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Sample records for cardiac hybrid imaging

  1. Hybrid imaging: integration of nuclear imaging and cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Marcelo F

    2009-05-01

    The integration of nuclear medicine cameras with multidetector CT scanners provides a unique opportunity to delineate cardiac and vascular anatomic abnormalities and their physiologic consequences in a single setting. By revealing the burden of anatomic coronary artery disease and its physiologic significance, hybrid imaging can provide unique information that may improve noninvasive diagnosis, risk assessment, and management of coronary artery disease. By integrating the detailed anatomic information from CT with the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to evaluate targeted molecular and cellular abnormalities, hybrid imaging may play a key role in shaping the future of molecular diagnostics and therapeutics. This article reviews potential clinical applications of hybrid imaging in cardiovascular disease.

  2. Hybrid cardiac imaging with MR-CAT scan: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, C; Sandstede, J; Pabst, T; Hahn, D; Haase, A; Jakob, P M

    2000-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of a new versatile hybrid imaging concept, the combined acquisition technique (CAT), for cardiac imaging. The cardiac CAT approach, which combines new methodology with existing technology, essentially integrates fast low-angle shot (FLASH) and echoplanar imaging (EPI) modules in a sequential fashion, whereby each acquisition module is employed with independently optimized imaging parameters. One important CAT sequence optimization feature is the ability to use different bandwidths for different acquisition modules. Twelve healthy subjects were imaged using three cardiac CAT acquisition strategies: a) CAT was used to reduce breath-hold duration times while maintaining constant spatial resolution; b) CAT was used to increase spatial resolution in a given breath-hold time; and c) single-heart beat CAT imaging was performed. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of cardiac imaging using the CAT approach and the potential of this technique to accelerate the imaging process with almost conserved image quality.

  3. Cardiac SPECT/CCTA hybrid imaging : One answer to two questions?

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, P A; Buechel, R R

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging has witnessed tremendous advances in the recent past, particularly with regard to coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) where substantial improvements in image quality have been achieved while at the same time patients' radiation dose exposure has been reduced to the sub-millisievert range. Similarly, for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the introduction of novel cadmium-zinc-telluride-based semiconductor detectors has significantly improved system sensitivity and image quality, enabling fast image acquisition within less than 2-3 min or reduction of radiation dose exposure to less than 5 mSv. However, neither imaging modality alone is able to fully cover the two aspects of coronary artery disease (CAD), that is, morphology and function. Both modalities have distinct advantages and shortcomings: While CCTA may prove a superb modality for excluding CAD through its excellent negative predictive value, it does not allow for assessment of hemodynamic relevance if obstructive coronary lesions are detected. Conversely, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging cannot provide any information on the presence or absence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. This article aims to highlight the great potential of cardiac hybrid imaging that allows for a comprehensive evaluation of CAD through combination of both morphological and functional information by fusing SPECT with CCTA.

  4. TU-G-BRA-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Hybrid PET-MRI Imaging of Acute Radiation Induced Cardiac Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Gaede, S; Sykes, J; Butler, J; Wisenberg, G; Prato, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the presence of low-dose radiation induced cardiac toxicity in a canine model using hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Research ethics board approval was obtained for a longitudinal imaging study of 5 canines after cardiac irradiation. Animals were imaged at baseline, 1 week post cardiac irradiation, and 1 month post cardiac irradiation using a hybrid PET- MRI system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). The imaging protocol was designed to assess acute changes in myocardial perfusion and inflammation. Myocardial perfusion imaging was performed using N13-ammonia tracer followed by a dynamic PET acquisition scan. A compartmental tracer kinetic model was used for absolute perfusion quantification. Myocardial inflammation imaging was performed using F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. The standard uptake value (SUV) over a region encompassing the whole heart was used to compare FDG scans. All animals received a simulation CT scan (GE Medical Systems) for radiation treatment planning. Radiation treatment plans were created using the Pinncale3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) and designed to resemble the typical cardiac exposure during left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Cardiac irradiations were performed in a single fraction using a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: The delivered dose (mean ± standard deviation) to heart was 1.8±0.2 Gy. Reductions in myocardial stress perfusion relative to baseline were observed in 2 of the 5 animals 1 month post radiation. A global inflammatory response 1 month post radiation was observed in 4 of the 5 animals. The calculated SUV at 1 month post radiation was significantly higher (p=0.05) than the baseline SUV. Conclusion: Low doses of cardiac irradiation (< 2 Gy) may lead to myocardial perfusion defects and a global inflammatory response that can be detectable as early as 1 month post irradiation

  5. Impact of cardiac hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging on choice of treatment strategy in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Nkoulou, Rene N.; Ghadri, Jelena-Rima; Herzog, Bernhard A.; Küest, Silke M.; Husmann, Lars; Wolfrum, Mathias; Goetti, Robert; Buechel, Ronny R.; Gaemperli, Oliver; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Cardiac hybrid imaging by fusing single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) provides important complementary diagnostic information for coronary artery disease (CAD) assessment. We aimed at assessing the impact of cardiac hybrid imaging on the choice of treatment strategy selection for CAD. Methods and results Three hundred and eighteen consecutive patients underwent a 1 day stress/rest 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT and a CCTA on a separate scanner for evaluation of CAD. Patients were divided into one of the following three groups according to findings in the hybrid images obtained by fusing SPECT and CCTA: (i) matched finding of stenosis by CCTA and corresponding reversible SPECT defect; (ii) unmatched CCTA and SPECT finding; (iii) normal finding by both CCTA and SPECT. Follow-up was confined to the first 60 days after hybrid imaging as this allows best to assess treatment strategy decisions including the revascularization procedure triggered by its findings. Hybrid images revealed matched, unmatched, and normal findings in 51, 74, and 193 patients. The revascularization rate within 60 days was 41, 11, and 0% for matched, unmatched, and normal findings, respectively (P< 0.001 for all inter-group comparisons). Conclusion Cardiac hybrid imaging with SPECT and CCTA provides an added clinical value for decision making with regard to treatment strategy for CAD. PMID:21804107

  6. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC).

    PubMed

    Flotats, Albert; Knuuti, Juhani; Gutberlet, Matthias; Marcassa, Claudio; Bengel, Frank M; Kaufmann, Philippe A; Rees, Michael R; Hesse, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in software and hardware have enabled the integration of dual imaging modalities into hybrid systems, which allow combined acquisition of the different data sets. Integration of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) scanners into PET/CT systems has shown improvement in the management of patients with cancer over stand-alone acquired CT and PET images. Hybrid cardiac imaging either with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or PET combined with CT depicts cardiac and vascular anatomical abnormalities and their physiologic consequences in a single setting and appears to offer superior information compared with either stand-alone or side-by-side interpretation of the data sets in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Hybrid systems are also advantageous for the patient because of the single short dual data acquisition. However, hybrid cardiac imaging has also generated controversy with regard to which patients should undergo such integrated examination for clinical effectiveness and minimization of costs and radiation dose, and if software-based fusion of images obtained separately would be a useful alternative. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients with known or suspected CAD.

  7. Multi-atlas label fusion using hybrid of discriminative and generative classifiers for segmentation of cardiac MR images.

    PubMed

    Sedai, Suman; Garnavi, Rahil; Roy, Pallab; Xi Liang

    2015-08-01

    Multi-atlas segmentation first registers each atlas image to the target image and transfers the label of atlas image to the coordinate system of the target image. The transferred labels are then combined, using a label fusion algorithm. In this paper, we propose a novel label fusion method which aggregates discriminative learning and generative modeling for segmentation of cardiac MR images. First, a probabilistic Random Forest classifier is trained as a discriminative model to obtain the prior probability of a label at the given voxel of the target image. Then, a probability distribution of image patches is modeled using Gaussian Mixture Model for each label, providing the likelihood of the voxel belonging to the label. The final label posterior is obtained by combining the classification score and the likelihood score under Bayesian rule. Comparative study performed on MICCAI 2013 SATA Segmentation Challenge demonstrates that our proposed hybrid label fusion algorithm is accurate than other five state-of-the-art label fusion methods. The proposed method obtains dice similarity coefficient of 0.94 and 0.92 in segmenting epicardium and endocardium respectively. Moreover, our label fusion method achieves more accurate segmentation results compared to four other label fusion methods.

  8. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  9. Noninvasive Imaging of Cardiac Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Thomas; Hintringer, Florian; Fischer, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cardiac electrophysiology is still a major goal despite all recent technical innovations. This review gives an overview about the historical background, recent developments and possible future applications of noninvasive imaging of cardiac electrophysiology. PMID:17684574

  10. MR imaging of cardiac masses.

    PubMed

    Syed, Imran S; Feng, Dali; Harris, Scott R; Martinez, Matthew W; Misselt, Andrew J; Breen, Jerome F; Miller, Dylan V; Araoz, Philip A

    2008-05-01

    Cardiac MR imaging is the preferred method for assessment of cardiac masses. A comprehensive cardiac MR imaging examination for a cardiac mass consists of static morphologic images using fast spin-echo sequences, including single-shot techniques, with T1 and T2 weighting and fat suppression pulses as well as dynamic imaging with cine steady-state free precession techniques. Further tissue characterization is provided with perfusion and delayed enhancement imaging. Specific cardiac tumoral characterization is possible in many cases. When specific tumor characterization is not possible, MR imaging often can demonstrate aggressive versus nonaggressive features that help in differentiating malignant from benign tumors.

  11. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  12. Cardiac T1 Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    T1 mapping of the heart has evolved into a valuable tool to evaluate myocardial tissue properties, with or without contrast injection, including assessment of myocardial edema and free water content, extra-cellular volume (expansion), and most recently cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The MRI pulse sequence techniques developed for these applications have had to address at least two important considerations for cardiac applications: measure magnetization inversion recoveries during cardiac motion with sufficient temporal resolution for the shortest expected T1 values, and, secondly, obtain these measurements within a time during which a patient can comfortably suspend breathing. So-called Look-Locker techniques, and variants thereof, which all sample multiple points of a magnetization recovery after each magnetization preparation have therefore become a mainstay in this field. The rapid pace of advances and new findings based on cardiac T1 mapping for assessment of diffuse fibrosis, or myocardial edema show that these techniques enrich the capabilities of MRI for myocardial tissue profiling, which is arguably unmatched by other cardiac imaging modalities. PMID:24509619

  13. Cardiac action potential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qinghai; Lipp, Peter; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-06-01

    Action potentials in cardiac myocytes have durations in the order of magnitude of 100 milliseconds. In biomedical investigations the documentation of the occurrence of action potentials is often not sufficient, but a recording of the shape of an action potential allows a functional estimation of several molecular players. Therefore a temporal resolution of around 500 images per second is compulsory. In the past such measurements have been performed with photometric approaches limiting the measurement to one cell at a time. In contrast, imaging allows reading out several cells at a time with additional spatial information. Recent developments in camera technologies allow the acquisition with the required speed and sensitivity. We performed action potential imaging on isolated adult cardiomyocytes of guinea pigs utilizing the fluorescent membrane potential sensor di-8-ANEPPS and latest electron-multiplication CCD as well as scientific CMOS cameras of several manufacturers. Furthermore, we characterized the signal to noise ratio of action potential signals of varying sets of cameras, dye concentrations and objective lenses. We ensured that di-8-ANEPPS itself did not alter action potentials by avoiding concentrations above 5 μM. Based on these results we can conclude that imaging is a reliable method to read out action potentials. Compared to conventional current-clamp experiments, this optical approach allows a much higher throughput and due to its contact free concept leaving the cell to a much higher degree undisturbed. Action potential imaging based on isolated adult cardiomyocytes can be utilized in pharmacological cardiac safety screens bearing numerous advantages over approaches based on heterologous expression of hERG channels in cell lines.

  14. Cardiac Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Although not available to all patients with narrowed arteries, balloon angioplasty has expanded dramatically since its introduction with an estimated further growth to 562,000 procedures in the U.S. alone by 1992. Growth has fueled demand for higher quality imaging systems that allow the cardiologist to be more accurate and increase the chances of a successful procedure. A major advance is the Digital Cardiac Imaging (DCI) System designed by Philips Medical Systems International, Best, The Netherlands and marketed in the U.S. by Philips Medical Systems North America Company. The key benefit is significantly improved real-time imaging and the ability to employ image enhancement techniques to bring out added details. Using a cordless control unit, the cardiologist can manipulate images to make immediate assessment, compare live x-ray and roadmap images by placing them side-by-side on monitor screens, or compare pre-procedure and post procedure conditions. The Philips DCI improves the cardiologist's precision by expanding the information available to him.

  15. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  16. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  17. Hybrid Imaging in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Maseeh uz; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Zaman, Unaiza; Shahid, Wajeeha; Zaman, Areeba; Tahseen, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    In oncology various imaging modalities play a crucial role in diagnosis, staging, restaging, treatment monitoring and follow up of various cancers. Stand-alone morphological imaging like computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide a high magnitude of anatomical details about the tumor but are relatively dumb about tumor physiology. Stand-alone functional imaging like positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) are rich in functional information but provide little insight into tumor morphology. Introduction of first hybrid modality PET/CT is the one of the most successful stories of current century which has revolutionized patient care in oncology due to its high diagnostic accuracy. Spurred on by this success, more hybrid imaging modalities like SPECT/CT and PET/MR were introduced. It is the time to explore the potential applications of the existing hybrid modalities, developing and implementing standardized imaging protocols and train users in nuclear medicine and radiology. In this review we discuss three existing hybrid modalities with emphasis on their technical aspects and clinical applications in oncology.

  18. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  19. Cardiac catheterization laboratory imaging quality assurance program.

    PubMed

    Wondrow, M A; Laskey, W K; Hildner, F J; Cusma, J; Holmes, D R

    2001-01-01

    With the recent approval of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) standard for "Characteristics of and Test Procedures for a Phantom to Benchmark Cardiac Fluoroscopic and Photographic Performance," comprehensive cardiac image assurance control programs are now possible. This standard was developed by a joint NEMA/Society for Cardiac Angiography and Interventions (SCA&I) working group of imaging manufacturers and cardiology society professionals over the past 4 years. This article details a cardiac catheterization laboratory image quality assurance and control program that includes the new standard along with current regulatory requirements for cardiac imaging. Because of the recent proliferation of digital imaging equipment, quality assurance for cardiac imaging fluoroscopy and digital imaging are critical. Included are the previous works recommended by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA), Society for Cardiac Angiographers and Interventions (SCA&I), and authors of previous image quality subjects.

  20. Cardiac imaging: does radiation matter?

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Knuuti, Juhani

    2012-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation in cardiovascular imaging has generated considerable discussion. Radiation should not be considered in isolation, but rather in the context of a careful examination of the benefits, risks, and costs of cardiovascular imaging. Such consideration requires an understanding of some fundamental aspects of the biology, physics, epidemiology, and terminology germane to radiation, as well as principles of radiological protection. This paper offers a concise, contemporary perspective on these areas by addressing pertinent questions relating to radiation and its application to cardiac imaging. PMID:21828062

  1. Hybrid carbon nanotube-polymer scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadian, Samad; Davenport-Huyer, Locke; Smith, Nathaniel; Radisic, Milica

    2017-02-01

    Due to insufficient supply of heart transplants and limited regenerative ability of heart tissues, cardiac tissue engineering has emerged to restore or regenerate the structure and function of native cardiac tissues. Scaffolds play a major role in fabrication of functional cardiac tissues, providing structural support, biodegradation, and cell affinity. However, currently used scaffolds in cardiac tissue regeneration tend to lack adequate electrical conductivity and favorable mechanical properties. In response to these concerns, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been used to enhance electrical and mechanical properties of scaffolds in cardiac tissue engineering. Here, we review different hybrid CNT-biomaterial scaffolds, both natural and synthetic, in cardiac tissue regeneration and their fabrication methods. Furthermore, CNT toxicity is also discussed. We further outline future trends in this research area toward using CNTs as a functional nanomaterial in cardiac tissue engineering.

  2. Multimodality imaging for resuscitated sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Deva, Djeven; Kirpalani, Anish; Prabhudesai, Vikram; Marcuzzi, Danny W; Graham, John J; Verma, Subodh; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Yan, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    We present a case that elegantly illustrates the utility of two novel noninvasive imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography and cardiac MRI, in the diagnosis and management of a 27-year-old man with exertion-induced cardiac arrest caused by an anomalous right coronary artery. CT coronary angiography with 3D reformatting delineated the interarterial course of an anomalous right coronary artery compressed between the aorta and pulmonary artery, whereas cardiac MRI showed a small myocardial infarction in the right coronary artery territory not detected on echocardiography. This case highlights the value of novel multimodality imaging techniques in the risk stratification and management of patients with resuscitated cardiac arrest.

  3. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques (fusion imaging).

    PubMed

    Sandulescu, Daniela Larisa; Dumitrescu, Daniela; Rogoveanu, Ion; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate non-invasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location, size, and morphology. Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and molecular (single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography) imaging modalities. One example is real-time virtual sonography, which combines ultrasound (grayscale, colour Doppler, or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging) with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI. The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence, direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities, more precise monitoring of interventional procedures, and reduced radiation exposure.

  4. Tissue Doppler imaging in cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Smedema, J P

    2008-07-01

    A middle-aged African lady, who presented with ventricular tachycardias, mitral valve regurgitation and congestive heart failure, was diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis. Tissue Doppler imaging demonstrated abnormalities suggestive of myocardial scar, which was confirmed by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance.

  5. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  6. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  7. [Hybrid imaging: clinical evidence, opportunities].

    PubMed

    Trencsényi, György; Barna, Sándor Kristóf; Garai, Ildikó

    2015-12-27

    Nowadays the hybrid imaging technologies which combine the modern equipments of radiology and nuclear medicine play an important role in both the translational research process and clinical diagnostics. Among the routine diagnostic imaging procedures positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography combined with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging currently belong to the most advanced techniques allowing that functional and morphological images can be superimposed on each other in the same position. The hybrid imaging equipments provide useful information about the pathological processes in the body due to their high sensibility and resolution. Furthermore, with the help of these imaging modalities we can get acquainted with the biochemical and pathobiochemical processes that are essential for understanding and treating diseases, or getting acquainted with the behaviour of a new drug candidate. With the help of the clinical and preclinical non-invasive in vivo molecular imaging systems the drug developing process can be shortened and its costs can be reduced.

  8. Nuclear Imaging of a Cardiac Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Almenieir, Nada; Karls, Shawn; Derbekyan, Vilma; Lisbona, Robert

    2017-09-01

    We report a case of a cardiac paraganglioma in the right atrioventricular groove in which the use of different nuclear medicine studies aided in the diagnosis. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  9. Cardiac Imaging in Heart Failure with Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chiew; Chen, Sylvia; Iyngkaran, Pupalan

    2017-01-01

    Imaging modalities stand at the frontiers for progress in congestive heart failure (CHF) screening, risk stratification and monitoring. Advancements in echocardiography (ECHO) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have allowed for improved tissue characterizations, cardiac motion analysis, and cardiac performance analysis under stress. Common cardiac comorbidities such as hypertension, metabolic syndromes and chronic renal failure contribute to cardiac remodeling, sharing similar pathophysiological mechanisms starting with interstitial changes, structural changes and finally clinical CHF. These imaging techniques can potentially detect changes earlier. Such information could have clinical benefits for screening, planning preventive therapies and risk stratifying patients. Imaging reports have often focused on traditional measures without factoring these novel parameters. This review is aimed at providing a synopsis on how we can use this information to assess and monitor improvements for CHF with comorbidities.

  10. Fabricating a hybrid imaging device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadsworth, Mark (Inventor); Atlas, Gene (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid detector or imager includes two substrates fabricated under incompatible processes. An array of detectors, such as charged-coupled devices, are formed on the first substrate using a CCD fabrication process, such as a buried channel or peristaltic process. One or more charge-converting amplifiers are formed on a second substrate using a CMOS fabrication process. The two substrates are then bonded together to form a hybrid detector.

  11. Hybrid 3D printing: a game-changer in personalized cardiac medicine?

    PubMed

    Kurup, Harikrishnan K N; Samuel, Bennett P; Vettukattil, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing in congenital heart disease has the potential to increase procedural efficiency and patient safety by improving interventional and surgical planning and reducing radiation exposure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are usually the source datasets to derive 3D printing. More recently, 3D echocardiography has been demonstrated to derive 3D-printed models. The integration of multiple imaging modalities for hybrid 3D printing has also been shown to create accurate printed heart models, which may prove to be beneficial for interventional cardiologists, cardiothoracic surgeons, and as an educational tool. Further advancements in the integration of different imaging modalities into a single platform for hybrid 3D printing and virtual 3D models will drive the future of personalized cardiac medicine.

