically Induced Calcium Handling in Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    For nearly a century, the heart was viewed as a terminally differentiated organ until the discovery of a resident population of cardiac stem cells known as cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). It has been shown that the regenerative capacity of CPCs can be enhanced by ex vivo modification. Preconditioning CPCs could provide drastic improvements in cardiac structure and function; however, a systematic approach to determining a mechanistic basis for these modifications founded on the physiology of CPCs is lacking. We have identified a novel property of CPCs to respond to electrical stimulation by initiating intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We used confocal microscopy and intracellular calcium imaging to determine the spatiotemporal properties of the Ca2+ signal and the key proteins involved in this process using pharmacological inhibition and confocal Ca2+ imaging. Our results provide valuable insights into mechanisms to enhance the therapeutic potential in stem cells and further our understanding of human CPC physiology.

  15. How does an electric field defibrillate cardiac muscle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Krinsky, Valentin I.

    Cardiac fibrillation is caused by an irregular wave propagation. Fibrillation can be eliminated by a strong electric field (5 kV, 20 A, 2 msec). The mechanism of this phenomenon (defibrillation) is not known. The principal difficulty, as shown in experiments and confirmed by classical cable theory, is that the changes in transmembrane potential, e, induced by electric field, decay exponentially with distance from the electrodes. We study wave suppression by an electric field in generic excitable media. In excitable media consisting of separate cells (similar to biological tissues), we have found a suppression of rotating waves and defibrillation induced by strong electric field, contrary to what happens in continuous media. We show that the spatially periodic component of e which arises in cellular media is responsible for defibrillation. We have found that (i) it does not decay with distance; (ii) it can excite quiescent cells and terminate excitation in excited cells; (iii) the coupling between cardiac cells is a crucial parameter affecting the amplitude of the spatially periodic component of e, and the efficiency of defibrillation. New experiments on cardiac muscle are proposed.

  16. Global Electric Circuit Diurnal Variation Derived from Storm Overflight and Satellite Optical Lightning Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bateman, M. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We have combined analyses of over 1000 high altitude aircraft observations of electrified clouds with diurnal lightning statistics from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) to produce an estimate of the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit. Using basic assumptions about the mean storm currents as a function of flash rate and location, and the global electric circuit, our estimate of the current in the global electric circuit matches the Carnegie curve diurnal variation to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Mean contributions to the global electric circuit from land and ocean thunderstorms are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean). Contributions to the global electric circuit from ESCs are 0.22 kA for ocean storms and 0.04 kA for land storms. Using our analysis, the mean total conduction current for the global electric circuit is 2.0 kA.

  17. Global Electric Circuit Implications of Combined Aircraft Storm Electric Current Measurements and Satellite-Based Diurnal Lightning Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bateman, Monte G.

    2011-01-01

    Using rotating vane electric field mills and Gerdien capacitors, we measured the electric field profile and conductivity during 850 overflights of thunderstorms and electrified shower clouds (ESCs) spanning regions including the Southeastern United States, the Western Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, Central America and adjacent oceans, Central Brazil, and the South Pacific. The overflights include storms over land and ocean, and with positive and negative fields above the storms. Over three-quarters (78%) of the land storms had detectable lightning, while less than half (43%) of the oceanic storms had lightning. Integrating our electric field and conductivity data, we determined total conduction currents and flash rates for each overpass. With knowledge of the storm location (land or ocean) and type (with or without lightning), we determine the mean currents by location and type. The mean current for ocean thunderstorms is 1.7 A while the mean current for land thunderstorms is 1.0 A. The mean current for ocean ESCs 0.41 A and the mean current for land ESCs is 0.13 A. We did not find any significant regional or latitudinal based patterns in our total conduction currents. By combining the aircraft derived storm currents and flash rates with diurnal flash rate statistics derived from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and Optical Transient Detector (OTD) low Earth orbiting satellites, we reproduce the diurnal variation in the global electric circuit (i.e., the Carnegie curve) to within 4% for all but two short periods of time. The agreement with the Carnegie curve was obtained without any tuning or adjustment of the satellite or aircraft data. Given our data and assumptions, mean contributions to the global electric circuit are 1.1 kA (land) and 0.7 kA (ocean) from thunderstorms, and 0.22 kA (ocean) and 0.04 (land) from ESCs, resulting in a mean total conduction current estimate for the global electric circuit of 2.0 kA. Mean storm counts are 1100 for land

  18. Satellite observations of penetration electric fields during a severe magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. S.; Yeh, H.

    2004-12-01

    During the severe magnetic storm of July 15, 2000, the ROCSAT-1 low earth orbiting satellite detected an unusually large region of density depletion at low latitudes (<35o) in the nightside ionosphere in co-rotation with the Southern Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Adjacent to the region of density dropout was a region of density enhancement with irregularities. We deduced convective electric fields during the storm from measurements of drift meters and retarding potential analyzer (RPA) on board ROCSAT-1. Large eastward zonal and outward radial electric fields were detected at apex height below 5000 km. The magnitude of the radial electric field was about 10 mV/m in the beginning of storm main phase and decayed to about 1-2 mV/m during the recovery phase. The zonal electric field followed the similar variation with a smaller magnitude. Electric fields were perturbed with distinct localized features in association with density depletion and enhancement structures in the SAA region. The mean magnitude of electric fields increased as density decreased in the density depletion region. The zonal and radial electric fields were generally reduced in the density enhancement region, suggesting an appreciable enhancement of ionospheric conductivities. Interestingly electric fields in the density enhancement region contained distinct wavy structures with wave length about 100 km. Both electric field components peaked at the apex height of discontinuity separating the density depletion and enhancement. These results suggest that feedback effects in the SAA region are important for the electric field penetration to the low latitude nightside ionosphere.

  19. In situ measurements and radar observations of a severe storm - Electricity, kinematics, and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, G. J.; Few, A. A.; Stewart, M. F.; Conrad, A. C.; Torczon, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electric field measurements made inside a multicell severe storm in Oklahoma in 1983 with a balloon-borne instrument are presented. The properties of the electric charge regions, such as altitude, thickness, and charge concentrations, are studied. These measurements are analzyed with meteorological measurements of temperature and humidity, and balloon tracking and radar observations. The relation between the electric charge structure and the precipitation and kinematic features of the storm is examined. The data reveal that the cell exhibits a bipolar charge structure with negative charge below positive charge. The average charge concentrations of the two regions are estimated as -1.2 and 0.15 nC/cu m, respectively; the upper positive charge is about 6 km in vertical extent, and the lower negative charge is less than 1 km in vertical extent.

  20. Tests of Convection Electric Field Models For The January 10, 1997, Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V.; Boonsiriseth, A.; Thorne, R.; Dotan, Y.

    The January 10-11, 1997, geomagnetic storm was caused by the passage at Earth of a magnetic cloud with a negative to positive Bz variation extending for 1 day. The ge- omagnetic indices had values of minimum Dst=-83 nT and maximum Kp=6 during the period of southward IMF within the cloud. We simulate ring current development during this storm using our kinetic drift-loss model and compare the results inferred from Volland-Stern type, Weimer, and AMIE convection electric field models. A pen- etration electric field is added to the AMIE model [Boonsiriseth et al., 2001] in order to improve the agreement with measurements from the electric field instrument on Po- lar spacecraft. The ionospheric electric potentials are mapped to the equatorial plane using the Tsyganenko 1996 magnetic field model and the resulting equatorial poten- tial models are coupled with our ring current model. While the temporal evolution of the large-scale features is similar in all three convection models, detailed comparison indicates that AMIE model shows highly variable small-scale features not present in the Volland-Stern or Weimer convection models. Results from our kinetic ring current model are compared with energetic particle data from the HYDRA, TIMAS, IPS, and CAMMICE instruments on Polar to test the applicability of the convection electric field models for this storm period.

  1. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 2; Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Mach, D. M.; Christian, H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman, M. G.

    2005-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory and "pitch down method" developed in Part I of this study are applied to complete the calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m and a 5 V/m error in the mean fair weather field function, the 3-D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V/m, the method retrieves the 3-D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair weather field estimate is typically within 1 V/m of the true fair weather field. Using this side constraint and data from fair weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. The resulting calibration matrix was then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably with the results obtained from earlier calibration analyses that were based on iterative techniques.

  2. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircrfaft Field Mill Data: Part II: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Mach, D. M.; Christian H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman M. G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory developed in Part I of this study is applied to complete a relative calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the Lagrange multiplier method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -1) and a 5 V m(sup -1) error in the mean fair-weather field function, the 3D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair-weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -l), the method retrieves the 3D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair-weather field estimate is typically within 1 V m(sup -1) of the true fair-weather field. Using this type of side constraint and data from fair-weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. Absolute calibration was completed using the pitch down method developed in Part I, and conventional analyses. The resulting calibration matrices were then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably in many respects with results derived from earlier (iterative) techniques of calibration.

  3. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Melissa R; Fernandez, Steven J; Fu, Joshua S; Walker, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  4. Summary of Almost 20 Years of Storm Overflight Electric Field, Conductivity, Flash Rate, and Current Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    We present total conduction (Wilson) currents for more than 1000 high-altitude aircraft overflights of electrified clouds acquired over nearly two decades. The overflights include a wide geographical sample of storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive (i.e., upward-directed) and negative current. Peak electric field, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV/m to 16. kV/m, with mean (median) of 0.9 kV/m (0.29 kV/m). Total conductivity at flight altitude ranged from 0.6 pS/m to 3.6 pS/m, with mean and median of 2.2 pS/m. Peak current densities ranged from -2.0 nA m(exp -2) to 33.0 nA m(exp -2) with mean (median) of 1.9 nA m(exp -2) (0.6 nA m(exp -2)). Total upward current flow from storms in our dataset ranged from -1.3 to 9.4 A. The mean current for storms with lightning is 1.7 A over ocean and 1.0 A over land. The mean current for electrified shower clouds (i.e. electrified storms without lightning) is 0.41 A for ocean and 0.13 A for land. About 78% (43%) of the land (ocean) storms have detectable lightning. Land storms have 2.8 times the mean flash rate as ocean storms (2.2 versus 0.8 flashes min-1, respectively). Approximately 7% of the overflights had negative current. The mean and median currents for positive (negative) polarity storms are 1.0 and 0.35 A (-0.30 and -0.26 A). We found no regional or latitudinal-based patterns in our storm currents, nor support for simple scaling laws between cloud top height and lightning flash rate.

  5. Summary of Almost 20 Years of Storm Overflight Electric Field, Conductivity, Flash Rates, and Electric Current Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    We determined total conduction currents and flash rates for around 900 high-altitude aircraft overflights of electrified clouds over 17 years. The overflights include a wide geographical sample of storms over land and ocean, with and without lightning, and with positive (i.e., upward-directed) and negative current. Peak electric field, with lightning transients removed, ranged from -1.0 kV m(sup -1) to 16. kV m(sup -1), with mean (median) of 0.9 kV m(sup -1) (0.29 kV m(sup -1)). Total conductivity at flight altitude ranged from 0.6 pS m(sup -1) to 3.6 pS m(sup -1), with mean and median of 2.2 pS m(sup -1). Peak current densities ranged from -2.0 nA m(sup -2) to 33.0 nA m(sup -2) with mean (median) of 1.9 nA m(sup -2) (0.6 nA m(sup -2)). Total upward current flow from storms in our dataset ranged from -1.3 to 9.4 A. The mean current for storms with lightning is 1.6 A over ocean and 1.0 A over land. The mean current for electrified shower clouds (i.e. electrified storms without lightning) is 0.39 A for ocean and 0.13 A for land. About 78% (43%) of the land (ocean) storms have detectable lightning. Land storms have 2.8 times the mean flash rate as ocean storms (2.2 versus 0.8 flashes min(sup -1), respectively). Approximately 7% of the overflights had negative current. The mean and median currents for positive (negative) polarity storms are 1.0 and 0.35 A (-0.30 and -0.26 A). We found no regional or latitudinal-based patterns in our storm currents, nor support for simple scaling laws between cloud top height and lightning flash rate.

  6. Towards Depth-Resolved Optical Imaging of Cardiac Electrical Activity.

    PubMed

    Walton, Richard D; Bernus, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of arrhythmias are likely to be complex three-dimensional phenomena. Yet, the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional imaging techniques, both in the clinic and the experimental lab, limits our ability to better understand the mechanisms of such arrhythmias. Optical mapping using voltage-sensitive dyes is a widely used tool in experimental electrophysiology. It has been known for decades that even in its most basic application, epi-fluorescence, the optical signal contains information from within a certain intramural volume. Understanding of this fundamental property of optical signals has paved the way towards novel three-dimensional optical imaging techniques. Here, we review our current understanding of the three-dimensional nature of optical signals; how penetration depths of cardiac optical imaging can be improved by using novel imaging modalities and finally, we highlight new techniques inspired from optical tomography and aiming at full depth-resolved optical mapping of cardiac electrical activity. PMID:26238062

  7. Electrical storm in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: can it be forecast?

    PubMed

    Emkanjoo, Zahra; Alihasani, Narges; Alizadeh, Abolfath; Tayyebi, Mohammad; Bonakdar, Hamid; Barakpour, Hamid; Sadr-Ameli, Mohammad Ali

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of electrical storm in 227 patients who had received implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and had been monitored for 31.7 +/- 15.6 months. Of these, 174 (77%) were men. The mean age was 55.8 +/- 15.5 years (range, 20-85 yr), and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 0.30 +/- 0.14. One hundred forty-six of the patients (64%) had underlying coronary artery disease. Cardioverter-defibrillators were implanted for secondary (80%) and primary (20%) prevention. Of the 227 patients, 117 (52%) experienced events that required ICD therapy. Thirty patients (mean age, 57.26 +/- 14.3 yr) had > or = 3 episodes requiring ICD therapy in a 24-hour period and were considered to have electrical storm. The mean number of events was 12.75 +/- 15 per patient. Arrhythmia-clustering occurred an average of 6.1 +/- 6.7 months after ICD implantation. Clinical variables with the most significant association with electrical storm were low LVEF (P = 0.04; hazard ratio of 0.261, and 95% confidence interval of 0.08-0.86) and higher use of class IA antiarrhythmic drugs (P = 0.018, hazard ratio of 3.84, and 95% confidence interval of 1.47-10.05). Amiodarone treatment and use of beta-blockers were not significant predictors when subjected to multivariate analysis. We conclude that electrical storm is most likely to occur in patients with lower LVEF and that the use of Class IA antiarrhythmic drugs is a risk factor.

  8. Electrical and Mechanical Strategies to Enable Cardiac Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hung; Kang, Bong Jin; Lee, Chia-An; Shung, K. Kirk; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate replacement of lost ventricular myocardium from myocardial infarction leads to heart failure. Investigating the regenerative capacity of mammalian hearts represents an emerging direction for tissue engineering and cell-based therapy. Recent advances in stem cells hold promise to restore cardiac functions. However, embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes lack functional phenotypes of the native myocardium, and transplanted tissues are not fully integrated for synchronized electrical and mechanical coupling with the host. In this context, this review highlights the mechanical and electrical strategies to promote cardiomyocyte maturation and integration, and to assess the functional phenotypes of regenerating myocardium. Simultaneous micro-electrocardiogram and high-frequency ultrasound techniques will also be introduced to assess electrical and mechanical coupling for small animal models of heart regeneration. PMID:25974948

  9. Equatorial spread F/plasma bubble irregularities under storm time disturbance electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, M. A.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is responsible for storm time disturbance electric field propagation to equatorial latitudes, by processes of direct penetration and disturbance wind dynamo. New results have been forthcoming in recent years from satellite and ground based observations and modeling studies on the important characteristics of these electric fields as well their effects on the electrodynamics of the equatorial ionosphere and thermosphere, especially, in terms of their impact on the equatorial spread F (ESF) plasma bubble irregularity development conditions that is in focus here. The disturbance zonal electric fields, when superimposed on equatorial evening pre-reversal enhancement electric field, PRE, can drastically modify the post-sunset, and night time, F layer heights, a basic control factor for the instability growth by Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism leading to plasma bubble development. Based on published results and some new data we present here a comprehensive, but brief, analysis and discussion of the processes of ESF development, suppression or disruption under different phases of a storm activity sequence. Consequences for ESF occurrence from under-shielding and over-shielding penetration electric fields as well as from the disturbance winds and wind dynamo electric field occurring in different local time sectors of the night, as also the irregularity dynamics and longitude extension, etc., are highlighted in this paper. Some outstanding problems for further research are also presented.

  10. Time causal operational estimation of electric fields induced in the Earth's lithosphere during magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Swidinsky, Andrei

    2014-04-01

    In support of projects for monitoring geomagnetic hazards for electric power grids, we develop a simple mathematical formalism, consistent with the time causality of deterministic physics, for estimating electric fields that are induced in the Earth's lithosphere during magnetic storms. For an idealized model of the lithosphere, an infinite half-space having uniform electrical conductivity properties described by a galvanic tensor, we work in the Laplace-transformed frequency domain to obtain a transfer function which, when convolved with measured magnetic field time series, gives an estimated electric field time series. Using data collected at the Kakioka, Japan observatory, we optimize lithospheric conductivity parameters by minimizing the discrepancy between model-estimated electric field variation and that actually measured. With our simple model, we can estimate 87% of the variance in storm time Kakioka electric field data; a more complicated model of lithospheric conductivity would be required to estimate the remaining 13% of the variance. We discuss how our estimation formalism might be implemented for geographically coordinated real-time monitoring of geoelectric fields.

  11. Summary of the NASA/MSFC FY-79 Severe Storm and Local Weather research review. [cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics reserach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Significant acomplishments, current focus of work, plans for FY-80, and recommendations for new research are outlined for 36 research projects proposed for technical monitoring by the Atmospheric Sciences Division at Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics of the investigations, which were reviewed at a two-day meeting, relate to cloud physics, atmospheric electricity, and mesoscale/storm dynamics.

  12. Practical aspects of cardiac tissue engineering with electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Christopher; Tandon, Nina; Figallo, Elisa; Park, Hyoungshin; Gerecht, Sharon; Radisic, Milica; Elvassore, Nicola; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2007-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in western society. Despite the success of heart transplantation, a chronic shortage of donor organs, along with the associated immunological complications of this approach, demands that alternative treatments be found. One such option is to repair, rather than replace, the heart with engineered cardiac tissue. Multiple studies have shown that to attain functional tissue, assembly signaling cues must be recapitulated in vitro. In their native environment, cardiomyocytes are directed to beat in synchrony by propagation of pacing current through the tissue. Recently, we have shown that electrical stimulation directs neonatal cardiomyocytes to assemble into native-like tissue in vitro. This chapter provides detailed methods we have employed in taking this "biomimetic" approach. After an initial discussion on how electric field stimulation can influence cell behavior, we examine the practical aspects of cardiac tissue engineering with electrical stimulation, such as electrode selection and cell seeding protocols, and conclude with what we feel are the remaining challenges to be overcome.

  13. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability. To obtain a comprehensive assessment, diverse biological models were employed. These involved cardiac electrical testing in the normal and ischemic heart in anesthetized and conscious dogs. The experimental plan was designed both to examine the direct effects of carbon monoxide exposure on the myocardium and to evaluate possible indirect influences through alterations in platelet aggregability or changes in central nervous system activity in the conscious animal. Our results indicate that exposure to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, is without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. It is important to note that the total exposure period was in the range of 90 to 124 minutes. The possibility that longer periods of exposure or exacerbation from nicotine in cigarette smoke could have a deleterious effect cannot be excluded. We also examined whether or not alterations in platelet aggregability due to carbon monoxide exposure could be a predisposing factor for cardiac arrhythmias. A model involving partial coronary artery stenosis was used to simulate the conditions under which platelet plugs could lead to myocardial ischemia and life-threatening arrhythmias. We found no changes either in the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Thus, carbon monoxide exposure does not appear to alter platelet aggregability or its effect on coronary blood flow during stenosis. In the final series of experiments, we examined the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state.

  14. Influence of the Convection Electric Field Models on Predicted Plasmapause Positions During Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrard, V.; Khazanov, G.; Cabrera, J.; Lemaire, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, we determine how three well documented models of the magnetospheric electric field, and two different mechanisms proposed for the formation of the plasmapause influence the radial distance, the shape and the evolution of the plasmapause during the geomagnetic storms of 28 October 2001 and of 17 April 2002. The convection electric field models considered are: Mcllwain's E51) electric field model, Volland-Stern's model and Weimer's statistical model compiled from low-Earth orbit satellite data. The mechanisms for the formation of the plasmapause to be tested are: (i) the MHD theory where the plasmapause should correspond to the last-closed- equipotential (LCE) or last-closed-streamline (LCS), if the E-field distribution is stationary or time-dependent respectively; (ii) the interchange mechanism where the plasmapause corresponds to streamlines tangent to a Zero-Parallel-Force surface where the field-aligned plasma distribution becomes convectively unstable during enhancements of the E-field intensity in the nightside local time sector. The results of the different time dependent simulations are compared with concomitant EUV observations when available. The plasmatails or plumes observed after both selected geomagnetic storms are predicted in all simulations and for all E-field models. However, their shapes are quite different depending on the E-field models and the mechanisms that are used. Despite the partial success of the simulations to reproduce plumes during magnetic storms and substorms, there remains a long way to go before the detailed structures observed in the EUV observations during periods of geomagnetic activity can be accounted for very precisely by the existing E-field models. Furthermore, it cannot be excluded that the mechanisms currently identified to explain the formation of "Carpenter's knee" during substorm events, will', have to be revised or complemented in the cases of geomagnetic storms.

  15. MRI for patients with cardiac implantable electrical devices.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Nazarian, Saman

    2014-05-01

    MRI has become an invaluable tool in the evaluation of soft tissue and bony abnormalities. The presence of a cardiac implantable electrical device (CIED) may complicate matters, however, because these devices are considered a contraindication to MRI scanning. When MRI is performed in patients with a CIED, risks include reed switch activation in older devices, lead heating, system malfunction, and significant radiofrequency noise resulting in inappropriate inhibition of demand pacing, tachycardia therapies, or programming changes. This report reviews indications and risk-benefit evaluation of MRI in patients with CIED and provides a clinical algorithm for performing MRI in patients with implanted devices. PMID:24793805

  16. Atmospheric Electrical Modeling in Support of the NASA F-106 Storm Hazards Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A recently developed storm electrification model (SEM) is used to investigate the operating environment of the F-106 airplane during the NASA Storm Hazards Project. The model is 2-D, time dependent and uses a bulkwater microphysical parameterization scheme. Electric charges and fields are included, and the model is fully coupled dynamically, microphysically and electrically. One flight showed that a high electric field was developed at the aircraft's operating altitude (28 kft) and that a strong electric field would also be found below 20 kft; however, this low-altitude, high-field region was associated with the presence of small hail, posing a hazard to the aircraft. An operational procedure to increase the frequency of low-altitude lightning strikes was suggested. To further the understanding of lightning within the cloud environment, a parameterization of the lightning process was included in the SEM. It accounted for the initiation, propagation, termination, and charge redistribution associated with an intracloud discharge. Finally, a randomized lightning propagation scheme was developed, and the effects of cloud particles on the initiation of lightning investigated.

  17. Storm-time Magnetospheric Effects on Electric Fields in the Subauroral Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R. A.; Garner, T. W.; Goldstein, J.; Sazykin, S.; Spiro, R. W.

    2001-12-01

    Although the inner edge of the plasma sheet tends to shield the mid- and low-latitude ionosphere from the full force of magnetospheric convection, the shielding is particularly ineffective during magnetic storms. This talk will review several effects that represent quick responses to magnetospheric drivers, specifically the following: 1. Overshielding and undershielding. The overshielding electric fields, which occur during convection decreases, were predicted theoretically and observed in the post-midnight sector more than twenty years ago. The predicted patterns have been largely confirmed by statistical analysis of radar observations, although it has been necessary to modify the original overshielding idea somewhat to be consistent with the observed strength and duration. Overshielding has also been seen in plasmaspheric observations, most recently by the IMAGE spacecraft. Simulations of the main phase of a large storm predict the sustained presence of an undershielding (direct penetration) eastward electric field in the post-dusk sector, possibly triggering scintillations there. 2. Polarization jets. Simulations indicate that strong ring current injection is accompanied by a several-degree-wide westward-moving jet of plasma in the dusk-midnight quadrant, just equatorward of the auroral zone. These have been observed in recent years from CRRES and Millstone Hill. 3. Interchange-associated electric-field eddies. These are predicted by recent Rice Convection Model simulations and have not, as far as we know, been reported observationally. We predict their occurrence in the early recovery phase of a magnetic storm whose main phase terminates with a strong and sustained northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field. They should occur in a band roughly 5 degrees wide, just equatorward of the auroral zone, in the dusk-midnight sector.

  18. Temporary ventricular overdrive pacing for electrical storm after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshihito; Naito, Yuji; Nishimura, Kuniharu

    2011-11-01

    A 57-year-old man who had been receiving chemotherapy for multiple myeloma complained of chest pain and was diagnosed with coronary artery disease. Coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass was performed smoothly, and extubation was done in the operating room. The next evening, cluster of ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation triggered by ventricular premature contractions occurred and required multiple electrical defibrillations. Despite intravenous administration of lidocaine, amiodarone, magnesium, and β-blocker, the storm sustained and was suppressed only by temporary ventricular overdrive pacing. He was discharged on foot.

  19. A case of a short-coupled variant of torsades de Pointes with electrical storm.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Toshiharu; Sato, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Fumihiko; Sato, Motohiko; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Akasaka, Nobuyuki; Go, Kazutomo; Fujimoto, Kazuhiro; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2003-02-01

    This case report describes a short-coupled variant of Torsades de Pointes with a characteristic ECG pattern consisting of a prominent J wave in leads V3-V6, in which an electrical storm was evoked with autonomic receptor stimulation and a blockade test. The patient's frequent VF attacks were triggered by short-coupled premature ventricular contractions with a right bundle branch block morphology and left-axis deviation, and were suppressed by deep sedation followed by a combination therapy using verapamil and mexiletine. Interestingly, with the use of those drugs, the prominent J wave diminished. The mechanism underlying this syndrome is discussed.

  20. Electrical Pacing of Cardiac Tissue Including Potassium Inward Rectification.

    PubMed

    Galappaththige, Suran; Roth, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    In this study cardiac tissue is stimulated electrically through a small unipolar electrode. Numerical simulations predict that around an electrode are adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization. Experiments have shown that during pacing of resting cardiac tissue the hyperpolarization is often inhibited. Our goal is to determine if the inward rectifying potassium current (IK1) causes the inhibition of hyperpolarization. Numerical simulations were carried out using the bidomain model with potassium dynamics specified to be inward rectifying. In the simulations, adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization were observed surrounding the electrode. For cathodal currents the virtual anode produces a hyperpolarization that decreases over time. For long duration pulses the current-voltage curve is non-linear, with very small hyperpolarization compared to depolarization. For short pulses, the hyperpolarization is more prominent. Without the inward potassium rectification, the current voltage curve is linear and the hyperpolarization is evident for both long and short pulses. In conclusion, the inward rectification of the potassium current explains the inhibition of hyperpolarization for long duration stimulus pulses, but not for short duration pulses.

  1. Subtle alternating electrocardiographic morphology as an indicator of decreased cardiac electrical stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Blue, B.; Clancy, E.; Valeri, C. R.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Observations from finite-element computer models, together with analytic developments based on percolation theory have suggested that subtle fluctuations of ECG morphology might serve as an indicator diminished cardiac electrical stability. With fixed-rate atrial pacing in canines, we have previously observed a pattern of alternation in T wave energy which correlated with cardiac electrical stability. We report here on a series of 20 canine experiments in which cardiac electrical stability (measured via Ventricular Fibrillation Threshold determination) was compared to a non-degenerate, multidimensional measurement of the degree of alternating activity present in the ECG complex morphology. The decrease in cardiac electrical stability brought on by both coronary artery occlusion and systemic hypothermia was consistently accompanied by subtle alternation in ECG morphology, with the absolute degree of alternating activity being significantly (negatively) correlated with cardiac electrical stability.

  2. Effect of Precipitating Electrons on Stormtime Inner Magnetospheric Electric Fields during the 17 March 2013 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Lemon, C. L.; Sazykin, S. Y.; Wolf, R.; Hecht, J. H.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Boyd, A. J.; Turner, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate how scattering of electrons by waves in the plasma sheet and plasmasphere affects precipitating energy flux distributions and how the precipitating electrons modify the ionospheric conductivity and electric potentials during the large 17 March 2013 magnetic storm. Of particular interest is how electron precipitation in the evening sector affects the development of the Sub-auroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) electric field that is observed at sub-auroral latitudes in that sector. Our approach is to use the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model - Equilibrium (RCM-E) of the inner magnetosphere to simulate the stormtime precipitating electron distributions and the electric field. We use parameterized rates of whistler-generated electron pitch-angle scattering from Orlova and Shprits [JGR, 2014] that depend on equatorial radial distance, magnetic activity (Kp), and magnetic local time (MLT) outside the simulated plasmasphere. Inside the plasmasphere, parameterized scattering rates due to hiss [Orlova et al., GRL, 2014] are used. We compare simulated trapped and precipitating electron flux distributions with measurements from Van Allen Probes/MagEIS, POES/TED and MEPED, respectively, to validate the electron loss model. Ground-based (SuperDARN) and in-situ (Van Allen Probes/EFW) observations of electric fields are compared with the simulation results. We discuss the effect of precipitating electrons on the SAPS and inner magnetospheric electric field through the data-model comparisons.

  3. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part 1; Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of retrieving storm electric fields from an aircraft instrumented with several electric field mill sensors can be expressed in terms of a standard Lagrange multiplier optimization problem. The method naturally removes aircraft charge from the retrieval process without having to use a high voltage stinger and linearly combined mill data values. It allows a variety of user-supplied physical constraints (the so-called side constraints in the theory of Lagrange multipliers) and also helps improve absolute calibration. Additionally, this paper introduces an alternate way of performing the absolute calibration of an aircraft that has some benefits over conventional analyses. It is accomplished by using the time derivatives of mill and pitch data for a pitch down maneuver performed at high (greater than 1 km) altitude. In Part II of this study, the above methods are tested and then applied to complete a full calibration of a Citation aircraft.

  4. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields From Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part I: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the problem of retrieving storm electric fields from an aircraft instrumented with several electric field mill sensors can be expressed in terms of a standard Lagrange multiplier optimization problem. The method naturally removes aircraft charge from the retrieval process without having to use a high voltage stinger and linearly combined mill data values. It also allows a variety of user-supplied physical constraints (the so-called side constraints in the theory of Lagrange multipliers). Additionally, this paper introduces a novel way of performing the absolute calibration of an aircraft that has several benefits over conventional analyses. In the new approach, absolute calibration is completed by inspecting the time derivatives of mill and pitch data for a pitch down maneuver performed at high (greater than 1 km) altitude. In Part II of this study, the above methods are tested and then applied to complete a full calibration of a Citation aircraft.

  5. Nanowires and Electrical Stimulation Synergistically Improve Functions of hiPSC Cardiac Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Richards, Dylan J; Tan, Yu; Coyle, Robert; Li, Yang; Xu, Ruoyu; Yeung, Nelson; Parker, Arran; Menick, Donald R; Tian, Bozhi; Mei, Ying

    2016-07-13

    The advancement of human induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hiPSC-CM) technology has shown promising potential to provide a patient-specific, regenerative cell therapy strategy to treat cardiovascular disease. Despite the progress, the unspecific, underdeveloped phenotype of hiPSC-CMs has shown arrhythmogenic risk and limited functional improvements after transplantation. To address this, tissue engineering strategies have utilized both exogenous and endogenous stimuli to accelerate the development of hiPSC-CMs. Exogenous electrical stimulation provides a biomimetic pacemaker-like stimuli that has been shown to advance the electrical properties of tissue engineered cardiac constructs. Recently, we demonstrated that the incorporation of electrically conductive silicon nanowires to hiPSC cardiac spheroids led to advanced structural and functional development of hiPSC-CMs by improving the endogenous electrical microenvironment. Here, we reasoned that the enhanced endogenous electrical microenvironment of nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids would synergize with exogenous electrical stimulation to further advance the functional development of nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids. For the first time, we report that the combination of nanowires and electrical stimulation enhanced cell-cell junction formation, improved development of contractile machinery, and led to a significant decrease in the spontaneous beat rate of hiPSC cardiac spheroids. The advancements made here address critical challenges for the use of hiPSC-CMs in cardiac developmental and translational research and provide an advanced cell delivery vehicle for the next generation of cardiac repair.

  6. Electrical stimulation of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells modulates cell phenotype and genetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, A; Sanchez, B; Soler-Botija, C; Gálvez-Montón, C; Prat-Vidal, C; Roura, S; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Bragos, R; Bayes-Genis, A

    2015-11-01

    A major challenge of cardiac tissue engineering is directing cells to establish the physiological structure and function of the myocardium being replaced. Our aim was to examine the effect of electrical stimulation on the cardiodifferentiation potential of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs). Three different electrical stimulation protocols were tested; the selected protocol consisted of 2 ms monophasic square-wave pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz over 14 days. Cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs were grown on biocompatible patterned surfaces. Cardiomyogenic differentiation was examined by real-time PCR and immunocytofluorescence. In cardiac ATDPCs, MEF2A and GATA-4 were significantly upregulated at day 14 after stimulation, while subcutaneous ATDPCs only exhibited increased Cx43 expression. In response to electrical stimulation, cardiac ATDPCs elongated, and both cardiac and subcutaneous ATDPCs became aligned following the linear surface pattern of the construct. Cardiac ATDPC length increased by 11.3%, while subcutaneous ATDPC length diminished by 11.2% (p = 0.013 and p = 0.030 vs unstimulated controls, respectively). Compared to controls, electrostimulated cells became aligned better to the patterned surfaces when the pattern was perpendicular to the electric field (89.71 ± 28.47º for cardiac ATDPCs and 92.15 ± 15.21º for subcutaneous ATDPCs). Electrical stimulation of cardiac ATDPCs caused changes in cell phenotype and genetic machinery, making them more suitable for cardiac regeneration approaches. Thus, it seems advisable to use electrical cell training before delivery as a cell suspension or within engineered tissue.

  7. A synthetic strand of cardiac muscle: its passive electrical properties

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, M; Sawanobori, T; Kootsey, JM; Johnson, EA

    1975-01-01

    The passive electrical properties of synthetic strands of cardiac muscle, grown in tissue culture, were studied using two intracellular microelectrodes: one to inject a rectangular pulse of current and the other to record the resultant displacement of membrane potential at various distances from the current source. In all preparations, the potential displacement, instead of approaching a steady value as would be expected for a cell with constant electrical properties, increased slowly with time throughout the current step. In such circumstances, the specific electrical constants for the membrane and cytoplasm must not be obtained by applying the usual methods, which are based on the analytical solution of the partial differential equation describing a one-dimensional cell with constant electrical properties. A satisfactory fit of the potential waveforms was, however, obtained with numerical solutions of a modified form of this equation in which the membrane resistance increased linearly with time. Best fits of the waveforms from 12 preparations gave the following values for the membrane resistance times unit length, membrane capacitance per unit length, and for the myoplasmic resistance: 1.22 plus or minus 0.13 x 10-5 omegacm, 0.224 plus or minus 0.023 uF with cm-minus 1, and 1.37 plus or minus 0.13 x 10-7 omegacm-minus 1, respectively. The value of membrane capacitance per unit length was close to that obtained from the time constant of the foot of the action potential and was in keeping with the generally satisfactory fit of the recorded waveforms with solutions of the cable equation in which the membrane impedance is that of a single capacitor and resistor in parallel. The area of membrane per unit length and the cross-sectional area of myoplasm at any given length of the preparation were determined from light and composite electron micrographs, and these were used to calculate the following values for the specific electrical membrane resistance, membrane

  8. Prophylactic left thoracic sympathectomy to prevent electrical storms in CPVT patients needing ICD placement.

    PubMed

    Moray, Amol; Kirk, Edwin P; Grant, Peter; Camphausen, Christoph

    2011-11-01

    Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia (CPVT), a life threatening arrhythmia induced by sympathetic stimulation in susceptible individuals is often refractory to antiarrhythmic agents. First line of treatment, beta-blockers can be ineffective in up to 50% with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) placement for refractory cases. Paradoxically ICD can be arryhthmogenic from shock-associated sympathetic stimulation, initiating more shocks and "electrical storms". This has led to the use of more effective beta blockade offered by left sympathectomy, now performed by minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Sympathectomy has been traditionally performed long after ICD placement, after the patient has experienced multiple shocks, thus necessitating two procedures. We report simultaneous ICD insertion and thoracoscopic sympathectomy in a 10 year-old boy with CPVT, and suggest it as a better approach than sequential procedures. To our knowledge this is first such reported case.

  9. Reconstruction of the electrical activity of cardiac Purkinje fibres.

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, R E; Noble, D; Tsien, R W

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical activity of Cardiac Purkinje fibres was reconstructed using a mathematical model of the membrane current. The individual components of ionic curent were described by equations which wee based as closely as possible on previous experiments using the voltage clamp technique. 2. Membrane action potentials and pace-maker activity were calculated and compared with time course of underlying changes in two functionally distinct outeard currents, iX1 and iK2. 3. The repolarization of the theoretical action potential is triggered by the onset of iX1, which becomes activated over the plateau range of potentials. iK2 also activates during the plateau but does not play a controlling role in the repolarization. Hwever, iK2 does govern the slow pace-maker depolarization through its subsequent deactivation at negative potentials. 4. The individual phases of the calculated action potential and their 'experimental' modifications were compared with published records. The upstroke is generated by a Hodgkin-Huxley type sodium conductance (gNa), and rises with a maximum rate of 478 V/sec, somewhat less than experimentally observed values ( up to 800 V/sec). The discrepancy is discussed in relation to experimental attempts at measuring gNa. 5. The ole of the transient outward chloride current (called igr) was studied in calculations of the rapid phase of repolarization and 'notch' configuration... PMID:1185607

  10. Electrical storm originating from a left ventricular epicardial scar in a patient with completely normal endocardial voltage.

    PubMed

    Sternick, Eduardo Back; Piorkowski, Christopher; Hindricks, Gerhard; Dagres, Nikolaos; Sommer, Philipp

    2011-11-01

    We report a patient with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy presenting with an electrical storm because of a poorly tolerated monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. Electroanatomical mapping revealed a scar restricted to the epicardium, whereas the endocardial voltage map was completely normal. Epicardial catheter ablation based on substrate mapping and limited pace and entrainment mapping eliminated the tachycardia.

  11. Electrical heart disease: Genetic and molecular basis of cardiac arrhythmias in normal structural hearts.

    PubMed

    Farwell, David; Gollob, Michael H

    2007-08-01

    Purely electrical heart diseases, defined by the absence of any structural cardiac defects, are responsible for a large number of sudden, unexpected deaths in otherwise healthy, young individuals. These conditions include the long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and the short QT syndrome. Collectively, these conditions have been referred to as channelopathies. Ion channels provide the molecular basis for cardiac electrical activity. These channels have specific ion selectivity and are responsible for the precise and timely regulation of the passage of charged ions across the cell membrane in myocytes, and the summation of their activity in cardiac muscle defines the surface electrocardiogram. Impairment in the flow of these ions in heart cells may mean the difference between a normal, prosperous life and the tragedy of a sudden, unexpected death due to ventricular arrhythmia. The present paper reviews the current clinical and molecular understanding of the electrical diseases of the heart associated with sudden cardiac death.

  12. Preliminary Optical And Electric Field Pulse Statistics From Storm Overflights During The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, D. A.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Goldberg, R. A.; Desch, M. D.; Houser, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) was conducted during the month of August, 2002 in an area near Key West, Florida. One of the goals of this uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) study was to collect high resolution optical pulse and electric field data from thunderstorms. During the month long campaign, we acquired 5294 lightning generated optical pulses with associated electric field changes. Most of these observations were made while close to the top of the storms. We found filtered mean and median 10-10% optical pulse widths of 875 and 830 microns respectively while the 50-50% mean and median optical pulse widths are 422 and 365 microns respectively. These values are similar to previous results as are the 10-90% mean and median rise times of 327 and 265 microns. The peak electrical to optical pulse delay mean and median were 209 and 145 microns which is longer than one would expect from theoretical results. The results of the pulse analysis will contribute to further validation of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellites. Pre-launch estimates of the flash detection efficiency were based on a small sample of optical pulse measurements associated with less than 350 lightning discharges collected by NASA U-2 aircraft in the early 1980s. Preliminary analyses of the ACES measurements show that we have greatly increased the number of optical pulses available for validation of the LIS and other orbital lightning optical sensors. Since the Altus was often close to the cloud tops, many of the optical pulses are from low-energy pulses. From these low-energy pulses, we can determine the fraction of optical lightning pulses below the thresholds of LIS, OTD, and any future satellite-based optical sensors such as the geostationary Lightning Mapping Sensor.

  13. Reversible cardiac conduction block and defibrillation with high-frequency electric field.

    PubMed

    Tandri, Harikrishna; Weinberg, Seth H; Chang, Kelly C; Zhu, Renjun; Trayanova, Natalia A; Tung, Leslie; Berger, Ronald D

    2011-09-28

    Electrical impulse propagation is an essential function in cardiac, skeletal muscle, and nervous tissue. Abnormalities in cardiac impulse propagation underlie lethal reentrant arrhythmias, including ventricular fibrillation. Temporary propagation block throughout the ventricular myocardium could possibly terminate these arrhythmias. Electrical stimulation has been applied to nervous tissue to cause reversible conduction block, but has not been explored sufficiently in cardiac tissue. We show that reversible propagation block can be achieved in cardiac tissue by holding myocardial cells in a refractory state for a designated period of time by applying a sustained sinusoidal high-frequency alternating current (HFAC); in doing so, reentrant arrhythmias are terminated. We demonstrate proof of concept using several models, including optically mapped monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, Langendorff-perfused guinea pig and rabbit hearts, intact anesthetized adult rabbits, and computer simulations of whole-heart impulse propagation. HFAC may be an effective and potentially safer alternative to direct current application, currently used to treat ventricular fibrillation.

  14. Reversible Cardiac Conduction Block and Defibrillation with High-Frequency Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Tandri, Harikrishna; Weinberg, Seth H.; Chang, Kelly C.; Zhu, Renjun; Trayanova, Natalia A.; Tung, Leslie; Berger, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical impulse propagation is an essential function in cardiac, skeletal muscle, and nervous tissue. Abnormalities in cardiac impulse propagation underlie lethal reentrant arrhythmias, including ventricular fibrillation. Temporary propagation block throughout the ventricular myocardium could possibly terminate these arrhythmias. Electrical stimulation has been applied to nervous tissue to cause reversible conduction block, but has not been explored sufficiently in cardiac tissue. We show that reversible propagation block can be achieved in cardiac tissue by holding myocardial cells in a refractory state for a designated period of time by applying a sustained sinusoidal high-frequency alternating current (HFAC); in doing so, reentrant arrhythmias are terminated. We demonstrate proof of concept using several models, including optically mapped monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, Langendorff-perfused guinea pig and rabbit hearts, intact anesthetized adult rabbits, and computer simulations of whole-heart impulse propagation. HFAC may be an effective and potentially safer alternative to direct current application, currently used to treat ventricular fibrillation. PMID:21957174

  15. Control of cardiac alternans by mechanical and electrical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapari, Felicia; Deshpande, Dipen; Belhamadia, Youssef; Dubljevic, Stevan

    2014-07-01

    A persistent alternation in the cardiac action potential duration has been linked to the onset of ventricular arrhythmia, which may lead to sudden cardiac death. A coupling between these cardiac alternans and the intracellular calcium dynamics has also been identified in previous studies. In this paper, the system of PDEs describing the small amplitude of alternans and the alternation of peak intracellular Ca2+ are stabilized by optimal boundary and spatially distributed actuation. A simulation study demonstrating the successful annihilation of both alternans on a one-dimensional cable of cardiac cells by utilizing the full-state feedback controller is presented. Complimentary to these studies, a three variable Nash-Panfilov model is used to investigate alternans annihilation via mechanical (or stretch) perturbations. The coupled model includes the active stress which defines the mechanical properties of the tissue and is utilized in the feedback algorithm as an independent input from the pacing based controller realization in alternans annihilation. Simulation studies of both control methods demonstrate that the proposed methods can successfully annihilate alternans in cables that are significantly longer than 1 cm, thus overcoming the limitations of earlier control efforts.