  12. Role of Cardiac MR Imaging in Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac MR imaging has made major inroads in the new millennium in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis for patients with cardiomyopathies. Imaging of left and right ventricular structure and function and tissue characterization with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as well as T1 and T2 mapping enable accurate diagnosis of the underlying etiology. In the setting of coronary artery disease, either transmurality of LGE or contractile reserve in response to dobutamine can assess the likelihood of recovery of function after revascularization. The presence of scar reduces the likelihood of a response to medical therapy and to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure. The presence and extent of LGE relate to overall cardiovascular outcome in cardiomyopathies. A major role for cardiac MR imaging in cardiomyopathies is to identify myocardial scar for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  13. Advances in radionuclide imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Kouranos, V; Wells, A U; Sharma, R; Underwood, S R; Wechalekar, K

    2015-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging for the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis has advanced significantly in recent years. This article is based on published clinical guidelines, literature review and our collective clinical experience. Gallium-67 scintigraphy is among the diagnostic criteria for cardiac involvement in systemic sarcoidosis, and it is strongly associated with response to treatment. However, fluorine-18, 2-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is now preferred both for diagnosis and for assessing prognosis. Most data are from small observational studies that are potentially biased. Quantitative imaging to assess changes in disease activity in response to treatment may lead to FDG-PET having an important routine role in managing cardiac sarcoidosis. Larger prospective studies are required, particularly to assess the effectiveness of radionuclide imaging in improving clinical management and outcome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. First-Generation Hybrid Compact Compton Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M; Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Krings, T; Lange, D; Hull, E; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Protic, D; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-07

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are pursuing the development of a gamma-ray imaging system using the Compton effect. We have built our first generation hybrid Compton imaging system, and we have conducted initial calibration and image measurements using this system. In this paper, we present the details of the hybrid Compton imaging system and initial calibration and image measurements.

  15. Hybrid Avalanche Photodiode Array Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Hiroaki

    A hybrid avalanche photodiode (APD) array is a vacuum tube containing a photocathode and an array of avalanche photodiodes. It is a hybrid device that combines a traditional phototube technology and an advanced semiconductor technology. A photon produces a photoelectron with quantum efficiency at the photocathode. Unlike a phototube with dynodes, multiplication of the photoelectron is provided by a bombardment of the accelerated photoelectron into the avalanche photodiode resulting in a number of electron-hole pairs and a subsequent avalanche multiplication of the secondary electrons at the pn junction of the reverse-biased diode. The resulting total gain ranging from 104 to 105 is large enough to retain a single-photon sensitivity by using low-noise amplifiers. Segmentation of the pn junction of the diode provides the position information of an incident photoelectron and enables imaging of an incident photon. We report the recent progress on R&D of a single-pixel large format hybrid APD and a multipixel hybrid APD array. A hybrid avalanche photodiode (APD) array is a vacuum tube containing a photocathode and an array of avalanche photodiodes. It is a hybrid device that combines a traditional phototube technology and an advanced semiconductor technology. A photon produces a photoelectron with quantum efficiency at the photocathode. Unlike a phototube with dynodes, multiplication of the photoelectron is provided by a bombardment of the accelerated photoelectron into the avalanche photodiode resulting in a number of electron-hole pairs and a subsequent avalanche multiplication of the secondary electrons at the pn junction of the reverse-biased diode. The resulting total gain ranging from 104 to 105 is large enough to retain a single-photon sensitivity by using low-noise amplifiers. Segmentation of the pn junction of the diode provides the position information of an incident photoelectron and enables imaging of an incident photon. We report the recent progress on R

  16. Cardiac sarcoidosis diagnosed by multimodality imaging.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kana; Garcia, Mario J

    2017-09-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with frequent premature ventricular contractions (PVC) and akinesis of the basal septum on echocardiography. Coronary angiography was normal. Cardiac magnetic resonance showed mid-wall enhancement. Positron emission tomography showed a perfusion defect at the same location using 13N-ammonia, but increased 18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. These findings supported the diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis. High-dose steroids initially reduced frequency of PVCs but had to be withdrawn due to severe side effects. An ICD was implanted. Our case demonstrates the utility of multimodality imaging to diagnose and guide management of this entity. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Radiation from Cardiac Imaging Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... for all coronary artery calcium scores. Questions for Nuclear Stress Tests Does the laboratory avoid using thallium ... be used to generate the images for a nuclear stress test. One, called thallium 201, exposes patients ...

  18. Ultrasound imaging in teaching cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher D; Montgomery, Laura E A; Quinn, Joe G; Roe, Sean M; Stewart, Michael T; Tansey, Etain A

    2016-09-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such as stroke volume, ejection fraction, and cardiac output. By repeating the measurements from a subject after a brief exercise period, an increase in stroke volume and ejection fraction are easily demonstrable, potentially with or without an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (which indicates preload). Thus, factors that affect cardiac performance can readily be discussed. This activity may be performed as a practical demonstration and visualized using an overhead projector or networked computers, concentrating on using the ultrasound images to teach basic physiological principles. This has proved to be highly popular with students, who reported a significant improvement in their understanding of Frank-Starling's law of the heart with ultrasound imaging.

  19. Simulating cardiac ultrasound image based on MR diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Lu, Guolan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac ultrasound simulation can have important applications in the design of ultrasound systems, understanding the interaction effect between ultrasound and tissue and setting the ground truth for validating quantification methods. Current ultrasound simulation methods fail to simulate the myocardial intensity anisotropies. New simulation methods are needed in order to simulate realistic ultrasound images of the heart. Methods: The proposed cardiac ultrasound image simulation method is based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data of the heart. The method utilizes both the cardiac geometry and the fiber orientation information to simulate the anisotropic intensities in B-mode ultrasound images. Before the simulation procedure, the geometry and fiber orientations of the heart are obtained from high-resolution structural MRI and DTI data, respectively. The simulation includes two important steps. First, the backscatter coefficients of the point scatterers inside the myocardium are processed according to the fiber orientations using an anisotropic model. Second, the cardiac ultrasound images are simulated with anisotropic myocardial intensities. The proposed method was also compared with two other nonanisotropic intensity methods using 50 B-mode ultrasound image volumes of five different rat hearts. The simulated images were also compared with the ultrasound images of a diseased rat heart in vivo. A new segmental evaluation method is proposed to validate the simulation results. The average relative errors (AREs) of five parameters, i.e., mean intensity, Rayleigh distribution parameter σ, and first, second, and third quartiles, were utilized as the evaluation metrics. The simulated images were quantitatively compared with real ultrasound images in both ex vivo and in vivo experiments. Results: The proposed ultrasound image simulation method can realistically simulate cardiac ultrasound images of the heart using high-resolution MR-DTI data. The AREs of their

  20. Establishing a cardiac imaging rotation in radiology residency.

    PubMed

    Zaheer, Atif; Raptopoulos, Vassilios

    2006-07-01

    The advent of new technologies for cardiac imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cardiac computed tomography (CT) have added new tools in the armamentarium of noninvasive methods for predicting cardiac disease. However, training in cardiac anatomy and physiology is critical if radiology is to meet the demands of this service. We designed a core rotation in cardiac imaging at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, to train residents in noninvasive cardiac imaging methods, such as cardiac echocardiography, nuclear cardiac imaging, cardiac MRI, and with special emphasis on cardiac CT. This 1-month block includes cardiac imaging conferences and a lecture series, hands-on training in the use of imaging software, introduction to cardiac catheterization, and clinical cardiology. Residents are provided with a set of research and review articles along with textbooks on coronary imaging to serve as references for this rotation. We believe that this educational exercise will establish a core of young, knowledgeable, and capable physicians who will be able to meet the clinical demand for noninvasive cardiac imaging and maintain a major role in this emerging specialty.

  1. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  2. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding.

  3. Update on cardiac imaging techniques 2013.

    PubMed

    García-Orta, Rocío; Mahía-Casado, Patricia; Gómez de Diego, José J; Barba-Cosials, Joaquín; Rodriguez-Palomares, José F; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; Candell-Riera, Jaume

    2014-02-01

    Cardiac imaging is a cornerstone of diagnosis in heart conditions, and an essential tool for assessing prognosis and establishing treatment decisions. This year, echocardiography stands out as a guide in interventional procedures and in choosing the size of the prosthesis. It is also proving to be a valuable technique in low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis. Three-dimensional echocardiography is advancing our knowledge of cardiac anatomy and valvular measurements. The parameters indicating tissue deformation have predictive power in valve disease and in the follow-up of drug-induced cardiotoxicity. Single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography are proving useful in ischemic heart disease and in the diagnosis of cardiac inflammation and infections. The role of computed tomography has been strengthened in noninvasive coronary angiography, the emergency room management of chest pain, assessment of chronic occlusions, and morphologic study of coronary plaque. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for tissue characterization in ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathies, and is assuming a greater role in stress studies and in the assessment of myocardial viability. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantifying the Area at Risk in Reperfused ST-Segment-Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients Using Hybrid Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography-Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bulluck, Heerajnarain; White, Steven K; Fröhlich, Georg M; Casson, Steven G; O'Meara, Celia; Newton, Ayla; Nicholas, Jennifer; Weale, Peter; Wan, Simon M Y; Sirker, Alex; Moon, James C; Yellon, Derek M; Groves, Ashley; Menezes, Leon; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2016-03-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance allows the advantages of magnetic resonance in tissue characterizing the myocardium to be combined with the unique metabolic insights of positron emission tomography. We hypothesized that the area of reduced myocardial glucose uptake would closely match the area at risk delineated by T2 mapping in ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Hybrid positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for glucose uptake was performed in 21 ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients at a median of 5 days. Follow-up scans were performed in a subset of patients 12 months later. The area of reduced FDG uptake was significantly larger than the infarct size quantified by late gadolinium enhancement (37.2±11.6% versus 22.3±11.7%; P<0.001) and closely matched the area at risk by T2 mapping (37.2±11.6% versus 36.3±12.2%; P=0.10, R=0.98, bias 0.9±4.4%). On the follow-up scans, the area of reduced FDG uptake was significantly smaller in size when compared with the acute scans (19.5 [6.3%-31.8%] versus 44.0 [21.3%-55.3%]; P=0.002) and closely correlated with the areas of late gadolinium enhancement (R 0.98) with a small bias of 2.0±5.6%. An FDG uptake of ≥45% on the acute scans could predict viable myocardium on the follow-up scan. Both transmural extent of late gadolinium enhancement and FDG uptake on the acute scan performed equally well to predict segmental wall motion recovery. Hybrid positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance in the reperfused ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients showed reduced myocardial glucose uptake within the area at risk and closely matched the area at risk delineated by T2 mapping. FDG uptake, as well as transmural extent of late gadolinium enhancement, acutely can identify viable myocardial segments. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Imaging of Cardiac Valves by Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Feuchtner, Gudrun

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes “how to” examine cardiac valves with computed tomography, the normal, diseased valves, and prosthetic valves. A review of current scientific literature is provided. Firstly, technical basics, “how to” perform and optimize a multislice CT scan and “how to” interpret valves on CT images are outlined. Then, diagnostic imaging of the entire spectrum of specific valvular disease by CT, including prosthetic heart valves, is highlighted. The last part gives a guide “how to” use CT for planning of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), an emerging effective treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. A special focus is placed on clinical applications of cardiac CT in the context of valvular disease. PMID:24490107

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging predicts cardiac catheter findings for great artery stenosis in children with congenital cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Oswal, Nilesh; Sullivan, Ian; Khambadkone, Sachin; Taylor, Andrew M; Hughes, Marina L

    2012-04-01

    To assess the cardiac catheterisation findings of all children in whom cardiac magnetic resonance imaging found great artery stenosis. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all 45 consecutive children with congenital cardiac disease who were undergoing cardiac catheterisation for intervention on cardiac magnetic resonance-defined great vessel stenosis, between January, 2006 and August, 2008. Following cardiac magnetic resonance, 60 significant great vessel stenoses were identified and referred to cardiac catheterisation for intervention. All patients were catheterised within a median and interquartile range of 84 and 4-149 days, respectively, of cardiac magnetic resonance. At cardiac catheterisation, the children were aged 11.5 years - with an interquartile range of 3.8-16.9 years - and weighed 34 kilograms - with an interquartile range of 15-56 kilograms. Comparing cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac catheterisation findings, 53 (88%) findings were concordant and seven were discordant. In six of seven (86%) discordant observations, cardiac magnetic resonance defined moderate-severe great vessel stenosis - involving three branch pulmonary arteries and three aortas. This was not confirmed by cardiac catheterisation, which revealed mild stenoses and haemodynamic gradients insufficient for intervention. In one patient, a mild, proximal right pulmonary artery narrowing was found at cardiac catheterisation, which was not mentioned in the cardiac magnetic resonance report. There was no difference between discordant and concordant groups on the basis of patient age, weight, interval between cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac catheterisation, or type of lesion. Invasive assessment confirmed cardiac magnetic resonance-diagnosed great vessel stenosis in the majority of this cohort. The predominant discordant finding was lower catherisation gradient than predicted by morphologic and functional cardiac magnetic resonance assessment. Flow volume diversion - for

  7. Update on cardiac imaging techniques 2014.

    PubMed

    Mahía-Casado, Patricia; García-Orta, Rocío; Gómez de Diego, José J; Barba-Cosials, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Palomares, José F; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we review the contributions of the most important imaging techniques used in cardiology, reported in 2014. Echocardiography remains the cornerstone for diagnosing and monitoring valvular heart disease, and there has been a continuing effort to improve quantification of this condition and obtain prognostic parameters for follow-up. The study of regional myocardial function is anchored in the diagnosis of subclinical ventricular dysfunction, and 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography has become the perfect ally in interventional procedures for structural heart disease. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are the focus of most publications on cardiac imaging in ischemic heart disease, reflecting their consolidated use in clinical practice. Nuclear medicine excels in the study of myocardial viability after interventional treatment of acute coronary syndromes and its performance is validated in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    PubMed Central

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda; Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Volpe, Gustavo Jardim; Trad, Henrique Simão; Schmidt, André

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. Objective To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Methods Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Results Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). Conclusion CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility. PMID:23887734

  9. Multimodality Imaging of a Silent Cardiac Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Cresti, Alberto; Chiavarelli, Mario; Munezero Butorano, Marie Aimèe Gloria; Franci, Luca

    2015-01-01

    A 74-year-old man underwent echocardiographic exam for hypertension screening. A fixed plurilobulated mass originating from the right ventricular lateral wall and occupying half of the cavity was incidentally diagnosed. On cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) it appeared homogeneous, intermediate-to-high signal on T1-weighted, and diffusely hyperintense on T2-weighted images. First pass enhancement was late and heterogeneous and no late gadolinium enhancement was present. Computed tomography (CT) showed no extracardiac infiltration, the feeding artery was a branch of therightcoronary artery. The tumor was excised and histological examination demonstrated a hemangioma of the cavernous type. The postoperative course was uneventful. From 1998 to 2014, four cardiac hemangiomas have been diagnosed in our Department, accounting for 8.7% of all primary cardiac tumors and for 9.5% of all benign forms; estimated population prevalence was 0.11/100.000 inhabitants/year. The hemodynamic consequences of unoperated cardiac hemangiomas cannot be predicted and therefore, resection is recommended. PMID:28465926

  10. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Cannon, P.J. )

    1991-09-01

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references.

  11. Imaging of cardiac electrical excitation conduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D F; Jiang, S Q; Zhu, J C; Zhao, C; Yan, Y R; Gronemeyer, D; Van Leeuwen, P

    2015-08-01

    We present a multiple time windows beamformer (MTWB) method of solving the inverse problem of magnetic field and non-invasively imaging the cardiac electrical excitation conduction using the magnetocardiac signals acquired by a 61-channel superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The MTWB constructs spatial filters for each location in source space, one for each component of the source moment based on the distributed source model, and estimates the cardiac equivalent current sources. The output of spatial filters is the source strength estimated in three-dimensional space and the weight matrix calculated with magnetocardiac signals in multiple time windows. A signal subspace projection technique is used to suppress noise. Then, the characteristics of cardiac electrical excitation conduction among two healthy subjects and two coronary vessel stenosis (CVS) patients are extracted from reconstructed current sources with maximum strength at each instant during QRS complex and ST-T segment, and a series of two-dimensional cardiac electrical excitation conduction maps (EECM) are obtained. It is demonstrated that two healthy subjects are of similar and the stronger electrical activities than those of two CVS patients. This technique can be used as an effective tool for the diagnosis of heart diseases.

  12. Cardiac phase detection in intravascular ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica M. S.; Lemos, Pedro Alves; Yoneyama, Takashi; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi

    2008-03-01

    Image gating is related to image modalities that involve quasi-periodic moving organs. Therefore, during intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination, there is cardiac movement interference. In this paper, we aim to obtain IVUS gated images based on the images themselves. This would allow the reconstruction of 3D coronaries with temporal accuracy for any cardiac phase, which is an advantage over the ECG-gated acquisition that shows a single one. It is also important for retrospective studies, as in existing IVUS databases there are no additional reference signals (ECG). From the images, we calculated signals based on average intensity (AI), and, from consecutive frames, average intensity difference (AID), cross-correlation coefficient (CC) and mutual information (MI). The process includes a wavelet-based filter step and ascendant zero-cross detection in order to obtain the phase information. Firstly, we tested 90 simulated sequences with 1025 frames each. Our method was able to achieve more than 95.0% of true positives and less than 2.3% of false positives ratio, for all signals. Afterwards, we tested in a real examination, with 897 frames and ECG as gold-standard. We achieved 97.4% of true positives (CC and MI), and 2.5% of false positives. For future works, methodology should be tested in wider range of IVUS examinations.

  13. Stress imaging in congenital cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Robbers-Visser, Daniëlle; Luijnenburg, Saskia E; van den Berg, Jochem; Moelker, Adriaan; Helbing, Willem A

    2009-12-01

    In patients with coronary arterial disease, stress imaging is able to demonstrate abnormalities in the motion of the ventricular walls, and abnormalities in coronary arterial perfusion not apparent at rest. It can also provide information on prognostic factors. In patients with congenitally malformed hearts, stress imaging is used to determine contractile reserve, abnormalities of mural motion, and global systolic function, but also to assess diastolic and vascular function. In most of these patients, stress is usually induced using pharmacological agents, mainly dobutamine given in varying doses. The clinical usefulness of abnormal responses to the stress induced in such patients has to be addressed in follow-up studies. The abnormal stress might serve as surrogate endpoints, predicting primary endpoints at an early stage, which are useful for stratification of risk in this population of growing patients. We review here the stress imaging studies performed to date in patients with congenitally malformed hearts, with a special emphasis on echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Cardiac MR imaging: current status and future direction.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Maythem; Van, Tu Anh; Krug, Roland; Hetts, Steven W; Wilson, Mark W

    2015-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is currently a worldwide epidemic with increasing impact on healthcare systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences give complementary information on LV function, regional perfusion, angiogenesis, myocardial viability and orientations of myocytes. T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR), fat suppression and black blood sequences have been frequently used for detecting edematous area at risk (AAR) of infarction. T2 mapping, however, indicated that the edematous reaction in acute myocardial infarct (AMI) is not stable and warranted the use of edematous area in evaluating therapies. On the other hand, cine MRI demonstrated reproducible data on LV function in healthy volunteers and LV remodeling in patients. Noninvasive first pass perfusion, using exogenous tracer (gadolinium-based contrast media) and arterial spin labeling MRI, using endogenous tracer (water), are sensitive and useful techniques for evaluating myocardial perfusion and angiogenesis. Recently, new strategies have been developed to quantify myocardial viability using T1-mapping and equilibrium contrast enhanced MR techniques because existing delayed contrast enhancement MRI (DE-MRI) sequences are limited in detecting patchy microinfarct and diffuse fibrosis. These new techniques were successfully used for characterizing diffuse myocardial fibrosis associated with myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis heart failure, aortic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension). Diffusion MRI provides information regarding microscopic tissue structure, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) helps to characterize the myocardium and monitor the process of LV remodeling after AMI. Novel trends in hybrid imaging, such as cardiac positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and optical imaging/MRI, are recently under intensive investigation. With the promise of higher spatial

  15. Cardiac MR imaging: current status and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Van, Tu Anh; Krug, Roland; Hetts, Steven W.; Wilson, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is currently a worldwide epidemic with increasing impact on healthcare systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences give complementary information on LV function, regional perfusion, angiogenesis, myocardial viability and orientations of myocytes. T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR), fat suppression and black blood sequences have been frequently used for detecting edematous area at risk (AAR) of infarction. T2 mapping, however, indicated that the edematous reaction in acute myocardial infarct (AMI) is not stable and warranted the use of edematous area in evaluating therapies. On the other hand, cine MRI demonstrated reproducible data on LV function in healthy volunteers and LV remodeling in patients. Noninvasive first pass perfusion, using exogenous tracer (gadolinium-based contrast media) and arterial spin labeling MRI, using endogenous tracer (water), are sensitive and useful techniques for evaluating myocardial perfusion and angiogenesis. Recently, new strategies have been developed to quantify myocardial viability using T1-mapping and equilibrium contrast enhanced MR techniques because existing delayed contrast enhancement MRI (DE-MRI) sequences are limited in detecting patchy microinfarct and diffuse fibrosis. These new techniques were successfully used for characterizing diffuse myocardial fibrosis associated with myocarditis, amyloidosis, sarcoidosis heart failure, aortic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, congenital heart disease, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia and hypertension). Diffusion MRI provides information regarding microscopic tissue structure, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) helps to characterize the myocardium and monitor the process of LV remodeling after AMI. Novel trends in hybrid imaging, such as cardiac positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI and optical imaging/MRI, are recently under intensive investigation. With the promise of higher spatial

  16. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Bradly J.; Guenther, David C.