  16. Response of the Fair Weather Atmospheric Electrical Current to Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Elhalal, Gal

    2013-04-01

    The Global Electric Circuit (GEC) is a conceptual model that integrates the observed electrical properties of the atmosphere in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. An average potential difference of 250 kV exists between these two conducting layers, leading to a surface electric field (Ez, sometimes also named the Potential Gradient or PG) of ~130 V/m, and a nearly constant downward flowing direct current density (Jz) of ~2 pA m-2. This is known as the DC component of the GEC. The Jz is an extremely sensitive parameter whose magnitude and fluctuations can be used for monitoring local and global conductivity changes due to aerosols, air-pollution and solar activity. The AC part of the circuit is driven by ~50 lightning flashes per second generating the global Schumann resonances (SR) in the ELF range. There are two time-scales for identifying solar effects on the GEC. On the longer scale, an 11-year modulation by solar activity, likely due to changes in ionization, was reported by several authors. For example, Satori et al. (2005) noted a decrease in the frequency of the first 3 modes of the SR band in conjunction with the solar minimum of 1995-6. On shorter time scales typical of solar activity (e.g. CMEs, solar flares and SEP events), observations show marked perturbations in Jz and in the ionospheric potential at the surface. Cobb (1967) observed an increase of Jz by 75% for ~ 6 h in measurements made at Mauna Loa in Hawaii, during a period of multiple solar flares. Reiter (1989) observed an increase in Jz of about 50%-60% following large solar flares, persisting for 4 days (at the Zungspietze station in the Alps). Belova et al. (2001) reported increased Jz for about 2 hours before T=0 (time of minimum in Bx) as well as enhanced average fluctuations. This talk will review the effects of solar storms on the GEC, and present new results from continuous measurements of Jz conducted at the Wise Observatory in Mitzpe-Ramon, Israel (30°35'N, 34°45'E). During 3 different

  17. Biphasic Electrical Field Stimulation Aids in Tissue Engineering of Multicell-Type Cardiac Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Loraine L.Y.; Iyer, Rohin K.; King, John-Paul

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of current work were (1) to compare the effects of monophasic or biphasic electrical field stimulation on structure and function of engineered cardiac organoids based on enriched cardiomyocytes (CM) and (2) to determine if electrical field stimulation will enhance electrical excitability of cardiac organoids based on multiple cell types. Organoids resembling cardiac myofibers were cultivated in Matrigel-coated microchannels fabricated of poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. We found that field stimulation using symmetric biphasic square pulses at 2.5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 1 ms (per pulse phase) was an improved stimulation protocol, as compared to no stimulation and stimulation using monophasic square pulses of identical total amplitude and duration (5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 2 ms). This was supported by the highest success rate for synchronous contractions, low excitation threshold, the highest cell density, and the highest expression of Connexin-43 in the biphasic group. Subsequently, enriched CM were seeded on the networks of (1) cardiac fibroblasts (FB), (2) D4T endothelial cells (EC), or (3) a mixture of FB and EC that were precultured for 2 days prior to the addition of enriched CM. Biphasic field stimulation was also effective at improving electrical excitability of these cardiac organoids by improving the three-dimensional organization of the cells, increasing cellular elongation and enhancing Connexin-43 presence. PMID:18783322

  18. Biphasic electrical field stimulation aids in tissue engineering of multicell-type cardiac organoids.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; Iyer, Rohin K; King, John-Paul; Radisic, Milica

    2011-06-01

    The main objectives of current work were (1) to compare the effects of monophasic or biphasic electrical field stimulation on structure and function of engineered cardiac organoids based on enriched cardiomyocytes (CM) and (2) to determine if electrical field stimulation will enhance electrical excitability of cardiac organoids based on multiple cell types. Organoids resembling cardiac myofibers were cultivated in Matrigel-coated microchannels fabricated of poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. We found that field stimulation using symmetric biphasic square pulses at 2.5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 1 ms (per pulse phase) was an improved stimulation protocol, as compared to no stimulation and stimulation using monophasic square pulses of identical total amplitude and duration (5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 2 ms). This was supported by the highest success rate for synchronous contractions, low excitation threshold, the highest cell density, and the highest expression of Connexin-43 in the biphasic group. Subsequently, enriched CM were seeded on the networks of (1) cardiac fibroblasts (FB), (2) D4T endothelial cells (EC), or (3) a mixture of FB and EC that were precultured for 2 days prior to the addition of enriched CM. Biphasic field stimulation was also effective at improving electrical excitability of these cardiac organoids by improving the three-dimensional organization of the cells, increasing cellular elongation and enhancing Connexin-43 presence.

  19. Polarization radar and electrical observations of microburst producing storms during Cohmex. [COoperative Huntsville Meteorological EXperiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Wright, Patrick D.; Rust, W. David; Nielsen, Kurt E.

    1989-01-01

    The life cycles of two electrified, microburst-producing storms that occurred on July 19 and 20, 1986 near Huntsville, Alabama are described and compared. The kinematic and microphysical development of the storm clouds is examined. Lightning activity prior to the onset of the microburst is studied. It is observed that ice phase precipitation particles are important in the electrification of the storm and in the formation of the strong downdraft, and the vertical distribution and movement of mass have a role in determining the total lightning activity and type of flashes.

  20. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence.

  1. Wave trains induced by circularly polarized electric fields in cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Tang, Juan-Mei; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Clinically, cardiac fibrillation caused by spiral and turbulent waves can be terminated by globally resetting electric activity in cardiac tissues with a single high-voltage electric shock, but it is usually associated with severe side effects. Presently, a promising alternative uses wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a sequence of low-voltage uniform electric field pulses. Nevertheless, this method can only emit waves locally near obstacles in turbulent waves and thereby requires multiple obstacles to globally synchronize myocardium and thus to terminate fibrillation. Here we propose a new approach using wave emission from heterogeneities induced by a low-voltage circularly polarized electric field (i.e., a rotating uniform electric field). We find that, this approach can generate circular wave trains near obstacles and they propagate outwardly. We study the characteristics of such circular wave trains and further find that, the higher-frequency circular wave trains can effectively suppress spiral turbulence. PMID:26302781

  2. Control of rotating waves in cardiac muscle: analysis of the effect of an electric field.

    PubMed

    Pumir, A; Plaza, F; Krinsky, V I

    1994-08-22

    The effect of an electric field on rotating waves in cardiac muscle is considered from a theoretical point of view. A model of excitation propagation taking into account the cellular structure of the heart is presented and studied. The application of a direct current electric field along the cardiac tissue is known to induce changes in membrane potential which decay exponentially with distance. Investigation of the model shows that the electric field induces a gradient of potential inside a cell which does not decay with distance, and results in modification of excitation propagation which extends a considerable distance from the electrodes. In two dimensions, it induces a drift of rotating waves. The effect of the electric field on propagation velocity and on rotating waves cannot be obtained in any arbitrary models of cardiac muscle. For an electric field of about 1 V cm-1 and junctional resistances of about 20 M omega, the change in velocity of propagation can be up to several percent, resulting in a drift velocity of rotating waves of the order of 1 cm s-1. To test these predictions, experiments with cardiac preparations are proposed.

  3. Effect of Cardiac Tissue Anisotropy on Three-Dimensional Electrical Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi Zhu; Liu, Jing

    A three-dimensional (3D) electrical action potential propagation model is developed to characterize the integrated effect of cardiac tissue structure using a homogenous function with a spatial inhomogeneity. This method may be more effective for bridging the gap between computational models and experimental data for cardiac tissue anisotropy. A generalized 3D eikonal relation considering anisotropy and a self-similar evolution solution of such a relation are derived to identify the effect of anisotropy and predict the anisotropy-induced electrical wave propagation instabilities. Furthermore, the phase field equation is introduced to obtain the complex three-dimensional numerical solution of the new correlation. The present results are expected to be valuable for better understanding the physiological behavior of cardiac tissues.

  4. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total

  5. Learning the Cardiac Cycle: Simultaneous Observations of Electrical and Mechanical Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Richard Alec; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for integrating electrical and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle by measuring systolic time intervals, which involves simultaneous recording of the ECG, a phonocardiogram, and the contour of the carotid pulse. Both resting and stress change data are provided as bases for class discussion. (CS)

  6. Effect of an externally applied electric field on excitation propagation in the cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Plaza, Frédéric; Krinsky, Valentin I.

    1994-09-01

    Classical theory of potential distribution in cardiac muscle (cable theory) postulates that all effects of electric field (internally or externally applied) should decay exponentially with a space constant of the order of the tissue space constant (˜1 mm). Classical theory does not take into account the cellular structure of the heart. Here, we formulate a mathematical model of excitation propagation taking into account cellular gap junctions. Investigation of the model has shown that the classical description is correct on the macroscopic scale only. At microscopic scale, electric field is modulated with a spatial period equal to the cell size (Plonsey and Barr), with the zero average. A very important new feature found here is that this effect of electric field does not decay at arbitrary big distances from the electrode. It opens the new way to control the excitation propagation in the cardiac muscle. In particular, we show that electric field can modify the velocity of propagation of an impulse in cardiac tissue at arbitrary big distances from electrode. In 2-dimensions, it can make rotating waves drift. To test these predictions, experiments with cardiac preparations are proposed.

  7. ALTERATION OF CARDIAC ELECTRICAL ACTIVITY BY WATER-LEACHABLE COMPONENTS OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alteration of cardiac electrical activity by water-leachable components
    of residual oil fly ash (ROFA)

    Desuo Wang, Yuh-Chin T. Huang*, An Xie, Ting Wang

    *Human Studies Division, NHEERL, US EPA
    104 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
    Department of Basic ...

  8. A case of premature ventricular contractions, ventricular tachycardia, and arrhythmic storm induced by right ventricular pacing during cardiac resynchronization therapy: Electrophysiological mechanism and catheter ablation

    PubMed Central

    Pedretti, Stefano; Vargiu, Sara; Paolucci, Marco; Lunati, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with ischemic cardiomyopathy and a cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillator (CRT-D) device came to our attention due to incessant ventricular tachycardia and multiple implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. An electrocardiogram showed non-sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardias (NSVTs) constantly occurring after each biventricular stimulation. During an electrophysiological study, NSVTs reproducibly recurred only after right ventricular (RV) pacing; LV pacing did not induce any NSVTs. The activation map was consistent with a localized reentry at the interventricular septum, and a double exit; at the LV exit site, a single radiofrequency energy application immediately interrupted the occurrence of the NSVTs. Current evidence supports LV pacing to be pro-arrhythmogenic in few CRT patients. This unusual case shows that RV pacing during CRT could produce frequent ventricular arrhythmias and arrhythmic storm. Catheter ablation can be considered an effective therapeutic option, especially when CRT maintenance is highly advisable. PMID:26702324

  9. Effect of dust storms on the D region of the Martian ionosphere: Atmospheric electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, S. A.; Sheel, V.; Smith, M. D.; Maguire, W. C.; Molina-Cuberos, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    We have used dust opacity values observed by the Thermal Emission Imaging System onboard Mars Odyssey to estimate the effect of dust aerosols in the D region of the Martian ionosphere. An ion-dust aerosol model has been developed to calculate ion concentrations and conductivity at midlatitudes during a dust storm in the Southern Hemisphere. We report that the concentration of the water cluster ions H+(H2O)n, NO2-(H2O)n, and CO3-(H2O)n are reduced by 2 orders of magnitude in the presence of dust aerosols. This indicates that during a dust storm, when the optical depth changes considerably, a large hole in the ion concentrations may appear until this anomalous condition returns to the normal condition after a period of about a few days. During such dust storms, the total ion conductivity is reduced by an order of magnitude.

  10. Electrical field stimulation induces cardiac fibroblast proliferation through the calcineurin-NFAT pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiang-Fan; Bao, Yun-Jian; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Wei-Zhong

    2012-12-01

    Most cardiac diseases are associated with fibrosis. Calcineurin (CaN) is regulated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). The CaN-NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cell) pathway is involved in the process of cardiac diseases, such as cardiac hypertrophy, but its effect on myocardial fibrosis remains unclear. The present study investigates whether the CaN-NFAT pathway is involved in cardiac fibroblast (CF) proliferation induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS), which recently became a popular treatment for heart failure and cardiac tissue engineering. CF proliferation was evaluated by a cell survival assay (MTT) and cell counts. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed by collagen I and collagen III protein expression. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged NFAT was used to detect NFAT nuclear translocation. CF proliferation, myocardial fibrosis, CaN activity, and NFAT nuclear translocation were enhanced by EFS. More importantly, these effects were abolished by CaN inhibitors, dominant negative CaN (DN-CaN), and CaN gene silenced with siRNA. Furthermore, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) with BAPTA-AM and blocking Ca(2+) influx with nifedipine suppressed EFS-induced increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and CF proliferation. These results suggested that the CaN-NFAT pathway mediates CF proliferation, and that the CaN-NFAT pathway might be a possible therapeutic target for EFS-induced myocardial fibrosis and cardiac tissue engineering.

  11. A single implantable cardioverter-defibrillator shock unmasking an electrical storm of 389 ventricular tachycardia episodes triggering device therapies.

    PubMed

    Arias, Miguel A; Valverde, Irene; Puchol, Alberto; Castellanos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Padial, Luis; Sánchez, Ana M; Alvarez-Temiño, María; Palomino, Miguel

    2008-11-01

    We describe the case of a patient with ischemic cardiomyopathy who presented the first implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shock approximately 5 months after implantation. Device interrogation surprisingly revealed the occurrence of 389 ventricular tachyarrhythmia episodes terminated by asymptomatic antitachycardia pacing (ATP) except for the episode requiring shock. The present case of electrical storm highlights how contemporary tiered ATP schemes constitute a valuable but underused form of termination for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in ICD patients, reducing the number of painful shocks and their adverse consequences.

  12. [Despite medication, overdrive pacing is required to stabilize the electrical storm associated with acute coronary syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masanobu; Morimoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Kaori; Tateishi, Emi; Makino, Kanako; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nakagawa, Yoko; Fukuhara, Shinya; Takase, Eiji

    2007-10-01

    A 75-year-old female complained of severe chest pain and was emergently admitted to our hospital because of anterior acute myocardial infarction. Emergent coronary angiography was performed and revealed occlusion in segment 7, so a stent was implanted. Lidocaine, carvedilol, amiodarone, magnesium, and nifekalant were administered successively because non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) frequently appeared like an electrical storm. After nifekalant administration, QTc was significantly prolonged and torsades de pointes was induced. Overdrive pacing was performed and finally the NSVT was completely controlled. If fatal arrhythmias such as NSVT show resistance to medication, overdrive pacing should be considered to stabilize the arrhythmia associated with acute coronary syndrome.

  13. Advanced computer techniques for inverse modeling of electric current in cardiac tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, S.A.; Romero, L.A.; Diegert, C.F.

    1996-08-01

    For many years, ECG`s and vector cardiograms have been the tools of choice for non-invasive diagnosis of cardiac conduction problems, such as found in reentrant tachycardia or Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. Through skillful analysis of these skin-surface measurements of cardiac generated electric currents, a physician can deduce the general location of heart conduction irregularities. Using a combination of high-fidelity geometry modeling, advanced mathematical algorithms and massively parallel computing, Sandia`s approach would provide much more accurate information and thus allow the physician to pinpoint the source of an arrhythmia or abnormal conduction pathway.

  14. Erbb2 Is Required for Cardiac Atrial Electrical Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Tenin, Gennadiy; Clowes, Christopher; Wolton, Kathryn; Krejci, Eliska; Wright, Jayne A.; Lovell, Simon C.; Sedmera, David; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    The heart is the first organ required to function during embryonic development and is absolutely necessary for embryo survival. Cardiac activity is dependent on both the sinoatrial node (SAN), which is the pacemaker of heart's electrical activity, and the cardiac conduction system which transduces the electrical signal though the heart tissue, leading to heart muscle contractions. Defects in the development of cardiac electrical function may lead to severe heart disorders. The Erbb2 (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) gene encodes a member of the EGF receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases. The Erbb2 receptor lacks ligand-binding activity but forms heterodimers with other EGF receptors, stabilising their ligand binding and enhancing kinase-mediated activation of downstream signalling pathways. Erbb2 is absolutely necessary in normal embryonic development and homozygous mouse knock-out Erbb2 embryos die at embryonic day (E)10.5 due to severe cardiac defects. We have isolated a mouse line, l11Jus8, from a random chemical mutagenesis screen, which carries a hypomorphic missense mutation in the Erbb2 gene. Homozygous mutant embryos exhibit embryonic lethality by E12.5-13. The l11Jus8 mutants display cardiac haemorrhage and a failure of atrial function due to defects in atrial electrical signal propagation, leading to an atrial-specific conduction block, which does not affect ventricular conduction. The l11Jus8 mutant phenotype is distinct from those reported for Erbb2 knockout mouse mutants. Thus, the l11Jus8 mouse reveals a novel function of Erbb2 during atrial conduction system development, which when disrupted causes death at mid-gestation. PMID:25269082

  15. In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: An Update on Pulseless Electrical Activity and Asystole.

    PubMed

    Attin, Mina; Tucker, Rebecca G; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Nonshockable rhythms, including pulseless electrical activity (PEA) and asystole, precede more than 70% of in-hospital cardiac arrests (I-HCA). Compared with shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia), nonshockable rhythms have higher mortality and morbidity. Therefore, investigating the underlying mechanisms of these arrhythmias to improve the quality of care and outcome for patients who suffer cardiac arrest is a priority. As the first responders to I-HCA, nurses must have the proper knowledge and training to provide timely and efficient cardiopulmonary resuscitation therapy. This article provides an overview of nonshockable cardiac arrhythmias preceding I-HCA as a means of addressing the gap between science and clinical practice. PMID:27484665

  16. Cardiac microstructure: implications for electrical propagation and defibrillation in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hooks, Darren A; Tomlinson, Karl A; Marsden, Scott G; LeGrice, Ian J; Smaill, Bruce H; Pullan, Andrew J; Hunter, Peter J

    2002-08-23

    Our understanding of the electrophysiological properties of the heart is incomplete. We have investigated two issues that are fundamental to advancing that understanding. First, there has been widespread debate over the mechanisms by which an externally applied shock can influence a sufficient volume of heart tissue to terminate cardiac fibrillation. Second, it has been uncertain whether cardiac tissue should be viewed as an electrically orthotropic structure, or whether its electrical properties are, in fact, isotropic in the plane orthogonal to myofiber direction. In the present study, a computer model that incorporates a detailed three-dimensional representation of cardiac muscular architecture is used to investigate these issues. We describe a bidomain model of electrical propagation solved in a discontinuous domain that accurately represents the microstructure of a transmural block of rat left ventricle. From analysis of the model results, we conclude that (1) the laminar organization of myocytes determines unique electrical properties in three microstructurally defined directions at any point in the ventricular wall of the heart, and (2) interlaminar clefts between layers of cardiomyocytes provide a substrate for bulk activation of the ventricles during defibrillation.

  17. Comparison of cardiac and 60 Hz magnetically induced electric fields measured in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Creim, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields interact with an animal by inducing internal electric fields, which are in addition to the normal endogenous fields present in living animals. Male rats weighing about 560 g each were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine. Small incisions were made in the ventral body wall at the chest and upper abdomen to position a miniature probe for measuring internal electric fields. The calibration constant for the probe size was 5.7 mm, with a flat response from at least 12 Hz to 20 kHz. A cardiac signal, similar to the normal electrocardiogram with a heart rate of about 250 bpm, was readily obtained at the chest. Upon analysis of its spectrum, the cardiac field detected by the probe had a broad maximum at 32--95 Hz. When the rates were exposed to a 1 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field, a spike appeared in the spectrum at 60 Hz. The peak-to-peak magnitudes of electric fields associated with normal heart function were comparable to fields induced by a 1 mT magnetic field at 60 Hz for those positions measured on the body surface. Within the body, or in different directions relative to the applied field, the induced fields were reduced. The cardiac field increased near the heart, becoming much larger than the induced field. Thus, the cardiac electric field, together with the other endogenous fields, combine with induced electric fields and help to provide reference levels for the induced-field dosimetry of ELF magnetic field exposures of living animals.

  18. Magnetospheric Convection Electric Field Dynamics and Stormtime Particle Energization: Case Study of the Magnetic Storm of May 4,1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Newman, Tim S.; Fok, Mei-Ching; Ridley, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that narrow channels of high electric field are an effective mechanism for injecting plasma into the inner magnetosphere. Analytical expressions for the electric field cannot produce these channels of intense plasma flow, and thus result in less entry and energization of the plasma sheet into near-Earth space. For the ions, omission of these channels leads to an underprediction of the strength of the stormtime ring current and therefore an underestimation of the geoeffectiveness of the storm event. For the electrons, omission of these channels leads to the inability to create a seed population of 10-100 keV electrons deep in the inner magnetosphere. These electrons can eventually be accelerated into MeV radiation belt particles.

  19. Thyroid storm

    MedlinePlus

    Thyrotoxic storm; Hyperthyroid storm; Accelerated hyperthyroidism; Thyroid crisis; Thyrotoxicosis - thyroid storm ... Thyroid storm occurs due to a major stress such as trauma, heart attack , or infection. In rare cases, thyroid ...

  20. Prompt penetration electric fields and the extreme topside ionospheric response to the June 22-23, 2015 geomagnetic storm as seen by the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, Elvira; Zakharenkova, Irina; Alken, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Using data from the three Swarm satellites, we study the ionospheric response to the intense geomagnetic storm of June 22-23, 2015. With the minimum SYM-H excursion of -207 nT, this storm is so far the second strongest geomagnetic storm in the current 24th solar cycle. A specific configuration of the Swarm satellites allowed investigation of the evolution of the storm-time ionospheric alterations on the day- and the nightside quasi-simultaneously. With the development of the main phase of the storm, a significant dayside increase of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) and electron density Ne was first observed at low latitudes on the dayside. From ~22 UT of 22 June to ~1 UT of 23 June, the dayside experienced a strong negative ionospheric storm, while on the nightside an extreme enhancement of the topside VTEC occurred at mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Our analysis of the equatorial electrojet variations obtained from the magnetic Swarm data indicates that the storm-time penetration electric fields were, most likely, the main driver of the observed ionospheric effects at the initial phase of the storm and at the beginning of the main phase. The dayside ionosphere first responded to the occurrence of the strong eastward equatorial electric fields. Further, penetration of westward electric fields led to gradual but strong decrease of the plasma density on the dayside in the topside ionosphere. At this stage, the disturbance dynamo could have contributed as well. On the nightside, the observed extreme enhancement of the Ne and VTEC in the northern hemisphere (i.e., the summer hemisphere) in the topside ionosphere was most likely due to the combination of the prompt penetration electric fields, disturbance dynamo and the storm-time thermospheric circulation. From ~2.8 UT, the ionospheric measurements from the three Swarm satellites detected the beginning of the second positive storm on the dayside, which was not clearly associated with electrojet

  1. Cardiac mechano-electric coupling research: fifty years of progress and scientific innovation.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter; Ravens, Ursula

    2014-08-01

    With its conceptualisation nearly fifty years ago, cardiac mechano-electric coupling (MEC) has developed from a collection of anecdotal reports into a field of research that - in spite of early scepticism - is now an accepted part of cardiac structure-function considerations. Throughout this development, MEC studies have been both driver and beneficiary of technological innovation: from sharp electrode recordings for the study of in situ cell responses to cell isolation and patch clamp; from early approaches to mechanical stimulation of tissue using photographic diaphragms to modern force-length feedback systems for isolated cells; and from strain gauge force recordings to genetically encodes stress probes. While much is now known about subcellular contributors to cardiac MEC, including stretch-activated ion channels and mechanical modulation of cell calcium handling, their integration at higher levels of structural complexity, and the generation of clinically-translatable knowledge, have remained challenging. This short review provides a brief summary of past achievements, current activities, and potentially rewarding future directions of cardiac MEC research. We highlight challenges and opportunities on the way to an integrated understanding of how external and intrinsic mechanical factors affect the heartbeat in health and disease, and how such understanding may improve the ways in which we prevent and/or treat cardiac pathology.

  2. On a mechanism of cardiac electrical stability. The fractal hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberger, A L; Bhargava, V; West, B J; Mandell, A J

    1985-01-01

    Electrical activation of the ventricles via the His-Purkinje system is represented on the body surface by a waveform with a broad range of frequency components. We speculate that this process is mediated by current flow through a fractal-like conduction network and therefore that the broadband spectrum of the depolarization waveform should be scaled as a power-law distribution. The prediction is confirmed by Fourier analysis of electrocardiographic data from healthy men. This observation suggests a new dynamical link between nonlinear (fractal) structure and nonlinear function in a stable physiologic system. PMID:4041542

  3. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle.

  4. A cardiac electrical activity model based on a cellular automata system in comparison with neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Sadiq Ali; Yousuf, Sidrah

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac Electrical Activity is commonly distributed into three dimensions of Cardiac Tissue (Myocardium) and evolves with duration of time. The indicator of heart diseases can occur randomly at any time of a day. Heart rate, conduction and each electrical activity during cardiac cycle should be monitor non-invasively for the assessment of "Action Potential" (regular) and "Arrhythmia" (irregular) rhythms. Many heart diseases can easily be examined through Automata model like Cellular Automata concepts. This paper deals with the different states of cardiac rhythms using cellular automata with the comparison of neural network also provides fast and highly effective stimulation for the contraction of cardiac muscles on the Atria in the result of genesis of electrical spark or wave. The specific formulated model named as "States of automaton Proposed Model for CEA (Cardiac Electrical Activity)" by using Cellular Automata Methodology is commonly shows the three states of cardiac tissues conduction phenomena (i) Resting (Relax and Excitable state), (ii) ARP (Excited but Absolutely refractory Phase i.e. Excited but not able to excite neighboring cells) (iii) RRP (Excited but Relatively Refractory Phase i.e. Excited and able to excite neighboring cells). The result indicates most efficient modeling with few burden of computation and it is Action Potential during the pumping of blood in cardiac cycle. PMID:27087101

  5. Acute effects of carbon monoxide on cardiac electrical stability. Research report, Sep 85-Jul 88

    SciTech Connect

    Verrier, R.L.; Mills, A.K.; Skornik, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the project was to determine the effects of acute carbon monoxide exposure on cardiac electrical stability in the normal and ischemic heart of anesthetized and conscious dogs. Exposure (90 to 120 minutes) to relatively high levels of carbon monoxide, leading to carboxyhemoglobin concentrations of up to 20 percent, was without significant effect on ventricular electrical stability in laboratory dogs. This appears to be the case in the acutely ischemic heart as well as in the normal heart. Using a model involving partial coronary artery stenosis, no changes were found in either the cycle frequency of coronary blood flow oscillations or in platelet aggregability during carbon monoxide exposure. Also examined were the effects of carbon monoxide exposure in the conscious state in order to take into consideration possible adverse consequences mediated by the central nervous system. The study found no adverse effects on the cardiac-excitable properties in response to either a 2-hour- or 24-hour-exposure paradigm.

  6. Remodeling of cardiac passive electrical properties and susceptibility to ventricular and atrial arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Dhein, Stefan; Seidel, Thomas; Salameh, Aida; Jozwiak, Joanna; Hagen, Anja; Kostelka, Martin; Hindricks, Gerd; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated electrical activation of the heart is essential for the maintenance of a regular cardiac rhythm and effective contractions. Action potentials spread from one cell to the next via gap junction channels. Because of the elongated shape of cardiomyocytes, longitudinal resistivity is lower than transverse resistivity causing electrical anisotropy. Moreover, non-uniformity is created by clustering of gap junction channels at cell poles and by non-excitable structures such as collagenous strands, vessels or fibroblasts. Structural changes in cardiac disease often affect passive electrical properties by increasing non-uniformity and altering anisotropy. This disturbs normal electrical impulse propagation and is, consequently, a substrate for arrhythmia. However, to investigate how these structural changes lead to arrhythmias remains a challenge. One important mechanism, which may both cause and prevent arrhythmia, is the mismatch between current sources and sinks. Propagation of the electrical impulse requires a sufficient source of depolarizing current. In the case of a mismatch, the activated tissue (source) is not able to deliver enough depolarizing current to trigger an action potential in the non-activated tissue (sink). This eventually leads to conduction block. It has been suggested that in this situation a balanced geometrical distribution of gap junctions and reduced gap junction conductance may allow successful propagation. In contrast, source-sink mismatch can prevent spontaneous arrhythmogenic activity in a small number of cells from spreading over the ventricle, especially if gap junction conductance is enhanced. Beside gap junctions, cell geometry and non-cellular structures strongly modulate arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The present review elucidates these and other implications of passive electrical properties for cardiac rhythm and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:25404918

  7. The induction of reentry in cardiac tissue. The missing link: How electric fields alter transmembrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Bradley J.; Krassowska, Wanda

    1998-03-01

    This review examines the initiation of reentry in cardiac muscle by strong electric shocks. Specifically, it concentrates on the mechanisms by which electric shocks change the transmembrane potential of the cardiac membrane and create the physiological substrate required by the critical point theory for the initiation of rotors. The mechanisms examined include (1) direct polarization of the tissue by the stimulating current, as described by the one-dimensional cable model and its two- and three-dimensional extensions, (2) the presence of virtual anodes and cathodes, as described by the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios of the intra- and extracellular spaces, (3) polarization of the tissue due to changing orientation of cardiac fibers, and (4) polarization of individual cells or groups of cells by the electric field ("sawtooth potential"). The importance of these mechanisms in the initiation of reentry is examined in two case studies: the induction of rotors using successive stimulation with a unipolar electrode, and the induction of rotors using cross-field stimulation. These cases reveal that the mechanism by which a unipolar stimulation induces arrhythmias can be explained in the framework of the bidomain model with unequal anisotropy ratios. In contrast, none of the examined mechanisms provide an adequate explanation for the induction of rotors by cross-field stimulation. Hence, this study emphasizes the need for further experimental and theoretical work directed toward explaining the mechanism of field stimulation.

  8. Unpinning of rotating spiral waves in cardiac tissues by circularly polarized electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Pan, De-Bei; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Spiral waves anchored to obstacles in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmia. To unpin these anchored spirals, comparing to high-voltage side-effect traditional therapies, wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by the uniform electric field (UEF) has provided a low-voltage alternative. Here we provide a new approach using WEH induced by the circularly polarized electric field (CPEF), which has higher success rate and larger application scope than UEF, even with a lower voltage. And we also study the distribution of the membrane potential near an obstacle induced by CPEF to analyze its mechanism of unpinning. We hope this promising approach may provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmia.

  9. Data-driven estimation of cardiac electrical diffusivity from 12-lead ECG signals.

    PubMed

    Zettinig, Oliver; Mansi, Tommaso; Neumann, Dominik; Georgescu, Bogdan; Rapaka, Saikiran; Seegerer, Philipp; Kayvanpour, Elham; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Amr, Ali; Haas, Jan; Steen, Henning; Katus, Hugo; Meder, Benjamin; Navab, Nassir; Kamen, Ali; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2014-12-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is challenging due to a large variety of causes and disease stages. Computational models of cardiac electrophysiology (EP) can be used to improve the assessment and prognosis of DCM, plan therapies and predict their outcome, but require personalization. In this work, we present a data-driven approach to estimate the electrical diffusivity parameter of an EP model from standard 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG). An efficient forward model based on a mono-domain, phenomenological Lattice-Boltzmann model of cardiac EP, and a boundary element-based mapping of potentials to the body surface is employed. The electrical diffusivity of myocardium, left ventricle and right ventricle endocardium is then estimated using polynomial regression which takes as input the QRS duration and electrical axis. After validating the forward model, we computed 9500 EP simulations on 19 different DCM patients in just under three seconds each to learn the regression model. Using this database, we quantify the intrinsic uncertainty of electrical diffusion for given ECG features and show in a leave-one-patient-out cross-validation that the regression method is able to predict myocardium diffusion within the uncertainty range. Finally, our approach is tested on the 19 cases using their clinical ECG. 84% of them could be personalized using our method, yielding mean prediction errors of 18.7ms for the QRS duration and 6.5° for the electrical axis, both values being within clinical acceptability. By providing an estimate of diffusion parameters from readily available clinical data, our data-driven approach could therefore constitute a first calibration step toward a more complete personalization of cardiac EP. PMID:24857832

  10. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut; Baki, Elif Dogan; Kavakli, Ali Sait; Sahin, Ayca Sultan; Ayoglu, Raif Umut; Karaveli, Arzu; Emmiler, Mustafa; Inanoglu, Kerem; Karsli, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229. PMID:27445610

  11. Temporary overdriving pacing as an adjunct to antiarrhythmic drug therapy for electrical storm in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Satoshi; Inoue, Ichiro; Kawagoe, Takuji; Ishihara, Masaharu; Shimatani, Yuji; Mitsuba, Naoya; Hata, Takaki; Nakama, Yasuharu; Kisaka, Tomohiko; Kijima, Yasufumi

    2005-05-01

    A-55-year-old man with diabetes mellitus was admitted to hospital because of chest pain. He was diagnosed as anterior acute myocardial infarction and treated with stent placement. After 7 days, ventricular fibrillation occurred because of a subacute reocclusion and balloon angioplasty was performed. Despite reperfusion therapy, intraaortic balloon pumping, antiarrhythmic drugs and beta-blocker, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation relapsed and cardioversion was performed 29 times during 32 h. Temporary overdrive atrioventricular sequential pacing was initiated and the malignant arrhythmia finally disappeared. Even after stoppage of 25 h overdride pacing, it never recurred. Temporary overdrive pacing is an easy and feasible therapy for a drug-resistant electrical storm associated with AMI and should be performed in the early stage.

  12. Successful bridge to recovery using a microaxial blood pump in a patient with electrical storm and cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Henning, A; Schreieck, J; Riessen, R; Gawaz, M; May, A E

    2011-10-01

    A 59-year-old patient with dilated cardiomyopathy and incessant ventricular tachycardia leading to progressive cardiogenic shock is presented. Due to hemodynamic instability, high dose catecholamines were required in addition to the implantation of an intraaortic balloon pump (IABP), which, however, appeared to further augment the frequency and duration of ventricular tachycardias. The implantation of a microaxial blood pump allowed catecholamine administration to be terminated, thereby, ending this vicious circle of catecholamine-driven electrical storm. Within 5 days, the patient was hemodynamically stabilized and kidney and liver function recovered with the support of intensive antiarrhythmic therapy (amiodarone, mexiletine, sotalol). During a 24-month follow-up, the patient had no further ICD shocks and no rehospitalization was required for treatment of congestive heart failure. PMID:22038638

  13. Myocardial scaffold-based cardiac tissue engineering: application of coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M; Williams, Lakiesha N; de Jongh Curry, Amy L; Liao, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Recently, we developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserve the natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates and also show good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multistimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulation for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (10(6) cells/mL) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that after 2 days of culturing with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed a cardiomyocyte-like phenotype by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2 days of bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2 day and 4 day tissue constructs were comparable to those of the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2 weeks of static culturing, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios.

  14. Myocardial Scaffold-based Cardiac Tissue Engineering: Application of Coordinated Mechanical and Electrical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J. Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M.; Williams, Lakiesha N.; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Liao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserved natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates, and also showed good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multi-stimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (106 cells/ml) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that, after 2-day culture with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed cardiomyocyte-like phenotype, by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2-day bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2-day and 4-day tissue constructs were comparable to the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2-week static culture, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development, but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios. PMID:23923967

  15. Storm time equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift reversal due to disturbance Hall electric field over the Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.; Denardini, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of equatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles over Brazilian sector during two magnetic storm events are investigated in this work. The observations were made at varying phases of magnetic disturbances when the bubble zonal drift velocity was found to reverse westward from its normally eastward velocity. Calculation of the zonal drift based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere modeled by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model showed on a quantitative basis a clear competition between vertical Hall electric field and disturbance zonal winds on the variations observed in the zonal velocity of the plasma bubble. The Hall electric field arising from enhanced ratio of field line-integrated conductivities, ΣH/ΣP, is most often generated by an increase in the integrated Hall conductivity, arising from enhanced energetic particle precipitation in the South American Magnetic Anomaly region for which evidence is provided from observation of anomalous sporadic E layers over Cachoeira Paulista and Fortaleza. Such sporadic E layers are also by themselves evidence for the development of the Hall electric field that modifies the zonal drift.

  16. Atmospheric electrical modeling in support of the NASA F106 Storm Hazards Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    With the use of composite (non-metallic) and microelectronics becoming more prevalent in the construction of both military and commercial aircraft, the control systems have become more susceptible to damage or failure from electromagnetic transients. One source of such transients is the lightning discharge. In order to study the effects of the lightning discharge on the vital components of an aircraft, NASA Langley Research Center has undertaken a Storm Hazards Program in which a specially instrumented F106B jet aircraft is flown into active thunderstorms with the intention of being struck by lightning. One of the specific purposes of the program is to quantify the environmental conditions which are conductive to aircraft lightning strikes.

  17. Development and characterization of novel electrically conductive PANI-PGS composites for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Rai, Ranjana; Dippold, Dirk; Roether, Judith E; Schubert, Dirk W; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, especially myocardial infarction, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world, also resulting in huge economic burdens on national economies. A cardiac patch strategy aims at regenerating an infarcted heart by providing healthy functional cells to the injured region via a carrier substrate, and providing mechanical support, thereby preventing deleterious ventricular remodeling. In the present work, polyaniline (PANI) was doped with camphorsulfonic acid and blended with poly(glycerol-sebacate) at ratios of 10, 20 and 30vol.% PANI content to produce electrically conductive composite cardiac patches via the solvent casting method. The composites were characterized in terms of their electrical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. The in vitro biodegradability of the composites was also evaluated. Electrical conductivity increased from 0Scm(-1) for pure PGS to 0.018Scm(-1) for 30vol.% PANI-PGS samples. Moreover, the conductivities were preserved for at least 100h post fabrication. Tensile tests revealed an improvement in the elastic modulus, tensile strength and elasticity with increasing PANI content. The degradation products caused a local drop in pH, which was higher in all composite samples compared with pure PGS, hinting at a buffering effect due to the presence of PANI. Finally, the cytocompatibility of the composites was confirmed when C2C12 cells attached and proliferated on samples with varying PANI content. Furthermore, leaching of acid dopants from the developed composites did not have any deleterious effect on the viability of C2C12 cells. Taken together, these results confirm the potential of PANI-PGS composites for use as substrates to modulate cellular behavior via electrical stimulation, and as biocompatible scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering applications.

  18. Mechanisms of Electrical Activation and Conduction in the Gastrointestinal System: Lessons from Cardiac Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Lai, Eric Tsz Him; Yeo, Jie Ming; Tse, Vivian; Wong, Sunny Hei

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is an electrically excitable organ system containing multiple cell types, which coordinate electrical activity propagating through this tract. Disruption in its normal electrophysiology is observed in a number of GI motility disorders. However, this is not well characterized and the field of GI electrophysiology is much less developed compared to the cardiac field. The aim of this article is to use the established knowledge of cardiac electrophysiology to shed light on the mechanisms of electrical activation and propagation along the GI tract, and how abnormalities in these processes lead to motility disorders and suggest better treatment options based on this improved understanding. In the first part of the article, the ionic contributions to the generation of GI slow wave and the cardiac action potential (AP) are reviewed. Propagation of these electrical signals can be described by the core conductor theory in both systems. However, specifically for the GI tract, the following unique properties are observed: changes in slow wave frequency along its length, periods of quiescence, synchronization in short distances and desynchronization over long distances. These are best described by a coupled oscillator theory. Other differences include the diminished role of gap junctions in mediating this conduction in the GI tract compared to the heart. The electrophysiology of conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroparesis, and functional problems such as irritable bowel syndrome are discussed in detail, with reference to ion channel abnormalities and potential therapeutic targets. A deeper understanding of the molecular basis and physiological mechanisms underlying GI motility disorders will enable the development of better diagnostic and therapeutic tools and the advancement of this field. PMID:27303305

  19. Optimisation of a generic ionic model of cardiac myocyte electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tianruo; Al Abed, Amr; Lovell, Nigel H; Dokos, Socrates

    2013-01-01

    A generic cardiomyocyte ionic model, whose complexity lies between a simple phenomenological formulation and a biophysically detailed ionic membrane current description, is presented. The model provides a user-defined number of ionic currents, employing two-gate Hodgkin-Huxley type kinetics. Its generic nature allows accurate reconstruction of action potential waveforms recorded experimentally from a range of cardiac myocytes. Using a multiobjective optimisation approach, the generic ionic model was optimised to accurately reproduce multiple action potential waveforms recorded from central and peripheral sinoatrial nodes and right atrial and left atrial myocytes from rabbit cardiac tissue preparations, under different electrical stimulus protocols and pharmacological conditions. When fitted simultaneously to multiple datasets, the time course of several physiologically realistic ionic currents could be reconstructed. Model behaviours tend to be well identified when extra experimental information is incorporated into the optimisation.

  20. Multiple mechanisms of spiral wave breakup in a model of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Hastings, Harold M.; Evans, Steven J.

    2002-09-01

    It has become widely accepted that the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias are due to reentrant waves, i.e., electrical wave(s) that recirculate repeatedly throughout the tissue at a higher frequency than the waves produced by the heart's natural pacemaker (sinoatrial node). However, the complicated structure of cardiac tissue, as well as the complex ionic currents in the cell, have made it extremely difficult to pinpoint the detailed dynamics of these life-threatening reentrant arrhythmias. A simplified ionic model of the cardiac action potential (AP), which can be fitted to a wide variety of experimentally and numerically obtained mesoscopic characteristics of cardiac tissue such as AP shape and restitution of AP duration and conduction velocity, is used to explain many different mechanisms of spiral wave breakup which in principle can occur in cardiac tissue. Some, but not all, of these mechanisms have been observed before using other models; therefore, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate them using just one framework model and to explain the different parameter regimes or physiological properties necessary for each mechanism (such as high or low excitability, corresponding to normal or ischemic tissue, spiral tip trajectory types, and tissue structures such as rotational anisotropy and periodic boundary conditions). Each mechanism is compared with data from other ionic models or experiments to illustrate that they are not model-specific phenomena. Movies showing all the breakup mechanisms are available at http://arrhythmia.hofstra.edu/breakup and at ftp://ftp.aip.org/epaps/chaos/E-CHAOEH-12-039203/ INDEX.html. The fact that many different breakup mechanisms exist has important implications for antiarrhythmic drug design and for comparisons of fibrillation experiments using different species, electromechanical uncoupling drugs, and initiation protocols.

  1. Study of Electrical Activity in Martian Dust Storms with the Deep Space Network antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Majid, W. A.; Garcia-Miro, C.; Tamppari, L. K.; Renno, N. O.; Ruf, C.; Trinh, J. T.