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  17. Synchronized, interactive teleconferencing with digital cardiac images.

    PubMed

    Walsh, C; Cosgrave, J; Crean, P; Murray, D; Walsh, R; Kennedy, J; Buckley, M; O'Hare, N

    2006-03-01

    St James's Hospital is a tertiary referral center for percutaneous intervention and cardiothoracic surgery for a number of referring hospitals. This article reports on the development and implementation of a synchronized, interactive teleconferencing system for cardiac images that links St. James's Hospital with a remote site (Sligo General Hospital) and overcomes the problems of transmission of large image files. Teleconferencing was achieved by setting up lossless auto transmission of patient files overnight and conferencing the next morning with linked control signals and databases. As a suitable product was not available, a commercially new software was developed. The system links the imaging databases, monitors and synchronizes progress through imaging sequences, and links a range of image processing and control functions. All parties to the conference are ensured that they are looking at the same images as they are played or at specific aspects of an image that the other party is highlighting. The system allows patient management decisions to be made at a weekly joint teleconference with cardiothoracic surgeons and interventional cardiologists from both sites. Rapid decision making was facilitated with 70% of decisions obtained within 24 h, and 88% within 1 week of their procedure. In urgent cases, data can be transmitted within 20 min of the diagnostic procedure. The system allows increased access to angiography for patients living in rural areas, and provides a more focused referral for revascularization. Participation of the referring cardiologist has improved the quality of decision making.

  18. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal

  19. Imaging cardiac extracellular matrices: a blueprint for regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jangwook P.; Squirrell, Jayne M.; Lyons, Gary E.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    Once damaged, cardiac tissue does not readily repair and is therefore a primary target of regenerative therapies. One regenerative approach is the development of scaffolds that functionally mimic the cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) to deliver stem cells or cardiac precursor populations to the heart. Technological advances in micro/nanotechnology, stem cell biology, biomaterials and tissue decellularization have propelled this promising approach forward. Surprisingly, technological advances in optical imaging methods have not been fully utilized in the field of cardiac regeneration. Here, we describe and provide examples to demonstrate how advanced imaging techniques could revolutionize how ECM-mimicking cardiac tissues are informed and evaluated. PMID:22209562

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of congestive cardiac failure.

    PubMed

    Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2012-07-01

    Congestive cardiac failure is the end-result of various cardiac disorders, and is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality, and financial burden throughout the world. Due to advances in the knowledge of the disease and scanner technology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the evaluation of cardiac failure, including in establishing diagnosis, problem solving, risk stratification, and monitoring of therapy. This review discusses and illustrates the role of MRI in the assessment of congestive cardiac failure.

  1. Ultrasound image guidance of cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terry M.; Pace, Danielle F.; Lang, Pencilla; Guiraudon, Gérard M.; Jones, Douglas L.; Linte, Cristian A.

    2011-03-01

    Surgical procedures often have the unfortunate side-effect of causing the patient significant trauma while accessing the target site. Indeed, in some cases the trauma inflicted on the patient during access to the target greatly exceeds that caused by performing the therapy. Heart disease has traditionally been treated surgically using open chest techniques with the patient being placed "on pump" - i.e. their circulation being maintained by a cardio-pulmonary bypass or "heart-lung" machine. Recently, techniques have been developed for performing minimally invasive interventions on the heart, obviating the formerly invasive procedures. These new approaches rely on pre-operative images, combined with real-time images acquired during the procedure. Our approach is to register intra-operative images to the patient, and use a navigation system that combines intra-operative ultrasound with virtual models of instrumentation that has been introduced into the chamber through the heart wall. This paper illustrates the problems associated with traditional ultrasound guidance, and reviews the state of the art in real-time 3D cardiac ultrasound technology. In addition, it discusses the implementation of an image-guided intervention platform that integrates real-time ultrasound with a virtual reality environment, bringing together the pre-operative anatomy derived from MRI or CT, representations of tracked instrumentation inside the heart chamber, and the intra-operatively acquired ultrasound images.

  2. [Hybrid operation theatre from the point of view of cardiac surgery. The future for the heart team].

    PubMed

    Börgermann, J; Jategaonkar, S; Haas, N; Gummert, J F; Ensminger, S M

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, increasing numbers of procedures jointly conducted by cardiac surgeons and cardiologists are performed as minimally invasive surgical procedures or interventions. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation, endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and a large variety of hybrid procedures for congenital heart disease have become current standards. Some of these hybrid procedures were shown to improve the therapeutic safety and efficacy, effects particularly true for high-risk patients and complex interventions. Hybrid procedures require indirect imaging, commonly provided by an angiography system in the hybrid operation theatre. This article describes the technical prerequisites required for a hybrid operation theatre as well as indications and rationales for hybrid procedures conducted in this environment. It is likely that the indications for cardiovascular hybrid procedures will continue to be expanded and that the hybrid operation theatre may become a laboratory for developing innovative approaches in the cardiovascular field. Therefore, the hybrid operation theatre will not only be the working environment for hybrid surgeons and interventionalists but also help to evolve their future.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiac amyloidosis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, J.K.; Go, R.T.; Bott-Silverman, C.; Feiglin, D.H.; Salcedo, E.; MacIntyre, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    Primary amyloidosis (AL) involves the myocardium in 90% of cases and may present as apparent ischemia, vascular disease, or congestive heart failure. Two-dimensional echocardiography (echo) has proven useful in the diagnosis, particularly in differentiating AL from constrictive pericarditis. The findings of thickened RV and LV myocardium, normal LV cavity dimension, and a diffuse hyperrefractile ''granular sparkling'' appearance are virtually diagnostic. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may improve the resolution of anatomic changes seen in cardiac AL and has the potential to provide more specific information based on biochemical tissue alterations. In this preliminary study, the authors obtained both MR and echo images in six patients with AL and biopsy-proven myocardial involvement. 5/6 patients also had Tc-99 PYP myocardial studies including emission tomography (SPECT). MR studies utilized a 0.6 Tesla superconductive magnet. End diastolic gated images were obtained with TE=30msec and TR=R-R interval on the ECG. 6/6 pts. showed LV wall thickening which was concentric and included the septum. Papillary muscles were identified in all and were enlarged in 3/6. 4/6 pts. showed RV wall thickening but to a lesser degree than LV. Pericardial effusions were present in 4 cases. These findings correlated well with the results of echo although MR gave better RV free wall resolution. PYP scans were positive in 3 pts. but there was no correlation with degree of LV thickening. The authors conclude that there are no identifiable MR findings in patients with cardiac AL which encourage further attempts to characterize myocardial involvement by measurement of MR relaxation times in vivo.

  4. High-resolution high-speed panoramic cardiac imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Evertson (In Memoriam), Dale W.; Holcomb, Mark R.; Eames, Matthew D.C.; Bray, Mark-Anthony P.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Xu, Junkai; Wingard, Holley; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Woods, Marcella C.; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Wikswo, John P.

    2008-01-01

    A panoramic cardiac imaging system consisting of three high-speed CCD cameras has been developed to image the surface electrophysiology of a rabbit heart via fluorescence imaging using a voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye. A robust, unique mechanical system was designed to accommodate the three cameras and to adapt to the requirements of future experiments. A unified computer interface was created for this application – a single workstation controls all three CCD cameras, illumination, and stimulation, and the stepping motor rotates the heart. The geometric reconstruction algorithms were adapted from a previous cardiac imaging system. We demonstrate the system by imaging a polymorphic cardiac tachycardia. PMID:18334422

  5. Integrated imaging of cardiac anatomy, physiology, and viability.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, James A

    2009-03-01

    Technologic developments in imaging will have a significant impact on cardiac imaging over the next decade. These advances will permit more detailed assessment of cardiac anatomy, complex assessment of cardiac physiology, and integration of anatomic and physiologic data. The distinction between anatomic and physiologic imaging is important. For assessing patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease, physiologic and anatomic imaging data are complementary. The strength of anatomic imaging rests in its ability to detect the presence of disease, whereas physiologic imaging techniques assess the impact of disease, such as whether a coronary atherosclerotic lesion limits myocardial blood flow. Research indicates that physiologic data are more prognostically important than anatomic data, but both may be important in patient management decisions. Integrated cardiac imaging is an evolving field, with many potential indications. These include assessment of coronary stenosis, myocardial viability, anatomic and physiologic characterization of atherosclerotic plaque, and advanced molecular imaging.

  6. Biophotonic Modelling of Cardiac Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Martin J; Plank, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been recently applied to simulate and better understand the nature of fluorescent photon scattering and optical signal distortion during cardiac optical imaging. The goal of such models is both to provide a useful post-processing tool to facilitate a more accurate and faithful comparison between computational simulations of electrical activity and experiments, as well as providing essential insight into the mechanisms underlying this distortion, suggesting ways in which it may be controlled or indeed utilised to maximise the information derived from the recorded fluorescent signal. Here, we present different modelling methodologies developed and used in the field to simulate both the explicit processes involved in optical signal synthesis and the resulting consequences of the effects of photon scattering within the myocardium upon the optically-detected signal. We focus our attentions to two main types of modelling approaches used to simulate light transport in cardiac tissue, specifically continuous (reaction-diffusion) and discrete stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods. For each method, we provide both a summary of the necessary methodological details of such models, in addition to brief reviews of relevant application studies which have sought to apply these methods to elucidate important information regarding experimentally-recorded optical signals under different circumstances.

  7. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  8. Cardiac tissue Doppler imaging in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Anne; Scharhag, Jürgen; Kindermann, Wilfried; Urhausen, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The differentiation of training-induced cardiac adaptations from pathological conditions is a key issue in sports cardiology. As morphological features do not allow for a clear delineation of early stages of relevant pathologies, the echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function is the technique of first choice in this regard. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a relatively recent method for the assessment of cardiac function that provides direct, local measurements of myocardial velocities throughout the cardiac cycle. Although it has shown a superior sensitivity in the detection of ventricular dysfunction in clinical and experimental studies, its application in sports medicine is still rare. Besides technical factors, this may be due to a lack in consensus on the characteristics of ventricular function in relevant conditions. For more than two decades there has been an ongoing debate on the existence of a supernormal left ventricular function in athlete's heart. While results from traditional echocardiography are conflicting, TDI studies established an improved diastolic function in endurance-trained athletes with athlete's heart compared with controls.The influence of anabolic steroids on cardiac function also has been investigated by standard echocardiographic techniques with inconsistent results. The only TDI study dealing with this topic demonstrated a significantly impaired diastolic function in bodybuilders with long-term abuse of anabolic steroids compared with strength-trained athletes without abuse of anabolic steroids and controls, respectively.Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequent cause of sudden death in young athletes. However, in its early stages, it is difficult to distinguish from athlete's heart. By means of TDI, ventricular dysfunction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be disclosed even before the development of left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, a differentiation of left ventricular hypertrophy due to hypertrophic

  9. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: patient safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Giroletti, Elio; Corbucci, Giorgio

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used in medicine. In cardiology, it is used to assess congenital or acquired diseases of the heat: and large vessels. Unless proper precautions are taken, it is generally advisable to avoid using this technique in patients with implanted electronic stimulators, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, on account of the potential risk of inducing electrical currents on the endocardial catheters, since these currents might stimulate the heart at a high frequency, thereby triggering dangerous arrhythmias. In addition to providing some basic information on pacemakers, defibrillators and MRI, and on the possible physical phenomena that may produce harmful effects, the present review examines the indications given in the literature, with particular reference to coronary stents, artificial heart valves and implantable cardiac stimulators.

  10. ASCI 2010 contrast media guideline for cardiac imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group.

    PubMed

    Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Chan, Carmen; Yu, Wei; Yong, Hwan Seok; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2010-12-01

    The use of contrast media for cardiac imaging becomes increasing as the widespread of cardiac CT and cardiac MR. A radiologist needs to carefully consider the indication and the injection protocol of contrast media to be used as well as the possibility of adverse effect. There are several guidelines for contrast media in western countries. However, these are focusing the adverse effect of contrast media. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and created a guideline, which summarizes the integrated knowledge of contrast media for cardiac imaging. In cardiac imaging, coronary artery evaluation is feasible by non-contrast MR angiography, which can be an alternative examination in high risk patients for the use of iodine contrast media. Furthermore, the body habitus of Asian patients is usually smaller than that of their western counterparts. This necessitates modifications in the injection protocol and in the formula for calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate. This guideline provided fundamental information for the use of contrast media for Asian patients in cardiac imaging.

  11. ASCI 2010 contrast media guideline for cardiac imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Chan, Carmen; Yu, Wei; Yong, Hwan Seok; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2010-01-01

    The use of contrast media for cardiac imaging becomes increasing as the widespread of cardiac CT and cardiac MR. A radiologist needs to carefully consider the indication and the injection protocol of contrast media to be used as well as the possibility of adverse effect. There are several guidelines for contrast media in western countries. However, these are focusing the adverse effect of contrast media. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and created a guideline, which summarizes the integrated knowledge of contrast media for cardiac imaging. In cardiac imaging, coronary artery evaluation is feasible by non-contrast MR angiography, which can be an alternative examination in high risk patients for the use of iodine contrast media. Furthermore, the body habitus of Asian patients is usually smaller than that of their western counterparts. This necessitates modifications in the injection protocol and in the formula for calculation of estimated glomerular filtration rate. This guideline provided fundamental information for the use of contrast media for Asian patients in cardiac imaging. PMID:20931289

  12. Extracting cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B.; Kirshbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (<20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  13. Extracting Cardiac Myofiber Orientations from High Frequency Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xulei; Cong, Zhibin; Jiang, Rong; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B; Kishbom, Paul; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-29

    Cardiac myofiber plays an important role in stress mechanism during heart beating periods. The orientation of myofibers decides the effects of the stress distribution and the whole heart deformation. It is important to image and quantitatively extract these orientations for understanding the cardiac physiological and pathological mechanism and for diagnosis of chronic diseases. Ultrasound has been wildly used in cardiac diagnosis because of its ability of performing dynamic and noninvasive imaging and because of its low cost. An extraction method is proposed to automatically detect the cardiac myofiber orientations from high frequency ultrasound images. First, heart walls containing myofibers are imaged by B-mode high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound imaging. Second, myofiber orientations are extracted from ultrasound images using the proposed method that combines a nonlinear anisotropic diffusion filter, Canny edge detector, Hough transform, and K-means clustering. This method is validated by the results of ultrasound data from phantoms and pig hearts.

  14. Multimodality Imaging in Cardiac Sarcoidosis: Is There a Winner?

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Irving E.; Garcia, Mario J.; Taub, Cynthia C.

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease of unknown cause that can affect the heart. Cardiac sarcoidosis may be present in as many as 25% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis, and it is frequently underdiagnosed. The early and accurate diagnosis of myocardial involvement is challenging. Advanced imaging techniques play important roles in the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. PMID:25784137

  15. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  16. A nonlinear, image domain filtering method for cardiac PET images

    SciTech Connect

    Farquhar, T.H.; Chinn, G.; Hoh, C.K.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1998-08-01

    An adaptive, nonlinear image domain filtering strategy is described which improves positron emission tomography (PET) images. The method was formulated to improve on the linear, low-pass filtering typically applied to each projection in the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm is a potential alternative to linear smoothing which reduces noise but degrades resolution; this method uses the FBP algorithm for reconstruction, but aims to incorporate some of the statistical information and nonlinear smoothing utilized in iterative reconstruction algorithms. The approach uses sinogram segmentation to separate the sinogram elements with higher and lower signal-to-noise ratios, and then reconstruct each with FBP using a more appropriate choice of filter and cut-off frequency. Also, this algorithm addresses the radial streak artifacts introduced by FBP. The algorithm was evaluated using simulations and clinical data of cardiac PET studies on an ECAT 931 PET scanner. The initial results suggest that this technique has advantages over the current clinical protocol. Images processed with the method show generally improved visual image quality and reduced radial streaks without the introduction of artifacts. In simulations, increased contrast recovery and resolution are realized without an increase in the background noise of the reconstructed images.

  17. Cardiac amyloidosis imaged by dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Pflederer, Tobias; Ropers, Dieter; Schmid, Michael; Wasmeier, Gerald; Söder, Stephan; Daniel, Werner G; Achenbach, Stephan

    2008-11-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been reported previously. Typical myocardial distribution patterns of "late enhancement" have been described for MRI. The same patterns can be observed in CT imaging, albeit at a lower signal to noise ratio. We report a case of cardiac amyloidosis with a typical pattern of subendocardial, circumferential late enhancement in all four cardiac chambers.

  18. Cardiac Strain Imaging With Coherent Compounding of Diverging Waves.

    PubMed

    Grondin, Julien; Sayseng, Vincent; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-08-01

    Current methods of cardiac strain imaging at high frame rate suffer from motion matching artifacts or poor lateral resolution. Coherent compounding has been shown to improve echocardiographic image quality while maintaining a high frame rate, but has never been used to image cardiac strain. However, myocardial velocity can have an impact on coherent compounding due to displacements between frames. The objective of this paper was to investigate the feasibility and performance of coherent compounding for cardiac strain imaging at a low and a high myocardial velocity. Left-ventricular contraction in short-axis view was modeled as an annulus with radial thickening and circumferential rotation. Simulated radio-frequency channel data with a cardiac phased array were obtained using three different beamforming methods: single diverging wave, coherent compounding of diverging waves, and conventional focusing. Axial and lateral displacements and strains as well as radial strains were estimated and compared to their true value. In vivo feasibility of cardiac strain imaging with coherent compounding was performed and compared to single diverging wave imaging. At low myocardial velocities, the axial, lateral, and radial strain relative error for nine compounded waves (16.3%, 40.4%, and 18.9%) were significantly lower than those obtained with single diverging wave imaging (19.9%, 80.3%, and 30.6%) and closer to that obtained with conventional focusing (16.7%, 43.7%, and 16%). In vivo left-ventricular radial strains exhibited higher quality with nine compounded waves than with single diverging wave imaging. These results indicate that cardiac strain can be imaged using coherent compounding of diverging waves with a better performance than with single diverging wave imaging while maintaining a high frame rate, and therefore, has the potential to improve diagnosis of myocardial strain-based cardiac diseases.

  19. Novel Nonlinear Hybrid Filters for Image Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shaomin

    1995-01-01

    Image noise removal and enhancement are important subjects in image processing. Nonlinear techniques for image enhancement and noise reduction challenge the linear techniques by improving image quality while removing noise. The purpose of this thesis is devoted to systematically unifying theory and techniques for mixed noise removal and image enhancement, and to developing new techniques for removing large amounts of mixed Gaussian and impulsive noise while preserving image details. In this thesis, we introduce three new hybrid filters which combine linear and nonlinear filters to produce new hybrid filters capable of removing large amounts of mixed noise. To efficiently use the ambiguous information in an image, both fuzzy set concepts and fuzzy logic operating rules are utilized in the filter design techniques. The three new filters include the single level trained fuzzy filter (SLTF), the multi-level adaptive fuzzy filter (MLAF), and the decision directed window adaptive hybrid filter (DDWAH). The SLTF filter is designed to remove large amounts of mixed noise by combining an impulse filter with a fuzzy filter. The efficiency of the SLTF filter in removing large amounts of mixed noise while preserving image edges is demonstrated. The MLAF filter is an adaptive SLTF filter which uses the local variance of image gray scales to adapt the weights used in the linear portion of the filter to local image statistics. The MLAF filter provides improved visual performance compared to the SLTF filter. The adaptive DDWAH filter uses local statistics to adapt the window size of the filter to local statistics. This approach prevents distortion of small objects in the image, and removes noise more effectively than non-adaptive filters. The experimental results clearly show the improved noise removal performance and good edge preservation properties. Theoretical analysis verifies the measured results.

  20. A hybrid technique for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nyma, Alamgir; Kang, Myeongsu; Kwon, Yung-Keun; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2012-01-01

    Medical image segmentation is an essential and challenging aspect in computer-aided diagnosis and also in pattern recognition research. This paper proposes a hybrid method for magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation. We first remove impulsive noise inherent in MR images by utilizing a vector median filter. Subsequently, Otsu thresholding is used as an initial coarse segmentation method that finds the homogeneous regions of the input image. Finally, an enhanced suppressed fuzzy c-means is used to partition brain MR images into multiple segments, which employs an optimal suppression factor for the perfect clustering in the given data set. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed approach in noisy environment, we add different types of noise and different amount of noise to T1-weighted brain MR images. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other FCM based algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy for both noise-free and noise-inserted MR images.