    2012-09-01

    Evidence for non-thermal emission produced by electrostatic discharges in a deep Martian dust storm has been reported by Ruf et al. 2009 [1]. Such discharges had been detected with an innovative kurtosis detector installed in a 34m radio telescope of the Deep Space Network (DSN) in June of 2006. The kurtosis (the fourth central moment of the signal normalized by the square of the second central moment) is extremely sensitive to the presence of non-thermal radiation, but is insensitive to variations in the intensity of the thermal radiation and instrument gain. The non-thermal radiation was detected while a 35 Km deep Martian dust storm was within the field of view of the radio telescope and presented signatures of modulation by the Martian Schumann Resonance. Encouraged by this discovery, several attempts have been made within the DSN to confirm the detection using the R&D antenna (DSS-13) and other antennas in the Madrid and Goldstone complexes, but using a very limited receiver, in terms of recorded data rates, the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (VSR). We are planning to initiate an extensive monitoring of Mars emission in a noninterfering basis while our antennas are tracking various Mars probes, using the Wideband Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Science Receiver (WVSR). The WVSR is a very flexible open-loop digital backend that is used for radio science and spacecraft navigation support in the DSN. This instrument allows us to sample a larger bandwidth than with previously used detectors. The processing to look for the kurtosis signature will be performed in software, limited only by the computer capacity. Additionally there are plans to develop an even more powerful custom-built detector based in CASPER technology and Graphic Processing Units for enhance computational power. This contribution will describe how we plan to select the target Mars tracking passes from the DSN schedule. An automated process will generate

  2. Westward electric field penetration to the dayside equatorial ionosphere during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm on 22 July 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Jose, Lijo; Ravindran, Sudha

    2011-03-01

    The moderate geomagnetic storm (minimum SYM-H = -89 nT) that occurred during the period from 21 to 25 July 2009 is anomalous because the storm main phase developed during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). A reduction (for ˜4 h) in the daytime E region westward drift (eastward electric field) over the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 77°E; dip latitude ˜0.5°N) in India is observed during the storm main phase. This reduction in the drift is also indicated by the disappearance of the equatorial sporadic E region (Esq) echoes on the ionograms. It is suggested that an additional westward prompt penetration electric field characterized by the northward IMF Bz is superposed on the ionosphere during the storm main phase which contributed to the observed reduction in the drift. These are the first observations which indicate the effects of the dusk-to-dawn penetration electric fields on the east-west drifts during northward IMF.

  3. Cardiac effects of anabolic steroids: hypertrophy, ischemia and electrical remodelling as potential triggers of sudden death.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, J H M; Medei, E

    2011-05-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic testosterone derivatives developed to maximise anabolic activity and minimise androgenic activity. AAS abuse is widespread among both athletes and non-athletes at fitness centres and is becoming a public health issue. In addition to their atherogenic, thrombogenic and spastic effects, AAS have direct cardiotoxic effects by causing hypertrophy, electrical and structural remodelling, and contractile dysfunction and by increasing the susceptibility to ischemic injuries. All of these factors contribute to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.

  4. After the storm: the social relations of return to work following electrical injury.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Elizabeth; Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Kirsh, Bonnie; Colantonio, Angela

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we explored the experiences of 13 individuals who had suffered an electrical injury at work and had subsequently returned to work. In this article, we report on the social, institutional, and relational elements that workers perceived to influence return to work experiences and the provision of workplace accommodations. These elements included (a) worker resources, (b) job characteristics, (c) workplace setting, (d) injury elements, (e) workers' compensation context, and (f) supports and advocacy provided. We conclude that the availability and provision of supportive accommodations are influenced by a multiplicity of interrelated factors including the legitimacy of resulting impairments following electrical injury, institutional structures (e.g., compensation and health care systems), the social relations of work, and broader labor market and economic contexts. Those workers who were vulnerable because of factors such as employment circumstances or labor market conditions were often poorly supported when returning to work following electrical injury.

  5. Reconstructing three-dimensional reentrant cardiac electrical wave dynamics using data assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M J; LaVigne, N S; Scorse, S T; Fenton, F H; Cherry, E M

    2016-01-01

    For many years, reentrant scroll waves have been predicted and studied as an underlying mechanism for cardiac arrhythmias using numerical techniques, and high-resolution mapping studies using fluorescence recordings from the surfaces of cardiac tissue preparations have confirmed the presence of visible spiral waves. However, assessing the three-dimensional dynamics of these reentrant waves using experimental techniques has been limited to verifying stable scroll-wave dynamics in relatively thin preparations. We propose a different approach to recovering the three-dimensional dynamics of reentrant waves in the heart. By applying techniques commonly used in weather forecasting, we combine dual-surface observations from a particular experiment with predictions from a numerical model to reconstruct the full three-dimensional time series of the experiment. Here, we use model-generated surrogate observations from a numerical experiment to evaluate the performance of the ensemble Kalman filter in reconstructing such time series for a discordant alternans state in one spatial dimension and for scroll waves in three dimensions. We show that our approach is able to recover time series of both observed and unobserved variables matching the truth. Where nearby observations are available, the error is reduced below the synthetic observation error, with a smaller reduction with increased distance from observations. Our findings demonstrate that state reconstruction for spatiotemporally complex cardiac electrical dynamics is possible and will lead naturally to applications using real experimental data. PMID:26826859

  6. Portable bioreactor for perfusion and electrical stimulation of engineered cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Nina; Taubman, Alanna; Cimetta, Elisa; Saccenti, Laetitia; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering aims to create functional tissue constructs that can reestablish the structure and function of injured myocardium. Although bioreactors have facilitated the engineering of cardiac patches of clinically relevant size in vitro, a major drawback remains the transportation of the engineered tissues from a production facility to a medical operation facility while maintaining tissue viability and preventing contamination. Furthermore, after implantation, most of the cells are endangered by hypoxic conditions that exist before vascular flow is established. We developed a portable device that provides the perfusion and electrical stimulation necessary to engineer cardiac tissue in vitro, and to transport it to the site where it will be implantated. The micropump-powered perfusion apparatus may additionally function as an extracorporeal active pumping system providing nutrients and oxygen supply to the graft post-implantation. Such a system, through perfusion of oxygenated media and bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors), could transiently support the tissue construct until it connects to the host vasculature and heart muscle, after which it could be taken away or let biodegrade. PMID:24111161

  7. Observation of enhanced ozone in an electrically active storm over Socorro, NM: Implications for ozone production from corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minschwaner, K.; Kalnajs, L. E.; Dubey, M. K.; Avallone, L. M.; Sawaengphokai, P. C.; Edens, H. E.; Winn, W. P.

    2008-09-01

    Enhancements in ozone were observed between about 3 and 10 km altitude within an electrically active storm in central New Mexico. Measurements from satellite sensors and ground-based radar show cloud top pressures between 300 and 150 mb in the vicinity of an ozonesonde launched from Socorro, NM, and heavy precipitation with radar reflectivities exceeding 50 dBZ. Data from a lightning mapping array and a surface electric field mill show a large amount of electrical activity within this thunderstorm. The observed ozone enhancements are large (50% above the mean) and could have resulted from a number of possible processes, including the advection of polluted air from the urban environments of El Paso and Juarez, photochemical production by lightning-generated NOx from aged thunderstorm outflow, downward mixing of stratospheric air, or local production from within the thunderstorm. We find that a large fraction of the ozone enhancement is consistent with local production from corona discharges, either from cloud particles or by corona associated with lightning. The implied global source of ozone from thunderstorm corona discharge is estimated to be 110 Tg O3 a-1 with a range between 40 and 180 Tg O3 a-1. This value is about 21% as large as the estimated ozone production rate from lightning NOx, and about 3% as large as the total chemical production rate of tropospheric ozone. Thus while the estimated corona-induced production of ozone may be significant on local scales, it is unlikely to be as important to the global ozone budget as other sources.

  8. Unpinning of rotating spiral waves in cardiac tissues by circularly polarized electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xia; Gao, Xiang; Pan, De-Bei; Li, Bing-Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Spiral waves anchored to obstacles in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmia. To unpin these anchored spirals, comparing to high-voltage side-effect traditional therapies, wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by the uniform electric field (UEF) has provided a low-voltage alternative. Here we provide a new approach using WEH induced by the circularly polarized electric field (CPEF), which has higher success rate and larger application scope than UEF, even with a lower voltage. And we also study the distribution of the membrane potential near an obstacle induced by CPEF to analyze its mechanism of unpinning. We hope this promising approach may provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmia. PMID:24777360

  9. A statistical study of the response of the dayside equatorial F2 layer to the main phase of intense geomagnetic storms as an indicator of penetration electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Yamamoto, M.; Sreeja, V.; Batista, I. S.; Lynn, K. J. W.; Abdu, M. A.; Ravindran, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Shokawa, K.; Alex, S.

    2011-03-01

    The response of the dayside equatorial F2 layer to the main phases of the 22 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst < -150 nT) in 1998-2008 is investigated using the digital ionosonde data from the equatorial stations in Brazilian, Indian, and Australian longitudes together with equatorial electrojet strength and IMF Bz; the storms include 15 superstorms (Dst < -200 nT). The observations show that there is a period during all MPs when the F2 layer peak rises (and falls) rapidly with large peak electron density (Nmax) reduction, the rise velocity strongly correlates with the intensity (Dst) of the storms, and the duration of the Nmax reduction corresponds to that of strong eastward electrojet when IMF Bz remains highly negative. The observations indicate the occurrence of strong eastward prompt penetration electric fields (PPEF) during the rapid F2 layer response. The PPEF drives the F2 layer peak rapidly upward, which reduces Nmax due to vertical expansion and diffusion. The results therefore suggest that the rapid F2 layer response (rapid rise (and fall) of peak height (hmax) with large Nmax reduction) observed by ionosondes can be used to detect the occurrence of the daytime eastward PPEF during intense geomagnetic storms irrespective of season and level of solar activity. The data also show two rare events of strong daytime westward electric fields due to disturbance dynamo and/or prompt penetration. The results are important when radars are not available to monitor the occurrence of the PPEF.

  10. Convection and overshielding electric fields in the global ionosphere as observed with magnetometers and SuperDARN during the geomagnetic storm on 14-15 December 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Ebihara, Y.; Hashimoto, K. K.; Kataoka, R.; Hori, T.; Watari, S.; Nishitani, N.

    2008-12-01

    The convection electric field penetrates to the equatorial ionosphere with no significant shielding effects during the DP2 fluctuation event of period of 30 - 60 min (Nishida, 1968) and during the storm main phase continuing over several hours (Huang et al., 2007). On the other hand, shielding becomes effective during the substorm growth phase (Somajajulu et al., 1987; Kikuchi et al., 2000) and even during storm main phase (Kikuchi et al., 2008). The well-developed shielding electric field results in an overshielding at the beginning of the recovery phase of storm/substorms (Kikuchi et al., 2003, 2008). Thus, the electric field manifests complex features at mid-equatorial latitudes, which is not determined only by the solar wind electric field but strongly controlled by magnetospheric processes such as the ring current. To reveal comparative roles of the convection and overshielding electric fields and in what condition the overshielding occurs at mid-equatorial latitudes, we analyzed the geomagnetic storm on 14-15 December, 2006, characterized by the quasi-periodic DP2 fluctuation of 30 min period at the beginning of the storm. We used magnetometer data from mid- equatorial latitudes to detect magnetic signatures due to the electric field originating in the magnetosphere, and used the SuperDARN data to identify electric fields associated with the solar wind dynamo (Region-1 FAC) and the ring current (R2 FAC). We further calculated an electric potential pattern caused by the R1 and R2 FACs with the comprehensive ring current model (CRCM) to better understand the SuperDARN convection pattern. First we show that the DP2 fluctuation was caused by alternating eastward (e-EJ) and westward currents (w-EJ) in the equatorial ionosphere, which were caused by the southward and northward IMF, respectively. We further show that the e-EJ was associated with the large-scale two-cell convection vortices, while the w-EJ accompanied a reverse flow equatorward of the two

  11. Statistical analysis of storm electrical discharges reconstituted from a lightning mapping system, a lightning location system, and an acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Defer, Eric; Rison, William; Schulz, Wolfgang; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment project, a field campaign devoted to the study of electrical activity during storms took place in the south of France in 2012. An acoustic station composed of four microphones and four microbarometers was deployed within the coverage of a Lightning Mapping Array network. On the 26 October 2012, a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Fifty-six natural thunder events, due to cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes, were recorded. This paper studies the acoustic reconstruction, in the low frequency range from 1 to 40 Hz, of the recorded flashes and their comparison with detections from electromagnetic networks. Concurrent detections from the European Cooperation for Lightning Detection lightning location system were also used. Some case studies show clearly that acoustic signal from thunder comes from the return stroke but also from the horizontal discharges which occur inside the clouds. The huge amount of observation data leads to a statistical analysis of lightning discharges acoustically recorded. Especially, the distributions of altitudes of reconstructed acoustic detections are explored in detail. The impact of the distance to the source on these distributions is established. The capacity of the acoustic method to describe precisely the lower part of nearby cloud-to-ground discharges, where the Lightning Mapping Array network is not effective, is also highlighted.

  12. Effect of Twisted Fiber Anisotropy in Cardiac Tissue on Ablation with Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fei; Zemlin, Christian W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ablation of cardiac tissue with pulsed electric fields is a promising alternative to current thermal ablation methods, and it critically depends on the electric field distribution in the heart. Methods We developed a model that incorporates the twisted anisotropy of cardiac tissue and computed the electric field distribution in the tissue. We also performed experiments in rabbit ventricles to validate our model. We find that the model agrees well with the experimentally determined ablation volume if we assume that all tissue that is exposed to a field greater than 3 kV/cm is ablated. In our numerical analysis, we considered how tissue thickness, degree of anisotropy, and electrode configuration affect the geometry of the ablated volume. We considered two electrode configurations: two parallel needles inserted into the myocardium (“penetrating needles” configuration) and one circular electrode each on epi- and endocardium, opposing each other (“epi-endo” configuration). Results For thick tissues (10 mm) and moderate anisotropy ratio (a = 2), we find that the geometry of the ablated volume is almost unaffected by twisted anisotropy, i.e. it is approximately translationally symmetric from epi- to endocardium, for both electrode configurations. Higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10) leads to substantial variation in ablation width across the wall; these variations were more pronounced for the penetrating needle configuration than for the epi-endo configuration. For thinner tissues (4 mm, typical for human atria) and higher anisotropy ratio (a = 10), the epi-endo configuration yielded approximately translationally symmetric ablation volumes, while the penetrating electrodes configuration was much more sensitive to fiber twist. Conclusions These results suggest that the epi-endo configuration will be reliable for ablation of atrial fibrillation, independently of fiber orientation, while the penetrating electrode configuration may experience problems when the

  13. Noninvasive functional cardiac electrical source imaging: combining MRI and ECG mapping for imaging electrical function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilg, Bernhard; Modre, Robert; Fischer, Gerald; Hanser, Friedrich; Messnarz, Bernd; Schocke, Michael F. H.; Kremser, Christian; Roithinger, Franz

    2002-04-01

    Inverse electrocardiography has been developing for several years. By coupling electrocardiographic mapping and 3D+time anatomical data, the electrical excitation sequence can be imaged completely noninvasively in the human heart. In this study, a bidomain theory based surface heart model activation time imaging approach was applied to single beat data of atrial and ventricular depolarization. For sinus and paced rhythms, the sites of early activation and the areas with late activation were estimated with sufficient accuracy. In particular for focal arrhythmias, this model-based imaging approach might allow the guidance and evaluation of antiarrhythmic interventions, for instance, in case of catheter ablation or drug therapy.

  14. Evolution of Storm-time Subauroral Electric Fields: RCM Event Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazykin, S.; Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Toffoletto, F.; Baker, J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Subauroral polarization streams (SAPS) are regions of strongly-enhanced westward ExB plasma drift (poleward-directed electric fields) located just equatorward of the evening auroral oval. Several recently -installed HF (coherent scatter) radars in the SuperDARN chain at mid-latitudes present a novel opportunity for obtaining two-dimensional maps of ionospheric ExB flows at F-region altitudes that span several hours of the evening and nighttime subauroral ionosphere. These new and exciting observations of SAPS provide an opportunity and a challenge to coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere models. In this paper, we use the Rice Convection Model (RCM) to simulate several events where SAPS were observed by the mid-latitude SuperDARN chain. RCM frequently predicts the occurrence of SAPS in the subauroral evening MLT sector; the mechanism is essentially current closure on the dusk side where downward Birkeland currents (associated with the ion plasma sheet inner edge) map to a region of reduced ionospheric conductance just equatorward of the diffuse auroral precipitation (associated with the electron plasma sheet inner edge). We present detailed comparisons of model-computed ionospheric convection patterns with observations, with two goals in mind: (1) to analyze to what extent the observed appearance and time evolution of SAPS structures are driven by time variations of the cross polar cap potential drop (or, equivalently, the z-component of the interplanetary magnetic field), and (2) to evaluate the ability of the model to reproduce the spatial extent and magnitude of SAPS structures.

  15. Bioreactor for modulation of cardiac microtissue phenotype by combined static stretch and electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miklas, Jason W; Nunes, Sara S; Sofla, Aarash; Reis, Lewis A; Pahnke, Aric; Xiao, Yun; Laschinger, Carol; Radisic, Milica

    2014-01-01

    We describe here a bioreactor capable of simultaneously applying mechanical and electrical field stimulation in conjunction with static strain and on-line force of contraction measurements. It consisted of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tissue chamber and a pneumatically driven stretch platform. The chamber contained eight tissue microwells (8.05 mm in length and 2.5 mm in width) with a pair of posts (2.78 mm in height and 0.8 mm in diameter) in each well to serve as fixation points and for measurements of contraction force. Carbon rods, stimulating electrodes, were placed into the PDMS chamber such that one pair stimulated four microwells. For feasibility studies, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded in collagen gels into the microwells. Following three days of gel compaction, electrical field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm and 1Hz, mechanical stimulation of 5% static strain or electromechanical stimulation (field stimulation at 3–4 V/cm, 1Hz and 5% static strain) were applied for 3 days. Cardiac microtissues subjected to electromechanical stimulation exhibited elevated amplitude of contraction and improved sarcomere structure as evidenced by sarcomeric α-actinin, actin and troponin T staining compared to microtissues subjected to electrical or mechanical stimulation alone or non-stimulated controls. The expression of atrial natriuretic factor and brain natriuretic peptide was also elevated in the electromechanically stimulated group. PMID:24876342

  16. Complex spiral wave dynamics in a spatially distributed ionic model of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtemanche, Marc

    1996-12-01

    This study presents computations and analysis of the dynamics of reentrant spiral waves in a realistic model of cardiac electrical activity, incorporating the Beeler-Reuter equations into a two-dimensional cable model. In this medium, spiral waves spontaneously break up, but may be stabilized by shortening the excitation pulse duration through an acceleration of the dynamics of the calcium current. We describe the breakup of reentrant waves based on the presence of slow recovery fronts within the medium. This concept is introduced using examples from pulse circulation around a ring and extended to two-dimensional propagation. We define properties of the restitution and dispersion relations that are associated with slow recovery fronts and promote spiral breakup. The role of slow recovery fronts is illustrated with concrete examples from numerical simulations.

  17. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  18. Direct observations of the role of convection electric field in the formation of a polar tongue of ionization from storm enhanced density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E. G.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Coster, A. J.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.

    2013-03-01

    examine the relationship of convection electric fields to the formation of a polar cap tongue of ionization (TOI) from midlatitude plumes of storm enhanced density (SED). Observations from the geomagnetic storm on 26-27 September 2011 are presented for two distinct SED events. During an hour-long period of geomagnetic activity driven by a coronal mass ejection, a channel of high-density F region plasma was transported from the dayside subauroral ionosphere and into the polar cap by enhanced convection electric fields extending to middle latitudes. This TOI feature was associated with enhanced HF backscatter, indicating that it was the seat of active formation of small-scale irregularities. After the solar wind interplanetary magnetic field conditions quieted and the dayside convection electric fields retreated to higher latitudes, an SED plume was observed extending to, but not entering, the dayside cusp region. This prominent feature in the distribution of total electron content (TEC) persisted for several hours and elongated in magnetic local time with the rotation of the Earth. No ionospheric scatter from SuperDARN radars was observed within this SED region. The source mechanism (enhanced electric fields) previously drawing the plasma from midlatitudes and into the polar cap as a TOI was no longer active, resulting in a fossil feature. We thus demonstrate the controlling role exercised by the convection electric field in generating a TOI from midlatitude SED.

  19. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR category:  ... Sep 22, 2009 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Australia and New Zealand ...

  20. Study of simultaneous presence of DD and PP electric fields during the geomagnetic storm of November 7-8, 2004 and resultant TEC variation over the Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galav, P.; Sharma, Shweta; Rao, S. S.; Veenadhari, B.; Nagatsuma, T.; Pandey, R.

    2014-04-01

    During very intense geomagnetic storm of November 7-8, 2004 simultaneous presence of storm time disturbance dynamo and eastward and westward directed prompt penetration electric fields inferred from the ground based magnetometer data in the 75∘ E sector is presented. Magnetometer observations show that, on the whole, average Δ H variation on 8 November remains below the night time level compared to its quiet day variation. A number of upward and downward excursions have been observed between 0130 UT and 0800 UT in the Δ H variation on 8 November. These excursions in Δ H have been attributed to the episodes of eastward and westward prompt penetrating electric fields. Ionospheric response in the equatorial ionization anomaly region along 75∘ E has also been studied using the total electron content data recorded at five GPS stations, namely Udaipur, Bengaluru (IISC), Hyderabad (HYDE), Maldives (MALD) and Diego Garcia (DGAR). Observation of markedly suppressed EIA, in conjunction with Δ H variation which was m negative during the daytime on 8 November, indicates the presence of an external field of opposite polarity (the disturbance dynamo electric field) that either undermined, or overshadowed the daytime ambient (eastward) electric field to the extent that the equatorial plasma fountain could not become effective.

  1. Magnetic storms and induction hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, E. Joshua; Pulkkinen, Antti; Balch, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic storms are potentially hazardous to the activities and technological infrastructure of modern civilization. This reality was dramatically demonstrated during the great magnetic storm of March 1989, when surface geoelectric fields, produced by the interaction of the time-varying geomagnetic field with the Earth's electrically conducting interior, coupled onto the overlying Hydro-Québec electric power grid in Canada. Protective relays were tripped, the grid collapsed, and about 9 million people were temporarily left without electricity [Bolduc, 2002].

  2. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  3. How the effects of winds and electric fields in F2-layer storms vary with latitude and longitude - A theoretical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, M.; He, X.-Q.; Rishbeth, H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of thermospheric winds and electric fields on the ionospheric F2-layer are controlled by the geometry of the magnetic field, and so vary with latitude and longitude. A simple model of the daytime F2-layer is adopted and the effects at midlatitudes (25-65 deg geographic) of three processes that accompany geomagnetic storms: (1) thermospheric changes due to auroral heating; (2) equatorward winds that tend to cancel the quiet-day poleward winds; and (3) the penetration of magnetospheric electric fields are studied. At +/- 65 deg, the effects of heating and electric fields are strongest in the longitudes toward which the geomagnetic dipole is tilted, i.e., the North American and the South Indian Ocean sectors. Because of the proximity of the geomagnetic equator to the East Asian and South American sectors, the reverse is true at +/- 25 deg.

  4. Alternative approach for management of an electrical storm in Brugada syndrome:Importance of primary ablation within a narrow time window.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmed Karim; Yui, Yoshiaki; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yukio; Nogami, Akihiko; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2016-06-01

    Placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is the only powerful treatment modality for Brugada syndrome in patients presenting with ventricular fibrillation (VF). For those whose first presentation is an electrical storm, pharmacologic therapy is typically used to control VF followed by ICD implantation. We report an alternative approach whereby, before ICD implantation, emergency catheter ablation of the VF-triggering premature ventricular contraction (PVC) resulted in long-term VF-free survival. The results suggest that, because VF triggers appear in a narrow time window, ablation of the culprit PVCs that initiate VF before the index PVCs subside is a reasonable alternative approach.

  5. Acute effects of nonexcitatory electrical stimulation during systole in isolated cardiac myocytes and perfused heart

    PubMed Central

    Blinova, Ksenia; Stohlman, Jayna; Krauthamer, Victor; Knapton, Alan; Bloomquist, Erik; Gray, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Application of electrical field to the heart during the refractory period of the beat has been shown to increase the force of contraction both in animal models and in heart failure patients (cardiac contractility modulation, or CCM). A direct increase in intracellular calcium during CCM has been suggested to be the mechanism behind the positive inotropic effect of CCM. We studied the effect of CCM on isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes and perfused whole rat hearts. The effect of CCM was observed in single cells via fluorescent measurements of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and cell length (L). Cells were paced once per second throughout these recordings, and CCM stimulation was delivered via biphasic electric fields of 20 ms duration applied during the refractory period. CCM increased the peak amplitude of both [Ca2+]i and L for the first beat during CCM compared to control, but then [Ca2+]i and L decayed to levels lower than the control. During CCM, all contractions had a faster time to peak for both [Ca2+]i and L; after stopping CCM the rise times returned to control levels. In the whole rat heart, the positive inotropic effect of CCM stimulation on left ventricular pressure was completely abolished in the presence of metoprolol, a beta‐1 adrenergic blocker. In summary, the CCM‐induced changes in intracellular calcium handling by cardiomyocytes did not explain the sustained positive inotropic effect in the whole heart and the β‐adrenergic pathway may be involved in the CCM mechanism of action. PMID:25096553

  6. Fluoroscopy-based method to determine heart geometry for functional imaging of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Raja N.; Ramanathan, Charulatha; Jia, Ping; Rudy, Yoram

    2003-05-01

    A fluoroscopy based method for determining heart surface geometry has been developed and validated in phantom and human studies. Biplane fluoroscopic projections were calibrated independently. The heart contour was segmented in each projection and corresponding contour points were matched using epipolar geometry. Points in 3D were reconstructed from the corresponding contour points using point reconstruction. B-splines were approximated from the reconstructed points and meshed to form the heart surface. The fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart was validated in a phantom and human study by comparison to CT imaging. Mean, minimum, maximum and standard deviation of the absolute distance errors were computed for the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart relative to the CT heart. The mean absolute distance error for the phantom was 4mm. The mean absolute distance error for the human subject was 10 mm. In addition to validating the geometry, we also evaluated in the human subject the feasibility of noninvasive imaging of normal cardiac electrical activity on the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart by comparing the results to those obtained on the CT heart. Noninvasive images on the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart by showed close correlation with those obtained on the CT heart (CC=0.70).

  7. Development of Electrically Conductive Double-Network Hydrogels via One-Step Facile Strategy for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Boguang; Yao, Fanglian; Hao, Tong; Fang, Wancai; Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yabin; Wang, Yan; Li, Junjie; Wang, Changyong

    2016-02-18

    Cardiac tissue engineering is an effective method to treat the myocardial infarction. However, the lack of electrical conductivity of biomaterials limits their applications. In this work, a homogeneous electronically conductive double network (HEDN) hydrogel via one-step facile strategy is developed, consisting of a rigid/hydrophobic/conductive network of chemical crosslinked poly(thiophene-3-acetic acid) (PTAA) and a flexible/hydrophilic/biocompatible network of photo-crosslinking methacrylated aminated gelatin (MAAG). Results suggest that the swelling, mechanical, and conductive properties of HEDN hydrogel can be modulated via adjusting the ratio of PTAA network to MAAG network. HEDN hydrogel has Young's moduli ranging from 22.7 to 493.1 kPa, and its conductivity (≈10(-4) S cm(-1)) falls in the range of reported conductivities for native myocardium tissue. To assess their biological activity, the brown adipose-derived stem cells (BADSCs) are seeded on the surface of HEDN hydrogel with or without electrical stimulation. Our data show that the HEDN hydrogel can support the survival and proliferation of BADSCs, and that it can improve the cardiac differentiation efficiency of BADSCs and upregulate the expression of connexin 43. Moreover, electrical stimulation can further improve this effect. Overall, it is concluded that the HEDN hydrogel may represent an ideal scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering.

  8. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... April 11, 2004 (top panels) contrast strongly with the dust storm that swept across Iraq and Saudi Arabia on May 13, 2004 (bottom panels). ... Apr 11 and May 13, 2004 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Middle East thumbnail:  ...

  9. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heartbeats ( arrhythmias ) ... due to medicine) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  10. Combining wet and dry research: experience with model development for cardiac mechano-electric structure-function studies

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, T. Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Since the development of the first mathematical cardiac cell model 50 years ago, computational modelling has become an increasingly powerful tool for the analysis of data and for the integration of information related to complex cardiac behaviour. Current models build on decades of iteration between experiment and theory, representing a collective understanding of cardiac function. All models, whether computational, experimental, or conceptual, are simplified representations of reality and, like tools in a toolbox, suitable for specific applications. Their range of applicability can be explored (and expanded) by iterative combination of ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ investigation, where experimental or clinical data are used to first build and then validate computational models (allowing integration of previous findings, quantitative assessment of conceptual models, and projection across relevant spatial and temporal scales), while computational simulations are utilized for plausibility assessment, hypotheses-generation, and prediction (thereby defining further experimental research targets). When implemented effectively, this combined wet/dry research approach can support the development of a more complete and cohesive understanding of integrated biological function. This review illustrates the utility of such an approach, based on recent examples of multi-scale studies of cardiac structure and mechano-electric function. PMID:23334215

  11. Rapid electrical stimulation causes alterations in cardiac intercellular junction proteins of cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Tadamitsu; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Okamoto, Yoko; Yoshida, Masaaki; Lee, Jong-Kook; Mizukami, Yoichi; Yano, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    The intercellular junctions contain two complexes, adhesion junctions (AJ) and connexin (Cx) gap junctions (GJs). GJs provide the pathway for intercellular current flow. AJs mediate normal mechanical coupling and play an important role in the stability of GJs. We investigated the effects of rapid electrical stimulation (RES) on cardiac intercellular junctions, especially β-catenin and Cx43 alterations. We also studied the effects of ANG II receptor blockade on intercellular junction remodeling. Neonatal rats were euthanized by decapitation, and cardiomyocytes were prepared, cultured, and subjected to RES. We used real-time PCR, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemical methods. Conduction properties were examined by an extracellular potential mapping system. Cx43 protein expression in cardiomyocytes was significantly increased after 60 min. β-Catenin expression in the total cell fraction was significantly increased after 30 min. The expression level of β-catenin in the nucleus, which functions as a T cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer binding factor transcriptional activator of Cx43 with its degradation regulated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, was dramatically increased after 10 min. Conduction velocity was increased significantly by RES for 60 min. Olmesartan prevented most these effects of RES. We showed an increase of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β, which is phosphorylated by activated MAPKs and inhibits β-catenin degradation, was attenuated by olmesartan. The changes in β-catenin precede Cx43 GJ remodeling and might play an important role in the formation and stability of GJs. Olmesartan might be a new upstream arrhythmia therapy by modulating intercellular junction remodeling through the β-catenin signaling pathway.

  12. The relationship between cardiac output, cerebral electrical activity, cerebral fractional oxygen extraction and peripheral blood flow in premature newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Victor, Suresh; Appleton, Richard E; Beirne, Margaret; Marson, Anthony G; Weindling, A Michael

    2006-10-01

    Cardiac output is a determinant of systemic blood flow and its measurement may therefore be a useful indicator of abnormal hemodynamics and tissue oxygen delivery. The purpose of this study was to investigate in very premature newborn infants the relationships between cardiac output (left and right ventricular outputs), systemic blood pressure, peripheral blood flow (PBF) and two indicators of cerebral oxygen delivery (cerebral electrical activity and cerebral fractional oxygen extraction (CFOE)). This was a prospective observational study performed on 40 infants of less than 30 wk gestation. Digital electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded for one hour every day during the first four days after birth and subjected to qualitative and quantitative analysis. Left and right ventricular outputs, mean blood pressure (MBP), CFOE, PBF and arterial blood gases were measured at the same time. Within the ranges studied, there was no apparent relationship between left or right ventricular output (RVO), PBF and indicators of cerebral perfusion (cerebral electrical activity and CFOE). The EEG was normal in infants with low left and right ventricular outputs (<150 mL/kg/min) and MBP > 30 mm Hg. Infants with low cardiac output and normal MBP seem able to maintain cerebral perfusion, possibly through vasodilatation of the cerebral microvasculature. PMID:16940235

  13. Removal of pinned scroll waves in cardiac tissues by electric fields in a generic model of three-dimensional excitable media.

    PubMed

    Pan, De-Bei; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Xia; Pan, Jun-Ting; Zhang, Hong

    2016-02-24

    Spirals or scroll waves pinned to heterogeneities in cardiac tissues may cause lethal arrhythmias. To unpin these life-threatening spiral waves, methods of wave emission from heterogeneities (WEH) induced by low-voltage pulsed DC electric fields (PDCEFs) and circularly polarized electric fields (CPEFs) have been used in two-dimensional (2D) cardiac tissues. Nevertheless, the unpinning of scroll waves in three-dimensional (3D) cardiac systems is much more difficult than that of spiral waves in 2D cardiac systems, and there are few reports on the removal of pinned scroll waves in 3D cardiac tissues by electric fields. In this article, we investigate in detail the removal of pinned scroll waves in a generic model of 3D excitable media using PDCEF, AC electric field (ACEF) and CPEF, respectively. We find that spherical waves can be induced from the heterogeneities by these electric fields in initially quiescent excitable media. However, only CPEF can induce spherical waves with frequencies higher than that of the pinned scroll wave. Such higher-frequency spherical waves induced by CPEF can be used to drive the pinned scroll wave out of the cardiac systems. We hope this remarkable ability of CPEF can provide a better alternative to terminate arrhythmias caused by pinned scroll waves.

  14. Cocaine Intoxication and Thyroid Storm

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cocaine, a widely used sympathomimetic drug, causes thermoregulatory and cardiac manifestations that can mimic a life-threatening thyroid storm. Case. A man presented to the emergency department requesting only cocaine detoxification. He reported symptoms over the last few years including weight loss and diarrhea, which he attributed to ongoing cocaine use. On presentation he had an elevated temperature of 39.4°C and a heart rate up to 130 beats per minute. Examination revealed the presence of an enlarged, nontender goiter with bilateral continuous bruits. He was found to have thyrotoxicosis by labs and was treated for thyroid storm and cocaine intoxication concurrently. The patient was ultimately diagnosed with Graves’ disease and treated with iodine-131 therapy. Conclusion. Cocaine use should be considered a possible trigger for thyroid storm. Recognition of thyroid storm is critical because of the necessity for targeted therapy and the significant mortality associated with the condition if left untreated. PMID:26425625

  15. Mapping and ablation of trigger premature ventricular contractions in a case of electrical storm associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Taro; Yamada, Takumi; Murakami, Yoshimasa; Yoshida, Naoki; Ninomiya, Yuuichi; Toyama, Junji

    2007-03-01

    We report a case of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (PVT/VF) storm associated with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). The electrocardiogram (ECG) monitor revealed frequent premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) initiated PVT/VF. Electroanatomic mapping revealed the plausible origins of PVCs were located in the scar border zone at the posterior septum of the left ventricle. Purkinje-like potentials (PLPs) always preceded PVCs and a decremental property for the PLPs and infarcted myocardium junction was observed. Ablation at these sites eliminated both PVCs and PVT/VF.

  16. Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Gonzalez, Walter D.

    1998-01-01

    One of the oldest mysteries in geomagnetism is the linkage between solar and geomagnetic activity. The 11-year cycles of both the numbers of sunspots and Earth geomagnetic storms were first noted by Sabine. A few years later, speculation on a causal relationship between flares and storms arose when Carrington reported that a large magnetic storm followed the great September 1859 solar flare. However, it was not until this century that a well-accepted statistical survey on large solar flares and geomagnetic storms was performed, and a significant correlation between flares and geomagnetic storms was noted. Although the two phenomena, one on the Sun and the other on the Earth, were statistically correlated, the exact physical linkage was still an unknown at this time. Various hypotheses were proposed, but it was not until interplanetary spacecraft measurements were available that a high-speed plasma stream rich in helium was associated with an intense solar flare. The velocity of the solar wind increased just prior to and during the helium passage, identifying the solar ejecta for the first time. Space plasma measurements and Skylab's coronagraph images of coronal mass elections (CMES) from the Sun firmly established the plasma link between the Sun and the Earth. One phenomenon associated with magnetic storms is brilliant "blood" red auroras, as shown.

  17. Groundwater discharge to wetlands driven by storm and flood events: Quantification using continuous Radon-222 and electrical conductivity measurements and dynamic mass-balance modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfedder, B. S.; Frei, S.; Hofmann, H.; Cartwright, I.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic response of groundwater discharge to external influences such as rainfall is an often neglected part of water and solute balances in wetlands. Here we develop a new field platform for long-term continuous 222Rn and electrical conductivity (EC) measurements at Sale Wetland, Australia to study the response of groundwater discharge to storm and flood events. The field measurements, combined with dynamic mass-balance modelling, demonstrate that the groundwater flux can increase from 3 to ∼20 mm d-1 following storms and up to 5 mm d-1 on the receding limb of floods. The groundwater pulses are likely produced by activation of local groundwater flow paths by water ponding on the surrounding flood plains. While 222Rn is a sensitive tracer for quantifying transient groundwater discharge, the mass-balance used to estimate fluxes is sensitive to parameterisation of gas exchange (k) with the atmosphere. Comparison of six equations for calculating k showed that, based on parameterisation of k alone, the groundwater flux estimate could vary by 58%. This work shows that neglecting transient processes will lead to errors in water and solute flux estimates based on infrequent point measurements. This could be particularly important for surface waters connected to contaminated or saline groundwater systems.

  18. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  19. [Electrical cardioversion in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias during pregnancy--case report and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Gałczyński, Krzysztof; Marciniak, Beata; Kudlicki, Janusz; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczukz, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias is estimated et 1.2 per 1000 pregnancies, usually in the third trimester and 50% of them are asymptomatic. They may appear for the first time in pregnancy or have a recurring character An important risk factor related to their appearance is the presence of structural heart disease, which complicates < 1% of pregnancies. Generally the symptoms are mild and the treatment is not necessary but in some cases pharmacotherapy is necessary Pharmacotherapy must be a compromise between the potentially adverse effects of drugs on the fetus and the beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system of the mother. Due to the development of cardiac surgery many women with heart defects reach reproductive age and become pregnant. Therefore this problem will be faced more and more often in clinical practice. In addition to pharmacological methods some cardiac arrhythmias may require urgent, life-saving procedures. External electrical cardioversion is associated with the application of certain amount of energy via two electrodes placed on the thorax. It is used to treat hemodynamically unstable supraventricular tachycardias, including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter Also in hemodynamically stable patients in whom drug therapy was ineffective elective electrical cardioversion can be use to convert cardiac arrhythmia to sinus rhythm. We present a case of a 33 years old patient with congenital heart disease surgically corrected in childhood who had first incident of atrial flutter in pregnancy. Arrhytmia occured in 26th week of gestation. The patient was hemodynamically stable and did not approve electrical cardioversion as a method of treatment therefore pharmacotherapy was started. Heart rate was controled with metoprolol and digoxin, warfarin was used to anticoagulation. Calcium and potassium were also given. Described therapy did not convert atrial flutter to sinus rhythm therefore in 33rd week of gestation after patient's approval

  20. Cardiac melanocytes influence atrial reactive oxygen species involved with electrical and structural remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hayoung; Liu, Fang; Petrenko, Nataliya B; Huang, Jianhe; Schillinger, Kurt J; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac melanocyte-like cells (CMLCs) contribute to atrial arrhythmias when missing the melanin synthesis enzyme dopachrome tautomerase (Dct). While scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Dct-null mice partially suppressed atrial arrhythmias, it remains unclear if CMLCs influence atrial ROS and structure or if the electrical response of CMLCs to ROS differs from that of atrial myocytes. This study is designed to determine if CMLCs contribute to overall atrial oxidative stress or structural remodeling, and if ROS affects the electrophysiology of CMLCs differently than atrial myocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis showed higher expression of the oxidative marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in Dct-null atria versus Dct-heterozygous (Dct-het) atria. Exposing isolated CMLCs from Dct-het and Dct-null mice to hydrogen peroxide increased superoxide anion more in Dct-null CMLCs. Trichrome staining showed increased fibrosis in Dct-null atria, and treating Dct-null mice with the ROS scavenger Tempol reduced atrial fibrosis. Action potential recordings from atrial myocytes and isolated Dct-het and Dct-null CMLCs in response to hydrogen peroxide showed that the EC50 for action potential duration (APD) prolongation of Dct-null CMLCs was 8.2 ± 1.7 μmol/L versus 16.8 ± 2.0 μmol/L for Dct-het CMLCs, 19.9 ± 2.1 μmol/L for Dct-null atrial myocytes, and 20.5 ± 1.9 μmol/L for Dct-het atrial myocytes. However, APD90 was longer in CMLCs versus atrial myocytes in response to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide also induced more afterdepolarizations in CMLCs compared to atrial myocytes. These studies suggest that Dct within CMLCs contributes to atrial ROS balance and remodeling. ROS prolongs APD to a greater extent and induces afterdepolarizations more frequently in CMLCs than in atrial myocytes.

  1. Effects of magnetospheric electric fields and neutral winds on the low-middle latitude ionosphere during the March 20-21, 1990, Storm

    SciTech Connect

    Buonsanto, M.J.; Foster, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    During the geomagnetic storm of March 20-21, 1990, substorm activity is clearly evident in magnetometer data collected during the night at the middle- and low-latitude stations Fredericksburg (38.2{degrees}N, 282.6{degrees}E) and San Juan (18.1{degrees}N, 293.8{degrees}E). At the same time, incoherent scatter radars at Millstone Hill (42.6{degrees}N, 288.5{degrees}E) and Arecibo (18.3{degrees}N, 293.25{degrees}E) observed ionospheric storm effects, which included the penetration of magnetospheric electric fields and disturbance neutral winds to the latitude of Arecibo. The eastward electric fields associated with the substorm disturbances result in increases in the F2 peak height (hmF2) at Arecibo. Decreases in hmF2 follow as a result of increased downward diffusion and/or the effects of an ion drag induced poleward wind. During the intervals between the electric field penetration events, equatorward surges in the neutral wind result in westward electric fields by the disturbance dynamo mechanism. At these times the horizontal ionization drifts are not as strong as the neutral winds, apparently because of a partial shorting out of the dynamo electric fields as a result of some E region conductivity. The anticorrelation between the components of ion drift parallel (V{sub {parallel}}) and perpendicular to the magnetic field in the northward direction (V{sub {perpendicular}}N) results in approximately horizontal (constant altitude) ion drift motion throughout the interval. Calculations of spatial gradients in the electron density and in the components of the ion velocity are carried out using the multi-directional incoherent scatter observations at Arecibo. The results show that the variations in electron density during the disturbed interval follow closely the motion term in the F2 region continuity equation, with both advection of spatial gradients and divergence of the ion flow important at times. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Electrical Wave Propagation in an Anisotropic Model of the Left Ventricle Based on Analytical Description of Cardiac Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pravdin, Sergey F.; Dierckx, Hans; Katsnelson, Leonid B.; Solovyova, Olga; Markhasin, Vladimir S.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a numerical approach based on our recent analytical model of fiber structure in the left ventricle of the human heart. A special curvilinear coordinate system is proposed to analytically include realistic ventricular shape and myofiber directions. With this anatomical model, electrophysiological simulations can be performed on a rectangular coordinate grid. We apply our method to study the effect of fiber rotation and electrical anisotropy of cardiac tissue (i.e., the ratio of the conductivity coefficients along and across the myocardial fibers) on wave propagation using the ten Tusscher–Panfilov (2006) ionic model for human ventricular cells. We show that fiber rotation increases the speed of cardiac activation and attenuates the effects of anisotropy. Our results show that the fiber rotation in the heart is an important factor underlying cardiac excitation. We also study scroll wave dynamics in our model and show the drift of a scroll wave filament whose velocity depends non-monotonically on the fiber rotation angle; the period of scroll wave rotation decreases with an increase of the fiber rotation angle; an increase in anisotropy may cause the breakup of a scroll wave, similar to the mother rotor mechanism of ventricular fibrillation. PMID:24817308

  3. An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons and two probe designs using a swine comparative cardiac safety model.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Donald Murray; Ho, Jeffrey D; Moore, Johanna C; Miner, James R

    2013-09-01

    Despite human laboratory and field studies that have demonstrated a reasonable safety profile for TASER brand conducted electrical weapons (CEW), the results of some swine studies and arrest related deaths temporal to the use of the CEWs continue to raise questions regarding cardiac safety. TASER International, Inc., has released a new CEW, the TASER X2, touted to have a better safety profile than its long-standing predecessor, the TASER X26. We have developed a model to assess the relative cardiac safety of CEWs and used it to compare the TASER X2 and the TASER X26. This safety model was also used to assess the relative safety of an experimental probe design as compared to the standard steel probe. Our results suggest that the TASER X2 has an improved safety margin over the TASER X26. The new probe design also has promise for enhanced cardiac safety, although may have some disadvantages when compared to the existing design which would make field use impractical.

  4. Label-free electrical detection of cardiac biomarker with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-compatible silicon nanowire sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Chua, Jay Huiyi; Chee, Ru-Ern; Agarwal, Ajay; Wong, She Mein; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2009-08-01

    Arrays of highly ordered silicon nanowire (SiNW) clusters are fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field effect transistor-compatible technology, and the ultrasensitive, label-free, electrical detection of cardiac biomarker in real time using the array sensor is presented. The successful detection of human cardiac troponin-T (cTnT) has been demonstrated in an assay buffer solution of concentration down to 1 fg/mL, as well as in an undiluted human serum environment of concentration as low as 30 fg/mL. The high specificity, selectivity, and swift response time of the SiNWs to the presence of ultralow concentrations of a target protein in a biological analyte solution, even in the presence of a high total protein concentration, paves the way for the development of a medical diagnostic system for point-of-care application that is able to provide an early and accurate indication of cardiac cellular necrosis. PMID:20337397

  5. Electrical recordings from rat cardiac muscle cells using field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprössler, Christoph; Denyer, Morgan; Britland, Steve; Knoll, Wolfgang; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    1999-08-01

    Extracellular electrophysiological recordings were made from cardiac cells cultured for up to seven days over microfabricated arrays of field-effect transistors. The recorded signals can be separated mainly into two types of cell transistor couplings: one that can be explained entirely by purely passive circuitry elements, and a second where voltage-gated ion channels contribute greatly to the measured extracellular signal.

  6. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  7. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  8. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  9. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  11. 30 CFR 56.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 56.6604 Section 56... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm, blasting operations shall be suspended and persons withdrawn from the blast area or to a...

  12. Dynamic boundary estimation of human heart within a complete cardiac cycle using electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, A.; Kim, B. S.; Khambampati, A. K.; Liu, Dong; Kim, S.; Kim, K. Y.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an EKF based boundary estimation algorithm to estimate the shape and size of human heart ventricle during a complete cardiac cycle. First-order kinematic model is used as a state evolution model. The boundary of the heart is expressed as coefficients of truncated Fourier series and the conductivity distribution inside the thorax region is assumed to be known a priori. The proposed method is tested with the use of a realistic chest shape FEM mesh.

  13. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  14. Influence of heart motion on cardiac output estimation by means of electrical impedance tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Rapin, Michael; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Bohm, Stephan H; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can measure cardiac-related intra-thoracic impedance changes. EIT-based cardiac output estimation relies on the assumption that the amplitude of the impedance change in the ventricular region is representative of stroke volume (SV). However, other factors such as heart motion can significantly affect this ventricular impedance change. In the present case study, a magnetic resonance imaging-based dynamic bio-impedance model fitting the morphology of a single male subject was built. Simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of heart motion and its influence on EIT-based SV estimation. Myocardial deformation was found to be the main contributor to the ventricular impedance change (56%). However, motion-induced impedance changes showed a strong correlation (r = 0.978) with left ventricular volume. We explained this by the quasi-incompressibility of blood and myocardium. As a result, EIT achieved excellent accuracy in estimating a wide range of simulated SV values (error distribution of 0.57 ± 2.19 ml (1.02 ± 2.62%) and correlation of r = 0.996 after a two-point calibration was applied to convert impedance values to millilitres). As the model was based on one single subject, the strong correlation found between motion-induced changes and ventricular volume remains to be verified in larger datasets.

  15. Deletion of Kvβ1.1 subunit leads to electrical and haemodynamic changes causing cardiac hypertrophy in female murine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Tur, Jared; Chapalamadugu, Kalyan C.; Padawer, Timothy; Badole, Sachin L.; Kilfoil, Peter J.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and debility in women in the USA, and cardiac arrhythmias are a major concern. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels along with the binding partners; Kvβ subunits are major regulators of the action potential (AP) shape and duration (APD). The regulation of Kv channels by the Kvβ1 subunit is unknown in female hearts. In the present study, we hypothesized that the Kvβ1 subunit is an important regulator of female cardiac physiology. To test this hypothesis, we ablated (knocked out; KO) the KCNAB1 isoform 1 (Kvβ1.1) subunit in mice and evaluated cardiac function and electrical activity by using ECG, monophasic action potential recordings and echocardiography. Our results showed that the female Kvβ1.1 KO mice developed cardiac hypertrophy, and the hearts were structurally different, with enlargement and increased area. The electrical derangements caused by Kvβ1.1 KO in female mice included long QTc and QRS intervals along with increased APD (APD20–90% repolarization). The male Kvβ1.1 KO mice did not develop cardiac hypertrophy, but they showed long QTc and prolonged APD. Molecular analysis showed that several genes that support cardiac hypertrophy were significantly altered in Kvβ1.1 KO female hearts. In particular, myosin heavy chain αexpression was significantly elevated in Kvβ1.1 KO mouse heart. Using a small interfering RNA strategy, we identified that knockdown of Kvβ1 increases myosin heavy chain αexpression in H9C2 cells. Collectively, changes in molecular and cell signalling pathways clearly point towards a distinct electrical and structural remodelling consistent with cardiac hypertrophy in the Kvβ1.1 KO female mice. PMID:27038296

  16. Nanosecond pulsed platelet-rich plasma (nsPRP) improves mechanical and electrical cardiac function following myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Barbara; Varghese, Frency; Barabutis, Nektarios; Catravas, John; Zemlin, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) of the heart is associated with biochemical and ionic changes that result in cardiac contractile and electrical dysfunction. In rabbits, platelet-rich plasma activated using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPRP) has been shown to improve left ventricular pumping. Here, we demonstrate that nsPRP causes a similar improvement in mouse left ventricular function. We also show that nsPRP injection recovers electrical activity even before reperfusion begins. To uncover the mechanism of nsPRP action, we studied whether the enhanced left ventricular function in nsPRP rabbit and mouse hearts was associated with increased expression of heat-shock proteins and altered mitochondrial function under conditions of oxidative stress. Mouse hearts underwent 30 min of global ischemia and 1 h of reperfusion in situ. Rabbit hearts underwent 30 min of ischemia in vivo and were reperfused for 14 days. Hearts treated with nsPRP expressed significantly higher levels of Hsp27 and Hsp70 compared to hearts treated with vehicle. Also, pretreatment of cultured H9c2 cells with nsPRP significantly enhanced the "spare respiratory capacity (SRC)" also referred to as "respiratory reserve capacity" and ATP production in response to the uncoupler FCCP. These results suggest a cardioprotective effect of nsPRP on the ischemic heart during reperfusion. PMID:26908713

  17. Effect of electric and magnetic fields near an HVDC converter terminal on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.J.

    1980-08-01

    The electromagnetic fields associated with HVDC converters and transmission lines constitute a unique environment for persons with implanted cardiac pacemakers. A measurement program has been conducted to assess the potential interfering effects of these harmonically rich fields on implanted pacemakers. The experimental procedures that were employed take into account the combined effects of the electric and magnetic fields. The effect of the resulting body current on the response of six pacemakers was assessed in the laboratory, using a previously developed model to relate body current to pacemaker pickup voltage. The results show that R-wave pacemaker reversion can be expected at some locations within the converter facility, but that a large safety margin for unperturbed pacemaker operation exists beneath the transmission lines.

  18. Pilocarpine modulates the cellular electrical properties of mammalian hearts by activating a cardiac M3 receptor and a K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huizhen; Shi, Hong; Lu, Yanjie; Yang, Baofeng; Wang, Zhiguo

    1999-01-01

    Pilocarpine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist, is widely used for treatment of xerostomia and glaucoma. It can also cause many other cellular responses by activating different subtypes of mAChRs in different tissues. However, the potential role of pilocarpine in modulating cardiac function remained unstudied.We found that pilocarpine produced concentration-dependent (0.1–10 μM) decrease in sinus rhythm and action potential duration, and hyperpolarization of membrane potential in guinea-pig hearts. The effects were nearly completely reversed by 1 μM atropine or 2 nM 4DAMP methiodide (an M3-selective antagonist).Patch-clamp recordings in dispersed myocytes from guinea-pig and canine atria revealed that pilocarpine induces a novel K+ current with delayed rectifying properties. The current was suppressed by low concentrations of M3-selective antagonists 4DAMP methiodide (2–10 nM), 4DAMP mustard (4–20 nM, an ackylating agent) and p-F-HHSiD (20–200 nM). Antagonists towards other subtypes (M1, M2 or M4) all failed to alter the current.The affinity of pilocarpine (KD) at mAChRs derived from displacement binding of [3H]-NMS in the homogenates from dog atria was 2.2 μM (65% of the total binding) and that of 4DAMP methiodide was 2.8 nM (70% of total binding), consistent with the concentration of pilocarpine needed for the current induction and for the modulation of the cardiac electrical activity and the concentration of 4DAMP to block pilocarpine effects.Our data indicate, for the first time, that pilocarpine modulates the cellular electrical properties of the hearts, likely by activating a K+ current mediated by M3 receptors. PMID:10372814

  19. Evaluation of the effects of electric fields on implanted cardiac pacemakers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, A.J.; Carstensen, E.

    1985-02-01

    The effects of extra high voltage (EHV) transmission line electric fields on pacemaker function were evaluated in 11 patients with seven different implanted pacemaker models from four manufacturers. Alteration in pacemaker function was demonstrated in five unipolar units (three different models) from two manufacturers during exposure to electric fields ranging from 2 to 9 kV/m, with total body currents from 47 to 175 ..mu..A. These electric fields and body currents are representative of values that can be encountered by individuals standing beneath EHV transmission lines. Transient alterations in pacemaker function observed in this study included inappropriate triggered activity, inhibition of impulse generation, reduction in rate, and reversion from demand to asynchronous mode. Electromagnetic interference from high voltage transmission lines can induce alterations in pacemaker function in certain designs of these devices. However, pacemaker manufacturers can incorporate appropriate circuits in the pacemaker design to eliminate this problem. 8 references.

  20. Continuous measurement of cardiac output with the electrical velocimetry method in patients under spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhong; Pian-Smith, May C M; Leffert, Lisa R; Minehart, Rebecca D; Torri, Andrea; Coté, Charles; Kacmarek, Robert M; Jiang, Yandong

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to continuously measure cardiac output (CO) with the electrical velocimetry (EV) method and characterize the hemodynamic profile of patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean delivery (CD), and to discuss the potential benefit of using real time CO monitoring to guide patient management. Forty-two patients scheduled for elective CD under spinal anesthesia were enrolled in this observational study. A non-invasive CO monitor incorporating the electrical velocimetry algorithm, ICON(®) (Cardiotronic(®), La Jolla, California, USA), was used to measure CO and stroke volume (SV) continuously. Peripheral venous pressure was measured intermittently at pre-defined time points. Systemic vascular resistance was calculated retrospectively after completion of the study. Hemodynamic changes at pre-defined time points and caused by phenylephrine administration were analyzed. Hypotension (MAP reduction more than 20% from baseline values) occurred in 71.1% of patients after spinal anesthesia, while the coinstantaneous CO was increased ≥20% from baseline in the majority of patients (76.3%) at the same time. Significant increase in CO took place at 3-2 min before the administration of phenylephrine bolus. Treatment of hypotension with phenylephrine was associated with significant decrease in CO. Continuous CO monitoring with EV enables clinicians to determine CO and SV changes prior to onset of hypotension and to better understand patients' hemodynamics. It is an important addition to the current monitoring. The benefit of routinely using this technique remains to be determined in term of the patient outcomes. PMID:25510959

  1. Tropical Storm Katrina

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... title:  Cloud Spirals and Outflow in Tropical Storm Katrina     View Larger Image ... heights and cloud-tracked wind velocities for Tropical Storm Katrina, as the center of the storm was situated over the Tennessee ...

  2. On the watch for geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Arthur W.; Brown, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms, induced by solar activity, pose significant hazards to satellites, electrical power distribution systems, radio communications, navigation, and geophysical surveys. Strong storms can expose astronauts and crews of high-flying aircraft to dangerous levels of radiation. Economic losses from recent geomagnetic storms have run into hundreds of millions of dollars. With the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as the lead agency, an international network of geomagnetic observatories monitors the onset of solar-induced storms and gives warnings that help diminish losses to military and commercial operations and facilities.

  3. [Cardiac failure in endocrine diseases].

    PubMed

    Hashizume, K

    1993-05-01

    Several endocrine diseases show the symptoms of cardiac failure. Among them, patients with acromegaly show a specific cardiomyopathy which results in a severe left-sided cardiac failure. Hypoparathyroidism also induces cardiac failure, which is resulted from hypocalcemia and low levels of serum parathyroid hormone. In the cases of hypothyroidism, the patients with myxedemal coma show a severe cardiac failure, which is characterized by disturbance of central nervous system, renal function, and cardiac function. In the patients with thyroid crisis (storm), the cardiac failure comes from the great reduction of cardiac output with dehydration. The reduction of circulation volume, observed in the patients with pheochromocytoma easily induces cardiac failure (shock) just after the removal of adrenal tumor. In patients with malignant carcinoid syndrome, right-sided ventricular failure which may be occurred through the actions of biogenic amines is observed. PMID:8331806

  4. Current understanding of magnetic storms: Storm-substorm relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kamide, Y.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Baumjohann, W.; Daglis, I.A.; Grande, M.; Joselyn, J.A.; Singer, H.J.; McPherron, R.L.; Phillips, J.L.; Reeves, E.G.; Rostoker, G.; Sharma, A.S.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1998-08-01

    This paper attempts to summarize the current understanding of the storm/substorm relationship by clearing up a considerable amount of controversy and by addressing the question of how solar wind energy is deposited into and is dissipated in the constituent elements that are critical to magnetospheric and ionospheric processes during magnetic storms. (1) Four mechanisms are identified and discussed as the primary causes of enhanced electric fields in the interplanetary medium responsible for geomagnetic storms. It is pointed out that in reality, these four mechanisms, which are not mutually exclusive, but interdependent, interact differently from event to event. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) and corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are found to be the primary phenomena responsible for the main phase of geomagnetic storms. The other two mechanisms, i.e., HILDCAA (high-intensity, long-duration, continuous auroral electrojet activity) and the so-called Russell-McPherron effect, work to make the ICME and CIR phenomena more geoeffective. The solar cycle dependence of the various sources in creating magnetic storms has yet to be quantitatively understood. (2) A serious controversy exists as to whether the successive occurrence of intense substorms plays a direct role in the energization of ring current particles or whether the enhanced electric field associated with southward IMF enhances the effect of substorm expansions. While most of the {ital Dst} variance during magnetic storms can be solely reproduced by changes in the large-scale electric field in the solar wind and the residuals are uncorrelated with substorms, recent satellite observations of the ring current constituents during the main phase of magnetic storms show the importance of ionospheric ions. This implies that ionospheric ions, which are associated with the frequent occurrence of intense substorms, are accelerated upward along magnetic field lines, contributing to the energy density of

  5. Regional electroporation of single cardiac myocytes in a focused electric field.

    PubMed

    Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-01-15

    There is now a significant interest in being able to locate single cells within geometrically defined regions of a microfluidic chip and to gain intracellular access through the local electroporation of the cell membrane. This paper describes the microfabrication of electroporation devices which can enable the regional electroporation of adult ventricular myocytes, in order to lower the local electrical resistance of the cell membrane. Initially three different devices, designed to suit the characteristic geometry of the cardiomyocyte, were investigated (all three designs serve to focus the electric field to selected regions of the cell). We demonstrate that one of these three devices revealed the sequence of cellular responses to field strengths of increasing magnitudes, namely, cell contraction, hypercontraction, and lysis. This same device required a reduced threshold voltage for each of these events, including in particular membrane breakdown. We were not only able to show the gradual regional increase in the electric conductivity of the cell membrane but were also able to avoid changes in the local intra- and extracellular pH (by preventing the local generation of protons at the electrode surface, as a consequence of the reduced threshold voltage). The paper provides evidence for new strategies for achieving robust and reproducible regional electroporation, a technique which, in future, may be used for the insertion of large molecular weight molecules (including genes) as well as for on-chip voltage clamping of the primary adult cardiomyocyte.

  6. Changes in the electrical activity of dog cardiac Purkinje fibres at high heart rates.

    PubMed Central

    Boyett, M R; Fedida, D

    1984-01-01

    Rate-dependent changes in the electrical activity of dog Purkinje fibres have been studied. At high rates of stimulation the rate of repolarization is greater, the action potential is shorter, the maximum diastolic potential is increased, the pace-maker potential is reduced in amplitude, and on cessation of rapid stimulation there can be a suppression of spontaneous activity. After an increase of the stimulus frequency there is an abrupt shortening of the action potential, which can be attributed to incomplete recovery of the plateau currents; this is followed by a progressive decline in action potential duration over the next several hundred seconds. The factor responsible for the slow changes in duration could also be responsible for the accompanying increase in maximum diastolic potential because this develops along a similar time course. These slow changes in electrical activity have been investigated with the phase-plane technique. They are the result of an increase in the net outward current over a wide range of potentials (approximately -10 to approximately -90 mV) during the repolarization phase of the action potential. In voltage-clamp experiments background current has been observed to be strongly rate dependent: the background current during a test voltage-clamp pulse after a train of action potentials is more outward at higher stimulus frequencies. When the frequency is increased, background current slowly becomes more outward over several hundred seconds, and this change therefore occurs along the appropriate time course to explain the slow alteration in electrical activity under these conditions. The extra outward background current at high rates is relatively independent of membrane potential in the range from -110 to -40 mV (more circumstantial evidence indicates that this range may extend to at least +10 mV); this potential dependence is similar to that of the Na-K-pump current (Eisner & Lederer, 1980). Strophanthidin and ouabain, agents known to

  7. Effects of trimebutine maleate on electrical activities of isolated mammalian cardiac preparations.

    PubMed

    Igawa, O; Kotake, H; Hirai, S; Hisatome, I; Hasegawa, J; Mashiba, H

    1989-05-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on electrical activity in guinea-pig isolated papillary muscles and rabbit sino-atrial nodes have been studied by means of a standard microelectrode method. In papillary muscles, trimebutine (above 10 microM) decreased the maximum rate of rise (Vmax) and the action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD90), whereas the resting potential was not significantly altered. As to a decrease in Vmax, trimebutine produced a negative shift of the curve relating Vmax to the resting potential along the voltage axis. Trimebutine also depressed the slow action potentials of papillary muscles produced by 27 mM K and 0.2 mM Ba. In spontaneously beating sino-atrial node preparations, trimebutine (above 10 microM) decreased the heart rate, Vmax and the rate of diastolic depolarization. These results indicate that trimebutine maleate possesses a depressant action on the electrical activities of the fast- and slow-response fibres of the heart mainly due to inhibitions of both fast Na+ and slow Ca2+ channels. PMID:2569517

  8. The influence of anatomical and physiological parameters on the interference voltage at the input of unipolar cardiac pacemakers in low frequency electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, S.; Pammler, K.; Silny, J.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of electromagnetic interference of electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers has been well known for many years. An increasing number of field sources in everyday life and occupational environment leads unavoidably to an increased risk for patients with electronic implants. However, no obligatory national or international safety regulations exist for the protection of this patient group. The aim of this study is to find out the anatomical and physiological worst-case conditions for patients with an implanted pacemaker adjusted to unipolar sensing in external time-varying electric fields. The results of this study with 15 volunteers show that, in electric fields, variation of the interference voltage at the input of a cardiac pacemaker adds up to 200% only because of individual factors. These factors should be considered in human studies and in the setting of safety regulations.

  9. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  10. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Mediated Electrical Remodeling in Mouse Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeremy; Gao, Junyuan; Cohen, Ira S; Mathias, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    We recently characterized an autocrine renin angiotensin system (RAS) in canine heart. Activation of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors (AT1Rs) induced electrical remodeling, including inhibition of the transient outward potassium current Ito, prolongation of the action potential (AP), increased calcium entry and increased contractility. Electrical properties of the mouse heart are very different from those of dog heart, but if a similar system existed in mouse, it could be uniquely studied through genetic manipulations. To investigate the presence of a RAS in mouse, we measured APs and Ito in isolated myocytes. Application of angiotensin II (A2) for 2 or more hours reduced Ito magnitude, without affecting voltage dependence, and prolonged APs in a dose-dependent manner. Based on dose-inhibition curves, the fast and slow components of Ito (Ito,fast and IK,slow) appeared to be coherently regulated by [A2], with 50% inhibition at an A2 concentration of about 400 nM. This very high K0.5 is inconsistent with systemic A2 effects, but is consistent with an autocrine RAS in mouse heart. Pre-application of the microtubule destabilizing agent colchicine eliminated A2 effects on Ito and AP duration, suggesting these effects depend on intracellular trafficking. Application of the biased agonist SII ([Sar1-Ile4-Ile8]A2), which stimulates receptor internalization without G protein activation, caused Ito reduction and AP prolongation similar to A2-induced changes. These data demonstrate AT1R mediated regulation of Ito in mouse heart. Moreover, all measured properties parallel those measured in dog heart, suggesting an autocrine RAS may be a fundamental feedback system that is present across species. PMID:26430746

  11. Iron Deposition following Chronic Myocardial Infarction as a Substrate for Cardiac Electrical Anomalies: Initial Findings in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xunzhang; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Tang, Richard L. Q.; Thajudeen, Anees; Shehata, Michael; Amorn, Allen M.; Liu, Enzhao; Stewart, Brian; Bennett, Nathan; Harlev, Doron; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.; Jackman, Warren M.; Chugh, Sumeet S.; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Iron deposition has been shown to occur following myocardial infarction (MI). We investigated whether such focal iron deposition within chronic MI lead to electrical anomalies. Methods Two groups of dogs (ex-vivo (n = 12) and in-vivo (n = 10)) were studied at 16 weeks post MI. Hearts of animals from ex-vivo group were explanted and sectioned into infarcted and non-infarcted segments. Impedance spectroscopy was used to derive electrical permittivity () and conductivity (). Mass spectrometry was used to classify and characterize tissue sections with (IRON+) and without (IRON-) iron. Animals from in-vivo group underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) for estimation of scar volume (late-gadolinium enhancement, LGE) and iron deposition (T2*) relative to left-ventricular volume. 24-hour electrocardiogram recordings were obtained and used to examine Heart Rate (HR), QT interval (QT), QT corrected for HR (QTc) and QTc dispersion (QTcd). In a fraction of these animals (n = 5), ultra-high resolution electroanatomical mapping (EAM) was performed, co-registered with LGE and T2* CMR and were used to characterize the spatial locations of isolated late potentials (ILPs). Results Compared to IRON- sections, IRON+ sections had higher, but no difference in. A linear relationship was found between iron content and (p<0.001), but not (p = 0.34). Among two groups of animals (Iron (<1.5%) and Iron (>1.5%)) with similar scar volumes (7.28%±1.02% (Iron (<1.5%)) vs 8.35%±2.98% (Iron (>1.5%)), p = 0.51) but markedly different iron volumes (1.12%±0.64% (Iron (<1.5%)) vs 2.47%±0.64% (Iron (>1.5%)), p = 0.02), QT and QTc were elevated and QTcd was decreased in the group with the higher iron volume during the day, night and 24-hour period (p<0.05). EAMs co-registered with CMR images showed a greater tendency for ILPs to emerge from scar regions with iron versus without iron. Conclusion The electrical behavior of infarcted hearts with iron appears to

  12. Propagation of Electrical Excitation in a Ring of Cardiac Cells: A Computer Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogan, B. Y.; Karplus, W. J.; Karpoukhin, M. G.; Roizen, I. M.; Chudin, E.; Qu, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The propagation of electrical excitation in a ring of cells described by the Noble, Beeler-Reuter (BR), Luo-Rudy I (LR I), and third-order simplified (TOS) mathematical models is studied using computer simulation. For each of the models it is shown that after transition from steady-state circulation to quasi-periodicity achieved by shortening the ring length (RL), the action potential duration (APD) restitution curve becomes a double-valued function and is located below the original ( that of an isolated cell) APD restitution curve. The distributions of APD and diastolic interval (DI) along a ring for the entire range of RL corresponding to quasi-periodic oscillations remain periodic with the period slightly different from two RLs. The 'S' shape of the original APD restitution curve determines the appearance of the second steady-state circulation region for short RLs. For all the models and the wide variety of their original APD restitution curves, no transition from quasi-periodicity to chaos was observed.

  13. Magnetic Imaging of Applied and Propagating Action Currents in Cardiac Tissue Slices: Determination of Anisotropic Electrical Conductivities in a Two-Dimensional Bidomain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staton, Daniel Joseph

    We describe the first, high-resolution magnetic images of applied currents and propagating action currents in slices of canine cardiac tissue. This tissue was maintained in vitro at 37^circC. Our main conclusions are summarized as follows: the action currents produce magnetic fields which are measurable; during the initial stages of the propagating action potential, small, expanding, quatrefoil loops of current develop; the magnetic fields produced by repolarization currents are larger than previously anticipated. Most of the current associated with the propagating action potential is confined within the wavefront and should be magnetically silent; however, differences in the intracellular and extracellular electrical conductivities, in both the longitudinal and transverse fiber directions, are great enough that expanding quatrefoil current densities are associated with the wavefront and produce measurable magnetic fields. Since action currents are affected by the electrical conductivities, it is of interest to determine their values, which depend not only upon the tissue characteristics, but also on the mathematical model used to interpret the measured data. In our analysis of current injection, we use the anisotropic bidomain model which incorporates a passive, linear membrane. We introduce theoretical techniques to calculate the anisotropic conductivities of a two-dimensional bidomain. To apply these techniques to magnetic fields resulting from current injection into cardiac tissue slices, we need to improve the higher spatial frequency content of our present measurements. This may be done by measuring the magnetic field closer to the cardiac slice (presently 2.5 mm), decreasing the sampling interval of the measurement, and increasing the sampling area of the field. Magnetic fields are produced by propagating action currents, which are in turn the result of the propagating action potential. From the magnetic field, we directly image isochronal transmembrane

  14. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  17. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6604 - Precautions during storms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Precautions during storms. 57.6604 Section 57... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6604 Precautions during storms. During the approach and progress of an electrical storm— (a) Surface blasting operations shall be suspended and persons...

  19. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  20. Nuclear magnetohydrodynamic EMP, solar storms, and substorms

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M. ); Meliopoulous, A.P.S.; Glytsis, E.N. . School of Electrical Engineering); Cokkinides, G.J. )

    1992-10-20

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS-GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E [approx lt] 10[sup [minus] 1] V/m and lasts [approx lt] 10[sup 2] sec, whereas for solar storms E [approx gt] 10[sup [minus] 2] V/m and lasts [approx gt] 10[sup 3] sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS-GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  1. Tropical Storm Bud

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  A Strengthening Eastern Pacific Storm     View Larger Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying toward hurricane status, which it acquired ...

  2. In the eye of the storm: iodinated contrast medium induced thyroid storm presenting as cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Alkhuja, Samer; Pyram, Ronald; Odeyemi, Olutunde

    2013-01-01

    The administration of iodinated contrast medium may lead to excess free thyroid hormone release and cause thyroid storm. A woman presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, hemoptysis, and intermittent bilateral lower extremities edema. Physical examination revealed mildly enlarged thyroid. Patient underwent a computed tomography scan of the chest with intravenous iodinated contrast medium to rule out pulmonary embolism, the patient developed a thyroid storm second to iodinated contrast medium injection. Proper treatment was provided and the patient had a good outcome. We present this case of an unusual presentation of a thyroid storm with cardiac arrest. This case illustrates that evaluating thyroid function tests in patients with an enlarged thyroid prior to the administration of iodinated contrast medium could prevent the development of thyroid storm.

  3. Lightning activity and severe storm structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. L.; Brandes, E. A.; Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    Space-time mapping of VHF sources from four severe storms on June 19, 1980 reveals that lightning processes for cloud-to-ground (CG) and large intracloud (IC) flashes are confined to an altitude below about 10 km and closely associated with the central regions of high reflectivity. Another class of IC flashes produces a splattering of sources within the storms' main electrically active volumes and also within the large divergent wind canopy aloft. There is no apparent temporal association between the small high altitude IC flashes that occur almost continuously and the large IC and CG flashes that occur sporadically in the lower portions of storms.

  4. Metabolic Determinants of Electrical Failure in Ex-Vivo Canine Model of Cardiac Arrest: Evidence for the Protective Role of Inorganic Pyrophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Junko; Taylor, Tyson G.; Venable, Paul W.; Rhodes, Nathaniel L.; Gil, Ryan B.; Warren, Mark; Wende, Adam R.; Abel, E. Dale; Cox, James; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Zaitsev, Alexey V.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Deterioration of ventricular fibrillation (VF) into asystole or severe bradycardia (electrical failure) heralds a fatal outcome of cardiac arrest. The role of metabolism in the timing of electrical failure remains unknown. Objective To determine metabolic factors of early electrical failure in an Ex-vivo canine model of cardiac arrest (VF+global ischemia). Methods and Results Metabolomic screening was performed in left ventricular biopsies collected before and after 0.3, 2, 5, 10 and 20 min of VF and global ischemia. Electrical activity was monitored via plunge needle electrodes and pseudo-ECG. Four out of nine hearts exhibited electrical failure at 10.1±0.9 min (early-asys), while 5/9 hearts maintained VF for at least 19.7 min (late-asys). As compared to late-asys, early-asys hearts had more ADP, less phosphocreatine, and higher levels of lactate at some time points during VF/ischemia (all comparisons p<0.05). Pre-ischemic samples from late-asys hearts contained ∼25 times more inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) than early-asys hearts. A mechanistic role of PPi in cardioprotection was then tested by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) during 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia using potentiometric probe TMRM in rabbit adult ventricular myocytes incubated with PPi versus control group. Untreated myocytes experienced significant loss of ΔΨ while in the PPi-treated myocytes ΔΨ was relatively maintained throughout 20 min of simulated-demand ischemia as compared to control (p<0.05). Conclusions High tissue level of PPi may prevent ΔΨm loss and electrical failure at the early phase of ischemic stress. The link between the two protective effects may involve decreased rates of mitochondrial ATP hydrolysis and lactate accumulation. PMID:23520482

  5. Utilities weather the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Lihach, N.

    1984-11-01

    Utilities must restore power to storm-damaged transmission and distribution systems, even if it means going out in ice storms or during lightning and hurricane conditions. Weather forecasting helps utilities plan for possible damage as well as alerting them to long-term trends. Storm planning includes having trained repair personnel available and adjusting the system so that less power imports are needed. Storm damage response requires teamwork and cooperation between utilities. Utilities can strengthen equipment in storm-prone or vulnerable areas, but good data are necessary to document the incidence of lighning strikes, hurricanes, etc. 2 references, 8 figures.

  6. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  7. Extreme Geoelectric Fields Induced By Magnetic Storm Sudden Impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. J.; Rigler, E. J.; Swidinsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    Large magnetic storms, as quantified by the Dst index, can produce geoelectric fields that are hazardous for the operation of electric power grids. The great storm of March 1989, for example, had the highest -Dst value of the 20th century. During the main phase of this storm, rapid magnetic variation induced geoelectric fields in the Earth's lithosphere that caused the complete collapse of the Canadian Hydro-Québec electric-power grid. In this study, we focus specifically on how sudden impulses in geomagnetic activity, those that occur during large storms, can induce geoelectric fields. These impulses can be seen during storm main phases, but they are most usually recognized as storm sudden commencements corresponding to the arrival, at Earth, of coronal mass ejections. We use a newly developed algorithm for estimating induced geoelectric fields from magnetic field variation recorded at ground-based observatories. We train the algorithm on 1-sec geomagnetic and geoelectric field data collected at Japanese observatories during the October 2003 Halloween storm. We then postdict geoelectric fields that would have been realized (but not directly measured at 1-sec resolution) in Japan during the 1989 Québec storm and during another intense storm that occurred in March 1991. The later storm is noteworthy, not because of its intense main phase, but because it commenced with a sudden impulse of enormous magnitude. For the first half minute of the 1991 storm, induced geoelectric fields far exceeded those realized during the 1989 storm. Recognizing the potential hazard, we also analyze a scenario geomagnetic time series of an extreme event sudden commencement, and we calculate the geoelectric fields that this scenario event might plausibly induce. Results show that substantial geoelectric field induction, possibly hazardous for electric power grids, can occur briefly but very abruptly as soon as a magnetic storm commences.

  8. Do mathematical model studies settle the controversy on the origin of cardiac synchronous trans-thoracic electrical impedance variations? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Sitter, A; Verdaasdonk, R M; Faes, T J C

    2016-09-01

    Impedance cardiography (ICG) is a method to evaluate cardiac-stroke volume and cardiac-output by measuring the cardiac-synchronous changes in the dynamic trans-thoracic electrical impedance (ΔZ). Clinical evaluations on the accuracy of ICG showed varying results. Consequently, the classic assumption in ICG-the aorta as a main source of ΔZ-is questioned and subsequently investigated in simulation studies using mathematical models of the electrical resistivity of the human body. The aim is to review the consensus in mathematical modelling studies that investigate the origin of the ΔZ as measured in ICG. In a systematic literature search, studies were identified and surveyed with reference to characteristics, such as included organs and their resistivity and geometries, electrode positions and calculation of ΔZ, to review the consensus between mathematical modelling studies that investigate the origin of the ΔZ as measured in ICG. Thirteen papers showed considerable variation in the model's characteristics with varying or contradicting outcomes for the ΔZ 's origin. For instance, 11 studies excluded perfused muscle tissue, implying implicitly their insignificance, while 3 other studies included muscle tissue and indicated it as the most important origin of ΔZ. In conclusion, the reviewed papers show a lack of consensus with respect to both the modelled characteristics as well as the model outcomes and, as a result, these studies failed to settle the controversy on ΔZ 's origin. Recommendations have been added to improve future mathematical model studies.

  9. The mechanism of PDT-induced electrical blockade: the dependence of time-lapse localization of talaporfin sodium on the cell death phenotypes in rat cardiac myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Matsuo, H.; Suenari, T.; Miyoshi, S.; Takatsuki, S.; Ogawa, S.; Arai, T.

    2009-02-01

    We have proposed a new type of atrial fibrillation treatment with the early state photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which the interval time between the photosensitizer injection and irradiation is shorter than that in conventional way. We had demonstrated the acute electrical blockade by the PDT with talaporfin sodium and a red (670 nm) diode laser in ex vivo and in vivo experiment using rat normal myocardial tissue. The previous study of intracellular Ca2+ concentration measurement in rat cardiac myocytes during the PDT indicated that Ca2+ influx induced by the plasma membrane damage might be the main cause of the acute reaction of myocardial tissue. We found that the cell damage of cardiac myocytes triggered by the PDT was mainly influenced by the site where the photosensitizer exists. In this study, we examined the relationship between the sites of talaporfin sodium existing and cell death phenotypes in response to the PDT, in order to clarify the mechanism of the acute electrical blockade induced by the PDT in myocardial tissue. The talaporfin sodium fluorescence was observed after the various incubation times to visualize the time-lapse intracellular photosensitizer localization. The distribution of the photosensitizer was dependent on the incubation time. The change in intracellular Ca2+ concentration during the PDT was examined with a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator by a high-speed Nipkow confocal laser microscope (CSU-X1, Yokogawa Electric Company). We obtained the Ca2+ dynamics during the PDT which can explain the PDT-induced cell death pathways. We concluded that the Ca2+ influx induced by plasma membrane damage is the possible mechanism of the electrical blockade by the early state PDT.

  10. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  11. Characterizing Extreme Ionospheric Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Altshuler, E.

    2011-12-01

    Ionospheric storms consist of disturbances of the upper atmosphere that generate regions of enhanced electron density typically lasting several hours. Depending upon the storm magnitude, gradients in electron density can sometimes become large and highly localized. The existence of such localized, dense irregularities is a major source of positioning error for users of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Consequently, satellite-based augmentation systems have been implemented to improve the accuracy and to ensure the integrity of user position estimates derived from GPS measurements. Large-scale irregularities generally do not pose a serious threat to estimate integrity as they can be readily detected by such systems. Of greater concern, however, are highly localized irregularities that interfere with the propagation of a signal detected by a user measurement but are poorly sampled by the receivers in the system network. The most challenging conditions have been found to arise following disturbances of large magnitude that occur only rarely over the course of a solar cycle. These extremely disturbed conditions exhibit behavior distinct from moderately disturbed conditions and, hence, have been designated "extreme storms". In this paper we examine and compare the behavior of the extreme ionospheric storms of solar cycle 23 (or, more precisely, extreme storms occurring between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2008), as represented in maps of vertical total electron content. To identify these storms, we present a robust means of quantifying the regional magnitude of an ionospheric storm. Ionospheric storms are observed frequently to occur in conjunction with magnetic storms, i.e., periods of geophysical activity as measured by magnetometers. While various geomagnetic indices, such as the disturbance storm time (Dst) and the planetary Kp index, have long been used to rank the magnitudes of distinct magnetic storms, no comparable, generally recognized index exists for

  12. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coronary artery disease - cardiac rehab; Angina - cardiac rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab ... have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery ...

  13. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  14. Renal sympathetic denervation as an adjunct to catheter ablation for the treatment of ventricular electrical storm in the setting of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Boris A; Steven, Daniel; Willems, Stephan; Sydow, Karsten

    2013-10-01

    We present a case of ventricular storm (VS) in a patient with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). After initial successful thrombus extraction and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, a 63-year-old male patient showed recurrent monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) and fibrillation (VF) episodes refractory to antiarrhythmic drug therapy. After initial successful VT ablation, fast VT and VF episodes remained an evident problem despite maximum antiarrhythmic drug therapy. Due to an increasing instability, renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) was performed. ICD interrogation and 24-hour Holter monitoring excluded recurrent episodes of VT or VF at a 6-month follow-up (FU) after discharge. This case highlights that RDN was effective and safely performed in a hemodynamically unstable patient with VS after STEMI and adjunct catheter ablation. RDN may open a new avenue for an adjunctive interventional bailout treatment of such highly challenging patients.

  15. Functional cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Zhang, Donghui; Bursac, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Heart attack remains the leading cause of death in both men and women worldwide. Stem cell-based therapies, including the use of engineered cardiac tissues, have the potential to treat the massive cell loss and pathological remodeling resulting from heart attack. Specifically, embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are a promising source for generation of therapeutically relevant numbers of functional cardiomyocytes and engineering of cardiac tissues in vitro. This review will describe methodologies for successful differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards the cardiovascular cell lineages as they pertain to the field of cardiac tissue engineering. The emphasis will be placed on comparing the functional maturation in engineered cardiac tissues and developing heart and on methods to quantify cardiac electrical and mechanical function at different spatial scales. PMID:22397609

  16. Wallops severe storms measurement capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, R. E.; Gerlach, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Some of the instrumentation system used in support of NASA'S Storm Hazards Program are described. These systems include the Radar Atmospheric Research Facility (RARF) with its Space Range Radar and a near real time display from the National Weather Service WSR-57 radar, a lightning detection and ranging system (LDAR), and a Ryan Stormscope. The RARF system can detect, track, and quantify the properties of severe storms. Simultaneous measurements in the UHF (70 cm), S (10 cm), and C (5 cm) bands can be made of clouds and precipitation to deduce particle size and characteristics, including quantitive cross sections of individual hailstones and raindrops. Relative attenuation at these wavelenghts can be used to calculate path integrated rainfall and water content. The track of an instrument aircraft can be displayed on S-band reflectivity map of the individual storm cells. The LDAR system can determine the location of lightning discharges in real time and measure and record the electric field waveform for further study. The Ryan Stormscope can detect and range lightning out to 320 kilometers.

  17. Ionospheric data assimilation and forecasting during storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartier, Alex T.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Collins, Nancy; Hoar, Timothy J.; Lu, Gang; Mitchell, Cathryn N.; Coster, Anthea J.; Paxton, Larry J.; Bust, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    Ionospheric storms can have important effects on radio communications and navigation systems. Storm time ionospheric predictions have the potential to form part of effective mitigation strategies to these problems. Ionospheric storms are caused by strong forcing from the solar wind. Electron density enhancements are driven by penetration electric fields, as well as by thermosphere-ionosphere behavior including Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances and Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and changes to the neutral composition. This study assesses the effect on 1 h predictions of specifying initial ionospheric and thermospheric conditions using total electron content (TEC) observations under a fixed set of solar and high-latitude drivers. Prediction performance is assessed against TEC observations, incoherent scatter radar, and in situ electron density observations. Corotated TEC data provide a benchmark of forecast accuracy. The primary case study is the storm of 10 September 2005, while the anomalous storm of 21 January 2005 provides a secondary comparison. The study uses an ensemble Kalman filter constructed with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. Maps of preprocessed, verticalized GPS TEC are assimilated, while high-latitude specifications from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics and solar flux observations from the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment are used to drive the model. The filter adjusts ionospheric and thermospheric parameters, making use of time-evolving covariance estimates. The approach is effective in correcting model biases but does not capture all the behavior of the storms. In particular, a ridge-like enhancement over the continental USA is not predicted, indicating the importance of predicting storm time electric field behavior to the problem of ionospheric forecasting.

  18. Responses of equatorial F region to different geomagnetic storms observed by GPS in the African sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewale, A. O.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Adeloye, A. B.; Ngwira, C. M.; Athieno, R.

    2011-12-01

    This article presents the first results regarding the investigation of the response of the equatorial ionospheric F region in the African sector during geomagnetic storm periods between April 2000 and November 2007 using GPS-derived vertical total electron content observed at Libreville, Gabon (0.35°N, 9.67°E, dip latitude -8.05°S). We performed a superposed epoch analysis of the storms by defining the start time of the epoch as the storm onset time. During geomagnetic storms, the altered electric fields contribute significantly to the occurrence of negative and positive ionospheric storm effects. Our results showed that the positive storm effects are more prevalent than the negative storm effects and generally last longer irrespective of storm onset times. Also, the positive storm effects are most pronounced in the daytime than in the premidnight and postmidnight periods.

  19. Dust storms: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Andrew S

    2009-01-01

    Dust storms have a number of impacts upon the environment including radiative forcing, and biogeochemical cycling. They transport material over many thousands of kilometres. They also have a range of impacts on humans, not least on human health. In recent years the identification of source areas for dust storms has been an important area or research, with the Sahara (especially Bodélé) and western China being recognised as the strongest sources globally. Another major development has been the recognition of the degree to which dust storm activity has varied at a range of time scales, millennial, century, decadal, annual and seasonal.

  20. Hazards of geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Geomagnetic storms are large and sometimes rapid fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field that are related to disturbances on the Sun's surface. Although it is not widely recognized, these transient magnetic disturbances can be a significant hazard to people and property. Many of us know that the intensity of the auroral lights increases during magnetic storms, but few people realize that these storms can also cause massive power outages, interrupt radio communications and satellite operations, increase corrosion in oil and gas pipelines, and lead to spuriously high rejection rates in the manufacture of sensitive electronic equipment. 

  1. Tropical Storm Faxai

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's TRMM Satellite provided data of developing Tropical Storm Faxai to make this 3-D image that showed some towering thunderstorms in the area were reaching altitudes of up to 15.5km/~9.6 m...

  2. Tropical Storm Dolly Develops

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Aug. 31-Sept. 2 shows the movement of a low pressure area from the western Caribbean Sea over the Yucatan Peninsula as it becomes Tropical Storm ...