  1. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  2. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, Jr., David N.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  3. Feature tracking cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: A review of a novel non-invasive cardiac imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Zia Ur; Sethi, Pooja; Murtaza, Ghulam; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Rai, Aitzaz; Mahmod, Masliza; Schoondyke, Jeffrey; Albalbissi, Kais

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Early diagnostic markers are gaining popularity for better patient care disease outcomes. There is an increasing interest in noninvasive cardiac imaging biomarkers to diagnose subclinical cardiac disease. Feature tracking cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is a novel post-processing technique that is increasingly being employed to assess global and regional myocardial function. This technique has numerous applications in structural and functional diagnostics. It has been validated in multiple studies, although there is still a long way to go for it to become routine standard of care. PMID:28515849

  4. Images as drivers of progress in cardiac computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Lamata, Pablo; Casero, Ramón; Carapella, Valentina; Niederer, Steve A; Bishop, Martin J; Schneider, Jürgen E; Kohl, Peter; Grau, Vicente

    2014-08-01

    Computational models have become a fundamental tool in cardiac research. Models are evolving to cover multiple scales and physical mechanisms. They are moving towards mechanistic descriptions of personalised structure and function, including effects of natural variability. These developments are underpinned to a large extent by advances in imaging technologies. This article reviews how novel imaging technologies, or the innovative use and extension of established ones, integrate with computational models and drive novel insights into cardiac biophysics. In terms of structural characterization, we discuss how imaging is allowing a wide range of scales to be considered, from cellular levels to whole organs. We analyse how the evolution from structural to functional imaging is opening new avenues for computational models, and in this respect we review methods for measurement of electrical activity, mechanics and flow. Finally, we consider ways in which combined imaging and modelling research is likely to continue advancing cardiac research, and identify some of the main challenges that remain to be solved.

  5. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with an magnetic resonance imaging conditional permanent pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, Andrew J.; Artis, Nigel J.; Sivananthan, U. Mohan; Pepper, Chris B.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as the optimum modality for cardiac imaging. An aging population and rising numbers of patients with permanent pacemakers means many such individuals may require cardiac MRI scanning in the future. Whilst the presence of a permanent pacemaker is historically regarded as a contra-indication to MRI scanning, pacemaker systems have been developed to limit any associated risks. No reports have been published regarding the use of such devices with cardiac MRI in a clinical setting. We present the safe, successful cardiac MRI scan of a patient with an MRI-conditional permanent pacing system. PMID:22355486

  6. Low-dose cardiac imaging: reducing exposure but not accuracy.

    PubMed

    Small, Gary R; Chow, Benjamin J W; Ruddy, Terrence D

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac imaging techniques that use ionizing radiation have become an integral part of current cardiology practice. However, concern has arisen that ionizing radiation exposure, even at the low levels used for medical imaging, is associated with the risk of cancer. From a single diagnostic cardiac imaging procedure, such risks are low. On a population basis, however, malignancies become more likely on account of stochastic effects being more probable as the number of procedures performed increases. In light of this, and owing to professional and industrial commitment to the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle, over the last decade major strides have been made to reduce radiation dose in cardiac imaging. Dose-reduction strategies have been most pronounced in cardiac computed tomography. This was important since computed tomography has rapidly become a widely used diagnostic alternative to invasive coronary angiography, and initial protocols were associated with relatively high radiation exposures. Advances have also been made in nuclear cardiology and in invasive coronary angiography, and these reductions in patient exposure have all been achieved with maintenance of image quality and accuracy. Improvements in imaging camera technology, image acquisition protocols and image processing have lead to reductions in patient radiation exposure without compromising imaging diagnostic accuracy.

  7. Multimodality 3-Dimensional Image Integration for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization procedures for patients with congenital and structural heart disease are becoming more complex. New imaging strategies involving integration of 3-dimensional images from rotational angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are employed to facilitate these procedures. We discuss the current use of these new 3D imaging technologies and their advantages and challenges when used to guide complex diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25114757

  8. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P.; Rimoldi, O. E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  9. Advances in imaging for diagnosis and management of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Snipelisky, David; Young, Phillip M; Gersh, Bernard J; Cooper, Leslie T; Chareonthaitawee, Panithaya

    2015-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder with a high prevalence of cardiac involvement. Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) may be life threatening due to end-stage cardiomyopathy and sudden cardiac death. The frequent absence of specific symptoms and lack of a diagnostic 'gold standard' pose challenges in the diagnosis of CS. Endomyocardial biopsy, although specific, has an unacceptably low sensitivity. Non-invasive cardiac imaging has a huge role in the assessment of patients with known or suspected CS. This comprehensive review compares the diagnostic accuracy, along with advantages and disadvantages, of established and emerging imaging modalities for CS. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Image analysis in comparative genomic hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lundsteen, C.; Maahr, J.; Christensen, B.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a new technique by which genomic imbalances can be detected by combining in situ suppression hybridization of whole genomic DNA and image analysis. We have developed software for rapid, quantitative CGH image analysis by a modification and extension of the standard software used for routine karyotyping of G-banded metaphase spreads in the Magiscan chromosome analysis system. The DAPI-counterstained metaphase spread is karyotyped interactively. Corrections for image shifts between the DAPI, FITC, and TRITC images are done manually by moving the three images relative to each other. The fluorescence background is subtracted. A mean filter is applied to smooth the FITC and TRITC images before the fluorescence ratio between the individual FITC and TRITC-stained chromosomes is computed pixel by pixel inside the area of the chromosomes determined by the DAPI boundaries. Fluorescence intensity ratio profiles are generated, and peaks and valleys indicating possible gains and losses of test DNA are marked if they exceed ratios below 0.75 and above 1.25. By combining the analysis of several metaphase spreads, consistent findings of gains and losses in all or almost all spreads indicate chromosomal imbalance. Chromosomal imbalances are detected either by visual inspection of fluorescence ratio (FR) profiles or by a statistical approach that compares FR measurements of the individual case with measurements of normal chromosomes. The complete analysis of one metaphase can be carried out in approximately 10 minutes. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Characterisation of peripartum cardiomyopathy by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Frederic; Lions, Christophe; de Groote, Pascal; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Willoteaux, Serge; Dagorn, Joel; Deruelle, Philippe; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe; Beregi, Jean Paul

    2008-12-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare cause of heart failure. Only half of the patients recover normal cardiac function. We assessed the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and late enhancement imaging to detect myocardial fibrosis in order to predict cardiac function recovery in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy. Among a consecutive series of 1,037 patients referred for heart failure treatment or prognostic evaluation between 1999 and 2006, eight women had confirmed PPCM. They all underwent echocardiography and cardiac MRI for assessment of left ventricular anatomy, systolic function and detection of myocardial fibrosis through late enhancement imaging. Mean (+/- SD) baseline left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 28 +/- 4%. After a follow-up of 50 +/- 9 months, half the patients recovered normal cardiac function (LVEF = 58 +/- 4%) and four did not (LVEF = 35 +/- 6%). None of the eight patients exhibited abnormal myocardial late enhancement. No difference in MRI characteristics was observed between the two groups. Patients with PPCM do not exhibit a specific cardiac MRI pattern and particularly no myocardial late enhancement. It suggests that myocardial fibrosis does not play a major role in the limitation of cardiac function recovery after PPCM.

  12. Assessment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Advanced Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic systemic disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas, usually in multiple organs. Several studies have shown that sarcoidosis might be the result of an exaggerated granulomatous reaction after exposure to unidentified antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. Cardiac involvement may occur and lead to an adverse outcome: the heart mechanics will be affected and that causes ventricular failure, and the cardiac electrical system will be disrupted and lead to third degree atrioventricular block, malignant ventricular tachycardia, and sudden cardiac death. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment of this potentially devastating disease is critically important. However, sensitive and accurate imaging modalities have not been established. Recent studies have demonstrated the promising potential of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in the diagnosis and assessment of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS). In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiology, histological findings, and clinical features of sarcoidosis. We also introduce advanced imaging including 18F-FDG PET and cardiac MRI as more reliable diagnostic modalities for CS. PMID:25250336

  13. Current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benyhesan, Mohammad Kassim

    Digital imaging is growing rapidly making Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semi conductor (CMOS) image sensor-based cameras indispensable in many modern life devices like cell phones, surveillance devices, personal computers, and tablets. For various purposes wireless portable image systems are widely deployed in many indoor and outdoor places such as hospitals, urban areas, streets, highways, forests, mountains, and towers. However, the increased demand on high-resolution image sensors and improved processing features is expected to increase the power consumption of the CMOS sensor-based camera systems. Increased power consumption translates into a reduced battery life-time. The increased power consumption might not be a problem if there is access to a nearby charging station. On the other hand, the problem arises if the image sensor is located in widely spread areas, unfavorable to human intervention, and difficult to reach. Given the limitation of energy sources available for wireless CMOS image sensor, an energy harvesting technique presents a viable solution to extend the sensor life-time. Energy can be harvested from the sun light or the artificial light surrounding the sensor itself. In this thesis, we propose a current-mode CMOS hybrid image sensor capable of energy harvesting and image capture. The proposed sensor is based on a hybrid pixel that can be programmed to perform the task of an image sensor and the task of a solar cell to harvest energy. The basic idea is to design a pixel that can be configured to exploit its internal photodiode to perform two functions: image sensing and energy harvesting. As a proof of concept a 40 x 40 array of hybrid pixels has been designed and fabricated in a standard 0.5 microm CMOS process. Measurement results show that up to 39 microW of power can be harvested from the array under 130 Klux condition with an energy efficiency of 220 nJ /pixel /frame. The proposed image sensor is a current-mode image sensor which has several

  14. Cardiac imaging approaches to evaluate drug-induced myocardial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Jennifer B.; Finkle, John K.; Ky, Bonnie; Douglas, Pamela S.; Gutstein, David E.; Hockings, Paul D.; Lainee, Pierre; Lenihan, Daniel J.; Mason, Jay W.; Sager, Philip T.; Todaro, Thomas G.; Hicks, Karen A.; Kane, Robert C.; Ko, Hon-Sum; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Michelson, Eric L.; Milligan, James; Munley, Jiefen Y.; Raichlen, Joel S.; Shahlaee, Amir; Strnadova, Colette; Ye, Brenda; Turner, J. Rick

    2013-01-01

    The ability to make informed benefit-risk assessments for potentially cardiotoxic new compounds is of considerable interest and importance at the public health, drug development, and individual patient levels. Cardiac imaging approaches in the evaluation of drug-induced myocardial dysfunction will likely play an increasing role. However, the optimal choice of myocardial imaging modality and the recommended frequency of monitoring are undefined. These decisions are complicated by the array of imaging techniques, which have varying sensitivities, specificities, availabilities, local expertise, safety, and costs, and by the variable time-course of tissue damage, functional myocardial depression, or recovery of function. This White Paper summarizes scientific discussions of members of the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium on the main factors to consider when selecting nonclinical and clinical cardiac function imaging techniques in drug development. We focus on 3 commonly used imaging modalities in the evaluation of cardiac function: echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radionuclide (nuclear) imaging and highlight areas for future research. PMID:23194484

  15. EANM/ESC guidelines for radionuclide imaging of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hesse, B; Lindhardt, T B; Acampa, W; Anagnostopoulos, C; Ballinger, J; Bax, J J; Edenbrandt, L; Flotats, A; Germano, G; Stopar, T Gmeiner; Franken, P; Kelion, A; Kjaer, A; Le Guludec, D; Ljungberg, M; Maenhout, A F; Marcassa, C; Marving, J; McKiddie, F; Schaefer, W M; Stegger, L; Underwood, R

    2008-04-01

    Radionuclide imaging of cardiac function represents a number of well-validated techniques for accurate determination of right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV volumes. These first European guidelines give recommendations for how and when to use first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, gated PET, and studies with non-imaging devices for the evaluation of cardiac function. The items covered are presented in 11 sections: clinical indications, radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry, study acquisition, RV EF, LV EF, LV volumes, LV regional function, LV diastolic function, reports and image display and reference values from the literature of RVEF, LVEF and LV volumes. If specific recommendations given cannot be based on evidence from original, scientific studies, referral is given to "prevailing or general consensus". The guidelines are designed to assist in the practice of referral to, performance, interpretation and reporting of nuclear cardiology studies for the evaluation of cardiac performance.

  16. Transcranial optical vascular imaging (TOVI) during cardiac arrest (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Meglinski, Igor; Harmelin, Alon

    2017-03-01

    Based on the recent studies the prognosis of patients after cardiac arrest (CA) remains poor. Thus it is extremely important to understand fine mechanisms related to the influence of CA on the brain and Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) during and after cardiac arrest. Recently our group introduced Transcranial Optical Vascular Imaging (TOVI) approach that combines laser speckle and dynamic fluorescent imaging. TOVI proved to be useful during various preclinical brain research applications. For example it allows imaging of brain blood vessels of a mouse in vivo through the intact cranium. Herein for the first time we present the use of TOVI during cardiac arrest. TOVI possibly could be a useful tool for preclinical studies of CBF during and after CA.

  17. Cardiac imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Signe; Hove, Jens D; Møller, Søren

    2017-07-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is characterized by an impaired contractile response to stress, diastolic dysfunction and the presence of electrophysiological abnormalities, and it may be diagnosed at rest in some patients or demasked by physiological or pharmacological stress. CCM seems to be involved in the development of hepatic nephropathy and is associated with an impaired survival. In the field of cardiac imaging, CCM is not yet a well-characterized entity, hence various modalities of cardiac imaging have been applied. Stress testing with either physiologically or pharmacologically induced circulatory stress has been used to assess systolic dysfunction. Whereas echocardiography with tissue Doppler is by far the most preferred method to detect diastolic dysfunction with measurement of E/A- and E/E'-ratio. In addition, echocardiography may also possess the potential to evaluate systolic dysfunction at rest by application of new myocardial strain techniques. Experience with other modalities such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography is limited. Future studies exploring these imaging modalities are necessary to characterize and monitor the cardiac changes in cirrhotic patients. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Mapping cardiac surface mechanics with structured light imaging

    PubMed Central

    Laughner, Jacob I.; Zhang, Song; Li, Hao; Shao, Connie C.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease often manifests as a combination of pathological electrical and structural heart remodeling. The relationship between mechanics and electrophysiology is crucial to our understanding of mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and the treatment of cardiac disease. While several technologies exist for describing whole heart electrophysiology, studies of cardiac mechanics are often limited to rhythmic patterns or small sections of tissue. Here, we present a comprehensive system based on ultrafast three-dimensional (3-D) structured light imaging to map surface dynamics of whole heart cardiac motion. Additionally, we introduce a novel nonrigid motion-tracking algorithm based on an isometry-maximizing optimization framework that forms correspondences between consecutive 3-D frames without the use of any fiducial markers. By combining our 3-D imaging system with nonrigid surface registration, we are able to measure cardiac surface mechanics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. In conclusion, we demonstrate accurate cardiac deformation at over 200,000 surface points of a rabbit heart recorded at 200 frames/s and validate our results on highly contrasting heart motions during normal sinus rhythm, ventricular pacing, and ventricular fibrillation. PMID:22796539

  19. Reentrant excitation in an analog-digital hybrid circuit model of cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, Farhanahani; Shiozawa, Naruhiro; Makikawa, Masaaki; Nomura, Taishin

    2011-06-01

    We propose an analog-digital hybrid circuit model of one-dimensional cardiac tissue with hardware implementation that allows us to perform real-time simulations of spatially conducting cardiac action potentials. Each active nodal compartment of the tissue model is designed using analog circuits and a dsPIC microcontroller, by which the time-dependent and time-independent nonlinear current-voltage relationships of six types of ion channel currents employed in the Luo-Rudy phase I (LR-I) model for a single mammalian cardiac ventricular cell can be reproduced quantitatively. Here, we perform real-time simulations of reentrant excitation conduction in a ring-shaped tissue model that includes eighty nodal compartments. In particular, we show that the hybrid tissue model can exhibit real-time dynamics for initiation of reentries induced by uni-directional block, as well as those for phase resetting that leads to annihilation of the reentry in response to impulsive current stimulations at appropriate nodes and timings. The dynamics of the hybrid model are comparable to those of a spatially distributed tissue model with LR-I compartments. Thus, it is conceivable that the hybrid model might be a useful tool for large scale simulations of cardiac tissue dynamics, as an alternative to numerical simulations, leading toward further understanding of the reentrant mechanisms.

  20. HOPIS: Hybrid Omnidirectional and Perspective Imaging System for Mobile Robots

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huei-Yung.; Wang, Min-Liang.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for the hybrid omnidirectional and perspective robot vision system. Based on the hybrid imaging geometry, a generalized stereo approach is developed via the construction of virtual cameras. It is then used to rectify the hybrid image pair using the perspective projection model. The proposed method not only simplifies the computation of epipolar geometry for the hybrid imaging system, but also facilitates the stereo matching between the heterogeneous image formation. Experimental results for both the synthetic data and real scene images have demonstrated the feasibility of our approach. PMID:25192317

  1. Role of Hybrid Brain Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Burhan, Amer M.; Marlatt, Nicole M.; Palaniyappan, Lena; Anazodo, Udunna C.; Prato, Frank S.

    2015-01-01

    This is a focused review of imaging literature to scope the utility of hybrid brain imaging in neuropsychiatric disorders. The review focuses on brain imaging modalities that utilize hybrid (fusion) techniques to characterize abnormal brain molecular signals in combination with structural and functional changes that have been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. An overview of clinical hybrid brain imaging technologies for human use is followed by a selective review of the literature that conceptualizes the use of these technologies in understanding basic mechanisms of major neuropsychiatric disorders and their therapeutics. Neuronal network abnormalities are highlighted throughout this review to scope the utility of hybrid imaging as a potential biomarker for each disorder. PMID:26854172

  2. Petascale computation performance of lightweight multiscale cardiac models using hybrid programming models.

    PubMed

    Pope, Bernard J; Fitch, Blake G; Pitman, Michael C; Rice, John J; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Future multiscale and multiphysics models must use the power of high performance computing (HPC) systems to enable research into human disease, translational medical science, and treatment. Previously we showed that computationally efficient multiscale models will require the use of sophisticated hybrid programming models, mixing distributed message passing processes (e.g. the message passing interface (MPI)) with multithreading (e.g. OpenMP, POSIX pthreads). The objective of this work is to compare the performance of such hybrid programming models when applied to the simulation of a lightweight multiscale cardiac model. Our results show that the hybrid models do not perform favourably when compared to an implementation using only MPI which is in contrast to our results using complex physiological models. Thus, with regards to lightweight multiscale cardiac models, the user may not need to increase programming complexity by using a hybrid programming approach. However, considering that model complexity will increase as well as the HPC system size in both node count and number of cores per node, it is still foreseeable that we will achieve faster than real time multiscale cardiac simulations on these systems using hybrid programming models.

  3. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  4. Gated magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jocobstein, M.D.; Nelson, A.D.; Riemenschneider, T.A.; Alfidi, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a variety of cardiac malformations in 19 patients aged 1 week to 33 years were obtained using pulse plethysmographic- or ECG-gated spin echo pulse sequences. Coronal, axial, and sagittal images displaying intracardiac structures with excellent spatial and contrast resolution were acquired during systole or diastole. It is concluded that MR will be a valuable noninvasive method of diagnosing congenital heart disease.