  3. Powerful Midwest Storm System

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of imagery from NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite shows themovement of storm systems in the south central United States on May 20,2013. Warm, moist gulf air flowing across Texas, Oklahoma...

  4. Tropical Storm Don

    NASA Video Gallery

    GOES-13 data was compiled into an animation by the NASA GOES Project at NASA Goddard that shows the development of Tropical Storm Don in the southern Gulf of Mexico, west of Cuba. The animation run...

  5. Thyroid Echography-induced Thyroid Storm and Exacerbation of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Naomi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Saito, Hideki; Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Okada, Hisayuki; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm affect cardiac circulation in some conditions. Several factors including trauma can induce thyroid storms. We herein describe the case of a 57-year-old woman who experienced a thyroid storm and exacerbation of acute heart failure on thyroid echography. She initially demonstrated a good clinical course after medical rate control for atrial fibrillation; however, thyroid echography for evaluating hyperthyroidism led to a thyroid storm and she collapsed. A multidisciplinary approach stabilized her thyroid hormone levels and hemodynamics. Thus, the medical staff should be prepared for a deterioration in the patient's condition during thyroid echography in heart failure patients with hyperthyroidism.

  6. Thyroid Echography-induced Thyroid Storm and Exacerbation of Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Naomi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Asano, Ryotaro; Saito, Hideki; Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Okada, Hisayuki; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm affect cardiac circulation in some conditions. Several factors including trauma can induce thyroid storms. We herein describe the case of a 57-year-old woman who experienced a thyroid storm and exacerbation of acute heart failure on thyroid echography. She initially demonstrated a good clinical course after medical rate control for atrial fibrillation; however, thyroid echography for evaluating hyperthyroidism led to a thyroid storm and she collapsed. A multidisciplinary approach stabilized her thyroid hormone levels and hemodynamics. Thus, the medical staff should be prepared for a deterioration in the patient's condition during thyroid echography in heart failure patients with hyperthyroidism. PMID:27522996

  7. Cardiac effects of the extract and active components of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae. I. Electrically-induced intracellular calcium transient and protein release during the calcium paradox.

    PubMed

    Wu, S; Yu, X C; Shan, J; Wong, T M; Chen, C F; Pang, K T

    2001-05-11

    The present study was designed to compare the cardiac actions of the extract and individual components, tetrandrine (Tet) and fangchinoline (Fan), of Radix stephaniae tetrandrae (RST). We measured the electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient in single rat ventricular myocytes and protein release following perfusion with a Ca2+ free solution (the Ca2+ paradox) from the isolated perfused rat heart, both of which are known to relate to Ca2+ influx. We found that Tet inhibited both electrically induced [Ca2+]i transient and protein release during the Ca2+ paradox, while Fan had no significant effects. The RST extract containing 9% Tet and 6% Fan by weight also affected the [Ca2+]i transient, and was only slightly, though significantly, less effective/potent than Tet alone. On the other hand, RST extract had a significantly greater inhibitory effect on protein release during the Ca2+ paradox than Tet alone. The observations suggest that the RST extract, which contains a mixture of components, may have more potent effects in the heart than its main active component. PMID:11432451

  8. Ionospheric Storms in Equatorial Region: Digisonde Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paznukhov, V.; Altadill, D.; Blanch, E.

    2011-12-01

    We present a study of the ionospheric storms observed in the low-latitude and equatorial ionosphere at several digisonde stations: Jicamarca (Geomagnetic Coordinates: 2.0 S, 355.3 E), Kwajalein Island (3.8 N, 238.2 E), Ascension Island (2.5 S, 56.8 E), Fortaleza (4.8 N, 33.7 W), and Ramey (28.6 N, 5.2 E). The strongest geomagnetic storms from years 1995-2009 have been analyzed. The main ionospheric characteristics, hmF2 and foF2 were used in the study, making it possible to investigate the changes in the ionosphere peak density and height during the storms. All digisonde data were manually processed to assure the accuracy of the measurements. Solar wind data, geomagnetic field variations, and auroral activity indices have been used to characterize the geomagnetic environment during the events. It was found in our analysis that the major drivers for the ionospheric storms, electric field and neutral wind have approximately equal importance at the low-latitude and equatorial latitudes. This is noticeably different from the behavior of the ionsphere in the middle latitudes, where the neutral wind is usually a dominant factor. It was found that the auroral index, AE is the best precursor of the ionospheric effects observed during the storms in this region. We analyze the difference between time delays of the storm effects observed at the stations located in different local time sectors. The overall statistics of the time delays of the storms as a function of the local time at the stations is also presented. Several very interesting cases of sudden very strong ionospheric uplifting and their possible relation to the equatorial super fountain effect are investigated in greater details.

  9. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Article.jsp. Accessed June 16, 2014. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Approach to cardiac arrest and life-threatening ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 63. Myerburg RJ, Castellanos A. Cardiac arrest and audden aardiac death. In: ...

  10. Detection of optimal PEEP for equal distribution of tidal volume by volumetric capnography and electrical impedance tomography during decreasing levels of PEEP in post cardiac-surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Blankman, P.; Shono, A.; Hermans, B. J. M.; Wesselius, T.; Hasan, D.; Gommers, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Homogeneous ventilation is important for prevention of ventilator-induced lung injury. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has been used to identify optimal PEEP by detection of homogenous ventilation in non-dependent and dependent lung regions. We aimed to compare the ability of volumetric capnography and EIT in detecting homogenous ventilation between these lung regions. Methods Fifteen mechanically-ventilated patients after cardiac surgery were studied. Ventilator settings were adjusted to volume-controlled mode with a fixed tidal volume (Vt) of 6–8 ml kg−1 predicted body weight. Different PEEP levels were applied (14 to 0 cm H2O, in steps of 2 cm H2O) and blood gases, Vcap and EIT were measured. Results Tidal impedance variation of the non-dependent region was highest at 6 cm H2O PEEP, and decreased significantly at 14 cm H2O PEEP indicating decrease in the fraction of Vt in this region. At 12 cm H2O PEEP, homogenous ventilation was seen between both lung regions. Bohr and Enghoff dead space calculations decreased from a PEEP of 10 cm H2O. Alveolar dead space divided by alveolar Vt decreased at PEEP levels ≤6 cm H2O. The normalized slope of phase III significantly changed at PEEP levels ≤4 cm H2O. Airway dead space was higher at higher PEEP levels and decreased at the lower PEEP levels. Conclusions In postoperative cardiac patients, calculated dead space agreed well with EIT to detect the optimal PEEP for an equal distribution of inspired volume, amongst non-dependent and dependent lung regions. Airway dead space reduces at decreasing PEEP levels. PMID:27199318

  11. Lightning parameterization in a storm electrification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Farley, Richard D.; Wu, Gang

    1988-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in our Storm Electrification Model. The initiation, propagation direction, termination and charge redistribution of the discharge are approximated assuming overall charge neutrality. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred have been done. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges, electric field components and electrical energy depend strongly on the charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge show favorable agreement.

  12. Fractal identification of supercell storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féral, Laurent; Sauvageot, Henri

    2002-07-01

    The most intense and violent form of convective storm is the supercell storm, usually associated with heavy rain, hail, and destructive gusty winds, downbursts, and tornadoes. Identifying a storm cell as a supercell storm is not easy. What is shown here, from radar data, is that when an ordinary, or multicell storm evolves towards the supercellular organization, its fractal dimension is modified. Whereas the fractal dimension of the ordinary convective storms, including multicell thunderstorms, is observed around 1.35, in agreement with previous results, the fractal dimension of supercell storms is found close to 1.07. This low value is due to the unicellular character of supercells. The present paper suggests that the fractal dimension is a parameter that should be considered to analyse the dynamical organization of a convective field and to detect and identify the supercell storms, either isolated or among a population of convective storms.

  13. Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is not a transcriptional regulator of cardiac electrical remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Sine V.; Tuomainen, Tomi; Borup, Rehannah; Tavi, Pasi; Antoons, Gudrun; Thomsen, Morten B.

    2016-01-01

    The heart-failure relevant Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) augments CaV1.2 and KV4.3. KChIP3 represses CaV1.2 transcription in cardiomyocytes via interaction with regulatory DNA elements. Hence, we tested nuclear presence of KChIP2 and if KChIP2 translocates into the nucleus in a Ca2+ dependent manner. Cardiac biopsies from human heart-failure patients and healthy donor controls showed that nuclear KChIP2 abundance was significantly increased in heart failure; however, this was secondary to a large variation of total KChIP2 content. Administration of ouabain did not increase KChIP2 content in nuclear protein fractions in anesthetized mice. KChIP2 was expressed in cell lines, and Ca2+ ionophores were applied in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The cell lines had KChIP2-immunoreactive protein in the nucleus in the absence of treatments to modulate intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Neither increasing nor decreasing intracellular Ca2+ concentrations caused translocation of KChIP2. Microarray analysis did not identify relief of transcriptional repression in murine KChIP2−/− heart samples. We conclude that although there is a baseline presence of KChIP2 in the nucleus both in vivo and in vitro, KChIP2 does not directly regulate transcriptional activity. Moreover, the nuclear transport of KChIP2 is not dependent on Ca2+. Thus, KChIP2 does not function as a conventional transcription factor in the heart. PMID:27349185

  14. Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is not a transcriptional regulator of cardiac electrical remodeling.

    PubMed

    Winther, Sine V; Tuomainen, Tomi; Borup, Rehannah; Tavi, Pasi; Antoons, Gudrun; Thomsen, Morten B

    2016-01-01

    The heart-failure relevant Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) augments CaV1.2 and KV4.3. KChIP3 represses CaV1.2 transcription in cardiomyocytes via interaction with regulatory DNA elements. Hence, we tested nuclear presence of KChIP2 and if KChIP2 translocates into the nucleus in a Ca(2+) dependent manner. Cardiac biopsies from human heart-failure patients and healthy donor controls showed that nuclear KChIP2 abundance was significantly increased in heart failure; however, this was secondary to a large variation of total KChIP2 content. Administration of ouabain did not increase KChIP2 content in nuclear protein fractions in anesthetized mice. KChIP2 was expressed in cell lines, and Ca(2+) ionophores were applied in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The cell lines had KChIP2-immunoreactive protein in the nucleus in the absence of treatments to modulate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Neither increasing nor decreasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations caused translocation of KChIP2. Microarray analysis did not identify relief of transcriptional repression in murine KChIP2(-/-) heart samples. We conclude that although there is a baseline presence of KChIP2 in the nucleus both in vivo and in vitro, KChIP2 does not directly regulate transcriptional activity. Moreover, the nuclear transport of KChIP2 is not dependent on Ca(2+). Thus, KChIP2 does not function as a conventional transcription factor in the heart. PMID:27349185

  15. Coastal storm monitoring in Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wicklein, Shaun M.; Bennett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Coastal communities in Virginia are prone to flooding, particularly during hurricanes, nor’easters, and other coastal low-pressure systems. These weather systems affect public safety, personal and public property, and valuable infrastructure, such as transportation, water and sewer, and electric-supply networks. Local emergency managers, utility operators, and the public are tasked with making difficult decisions regarding evacuations, road closures, and post-storm recovery efforts as a result of coastal flooding. In coastal Virginia these decisions often are made on the basis of anecdotal knowledge from past events or predictions based on data from monitoring sites located far away from the affected area that may not reflect local conditions. Preventing flood hazards, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, from becoming human disasters requires an understanding of the relative risks that flooding poses to specific communities. The risk to life and property can be very high if decisions about evacuations and road closures are made too late or not at all.

  16. Should we revisit anticoagulation guidelines during thyroid storm?

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrew W; Puig-Carrión, Gisela D; López-Candales, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially catastrophic disease expression of thyrotoxicosis with well-recognized cardiovascular manifestations such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Even through some studies have found an increased risk of cardiac thrombus formation and subsequent thromboembolism in these patients, the use of anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic sequelae of thyrotoxic atrial fibrillation remains unclear. We present a patient presenting with new onset dilated cardiomyopathy and resistant atrial fibrillation with thyroid storm that had a large left atrial appendage clot. Case particulars are discussed and the literature reviewed. PMID:26035989

  17. The relationship of storm severity to directionally resolved radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. L.

    1986-04-01

    The objective was to provide continuous observation of atmospheric electrical activity occurring in association with tropical storms in the Gulf of Mexico. The observations were to include the location of all detected intracloud and cloud-to-ground lightning activity occurring in the storm. To provide synoptic scale coverage, a phase linear interferometer high frequency direction finder (HFDF) system was constructed and developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This was used in concert with the existing HFDF interferometer at the southwest research institute to provide lightning location data through triangulation. Atmospheric electrical events were synchronized through the use of satellite receivers at each site. The intent of the data analysis was to correlate the location of electrical centers of activity with radar and satellite imagry to identify areas of intense convection within the tropical storm system. Analysis of the hurricane Alicia data indicate a center of atmospheric electrical activity associated with the vortex of the storm. The center appears to rotate from the Northern side of the vortex to the Southern side during the period of observation. An analysis of the atmospheric electrical burst rates associated with hurrican Alicia indicates that the electrical activity appears to maximize at the time of greatest storm intensity, i.e., maximum winds and lowest central pressure.

  18. Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A Huntsville meteorologist of Baron Services, Inc. has formed a commercial weather advisory service. Weather information is based on data from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) collected from antennas in Alabama and Tennessee. Bob Baron refines and enhances MSFC's real time display software. Computer data is changed to audio data for radio transmission, received by clients through an antenna and decoded by computer for display. Using his service, clients can monitor the approach of significant storms and schedule operations accordingly. Utilities and emergency management officials are able to plot a storm's path. A recent agreement with two other companies will promote continued development and marketing.

  19. Tropical Storm near Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This unnamed tropical storm near Bermuda (26.5N, 59.5W) was the result of a strong mid-latitude low pressure system that formed over the Gulf Stream near Cape Hatteras. It rapidly developed into a spiral gyre with internal wind speeds of up to 50 knots and whipped up the sea surface with swells of 15 to 20 feet creating dangerous boating conditions. These sub-hurricane storms are frequent occurances in this region during the fall, winter and spring.

  20. North Polar Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-334, 18 April 2003

    This composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle daily global images shows a north polar dust storm on March 7, 2003. Similar late summer storms occurred nearly every day from late February well into April 2003; these were also seen in late summer in 1999 and 2001. The white features at the top of the image are the water ice surfaces of the north polar residual cap. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Cardiac Applications of Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Christina M.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics. PMID:25035999

  2. Cardiac applications of optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Christina M; Klimas, Aleksandra; Yu, Jinzhu; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    In complex multicellular systems, such as the brain or the heart, the ability to selectively perturb and observe the response of individual components at the cellular level and with millisecond resolution in time, is essential for mechanistic understanding of function. Optogenetics uses genetic encoding of light sensitivity (by the expression of microbial opsins) to provide such capabilities for manipulation, recording, and control by light with cell specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. As an optical approach, it is inherently scalable for remote and parallel interrogation of biological function at the tissue level; with implantable miniaturized devices, the technique is uniquely suitable for in vivo tracking of function, as illustrated by numerous applications in the brain. Its expansion into the cardiac area has been slow. Here, using examples from published research and original data, we focus on optogenetics applications to cardiac electrophysiology, specifically dealing with the ability to manipulate membrane voltage by light with implications for cardiac pacing, cardioversion, cell communication, and arrhythmia research, in general. We discuss gene and cell delivery methods of inscribing light sensitivity in cardiac tissue, functionality of the light-sensitive ion channels within different types of cardiac cells, utility in probing electrical coupling between different cell types, approaches and design solutions to all-optical electrophysiology by the combination of optogenetic sensors and actuators, and specific challenges in moving towards in vivo cardiac optogenetics.

  3. Ionospheric Response During Four Intense Geomagnetic Storms: Similarities and Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Crowley, G.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2007-05-01

    Large magnitude and hemispheric-scale increases in ionospheric plasma content are observed for daytime local times during intense geomagnetic storms. Ionospheric increases during the main phase of geomagnetic storms were identified many years ago and categorized as the "positive phase" ionospheric response. This talk will explore what we can learn using satellite data and distributed ground-based measurements, to understand the geoeffective processes at work in creating the positive phase for intense storms. The importance of electric fields penetrating to low latitudes on the dayside has received a great deal of attention recently, and is leading to revised theoretical and modeling constructs to account for the observations in a quantitative manner. We will present ground and space-based Global Positioning System (GPS) electron content data for four storms and analyze the data in light of the upstream conditions with a common epoch analysis. Modeling studies of the storm-time ionospheric behavior will be shown, using the ASPEN-TIMEGCM fully-coupled thermosphere- ionosphere (T-I) model with low-latitude electrodynamics. The ASPEN-TIMEGCM model contains storm-time effects such as winds and the resulting dynamo electric fields, but penetration E-fields including shielding are not currently included. The model runs are driven by carefully reconstructed high latitude time-dependent drivers based in part on the AMIE high latitude electrodynamics model. The time history of a modeled storm will be compared with observations. We will highlight outstanding science questions that are revealed in this study.

  4. Tropical Storm Lee to Newfoundland

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Tropical Storm Lee as it made landfall in Louisiana and Mississippi on September 4, 2011. This storm produced flooding and tornadoes to the southern states all the way to flooding ...

  5. Mars Atmospheric Chemistry in Electrified Dust Devils and Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Delory, G. T.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, A.-S.; Renno, N. O.; Sentmann, D. D.; Marshall, J. G.; Cummer, S. A.; Rafkin, S.; Catling, D.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory studies, simulations and desert field tests all indicate that aeolian mixing dust can generate electricity via contact electrification or "triboelectricity". In convective structures like dust devils or storms, grain stratification (or charge separation) occurs giving rise to an overall electric dipole moment to the aeolian feature, similar in nature to the dipolar electric field generated in terrestrial thunderstorms. Previous simulation studies [1] indicate that this storm electric field on Mars can approach atmospheric breakdown field strength of 20 kV/m. In terrestrial dust devils, coherent dipolar electric fields exceeding 20 kV/m have been measured directly via electric field instrumentation. Given the expected electrostatic fields in Martian dust devils and storms, electrons in the low pressure CO2 gas can be energized via the electric field to values exceeding the electron dissociative attachment energy of both CO2 and H2O, resulting in the formation of new chemical products CO and O- and OH and H- within the storm. Using a collisional plasma physics model we present a calculation of the CO/O- and OH/H- reaction and production rates. We demonstrate that these rates vary geometrically with ambient electric field, with substantial production of dissociative products when fields approach breakdown levels of 20-30 kV/m.

  6. Recovery from major storms

    SciTech Connect

    Holeman, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Public Service Company of Oklahoma's transmission and distribution system is in tornado alley, and it seems the number of tornados hitting some part of the system is increasing each year. In the past 30 years, Tulsa his been hit 7 times, and experienced 3 very wide and destructive tornado storm systems between 1971 and 1975.

  7. STORM INLET FILTRATION DEVICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five field tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Storm and Groundwater Enhancement Systems (SAGES) device for removing contaminants from stormwater. The SAGES device is a three-stage filtering system that could be used as a best management practices (BMP) retr...

  8. California's Perfect Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, David

    2010-01-01

    The United States today faces an economic crisis worse than any since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Nowhere is it sharper than in the nation's schools. Last year, California saw a perfect storm of protest in virtually every part of its education system. K-12 teachers built coalitions with parents and students to fight for their jobs and their…

  9. Weathering the storm

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1993-02-01

    When Hurricane Andrew struck, thousands were displaced from their homes in Florida and Louisiana. Now, months after the winds ceased blowing, the storm is causing hardship once again. Insurance companies sustaining large losses in recent months from a number of natural disasters - including the hurricane - are now passing those losses on to their customers. Independent power companies are no exception.

  10. Stories from the Storm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smoczynski, Carol

    2007-01-01

    For four months, St. Paul's Episcopal School in the Lakeview neighborhood of New Orleans, Louisiana remained closed after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the entire city in August 2005. The storm left St. Paul's campus under nine feet of water for two weeks, destroying many buildings and the entire first floor of the campus. As the only remaining art…

  11. Mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Blood circulation is the result of the beating of the heart, which provides the mechanical force to pump oxygenated blood to, and deoxygenated blood away from, the peripheral tissues. This depends critically on the preceding electrical activation. Disruptions in the orderly pattern of this propagating cardiac excitation wave can lead to arrhythmias. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying their generation and maintenance requires knowledge of the ionic contributions to the cardiac action potential, which is discussed in the first part of this review. A brief outline of the different classification systems for arrhythmogenesis is then provided, followed by a detailed discussion for each mechanism in turn, highlighting recent advances in this area. PMID:27092186

  12. Superposed Epoch Analysis of Current Systems During Intense Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Katus, R. M.

    2013-05-01

    A statistical approach to investigating the intensity and timing of storm-time current systems is conducted and presented. The Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) model was used to simulate all of the intense storms (Dstmin < -100 nT) from solar cycle 23 (1996-2005). Five different HEIDI input combinations were used to create a large collection of numerical results, varying the plasma outer boundary condition and electric field description in the model. The simulation results are then combined with a normalized superposed epoch analysis, where each phase of each storm is prorated to the average duration of that phase and then all of the storms are averaged together. The azimuthal currents in the HEIDI simulation domain are classified as westward and eastward symmetric ring current, partial ring current, banana current, and tail current. The average behavior of these current systems with respect to the HEIDI plasma and electric field boundary conditions are then presented and discussed. It is found that the Volland-Stern electric field produces an earlier increase in the inner magnetospheric current systems because of the usage of the 3-h Kp index. A self-consistent electric field develops the current systems a few hours later, but produces much stronger asymmetric current systems (partial, banana, and tail currents), especially in the main phase of the storm. Applying a nonuniform local time distribution for the plasma outer boundary condition slightly increases the magnitudes of the current systems, but this effect is smaller than the electric field influence.

  13. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  14. Estimation of Observatory Geoelectric Fields Induced during Great Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, J. J.; Swidinsky, A.

    2014-12-01

    In support of a project for monitoring hazards for electric power grids, we present a new method for estimating electric fields that are induced in the Earth's interior at a particular site during magnetic storms. For this, we adopt a model of the electrical conductivity of the lithosphere that is simple but sufficient to model most variation in the induced geoelectric field: two horizontal layers, each with uniform electrical conductivity properties that can be parameterized by a galvanic distortion tensor. After Laplace transformation of the induction equations into the complex frequency domain, we obtain an electromagnetic impedance function. Upon inverse transformation back to the time domain, convolution of the impedance tensor with a geomagnetic time series yields an estimated geoelectric time series. We optimize the model conductivity parameters using 1-sec resolution magnetic and electric field data collected at the Kakioka magnetic observatory during the October 2003 Halloween storm. We validate the algorithm against Kakioka magnetic and electric field data for the July 2000 Bastille-Day storm. Finally, we infer 1-sec geoelectric fields that were realized (but not directly measured) in Japan during the 1989 Quebec storm. Results highlight the need for improved ground-level monitoring of geomagnetic and geoelectric fields. They also reveal the need for accommodating the galvanic distortion of three-dimensional conductivity when predicting geoelectric fields in the lithosphere and geomagnetically induced currents in electric power grids.

  15. [Updated ESC guideline: innovations for the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and recommendations for prevention of sudden cardiac death].

    PubMed

    Eckardt, L; Deneke, T

    2016-09-01

    The 2015 European Society of Cardiology Guidelines for the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death is an update of the former 2006 European/American guidelines. This new consensus document gives a detailed overview on prevention and therapy of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. This includes detailed discussion of channelopathies and various cardiomyopathies. Gaps in evidence are identified and also discussed. DNA analysis and postmortem assessment in sudden cardiac death victims is for the first time part of these new recommendations. In addition, for the first time recommendations on subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) and the wearable defibrillator are given. The guidelines strengthen the role of ICD therapy in primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death although data used as the basis for these recommendations are 10-15 years old and patients' characteristics including therapeutic options have changed during that time. Systematic reassessment of left ventricular function 6-12 weeks after infarction is also included as a new recommendation. The role of catheter ablation in electrical storm and for those presenting with a first episode of sustained ventricular tachycardia has also been upgraded in the new guidelines. Hopefully, the new guidelines will reach not only cardiologists and help to improve patient care, but also contribute to reducing the high number sudden cardiac deaths in Europe. PMID:27581243

  16. Historic and Future Ice Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Ice storm losses from business interruption as well as transportation and health damages can range into billions of dollars. For instance, the December 2008 New England and Upstate New York ice storm caused four deaths and monetary damages between 2.5 and 3.7 billion, and the 2008 Chinese winter storms resulted in over 130 deaths and over 20 billion in damages. Informal discussions with ice storm experts indicate that due to competing temperature and precipitation effects as well as local topographic effects, it is unclear how exactly climate change will affect ice storms. Here we ask how incident frequencies might change in a future climate at four weather stations prone to ice storms. Using historical atmospheric soundings, we conduct a thought experiment where we perturb the temperatures as might be expected in a future climate. We then discuss changes in monthly frequency of ice storms.

  17. Storm water pollution prevention plans

    SciTech Connect

    Rossmiller, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general permit applications for industrial storm water discharge were to have been filed by October 1992. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies are now issuing permits based on these applications. One compliance aspect of the permits is the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3). The plan must identify the facility's potential sources of storm water pollution and develop and implement best management practices (BMPs) to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff. The objectives of the NPDES storm water program are to eliminate illegal dumping and illicit connections, and to reduce pollutants in industrial storm water discharge. These regulations require industry to develop detailed facility site maps, and describe the types, amounts and locations of potential pollutants. Based on this information, industry can develop and implement best management practices to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff.

  18. Cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shanewise, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a proven, accepted mode of therapy for selected patients with end-stage heart failure, but the inadequate number of suitable donor hearts available ultimately limits its application. This chapter reviews adult cardiac transplantation, with an emphasis on the anesthetic considerations of the heart transplant operation itself.

  19. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  20. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  1. Dust Storm, Aral Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Aral Sea has shrunk to less than half its size since 1985. The Aral Sea receives little water (sometimes no water) from the two major rivers that empty into it-the Syr Darya and Amu Darya. Instead, the river water is diverted to support irrigation for the region's extensive cotton fields. Recently, water scarcity has increased due to a prolonged drought in Central Asia. As the Aral Sea recedes, its former sea bed is exposed. The Aral's sea bed is composed of fine sediments-including fertilizers and other agricultural chemicals-that are easily picked up by the region's strong winds, creating thick dust storms. The International Space Station crew observed and recorded a large dust storm blowing eastward from the Aral Sea in late June 2001. This image illustrates the strong coupling between human activities (water diversions and irrigation), and rapidly changing land, sea and atmospheric processes-the winds blow across the

  2. Development in the STORM.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Huang, Bo

    2012-12-11

    The recent invention of superresolution microscopy has brought up much excitement in the biological research community. Here, we focus on stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy/photoactivated localization microscopy (STORM/PALM) to discuss the challenges in applying superresolution microscopy to the study of developmental biology, including tissue imaging, sample preparation artifacts, and image interpretation. We also summarize new opportunities that superresolution microscopy could bring to the field of developmental biology. PMID:23237944

  3. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  4. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Dust storm, northern Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This large dust storm along the left side of the photo, covers a large portion of the state of Coahuila, Mexico (27.5N, 102.0E). The look angle of this oblique photo is from the south to the north. In the foreground is the Sierra Madre Oriental in the states Coahuila and Nuevo Leon with the Rio Grande River, Amistad Reservoir and Texas in the background.

  6. Devastation of aquifers from tsunami-like storm surge by Supertyphoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Bennett, P. C.; Zamora, P. B.; Befus, K. M.; Rodolfo, R. S.; Cabria, H. B.; Lapus, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The northwest Pacific Ocean is a hot spot for sea level rise and increasing frequency of stronger storms. It is where Supertyphoon Haiyan formed, the strongest storm to hit land, which provided a window into the hydrologic impacts of an extreme storm. Through detailed documentation of flood levels, groundwater table elevations and salinity, electrical resistivity, and modeling, we found that Haiyan's storm surge reached 7 m above sea level along Samar Island, Philippines, which led to contamination of crucial aquifers by infiltrating seawater. A contaminated surficial aquifer will take years to recover. Groundwater in an underlying deeper aquifer saw widespread contamination immediately after the storm, but here salinity has decreased significantly after 8 months. However, this deeper aquifer remains vulnerable to seawater slowly percolating through the surficial aquifer. As warmer seas generate more powerful storms, the vulnerability of aquifers to persistent contamination from intense storm surges is a growing concern for coastal communities.

  7. Devastation of aquifers from tsunami-like storm surge by Supertyphoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani; Bennett, Philip C.; Zamora, Peter B.; Befus, Kevin M.; Rodolfo, Raymond S.; Cabria, Hillel B.; Lapus, Mark R.

    2015-04-01

    The northwest Pacific Ocean is a hot spot for sea level rise and increasing frequency of stronger storms. It is where Supertyphoon Haiyan formed, the strongest storm to hit land, which provided a window into the hydrologic impacts of an extreme storm. Through detailed documentation of flood levels, groundwater table elevations and salinity, electrical resistivity, and modeling, we found that Haiyan's storm surge reached 7 m above sea level along Samar Island, Philippines, which led to contamination of crucial aquifers by infiltrating seawater. A contaminated surficial aquifer will take years to recover. Groundwater in an underlying deeper aquifer saw widespread contamination immediately after the storm, but here salinity has decreased significantly after 8 months. However, this deeper aquifer remains vulnerable to seawater slowly percolating through the surficial aquifer. As warmer seas generate more powerful storms, the vulnerability of aquifers to persistent contamination from intense storm surges is a growing concern for coastal communities.

  8. Defining Coastal Storm and Quantifying Storms Applying Coastal Storm Impulse Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudpour, Nader

    2014-05-01

    What defines a storm condition and what would initiate a "storm" has not been uniquely defined among scientists and engineers. Parameters that have been used to define a storm condition can be mentioned as wind speed, beach erosion and storm hydrodynamics parameters such as wave height and water levels. Some of the parameters are storm consequential such as beach erosion and some are not directly related to the storm hydrodynamics such as wind speed. For the purpose of the presentation, the different storm conditions based on wave height, water levels, wind speed and beach erosion will be discussed and assessed. However, it sounds more scientifically to have the storm definition based on the hydrodynamic parameters such as wave height, water level and storm duration. Once the storm condition is defined and storm has initiated, the severity of the storm would be a question to forecast and evaluate the hazard and analyze the risk in order to determine the appropriate responses. The correlation of storm damages to the meteorological and hydrodynamics parameters can be defined as a storm scale, storm index or storm parameter and it is needed to simplify the complexity of variation involved developing the scale for risk analysis and response management. A newly introduced Coastal Storm Impulse (COSI) parameter quantifies storms into one number for a specific location and storm event. The COSI parameter is based on the conservation of linear, horizontal momentum to combine storm surge, wave dynamics, and currents over the storm duration. The COSI parameter applies the principle of conservation of momentum to physically combine the hydrodynamic variables per unit width of shoreline. This total momentum is then integrated over the duration of the storm to determine the storm's impulse to the coast. The COSI parameter employs the mean, time-averaged nonlinear (Fourier) wave momentum flux, over the wave period added to the horizontal storm surge momentum above the Mean High

  9. Lightning activity observed in upper and lower portions of storms and its relationship to storm structure from VHF mapping and Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. L.; Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Brandes, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    Space time mapping of very high frequencies (VHF) sources reveals lightning processes for cloud to ground (CG) and for large intracloud (IC) flashes are confined to an altitude below about 10 km and closely associated with the central high reflectivity region of a storm. Another class of IC flashes was identified that produces a splattering of small sources within the main electrically active volume of a storm and also within a large divergent wind canopy at the top of a storm. There is no apparent temporal association between the small high altitude IC flashes occurring almost continuously and the large IC and CG flashes sporadically occurring in the lower portions of storms.

  10. How Ionospheric Ions Populate the Magnetosphere during a Magnetic Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, T. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Slinker, S. P.; Fedder, J. A.; Delcourt, D. C.

    2008-01-01

    Ionospheric oxygen ions have been observed throughout the magnetosphere, from the plasma sheet to the ring current region. I t has been found that the O+ /H+ density ratio in the magnetosphere increases with geomagnetic activity and varies with storm phases. During the magnetic storm in late September to earIy October 2002, Cluster was orbiting in the plasma sheet and ring current regions. At prestorm time, Cluster observed high H+ density and low O+ density in the plasma sheet and lobes. During the storm main phase, 0+ density has increased by 10 times over the pre-storm level. Strong field-aligned beams of O+ were observed in the lobes. O+ fluxes were significantly reduced in the central plasma sheet during the storm recovery. However, 0+ was still evident on the boundaries of the plasma sheet and in the lobes. In order to interpret the Cluster observations and to understand how O+ ions populate the magnetosphere during a magnetic storm, we model the storm in early October 2002 using our global ion kinetic simulation (GIK). We use the LFN global simulation model to produce electric and magnetic fields in the outer magnetosphere, the Strangeway outflow scaling with Delcourt ion trajectories to include ionospheric outflows, and the Fok inner magnetospheric model for the plasmaspheric and ring current response to all particle populations. We find that the observed composition features are qualitatively reproduced by the simulations, with some quantitative differences that point to future improvements in the models.

  11. Influence of magnetospheric inputs definition on modeling of ionospheric storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchilin, A. V.; Romanova, E. B.; Kurkin, V. I.

    Usually for numerical modeling of ionospheric storms corresponding empirical models specify parameters of neutral atmosphere and magnetosphere. Statistical kind of these models renders them impractical for simulation of the individual storm. Therefore one has to correct the empirical models using various additional speculations. The influence of magnetospheric inputs such as distributions of electric potential, number and energy fluxes of the precipitating electrons on the results of the ionospheric storm simulations has been investigated in this work. With this aim for the strong geomagnetic storm on September 25, 1998 hour global distributions of those magnetospheric inputs from 20 to 27 September were calculated by the magnetogram inversion technique (MIT). Then with the help of 3-D ionospheric model two variants of ionospheric response to this magnetic storm were simulated using MIT data and empirical models of the electric fields (Sojka et al., 1986) and electron precipitations (Hardy et al., 1985). The comparison of the received results showed that for high-latitude and subauroral stations the daily variations of electron density calculated with MIT data are more close to observations than those of empirical models. In addition using of the MIT data allows revealing some peculiarities in the daily variations of electron density during strong geomagnetic storm. References Sojka J.J., Rasmussen C.E., Schunk R.W. J.Geophys.Res., 1986, N10, p.11281. Hardy D.A., Gussenhoven M.S., Holeman E.A. J.Geophys.Res., 1985, N5, p.4229.

  12. Storm-Substorm Relations Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Joe

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic storms in the magnetosphere can cause damage to communication satellites and large-scale power outages. The concept that a magnetic storm is a compilation of a series of substorms was proposed by Akasofu [1968]. However, Kamide [1992] showed that substorms are not a necessary condition for the occurrence of a magnetic storm. This controversy initiated a new era of research on the storm-substorm relation, which was the subject of a recent workshop in Banff, Alberta, Canada. The main topics discussed during the meeting included a brief overview of what a substorm is, how quasiperiodic substorm events and steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) events without substorms contribute to storms, and how plasma flows enhanced by magnetic reconnection in the plasma sheet contribute to substorms and storms.

  13. Lightning location relative to storm structure in a supercell storm and a multicell storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Peter S.; Macgorman, Donald R.; Rust, W. David; Taylor, William L.; Rasmussen, Lisa Walters

    1987-01-01

    Relationships between lightning location and storm structure are examined for one radar volume scan in each of two mature, severe storms. One of these storms had characteristics of a supercell storm, and the other was a multicell storm. Data were analyzed from dual-Doppler radar and dual-VHF lightning-mapping systems. The distributions of VHF impulse sources were compared with radar reflectivity, vertical air velocity, and their respective gradients. In the supercell storm, lightning tended to occur along streamlines above and down-shear of the updraft and reflectivity cores; VHF impulse sources were most concentrated in reflectivities between 30 and 40 dBZ and were distributed uniformly with respect to updraft speed. In the multicell storm, on the other hand, lightning tended to coincide with the vertical reflectivity and updraft core and with the diverging streamlines near the top of the storm. The results suggest that the location of lightning in these severe storms were most directly associated with the wind field structure relative to updraft and reflectivity cores. Since the magnitude and vertical shear of the environmental wind are fundamental in determining the reflectivity and wind field structure of a storm, it is suggested that these environmental parameters are also fundamental in determining lightning location.

  14. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  15. Tropical Storm Erin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The Atlantic Ocean 210 miles south of Galveston, Texas Categorization: Tropical Storm Sustained Winds: 40 mph (60 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is therefore low. Thus the ocean also appears 'low temperature' in the AIRS microwave images and is assigned the color blue

  16. Empirical STORM-E Model. [I. Theoretical and Observational Basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Xu, Xiaojing; Bilitza, Dieter; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III

    2013-01-01

    Auroral nighttime infrared emission observed by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument onboard the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite is used to develop an empirical model of geomagnetic storm enhancements to E-region peak electron densities. The empirical model is called STORM-E and will be incorporated into the 2012 release of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI). The proxy for characterizing the E-region response to geomagnetic forcing is NO+(v) volume emission rates (VER) derived from the TIMED/SABER 4.3 lm channel limb radiance measurements. The storm-time response of the NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER is sensitive to auroral particle precipitation. A statistical database of storm-time to climatological quiet-time ratios of SABER-observed NO+(v) 4.3 lm VER are fit to widely available geomagnetic indices using the theoretical framework of linear impulse-response theory. The STORM-E model provides a dynamic storm-time correction factor to adjust a known quiescent E-region electron density peak concentration for geomagnetic enhancements due to auroral particle precipitation. Part II of this series describes the explicit development of the empirical storm-time correction factor for E-region peak electron densities, and shows comparisons of E-region electron densities between STORM-E predictions and incoherent scatter radar measurements. In this paper, Part I of the series, the efficacy of using SABER-derived NO+(v) VER as a proxy for the E-region response to solar-geomagnetic disturbances is presented. Furthermore, a detailed description of the algorithms and methodologies used to derive NO+(v) VER from SABER 4.3 lm limb emission measurements is given. Finally, an assessment of key uncertainties in retrieving NO+(v) VER is presented

  17. Communicating Storm Surge Forecast Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troutman, J. A.; Rhome, J.

    2015-12-01

    When it comes to tropical cyclones, storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property along the coastal United States. The coastal population density has dramatically increased over the past 20 years, putting more people at risk. Informing emergency managers, decision-makers and the public about the potential for wind driven storm surge, however, has been extremely difficult. Recently, the Storm Surge Unit at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida has developed a prototype experimental storm surge watch/warning graphic to help communicate this threat more effectively by identifying areas most at risk for life-threatening storm surge. This prototype is the initial step in the transition toward a NWS storm surge watch/warning system and highlights the inundation levels that have a 10% chance of being exceeded. The guidance for this product is the Probabilistic Hurricane Storm Surge (P-Surge) model, which predicts the probability of various storm surge heights by statistically evaluating numerous SLOSH model simulations. Questions remain, however, if exceedance values in addition to the 10% may be of equal importance to forecasters. P-Surge data from 2014 Hurricane Arthur is used to ascertain the practicality of incorporating other exceedance data into storm surge forecasts. Extracting forecast uncertainty information through analyzing P-surge exceedances overlaid with track and wind intensity forecasts proves to be beneficial for forecasters and decision support.

  18. Storm impact for barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A new scale is proposed that categorizes impacts to natural barrier islands resulting from tropical and extra-tropical storms. The proposed scale is fundamentally different than existing storm-related scales in that the coupling between forcing processes and the geometry of the coast is explicitly included. Four regimes, representing different levels of impact, are defined. Within each regime, patterns and relative magnitudes of net erosion and accretion are argued to be unique. The borders between regimes represent thresholds defining where processes and magnitudes of impacts change dramatically. Impact level 1 is the 'swash' regime describing a storm where runup is confined to the foreshore. The foreshore typically erodes during the storm and recovers following the storm; hence, there is no net change. Impact level 2 is the 'collision' regime describing a storm where the wave runup exceeds the threshold of the base of the foredune ridge. Swash impacts the dune forcing net erosion. Impact level 3 is the 'overwash' regime describing a storm where wave runup overtops the berm or, if present, the foredune ridge. The associated net landward sand transport contributes to net migration of the barrier landward. Impact level 4 is the 'inundation' regime describing a storm where the storm surge is sufficient to completely and continuously submerge the barrier island. Sand undergoes net landward transport over the barrier island; limited evidence suggests the quantities and distance of transport are much greater than what occurs during the 'overwash' regime.

  19. Solar radio continuum storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the current status of research on solar radio continuum emissions from metric to hectometric wave frequencies, emphasizing the role of energetic electrons in the 10-100 keV range in these emissions. It is seen that keV-energy electrons generated in active sunspot groups must be the sources of radio continuum storm emissions for wide frequency bands. These electrons excite plasma oscillations in the medium, which in turn are converted to electromagnetic radiation. The radio noise continuum sources are usually associated with type III burst activity observed above these sources. Although the mechanism for the release of the energetic electrons is not known, it seems they are ejected from storm source regions in association with rapid variation of associated sunspot magnetic fields due to their growth into complex types. To explain some of the observed characteristics, the importance of two-stream instability and the scattering of ambient plasma ions on energetic electron streams is pointed out.

  20. Validation of stroke volume and cardiac output by electrical interrogation of the brachial artery in normals: assessment of strengths, limitations, and sources of error.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Donald P; Henry, Isaac C; Lemmens, Harry J; Chaltas, Janell L; DeMaria, Anthony N; Moon, James B; Kahn, Andrew M

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study is to validate a new, continuous, noninvasive stroke volume (SV) method, known as transbrachial electrical bioimpedance velocimetry (TBEV). TBEV SV was compared to SV obtained by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in normal humans devoid of clinically apparent heart disease. Thirty-two (32) volunteers were enrolled in the study. Each subject was evaluated by echocardiography to assure that no aortic or mitral valve disease was present. Subsequently, each subject underwent electrical interrogation of the brachial artery by means of a high frequency, low amplitude alternating current. A first TBEV SV estimate was obtained. Immediately after the initial TBEV study, subjects underwent cMRI, using steady-state precession imaging to obtain a volumetric estimate of SV. Following cMRI, the TBEV SV study was repeated. Comparing the cMRI-derived SV to that of TBEV, the two TBEV estimates were averaged and compared to the cMRI standard. CO was computed as the product of SV and heart rate. Statistical methods consisted of Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis. TBEV SV and CO estimates were obtained in 30 of the 32 subjects enrolled. Bland-Altman analysis of pre- and post-cMRI TBEV SV showed a mean bias of 2.87 % (2.05 mL), precision of 13.59% (11.99 mL) and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) of +29.51% (25.55 mL) and -23.77% (-21.45 mL). Regression analysis for pre- and post-cMRI TBEV SV values yielded y = 0.76x + 25.1 and r(2) = 0.71 (r = 0.84). Bland-Altman analysis comparing cMRI SV with averaged TBEV SV showed a mean bias of -1.56% (-1.53 mL), precision of 13.47% (12.84 mL), 95% LOA of +24.85% (+23.64 mL) and -27.97% (-26.7 mL) and percent error = 26.2 %. For correlation analysis, the regression equation was y = 0.82x + 19.1 and correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.61 (r = 0.78). Bland-Altman analysis of averaged pre- and post-cMRI TBEV CO versus cMRI CO yielded a mean bias of 5.01% (0.32 L min(-1)), precision of 12.85% (0.77 L min(-1)), 95% LOA

  1. Thyroid storm: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chiha, Maguy; Samarasinghe, Shanika; Kabaker, Adam S

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid storm, an endocrine emergency first described in 1926, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. No laboratory abnormalities are specific to thyroid storm, and the available scoring system is based on the clinical criteria. The exact mechanisms underlying the development of thyroid storm from uncomplicated hyperthyroidism are not well understood. A heightened response to thyroid hormone is often incriminated along with increased or abrupt availability of free hormones. Patients exhibit exaggerated signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and varying degrees of organ decompensation. Treatment should be initiated promptly targeting all steps of thyroid hormone formation, release, and action. Patients who fail medical therapy should be treated with therapeutic plasma exchange or thyroidectomy. The mortality of thyroid storm is currently reported at 10%. Patients who have survived thyroid storm should receive definite therapy for their underlying hyperthyroidism to avoid any recurrence of this potentially fatal condition.