  5. Intraocular Lymphoma after Cardiac Transplantation: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Woo, Kyung In; Kim, Yoon-Duck

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular lymphoma in a 65-year-old man, 15 months after cardiac transplantation. On Magnetic Resonance (MR) images, the iris and the anterior chamber of the right eye were found to be involved with an enhancing soft-tissue lesion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of post-transplantation intraocular lymphoma evaluated with MR imaging. PMID:23323042

  6. Image-Guided Quantification of Cardioplegia Delivery during Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soltesz, Edward G.; Laurence, Rita G.; De Grand, Alec M.; Cohn, Lawrence H.; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Homogenous distribution of cardioplegia delivered to the myocardium has been identified as an important predictor of post-cardiopulmonary bypass ventricular recovery and function. Presently, a method to determine adequate distribution of cardioplegia in patients during cardiac surgery does not exist. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying cardioplegia delivery using a novel, non-invasive optical method. Such a system would permit instantaneous imaging of jeopardized myocardium and allow immediate, intraoperative corrective measures. Methods We have previously developed a portable, intraoperative near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging system for use in large animal cardiac surgery, which simultaneously displays color video and NIR fluorescent images of the surgical field. By introducing exogenous, non-isotopic NIR fluorophores, specific cardiac functions can be visualized in real-time. Results In a cardiopulmonary bypass porcine model, we demonstrate that the FDA-approved intravascular fluorophore indocyanine green (ICG) permits real-time assessment of cardioplegia delivery. ICG was injected into an aortic root and/or transatrial coronary sinus catheter during delivery of cold crystalloid cardioplegia solution. Segmental distribution was immediately noted at the time of injection. In a subset of animals, simulated coronary occlusions resulted in imaging defects consistent with poor cardioplegia delivery and jeopardized myocardium. Videodensitometric analysis was performed on-line to quantify right and left ventricular (RV, LV) distribution. Conclusions We report the development of a novel, non-invasive, intraoperative technique which can easily and safely provide a visual assessment of cardioplegia delivery (antegrade and/or retrograde) and which offers the potential to quantify the relative segmental distribution during cardiac surgical procedures. ULTRAMINI ABSTRACT Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging is a

  7. Heartfelt images: learning cardiac science artistically.

    PubMed

    Courneya, Carol Ann

    2017-07-29

    There are limited curricular options for medical students to engage in art-making during their training. Yet, it is known that art-making confers a variety of benefits related to learning. This qualitative study utilises a visual methodology to explore students' art-making in the context of the cardiovascular sciences. The existence of a multiyear repository of medical/dental student generated, cardiac-inspired art, collected over 6 years, provided the opportunity to explore the nature of the art made. The aim was to categorise the art produced, as well as the depth and breadth of understanding required to produce the art. The data set included a wide variety of titled art (paintings, photographs, sketches, sculptures, collages, poetry and music/dance). Systematic curation of the collection, across all media, yielded three main categories: anatomical renderings, physiology/pathophysiology renderings and kinesthetic creations (music/dance/tactile). Overall (medical and dental) student-generated art suggested a high level of content/process understanding, as illustrated by attention to scientific detail, integration of form and function as well as the sophisticated use of visual metaphor and word play. Dental students preferentially expressed their understanding of anatomy and physiology kinesthetically, creating art that required manual dexterity as well as through choreography and dance. Combining art-making with basic science curricular learning invited the medical and dentistry students to link their understanding to different modes of expression and a non-biomedical way of knowing. Subsequent incorporation of the student-generated cardiac art into lectures exposed the entire class to creative pictorial expressions of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Imaging in blunt cardiac injury: Computed tomographic findings in cardiac contusion and associated injuries.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Mark M; Raptis, Demetrios A; Cummings, Kristopher W; Mellnick, Vincent M; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Schuerer, Douglas J; Raptis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    Blunt cardiac injury (BCI) may manifest as cardiac contusion or, more rarely, as pericardial or myocardial rupture. Computed tomography (CT) is performed in the vast majority of blunt trauma patients, but the imaging features of cardiac contusion are not well described. To evaluate CT findings and associated injuries in patients with clinically diagnosed BCI. We identified 42 patients with blunt cardiac injury from our institution's electronic medical record. Clinical parameters, echocardiography results, and laboratory tests were recorded. Two blinded reviewers analyzed chest CTs performed in these patients for myocardial hypoenhancement and associated injuries. CT findings of severe thoracic trauma are commonly present in patients with severe BCI; 82% of patients with ECG, cardiac enzyme, and echocardiographic evidence of BCI had abnormalities of the heart or pericardium on CT; 73% had anterior rib fractures, and 64% had pulmonary contusions. Sternal fractures were only seen in 36% of such patients. However, myocardial hypoenhancement on CT is poorly sensitive for those patients with cardiac contusion: 0% of right ventricular contusions and 22% of left ventricular contusions seen on echocardiography were identified on CT. CT signs of severe thoracic trauma are frequently present in patients with severe BCI and should be regarded as indirect evidence of potential BCI. Direct CT findings of myocardial contusion, i.e. myocardial hypoenhancement, are poorly sensitive and should not be used as a screening tool. However, some left ventricular contusions can be seen on CT, and these patients could undergo echocardiography or cardiac MRI to evaluate for wall motion abnormalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporal resolution improvement using PICCS in MDCT cardiac imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Tang, Jie; Hsieh, Jiang

    2009-01-01

    The current paradigm for temporal resolution improvement is to add more source-detector units and∕or increase the gantry rotation speed. The purpose of this article is to present an innovative alternative method to potentially improve temporal resolution by approximately a factor of 2 for all MDCT scanners without requiring hardware modification. The central enabling technology is a most recently developed image reconstruction method: Prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS). Using the method, cardiac CT images can be accurately reconstructed using the projection data acquired in an angular range of about 120°, which is roughly 50% of the standard short-scan angular range (∼240° for an MDCT scanner). As a result, the temporal resolution of MDCT cardiac imaging can be universally improved by approximately a factor of 2. In order to validate the proposed method, two in vivo animal experiments were conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at different gantry rotation times and different heart rates. One animal was scanned at heart rate of 83 beats per minute (bpm) using 400 ms gantry rotation time and the second animal was scanned at 94 bpm using 350 ms gantry rotation time, respectively. Cardiac coronary CT imaging can be successfully performed at high heart rates using a single-source MDCT scanner and projection data from a single heart beat with gantry rotation times of 400 and 350 ms. Using the proposed PICCS method, the temporal resolution of cardiac CT imaging can be effectively improved by approximately a factor of 2 without modifying any scanner hardware. This potentially provides a new method for single-source MDCT scanners to achieve reliable coronary CT imaging for patients at higher heart rates than the current heart rate limit of 70 bpm without using the well-known multisegment FBP reconstruction algorithm. This method also enables dual-source MDCT scanner to achieve higher temporal resolution

  10. Nuclear Image-Guided Approaches for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weihua; Garcia, Ernest V

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a standard treatment for patients with heart failure. However, 30-40 % of the patients having CRT do not respond to CRT with improved clinical symptom and cardiac functions. It is important for CRT response that left ventricular (LV) lead is placed away from scar and at or near the site of the latest mechanical activation. Nuclear image-guided approaches for CRT have shown significant clinical value to assess LV myocardial viability and mechanical dyssynchrony, recommend the optimal LV lead position, and navigate the LV lead to the target coronary venous site. All these techniques, once validated and implemented, should impact the current clinical practice.

  11. Variational Reconstruction of Left Cardiac Structure from CMR Images

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Min; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Zhao, Xiaodan; Tan, Ru San; Wan, Xiaofeng; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular Disease (CVD), accounting for 17% of overall deaths in the USA, is the leading cause of death over the world. Advances in medical imaging techniques make the quantitative assessment of both the anatomy and function of heart possible. The cardiac modeling is an invariable prerequisite for quantitative analysis. In this study, a novel method is proposed to reconstruct the left cardiac structure from multi-planed cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images and contours. Routine CMR examination was performed to acquire both long axis and short axis images. Trained technologists delineated the endocardial contours. Multiple sets of two dimensional contours were projected into the three dimensional patient-based coordinate system and registered to each other. The union of the registered point sets was applied a variational surface reconstruction algorithm based on Delaunay triangulation and graph-cuts. The resulting triangulated surfaces were further post-processed. Quantitative evaluation on our method was performed via computing the overlapping ratio between the reconstructed model and the manually delineated long axis contours, which validates our method. We envisage that this method could be used by radiographers and cardiologists to diagnose and assess cardiac function in patients with diverse heart diseases. PMID:26689551

  12. Diagnosing cardiac disease during pregnancy: imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Ntusi, Ntobeko A; Samuels, Petronella; Moosa, Sulaiman; Mocumbi, Ana O

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women with known or suspected cardiovascular disease (CVD) often require cardiovascular imaging during pregnancy. The accepted maximum limit of ionising radiation exposure to the foetus during pregnancy is a cumulative dose of 5 rad. Concerns related to imaging modalities that involve ionising radiation include teratogenesis, mutagenesis and childhood malignancy. Importantly, no single imaging study approaches this cautionary dose of 5 rad (50 mSv or 50 mGy). Diagnostic imaging procedures that may be used in pregnancy include chest radiography, fluoroscopy, echocardiography, invasive angiography, cardiovascular computed tomography, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and nuclear techniques. Echocardiography and CMR appear to be completely safe in pregnancy and are not associated with any adverse foetal effects, provided there are no general contra-indications to MR imaging. Concerns related to safety of imaging tests must be balanced against the importance of accurate diagnosis and thorough assessment of the pathological condition. Decisions about imaging in pregnancy are premised on understanding the physiology of pregnancy, understanding basic concepts of ionising radiation, the clinical manifestations of existent CVD in pregnancy and features of new CVD. The cardiologist/physician must understand the indications for and limitations of, and the potential harmful effects of each test during pregnancy. Current evidence suggests that a single cardiovascular radiological study during pregnancy is safe and should be undertaken at all times when clinically justified. In this article, the different imaging modalities are reviewed in terms of how they work, how safe they are and what their clinical utility in pregnancy is. Furthermore, the safety of contrast agents in pregnancy is also reviewed.

  13. Mitochondrial-Targeted Molecular Imaging in Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhui

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to discuss the role of mitochondrion in cardiac function and disease. The mitochondrion plays a fundamental role in cellular processes ranging from metabolism to apoptosis. The mitochondrial-targeted molecular imaging could potentially illustrate changes in global and regional cardiac dysfunction. The collective changes that occur in mitochondrial-targeted molecular imaging probes have been widely explored and developed. As probes currently used in the preclinical setting still have a lot of shortcomings, the development of myocardial metabolic activity, viability, perfusion, and blood flow molecular imaging probes holds great potential for accurately evaluating the myocardial viability and functional reserve. The advantages of molecular imaging provide a perspective on investigating the mitochondrial function of the myocardium in vivo noninvasively and quantitatively. The molecular imaging tracers of single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography could give more detailed information on myocardial metabolism and restoration. In this study, series mitochondrial-targeted 99mTc-, 123I-, and 18F-labeled tracers displayed broad applications because they could provide a direct link between mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiac disease. PMID:28638829

  14. Images as drivers of progress in cardiac computational modelling

    PubMed Central

    Lamata, Pablo; Casero, Ramón; Carapella, Valentina; Niederer, Steve A.; Bishop, Martin J.; Schneider, Jürgen E.; Kohl, Peter; Grau, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Computational models have become a fundamental tool in cardiac research. Models are evolving to cover multiple scales and physical mechanisms. They are moving towards mechanistic descriptions of personalised structure and function, including effects of natural variability. These developments are underpinned to a large extent by advances in imaging technologies. This article reviews how novel imaging technologies, or the innovative use and extension of established ones, integrate with computational models and drive novel insights into cardiac biophysics. In terms of structural characterization, we discuss how imaging is allowing a wide range of scales to be considered, from cellular levels to whole organs. We analyse how the evolution from structural to functional imaging is opening new avenues for computational models, and in this respect we review methods for measurement of electrical activity, mechanics and flow. Finally, we consider ways in which combined imaging and modelling research is likely to continue advancing cardiac research, and identify some of the main challenges that remain to be solved. PMID:25117497

  15. Multimodality cardiac imaging in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Kristian H; Gopalan, Deepa; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Andersen, Niels H; Gravholt, Claus H

    2016-06-01

    Congenital and acquired cardiovascular diseases contribute significantly to the threefold elevated risk of premature death in Turner syndrome. A multitude of cardiovascular anomalies and disorders, many of which deleteriously impact morbidity and mortality, is frequently left undetected and untreated because of poor adherence to screening programmes and complex clinical presentations. Imaging is essential for timely and effective primary and secondary disease prophylaxis that may alleviate the severe impact of cardiovascular disease in Turner syndrome. This review illustrates how cardiovascular disease in Turner syndrome manifests in a complex manner that ranges in severity from incidental findings to potentially fatal anomalies. Recommendations regarding the use of imaging for screening and surveillance of cardiovascular disease in Turner syndrome are made, emphasising the key role of non-invasive and invasive cardiovascular imaging to the management of all patients with Turner syndrome.

  16. Bayesian learning for cardiac SPECT image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Jarosław P; Goodenday, Lucy S; Cios, Krzysztof J

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a system for automating the diagnosis of myocardial perfusion from single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images of male and female hearts. Initially we had several thousand of SPECT images, other clinical data and physician-interpreter's descriptions of the images. The images were divided into segments based on the Yale system. Each segment was described by the physician as showing one of the following conditions: normal perfusion, reversible perfusion defect, partially reversible perfusion defect, fixed perfusion defect, defect showing reverse redistribution, equivocal defect or artifact. The physician's diagnosis of overall left ventricular (LV) perfusion, based on the above descriptions, categorizes a study as showing one or more of eight possible conditions: normal, ischemia, infarct and ischemia, infarct, reverse redistribution, equivocal, artifact or LV dysfunction. Because of the complexity of the task, we decided to use the knowledge discovery approach, consisting of these steps: problem understanding, data understanding, data preparation, data mining, evaluating the discovered knowledge and its implementation. After going through the data preparation step, in which we constructed normal gender-specific models of the LV and image registration, we ended up with 728 patients for whom we had both SPECT images and corresponding diagnoses. Another major contribution of the paper is the data mining step, in which we used several new Bayesian learning classification methods. The approach we have taken, namely the six-step knowledge discovery process has proven to be very successful in this complex data mining task and as such the process can be extended to other medical data mining projects.

  17. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pediatric Turner Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Scott; Rosolowsky, Elizabeth; Suntratonpipat, Somjate; Girgis, Rose; Goot, Benjamin H; Tham, Edythe B

    2016-08-01

    To compare the detection of cardiac lesions with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) and conventional echocardiography in children with Turner syndrome. Twenty-four girls with Turner syndrome, 8-18 years of age, were recruited through the Pediatric Endocrinology Program. Participants underwent CMR and echocardiography within a 2-year period, and discrepancies between the results of each modality were identified. Fifteen of 24 (63%) girls had a cardiac lesion identified on CMR or echocardiography. Both modalities identified the same lesion in 10 of 15 (67%); however, 6 of 15 (40%) participants had a lesion identified on CMR but not echocardiography. Participants with a missed lesion had a trend towards greater body mass index. Aortic dilation and bicuspid aortic valve were the most commonly missed lesions by echocardiography. CMR identifies significant cardiac lesions missed by echocardiography in pediatric patients with Turner syndrome, particularly along the aorta. These findings support the current guidelines that recommend screening CMR in addition to echocardiogram. Early identification of cardiac abnormalities in patients with Turner syndrome will allow for a greater understanding of the natural history in these patients and potentially identify candidates for earlier intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Loschak, Paul M.; Brattain, Laura J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control. PMID:24683501

  19. Cardiac troponin T in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices undergoing magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John V; Watson, Robert E; Jaffe, Allan S; Dalzell, Connie; Acker, Nancy; Felmlee, Joel P; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Cha, Yong-Mei; Friedman, Paul A; Kapa, Suraj

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been safely performed in many patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) using institution-specific protocols. A potential risk of MRI is myocardial heating and cardiac injury, which might be detectable with cardiac Troponin (cTn). We evaluated this in patients with CIEDs undergoing MRI. Prospective data were collected from 2008 to the present in patients with CIEDs undergoing clinically indicated MRI performed under institutional protocol. Cardiac Troponin T (cTnT) levels were drawn both before and 24–36 h after the procedure. The collective data were retrospectively analyzed. MRI exams (n=512) were performed in 398 patients. Of these, there were 348 unique scans with cTnT recorded before and after MRI (median age 68, IQ 56–78; 62%men). cTnT did not significantly change for the group as a whole (0.00±0.056). There were 22 (6.3 %) exams with cTnT change ≥0.002 ng/mL following MRI (range 0.01–0.09 ng/mL). There were no clinically significant events in these patients directly attributable to MR. There were no significant changes in pacing threshold or impedance in the group with elevated cardiac biomarkers. There are very few situations where myocardial injury as detected by cTnT in patients undergoing MRI with CIEDs could be detected. No adverse clinical events or functional changes of the device were noted, even in those with increases in cTnT. Our experience supports that MRI can be performed safely for appropriately selected patients under close clinical observation. Proactive monitoring with the present iteration of cardiac biomarkers appears to be of limited utility, but prospective monitoring with high sensitivity assays may be able to detect subclinical myocardial damage.

  20. Small Rodent Cardiac Phantom for Preclinical Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Imaging phantoms play a valuable role in the quality control and quality assurance of medical imaging systems. However, for use in the relatively new field of small-animal preclinical imaging, very few have been described in the literature, and even less or none at all are available commercially. Yet, preclinical small animal phantoms offer the possibility of reducing the need for live animals for test and measurement purposes. Human scale cardiac phantoms, both reported in the literature and available commercially, are typically complex devices. Their designs include numerous flow control valves, pumps, and servo motors. These devices are coupled to tissue mimicking materials (TMMs) shaped to replicate the form of cardiac chambers and valves. They are then operated in such a way as to cause the replica TMM heart to move in a lifelike manner. This paper describes the design and construction of a small rodent preclinical cardiac phantom, which is both of a simple design and construction. Using only readily available materials and components, it can be manufactured without the use of workshop facilities, using only hand-tools. Drawings and pictures of the design are presented along with images of the phantom in operation, using a high-frequency preclinical ultrasound scanner.

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Helbing, Willem A; Ouhlous, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    MRI is an important additional tool in the diagnostic work-up of children with congenital heart disease. This review aims to summarise the role MRI has in this patient population. Echocardiography remains the main diagnostic tool in congenital heart disease. In specific situations, MRI is used for anatomical imaging of congenital heart disease. This includes detailed assessment of intracardiac anatomy with 2-D and 3-D sequences. MRI is particularly useful for assessment of retrosternal structures in the heart and for imaging large vessel anatomy. Functional assessment includes assessment of ventricular function using 2-D cine techniques. Of particular interest in congenital heart disease is assessment of right and single ventricular function. Two-dimensional and newer 3-D techniques to quantify flow in these patients are or will soon become an integral part of quantification of shunt size, valve function and complex flow patterns in large vessels. More advanced uses of MRI include imaging of cardiovascular function during stress and tissue characterisation of the myocardium. Techniques used for this purpose need further validation before they can become part of the daily routine of MRI assessment of congenital heart disease.

  2. An integrated platform for image-guided cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying Liang; Shetty, Anoop K; Duckett, Simon; Etyngier, Patrick; Gijsbers, Geert; Bullens, Roland; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Rhode, Kawal S

    2012-05-21

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective procedure for patients with heart failure but 30% of patients do not respond. This may be due to sub-optimal placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead. It is hypothesized that the use of cardiac anatomy, myocardial scar distribution and dyssynchrony information, derived from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may improve outcome by guiding the physician for optimal LV lead positioning. Whole heart MR data can be processed to yield detailed anatomical models including the coronary veins. Cine MR data can be used to measure the motion of the LV to determine which regions are late-activating. Finally, delayed Gadolinium enhancement imaging can be used to detect regions of scarring. This paper presents a complete platform for the guidance of CRT using pre-procedural MR data combined with live x-ray fluoroscopy. The platform was used for 21 patients undergoing CRT in a standard catheterization laboratory. The patients underwent cardiac MRI prior to their procedure. For each patient, a MRI-derived cardiac model, showing the LV lead targets, was registered to x-ray fluoroscopy using multiple views of a catheter looped in the right atrium. Registration was maintained throughout the procedure by a combination of C-arm/x-ray table tracking and respiratory motion compensation. Validation of the registration between the three-dimensional (3D) roadmap and the 2D x-ray images was performed using balloon occlusion coronary venograms. A 2D registration error of 1.2 ± 0.7 mm was achieved. In addition, a novel navigation technique was developed, called Cardiac Unfold, where an entire cardiac chamber is unfolded from 3D to 2D along with all relevant anatomical and functional information and coupled to real-time device detection. This allowed more intuitive navigation as the entire 3D scene was displayed simultaneously on a 2D plot. The accuracy of the unfold navigation was assessed off-line using 13 patient data sets

  3. An integrated platform for image-guided cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying Liang; Shetty, Anoop K.; Duckett, Simon; Etyngier, Patrick; Gijsbers, Geert; Bullens, Roland; Schaeffter, Tobias; Razavi, Reza; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Rhode, Kawal S.

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective procedure for patients with heart failure but 30% of patients do not respond. This may be due to sub-optimal placement of the left ventricular (LV) lead. It is hypothesized that the use of cardiac anatomy, myocardial scar distribution and dyssynchrony information, derived from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), may improve outcome by guiding the physician for optimal LV lead positioning. Whole heart MR data can be processed to yield detailed anatomical models including the coronary veins. Cine MR data can be used to measure the motion of the LV to determine which regions are late-activating. Finally, delayed Gadolinium enhancement imaging can be used to detect regions of scarring. This paper presents a complete platform for the guidance of CRT using pre-procedural MR data combined with live x-ray fluoroscopy. The platform was used for 21 patients undergoing CRT in a standard catheterization laboratory. The patients underwent cardiac MRI prior to their procedure. For each patient, a MRI-derived cardiac model, showing the LV lead targets, was registered to x-ray fluoroscopy using multiple views of a catheter looped in the right atrium. Registration was maintained throughout the procedure by a combination of C-arm/x-ray table tracking and respiratory motion compensation. Validation of the registration between the three-dimensional (3D) roadmap and the 2D x-ray images was performed using balloon occlusion coronary venograms. A 2D registration error of 1.2 ± 0.7 mm was achieved. In addition, a novel navigation technique was developed, called Cardiac Unfold, where an entire cardiac chamber is unfolded from 3D to 2D along with all relevant anatomical and functional information and coupled to real-time device detection. This allowed more intuitive navigation as the entire 3D scene was displayed simultaneously on a 2D plot. The accuracy of the unfold navigation was assessed off-line using 13 patient data sets

  4. Towards production-level cardiac image analysis with grids.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Ketan; Glatard, Tristan; Schaerer, Joël; Delhay, Bertrand; Camarasu-Pop, Sorina; Clarysse, Patrick; Montagnat, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Production exploitation of cardiac image analysis tools is hampered by the lack of proper IT infrastructure in health institutions, the non trivial integration of heterogeneous codes in coherent analysis procedures, and the need to achieve complete automation of these methods. HealthGrids are promising technologies to address these difficulties. This paper details how they can be complemented by high level problem solving environments such as workflow managers to improve the performance of applications both in terms of execution time and robustness of results. Two of the most important important cardiac image analysis tasks are considered, namely myocardium segmentation and motion estimation in a 4D sequence. Results are shown on the corresponding pipelines, using two different execution environments on the EGEE grid production infrastructure.