  2. Inside storm window

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.I.

    1980-11-01

    The work effort to design, build, install, and evaluate an inside storm window is presented. The ISW, made of two separated layers of mylar (like a thermopane window) which when not in use can be rolled up in a shade, is described. The work effort included: development of a prototype model; the development of production facilities to turn out a small number (50) of ISW's; the production of the windows; the installation of the windows into buildings; the building of a test chamber to determine the R value of the ISW and the subsequent determination of the R value; and a survey to determine how the residents of the homes in which ISW's were installed felt about the windows. Comments on each of these tasks are presented and some comments on initial steps towards commercialization are offered. (MCW)

  3. Statistical signatures of geomagnetic storms with reference to delay distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, A. M.; Gwal, Ashok Kumar

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a statistical study on the nature and association of time delay (between IMF Bz and Dst) with various solar wind parameters and Inter planetary Magnetic field components. The study integrally covers all (634 storms) the geomagnetic storms observed during 1996 to 2011. We have calculated the time delay (∆T) between the peak values of IMF Bz and minimum Dst for each event and statistically investigated its relation with various solar wind parameters and IMF. For this analysis we have taken Solar wind parameters; Velocity, Density, Plasma beta and Temperature as well as IMF Bz, into consideration. We have categorized the storms into three categories based on the Dst Index as weak (-30nT ≤ Dst ≤ -50nT), moderate (-50nT ≤ Dst ≤ -100nT) and intense (Dst ≤ -100nT) storms. The relation of delay with solar wind parameters and IMF components were studied separately for different classes of storms and for different delays viz. 0,1,2,3,4 (hours). From our analysis we are able to draw some interesting inferences. The fact, that the characteristic feature describing the geoeffectiveness of the IMF is its z-component; Bz, and the electric field component -V× Bz, stands true for all delay classes of the storms. The time delay (∆T) between peak values of IMF Bz and minimum Dst can vary in a wide range and mostly varies from 0-10 hours. However, it was found that a major percentage (~80 %) of the storms have a 0 - 4 hour delay. Meanwhile Temperature, density and plasma beta seems to have no significant association with the storm intensity.

  4. ARkStorm: A West Coast Storm Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. A.; Jones, L. M.; Ralph, F. M.; Dettinger, M. D.; Porter, K.; Perry, S. C.; Barnard, P. L.; Hoover, D.; Wills, C. J.; Stock, J. D.; Croyle, W.; Ferris, J. C.; Plumlee, G. S.; Alpers, C. N.; Miller, M.; Wein, A.; Rose, A.; Done, J.; Topping, K.

    2009-12-01

    The United Stated Geological Survey (USGS) Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project (MHDP) is preparing a new emergency-preparedness scenario, called ARkStorm, to address massive U.S. West Coast storms analogous to those that devastated California in 1861-62. Storms of this magnitude are projected to become more frequent and intense as a result of climate change. The MHDP has assembled experts from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), USGS, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, the State of California, California Geological Survey, the University of Colorado, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, and other organizations to design the large, but scientifically plausible, hypothetical scenario storm that would provide emergency responders, resource managers, and the public a realistic assessment of what is historically possible. The ARkStorm patterns the 1861 - 1862 historical events but uses modern modeling methods and data from large storms in 1969 and 1986. The ARkStorm draws heat and moisture from the tropical Pacific, forming Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) that grow in size, gain speed, and with a ferocity equal to hurricanes, slam into the U.S. West Coast for several weeks. Using sophisticated weather models and expert analysis, precipitation, snowlines, wind, and pressure data the modelers will characterize the resulting floods, landslides, and coastal erosion and inundation. These hazards will then be translated into the infrastructural, environmental, agricultural, social, and economic impacts. Consideration will be given to catastrophic disruptions to water supplies resulting from impacts on groundwater pumping, seawater intrusion, water supply degradation, and land subsidence. Possible climate-change forces that could exacerbate the problems will also be evaluated. In contrast to the recent U.S. East and Gulf Coast hurricanes, only recently have scientific and technological advances documented the ferocity and strength of possible future

  5. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  6. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  7. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  8. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker... § 870.5550 External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). (a) Identification. An external transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  9. A case study of ionospheric storm effects in the Chinese sector during the October 2013 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tian; Sun, Lingfeng; Hu, Lianhuan; Wang, Yungang; Wang, Zhijun

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the ionospheric storm effects in the Chinese sector during 2 October 2013 geomagnetic storm. The TEC map over China sector (1° × 1°) and eight ionosondes data along the longitude of 110°E are used to show significant positive ionospheric phases (enhancements in TEC and ionospheric peak electron density NmF2) in the high-middle latitude region and the negative effects at the low latitude and equatorial region during the storm. A wave structure with periods about 1-2 h and horizontal speed about 680 m/s, propagating from the high latitudes to the low latitudes is observed in electron densities within the height region from 200 to 400 km, which is caused by the combined effects of neutral wind and the large-scale traveling disturbances (LSTIDs). In the low latitude regions, compared with those in the quiet day, the ionospheric peak heights of the F2 layer (hmF2) in the storm day obviously increase accompanying a notably decrease in TEC and NmF2, which might be as a result of the eastward prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) evidenced by the two magnetometers and the subsequent westward disturbance dynamo electric fields (DDEF). The storm-time TEC enhancement mainly occurs in the topside ionosphere, as revealed from the topside TEC, bottomside TEC and GPS TEC.

  10. Thromboembolic complications of thyroid storm

    PubMed Central

    Min, T; Benjamin, S; Cozma, L

    2014-01-01

    Summary Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of hyperthyroidism. Early recognition and prompt treatment are essential. Atrial fibrillation can occur in up to 40% of patients with thyroid storm. Studies have shown that hyperthyroidism increases the risk of thromboembolic events. There is no consensus with regard to the initiation of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in severe thyrotoxicosis. Anticoagulation is not routinely initiated if the risk is low on a CHADS2 score; however, this should be considered in patients with thyroid storm or severe thyrotoxicosis with impending storm irrespective of the CHADS2 risk, as it appears to increase the risk of thromboembolic episodes. Herein, we describe a case of thyroid storm complicated by massive pulmonary embolism. Learning points Diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical findings. Early recognition and prompt treatment could lead to a favourable outcome.Hypercoagulable state is a recognised complication of thyrotoxicosis.Atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm.Anticoagulation should be considered for patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation irrespective of the CHADS2 score.Patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and clinical evidence of thrombosis should be immediately anticoagulated until hyperthyroidism is under control. PMID:24683480

  11. [Cardiac amyloidosis].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Caroline; Angermann, Christiane E; Knop, Stefan; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan

    2008-03-15

    Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of multisystem disorders, which are characterized by an extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Typically affected are the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system. More than half of the patients die due to cardiac involvement. Clinical signs of cardiac amyloidosis are edema of the lower limbs, hepatomegaly, ascites and elevated jugular vein pressure, frequently in combination with dyspnea. There can also be chest pain, probably due to microvessel disease. Dysfunction of the autonomous nervous system or arrhythmias may cause low blood pressure, dizziness, or recurrent syncope. The AL amyloidosis caused by the deposition of immunoglobulin light chains is the most common form. It can be performed by monoclonal gammopathy. The desirable treatment therapy consists of high-dose melphalan therapy twice followed by autologous stem cell transplantation. Due to the high peritransplantation mortality, selection of appropriate patients is mandatory. The ATTR amyloidosis is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by the amyloidogenic form of transthyretin, a plasmaprotein that is synthesized in the liver. Therefore, liver transplantation is the only curative therapy. The symptomatic treatment of cardiac amyloidosis is based on the current guidelines for chronic heart failure according to the patient's New York Heart Association (NYHA) state. Further types of amyloidosis with possible cardiac involvement comprise the senile systemic amyloidosis caused by the wild-type transthyretin, secondary amyloidosis after chronic systemic inflammation, and the beta(2)-microglobulin amyloidosis after long-term dialysis treatment. PMID:18344065

  12. Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A final progress report is presented on the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary purpose of the CSIS is to demonstrate and evaluate real time interactive computerized data collection, interpretation and display techniques as applied to severe weather forecasting. CSIS objectives pertaining to improved severe storm forecasting and warning systems are outlined. The positive impact that CSIS has had on the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is discussed. The benefits of interactive processing systems on the forecasting ability of the NSSFC are described.

  13. Solar storms can destabilize power grids at midlatitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-10-01

    The Sun is capable of disrupting electrical systems on Earth in a variety of ways, from solar flares and coronal mass ejections to proton storms. Typically, it is only objects far above the Earth's surface, or systems at high altitudes at polar latitudes that are considered at risk except during the most powerful storms. Notable recent examples include solar activity during March 1989 and October 2003 (the “Halloween Storms”), which knocked out power in Québec, Canada, and Sweden, respectively. Research by Marshall et al., however, found that even a moderate event can have destructive effects far from the typical regions of concern.

  14. Neonatal thyroid storm accompanied with severe anaemia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu-Ying; Wei, Hong; Wang, Zheng-Li

    2015-07-01

    Neonatal thyroid storm is rare; the diagnostic criteria and management of neonatal thyroid storm have not been well established. In this paper, we report a preterm infant diagnosed with neonatal hyperthyroidism secondary to maternal Graves' disease who was discharged after therapy. Unfortunately, he was rehospitalised for neonatal thyroid storm. We will discuss the diagnosis and general therapy of neonatal thyroid storm.

  15. Effects of cAMP modulators on long-chain fatty-acid uptake and utilization by electrically stimulated rat cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Luiken, J J F P; Willems, J; Coort, S L M; Coumans, W A; Bonen, A; Van Der Vusse, G J; Glatz, J F C

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we established that cellular contractions increase long-chain fatty-acid (FA) uptake by cardiac myocytes. This increase is dependent on the transport function of an 88 kDa membrane FA transporter, FA translocase (FAT/CD36), and, in analogy to skeletal muscle, is likely to involve its translocation from an intracellular pool to the sarcolemma. In the present study, we investigated whether cAMP-dependent signalling is involved in this translocation process. Isoproterenol, dibutyryl-cAMP and the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, amrinone, which markedly raised the intracellular cAMP level, did not affect cellular FA uptake, but influenced the fate of intracellular FAs by directing these to mitochondrial oxidation in electrostimulated cardiac myocytes. The PDE inhibitors 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, milrinone and dipyridamole each significantly stimulated FA uptake as well as intracellular cAMP levels, but these effects were quantitatively unrelated. The stimulatory effects of these PDE inhibitors were antagonized by sulpho- N -succinimidylpalmitate, indicating the involvement of FAT/CD36, albeit that the different PDE inhibitors use different molecular mechanisms to stimulate FAT/CD36-mediated FA uptake. Notably, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and milrinone increased the intrinsic activity of FAT/CD36, possibly through its covalent modification, and dipyridamole induces translocation of FAT/CD36 to the sarcolemma. Elevation of intracellular cGMP, but not of cAMP, by the PDE inhibitor zaprinast did not have any effect on FA uptake and metabolism by cardiac myocytes. The stimulatory effects of PDE inhibitors on cardiac FA uptake should be considered when applying these agents in clinical medicine. PMID:12093365

  16. Calmodulin 2 Mutation N98S Is Associated with Unexplained Cardiac Arrest in Infants Due to Low Clinical Penetrance Electrical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Palomino Doza, Julián; Ortega, Ángeles; Macías-Ruiz, Rosa; Perin, Francesca; Rodríguez-Vázquez del Rey, M. Mar; Ortiz-Genga, Martín; Monserrat, Lorenzo; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; Blanca, Enrique; Álvarez, Miguel; Tercedor, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin 1, 2 and 3 (CALM) mutations have been found to cause cardiac arrest in children at a very early age. The underlying aetiology described is long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) and idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF). Little phenotypical data about CALM2 mutations is available. Objectives The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical manifestations of the Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 in two unrelated children in southern Spain with apparently unexplained cardiac arrest/death. Methods Two unrelated children aged 4 and 7, who were born to healthy parents, were studied. Both presented with sudden cardiac arrest. The first was resuscitated after a VF episode, and the second died suddenly. In both cases the baseline QTc interval was within normal limits. Peripheral blood DNA was available to perform targeted gene sequencing. Results The surviving 4-year-old girl had a positive epinephrine test for LQTS, and polymorphic ventricular ectopic beats were seen on a previous 24-hour Holter recording from the deceased 7-year-old boy, suggestive of a possible underlying CPVT phenotype. A p.Asn98Ser mutation in CALM2 was detected in both cases. This affected a highly conserved across species residue, and the location in the protein was adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain, predicting a high pathogenic effect. Conclusions Human calmodulin 2 mutation p.Asn98Ser is associated with sudden cardiac death in childhood with a variable clinical penetrance. Our results provide new phenotypical information about clinical behaviour of this mutation. PMID:27100291

  17. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  18. Tropical Storm Faxai's Rainfall Rates

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows Tropical Storm Faxai's rainfall rates on March 2 from a TRMM TMI/PR rainfall analysis being faded in over infrared cloud data from the TRMM VIRS instrument. Credit: SSAI/NASA, ...

  19. Cloudsat Dissects Tropical Storm Ileana

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's CloudSat satellite's Cloud Profiling Radar captured a sideways look across Tropical Storm Ileana on Aug. 27 at 20:40 UTC. The colors indicate intensity of reflected radar energy. The blue ar...

  20. Riding the storm out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurman, Josh

    2009-04-01

    I am standing on a bridge near the North Carolina coast. There is a light breeze, and I am enjoying some hazy sunshine. But this calm is an illusion: in a few minutes winds of up to 45ms-1 (100 mph) will sweep in again. The approaches to my section of the bridge are already drowned under 2.5 m of water, and my companions on this island are an eclectic mix of traumatized animals, including snakes, rats, wounded pelicans and frogs. Earlier, one of the snakes flew through the air past my truck. The animals and I have been drawn to this bridge by Hurricane Isabel, which has just slammed into the coastal islands of North Carolina, and at the moment we are in the calm, sunny eye of the storm. The animals are just trying to survive on the area's only dry ground. But I have come to the bridge with a radar system on a truck and have spent a night and a day on it because I want to know what is happening inside this hurricane.

  1. Ionospheric redistribution during geomagnetic storms

    PubMed Central

    Immel, T J; Mannucci, A J

    2013-01-01

    [1]The abundance of plasma in the daytime ionosphere is often seen to grow greatly during geomagnetic storms. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of the plasma density enhancement depends on the UT of storm onset. This possibility is investigated over a 7year period using global maps of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) produced at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The analysis confirms that the American sector exhibits, on average, larger storm time enhancement in ionospheric plasma content, up to 50% in the afternoon middle-latitude region and 30% in the vicinity of the high-latitude auroral cusp, with largest effect in the Southern Hemisphere. We investigate whether this effect is related to the magnitude of the causative magnetic storms. Using the same advanced Dst index employed to sort the TEC maps into quiet and active (Dst<−100 nT) sets, we find variation in storm strength that corresponds closely to the TEC variation but follows it by 3–6h. For this and other reasons detailed in this report, we conclude that the UT-dependent peak in storm time TEC is likely not related to the magnitude of external storm time forcing but more likely attributable to phenomena such as the low magnetic field in the South American region. The large Dst variation suggests a possible system-level effect of the observed variation in ionospheric storm response on the measured strength of the terrestrial ring current, possibly connected through UT-dependent modulation of ion outflow. PMID:26167429

  2. Venturing into ventricular arrhythmia storm: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nayyar, Sachin; Ganesan, Anand N; Brooks, Anthony G; Sullivan, Thomas; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C; Sanders, Prashanthan

    2013-02-01

    Ablation has substantial evidence base in the management of ventricular arrhythmia (VA). It can be a 'lifesaving' procedure in the acute setting of VA storm. Current reports on ablation in VA storm are in the form of small series and have relative small representation in a large observational series. The purpose of this study was to systematically synthesize the available literature to appreciate the efficacy and safety of ablation in the setting of VA storm. The medical electronic databases through 31 January 2012 were searched. Ventricular arrhythmia storm was defined as recurrent (≥ 3 episodes or defibrillator therapies in 24 h) or incessant (continuous >12 h) VA. Studies reporting data on VA storm patients at the individual or study level were included. A total of 471 VA storm patients from 39 publications were collated for the analysis. All VAs were successfully ablated in 72% [95% confidence interval (CI) 71-89%] and 9% (95% CI: 3-10%) had a failed procedure. Procedure-related mortality occurred in three patients (0.6%). Only 6% patients had a recurrence of VA storm. The recurrence of VA was significantly higher after ablation for arrhythmic storm of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) relative to ventricular fibrillation or polymorphic VT with underlying cardiomyopathy (odds ratio 3.76; 95% CI: 1.65-8.57; P = 0.002). During the follow-up (61 ± 37 weeks), 17% of patients died (heart failure 62%, arrhythmias 23%, and non-cardiac 15%) with 55% deaths occurring within 12 weeks of intervention. The odds of death were four times higher after a failed procedure compared with those with a successful procedure (95% CI: 2.04-8.01, P < 0.001). Ventricular arrhythmia storm ablation has high-acute success rates, with a low rate of recurrent storms. Heart failure is the dominant cause of death in the long term. Failure of the acute procedure carries a high mortality.

  3. Global ionospheric dynamics and electrodynamics during geomagnetic storms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Tsurutani, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Komjathy, A.; Butala, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Globally distributed total electron content (TEC) data has become an important tool for exploring the consequences of storm-time electrodynamics. Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling during the main phase is responsible for the largest ionospheric effects observed during geomagnetic storms, mediated by global scale electrodynamics. Recent research using case studies reveals a complex picture of M-I coupling and its relationship to interplanetary drivers such as the solar wind electric field. Periods of direct coupling exist where the solar wind electric field is strongly correlated with prompt penetration electric fields, observed as enhanced vertical plasma drifts or an enhanced electrojet in the daytime equatorial ionosphere. Periods of decoupling between low latitude electric fields and the solar wind electric field are also observed, but the factors distinguishing these two types of response have not been clearly identified. Recent studies during superstorms suggest a role for the transverse (y-component) of the interplanetary magnetic field, which affects magnetospheric current systems and therefore may affect M-I coupling, with significant ionospheric consequences. Observations of the global ionospheric response to a range of geomagnetic storm intensities are presented. Scientific understanding of the different factors that affect electrodynamic aspects of M-I coupling are discussed.

  4. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  5. Cardiac Na Channels: Structure to Function.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, K R; Clancy, C E

    2016-01-01

    Heart rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. Opening of the primary cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.5) channel initiates cellular depolarization and the propagation of an electrical action potential that promotes coordinated contraction of the heart. The regularity of these contractile waves is critically important since it drives the primary function of the heart: to act as a pump that delivers blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. Perturbations to NaV1.5 may alter the structure, and hence the function, of the ion channel and are associated downstream with a wide variety of cardiac conduction pathologies, such as arrhythmias. PMID:27586288

  6. Climatic Perspective and Impacts of the 1998 Northern New York and New England Ice Storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degaetano, Arthur T.

    2000-02-01

    From 4 through 10 January 1998 a severe ice storm impacted northern New York and New England. Liquid-equivalent precipitation totals, which fell exclusively as freezing rain, reached as high as 11 cm at some observing sites in northwestern New York. At the limited number of stations in the region that report hourly meteorological observations, the magnitude of the storm was unprecedented since the beginning of digital records in 1948. The duration of the storm exceeded 115 h at Massena, New York, nearly twice the duration of the second-longest event. In terms of the liquid-equivalent precipitation amount that fell as freezing rain, nearly 9 cm was reported at Massena, New York, and 5.7 cm was observed at Burlington, Vermont, the highest amounts on record. Despite these point estimates of storm severity, it is argued that icing events in 1973, 1969, 1956, and 1921 were of comparable magnitude in New York and New England. However, with the exception of the 1921 storm, it does not appear that the spatial extent of these storms was as broad as that of the 1998 ice storm.The economic impacts associated with the storm were most severe in New York and Maine. Across the region, the greatest icing impacts affected electric and communications utilities, forestry interests, the dairy and maple syrup industries, and property owners. Overall, a conservative estimate of ice storm related damages exceeds $1 billion.

  7. Energy and Mass Transport of Magnetospheric Plasmas during the November 2003 Magnetic Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Chging; Moore, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Intensive energy and mass transport from the solar wind across the magnetosphere boundary is a trigger of magnetic storms. The storm on 20-21 November 2003 was elicited by a high-speed solar wind and strong southward component of interplanetary magnetic field. This storm attained a minimum Dst of -422 nT. During the storm, some of the solar wind particles enter the magnetosphere and eventually become part of the ring current. At the same time, the fierce solar wind powers strong outflow of H+ and O+ from the ionosphere, as well as from the plasmasphere. We examine the contribution of plasmas from the solar wind, ionosphere and plasmasphere to the storm-time ring current. Our simulation shows, for this particular storm, ionospheric O+ and solar wind ions are the major sources of the ring current particles. The polar wind and plasmaspheric H+ have only minor impacts. In the storm main phase, the strong penetration of solar wind electric field pushes ions from the geosynchronous orbit to L shells of 2 and below. Ring current is greatly intensified during the earthward transport and produces a large magnetic depression in the surface field. When the convection subsides, the deep penetrating ions experience strong charge exchange loss, causing rapid decay of the ring current and fast initial storm recovery. Our simulation reproduces very well the storm development indicated by the Dst index.

  8. Physics of Cardiac Arrhythmogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2013-04-01

    A normal heartbeat is orchestrated by the stable propagation of an excitation wave that produces an orderly contraction. In contrast, wave turbulence in the ventricles, clinically known as ventricular fibrillation (VF), stops the heart from pumping and is lethal without prompt defibrillation. I review experimental, computational, and theoretical studies that have shed light on complex dynamical phenomena linked to the initiation, maintenance, and control of wave turbulence. I first discuss advances made to understand the precursor state to a reentrant arrhythmia where the refractory period of cardiac tissue becomes spatiotemporally disordered; this is known as an arrhythmogenic tissue substrate. I describe observed patterns of transmembrane voltage and intracellular calcium signaling that can contribute to this substrate, and symmetry breaking instabilities to explain their formation. I then survey mechanisms of wave turbulence and discuss novel methods that exploit electrical pacing stimuli to control precursor patterns and low-energy pulsed electric fields to control turbulence.

  9. Storm tracks near marginal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Novak, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    The variance of atmospheric storm tracks is characterised by intermittent bursts of activity interspersed with relatively quiescent periods. Most of the poleward heat transport by storm tracks is due to a limited number of strong heat flux events, which occur in a quasi-periodic fashion. This behaviour is in contradiction with the usual conceptual model of the storm tracks, which relies on high growth rate background flows which then spawn weather systems that grow in an exponential or non-normal fashion. Here we present a different conceptual model of the atmospheric storm tracks which is built on the observation that, when including diabatic and other dissipative effects, the storm track region is in fact most of the time marginally stable. The ensuing model is a nonlinear oscillator, very similar to Volterra-Lotka predator-prey models. We demonstrate the extensions of this model to a stochastically driven nonlinear oscillator. The model produces quasi-periodic behaviour dominated by intermittent heat flux events. Perhaps most surprisingly, we will show strong evidence from re-analysis data for our conceptual model: the re-analysis data produces a phase-space plot that is very similar indeed to the phase-space plot for our nonlinear oscillator model.

  10. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images. The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image. The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001. Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image. Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation. Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide. Image courtesy NASA/JPL/GSFC/LaRC, MISR Team

  11. Tropical Storms Bud and Dera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Like dancers pirouetting in opposite directions, the rotational patterns of two different tropical storms are contrasted in this pair of MISR nadir-camera images.

    The left-hand image is of Tropical Storm Bud, acquired on June 17, 2000 (Terra orbit 2656) as the storm was dissipating. Bud was situated in the eastern Pacific Ocean between Socorro Island and the southern tip of Baja California. South of the storm's center is a vortex pattern caused by obstruction of the prevailing flow by tiny Socorro Island. Sonora, Mexico and Baja California are visible at the top of the image.

    The right-hand image is of Tropical Cyclone Dera, acquired on March 12, 2001 (Terra orbit 6552). Dera was located in the Indian Ocean, south of Madagascar. The southern end of this large island is visible in the top portion of this image.

    Northern hemisphere tropical storms, like Bud, rotate in a counterclockwise direction, whereas those in the southern hemisphere, such as Dera, rotate clockwise. The opposite spins are a consequence of Earth's rotation.

    Each image covers a swath approximately 380 kilometers wide.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  13. Empirical Model of Subauroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Subauroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) are important electromagnetic phenomena associated with geomagnetic storms that affect the inner magnetosphere and ionosphere. They are characterized by strong sunward plasma flows caused by poleward-directed electric fields in the region of the ionosphere equatorword of the auroral zone. To examine the effects subauroral electric fields have on ITM coupling and magnetospheric-ionospheric convection we are developing an empirical model of SAPS using data acquired by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft which have made decades of in-situ measurements of ionospheric ion drifts, composition, and precipitating auroral particles. These measurements are used to characterize the subauroral electric fields relative to the location of the auroral boundary at varying magnetic local times and magnetic activity levels. As a critical component of this model, we have developed a model of the nightside zero energy electron precipitation boundary equatorward of the auroral oval parameterized by AE and MLT, using boundary identifications derived from DMSP data. We will use this model to create a global subauroral potential model and perform a superposed epoch study of SAPS fields in relationship to the auroral boundary during selected geomagnetic storms as a function of storm phase. A global empirical model of SAPS electric fields of this kind is required to realistically model thermosphere-ionosphere coupling and inner-magnetospheric convection.

  14. A model model: a commentary on DiFrancesco and Noble (1985) ‘A model of cardiac electrical activity incorporating ionic pumps and concentration changes’

    PubMed Central

    Dibb, Katharine; Trafford, Andrew; Zhang, Henggui; Eisner, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the advances made by the DiFrancesco and Noble (DFN) model of cardiac cellular electrophysiology, which was published in Philosophical Transactions B in 1985. This model was developed at a time when the introduction of new techniques and provision of experimental data had resulted in an explosion of knowledge about the cellular and biophysical properties of the heart. It advanced the cardiac modelling field from a period when computer models considered only the voltage-dependent channels in the surface membrane. In particular, it included a consideration of changes of both intra- and extracellular ionic concentrations. In this paper, we summarize the most important contributions of the DiFrancesco and Noble paper. We also describe how computer modelling has developed subsequently with the extension from the single cell to the whole heart as well as its use in understanding disease and predicting the effects of pharmaceutical interventions. This commentary was written to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. PMID:25750236

  15. Intensity of the auroral electrojets during a recovery phase of magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroyev, R. N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the effect of solar wind velocity on the development of magnetospheric and ionospheric disturbances is studied. It is shown that at high velocity of the solar wind during a recovery phase of magnetic storm the strong auroral activity characterized by the AE index is observed. In some cases during a recovery phase of magnetic storm the value of AE index is practically comparable with the value of AE index observed during the main phase of magnetic storm. When comparing time intervals of two magnetic storms during which the values of solar wind electric fields are approximately equal to each other, it is found that auroral electrojet intensity is stronger in that storm in which the solar wind velocity is higher.

  16. On the Variability of Wilson Currents by Storm Type and Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deierling, Wiebke; Kalb, Christina; Mach, Douglas; Liu, Chuntao; Peterson, Michael; Blakeslee, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Storm total conduction currents from electrified clouds are thought to play a major role in maintaining the potential difference between the earth's surface and the upper atmosphere within the Global Electric Circuit (GEC). However, it is not entirely known how the contributions of these currents vary by cloud type and phase of the clouds life cycle. Estimates of storm total conduction currents were obtained from data collected over two decades during multiple field campaigns involving the NASA ER-2 aircraft. In this study the variability of these currents by cloud type and lifecycle is investigated. We also compared radar derived microphysical storm properties with total storm currents to investigate whether these storm properties can be used to describe the current variability of different electrified clouds. The ultimate goal is to help improve modeling of the GEC via quantification and improved parameterization of the conduction current contribution of different cloud types.

  17. Electrophysiological Cardiac Modeling: A Review.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Umapathy, Karthikeyan; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological modeling in conjunction with experimental and clinical findings has contributed to better understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in various species. As our knowledge on underlying electrical, mechanical, and chemical processes has improved over time, mathematical models of the cardiac electrophysiology have become more realistic and detailed. These models have provided a testbed for various hypotheses and conditions that may not be easy to implement experimentally. In addition to the limitations in experimentally validating various scenarios implemented by the models, one of the major obstacles for these models is computational complexity. However, the ever-increasing computational power of supercomputers facilitates the clinical application of cardiac electrophysiological models. The potential clinical applications include testing and predicting effects of pharmaceutical agents and performing patient-specific ablation and defibrillation. A review of studies involving these models and their major findings are provided.

  18. Electrophysiological Cardiac Modeling: A Review.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Mohammadali; Umapathy, Karthikeyan; Krishnan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological modeling in conjunction with experimental and clinical findings has contributed to better understanding of electrophysiological phenomena in various species. As our knowledge on underlying electrical, mechanical, and chemical processes has improved over time, mathematical models of the cardiac electrophysiology have become more realistic and detailed. These models have provided a testbed for various hypotheses and conditions that may not be easy to implement experimentally. In addition to the limitations in experimentally validating various scenarios implemented by the models, one of the major obstacles for these models is computational complexity. However, the ever-increasing computational power of supercomputers facilitates the clinical application of cardiac electrophysiological models. The potential clinical applications include testing and predicting effects of pharmaceutical agents and performing patient-specific ablation and defibrillation. A review of studies involving these models and their major findings are provided. PMID:27652454

  19. Bracing for the geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Kappenman, J.G. ); Albertson, V.D. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors discuss the impact of geomagnetic storms on utility transmission networks. The effects of a recent storm on the Hydro-Quebec transmission system are described in detail. Research into geomagnetic disturbance prediction is discussed. In coming months, geomagnetic field activity will be high as it builds toward a peak, the 22nd since reliable records of the phenomenon began in the mid-1700s. The peaks come in roughly 11-year cycles, and the next is expected later this year or early in 1991. The solar activity has so far risen at one of the fastest rates ever recorded, and solar forecasters expect cycle 22 to have unusually high activity levels.

  20. National Severe Storms Forecast Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The principal mission of the National Severe Storms Forecast Center (NSSFC) is to maintain a continuous watch of weather developments that are capable of producing severe local storms, including tornadoes, and to prepare and issue messages designated as either Weather Outlooks or Tornado or Severe Thunderstorm Watches for dissemination to the public and aviation services. In addition to its assigned responsibility at the national level, the NSSFC is involved in a number of programs at the regional and local levels. Subsequent subsections and paragraphs describe the NSSFC, its users, inputs, outputs, interfaces, capabilities, workload, problem areas, and future plans in more detail.

  1. GPM Sees Powerful Storms in Tropical Storm Hermine

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is a 3-D animated flyby of Tropical Storm Hermine created using radar data from the GPM core satellite. On Aug. 31 at 4 p.m. EDT GPM found rainfall occurring at a rate of over 9.9 inches (251 ...

  2. The need to immobilise the cervical spine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electric shock administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Desroziers, Milene; Mole, Sophie; Jost, Daniel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-13

    In cases of out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), falling to the ground can cause brain and neck trauma to the patient. We present a case of a man in his mid-60s who suffered from an OHCA resulting in a violent collapse. The patient received immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but his spine was immobilised only after a large frontal haematoma was found. The resuscitation efforts resulted in return of spontaneous circulation and discharge from hospital. After this, doctors performed angioplasty, followed by a cardiopulmonary bypass. Later, CT scan examination reported a displaced and unstable fracture of the 6th vertebra without bone marrow involvement. The patient underwent a second operation. 40 days later, he was able to return home without sequela. This case shows the importance of analysing the circumstances of a fall, considering the possibility of two concomitant diagnoses and prioritising investigations and treatment.

  3. Bifurcation theory and cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Karagueuzian, Hrayr S; Stepanyan, Hayk; Mandel, William J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we review two types of dynamic behaviors defined by the bifurcation theory that are found to be particularly useful in describing two forms of cardiac electrical instabilities that are of considerable importance in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. The first is action potential duration (APD) alternans with an underlying dynamics consistent with the period doubling bifurcation theory. This form of electrical instability could lead to spatially discordant APD alternans leading to wavebreak and reentrant form of tachyarrhythmias. Factors that modulate the APD alternans are discussed. The second form of bifurcation of importance to cardiac arrhythmogenesis is the Hopf-homoclinic bifurcation that adequately describes the dynamics of the onset of early afterdepolarization (EAD)-mediated triggered activity (Hopf) that may cause ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF respectively). The self-termination of the triggered activity is compatible with the homoclinic bifurcation. Ionic and intracellular calcium dynamics underlying these dynamics are discussed using available experimental and simulation data. The dynamic analysis provides novel insights into the mechanisms of VT/VF, a major cause of sudden cardiac death in the US.

  4. Inducing Therapeutic Hypothermia in Cardiac Arrest Caused by Lightning Strike.

    PubMed

    Scantling, Dane; Frank, Brian; Pontell, Mathew E; Medinilla, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    Only limited clinical scenarios are grounds for induction of therapeutic hypothermia. Its use in traumatic cardiac arrests, including those from lightning strikes, is not well studied. Nonshockable cardiac arrest rhythms have only recently been included in resuscitation guidelines. We report a case of full neurological recovery with therapeutic hypothermia after a lightning-induced pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old woman. We also review the important pathophysiology of lightning-induced cardiac arrest and neurologic sequelae, elaborate upon the mechanism of therapeutic hypothermia, and add case-based evidence in favor of the use of targeted temperature management in lightning-induced cardiac arrest. PMID:27451005

  5. Inducing Therapeutic Hypothermia in Cardiac Arrest Caused by Lightning Strike.

    PubMed

    Scantling, Dane; Frank, Brian; Pontell, Mathew E; Medinilla, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    Only limited clinical scenarios are grounds for induction of therapeutic hypothermia. Its use in traumatic cardiac arrests, including those from lightning strikes, is not well studied. Nonshockable cardiac arrest rhythms have only recently been included in resuscitation guidelines. We report a case of full neurological recovery with therapeutic hypothermia after a lightning-induced pulseless electrical activity cardiac arrest in an 18-year-old woman. We also review the important pathophysiology of lightning-induced cardiac arrest and neurologic sequelae, elaborate upon the mechanism of therapeutic hypothermia, and add case-based evidence in favor of the use of targeted temperature management in lightning-induced cardiac arrest.

  6. Templates of Change: Storms and Shoreline Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Robert; Hayden, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    Presents results of research designed to assess and predict the storm-related hazards of living on the coast. Findings suggest that certain sections of coastline are more vulnerable than others to storm damage. (WB)

  7. Tropical Storm Debby Moves into Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Debby from June 25-27, 2012. The animation shows that Tropical Storm Debby's center move from the northeastern Gulf of...

  8. Satellite View of 2 Trop. Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    System 98L exploded into Tropical Storm Irene on Saturday, August 20. This GOES-13 Video shows Tropical Storm Harvey making landfall in Belize (just beneath the Yucatan Peninsula) and moving into t...

  9. ENSO and winter storms in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cayan, D.R.; Bromirski, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and intensity of North Pacific winter storms that penetrate the California coast drives the winds, sea level, precipitation and streamflow that are crucial influences on coastal processes. There is considerable variability of these storm characteristics, in large part owing to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO} phenomenon. There is a great contrast of the storm characteristics during the El Nino phase vs. the La Nina phase, with the largest scale, southerly extensive winter storms generated during El Nino.

  10. DE 2 observations of disturbances in the upper atmosphere during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, N. J.; Brace, L. H.; Spencer, N. W.; Carignan, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of physical interpretations of a sequence of in situ measurements taken in the midlatitude dusk sector during the geomagnetic storm of November 24, 1982 by instruments on board the DE-2 spacecraft in polar orbit. The results represent the first comparison of nearly simultaneous measurements, obtained at different seasons in a common local time sector, of storm disturbances in dc electric fields, zonal ion convection, zonal winds, gas composition and temperature, and electron density and temperature.

  11. Thyroid storm during beta blockade.

    PubMed

    Strube, P J

    1984-04-01

    A thyrotoxic patient who had received beta-adrenoceptor blockers pre-operatively suffered an episode of severe heart failure immediately following thyroidectomy and required artificial ventilation of the lungs for six hours. The possible causes are discussed and the likelihood of thyroid storm unmitigated by beta adrenergic blockade suggested.

  12. Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater discharges continue to cause impairment of our Nation’s waterbodies. Regulations that require the retention and/or treatment of frequent, small storms that dominate runoff volumes and pollutant loads are becoming more common. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (E...

  13. Rain from Tropical Storm Noel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Though not the most powerful storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane season, Tropical Storm Noel was among the most deadly. Only Category 5 Hurricane Felix and its associated flooding had a higher toll. The slow-moving Tropical Storm Noel inundated the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Cuba, and the Bahamas with heavy rain between October 28 and November 1, 2007. The resulting floods and mudslides left at least 115 dead and thousands homeless throughout the Caribbean, reported the Associated Press on November 2, 2007. This image shows the distribution of the rainfall that made Noel a deadly storm. The image shows rainfall totals as measured by the Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (MPA) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center from October 26 through November 1, 2007. The analysis is based on measurements taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The heaviest rainfall fell in the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, northeast of Noel's center. Areas of dark red show that rainfall totals over the south-central Dominican Republic and parts of the Bahamas were over 551 millimeters (21 inches). Much of eastern Hispaniola, including both the Dominican Republic and Haiti received at least 200 mm (about 8 inches) of rain, shown in yellow. Rainfall totals over Haiti and Cuba were less, with a range of at least 50 mm (2 inches) to over 200 mm (8 inches).

  14. Storm Water Management Model (SWMM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater discharges continue to cause impairment of our Nation’s waterbodies. Regulations that require the retention and/or treatment of frequent, small storms that dominate runoff volumes and pollutant loads are becoming more common. The U.S. Environmental Protection Age...

  15. NASA Studies Lightning Storms Using High-Flying, Uninhabited Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA team studying the causes of electrical storms and their effects on our home planet achieved a milestone on August 21, 2002, completing the study's longest-duration research flight and monitoring four thunderstorms in succession. Based at the Naval Air Station Key West, Florida, researchers with the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) used the Altus II remotely-piloted aircraft to study thunderstorms in the Atlantic Ocean off Key West and the west of the Everglades. Data obtained through sensors mounted to the aircraft will allow researchers in ACES to gauge elements such as lightning activity and the electrical environment in and around storms. By learning more about individual storms, scientists hope to better understand the global water and energy cycle, as well as climate variability. Contained in one portion of the aircraft is a three-axis magnetic search coil, which measures the AC magnetic field; a three-axis electric field change sensor; an accelerometer; and a three-axis magnetometer, which measures the DC magnetic field. With dual goals of gathering weather data safely and testing the adaptability of the uninhabited aircraft, the ACES study is a collaboration among the Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, Pernsylvania State University in University Park, and General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.

  16. Space Derived Health Aids (Cardiac Pacemaker)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    St. Jude Medical's Cardiac Rhythm Management Division's (formerly known as Pacesetter Systems, Inc.) pacer is a rechargeable cardiac pacemaker that eliminates the recurring need for surgery to implant a new battery. The Programalith is an advanced cardiac pacing system which permits a physician to reprogram a patient's implanted pacemaker without surgery. System consists of a pacemaker, together with a physician's console containing the programmer and a data printer. Signals are transmitted by wireless telemetry. Two-way communications, originating from spacecraft electrical power systems technology, allows physician to interrogate the pacemaker as to the status of the heart, then to fine tune the device to best suit the patient's needs.

  17. Characterizing Times Between Storms in Mountainous Areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An exploratory investigation was conducted on how two parameters that characterize dry times between storms (average time between storms, ATBS, and minimum dry time between storms, MTBS) vary with elevation, and how these two parameters may be estimated for areas without data. 16 rain gauges with h...

  18. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  19. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  20. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  1. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  2. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  3. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  4. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  5. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  6. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  7. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  8. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  9. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  10. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  11. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  12. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  13. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  14. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  15. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  16. 46 CFR 116.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 116.920 Section 116.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150... and Guards § 116.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must be installed where...

  17. 46 CFR 127.320 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 127.320 Section 127.320 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Rails and Guards § 127.320 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails must be installed in each passageway and...

  18. 46 CFR 177.920 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 177.920 Section 177.920 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Rails and Guards § 177.920 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  19. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  20. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  1. 46 CFR 169.329 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 169.329 Section 169.329 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Rails and Guards § 169.329 Storm rails. Suitable storm rails or hand grabs must...

  2. 46 CFR 108.221 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 108.221 Section 108.221 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Rails § 108.221 Storm rails. Each unit must have a storm rail in the...

  3. Computational approaches to understand cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Byron N.; Yang, Pei-Chi; Behrens, Steven B.; Moreno, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. These impulses spread throughout the cardiac muscle to manifest as electrical waves in the whole heart. Regularity of electrical waves is critically important since they signal the heart muscle to contract, driving the primary function of the heart to act as a pump and deliver blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. For more than 50 years, mathematically based models of cardiac electrical activity have been used to improve understanding of basic mechanisms of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical function. Computer-based modeling approaches to understand cardiac activity are uniquely helpful because they allow for distillation of complex emergent behaviors into the key contributing components underlying them. Here we review the latest advances and novel concepts in the field as they relate to understanding the complex interplay between electrical, mechanical, structural, and genetic mechanisms during arrhythmia development at the level of ion channels, cells, and tissues. We also discuss the latest computational approaches to guiding arrhythmia therapy. PMID:22886409

  4. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  5. The Ring Current Response to Solar and Interplanetary Storm Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouikis, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Bingham, S.; Kronberg, E. A.; Gkioulidou, M.; Huang, C. L.; Farrugia, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The ring current responds differently to the different solar and interplanetary storm drivers such as coronal mass injections, (CME's), corotating interaction regions (CIR's), high-speed streamers and other structures. The resulting changes in the ring current particle pressure, in turn, change the global magnetic field, controlling the transport of the radiation belts. To quantitatively determine the field changes during a storm throughout the magnetosphere, it is necessary to understand the transport, sources and losses of the particles that contribute to the ring current. Because the measured ring current energy spectra depend not only on local processes, but also on the history of the ions along their entire drift path, measurements of ring current energy spectra at two or more locations can be used to strongly constrain the time dependent magnetic and electric fields. In this study we use data predominantly from the Cluster and the Van Allen Probes, covering more than a full solar cycle (from 2001 to 2014). For the period 2001-2012, the Cluster CODIF and RAPID measurements of the inner magnetosphere are the primary data set used to monitor the storm time ring current variability. After 2012, the Cluster data set complements the data from the Van Allen Probes HOPE and RBSPICE instruments, providing additional measurements from different MLT and L shells. Selected storms from this periods, allow us to study the ring current dynamics and pressure changes, as a function of L shell, magnetic local time, and the type of interplanetary disturbances.

  6. Large Geomagnetic Storms: Introduction to Special Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2010-01-01

    Solar cycle 23 witnessed the accumulation of rich data sets that reveal various aspects of geomagnetic storms in unprecedented detail both at the Sun where the storm causing disturbances originate and in geospace where the effects of the storms are directly felt. During two recent coordinated data analysis workshops (CDAWs) the large geomagnetic storms (Dst < or = -100 nT) of solar cycle 23 were studied in order to understand their solar, interplanetary, and geospace connections. This special section grew out of these CDAWs with additional contributions relevant to these storms. Here I provide a brief summary of the results presented in the special section.

  7. Storm Impacts on Potential Pathogens in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, J. Stephen; Noble, Rachel T.; Kelly, Ginger M.; Hsieh, Jennifer L.

    2007-02-01

    Estuarine and coastal environments are susceptible to a variety of changes driven by tropical storms and hurricanes. The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season impressed upon the public the devastating impacts of storms on coastal populations and the possible social and public health costs. Storm surges and subsequent flooding have the potential to redistribute water and associated contaminants, including a wide range of chemicals and microorganisms. While this impact is difficult to observe through monitoring during larger storms, smaller storms provide opportunities to observe the mechanisms responsible for contaminant and microbial transport.

  8. CARDIAC MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Joachim R.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1968-01-01

    With light and electron microscopy a comparison has been made of the morphology of ventricular (V) and Purkinje (P) fibers of the hearts of guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, goat, and sheep. The criteria, previously established for the rabbit heart, that V fibers are distinguished from P fibers by the respective presence and absence of transverse tubules is shown to be true for all animals studied. No evidence was found of a permanent connection between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the extracellular space. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of V fibers formed couplings with the sarcolemma of a transverse tubule (interior coupling) and with the peripheral sarcolemma (peripheral coupling), whereas in P fibers the SR formed only peripheral couplings. The forms of the couplings were identical. The significance, with respect to excitation-contraction coupling, of the difference in the form of the couplings in cardiac versus skeletal muscle is discussed together with the electrophysiological implications of the differing geometries of bundles of P fibers from different animals. PMID:5645545

  9. Solar-Storm/Lunar Atmosphere Model (SSLAM): An Overview of the Effort and Description of the Driving Storm Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Killen, R. M.; Delroy, G. T.; Gross, N.; Bleacher, V; Krauss-Varben, D.; Hurley, D; Zimmerman, M. I.

    2012-01-01

    On 29 April 1998, a coronal mass ejection (CME) was emitted from the Sun that had a significant impact on bodies located at 1 AU. The terrestrial magnetosphere did indeed become more electrically active during the storm passage but an obvious question is the effect of such a storm on an exposed rocky body like our Moon. The solar-storm/lunar atmosphere modeling effort (SSLAM) brings together surface interactions, exosphere, plasma, and surface charging models all run with a common driver - the solar storm and CME passage occurring from 1-4 May 1998. We present herein an expanded discussion on the solar driver during the 1-4 May 1998 period that included the passage of an intense coronal mass ejection (CME) that had> 10 times the solar wind density and had a compositional component of He++ that exceeded 20%. We also provide a very brief overview oflhe SSLAM system layout and overarching results. One primary result is that the CME driver plasma can greatly increase the exospheric content via sputtering, with total mass loss rates that approach 1 kg/s during the 2-day CME passage. By analogy, we suggest that CME-related sputtering increases might also be expected during a CME passage by a near-earth asteroid or at the Mars exobase, resulting in an enhanced loss of material.

  10. Storms of Mediterranean and Atlantic legends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenenwald, N.; Tabeaud, M.

    2009-09-01

    Weather extremes and notably wind storms are very often the channel ones since they are suspected of being the outward signs of climate change. However, even if audiovisual medias talk about wind storms in a very similar way, tales and legends stories account for the richness of their representations. Coastal and insular regions, whatever Atlantic or Mediterranean, are the ones where wind storms are most mentioned. The comparison between the tales and legends of these two regions, with distinct climatic characteristics, allows to underline the similarities and dissimilarities about the impregnation (or impact) of wind storms on these territories. Winds and storms distinguish spaces through vocabulary which can be peculiar to a region. Nevertheless, they also bring them together because above the local cultures is the human thought upon which wind storms create comparable perceptions, whatever the region. Key words: wind storms, Mediterranean regions, Atlantic regions, perceptions, representations.

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of thyroid storm].

    PubMed

    Akamizu, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    Thyrotoxic storm is a life-threatening condition requiring emergency treatment. Neither its epidemiological data nor diagnostic criteria have been fully established. We clarified the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of thyroid storm using nationwide surveys and then formulate diagnostic criteria for thyroid storm. To perform the nationwide survey on thyroid storm, we first developed tentative diagnostic criteria for thyroid storm, mainly based upon the literature (the first edition). We analyzed the relationship of the major features of thyroid storm to mortality and to certain other features. Finally, based upon the findings of these surveys, we revised the diagnostic criteria. Thyrotoxic storm is still a life-threatening disorder with over 10% mortality in Japan.

  12. Thyroid storm precipitated by duodenal ulcer perforation.

    PubMed

    Natsuda, Shoko; Nakashima, Yomi; Horie, Ichiro; Ando, Takao; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening complication of thyrotoxicosis that requires prompt treatment. Thyroid storm is also known to be associated with precipitating events. The simultaneous treatment of thyroid storm and its precipitant, when they are recognized, in a patient is recommended; otherwise such disorders, including thyroid storm, can exacerbate each other. Here we report the case of a thyroid storm patient (a 55-year-old Japanese male) complicated with a perforated duodenal ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with intensive treatment for thyroid storm and a prompt operation. Although it is believed that peptic ulcer rarely coexists with hyperthyroidism, among patients with thyroid storm, perforation of a peptic ulcer has been reported as one of the causes of fatal outcome. We determined that surgical intervention was required in this patient, reported despite ongoing severe thyrotoxicosis, and reported herein a successful outcome.

  13. Uplift of Ionospheric Oxygen Ions During Extreme Magnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Huba, Joseph; Lakhina, Gurbax S.

    2013-01-01

    Research reported earlier in literature was conducted relating to estimation of the ionospheric electrical field, which may have occurred during the September 1859 Carrington geomagnetic storm event, with regard to modern-day consequences. In this research, the NRL SAMI2 ionospheric code has been modified and applied the estimated electric field to the dayside ionosphere. The modeling was done at 15-minute time increments to track the general ionospheric changes. Although it has been known that magnetospheric electric fields get down into the ionosphere, it has been only in the last ten years that scientists have discovered that intense magnetic storm electric fields do also. On the dayside, these dawn-to-dusk directed electric fields lift the plasma (electrons and ions) up to higher altitudes and latitudes. As plasma is removed from lower altitudes, solar UV creates new plasma, so the total plasma in the ionosphere is increased several-fold. Thus, this complex process creates super-dense plasmas at high altitudes (from 700 to 1,000 km and higher).

  14. Dust storm off Western Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The impacts of Saharan dust storms reach far beyond Africa. Wind-swept deserts spill airborne dust particles out over the Atlantic Ocean where they can enter trade winds bound for Central and North America and the Caribbean. This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image shows a dust storm casting an opaque cloud of cloud across the Canary Islands and the Atlantic Ocean west of Africa on June 30, 2002. In general it takes between 5 and 7 days for such an event to cross the Atlantic. The dust has been shown to introduce foreign bacteria and fungi that have damaged reef ecosystems and have even been hypothesized as a cause of increasing occurrences of respiratory complaints in places like Florida, where the amount of Saharan dust reaching the state has been increasing over the past 25 years.

  15. Cardiac electrophysiology in mice: a matter of size

    PubMed Central

    Kaese, Sven; Verheule, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, mouse models have become a popular instrument for studying cardiac arrhythmias. This review assesses in which respects a mouse heart is a miniature human heart, a suitable model for studying mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in humans and in which respects human and murine hearts differ. Section I considers the issue of scaling of mammalian cardiac (electro) physiology to body mass. Then, we summarize differences between mice and humans in cardiac activation (section II) and the currents underlying the action potential in the murine working myocardium (section III). Changes in cardiac electrophysiology in mouse models of heart disease are briefly outlined in section IV, while section V discusses technical considerations pertaining to recording cardiac electrical activity in mice. Finally, section VI offers general considerations on the influence of cardiac size on the mechanisms of tachy-arrhythmias. PMID:22973235

  16. Severe storms observing satellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwens, R. P.; Stern, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Payload distribution and the attitude control system for the multi-mission modular spacecraft/StormSat configuration are discussed. The design of the advanced atmospheric sounder and imaging radiometer (AASIR) gimbal drive and its servomechanism is described. Onboard data handling, data downlink communications, and ground data handling systems are developed. Additional topics covered include: magnetic unloading at synchronous altitude, north-south stationkeeping, and the feasibility and impact of flying the microwave atmospheric sounding radiometer (MASR) as an additional payload.

  17. Toward microendoscopy-inspired cardiac optogenetics in vivo: technical overview and perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to perform precise, spatially localized actuation and measurements of electrical activity in the heart is crucial in understanding cardiac electrophysiology and devising new therapeutic solutions for control of cardiac arrhythmias. Current cardiac imaging techniques (i.e. optical mapping) employ voltage- or calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes to visualize the electrical signal propagation through cardiac syncytium in vitro or in situ with very high-spatiotemporal resolution. The extension of optogenetics into the cardiac field, where cardiac tissue is genetically altered to express light-sensitive ion channels allowing electrical activity to be elicited or suppressed in a precise cell-specific way, has opened the possibility for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology. In vivo application of cardiac optogenetics faces multiple challenges and necessitates suitable optical systems employing fiber optics to actuate and sense electrical signals. In this technical perspective, we present a compendium of clinically relevant access routes to different parts of the cardiac electrical conduction system based on currently employed catheter imaging systems and determine the quantitative size constraints for endoscopic cardiac optogenetics. We discuss the relevant technical advancements in microendoscopy, cardiac imaging, and optogenetics and outline the strategies for combining them to create a portable, miniaturized fiber-based system for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology in vivo. PMID:25117076

  18. Toward microendoscopy-inspired cardiac optogenetics in vivo: technical overview and perspective.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The ability to perform precise, spatially localized actuation and measurements of electrical activity in the heart is crucial in understanding cardiac electrophysiology and devising new therapeutic solutions for control of cardiac arrhythmias. Current cardiac imaging techniques (i.e. optical mapping) employ voltage- or calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes to visualize the electrical signal propagation through cardiac syncytium in vitro or in situ with very high-spatiotemporal resolution. The extension of optogenetics into the cardiac field, where cardiac tissue is genetically altered to express light-sensitive ion channels allowing electrical activity to be elicited or suppressed in a precise cell-specific way, has opened the possibility for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology. In vivo application of cardiac optogenetics faces multiple challenges and necessitates suitable optical systems employing fiber optics to actuate and sense electrical signals. In this technical perspective, we present a compendium of clinically relevant access routes to different parts of the cardiac electrical conduction system based on currently employed catheter imaging systems and determine the quantitative size constraints for endoscopic cardiac optogenetics. We discuss the relevant technical advancements in microendoscopy, cardiac imaging, and optogenetics and outline the strategies for combining them to create a portable, miniaturized fiber-based system for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology in vivo.

  19. Toward microendoscopy-inspired cardiac optogenetics in vivo: technical overview and perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimas, Aleksandra; Entcheva, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The ability to perform precise, spatially localized actuation and measurements of electrical activity in the heart is crucial in understanding cardiac electrophysiology and devising new therapeutic solutions for control of cardiac arrhythmias. Current cardiac imaging techniques (i.e. optical mapping) employ voltage- or calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes to visualize the electrical signal propagation through cardiac syncytium in vitro or in situ with very high-spatiotemporal resolution. The extension of optogenetics into the cardiac field, where cardiac tissue is genetically altered to express light-sensitive ion channels allowing electrical activity to be elicited or suppressed in a precise cell-specific way, has opened the possibility for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology. In vivo application of cardiac optogenetics faces multiple challenges and necessitates suitable optical systems employing fiber optics to actuate and sense electrical signals. In this technical perspective, we present a compendium of clinically relevant access routes to different parts of the cardiac electrical conduction system based on currently employed catheter imaging systems and determine the quantitative size constraints for endoscopic cardiac optogenetics. We discuss the relevant technical advancements in microendoscopy, cardiac imaging, and optogenetics and outline the strategies for combining them to create a portable, miniaturized fiber-based system for all-optical interrogation of cardiac electrophysiology in vivo.

  20. Dust Storm in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Along historic Route 66, just southeast of the little town of Amboy, California, lies a dried-up lake. Dry lakebeds are good sources of two things: salt and dust. In this image, the now-parched Bristol Lake offers up both. On April 12, 2007, dust storms menaced the area around Amboy. To the northwest, near Newberry Springs, California, dust hampered visibility and led to a multi-car collision on Interstate 40, killing two people and injuring several others. The same day, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of a dust storm in the dry remains of Bristol Lake. Many small dust clouds boil up from the ground surface, casting their shadows to the northwest. A bright white cloud floating over the dust also throws its shadow onto the ground below. East of the dust storm are salt works that stand out from the surrounding landscape thanks to their straight lines and sharp angles. Dark ground surfaces alternate with mined white salt in a network of stripes. When lakes evaporate, chemicals that had been dissolved in the water stay behind, making dry lake beds an ideal place to find heavy concentrations of minerals, including salt. Besides the salt works, something else appears in stark contrast to this arid place. Lush green fields of irrigated crops appear in the east. Besides their color, their orderly arrangement reveals their human-made origin.

  1. Coordinated incoherent scatter radar study of the January 1997 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonsanto, M. J.; González, S. A.; Lu, G.; Reinisch, B. W.; Thayer, J. P.

    1999-11-01

    We describe many important features of the ionospheric F region as observed by the Sondrestrom, Millstone Hill, and Arecibo incoherent scatter radars (ISRs) and the Millstone Hill and Ramey Digisondes during January 6-10, 1997, with emphasis on the January 10, 1997 storm. Coordinated analysis of the data provides evidence for traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs) and for two likely electric field penetration events linking these stations. Large and rapid changes in hmF2 were seen at Arecibo and nearby Ramey which are related to the TADs and penetrating electric fields. Results are compared with simulations by the thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamics general circulation model (TIEGCM), which utilizes high-latitude inputs given by the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) technique. An important result of this study is that the TIEGCM is able to predict TADs similar to those observed. Exceptional features observed during this storm at Millstone Hill are a very large nighttime Te enhancement on January 10 and a larger decrease in NmF2 than predicted by the TIEGCM throughout the storm period. The latter appears to be related to an underestimation of the neutral temperature by the model.

  2. NASA Studies Lightning Storms Using High-Flying, Uninhabited Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A NASA team studying the causes of electrical storms and their effects on our home planet achieved a milestone on August 21, 2002, completing the study's longest-duration research flight and monitoring four thunderstorms in succession. Radio news media can talk with Dr. Richard Blakeslee, the project's principal investigator, and Tony Kim, project manager at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), about their results and how their work will help improve future weather forecasting ability. Based at the Naval Air Station Key West, Florida, researchers with the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) used the Altus II remotely- piloted aircraft to study a thunderstorm in the Atlantic Ocean off Key West, two storms at the western edge of the Everglades, and a large storm over the northwestern corner of the Everglades. This photograph shows Tony Kim And Dr. Richard Blakeslee of MSFC testing aircraft sensors that would be used to measure the electric fields produced by thunderstorm as part of NASA's ACES. With dual goals of gathering weather data safely and testing the adaptability of the uninhabited aircraft, the ACES study is a collaboration among the MSFC, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, Pernsylvania State University in University Park, and General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.

  3. An intracloud lightning parameterization scheme for a storm electrification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helsdon, John H., Jr.; Wu, Gang; Farley, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The parameterization of an intracloud lightning discharge has been implemented in the present storm electrification model. The initiation, propagation direction, and termination of the discharge are computed using the magnitude and direction of the electric field vector as the determining criteria. The charge redistribution due to the lightning is approximated assuming the channel to be an isolated conductor with zero net charge over its entire length. Various simulations involving differing amounts of charge transferred and distribution of charges have been done. Values of charge transfer, dipole moment change, and electrical energy dissipation computed in the model are consistent with observations. The effects of the lightning-produced ions on the hydrometeor charges and electric field components depend strongly on the amount of charge transferred. A comparison between the measured electric field change of an actual intracloud flash and the field change due to the simulated discharge shows favorable agreement. Limitations of the parameterization scheme are discussed.

  4. Real time cardiac radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jarkewicz, G.G.

    1986-04-29

    A data acquisition system is described for use in radionuclide cardiac imaging of a patient having been administered a myocardium specific radionuclide, comprising: (a) means for monitoring the electrical activity of the heart; (b) first temporary storage means for accumulating respective pages of data corresponding to nuclear events during each cardiac cycle; (c) means, responsive to the means for monitoring, for determining the time duration of each successive cardiac cycle; (d) means for comparing each determined duration of a cardiac cycle with a preselected time duration range; (e) second temporary storage means; and (f) means for conditionally transferring pages of data from the first temporary storage means to the second temporary storage means if the measured duration associated with each page has predetermined correspondence with the preselected duration range, whereby pages of data having the predetermined correspondence may be collated into a quasi-real time study, while pages of data having different correspondence with the preselected time duration range are discarded from the study.

  5. Simulation and Twins Observations of the 22 July 2009 Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Buzulukova, N.; Chen, S.-H.; Valek, P. W.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    TWINS is the first mission to perform stereo imaging of the Earth's ring current. The magnetic storm on 22 July 2009 was at the time the largest storm observed since TWINS began routine stereo imaging in June 2008. On 22 July 2009, the Dst dropped to nearly .80 nT at 0700 and 1000 UT. During the main phase, and at the peak of the storm, TWINS 1 and 2 were near apogee and moving between predawn and postdawn local time. The energetic neutral atom (ENA) imagers on the two spacecraft captured the storm intensification and the formation of the partial ring current. The peak of the high-altitude ENA emissions was seen in the midnight-to-dawn local time sector. The development of this storm has been simulated using the comprehensive ring current model (CRCM) to understand and interpret the observed signatures. We perform CRCM runs with constant and time-varying magnetic field. The model calculations are validated by comparing the simulated ENA and ion flux intensities with TWINS ENA images and in situ ion data from a THEMIS satellite. Simulation with a static magnetic field produces a strong shielding electric field that skews the ion drift trajectories toward dawn. The model's corresponding peak ENA emissions are always more eastward than those in the observed TWINS images. On the other hand, the simulation with a dynamic magnetic field gives better spatial agreement with both ENA and in situ particle data, suggesting that temporal variations of the geomagnetic field exert a significant influence upon global ring current ion dynamics.

  6. Simulation and 'TWINS Observations of the 22 July 2009 Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Buzulukova, Natalia Y.; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Valek, Phil; Goldstein, Jerry; McComas, David

    2010-01-01

    TWINS is the first mission to perform stereo imaging of the Earth's ring current. The magnetic storm on 22 July 2009 is the largest storm observed since TWINS began routine stereo imaging in June 2008. On 22 July 2009, the Dst dropped to nearly -80nT at 7:00 and 10:00 UT. During the main phase and at the peak of the storm, TWINS 1 and 2 were near apogee and moving from pre-dawn to post-dawn local time. The energetic neutral atom (ENA) imagers on the 2 spacecraft captured the storm intensification and the formation of the partial ring current. The peak of the ENA emissions was seen in the midnight-to-dawn local-time sector. The development of this storm has been simulated using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) to understand and interpret the observed signatures. We perform CRCM runs with constant and time-varying magnetic field. The model calculations are validated by comparing the simulated ENA and ion flux intensities with TWINS ENA images and in-situ ion data from THEMIS satellites. Simulation with static magnetic field produces a strong shielding electric field that skews the ion drift trajectories toward dawn. The model's corresponding peak ENA emissions are always eastward than those in the observed TWINS images. On the other hand, simulation with a dynamic magnetic field gives better spatial agreements with both ENA and insitu particle data, suggesting that temporal variations of the geomagnetic field exert a significant influence upon global ring current ion dynamics.

  7. Investigation of Ionospheric response to Geomagnetic Storms over a Low Latitude Station, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimoh, Oluwaseyi E.; Yesufu, Thomas K.; Ariyibi, Emmanuel A.

    2016-05-01

    Due to several complexities associated with the equatorial ionosphere, and the significant role which the total electron content (TEC) variability plays in GPS signal transmission, there is the need to monitor irregularities in TEC during storm events. The GPS SCINDA receiver data at Ile-Ife, Nigeria, was analysed with a view to characterizing the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms on 9 March and 1 October 2012. Presently, positive storm effects, peaks in TEC which were associated with prompt penetration of electric fields and changes in neutral gas composition were observed for the storms. The maximum percentage deviation in TEC of about 120 and 45% were observed for 9 March and 1 October 2012, respectively. An obvious negative percentage TEC deviation subsequent to sudden storm commencement (SSC) was observed and besides a geomagnetic storm does not necessarily suggest a high scintillation intensity (S4) index. The present results show that magnetic storm events at low latitude regions may have an adverse effect on navigation and communication systems.

  8. Effects of geomagnetic storm on low latitude ionospheric total electron content: A case study from Indian sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Monti; Kumar, Sanjay; De, Barin Kumar; Guha, Anirban

    2015-07-01

    The effect of geomagnetic storms on low latitude ionosphere has been investigated with the help of Global Positioning System Total Electron Content (GPS-TEC) data. The investigation has been done with the aid of TEC data from the Indian equatorial region, Port Blair (PBR) and equatorial ionization anomaly region, Agartala (AGR). During the geomagnetic storms on 24th April and 15th July 2012, significant enhancement up to 150% and depression up to 72% in VTEC is observed in comparison to the normal day variation. The variations in VTEC observed from equatorial to EIA latitudes during the storm period have been explained with the help of electro-dynamic effects (prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) and disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF)) as well as mechanical effects (storm-induced equatorward neutral wind effect and thermospheric composition changes). The current study points to the fact that the electro-dynamic effect of geomagnetic storms around EIA region is more effective than at the lower latitude region. Drastic difference has been observed over equatorial region (positive storm impact) and EIA region (negative storm impact) around same longitude sector, during storm period on 24th April. This drastic change as observed in GPS-TEC on 24th April has been further confirmed by using the O/N2 ratio data from GUVI (Global Ultraviolet Imager) as well as VTEC map constructed from IGS data. The results presented in the paper are important for the application of satellite-based communication and navigational system.

  9. Arrhythmic storm: Short-coupled variant torsade de pointes.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Frutuoso, Cecília; Vasconcelos, Mariana; Dias, Paula; Garcia, Raquel; Pinho, Teresa; Araújo, Vítor; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2016-05-01

    A 49-year-old woman, with no relevant family history, was admitted in 1996 for arrhythmic storm with polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsade de pointes) which degenerated into ventricular fibrillation. Iatrogenic causes were excluded, the electrocardiogram (ECG) was normal and there was no structural heart disease. She refused cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Treatment was begun with amiodarone, which she took irregularly. She remained asymptomatic until 2014 when she was admitted for a new arrhythmic storm with torsade de pointes, refractory to antiarrhythmic therapy and aggravated by ventricular pacing (65 defibrillations). She had frequent ventricular extrasystoles (with short-coupled period <300 ms) preceding the tachycardia. After administration of isoprenaline infusion electric stability was maintained. In this setting and in the absence of structural heart disease or iatrogenic cause, a diagnosis of short-coupled variant torsade de pointes was established. A cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted and she was treated with verapamil, without recurrence of arrhythmias.

  10. The relationship of storm severity to directionally resolved radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. O.; Bushman, M. L.; Sherrill, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Directionally resolved atmospheric radio frequency emission data were acquired from thunderstorms occurring in the central and southwestern United States. In addition, RF sferic tracking data were obtained from hurricanes and tropical depressions occurring in the Gulf of Mexico. The data were acquired using a crossed baseline phase interferometer operating at a frequency of 2.001 MHz. The received atmospherics were tested for phase linearity across the array, and azimuth/elevation angles of arrival were computed in real time. A histogram analysis of sferic burst count versus azimuth provided lines of bearing to centers of intense electrical activity. Analysis indicates a consistent capability of the phase linear direction finder to detect severe meteorological activity to distances of 2000 km from the receiving site. The technique evidences the ability to discriminate severe storms from nonsevere storms coexistent in large regional scale thunderstorm activity.

  11. On the contribution of plasma sheet bubbles to the storm time ring current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Toffoletto, Frank R.; Wolf, Richard A.; Sazykin, Stanislav

    2015-09-01

    Particle injections occur frequently inside 10 Re during geomagnetic storms. They are commonly associated with bursty bulk flows or plasma sheet bubbles transported from the tail to the inner magnetosphere. Although observations and theoretical arguments have suggested that they may have an important role in storm time dynamics, this assertion has not been addressed quantitatively. In this paper, we investigate which process is dominant for the storm time ring current buildup: large-scale enhanced convection or localized bubble injections. We use the Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) to model a series of idealized storm main phases. The boundary conditions at 14-15 Re on the nightside are adjusted to randomly inject bubbles to a degree roughly consistent with observed statistical properties. A test particle tracing technique is then used to identify the source of the ring current plasma. We find that the contribution of plasma sheet bubbles to the ring current energy increases from ~20% for weak storms to ~50% for moderate storms and levels off at ~61% for intense storms, while the contribution of trapped particles decreases from ~60% for weak storms to ~30% for moderate and ~21% for intense storms. The contribution of nonbubble plasma sheet flux tubes remains ~20% on average regardless of the storm intensity. Consistent with previous RCM and RCM-E simulations, our results show that the mechanisms for plasma sheet bubbles enhancing the ring current energy are (1) the deep penetration of bubbles and (2) the bulk plasma pushed ahead of bubbles. Both the bubbles and the plasma pushed ahead typically contain larger distribution functions than those in the inner magnetosphere at quiet times. An integrated effect of those individual bubble injections is the gradual enhancement of the storm time ring current. We also make two predictions testable against observations. First, fluctuations over a time scale of 5-20 min in the plasma distributions and electric field

  12. 21 CFR 870.5550 - External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive). 870.5550 Section 870.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... transcutaneous cardiac pacemaker (noninvasive) is a device used to supply a periodic electrical pulse intended...

  13. Sudden cardiac death risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Deyell, Marc W; Krahn, Andrew D; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be caused by ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation or pulseless electric activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our healthcare and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD because of pulseless electric activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized.

  14. Sudden Cardiac Death Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Deyell, Marc W.; Krahn, Andrew D.; Goldberger, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmic sudden cardiac death (SCD) may be due to ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation (SCD-VT/VF) or pulseless electrical activity/asystole. Effective risk stratification to identify patients at risk of arrhythmic SCD is essential for targeting our health care and research resources to tackle this important public health issue. Although our understanding of SCD due to pulseless electrical activity/asystole is growing, the overwhelming majority of research in risk stratification has focused on SCD-VT/VF. This review focuses on existing and novel risk stratification tools for SCD-VT/VF. For patients with left ventricular dysfunction and/or myocardial infarction, advances in imaging, measures of cardiac autonomic function, and measures of repolarization have shown considerable promise in refining risk. Yet the majority of SCD-VT/VF occurs in patients without known cardiac disease. Biomarkers and novel imaging techniques may provide further risk stratification in the general population beyond traditional risk stratification for coronary artery disease alone. Despite these advances, significant challenges in risk stratification remain that must be overcome before a meaningful impact on SCD can be realized. PMID:26044247

  15. Extreme Lightning Flash Rates as an Early Indicator of Severe Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Extreme lightning flash rates are proving to be an early indicator of intensifying storms capable of producing tornadoes, damaging winds and hail. Most of this lightning is in the cloud, where the naked eye can not see it. Recent global observations of thunderstorms from space indicate that giant electrical storms (supercells and convective complexes) with flash rates on the order of 1 flash per second are most common over the land masses of the America sub-tropics and equatorial Congo Basin. Within the United States, the average tornado warning lead time on a national basis is about 11 min. The real-time observation of extreme flash rates and the rapid increase in the in-cloud flash rate, signalling the intensification of the storm updraft, may provide as much as a 50% increase in severe storm warning lead time.

  16. The responses of the thermosphere due to a geomagnetic storm: A MHD model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chang, S.

    1972-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamics theory was used to study the dynamic response of the neutral atmosphere to a geomagnetic storm. A full set of magnetohydrodynamic equations appropriate for the present problem is derived and their various orders of approximation are discussed in some detail. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of this theoretical model, the May 1967 geomagnetic storm data were used in the resulting set of nonlinear, time dependent, partial differential magnetohydrodynamic equations to calculate variations of the thermosphere due to the storm. The numerical results are presented for wind speeds, electric field strength, and amount of joule heating at a constant altitude for the data recorded. Data show that the strongest thermospheric responses are at the polar region becoming weaker in the equatorial region. This may lead to the speculation that a thermospheric wave is generated in the polar region due to the geomagnetic storm which propagates towards the equator.

  17. Understanding Storm Time Poynting Flux Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, H. M.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that energy deposited by dayside Earth-directed Poynting flux (S||) is greater during geomagnetic storms; however, S|| spatial and temporal variability are less well understood. Eight years (2000-2008) of data from the WDC for Geomagnetism, Kyoto, were collected to identify thirteen large and five super storms according to specific criteria: "classic" storm structure in which the time interval between sudden storm commencement (SSC) and minimum Dst (Dstmin) was ≤ 24 hours; the main and recovery phases did not experience secondary or tertiary disturbances; large storms where Dst ≤ -93 nT; and, super storms where Dst ≤ -184 nT. Solar wind and magnetospheric data for the 18 storms were collected from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F-15) and NASA OMNI. For all storms, the data were averaged and plotted to identify S|| variability for the mantle, cusp, polar rain, and central and boundary layer plasma sheet regions during geomagnetic storm time. As known for all storms, while Dst decreased, average S|| peaked, as did Kp. The energy deposited per square-meter by precipitating energetic particles (electrons) did not increase, though average hemispheric power increased by nearly a factor of two for the large and super storms between SSC and Dstmin. For the large storms, average S|| from the central and boundary layer plasma sheet regions (on closed field lines) was enhanced by nearly a factor of two between SSC and Dstmin; for the super storms, enhancement was over a factor of three. Average large storm S|| enhancement from the mantle, cusp, and polar rain regions (on open field lines) was significantly more enhanced by a factor of three between SSC and Dstmin. It was enhanced by a factor of over five for the super storms. For the open field line regions, a large, prolonged secondary peak in S|| was observed for large and super storms during the recovery phase. As suggested by this and prior studies, research is needed to better

  18. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  19. Plasma exchange in the treatment of thyroid storm secondary to type II amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Zainudin, Sueziani Binte; Kaushik, Manish; Khor, Li Yan; Chng, Chiaw Ling

    2016-01-01

    Summary Type II amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) is an uncommon cause of thyroid storm. Due to the rarity of the condition, little is known about the role of plasma exchange in the treatment of severe AIT. A 56-year-old male presented with thyroid storm 2months following cessation of amiodarone. Despite conventional treatment, his condition deteriorated. He underwent two cycles of plasma exchange, which successfully controlled the severe hyperthyroidism. The thyroid hormone levels continued to fall up to 10h following plasma exchange. He subsequently underwent emergency total thyroidectomy and the histology of thyroid gland confirmed type II AIT. Management of thyroid storm secondary to type II AIT can be challenging as patients may not respond to conventional treatments, and thyroid storm may be more harmful in AIT patients owing to the underlying cardiac disease. If used appropriately, plasma exchange can effectively reduce circulating hormones, to allow stabilisation of patients in preparation for emergency thyroidectomy. Learning points Type II AIT is an uncommon cause of thyroid storm and may not respond well to conventional thyroid storm treatment. Prompt diagnosis and therapy are important, as patients may deteriorate rapidly. Plasma exchange can be used as an effective bridging therapy to emergency thyroidectomy. This case shows that in type II AIT, each cycle of plasma exchange can potentially lower free triiodothyronine levels for 10h. Important factors to consider when planning plasma exchange as a treatment for thyroid storm include timing of each session, type of exchange fluid to be used and timing of surgery. PMID:27398220

  20. Origin of Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Role of Periostin

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Paige; Standley, Kara N.; Wang, Jian; Azhar, Mohamad; Doetschman, Thomas; Conway, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts are the most populous non-myocyte cell type within the mature heart and are required for extracellular matrix synthesis and deposition, generation of the cardiac skeleton, and to electrically insulate the atria from the ventricles. Significantly, cardiac fibroblasts have also been shown to play an important role in cardiomyocyte growth and expansion of the ventricular chambers during heart development. Although there are currently no cardiac fibroblast-restricted molecular markers, it is generally envisaged that the majority of the cardiac fibroblasts are derived from the proepicardium via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation. However, still relatively little is known about when and where the cardiac fibroblasts cells are generated, the lineage of each cell, and how cardiac fibroblasts move to reside in their final position throughout all four cardiac chambers. In this review we summarize the current understanding regarding the function of Periostin, a useful marker of the non-cardiomyocyte lineages, and its role during cardiac morphogenesis. Characterization of the cardiac fibroblast lineage and identification of the signals that maintain, expand and regulate their differentiation will be required to improve our understanding of cardiac function in both normal and pathophysiological states. PMID:19893021

  1. Peculiar features of the low-latitude and midlatitude ionospheric response to the St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Chinmaya; Tsai, L.-C.; Su, S.-Y.; Galkin, I. A.; Tan, Adrian Teck Keng; Nofri, Ed; Jamjareegulgarn, Punyawi

    2016-08-01

    The current study aims at investigating and identifying the ionospheric effects of the geomagnetic storm that occurred during 17-19 March 2015. Incidentally, with SYM-H hitting a minimum of -232 nT, this was the strongest storm of the current solar cycle 24. The study investigates how the storm has affected the equatorial, low-latitude, and midlatitude ionosphere in the American and the European sectors using available ground-based ionosonde and GPS TEC (total electron content) data. The possible effects of prompt electric field penetration is observed in both sectors during the main phase of the storm. In the American sector, the coexistence of both positive and negative ionospheric storm phases are observed at low latitudes and midlatitudes to high latitudes, respectively. The positive storm phase is mainly due to the prompt penetration electric fields. The negative storm phase in the midlatitude region is a combined effect of disturbance dynamo electric fields, the equatorward shift of the midlatitude density trough, and the equatorward compression of the plasmapause in combination with chemical compositional changes. Strong negative ionospheric storm phase is observed in both ionosonde and TEC observations during the recovery phase which also shows a strong hemispherical asymmetry. Additionally, the variation of equatorial ionization anomaly as seen through the SWARM constellation plasma measurements across different longitudes has been discussed. We, also, take a look at the performance of the IRI Real-Time Assimilative Mapping during this storm as an ionospheric space weather tool.

  2. The storm-time equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, K.; Sastry, T. S. G.; Sampath, S.; Stolarik, J. D.; Usher, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    A Petrel rocket carrying a double cell rubidium magnetometer was launched from the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station during the early main phase of a magnetic storm. No ionospheric currents associated with the storm were observed and the large field depression, at the flight time, must therefore be attributed to currents at higher altitudes. The equatorial enhancement of ionospheric magnetic storm currents, predicted on the basis of theory and earlier ground data, was not observed.

  3. The storm-time equatorial electrojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, K.; Sastry, T. S. G.; Sampath, S.; Stolarik, J. D.; Usher, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A Petrel rocket carrying a double cell rubidium magnetometer was launched from the Thumba Equatorial Rocket Launching Station during the early main phase of a magnetic storm. No ionospheric currents associated with the storm were observed, and the large field depression at the flight time must therefore be attributed to currents at higher altitudes. The equatorial enhancement of ionospheric magnetic storm currents, predicted on the basis of theory and earlier ground data, was not observed.

  4. Topographic Correction Module at Storm (TC@Storm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaksek, K.; Cotar, K.; Veljanovski, T.; Pehani, P.; Ostir, K.

    2015-04-01

    Different solar position in combination with terrain slope and aspect result in different illumination of inclined surfaces. Therefore, the retrieved satellite data cannot be accurately transformed to the spectral reflectance, which depends only on the land cover. The topographic correction should remove this effect and enable further automatic processing of higher level products. The topographic correction TC@STORM was developed as a module within the SPACE-SI automatic near-real-time image processing chain STORM. It combines physical approach with the standard Minnaert method. The total irradiance is modelled as a three-component irradiance: direct (dependent on incidence angle, sun zenith angle and slope), diffuse from the sky (dependent mainly on sky-view factor), and diffuse reflected from the terrain (dependent on sky-view factor and albedo). For computation of diffuse irradiation from the sky we assume an anisotropic brightness of the sky. We iteratively estimate a linear combination from 10 different models, to provide the best results. Dependent on the data resolution, we mask shades based on radiometric (image) or geometric properties. The method was tested on RapidEye, Landsat 8, and PROBA-V data. Final results of the correction were evaluated and statistically validated based on various topography settings and land cover classes. Images show great improvements in shaded areas.

  5. Convective storms in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2013-05-01

    The atmospheres of the planets in the Solar System have different physical properties that in some cases can be considered as extreme when compared with our own planet's more familiar atmosphere. From the tenuous and cold atmosphere of Mars to the dense and warm atmosphere of Venus in the case of the terrestrial planets, to the gigantic atmospheres of the outer planets, or the nitrogen and methane atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan, we can find a large variety of physical environments. The comparative study of these atmospheres provides a better understanding of the physics of a geophysical fluid. In many of these worlds convective storms of different intensity appear. They are analogous to terrestrial atmospheres fed by the release of latent heat when one of the gases in the atmosphere condenses and they are therefore called moist convective storms. In many of these planets they can produce severe meteorological phenomena and by studying them in a comparative way we can aspire to get a further insight in the dynamics of these atmospheres even beyond the scope of moist convection. A classical example is the structure of the complex systems of winds in the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. These winds are zonal and alternate in latitude but their deep structure is not accessible to direct observation. However the behaviour of large--scale convective storms vertically extending over the "weather layer" allows to study the buried roots of these winds. Another interesting atmosphere with a rather different structure of convection is Titan, a world where methane is close to its triple point in the atmosphere and can condense in bright clouds with large precipitation fluxes that may model part of the orography of the surface making Titan a world with a methane cycle similar to the hydrological cycle of Earth's atmosphere.

  6. Aconitine "challenge" test reveals a single whole-body exposure to diesel exhaust increases cardiac arrhythmia risk in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate a significant association between cardiac electrical dysfunction, arrhythmias and air pollution exposure. Sensitivity to aconitine-induced arrhythmia has been used repeatedly to examine the factors that increase the risk of such cardiac electri...

  7. Plasmaspheric hiss intensity variations during magnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Frandsen, A. M. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Thorne, R. M.; Chan, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    The storm time intensity variations of ELF electromagnetic emissions have been studied by using the Ogo 6 search coil magnetometer. Low-latitude signals exhibit a sharp low-frequency cutoff and are identified as plasmaspheric hiss. Such waves show pronounced intensification during the recovery phase of magnetic storms but remain close to background levels during the storm main phase. This behavior is consistent with cyclotron resonant generation within the plasmasphere as the latter expands into the intensified belt of outer zone electrons during the storm recovery.

  8. Observing storm surges from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi

    2016-07-01

    Storm surges can cause catastrophic damage to properties and loss of life in coastal communities. Thus it is important to enhance our capabilities of observing and forecasting storm surges for mitigating damage and loss. In this presentation we show examples of observing storm surges around the world using nadir satellite altimetry, during Hurricane Sandy, Igor, and Isaac, as well as other cyclone events. The satellite observations are evaluated against tide-gauge observations and discussed for dynamic mechanisms. We also show the potential of a new wide-swath altimetry mission, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), for observing storm surges.

  9. Storm impact scale for barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    A new scale is proposed that categorizes impacts to natural barrier islands resulting from tropical and extra-tropical storms. The proposed scale is fundamentally different than existing storm-related scales in that the coupling between forcing processes and the geometry of the coast is explicitly included. Four regimes, representing different levels of impact, are defined. Within each regime, patterns and relative magnitudes of net erosion and accretion are argued to be unique. The borders between regimes represent thresholds defining where processes and magnitudes of impacts change dramatically. Impact level 1 is the 'swash' regime describing a storm where runup is confined to the foreshore. The foreshore typically erodes during the storm and recovers following the storm; hence, there is no net change. Impact level 2 is the 'collision' regime describing a storm where the wave runup exceeds the threshold of the base of the foredune ridge. Swash impacts the dune forcing net erosion. Impact level 3 is the 'overwash' regime describing a storm where wave runup overtops the berm or, if present, the foredune ridge. The associated net landward sand transport contributes to net migration of the barrier landward. Impact level 4 is the 'inundation' regime describing a storm where the storm surge is sufficient to completely and continuously submerge the barrier island. Sand undergoes net landward transport over the barrier island; limited evidence suggests the quantities and distance of transport are much greater than what occurs during the 'overwash' regime.

  10. A Personal Storm Warning Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Although lightning detection systems operated by government agencies, utilities and other businesses provide storm warnings, this information often does not reach the public until some time after the observations have been made. A low-cost personal lightning detector offers a significant safety advantage to private flyers, boaters, golfers and others. Developed by Airborne Research Associates, the detectors originated in Space Shuttle tests of an optical lightning detection technique. The commercial device is pointed toward a cloud to detect invisible intracloud lightning by sensing subtle changes in light presence. The majority of the sales have been to golf courses. Additional products and more advanced applications are in progress.

  11. Tropical Storm Iniki, Central Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Tropical Storm Iniki in the North Pacific (40.5N, 152.5W) was dissipating from hurricane status when this photo was taken. Two days prior, as a full fledged hurricane, with winds of about 150 mph and waves of over 15 ft., it swept over the Hawaiian island of Kauai. But, as Iniki moved over the colder waters of the North Pacific, it began to weaken as can be seen by the lack of a tight spiral gyre and the absence of an eye in the center.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Macroscopic Cardiac Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Gavin; Balazs, Anna

    2003-03-01

    In order to gain insight into the complex interactions between electrical excitation of the myocardial tissue, the mechanical contraction of the heart muscles and cardiac fluid dynamics, three computational techniques are successfully coupled. A Gerhardt-Schuster-Tyson Cellular Automata algorithm enables the excitation kinetics of myocardial tissue to be simulated in a computationally efficient manner. The cardiac excitation spreading is then coupled with a dynamic Born Lattice Spring Model which enables the contraction of the heart muscles and their subsequent relaxation to be modelled. The velocities at the inner surfaces of the heart can then be transferred to a Lattice Boltzmann simulation of blood flow within the cardiac chambers. The interactions (and complex feedback mechanisms) between electrical excitation, mechanical deformation, and fluid flow in the heart are explored through these three-dimensional models and the regular functionality of the whole heart is visualised.

  13. Using noise to determine cardiac restitution with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shu; Keener, James P.

    2012-06-01

    Variation in cardiac pacing cycles, as seen, for example, in heart rate variability, has been observed for decades. Contemporarily, various mathematical models have been constructed to investigate the electrical activity of paced cardiac cells. Yet there has not been a study of these cardiac models when there is variation in the pacing cycles such as noise. We present a method that uses the stochasticity of pacing cycles to determine approximate models of the dynamics of cardiac cells, and use these models to detect bifurcations to alternans.

  14. The Path From Heart Failure to Cardiac Transplant.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Regi; Koerner, Erika; Clark, Courtney; Halabicky, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a progressive and fatal disease impacting millions of American each year. Divided into stages, heart failure presents with progressive symptoms requiring a wide range of medical treatments. Treatments include diet and lifestyle changes, medications, electrical therapies (defibrillator and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy), as well as mechanical circulatory support. Cardiac transplant is the gold standard treatment of heart failure, although the availability of donors limits the utility of a cardiac transplant. This article outlines heart failure treatments and the indications, contraindications, and pretransplant evaluation for a cardiac transplant. Information on the allocation of donor hearts and donor characteristics is also included for the reader. PMID:27254637

  15. In the Eye of the Storm: A Participatory Course on Coastal Storms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Storm disasters are amplified in the coastal environment due to population pressures and the power of the sea. The upper-division/graduate university course "Coastal Storms" was designed to equip future practitioners with the skills necessary to understand, respond to, and mitigate for these natural disasters. To accomplish this, "Coastal Storms"…

  16. Storm-induced changes of the topside ionosphere as deduced from incoherent-scatter radars. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lunn, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    Incoherent scatter radar observations from Millstone Hill, Saint Santin, and Arecibo are used to illustrate changes of the topside ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm. These observations consist of electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. These parameters can further describe changes in ion composition, electric fields, and neutral winds. Attention is given to a specific storm during the Equinox Transition Study (ETS) of September 1984. In order to isolate the storm effects in the topside ionosphere, a comparison will be made between a disturbed and quiet day. A novel result from this study is the finding of correlated oscillations between parallel and perpendicular ion velocity components which are apparently storm induced. Previously, these oscillations have been observed primarily at night, but now it's noticed that during storm conditions there are prominent oscillations during the day.