  5. Imaging approaches for the study of cell based cardiac therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joe F.; Anderson, Stasia A.; Adler, Eric; Frank, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical data, the treatment of cardiovascular diseases using embryonic, bone-marrow-derived, and skeletal myoblast stem cells has not yet come to fruition within mainstream clinical practice. Major obstacles in cardiac stem cell investigations include the ability to monitor cell engraftment and survival following implantation within the myocardium. Several cellular imaging modalities, including reporter gene and MRI-based tracking approaches, have emerged that provide the means to identify, localize and monitor stem cells longitudinally in vivo following implantation. This Review will examine the various cardiac cellular tracking modalities, including the combinatorial use of several probes in multimodality imaging, with a focus on data from the last five years. PMID:20027188

  6. A Phased Array Coil for Human Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Chris D.; Westgate, Charles R.; O'Dell, Walter G.; Zerhouni, Elias A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype cardiac phased array receiver coil was constructed that comprised a cylindrical array and a separate planar array. Both arrays had two coil loops with the same coil dimensions. Data acquisition with the cylindrical array placed on the human chest, and the planar array placed under the back, yielded an overall enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over the entire heart by a factor of 1.1–2.85 over a commercially available flexible coil and a commercially available four-loop planar phased array coil. This improvement in SNR can be exploited in cardiac imaging to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the image acquisition time. PMID:7674903

  7. Hybrid Image-Plane/Stereo Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Eric; Robinson, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid Image-Plane/Stereo (HIPS) manipulation is a method of processing image data, and of controlling a robotic manipulator arm in response to the data, that enables the manipulator arm to place an end-effector (an instrument or tool) precisely with respect to a target (see figure). Unlike other stereoscopic machine-vision-based methods of controlling robots, this method is robust in the face of calibration errors and changes in calibration during operation. In this method, a stereoscopic pair of cameras on the robot first acquires images of the manipulator at a set of predefined poses. The image data are processed to obtain image-plane coordinates of known visible features of the end-effector. Next, there is computed an initial calibration in the form of a mapping between (1) the image-plane coordinates and (2) the nominal three-dimensional coordinates of the noted end-effector features in a reference frame fixed to the main robot body at the base of the manipulator. The nominal three-dimensional coordinates are obtained by use of the nominal forward kinematics of the manipulator arm that is, calculated by use of the currently measured manipulator joint angles and previously measured lengths of manipulator arm segments under the assumption that the arm segments are rigid, that the arm lengths are constant, and that there is no backlash. It is understood from the outset that these nominal three-dimensional coordinates are likely to contain possibly significant calibration errors, but the effects of the errors are progressively reduced, as described next. As the end-effector is moved toward the target, the calibration is updated repeatedly by use of data from newly acquired images of the end-effector and of the corresponding nominal coordinates in the manipulator reference frame. By use of the updated calibration, the coordinates of the target are computed in manipulator-reference-frame coordinates and then used to the necessary manipulator joint angles to position

  8. The Risks of Inappropriateness in Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged “worried-well” asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks. PMID:19543412

  9. The risks of inappropriateness in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio

    2009-05-01

    The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged "worried-well" asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium) smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks.

  10. Cardiac imaging: working towards fully-automated machine analysis & interpretation.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Piotr J; Dey, Damini; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Motwani, Manish; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in managing patients with cardiovascular disease. Although subjective visual interpretation remains the clinical mainstay, quantitative analysis facilitates objective, evidence-based management, and advances in clinical research. This has driven developments in computing and software tools aimed at achieving fully automated image processing and quantitative analysis. In parallel, machine learning techniques have been used to rapidly integrate large amounts of clinical and quantitative imaging data to provide highly personalized individual patient-based conclusions. Areas covered: This review summarizes recent advances in automated quantitative imaging in cardiology and describes the latest techniques which incorporate machine learning principles. The review focuses on the cardiac imaging techniques which are in wide clinical use. It also discusses key issues and obstacles for these tools to become utilized in mainstream clinical practice. Expert commentary: Fully-automated processing and high-level computer interpretation of cardiac imaging are becoming a reality. Application of machine learning to the vast amounts of quantitative data generated per scan and integration with clinical data also facilitates a move to more patient-specific interpretation. These developments are unlikely to replace interpreting physicians but will provide them with highly accurate tools to detect disease, risk-stratify, and optimize patient-specific treatment. However, with each technological advance, we move further from human dependence and closer to fully-automated machine interpretation.

  11. Cardiac imaging: working towards fully-automated machine analysis & interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Slomka, Piotr J; Dey, Damini; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Motwani, Manish; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in managing patients with cardiovascular disease. Although subjective visual interpretation remains the clinical mainstay, quantitative analysis facilitates objective, evidence-based management, and advances in clinical research. This has driven developments in computing and software tools aimed at achieving fully automated image processing and quantitative analysis. In parallel, machine learning techniques have been used to rapidly integrate large amounts of clinical and quantitative imaging data to provide highly personalized individual patient-based conclusions. Areas covered This review summarizes recent advances in automated quantitative imaging in cardiology and describes the latest techniques which incorporate machine learning principles. The review focuses on the cardiac imaging techniques which are in wide clinical use. It also discusses key issues and obstacles for these tools to become utilized in mainstream clinical practice. Expert commentary Fully-automated processing and high-level computer interpretation of cardiac imaging are becoming a reality. Application of machine learning to the vast amounts of quantitative data generated per scan and integration with clinical data also facilitates a move to more patient-specific interpretation. These developments are unlikely to replace interpreting physicians but will provide them with highly accurate tools to detect disease, risk-stratify, and optimize patient-specific treatment. However, with each technological advance, we move further from human dependence and closer to fully-automated machine interpretation. PMID:28277804

  12. Subject-specific models for image-guided cardiac surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Moore, John; Drangova, Maria; Peters, Terry

    2008-10-01

    Three-dimensional visualization for planning and guidance is still not routinely available for minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). This can be addressed by providing the surgeon with subject-specific geometric models derived from 3D preoperative images for planning of port locations or to rehearse the procedure. For guidance purposes, these models can also be registered to the subject using intraoperative images. In this paper, we present a method for extracting subject-specific heart geometry from preoperative MR images. The main obstacle we face is the low quality of clinical data in terms of resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and presence of artefacts. Instead of using these images directly, we approach the problem in three steps: (1) generate a high quality template model, (2) register the template with the preoperative data, and (3) animate the result over the cardiac cycle. Validation of this approach showed that dynamic subject-specific models can be generated with a mean error of 3.6 ± 1.1 mm from low resolution target images (6 mm slices). Thus, the models are sufficiently accurate for MICS training and procedure planning. In terms of guidance, we also demonstrate how the resulting models may be adapted to the operating room using intraoperative ultrasound imaging.

  13. A hybrid continuous-wave terahertz imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Dolganova, Irina N. Zaytsev, Kirill I. Metelkina, Anna A.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2015-11-15

    A hybrid (active-passive mode) terahertz (THz) imaging system and an algorithm for imaging synthesis are proposed to enhance the THz image quality. The concept of image contrast is used to compare active and passive THz imaging. Combining the measurement of the self-emitted radiation of the object with the back-scattered source radiation measurement, it becomes possible to use the THz image to retrieve maximum information about the object. The experimental results confirm the advantages of hybrid THz imaging systems, which can be generalized for a wide range of applications in the material sciences, chemical physics, bio-systems, etc.

  14. Image-based motion estimation for cardiac CT via image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammin, J.; Taguchi, K.

    2010-03-01

    Images reconstructed from tomographic projection data are subject to motion artifacts from organs that move during the duration of the scan. The effect can be reduced by taking the motion into account in the reconstruction algorithm if an estimate of the deformation exists. This paper presents the estimation of the three-dimensional cardiac motion by registering reconstructed images from cardiac quiet phases as a first step towards motion-compensated cardiac image reconstruction. The non-rigid deformations of the heart are parametrized on a coarse grid on the image volume and are interpolated with cubic b-splines. The optimization problem of finding b-spline coefficients that best describe the observed deformations is ill-posed due to the large number of parameters and the resulting motion vector field is sensitive to the choice of initial parameters. Particularly challenging is the task to capture the twisting motion of the heart. The motion vector field from a dynamic computer phantom of the human heart is used to initialize the transformation parameters for the optimization process with realistic starting values. The results are evaluated by comparing the registered images and the obtained motion vector field to the case when the registration is performed without using prior knowledge about the expected cardiac motion. We find that the registered images are similar for both approaches, but the motion vector field obtained from motion estimation initialized with the phantom describes the cardiac contraction and twisting motion more accurately.

  15. Autopsy imaging for cardiac tamponade in a Thoroughbred foal.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazutaka; Sato, Fumio; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Higuchi, Tohru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Sasaki, Naoki; Nambo, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Autopsy imaging (Ai), postmortem imaging before necropsy, is used in human forensic medicine. Ai was performed using computed tomography (CT) for a 1-month-old Thoroughbred foal cadaver found in a pasture. CT revealed pericardial effusion, collapse of the aorta, bleeding in the lung lobe, gas in the ventricles and liver parenchyma, and distension of the digestive tract. Rupture in the left auricle was confirmed by necropsy; however, it was not depicted on CT. Therefore, Ai and conventional necropsy are considered to complement each other. The cause of death was determined to be traumatic cardiac tamponade. In conclusion, Ai is an additional option for determining cause of death.

  16. Color Doppler imaging of cardiac catheters using vibrating motors.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kalyan E; Light, Edward D; Rivera, Danny J; Kisslo, Joseph A; Smith, Stephen W

    2008-10-01

    A miniature motor rotating at 11,000 rpm was attached onto the proximal end of cardiac electrophysiological (EP) catheters in order to produce vibrations at the tip that were then visualized by color Doppler on ultrasound scanners. The catheter tip was imaged within a vascular graft submerged in a water tank using the Volumetrics Medical Imaging 3D scanner, the Siemens Sonoline Antares 2D scanner and the Philips ie33 3D ultrasound scanner with TEE probe. The vibrating catheter tip was visualized in each case, although results varied with the color Doppler properties of the individual scanner.

  17. Autopsy imaging for cardiac tamponade in a Thoroughbred foal

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, Kazutaka; SATO, Fumio; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; HIGUCHI, Tohru; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; SASAKI, Naoki; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autopsy imaging (Ai), postmortem imaging before necropsy, is used in human forensic medicine. Ai was performed using computed tomography (CT) for a 1-month-old Thoroughbred foal cadaver found in a pasture. CT revealed pericardial effusion, collapse of the aorta, bleeding in the lung lobe, gas in the ventricles and liver parenchyma, and distension of the digestive tract. Rupture in the left auricle was confirmed by necropsy; however, it was not depicted on CT. Therefore, Ai and conventional necropsy are considered to complement each other. The cause of death was determined to be traumatic cardiac tamponade. In conclusion, Ai is an additional option for determining cause of death. PMID:27703406

  18. Color Doppler Imaging of Cardiac Catheters Using Vibrating Motors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kalyan E.; Light, Edward D.; Rivera, Danny J.; Kisslo, Joseph A.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    We attached a miniature motor rotating at 11,000 rpm onto the proximal end of cardiac electrophysiological (EP) catheters in order to produce vibrations at the tip which were then visualized by color Doppler on ultrasound scanners. We imaged the catheter tip within a vascular graft submerged in a water tank using the Volumetrics Medical Imaging 3D scanner, the Siemens Sonoline Antares 2D scanner, and the Philips ie33 3D ultrasound scanner with TEE probe. The vibrating catheter tip was visualized in each case though results varied with the color Doppler properties of the individual scanner. PMID:19514134

  19. Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion

    DOEpatents

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O& #x27; Neil, James P

    2013-09-17

    A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

  20. Optical Imaging of Voltage and Calcium in Cardiac Cells & Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Todd J.; Lee, Peter; Jalife, José

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac optical mapping has proven to be a powerful technology for studying cardiovascular function and disease. The development and scientific impact of this methodology are well documented. Because of its relevance in cardiac research, this imaging technology advances at a rapid pace. Here we review technological and scientific developments during the past several years and look also towards the future. First we explore key components of a modern optical mapping setup, focusing on 1) new camera technologies, 2) powerful light-emitting-diodes (from ultraviolet to red) for illumination, 3) improved optical filter technology, 4) new synthetic and optogenetic fluorescent probes, 5) optical mapping with motion and contraction, 6) new multi-parametric optical mapping techniques and 7) photon scattering effects in thick tissue preparations. We then look at recent optical mapping studies in single cells, cardiomyocyte monolayers, atria and whole hearts. Finally, we briefly look into the possible future roles of optical mapping in the development of regenerative cardiac research, cardiac cell therapies, and molecular genetic advances. PMID:22343556

  1. A Multimodality Hybrid Gamma-Optical Camera for Intraoperative Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lees, John E.; Bugby, Sarah L.; Alqahtani, Mohammed S.; Jambi, Layal K.; Dawood, Numan S.; McKnight, William R.; Ng, Aik H.; Perkins, Alan C.

    2017-01-01

    The development of low profile gamma-ray detectors has encouraged the production of small field of view (SFOV) hand-held imaging devices for use at the patient bedside and in operating theatres. Early development of these SFOV cameras was focussed on a single modality—gamma ray imaging. Recently, a hybrid system—gamma plus optical imaging—has been developed. This combination of optical and gamma cameras enables high spatial resolution multi-modal imaging, giving a superimposed scintigraphic and optical image. Hybrid imaging offers new possibilities for assisting clinicians and surgeons in localising the site of uptake in procedures such as sentinel node detection. The hybrid camera concept can be extended to a multimodal detector design which can offer stereoscopic images, depth estimation of gamma-emitting sources, and simultaneous gamma and fluorescence imaging. Recent improvements to the hybrid camera have been used to produce dual-modality images in both laboratory simulations and in the clinic. Hybrid imaging of a patient who underwent thyroid scintigraphy is reported. In addition, we present data which shows that the hybrid camera concept can be extended to estimate the position and depth of radionuclide distribution within an object and also report the first combined gamma and Near-Infrared (NIR) fluorescence images. PMID:28282957

  2. Advanced Imaging of Athletes: Added Value of Coronary Computed Tomography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Matthew W

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomographic angiography have become important parts of the armamentarium for noninvasive diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. Emerging technologies have produced faster imaging, lower radiation dose, improved spatial and temporal resolution, as well as a wealth of prognostic data to support usage. Investigating true pathologic disease as well as distinguishing normal from potentially dangerous is now increasingly more routine for the cardiologist in practice. This article investigates how advanced imaging technologies can assist the clinician when evaluating all athletes for pathologic disease that may put them at risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac surgery or interventional cardiology? Why not both? Let's go hybrid.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, Nikolaos A; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis; Charitos, Christos

    2017-01-01

    A hybrid strategy, firstly performed in the 1990s, is a combination of tools available only in the catheterization laboratory with those available only in the operating room in order to minimize surgical morbidity and face with any cardiovascular lesion. The continuous evolution of stent technology along with the adoption of minimally invasive surgical approaches, make hybrid approaches an attractive alternative to standard surgical or transcatheter techniques for any given set of cardiovascular lesions. Examples include hybrid coronary revascularization, when an open surgical anastomosis of the left internal mammary artery to the left anterior descending coronary artery is performed along with stent implantation in non-left anterior descending coronary vessels, open heart valve surgery combined with percutaneous coronary interventions to coronary lesions, hybrid aortic arch debranching combined with endovascular grafting for thoracic aortic aneurysms, hybrid endocardial and epicardial atrial fibrillation procedures, and carotid artery stenting along with coronary artery bypass grafting. The cornerstone of success for all of these methods is the productive collaboration between cardiac surgeons and interventional cardiologists. The indications and patient selection of these procedures are still to be defined. However, high-risk patients have already been shown to benefit from hybrid approaches.

  4. Bioluminescence imaging: a shining future for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Roura, Santiago; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2013-06-01

    Advances in bioanalytical techniques have become crucial for both basic research and medical practice. One example, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), is based on the application of natural reactants with light-emitting capabilities (photoproteins and luciferases) isolated from a widespread group of organisms. The main challenges in cardiac regeneration remain unresolved, but a vast number of studies have harnessed BLI with the discovery of aequorin and green fluorescent proteins. First described in the luminous hydromedusan Aequorea victoria in the early 1960s, bioluminescent proteins have greatly contributed to the design and initiation of ongoing cell-based clinical trials on cardiovascular diseases. In conjunction with advances in reporter gene technology, BLI provides valuable information about the location and functional status of regenerative cells implanted into numerous animal models of disease. The purpose of this review was to present the great potential of BLI, among other existing imaging modalities, to refine effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy. We recount the first discovery of natural primary compounds with light-emitting capabilities, and follow their applications to bioanalysis. We also illustrate insights and perspectives on BLI to illuminate current efforts in cardiac regeneration, where the future is bright.

  5. Bioluminescence imaging: a shining future for cardiac regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Advances in bioanalytical techniques have become crucial for both basic research and medical practice. One example, bioluminescence imaging (BLI), is based on the application of natural reactants with light-emitting capabilities (photoproteins and luciferases) isolated from a widespread group of organisms. The main challenges in cardiac regeneration remain unresolved, but a vast number of studies have harnessed BLI with the discovery of aequorin and green fluorescent proteins. First described in the luminous hydromedusan Aequorea victoria in the early 1960s, bioluminescent proteins have greatly contributed to the design and initiation of ongoing cell-based clinical trials on cardiovascular diseases. In conjunction with advances in reporter gene technology, BLI provides valuable information about the location and functional status of regenerative cells implanted into numerous animal models of disease. The purpose of this review was to present the great potential of BLI, among other existing imaging modalities, to refine effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy. We recount the first discovery of natural primary compounds with light-emitting capabilities, and follow their applications to bioanalysis. We also illustrate insights and perspectives on BLI to illuminate current efforts in cardiac regeneration, where the future is bright. PMID:23402217

  6. High-performance web viewer for cardiac images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Marcelo; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2004-04-01

    With the advent of the digital devices for medical diagnosis the use of the regular films in radiology has decreased. Thus, the management and handling of medical images in digital format has become an important and critical task. In Cardiology, for example, the main difficulty is to display dynamic images with the appropriated color palette and frame rate used on acquisition process by Cath, Angio and Echo systems. In addition, other difficulty is handling large images in memory by any existing personal computer, including thin clients. In this work we present a web-based application that carries out these tasks with robustness and excellent performance, without burdening the server and network. This application provides near-diagnostic quality display of cardiac images stored as DICOM 3.0 files via a web browser and provides a set of resources that allows the viewing of still and dynamic images. It can access image files from the local disks, or network connection. Its features include: allows real-time playback, dynamic thumbnails image viewing during loading, access to patient database information, image processing tools, linear and angular measurements, on-screen annotations, image printing and exporting DICOM images to other image formats, and many others, all characterized by a pleasant user-friendly interface, inside a Web browser by means of a Java application. This approach offers some advantages over the most of medical images viewers, such as: facility of installation, integration with other systems by means of public and standardized interfaces, platform independence, efficient manipulation and display of medical images, all with high performance.

  7. ASCI 2010 appropriateness criteria for cardiac computed tomography: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Cardiac Computed Tomography and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guideline Working Group.

    PubMed

    Tsai, I-Chen; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chan, Carmen; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

    2010-02-01

    In Asia, the healthcare system, populations and patterns of disease differ from Western countries. The current reports on the criteria for cardiac CT scans, provided by Western professional societies, are not appropriate for Asian cultures. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a Working Group and invited 23 Technical Panel members representing a variety of Asian countries to rate the 51 indications for cardiac CT in clinical practice in Asia. The indications were rated as 'appropriate' (7-9), 'uncertain' (4-6), or 'inappropriate' (1-3) on a scale of 1-9. The median score was used for the final result if there was no disagreement. The final ratings for indications were 33 appropriate, 14 uncertain and 4 inappropriate. And 20 of them are highly agreed (19 appropriate and 1 inappropriate). Specifically, the Asian representatives considered cardiac CT as an appropriate modality for Kawasaki disease and congenital heart diseases in follow up and in symptomatic patients. In addition, except for some specified conditions, cardiac CT was considered to be an appropriate modality for one-stop shop ischemic heart disease evaluation due to its general appropriateness in coronary, structure and function evaluation. This report is expected to have a significant impact on the clinical practice, research and reimbursement policy in Asia.

  8. Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging of the Cardiac Activation Wave Using a Clinical Cardiac Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yexian; Li, Qian; Ingram, Pier; Barber, Christy; Liu, Zhonglin

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI), based on the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, is a noninvasive method for mapping electrical current in 4-D (space + time). This technique potentially overcomes limitations with conventional electrical mapping procedures typically used during treatment of sustained arrhythmias. However, the weak AE signal associated with the electrocardiogram is a major challenge for advancing this technology. In this study, we examined the effects of the electrode configuration and ultrasound frequency on the magnitude of the AE signal and quality of UCSDI using a rabbit Langendorff heart preparation. The AE signal was much stronger at 0.5 MHz (2.99 μV/MPa) than 1.0 MHz (0.42 μV/MPa). Also, a clinical lasso catheter placed on the epicardium exhibited excellent sensitivity without penetrating the tissue. We also present, for the first time, 3-D cardiac activation maps of the live rabbit heart using only one pair of recording electrodes. Activation maps were used to calculate the cardiac conduction velocity for atrial (1.31 m/s) and apical (0.67 m/s) pacing. This study demonstrated that UCSDI is potentially capable of real-time 3-D cardiac activation wave mapping, which would greatly facilitate ablation procedures for treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:25122512

  9. Hybrid PET/MR imaging: physics and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shetal N; Huang, Steve S

    2015-08-01

    In just over a decade, hybrid imaging with FDG PET/CT has become a standard bearer in the management of cancer patients. An exquisitely sensitive whole-body imaging modality, it combines the ability to detect subtle biologic changes with FDG PET and the anatomic information offered by CT scans. With advances in MR technology and advent of novel targeted PET radiotracers, hybrid PET/MRI is an evolutionary technique that is poised to revolutionize hybrid imaging. It offers unparalleled spatial resolution and functional multi-parametric data combined with biologic information in the non-invasive detection and characterization of diseases, without the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation. This article reviews the basic principles of FDG PET and MR imaging, discusses the salient technical developments of hybrid PET/MR systems, and provides an introduction to FDG PET/MR image acquisition.

  10. Coded excitation for diverging wave cardiac imaging: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Feifei; Tong, Ling; He, Qiong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-02-01

    Diverging wave (DW) based cardiac imaging has gained increasing interest in recent years given its capacity to achieve ultrahigh frame rate. However, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and penetration depth of the resulting B-mode images are typically low as DWs spread energy over a large region. Coded excitation is known to be capable of increasing the SNR and penetration for ultrasound imaging. The aim of this study was therefore to test the feasibility of applying coded excitation in DW imaging to improve the corresponding SNR, contrast and penetration depth. To this end, two types of codes, i.e. a linear frequency modulated chirp code and a set of complementary Golay codes were tested in three different DW imaging schemes, i.e. 1 angle DW transmit without compounding, 3 and 5 angles DW transmits with coherent compounding. The performances (SNR, contrast ratio (CR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and penetration) of different imaging schemes were investigated by means of simulations and in vitro experiments. As for benchmark, corresponding DW imaging schemes with regular pulsed excitation as well as the conventional focused imaging scheme were also included. The results showed that the SNR was improved by about 10 dB using coded excitation while the penetration depth was increased by 2.5 cm and 1.8 cm using chirp code and Golay codes, respectively. The CNR and CR gains varied with the depth for different DW schemes using coded excitations. Specifically, for non-compounded DW imaging schemes, the gain in the CR was about 5 dB and 3 dB while the gain in the CNR was about 4.5 dB and 3.5 dB at larger depths using chirp code and Golay codes, respectively. For compounded imaging schemes, using coded excitation, the gain in the penetration and contrast were relatively smaller compared to non-compounded ones. Overall, these findings indicated the feasibility of coded excitation in improving the image quality of DW imaging. Preliminary in vivo cardiac images

  11. Quantitative outcome of registration methods for correcting cardiac drift in cardiac PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Nye, Jonathan A; Tudorascu, Dana; Esteves, Fabio; Votaw, John R

    2016-03-08

    Myocardial perfusion studies suffer from artifacts caused by misalignment of the transmission and emission data due to the influences of voluntary and involuntary patient motion. Regardless of 68Ge or respiratory-averaged CT based attenuation correction and good patient cooperation, approximately 21% of perfusion studies exhibit artifacts arising from misalignment that cannot be corrected by manipulating the attenuation acquisition protocol. This misalignment, termed cardiac drift, is caused by slow-moving abdominal cavity contents that reposition the heart in the thorax and appear as myocardial uptake overlying the left CT lung in fused PET/CT images. This study evaluates three postimaging registration techniques to correct PET/CT misalignment by altering the transmission map to match myo-cardial uptake. Simulated misalignment studies were performed with a cardiac torso phantom filled with [18F]FDG at 10:1 myocardium/background. An air-filled saline bag affixed to the medial left lung surface served as a distensible lung. An initial CT acquisition was followed by successive PET acquisitions consisting of small displacements of the cardiac insert into the left lung. Phantom transmission scans were aligned to the myocardial uptake in the emission scans by applying 1) full rigid-body translations and rotations, 2) rigid-body restricted to medial / lateral and superior / inferior translation, or 3) an emission-driven method that adds myocardial tissue to the transmission scan. These methods were also applied to 10 low-likelihood coronary artery disease (CAD) patients showing signs of cardiac drift. Full rigid-body registration showed significant over-correction (p < 0.004) of activity concentrations in the artifact areas of the phantom data due the relocation of highly attenuating structures (i.e., spine). Inaccurate regional activity distributions were also observed as streaks extending from the spine and these results were replicated in the patient population. There

  12. Quantitative outcome of registration methods for correcting cardiac drift in cardiac PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Nye, Jonathon A; Tudorascu, Dana; Esteves, Fabio; Votaw, John R

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies suffer from artifacts caused by misalignment of the transmission and emission data due to the influences of voluntary and involuntary patient motion. Regardless of G68e or respiratory-averaged CT based attenuation correction and good patient cooperation, approximately 21% of perfusion studies exhibit artifacts arising from misalignment that cannot be corrected by manipulating the attenuation acquisition protocol. This misalignment, termed cardiac drift, is caused by slow-moving abdominal cavity contents that reposition the heart in the thorax and appear as myocardial uptake overlying the left CT lung in fused PET/CT images. This study evaluates three postimaging registration techniques to correct PET/CT misalignment by altering the transmission map to match myocardial uptake. Simulated misalignment studies were performed with a cardiac torso phantom filled with [F18]FDG at 10:1 myocardium/background. An air-filled saline bag affixed to the medial left lung surface served as a distensible lung. An initial CT acquisition was followed by successive PET acquisitions consisting of small displacements of the cardiac insert into the left lung. Phantom transmission scans were aligned to the myocardial uptake in the emission scans by applying 1) full rigid-body translations and rotations, 2) rigid-body restricted to medial / lateral and superior / inferior translation, or 3) an emission-driven method that adds myocardial tissue to the transmission scan. These methods were also applied to 10 low-likelihood coronary artery disease (CAD) patients showing signs of cardiac drift. Full rigid-body registration showed significant over-correction (p<0.004) of activity concentrations in the artifact areas of the phantom data due the relocation of highly attenuating structures (i.e., spine). Inaccurate regional activity distributions were also observed as streaks extending from the spine and these results were replicated in the patient population. There

  13. A macro finite element formulation for cardiac electrophysiology simulations using hybrid unstructured grids

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bernardo M.; Kickinger, Ferdinand; Prassl, Anton J.; Haase, Gundolf; Vigmond, Edward J.; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Zaglmayr, Sabine; Plank, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Electrical activity in cardiac tissue can be described by the bidomain equations whose solution for large scale simulations still remains a computational challenge. Therefore, improvements in the discrete formulation of the problem which decrease computational and/or memory demands are highly desirable. In this study, we propose a novel technique for computing shape functions of finite elements. The technique generates macro finite elements (MFEs) based on the local decomposition of elements into tetrahedral sub-elements with linear shape functions. Such an approach necessitates the direct use of hybrid meshes composed of different types of elements. MFEs are compared to classic standard finite elements with respect to accuracy and RAM memory usage under different scenarios of cardiac modeling including bidomain and monodomain simulations in 2D and 3D for simple and complex tissue geometries. In problems with analytical solutions, MFEs displayed the same numerical accuracy of standard linear triangular and tetrahedral elements. In propagation simulations, conduction velocity and activation times agreed very well with those computed with standard finite elements. However, MFEs offer a significant decrease in memory requirements. We conclude that hybrid meshes composed of MFEs are well suited for solving problems in cardiac computational electrophysiology. PMID:20699206

  14. Tough and flexible CNT-polymeric hybrid scaffolds for engineering cardiac constructs.

    PubMed

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Shin, Su Ryon; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Topkaya, Seda Nur; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-08-01

    In the past few years, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted toward the development of biomimetic scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. However, most of the previous scaffolds have been electrically insulating or lacked the structural and mechanical robustness to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with suitable electrophysiological functions. Here, we developed tough and flexible hybrid scaffolds with enhanced electrical properties composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded aligned poly(glycerol sebacate):gelatin (PG) electrospun nanofibers. Incorporation of varying concentrations of CNTs from 0 to 1.5% within the PG nanofibrous scaffolds (CNT-PG scaffolds) notably enhanced fiber alignment and improved the electrical conductivity and toughness of the scaffolds while maintaining the viability, retention, alignment, and contractile activities of cardiomyocytes (CMs) seeded on the scaffolds. The resulting CNT-PG scaffolds resulted in stronger spontaneous and synchronous beating behavior (3.5-fold lower excitation threshold and 2.8-fold higher maximum capture rate) compared to those cultured on PG scaffold. Overall, our findings demonstrated that aligned CNT-PG scaffold exhibited superior mechanical properties with enhanced CM beating properties. It is envisioned that the proposed hybrid scaffolds can be useful for generating cardiac tissue constructs with improved organization and maturation.

  15. Tough and Flexible CNT-Polymeric Hybrid Scaffolds for Engineering Cardiac Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Ryon Shin, Su; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Nur Topkaya, Seda; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet. R.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted toward the development of biomimetic scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. However, most of the previous scaffolds have been electrically insulating or lacked the structural and mechanical robustness to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with suitable electrophysiological functions. Here, we developed tough and flexible hybrid scaffolds with enhanced electrical properties composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded aligned poly(glycerol sebacate):gelatin (PG) electrospun nanofibers. Incorporation of varying concentrations of CNTs from 0 to 1.5% within the PG nanofibrous scaffolds (CNT-PG scaffolds) notably enhanced fiber alignment and improved the electrical conductivity and toughness of the scaffolds while maintaining the viability, retention, alignment, and contractile activities of cardiomyocytes (CMs) seeded on the scaffolds. The resulting CNT-PG scaffolds resulted in stronger spontaneous and synchronous beating behavior (3.5-fold lower excitation threshold and 2.8-fold higher maximum capture rate) compared to those cultured on PG scaffold. Overall, our findings demonstrated that aligned CNT-PG scaffold exhibited superior mechanical properties with enhanced CM beating properties. It is envisioned that the proposed hybrid scaffolds can be useful for generating cardiac tissue constructs with improved organization and maturation. PMID:24927679

  16. Imaging: Guiding the Clinical Translation of Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Patricia K.; Lan, Feng; Wang, Yongming; Wu, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have been touted as the holy grail of medical therapy with promises to regenerate cardiac tissue, but it appears the jury is still out on this novel therapy. Using advanced imaging technology, scientists have discovered that these cells do not survive nor engraft long-term. In addition, only marginal benefit has been observed in large animal studies and human trials. However, all is not lost. Further application of advanced imaging technology will help scientists unravel the mysteries of stem cell therapy and address the clinical hurdles facing its routine implementation. In this review, we will discuss how advanced imaging technology will help investigators better define the optimal delivery method, improve survival and engraftment, and evaluate efficacy and safety. Insights gained from this review may direct the development of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:21960727

  17. Role of imaging in ablation therapy of ventricular arrhythmias. Focus on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yokokawa, Miki; Mueller, Gisela; Bogun, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a central role in the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias. Cardiac MRIs help to identify patients with risk for life-threatening arrhythmias. Delayed enhancement identifies scar tissue within the heart. Because scar harbors the arrhythmic substrate in patients with structural heart disease, areas of delayed enhancement can be targeted in order to eliminate ventricular arrhythmias with catheter ablation procedures. In this article, we will discuss the role of MRI in diagnosing different forms of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and its role in risk stratification. Furthermore, we will discuss the role of MRI in imaging of the arrhythmogenic substrate in patients with structural heart disease.

  18. [Cardiac hydatid cyst. Which imaging modality for an accurate diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Ben Khalfallah, A; Ben Slima, H

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac echinococcosis is rare. Its spontaneous course is serious because of the risk of rupture. Its clinical manifestations are variable, often latent and misleading. The diagnosis is sometimes referred to by chest radiography. It is much facilitated by non-invasive imaging techniques in particular transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography, CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging. The latter through a morphological and topographical analysis accurate diagnosis of hydatid cyst and its relationship to cardiac muscle and surrounding tissue. Through functional analysis in cine cyst movements relative to the heart wall, it confirms its free or fixed character in the heart chambers, determines its insertion area, its deformability, the risk of rupture and its impact on myocardial contraction. Our case illustrates the relative contribution of these different imaging techniques and their respective contributions to the identification of hydatid cyst of its wall, its contents, its relationship with the various tunics and heart chambers and its relations with the lungs and mediastinum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Towards robust specularity detection and inpainting in cardiac images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaleh, Samar M.; Aviles, Angelica I.; Sobrevilla, Pilar; Casals, Alicia; Hahn, James

    2016-03-01

    Computer-assisted cardiac surgeries had major advances throughout the years and are gaining more popularity over conventional cardiac procedures as they offer many benefits to both patients and surgeons. One obvious advantage is that they enable surgeons to perform delicate tasks on the heart while it is still beating, avoiding the risks associated with cardiac arrest. Consequently, the surgical system needs to accurately compensate the physiological motion of the heart which is a very challenging task in medical robotics since there exist different sources of disturbances. One of which is the bright light reflections, known as specular highlights, that appear on the glossy surface of the heart and partially occlude the field of view. This work is focused on developing a robust approach that accurately detects and removes those highlights to reduce their disturbance to the surgeon and the motion compensation algorithm. As a first step, we exploit both color attributes and Fuzzy edge detector to identify specular regions in each acquired image frame. These two techniques together work as restricted thresholding and are able to accurately identify specular regions. Then, in order to eliminate the specularity artifact and give the surgeon a better perception of the heart, the second part of our solution is dedicated to correct the detected regions using inpainting to propagate and smooth the results. Our experimental results, which we carry out in realistic datasets, reveal how efficient and precise the proposed solution is, as well as demonstrate its robustness and real-time performance.

  20. Wide coverage by volume CT: benefits for cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablayrolles, Jean-Louis; Cesmeli, Erdogan; Mintandjian, Laura; Adda, Olivier; Dessalles-Martin, Diane

    2005-04-01

    With the development of new technologies, computed tomography (CT) is becoming a strong candidate for non-invasive imaging based tool for cardiac disease assessment. One of the challenges of cardiac CT is that a typical scan involves a breath hold period consisting of several heartbeats, about 20 sec with scanners having a longitudinal coverage of 2 cm, and causing the image quality (IQ) to be negatively impacted since beat to beat variation is high likely to occur without any medication, e.g. beta blockers. Because of this and the preference for shorter breath hold durations, a CT scanner with a wide coverage without the compromise in the spatial and temporal resolution of great clinical value. In this study, we aimed at determining the optimum scan duration and the delay relative to beginning of breath hold, to achieve high IQ. We acquired EKG data from 91 consecutive patients (77 M, 14 F; Age: 57 +/- 14) undergoing cardiac CT exams with contrast, performed on LightSpeed 16 and LightSpeed Pro16. As an IQ metric, we adopted the standard deviation of "beat-to-beat variation" (stdBBV) within a virtual scan period. Two radiologists evaluated images by assigning a score of 1 (worst) to 4 best). We validated stdBBV with the radiologist scores, which resulted in a population distribution of 9.5, 9.5, 31, and 50% for the score groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Based on the scores, we defined a threshold for stdBBV and identified an optimum combination of virtual scan period and a delay. With the assumption that the relationship between the stdBBV and diagnosable scan IQ holds, our analysis suggested that the success rate can be improved to 100% with scan durations equal or less than 5 sec with a delay of 1 - 2 sec. We confirmed the suggested conclusion with LightSpeed VCT (GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI), which has a wide longitudinal coverage, fine isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution, e.g. 40 mm coverage per rotation of 0.35 sec

  1. The Value of Attenuation Correction in Hybrid Cardiac SPECT/CT on Inferior Wall According to Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Tamam, Muge; Mulazimoglu, Mehmet; Edis, Nurcan; Ozpacaci, Tevfik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of attenuation-corrected single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) on the inferior wall compared to uncorrected (NC) SPECT MPI between obese and nonobese patients. A total of 157 consecutive patients (122 males and 35 females, with median age: 57.4 ± 11 years) who underwent AC technetium 99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (AC Tc99m-sestamibi) SPECT MPI were included to the study. A hybrid SPECT and transmission computed tomography (CT) system was used for the diagnosis with 1-day protocol, and stress imaging was performed first. During attenuation correction (AC) processing on a Xeleris Workstation using Myovation cardiac software with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM), iterative reconstruction with attenuation correction (IRAC) and NC images filtered back projection (FBP) were used. For statistical purposes, P < 0.05 was considered significant. This study included 73 patients with body mass index (BMI) <30 and 84 patients with BMI ≥ 30. In patients with higher BMI, increased amount of both visual and semiquantitative attenuation of the inferior wall was detected. IRAC reconstruction corrects the diaphragm attenuation of the inferior wall better than FBP. AC with OSEM iterative reconstruction significantly improves the diagnostic value of stress-only SPECT MPI in patients with normal weight and those who are obese, but the improvements are significantly greater in obese patients. Stress-only SPECT imaging with AC provides shorter and lower radiation exposure. PMID:26912974

  2. The Value of Attenuation Correction in Hybrid Cardiac SPECT/CT on Inferior Wall According to Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Muge; Mulazimoglu, Mehmet; Edis, Nurcan; Ozpacaci, Tevfik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of attenuation-corrected single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) on the inferior wall compared to uncorrected (NC) SPECT MPI between obese and nonobese patients. A total of 157 consecutive patients (122 males and 35 females, with median age: 57.4 ± 11 years) who underwent AC technetium 99m-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (AC Tc99m-sestamibi) SPECT MPI were included to the study. A hybrid SPECT and transmission computed tomography (CT) system was used for the diagnosis with 1-day protocol, and stress imaging was performed first. During attenuation correction (AC) processing on a Xeleris Workstation using Myovation cardiac software with ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM), iterative reconstruction with attenuation correction (IRAC) and NC images filtered back projection (FBP) were used. For statistical purposes, P < 0.05 was considered significant. This study included 73 patients with body mass index (BMI) <30 and 84 patients with BMI ≥ 30. In patients with higher BMI, increased amount of both visual and semiquantitative attenuation of the inferior wall was detected. IRAC reconstruction corrects the diaphragm attenuation of the inferior wall better than FBP. AC with OSEM iterative reconstruction significantly improves the diagnostic value of stress-only SPECT MPI in patients with normal weight and those who are obese, but the improvements are significantly greater in obese patients. Stress-only SPECT imaging with AC provides shorter and lower radiation exposure.

  3. Hybrid automata models of cardiac ventricular electrophysiology for real-time computational applications.

    PubMed

    Andalam, Sidharta; Ramanna, Harshavardhan; Malik, Avinash; Roop, Parthasarathi; Patel, Nitish; Trew, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Virtual heart models have been proposed for closed loop validation of safety-critical embedded medical devices, such as pacemakers. These models must react in real-time to off-the-shelf medical devices. Real-time performance can be obtained by implementing models in computer hardware, and methods of compiling classes of Hybrid Automata (HA) onto FPGA have been developed. Models of ventricular cardiac cell electrophysiology have been described using HA which capture the complex nonlinear behavior of biological systems. However, many models that have been used for closed-loop validation of pacemakers are highly abstract and do not capture important characteristics of the dynamic rate response. We developed a new HA model of cardiac cells which captures dynamic behavior and we implemented the model in hardware. This potentially enables modeling the heart with over 1 million dynamic cells, making the approach ideal for closed loop testing of medical devices.

  4. ASCI 2010 appropriateness criteria for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a report of the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Kakuya; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chan, Carmen; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Tsai, I-Chen; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

    2010-12-01

    There has been a growing need for standard Asian population guidelines for cardiac CT and cardiac MR due to differences in culture, healthcare system, ethnicity and disease prevalence. The Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging, as the only society dedicated to cardiovascular imaging in Asia, formed a cardiac CT and cardiac MR guideline working group in order to help Asian practitioners to establish cardiac CT and cardiac MR services. In this ASCI cardiac MR appropriateness criteria report, 23 Technical Panel members representing various Asian countries were invited to rate 50 indications that can frequently be encountered in clinical practice in Asia. Indications were rated on a scale of 1-9 to be categorized into 'appropriate' (7-9), 'uncertain' (4-6), or 'inappropriate' (1-3). According to median scores of the 23 members, the final ratings for indications were 24 appropriate, 18 uncertain and 8 inappropriate with 22 'highly-agreed' (19 appropriate and 3 inappropriate) indications. This report is expected to have a significant impact on the cardiac MR practices in many Asian countries by promoting the appropriate use of cardiac MR.