  17. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  18. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  19. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, free-standing electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on-demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function. PMID:26974408

  20. Spring Dust Storm Smothers Beijing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A few days earlier than usual, a large, dense plume of dust blew southward and eastward from the desert plains of Mongolia-quite smothering to the residents of Beijing. Citizens of northeastern China call this annual event the 'shachenbao,' or 'dust cloud tempest.' However, the tempest normally occurs during the spring time. The dust storm hit Beijing on Friday night, March 15, and began coating everything with a fine, pale brown layer of grit. The region is quite dry; a problem some believe has been exacerbated by decades of deforestation. According to Chinese government estimates, roughly 1 million tons of desert dust and sand blow into Beijing each year. This true-color image was made using two adjacent swaths (click to see the full image) of data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), flying aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, on March 17, 2002. The massive dust storm (brownish pixels) can easily be distinguished from clouds (bright white pixels) as it blows across northern Japan and eastward toward the open Pacific Ocean. The black regions are gaps between SeaWiFS' viewing swaths and represent areas where no data were collected. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  1. Severe Local Storms Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladich, I.; Gallai, I.; Giaiotti, D. B.; Morgan, G. M.; Stel, F.

    2009-09-01

    Local storms always had a deep impact on people communities, mainly because of the severe damage caused, because of their unpredictability and, up to a few years ago, even because of the lack of knowledge and awareness on their physical origin. Because of this large impact on real life and on imagination, people needed and wanted to describe and report the occurrence of these events, giving them suited names. Often, these nouns are related to the myth developed to explain the cause of the events. In this work, a short presentation and description of the popular nouns used to describe severe local storm events in different areas of the World is given. Countries taken into account span from Italy, moving toward Africa and reaching a few communities of Native Americans. The etymology of the names gives interesting information, useful even under the anthropological point of view, on the Culture and Believes of the peoples who adopted them. This research work is the result of an underground activity carried out in the last ten years by the authors, during their contacts with students and researchers coming from different Countries and mainly met at the International Center for Theoretical Physics in Trieste.

  2. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  3. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  4. Analysis of the positive ionospheric response to a moderate geomagnetic storm using a global numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgaladze, A. A.; Förster, M.; Yurik, R. Y.

    2000-04-01

    Current theories of F-layer storms are discussed using numerical simulations with the Upper Atmosphere Model, a global self-consistent, time dependent numerical model of the thermosphere-ionosphere-plasmasphere-magnetosphere system including electrodynamical coupling effects. A case study of a moderate geomagnetic storm at low solar activity during the northern winter solstice exemplifies the complex storm phenomena. The study focuses on positive ionospheric storm effects in relation to thermospheric disturbances in general and thermospheric composition changes in particular. It investigates the dynamical effects of both neutral meridional winds and electric fields caused by the disturbance dynamo effect. The penetration of short-time electric fields of magnetospheric origin during storm intensification phases is shown for the first time in this model study. Comparisons of the calculated thermospheric composition changes with satellite observations of AE-C and ESRO-4 during storm time show a good agreement. The empirical MSISE90 model, however, is less consistent with the simulations. It does not show the equatorward propagation of the disturbances and predicts that they have a gentler latitudinal gradient. Both theoretical and experimental data reveal that although the ratio of [O]/[N2] at high latitudes decreases significantly during the magnetic storm compared with the quiet time level, at mid to low latitudes it does not increase (at fixed altitudes) above the quiet reference level. Meanwhile, the ionospheric storm is positive there. We conclude that the positive phase of the ionospheric storm is mainly due to uplifting of ionospheric F2-region plasma at mid latitudes and its equatorward movement at low latitudes along geomagnetic field lines caused by large-scale neutral wind circulation and the passage of travelling atmospheric disturbances (TADs). The calculated zonal electric field disturbances also help to create the positive ionospheric disturbances both

  5. On the phenomenological theory of magnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Anatol

    2016-06-01

    This article describes the methodical issues of modeling of the Dst variation of geomagnetic storms. We describe the so-called the RBM model, having the form of an ordinary differential equation whose solutions simulate the relation of Dst variations with azimuthal component of the interplanetary electric field. It has been paid a special attention to the threshold nature of the excitation Dst variation. We have emphasize the needs of statistical generalization of RBM model by taking into account the fluctuations inherent in any physical system. The integral representation of the bifurcation diagram of Dst variation is found. It allowed to take into account the effect of the fluctuations, which eliminate the root singularity of the diagram and lead to a shift in the threshold point. It is shown that the Dst variation belongs to a wide class of threshold phenomena related to phase transitions of the second kind. We have shown an analogy with threshold phenomena in the magnetosphere, atmosphere and lithosphere of the Earth's. In addition, we briefly discussed the issue of soft and hard regimes of passing through the threshold, and raised the issue of explosive instability in the geophysical media.

  6. Unpinning and Removal of a Rotating Wave in Cardiac Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, S.; Pumir, A.; Pazó, D.; Efimov, I.; Nikolski, V.; Krinsky, V.

    2004-07-01

    Rotating waves in cardiac muscle may be pinned to a heterogeneity, as it happens in superconductors or in superfluids. We show that the physics of electric field distribution between cardiac cells permits one to deliver an electric pulse exactly to the core of a pinned wave, without knowing its position, and even to locations where a direct access is not possible. Thus, unpinning or removal of rotating waves can be achieved. The energy needed is 2 orders of magnitude less than defibrillation energy. This opens a way to new manipulations with pinned vortices both in experiments and in cardiac clinics.

  7. Thunderstorm Electric Potential Profiles: Electrical Evolution and Lightning Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, M.; Marshall, T. C.

    2005-05-01

    From a balloon sounding of electric field through a thunderstorm, one can calculate the vertical profile of potential, V, within the storm. In this presentation we investigate thunderstorm electrical evolution by examining V profiles through various stages of a storm's life. We present data from New Mexico mountain thunderstorms in which we made a series of 4 to 6 balloon soundings. Several of the successive V profiles in the same storm are quite similar, in spite of the numerous lightning flashes that occurred during the balloon flights. These similarities suggest that the V profiles are reasonable estimates of the in-cloud potential. The similar profiles occur during the mature phase of the storm, and mature phase profiles are even similar from one storm to another. This is true despite different lightning flashing rates and, presumably, different charge generation rates in the different storms. Another result of this work is that potential profiles during the early and late stages of the storm do not resemble those from the mature stage. Recently, Coleman et al. [2003] showed that intra-cloud (IC) flashes connect potential extrema of opposite polarity and that normal (negative) cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes connect a potential minimum to ground. Thus we can use the V profiles to estimate the potential difference spanned by lightning flashes during the evolution of the storm and, with this, estimate the lightning energy. Typical potential differences spanned by IC and CG flashes will be presented from four storms. Reference: Coleman, L.M., T.C. Marshall, M. Stolzenburg, T. Hamlin, P.R. Krehbiel, W. Rison, and R.J. Thomas, Effects of charge and electrostatic potential on lightning propagation, J. Geophys. Res., 108, doi:10.1029/2002JD002718, 2003.

  8. NASA Studies Lightning Storms Using High-Flying, Uninhabited Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A NASA team studying the causes of electrical storms and their effects on our home planet achieved a milestone on August 21, 2002, completing the study's longest-duration research flight and monitoring four thunderstorms in succession. Based at the Naval Air Station Key West, Florida, researchers with the Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) used the Altus II remotely-piloted aircraft to study thunderstorms in the Atlantic Ocean off Key West and the west of the Everglades. Using special equipment aboard the Altus II, scientists in ACES will gather electric, magnetic, and optical measurements of the thunderstorms, gauging elements such as lightning activity and the electrical environment in and around the storms. With dual goals of gathering weather data safely and testing the adaptability of the uninhabited aircraft, the ACES study is a collaboration among the Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, Pernsylvania State University in University Park, and General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.

  9. Ionospheric response to great geomagnetic storms during solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merline Matamba, Tshimangadzo; Bosco Habarulema, John

    2016-07-01

    The analyses of ionospheric responses due to great geomagnetic storms i.e. Dst index < 350 nT that occurred during solar cycle 23 are presented. The GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) and ionosonde data over Southern and Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes were used to study the ionospheric responses. A geomagnetic latitude region of ±30° to ±46° within a longitude sector of 15° to 40° was considered. Using a criteria of Dst < -350 nT, there were only four great storm periods (29 March - 02 April 2001, 27 - 31 October 2003, 18 - 23 November 2003 and 06 - 11 November 2004) in solar cycle 23. Analysis has shown that ionospheric dynamics during these disturbed conditions could be due to a number of dynamic and electrodynamics processes in both Hemispheres. In some instances the ionosphere responds differently to the same storm condition in both Hemispheres. Physical mechanisms related to (but not limited to) composition changes and electric fields will be discussed.

  10. Radial transport of storm time ring current ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    1993-01-01

    Radial transport of energetic ions for the development of the main phase of geomagnetic storms is investigated with data from the medium energy particle analyzer (MEPA) on the Charge Composition Explorer spacecraft, which monitored protons, helium ions, and the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen group, which is mostly dominated by oxygen ions. From a study of four geomagnetic storms, we show that the flux increase of these ions in the inner ring current region can be accounted for by an inward displacement of the ring current population by 0.5 to 3.5 R(E). There is a general trend that a larger inward displacement occurs at higher L shells than at lower ones. These results are in agreement with previous findings. The radially injected population consists of the prestorm population modified by substorm injections which occur on a much shorter time scale than that for a storm main phase. It is also found that the inward displacement is relatively independent of ion mass and energy, suggesting that the radial transport of these energetic ions is effected primarily by convective motion from a large electric field or by diffusion resulting from magnetic field fluctuations.

  11. NASA's 3-D Animation of Tropical Storm Ulika from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animated 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ulika using GPM's Radar data showed some strong convective storms inside the tropical storm were dropping precipitation at a rate of over 187 mm (7.4 inches)...

  12. Normothermic thyroid storm: an unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Anas Ahmad; Sada, Kabiru; Yusuf, Bashir O.; Aliyu, Idris

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare life-threatening emergency due to thyrotoxicosis. A 30-year-old female presented with restlessness, tachycardia and vomiting but with normothermia which is an unusual presentation. There is the need for clinicians to be aware of atypical clinical features that can make the diagnosis of thyroid storm difficult. PMID:27540465

  13. Global differences between moderate and large storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valek, P. W.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. C. H.; Goldstein, J.; Keesee, A. M.; McComas, D. J.; Perez, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The current solar maximum has been relatively quiet compared to previous solar cycles. Whereas numerous moderate storms (Dst < -50 nT) have occurred, there have been only a small number of large (Dst < - 100 nT) and extreme (Dst < -200 nT) storms. Throughout this sequence of storms, the Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission has since 2008 observed the inner magnetosphere. TWINS consists of two ENA cameras flown aboard two separate spacecraft in Molniya orbits. TWINS images the ENA emissions from the inner magnetosphere across a broad range of energies (1 to 100 keV for H, 16 to 256 keV for O). This allows TWINS to observe the evolution in space and time of the trapped and precipitating particles most relevant for storm time dynamics on very high time scales (i.e., minutes). Here we will present the differences seen between moderate storms and the two large storms of 17 March 2015 (Dst < -223, St. Patrick's day storm) and 22 June 2015 (Dst < -195 nT). We will present composition-separated ENA observations of the inner magnetosphere covering the both the medium (1 to 30 keV) and high (30 to > 100 keV) energy ranges, and describe how the inner magnetosphere evolves during storm time.

  14. Severe storms and local weather research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Developments in the use of space related techniques to understand storms and local weather are summarized. The observation of lightning, storm development, cloud development, mesoscale phenomena, and ageostrophic circulation are discussed. Data acquisition, analysis, and the development of improved sensor and computer systems capability are described. Signal processing and analysis and application of Doppler lidar data are discussed. Progress in numerous experiments is summarized.

  15. Normothermic thyroid storm: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Anas Ahmad; Sada, Kabiru; Yusuf, Bashir O; Aliyu, Idris

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare life-threatening emergency due to thyrotoxicosis. A 30-year-old female presented with restlessness, tachycardia and vomiting but with normothermia which is an unusual presentation. There is the need for clinicians to be aware of atypical clinical features that can make the diagnosis of thyroid storm difficult.

  16. Normothermic thyroid storm: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Anas Ahmad; Sada, Kabiru; Yusuf, Bashir O; Aliyu, Idris

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare life-threatening emergency due to thyrotoxicosis. A 30-year-old female presented with restlessness, tachycardia and vomiting but with normothermia which is an unusual presentation. There is the need for clinicians to be aware of atypical clinical features that can make the diagnosis of thyroid storm difficult. PMID:27540465

  17. Pre-Storm effect at the equatorial, low and Mid-latitude Ionosphere and their possible causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshua, B. W.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence and the possible causes of pre storm effect at the equatorial, low latitude and mid latitude have been investigated using some geomagnetic storm parameters and Electron density of the Ionospheric F2 layer. The data used is for 2010 t0 2012. The pre storm effects appeared as either NmF2 depletions or enhancements or even both, when the Dst and Kp indicates a geomagnetically quiet condition (i.e. Dst > -10 nT, Kp < 3). Our results reveal a simultaneous response of the Ionospheric F2 layer and the auroral indices, e.g. AL, AU and AE indices. This suggest their connection to sub storms and a possibility of penetration of the aurora electric field to the mid and low latitudes, leading to the modification of the zonal electric field which in turn affects the drift of electrons from these regions. This and other observations from this study have further shown that Dst and Kp which are indices that have been most widely used in academic research to describe the behavior of geomagnetic storms, are not sufficient for storm time analysis in the equatorial and low latitude. Therefore, it is suggested that AU, AL and AE indices should always be used alongside Dst and Kp or Ap indices for proper and effective storm analysis.

  18. Interactions Between Convective Storms and Their Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, R. A.; Hoxit, L. R.; Chappell, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    The ways in which intense convective storms interact with their environment are considered for a number of specific severe storm situations. A physical model of subcloud wind fields and vertical wind profiles was developed to explain the often observed intensification of convective storms that move along or across thermal boundaries. A number of special, unusually dense, data sets were used to substantiate features of the model. GOES imagery was used in conjunction with objectively analyzed surface wind data to develop a nowcast technique that might be used to identify specific storm cells likely to become tornadic. It was shown that circulations associated with organized meso-alpha and meso-beta scale storm complexes may, on occasion, strongly modify tropospheric thermodynamic patterns and flow fields.

  19. A rare case of thyroid storm.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Brock; Dhillon, Manvinder Shelley; Yong-Yow, Sabrina

    2016-04-18

    Thyroid storm is a rare and life-threatening state of thyroid hormone excess. Rapid recognition of thyroid storm is key to decreasing the morbidity and mortality of this condition. Clinical manifestations of thyroid storm include unexplained weight loss, hyperactivity and irritability. The most common causes of thyrotoxicosis are Graves' disease, toxic multinodular goitre and toxic adenoma. We present a rare case of thyroid storm induced by dual nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy in a patient receiving treatment for advanced melanoma. In this case, our patient was admitted for thyroid storm 1 month after initiating treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab immunotherapy. The patient was treated with β-blockers, antithyroid medications and systemic steroids resulting in an improvement in thyroid function testing and symptoms.

  20. Low-latitude ionospheric effects of energetic electrons during a recurrent magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorova, A. V.; Huang, C.-M.; Matsumoto, H.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Andreeva, E. S.; Nesterov, I. A.; Tsai, L.-C.

    2014-11-01

    We study a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at low latitudes during a moderate (corotating interaction regions/high-speed solar wind streams-driven) geomagnetic storm on 22 July 2009. Recently, it has been shown that during major (coronal mass ejection-driven) storms, quasi-trapped >30 keV electrons largely enhance below the radiation belt in the forbidden zone and produce an additional ionization in the topside ionosphere. In this work, we examine a case of the recurrent storm when the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling through the quasi-trapped electrons also may take place. Data from NOAA/Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite and Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite were used to identify the forbidden electron enhancement (FEE). We find a positive vertical gradient of the electron fluxes that indicates to the radiation belt as a source of FEE. Using global ionospheric maps, radiotomography reconstructions from beacon data and COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 radio occultation measurements, we have observed an unusually large area in the nighttime ionosphere with increased total electron content (TEC) and prominent elevation of the F layer at low latitudes that coincides with FEEs spatially and temporarily. Ionizing particles are considered as an addition source of ionization along with generally accepted mechanisms for storm time TEC increase (a positive ionospheric storm). We discuss relative contributions of the FEE and disturbance dynamo electric field in the TEC increases during the storm recovery phase.

  1. Pre-storm NmF2 enhancements at middle latitudes: delusion or reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, A. V.; Perrone, L.

    2009-03-01

    A critical analysis of recent publications devoted to the NmF2 pre-storm enhancements is performed. There are no convincing arguments that the observed cases of NmF2 enhancements at middle and sub-auroral latitudes bear a relation to the following magnetic storms. In all cases considered the NmF2 pre-storm enhancements were due to previous geomagnetic storms, moderate auroral activity or they presented the class of positive quiet time events (Q-disturbances). Therefore, it is possible to conclude that there is no such an effect as the pre-storm NmF2 enhancement as a phenomenon inalienably related to the following magnetic storm. The observed nighttime NmF2 enhancements at sub-auroral latitudes may result from plasma transfer from the plasma ring area by meridional thermospheric wind. Enhanced plasmaspheric fluxes into the nighttime F2-region resulted from westward substorm-associated electric fields is another possible source of nighttime NmF2 enhancements. Daytime positive Q-disturbances occurring under very low geomagnetic activity level may be related to the dayside cusp activity.

  2. Arecibo observations of ionospheric perturbations associated with the passage of Tropical Storm Odette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. L.; Aponte, N.; Earle, G. D.; Sulzer, M.; Larsen, M. F.; Peng, G. S.

    2006-11-01

    A suite of instruments including incoherent scatter radar, ionosonde, and a satellite-bourne GPS receiver observed the ionosphere immediately following the passage of a tropical storm. Tropical Storm Odette formed on 4 December 2003 and proceeded northeasterly over the next 4 days, passing within 600 km of the Arecibo Observatory (AO). On the night of 7-8 December AO measured F region plasma densities and velocities nearly coincident with the storm. Large velocity variations, 10-80 m/s, are evident in the plasma drift components. The variations appear wave-like with an average period of 90 min at 367 km. Zonal drifts were observed with magnitudes significantly greater than commonly observed for similar geomagnetic conditions. The Ramey ionosonde observed intense midlatitude spread F on the night following the closest passage of the storm. GPS occultations within the storm path showed an increase in gravity wave activity and F region scintillation. Combining the local increase in gravity wave activity with the large drift variations and dominant meridional electric field observed immediately following the storm's traversal of the flux tube coincident with the AO observing volume provide insight into coupling between mesoscale weather systems and the ionosphere.

  3. Biomimetic materials design for cardiac tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dunn, David A; Hodge, Alexander J; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. In the absence of sufficient numbers of organs for heart transplant, alternate approaches for healing or replacing diseased heart tissue are under investigation. Designing biomimetic materials to support these approaches will be essential to their overall success. Strategies for cardiac tissue engineering include injection of cells, implantation of three-dimensional tissue constructs or patches, injection of acellular materials, and replacement of valves. To replicate physiological function and facilitate engraftment into native tissue, materials used in these approaches should have properties that mimic those of the natural cardiac environment. Multiple aspects of the cardiac microenvironment have been emulated using biomimetic materials including delivery of bioactive factors, presentation of cell-specific adhesion sites, design of surface topography to guide tissue alignment and dictate cell shape, modulation of mechanical stiffness and electrical conductivity, and fabrication of three-dimensional structures to guide tissue formation and function. Biomaterials can be engineered to assist in stem cell expansion and differentiation, to protect cells during injection and facilitate their retention and survival in vivo, and to provide mechanical support and guidance for engineered tissue formation. Numerous studies have investigated the use of biomimetic materials for cardiac regeneration. Biomimetic material design will continue to exploit advances in nanotechnology to better recreate the cellular environment and advance cardiac regeneration. Overall, biomimetic materials are moving the field of cardiac regenerative medicine forward and promise to deliver new therapies in combating heart disease.

  4. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  5. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  6. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  7. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. ); Taylor, E.R. Jr. ); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  8. Middle- and low-latitude ionosphere response to 2015 St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, B.; Rodríguez-Zuluaga, J.; Alazo-Cuartas, K.; Kashcheyev, A.; Migoya-Orué, Y.; Radicella, S. M.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Fleury, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a study of the St Patrick's Day storm of 2015, with its ionospheric response at middle and low latitudes. The effects of the storm in each longitudinal sector (Asian, African, American, and Pacific) are characterized using global and regional electron content. At the beginning of the storm, one or two ionospheric positive storm effects are observed depending on the longitudinal zones. After the main phase of the storm, a strong decrease in ionization is observed at all longitudes, lasting several days. The American region exhibits the most remarkable increase in vertical total electron content (vTEC), while in the Asian sector, the largest decrease in vTEC is observed. At low latitudes, using spectral analysis, we were able to separate the effects of the prompt penetration of the magnetospheric convection electric field (PPEF) and of the disturbance dynamo electric field (DDEF) on the basis of ground magnetic data. Concerning the PPEF, Earth's magnetic field oscillations occur simultaneously in the Asian, African, and American sectors, during southward magnetization of the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field. Concerning the DDEF, diurnal magnetic oscillations in the horizontal component H of the Earth's magnetic field exhibit a behavior that is opposed to the regular one. These diurnal oscillations are recognized to last several days in all longitudinal sectors. The observational data obtained by all sensors used in the present paper can be interpreted on the basis of existing theoretical models.

  9. Living cardiac tissue slices: an organotypic pseudo two-dimensional model for cardiac biophysics research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ken; Terrar, Derek; Gavaghan, David J; Mu-U-Min, Razik; Kohl, Peter; Bollensdorff, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Living cardiac tissue slices, a pseudo two-dimensional (2D) preparation, have received less attention than isolated single cells, cell cultures, or Langendorff-perfused hearts in cardiac biophysics research. This is, in part, due to difficulties associated with sectioning cardiac tissue to obtain live slices. With moderate complexity, native cell-types, and well-preserved cell-cell electrical and mechanical interconnections, cardiac tissue slices have several advantages for studying cardiac electrophysiology. The trans-membrane potential (Vm) has, thus far, mainly been explored using multi-electrode arrays. Here, we combine tissue slices with optical mapping to monitor Vm and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). This combination opens up the possibility of studying the effects of experimental interventions upon action potential (AP) and calcium transient (CaT) dynamics in 2D, and with relatively high spatio-temporal resolution. As an intervention, we conducted proof-of-principle application of stretch. Mechanical stimulation of cardiac preparations is well-established for membrane patches, single cells and whole heart preparations. For cardiac tissue slices, it is possible to apply stretch perpendicular or parallel to the dominant orientation of cells, while keeping the preparation in a constant focal plane for fluorescent imaging of in-slice functional dynamics. Slice-to-slice comparison furthermore allows one to assess transmural differences in ventricular tissue responses to mechanical challenges. We developed and tested application of axial stretch to cardiac tissue slices, using a manually-controlled stretching device, and recorded Vm and [Ca(2+)]i by optical mapping before, during, and after application of stretch. Living cardiac tissue slices, exposed to axial stretch, show an initial shortening in both AP and CaT duration upon stretch application, followed in most cases by a gradual prolongation of AP and CaT duration during stretch maintained

  10. Stem cells in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death among people in industrialized nations. Although the heart has some ability to regenerate after infarction, myocardial restoration is inadequate. Consequently, investigators are currently exploring the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), skeletal myoblasts and adult bone marrow stem cells to limit infarct size. hESCs are pluripotent cells that can regenerate myocardium in infarcted hearts, attenuate heart remodeling and contribute to left ventricle (LV) systolic force development. Since hESCs can form heart teratomas, investigators are differentiating hESCs toward cardiac progenitor cells prior to transplantation into hearts. Large quantities of hESCs cardiac progenitor cells, however, must be generated, immune rejection must be prevented and grafts must survive over the long term to significantly improve myocardial performance. Transplanted autologous skeletal myoblasts can survive in infarcted myocardium in small numbers, proliferate, differentiate into skeletal myofibers and increase the LV ejection fraction. These cells, however, do not form electromechanical connections with host cardiomyocytes. Consequently, electrical re-entry can occur and cause cardiac arrhythmias. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. In several meta-analyses, patients with coronary disease who received autologous bone marrow cells by intracoronary injection show significant 3.7% (range: 1.9-5.4%) increases in LV ejection fraction, decreases in LV end-systolic volume of -4.8 ml (range: -1.4 to -8.2 ml) and reductions in infarct size of 5.5% (-1.9 to -9.1%), without experiencing arrhythmias. Bone marrow cells appear to release biologically active factors that limit myocardial damage. Unfortunately, bone marrow cells from patients with chronic diseases propagate poorly and can die prematurely. Substantial challenges must be addressed and resolved to advance the use of stem cells

  11. Multiple spiral patterns in a cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhanguo; Li, Xia

    2009-11-01

    Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the major cause of sudden cardiac death, the leading cause of death in the industrialized world. However, the mechanisms for its onset are still not well understood. Recent experiments indicate that VF is induced by transitions of cardiac electric propagationg waves from a single spiral wave to multiple waves. To further understand the underlying mechanism of VF, we investigated the interaction between two waves in a two-dimensional excitable media. Three types of multiple spirals including multi-arm spirals have been found depending on the rotation direction and the distance among spiral waves.

  12. Development and Evaluation of Storm Surge Ensemble Forecasting for the Philippines Using JMA Storm Surge Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapidez, J. P. B.; Tablazon, J. P.; Lagmay, A. M. F. A.; Suarez, J. K. B.; Santiago, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Philippines is one of the countries most vulnerable to storm surge. It is located in the North-western Pacific basin which is the most active basin in the planet. An average of 20 tropical cyclones enters the Philippine area of responsibility (PAR) every year. The archipelagic nature of the country with regions having gently sloping coasts and shallow bays also contribute to the formation of extreme surges. Last November 2013, storm surge brought by super typhoon Haiyan severely damaged several coastal regions in the Visayan Islands. Haiyan left more than 6 300 casualties and damages amounting to more than $ 2 billion. Extreme storm surge events such as this highlight the need to establish a storm surge early warning system for the country. This study explores the development and evaluation of storm surge ensemble forecasting for the Philippines using the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) storm surge model. 36-hour, 24-hour, and 12-hour tropical cyclone forecasts are used to generate an ensemble storm surge forecast to give the most probable storm surge height at a specific point brought by an incoming tropical cyclone. The result of the storm surge forecast is compared to tide gauge record to evaluate the accuracy. The total time of computation and dissemination of forecast result is also examined to assess the feasibility of using the JMA storm surge model for operational purposes.

  13. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  14. Stability of subsea pipelines during large storms

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Scott; An, Hongwei; Cheng, Liang; White, David J.; Griffiths, Terry

    2015-01-01

    On-bottom stability design of subsea pipelines transporting hydrocarbons is important to ensure safety and reliability but is challenging to achieve in the onerous metocean (meteorological and oceanographic) conditions typical of large storms (such as tropical cyclones, hurricanes or typhoons). This challenge is increased by the fact that industry design guidelines presently give no guidance on how to incorporate the potential benefits of seabed mobility, which can lead to lowering and self-burial of the pipeline on a sandy seabed. In this paper, we demonstrate recent advances in experimental modelling of pipeline scour and present results investigating how pipeline stability can change in a large storm. An emphasis is placed on the initial development of the storm, where scour is inevitable on an erodible bed as the storm velocities build up to peak conditions. During this initial development, we compare the rate at which peak near-bed velocities increase in a large storm (typically less than 10−3 m s−2) to the rate at which a pipeline scours and subsequently lowers (which is dependent not only on the storm velocities, but also on the mechanism of lowering and the pipeline properties). We show that the relative magnitude of these rates influences pipeline embedment during a storm and the stability of the pipeline. PMID:25512592

  15. Stability of subsea pipelines during large storms.

    PubMed

    Draper, Scott; An, Hongwei; Cheng, Liang; White, David J; Griffiths, Terry

    2015-01-28

    On-bottom stability design of subsea pipelines transporting hydrocarbons is important to ensure safety and reliability but is challenging to achieve in the onerous metocean (meteorological and oceanographic) conditions typical of large storms (such as tropical cyclones, hurricanes or typhoons). This challenge is increased by the fact that industry design guidelines presently give no guidance on how to incorporate the potential benefits of seabed mobility, which can lead to lowering and self-burial of the pipeline on a sandy seabed. In this paper, we demonstrate recent advances in experimental modelling of pipeline scour and present results investigating how pipeline stability can change in a large storm. An emphasis is placed on the initial development of the storm, where scour is inevitable on an erodible bed as the storm velocities build up to peak conditions. During this initial development, we compare the rate at which peak near-bed velocities increase in a large storm (typically less than 10(-3) m s(-2)) to the rate at which a pipeline scours and subsequently lowers (which is dependent not only on the storm velocities, but also on the mechanism of lowering and the pipeline properties). We show that the relative magnitude of these rates influences pipeline embedment during a storm and the stability of the pipeline.

  16. long duration dust storm sequences on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera (MOC) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) Mars daily global maps have revealed new characteristics for long duration dust storm sequences. These dust storm sequences have long histories of more than a week, travel long distances out of their origination region, and influence large areas in different regions of the planet. During the Ls = 180 - 360 season, except for global dust storms which involve multiple remote dust lifting centers and generally expand explosively from the southern hemisphere northward, other long-lived dust storm sequences usually travel southward through the Acidalia-Chryse, Utopia-Isidis or Arcadia-Amazonis channels with subsequent dust lifting along the way. Sometimes, they penetrate remarkably deep to the southern high latitudes, producing fantastic display of dust band. During the rest of the year, long duration dust storm sequences usually originate from the Argyre/Solis, Hellas/Noachis, or Cimmeria/Sirenum area and travel northward toward the southern low latitudes. Each route exhibits its own peculiar characteristics. We will present our results about these long duration dust storm sequences summarized from the complete archive of MGS MOC daily global maps and two years of MRO MARCI daily global maps. The systematic daily nearly global coverage of these maps makes it feasible to reconstruct the history of long duration dust storm sequences with detail.

  17. An Evaluation of Lightning Flash Rate Parameterizations Based on Observations of Colorado Storms during DC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basarab, B.; Fuchs, B.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Predicting lightning activity in thunderstorms is important in order to accurately quantify the production of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) by lightning (LNOx). Lightning is an important global source of NOx, and since NOx is a chemical precursor to ozone, the climatological impacts of LNOx could be significant. Many cloud-resolving models rely on parameterizations to predict lightning and LNOx since the processes leading to charge separation and lightning discharge are not yet fully understood. This study evaluates predicted flash rates based on existing lightning parameterizations against flash rates observed for Colorado storms during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3). Evaluating lightning parameterizations against storm observations is a useful way to possibly improve the prediction of flash rates and LNOx in models. Additionally, since convective storms that form in the eastern plains of Colorado can be different thermodynamically and electrically from storms in other regions, it is useful to test existing parameterizations against observations from these storms. We present an analysis of the dynamics, microphysics, and lightning characteristics of two case studies, severe storms that developed on 6 and 7 June 2012. This analysis includes dual-Doppler derived horizontal and vertical velocities, a hydrometeor identification based on polarimetric radar variables using the CSU-CHILL radar, and insight into the charge structure using observations from the northern Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). Flash rates were inferred from the LMA data using a flash counting algorithm. We have calculated various microphysical and dynamical parameters for these storms that have been used in empirical flash rate parameterizations. In particular, maximum vertical velocity has been used to predict flash rates in some cloud-resolving chemistry simulations. We diagnose flash rates for the 6 and 7 June storms using this parameterization and compare

  18. Effects of the magnetic storm in April 2000 in the low latitude ionosphere near longitude 120E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wan, W.; Lee, C.

    A halo-CME induced interplanetary shock wave that passed the Earth around 1648 UT on April 6, 2000 triggered a geomagnetic storm with a minimum value of about -300 nT in Dst index. In this paper, digisonde data from ionospheric stations at Chungli, Wuhan, and Kokubunji are included to investigate the ionospheric responses of low latitudes near longitude 120 E to this storm. At three low latitudes near longitude 120 E during this storm, the significant ionospheric responses was an anomalous rapid and large increase in the ionospheric heights occurred around the beginning of the main phase, and the lifts in h'F and hmF2 lasted for about 2 hours. The nearsimultaneous ionosphere increase was also observed at Chungli, Taiwan. And a wave like disturbance appeared on daytime of the second day. The near simultaneity of the ionospheric lifts at these stations in the nighttime ionospheric heights after the SSC suggested that an ExB plasma drift due to the storm related perturbed east-west electric fields. The empirical models of storm time equatorial zonal electric fields (Fejer and Scherliess, 1997) attributed those rapid and large lifts to the effect of solar wind-magnetosphere dynamo origin, which penetrate to low latitudes and equatorial regions. The following wave like disturbance was suggested to be caused by storm induced Travelling atmospheric disturbances (TADs). A method developed by Liu et al. (2002) and Luan et al. (2002) was used to derive the vertical effective winds from ionospheric measurements. It also shows that there was a significantly downward and upward vertical drift during the storm, which verifies the existence of the storm related perturbed east-west electric fields. Finally, the ionospheric storm time derivation from its monthly median level at these stations was also used to validate the predication ability of STORM, a storm empirical model of Araujo-Pradere et al. (2001), which is now included in the international reference ionosphere model IRI

  19. Measured winter performance of storm windows

    SciTech Connect

    Klems, Joseph H.

    2002-08-23

    Direct comparison measurements were made between various prime/storm window combinations and a well-weatherstripped, single-hung replacement window with a low-E selective glazing. Measurements were made using an accurate outdoor calorimetric facility with the windows facing north. The doublehung prime window was made intentionally leaky. Nevertheless, heat flows due to air infiltration were found to be small, and performance of the prime/storm combinations was approximately what would be expected from calculations that neglect air infiltration. Prime/low-E storm window combinations performed very similarly to the replacement window. Interestingly, solar heat gain was not negligible, even in north-facing orientation.

  20. Reduced Baroclinicity During Martian Global Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battalio, Joseph; Szunyogh, Istvan; Lemmon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The eddy kinetic energy equation is applied to the Mars Analysis Correction Data Assimilation (MACDA) dataset during the pre-winter solstice period for the northern hemisphere of Mars. Traveling waves are triggered by geopotential flux convergence, grow baroclinically, and decay barotropically. Higher optical depth increases the static stability, which reduces vertical and meridional heat fluxes. Traveling waves during a global dust storm year develop a mixed baroclinic/barotropic growth phase before decaying barotropically. Baroclinic energy conversion is reduced during the global dust storm, but eddy intensity is undiminished. Instead, the frequency of storms is reduced due to a stabilized vertical profile.

  1. A patient with Graves' disease who survived despite developing thyroid storm and lactic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman with Graves' disease presented with the complaints of diarrhea and palpitations. Physical examination and laboratory data revealed hypothermia and signs of mild hyperthyroidism, heart failure, hepatic dysfunction with jaundice, hypoglycemia, and lactic acidosis. The patient was diagnosed as having developed the complication of thyroid storm in the absence of marked elevation of the thyroid hormone levels, because of the potential hepatic and cardiac dysfunctions caused by heavy alcohol drinking. A year later, after successful treatment, the patient remains well without any clinical evidence of heart failure or hepatic dysfunction. Thyroid storm associated with lactic acidosis and hypothermia is a serious condition and has rarely been reported. Prompt treatment is essential even if the serum thyroid hormone levels are not markedly elevated. We present a report about this patient, as her life could eventually be saved. PMID:20731531

  2. An electrified dust storm over the Negev desert, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Y.; Price, C. G.; Yaniv, R.; Katz, S.

    2015-12-01

    We report on atmospheric electrical measurements conducted at the Wise Observatory in Mitzpe-Ramon, Israel (30035'N, 34045'E) during a massive dust storm that occurred over the Eastern Mediterranean region on 10-11 February 2015. The event transported Saharan dust from Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula in advance of the warm front of a Cyprus low pressure system. Satellite images show the dust plume covering the Negev desert and Southern Israel and moving north. The concentrations of PM10 particles measured by the air-quality monitoring network of the Israeli Ministry of the Environment in Beer-Sheba reached values > 450 μg m-3 and AOT from the AERONET station in Sde-Boker was 1.5 on the 10th. The gradual intensification of the event reached peak values on February 11th of over 1200 μg m-3 and AOT of 1.8. This was the most severe dust event in a decade. Continuous measurements of the fair weather vertical electric field (Ez) and vertical current density (Jz) were conducted with 1 minute temporal resolution. Meteorological data was also recorded at the site. As the dust was advected over the observation site, we noted very large fluctuations in the electrical parameters. Since the onset of the dust storm, the Ez values changed between +1000 and +8000 V m-1 while the Jz fluctuated between -10 pA m2 and +20 pA m2, both on time-scales of a few minutes. These values are a significant departures from the mean fair-weather values measured at the site, which are -~200 V m-1 and ~2 pA m2. The disturbed episodes lasted for several hours on the 10th and 11th and coincided with local meteorological conditions related to the wind direction, which carried large amounts of dust particles. We interpret the rapid changes as caused by the transport of electrically charged dust. Calculation of the total electrical charge during the dust storm will be presented.

  3. Numerical Simulations of the Ring Current During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Roeder, J. L.; Lui, A.; Keesee, A. M.; Goldstein, J.; Le, G.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2012-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport along with magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. The ring current intensity and spatial distribution are significantly affected by variations in the plasma sheet (the major source to the ring current), the cross polar cap potential, and compressions and expansions of the magnetosphere. We simulate the ion and electron ring current and plasma sheet by using the magnetically and electrically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic (IMF) conditions and with time-varying plasma sheet distributions as boundary conditions. Examples of detailed comparisons of simulated storm events with in-situ magnetic intensities (e. g., GOES, Polar/MPA, or THEMIS) and proton flux spectra (e. g., LANL/MPA and SOPA, Polar/CAMMICE, or THEMIS) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes (e. g., TWINS) will be shown. We will also present comparisons of observed electron flux spectra with simulations based on a few simple electron loss models. These data-model comparisons test the ability of our model to characterize the ring current environment and the storm-time inner magnetospheric magnetic field.

  4. 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, H. J. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the 11th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity (ICAE 99), held June 7-11, 1999. This conference was attended by scientists and researchers from around the world. The subjects covered included natural and artificially initiated lightning, lightning in the middle and upper atmosphere (sprites and jets), lightning protection and safety, lightning detection techniques (ground, airborne, and space-based), storm physics, electric fields near and within thunderstorms, storm electrification, atmospheric ions and chemistry, shumann resonances, satellite observations of lightning, global electrical processes, fair weather electricity, and instrumentation.

  5. Storm diagnostic/predictive images derived from a combination of lightning and satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Meyer, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is presented for generating trend or convective tendency images using a combination of GOES satellite imagery and cloud-to-ground lightning observations. The convective tendency images can be used for short term forecasting of storm development. A conceptual model of cloud electrical development and an example of the methodology used to generate lightning/satellite convective tendency imagery are given. Successive convective tendency images can be looped or animated to show the previous growth or decay of thunderstorms and their associated lighting activity. It is suggested that the convective tendency image may also be used to indicate potential microburst producing storms.

  6. A new parameter of geomagnetic storms for the severity of space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Batista, I. S.; Tulasi Ram, S.; Rajesh, P. K.

    2016-12-01

    Using the continuous Dst data available since 1957 and H component data for the Carrington space weather event of 1859, the paper shows that the mean value of Dst during the main phase of geomagnetic storms, called mean DstMP, is a unique parameter that can indicate the severity of space weather. All storms having high mean DstMP (≤-250 nT), which corresponds to high amount of energy input in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system in short duration, are found associated with severe space weather events that caused all known electric power outages and telegraph system failures.

  7. Cardiac nuclear imaging - Principles, instrumentation and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H.W.; Mckusick, K.A.; Bingham, J.B.

    1980-12-18

    Nuclear methods of cardiac imaging require a radiolabeled tracer, a collimator to assure interaction of photons from specific areas of the heart with the imaging device, equipment which converts gamma photon energy into an electrical signal which can be displayed, and a computer to record and quantify the data. Nuclear imaging is based on the averaging of many cardiac cycles, while nuclear probes supply information which can be analyzed only on a beat-by-beat basis imaging data can be reviewed visually and quantitatively. It is concluded that nuclear cardiac imaging can detect abnormal functions at rest or after interventions, and can be used both for outpatients and acutely ill persons in intensive care units.

  8. Statistical analysis of storm-time near-Earth current systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Katus, R. M.; Ilie, R.

    2015-08-01

    Currents from the Hot Electron and Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI) inner magnetospheric model results for all of the 90 intense storms (disturbance storm-time (Dst) minimum < -100 nT) from solar cycle 23 (1996-2005) are calculated, presented, and analyzed. We have categorized these currents into the various systems that exist in near-Earth space, specifically the eastward and westward symmetric ring current, the partial ring current, the banana current, and the tail current. The current results from each run set are combined by a normalized superposed epoch analysis technique that scales the timeline of each phase of each storm before summing the results. It is found that there is a systematic ordering to the current systems, with the asymmetric current systems peaking during storm main phase (tail current rising first, then the banana current, followed by the partial ring current) and the symmetric current systems peaking during the early recovery phase (westward and eastward symmetric ring current having simultaneous maxima). The median and mean peak amplitudes for the current systems ranged from 1 to 3 MA, depending on the setup configuration used in HEIDI, except for the eastward symmetric ring current, for which the mean never exceeded 0.3 MA for any HEIDI setup. The self-consistent electric field description in HEIDI yielded larger tail and banana currents than the Volland-Stern electric field, while the partial and symmetric ring currents had similar peak values between the two applied electric field models.

  9. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  10. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  11. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  12. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  13. 46 CFR 72.40-10 - Storm rails.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Storm rails. 72.40-10 Section 72.40-10 Shipping COAST... and Guards § 72.40-10 Storm rails. (a) Suitable storm rails shall be installed in all passageways and at the deckhouse sides where passengers or crew might have normal access. Storm rails shall...

  14. Radiation Belt Storm Probe Mission Trailer

    NASA Video Gallery

    With launch scheduled for 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) are two identical spacecraft that will investigate the doughnut shaped Van Allen radiation belts, the first discovery of the sp...

  15. Tropical Storm Gilma in Eastern Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations shows the progression of Tropical Storm Gilma from August 7-10, 2012, along the coast of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This visualization was created by the NASA...

  16. GOES Satellite Movie of 2014 Winter Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery shows the movement of winter storms from January 1 to March 24 making for a snowier-than-normal winter along the U.S. East coast and Midwest...

  17. Satellite Movie Sees Southern California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Jan. 5 through Jan 7 shows the progression of storm systems in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that hit southern California and generated flooding a...

  18. GMI Rainfall Data on Tropical Storm Adjali

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows GMI rainfall data on Tropical Storm Adjali on Nov. 19, 2014 combined with cloud data from the METEOSAT-7 satellite. Rainfall was found to be falling at a rate of over 69 mm/hr ...

  19. Isaac's Remnants; Tropical Storms Kirk, Michael

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of GOES-13 satellite observations from Sept. 1-4, 2012, showing Isaac's remnants move from the central to eastern U.S., Tropical Storm Leslie nearing Bermuda, Kirk fading in the No. Atlan...

  20. Tropical Storm Wali Seen by GOESWest

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from July 15 to 18 shows the birth of Tropical Storm Wali southeast of the Big Island of Hawaii on July 17. Credit: NA...