  5. Centralized Digital Picture Processing System For Cardiac Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeFree, M. T.; Vogel, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a system for the centralized acquisition, display, analysis and archiving of diagnostic cardiac medical images from x-ray fluoroscopy, two-dimensional ultrasonography and nuclear scintigraphy. Centered around a DLC PUP 11/34 minicomputer with an existing gamma camera interface, we have added a closed-circuit television system with a 256x512x8-bit video digitizer and image display controller to interface the video output of the fluoroscope and ultrasonograph. A video disc recorder (under computer control) is used as an input and playback buffer, allowing for data transfer to and from digital disc drives. Thus, real-time video digitization is possible for up to ten seconds of incoming RS-170-compatible video. The digitizer separates video fields at real-time into two 256x256x8-bit refresh memories, providing 60Hz temporal resolution. Generally, however, we choose to record at non-real-time rates to encompass more than ten seconds. In addition to I/O software controlling data acquisition ana playback, we have developed a versatile data analysis package (offering such capabilities as image algebra, Fourier analysis and convolutional filtering), as well as interactive data reduction subroutines (such as region-of-interest definition, profile plotting and regional extraction of statistical and probabilistic information). We have found the system useful for standard cardiac image analysis, for simultaneous display of images from the three modalities, for picture storage and retrieval, and as a research tool. future plans include the addition of intelligent terminals at each modality and progression to a 32-bit machine for the central processor.

  6. OsiriX plugin for integrated cardiac imaging research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüllebrand, Markus; Hennemuth, Anja; Messroghli, Daniel; Kühne, Titus

    2014-03-01

    Strongly evolving imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays provide a multitude of new complementary techniques for the analysis of cardiovascular tissue properties, function, and hemodynamics. The purpose of the presented work is to provide a research tool, which enables a quick validation of newly developed imaging techniques and supports the co-development of clinically usable analysis tools, which allow an integration with existing complementary examination methods. The concepts combined to this end consist of an integration with the open source research PACS OsiriX, an advanced heuristic DICOM classification and preprocessing as well as an integrative data model, which accumulates patient-specific image data, results and the data relations. Specific processing and analysis plugins can easily be integrated in such a way that they use the data integration and visualization infrastructure as well as results from other existing plugins. The presented example applications, such as the evaluation of slice orientations for cardiac function quantification or the integrated analysis of different types of image data for diagnosis of myocarditis show that the provided tool can be successfully used for a multitude of research applications in cardiovascular imaging.

  7. Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Umeno, Marc M.

    2011-09-13

    A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

  8. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  9. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  10. A hybrid algorithm for speckle noise reduction of ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Singh, Karamjeet; Ranade, Sukhjeet Kaur; Singh, Chandan

    2017-09-01

    Medical images are contaminated by multiplicative speckle noise which significantly reduce the contrast of ultrasound images and creates a negative effect on various image interpretation tasks. In this paper, we proposed a hybrid denoising approach which collaborate the both local and nonlocal information in an efficient manner. The proposed hybrid algorithm consist of three stages in which at first stage the use of local statistics in the form of guided filter is used to reduce the effect of speckle noise initially. Then, an improved speckle reducing bilateral filter (SRBF) is developed to further reduce the speckle noise from the medical images. Finally, to reconstruct the diffused edges we have used the efficient post-processing technique which jointly considered the advantages of both bilateral and nonlocal mean (NLM) filter for the attenuation of speckle noise efficiently. The performance of proposed hybrid algorithm is evaluated on synthetic, simulated and real ultrasound images. The experiments conducted on various test images demonstrate that our proposed hybrid approach outperforms the various traditional speckle reduction approaches included recently proposed NLM and optimized Bayesian-based NLM. The results of various quantitative, qualitative measures and by visual inspection of denoise synthetic and real ultrasound images demonstrate that the proposed hybrid algorithm have strong denoising capability and able to preserve the fine image details such as edge of a lesion better than previously developed methods for speckle noise reduction. The denoising and edge preserving capability of hybrid algorithm is far better than existing traditional and recently proposed speckle reduction (SR) filters. The success of proposed algorithm would help in building the lay foundation for inventing the hybrid algorithms for denoising of ultrasound images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart defects in adults].

    PubMed

    Bastarrika Alemañ, G; Gavira Gómez, J J; Zudaire Díaz-Tejeiro, B; Castaño Rodríguez, S; Romero Ibarra, C; Sáenz de Buruaga, J D

    2007-01-01

    The study of congenital cardiopathies (CC) is one of the most clearly established indications of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Different sequences, including anatomic, functional, flow (phase contrast), and 3D angiographic sequences, enable the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up of these conditions. CMRI allows the anatomy, function, and alterations of flow in these cardiopathies to be evaluated in a single examination. Three-dimensional MR angiography enables the study of the great vessels and the anomalies associated to congenital heart defects in adults. This article describes an examination protocol and provides examples of MR images of the most common CC in adults: atrial septal defect, interventricular communication, atrioventricular canal, tetralogy of Fallot, transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, bicuspid aortic valve, subaortic stenosis, aortic coarctation, and Ebstein's anomaly.

  12. Hybrid measurement to achieve satisfactory precision in perioperative cardiac output monitoring.

    PubMed

    Peyton, P

    2014-05-01

    Advanced haemodynamic monitoring employing minimally invasive cardiac output measurement may lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes in major surgery. However, the precision (scatter) of measurement of available generic technologies has been shown to be unsatisfactory with percentage error of agreement with bolus thermodilution (% error) of 40% to 50%. Simultaneous measurement and averaging by two or more technologies may reduce random measurement scatter and improve precision. This concept, called the hybrid method, was tested by comparing accuracy and precision of measurement relative to bolus thermodilution using combinations of three component methods. Thirty patients scheduled for either elective cardiac surgery or liver transplantation were studied. Agreement with simultaneous bolus thermodilution of hybrid combinations of continuous thermodilution (QtCCO) or Vigeleo™/FloTrac™ pulse contour measurement (QtFT) with pulmonary Capnotracking (QtCO2) was assessed pre- and post-cardiopulmonary bypass or pre- and post-reperfusion of the donor liver and compared with that of the component methods alone. Hybridisation of QtCO2 (% error 42.2) and QtCCO (% error 51.3) achieved significantly better precision (% error 31.3) than the component methods (P=0.0004) and (P=0.0195). Due to poor inherent precision of QtFT (% error 82.8), hybrid combination of QtFT with QtCO2 did not result in better precision than QtCO2 alone. Hybrid measurement can approach a 30% error, which is recommended as the upper limit for acceptability. This is a practical option where at least one component method, such as Capnotracking, is automated and does not increase the cost or complexity of the measurement process.

  13. Combining simulated patients and simulators: pilot study of hybrid simulation in teaching cardiac auscultation.

    PubMed

    Friederichs, Hendrik; Weissenstein, Anne; Ligges, Sandra; Möller, David; Becker, Jan C; Marschall, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    Auscultation torsos are widely used to teach position-dependent heart sounds and murmurs. To provide a more realistic teaching experience, both whole body auscultation mannequins and torsos have been used in clinical examination skills training at the Medical Faculty of the University of Muenster since the winter term of 2008-2009. This training has since been extended by simulated patients, which are normal, healthy subjects who have undergone attachment of the electronic components of the auscultation mannequins to their chests to mimic pathophysiological conditions ("hybrid models"). The acceptance of this new learning method was examined in the present pilot study. In total, 143 students in their second preclinical year who were participating in auscultation training were randomized into an intervention group (hybrid models) and a control group (auscultation mannequins). One hundred forty-two (99.3%) of these students completed a self-assessment Likert-scale questionnaire regarding different teaching approaches (where 1 = "very poor" to 100 = "very good"). The questionnaire focused on the "value of learning" of different teaching approaches. Direct comparison showed that students evaluated the hybrid models to be significantly more effective than the auscultation mannequins (median: 83 vs. 64, P < 0.001). The cardiac auscultation training was generally assessed positively (median: 88). Additionally, verbal feedback was obtained from simulated patients and tutors (trained students who had successfully passed the course a few semesters earlier). Personal feedback showed high satisfaction from student tutors and simulated patients. Hybrid simulators for teaching cardiac auscultation elucidated positive responses from students, tutors, and simulated patients.

  14. Cardiac Structure and Function in Cushing's Syndrome: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Methods: Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2–12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Results: Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P < .001 for all) and increased end-diastolic LV segmental thickness (P < .001). Treatment of hypercortisolism was associated with an improvement in ventricular and atrial systolic performance, as reflected by a 15% increase in the LV ejection fraction (P = .029), a 45% increase in the LA ejection fraction (P < .001), and an 11% increase in the RV ejection fraction (P = NS). After treatment, the LV mass index and end-diastolic LV mass to volume ratio decreased by 17% (P < .001) and 10% (P = .002), respectively. None of the patients had late gadolinium myocardial enhancement. Conclusion: Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism. PMID:25093618

  15. Image quality improvement in MDCT cardiac imaging via SMART-RECON method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Cao, Ximiao; Xing, Zhanfeng; Sun, Xuguang; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a challenging imaging task currently limited by the achievable temporal resolution of modern Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) scanners. In this paper, the recently proposed SMARTRECON method has been applied in MDCT-based CCTA imaging to improve the image quality without any prior knowledge of cardiac motion. After the prospective ECG-gated data acquisition from a short-scan angular span, the acquired data were sorted into several sub-sectors of view angles; each corresponds to a 1/4th of the short-scan angular range. Information of the cardiac motion was thus encoded into the data in each view angle sub-sector. The SMART-RECON algorithm was then applied to jointly reconstruct several image volumes, each of which is temporally consistent with the data acquired in the corresponding view angle sub-sector. Extensive numerical simulations were performed to validate the proposed technique and investigate the performance dependence.

  16. Dynamic Enhancement of B-Mode Cardiac Ultrasound Image Sequences.

    PubMed

    Perperidis, Antonios; Cusack, David; White, Audrey; McDicken, Norman; MacGillivray, Tom; Anderson, Tom

    2017-07-01

    Limited contrast, along with speckle and acoustic noise, can reduce the diagnostic value of echocardiographic images. This study introduces dynamic histogram-based intensity mapping (DHBIM), a novel approach employing temporal variations in the cumulative histograms of cardiac ultrasound images to contrast enhance the imaged structures. DHBIM is then combined with spatial compounding to compensate for noise and speckle. The proposed techniques are quantitatively assessed (32 clinical data sets) employing (i) standard image quality measures and (ii) the repeatability of routine clinical measurements, such as chamber diameter and wall thickness. DHBIM introduces a mean increase of 120.9% in tissue/chamber detectability, improving the overall repeatability of clinical measurements by 17%. The integrated approach of DHBIM followed by spatial compounding provides the best overall enhancement of image quality and diagnostic value, consistently outperforming the individual approaches and achieving a 401.4% average increase in tissue/chamber detectability with an associated 24.3% improvement in the overall repeatability of clinical measurements. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. State of the Art in Cardiac Hybrid Technology: PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Nappi, Carmela; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous PET/MRI is an emerging technique combining two powerful imaging modalities in a single device. The wide variety of available tracers for perfusion and metabolic studies and the high sensitivity of positron emission tomography (PET) combined with the high spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in depicting cardiac morphology and function as well as MRI's absence of ionizing radiation makes PET/MRI very attractive to radiologists and clinicians. Nevertheless, PET/MR scientific and clinical promise is to be considered in the context of numerous technical challenges that hinder its use in the clinical setting. For example, in order for a PET system to work correctly within an MR field, major changes are required to the photon detection chain such as the elimination of photomultiplier tubes, etc. Another significant limitation of PET/MRI is the lack of an electron density map (as is the case with PET-CT) that can be readily obtained from MRI (the latter measures proton not electron density) and used to correct PET data for attenuation. Moreover, as with PET-CT, cardiac and respiratory motions cause image degradations that affect image quality and accuracy both in static and dynamic PET imaging. As a result, overcoming these (and other) technical limitations is a very active area of research both in academic institutions as well as industry. In this paper, we review recent literature on cardiac PET/MRI, present the state-of-the-art of this technology, and explore promising preclinical and clinical cardiac applications where PET/MRI could play a substantial role. PMID:24073295

  18. Lossless compression of hyperspectral images using hybrid context prediction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuan; Li, Jianping; Guo, Ke

    2012-03-26

    In this letter a new algorithm for lossless compression of hyperspectral images using hybrid context prediction is proposed. Lossless compression algorithms are typically divided into two stages, a decorrelation stage and a coding stage. The decorrelation stage supports both intraband and interband predictions. The intraband (spatial) prediction uses the median prediction model, since the median predictor is fast and efficient. The interband prediction uses hybrid context prediction. The hybrid context prediction is the combination of a linear prediction (LP) and a context prediction. Finally, the residual image of hybrid context prediction is coded by the arithmetic coding. We compare the proposed lossless compression algorithm with some of the existing algorithms for hyperspectral images such as 3D-CALIC, M-CALIC, LUT, LAIS-LUT, LUT-NN, DPCM (C-DPCM), JPEG-LS. The performance of the proposed lossless compression algorithm is evaluated. Simulation results show that our algorithm achieves high compression ratios with low complexity and computational cost.

  19. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed.

  20. Optical imaging predicts mechanical properties during decellularization of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Merna, Nick; Robertson, Claire; La, Anh; George, Steven C

    2013-10-01

    Decellularization of xenogeneic hearts offers an acellular, naturally occurring, 3D scaffold that may aid in the development of an engineered human heart tissue. However, decellularization impacts the structural and mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which can strongly influence a cell response during recellularization. We hypothesized that multiphoton microscopy (MPM), combined with image correlation spectroscopy (ICS), could be used to characterize the structural and mechanical properties of the decellularized cardiac matrix in a noninvasive and nondestructive fashion. Whole porcine hearts were decellularized for 7 days by four different solutions of Trypsin and/or Triton. The compressive modulus of the cardiac ECM decreased to < 20% of that of the native tissue in three of the four conditions (range 2-8 kPa); the modulus increased by -150% (range 125-150 kPa) in tissues treated with Triton only. The collagen and elastin content decreased steadily over time for all four decellularization conditions. The ICS amplitude of second harmonic generation (SHG, ASHG) collagen images increased in three of the four decellularization conditions characterized by a decrease in fiber density; the ICS amplitude was approximately constant in tissues treated with Triton only. The ICS ratio (R(SHG), skew) of collagen images increased significantly in the two conditions characterized by a loss of collagen crimping or undulations. The ICS ratio of two-photon fluorescence (TPF, R(TPF)) elastin images decreased in three of the four conditions, but increased significantly in Triton-only treated tissue characterized by retention of densely packed elastin fibers. There were strong linear relationships between both the log of A(SHG) (R(2) = 0.86) and R(TPF) (R(2) = 0.92) with the compressive modulus. Using these variables, a linear model predicts the compressive modulus: E=73.9 × Log(A(SHG))+70.1 × R(TPF) - 131 (R(2) = 0.94). This suggests that the collagen

  1. Update: Cardiac Imaging (II). Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Advantages and Limitations of Different Cardiac Imaging Techniques.

    PubMed

    Podlesnikar, Tomaz; Delgado, Victoria

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is an established therapy for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis and contraindications or high risk for surgery. Advances in prostheses and delivery system designs and continuous advances in multimodality imaging, particularly the 3-dimensional techniques, have led to improved outcomes with significant reductions in the incidence of frequent complications such as paravalvular aortic regurgitation. In addition, data on prosthesis durability are accumulating. Multimodality imaging plays a central role in the selection of patients who are candidates for transcatheter aortic valve replacement, procedure planning and guidance, and follow-up of prosthesis function. The strengths and limitations of each imaging technique for transcatheter aortic valve replacement will be discussed in this update article. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has limited additional yield in cryptogenic stroke evaluation after transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Ava L; Kalani, Rizwan E; Aw-Zoretic, Jessie; Sondag, Matthew; Daruwalla, Vistasp J; Mitter, Sumeet S; Bernstein, Richard; Collins, Jeremy D; Prabhakaran, Shyam

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is increasing, but its role in the diagnostic work-up following ischemic stroke has received limited study. We aimed to explore the added yield of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to identify cardio-aortic sources not detected by transesophageal echocardiography among patients with cryptogenic stroke. Methods A retrospective single-center cohort study was performed from 01 January 2009 to 01 March 2013. Consecutive patients who had both a stroke protocol cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and a transesophageal echocardiography preformed during a single hospitalization were included. All cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies underwent independent, blinded review by two investigators. We applied the causative classification system for ischemic stroke to all patients, first blinded to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging results; we then reapplied the causative classification system using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Standard statistical tests to evaluate stroke subtype reclassification rates were used. Results Ninety-three patients were included in the final analysis; 68.8% were classified as cryptogenic stroke after initial diagnostic evaluation. Among patients with cryptogenic stroke, five (7.8%) were reclassified due to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings: one was reclassified as "cardio-aortic embolism evident" due to the presence of a patent foramen ovale and focal cardiac infarct and four were reclassified as "cardio-aortic embolism possible" due to mitral valve thickening (n = 1) or hypertensive cardiomyopathy (n = 3). Overall, findings on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging reduced the percentage of patients with cryptogenic stroke by slightly more than 1%. Conclusion Our stroke subtype reclassification rate after the addition of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging results to a diagnostic work-up which includes transesophageal echocardiography was very low. Prospective studies

  3. Cardiac biplane strain imaging: initial in vivo experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopata, R. G. P.; Nillesen, M. M.; Verrijp, C. N.; Singh, S. K.; Lammens, M. M. Y.; van der Laak, J. A. W. M.; van Wetten, H. B.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2010-02-01

    In this study, first we propose a biplane strain imaging method using a commercial ultrasound system, yielding estimation of the strain in three orthogonal directions. Secondly, an animal model of a child's heart was introduced that is suitable to simulate congenital heart disease and was used to test the method in vivo. The proposed approach can serve as a framework to monitor the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. A 2D strain estimation technique using radio frequency (RF) ultrasound data was applied. Biplane image acquisition was performed at a relatively low frame rate (<100 Hz) using a commercial platform with an RF interface. For testing the method in vivo, biplane image sequences of the heart were recorded during the cardiac cycle in four dogs with an aortic stenosis. Initial results reveal the feasibility of measuring large radial, circumferential and longitudinal cumulative strain (up to 70%) at a frame rate of 100 Hz. Mean radial strain curves of a manually segmented region-of-interest in the infero-lateral wall show excellent correlation between the measured strain curves acquired in two perpendicular planes. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility and reproducibility of assessing radial, circumferential and longitudinal strains simultaneously. In this preliminary study, three beagles developed an elevated pressure gradient over the aortic valve (Δp: 100-200 mmHg) and myocardial hypertrophy. One dog did not develop any sign of hypertrophy (Δp = 20 mmHg). Initial strain (rate) results showed that the maximum strain (rate) decreased with increasing valvular stenosis (-50%), which is in accordance with previous studies. Histological findings corroborated these results and showed an increase in fibrotic tissue for the hearts with larger pressure gradients (100, 200 mmHg), as well as lower strain and strain rate values.

  4. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging safety following percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Jason W; Lesniak, Donna C; Wible, James H; Woodard, Pamela K

    2013-10-01

    In the first 8 weeks after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), possible negative interactions exist between the cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging environment and the weakly ferromagnetic material in coronary stents. There are circumstances when CMR would be indicated shortly following PCI, such as acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The purpose of this study is to demonstrate CMR safety shortly following stent PCI in AMI patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of safety data in AMI patients with recently placed coronary artery stents enrolled in a multi-center phase II trial for gadoversetamide. Patients underwent 1.5 T CMR within 16 days of PCI. Vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature) and ECGs were taken pre-CMR, 1, 2, and 24 h post-CMR. Any major adverse cardiac event (MACE) or other serious adverse events in the first 24 h after MRI were recorded. There were 258 stents in 211 AMI patients. The mean delay to CMR following PCI was 6.5 ± 4 days, with 62 patients (29 %) receiving CMR within 3 days and 132 patients (63 %) within 1 week. Patients showed no significant vital sign changes following CMR. Ten patients (4.7 %) showed mild, transient ECG changes. Within the 24-h follow-up group, 4 patients (1.9 %) had moderate to severe events, including chest pain (1) and elevated cardiac enzymes (1), resolving in 24 h; heart failure (1) and ischemic stroke (1). There were no deaths. This study demonstrates fewer MACE in AMI patients undergoing 1.5 T CMR within 16 days of stent placement in comparison to post-stent event rate reported in the literature. This study adds to the CMR after stent PCI safety profile suggested by previous studies and is the largest and first study that uses multicenter data to assess stent safety following CMR examination.

  5. Prognostic Value of Brain Diffusion Weighted Imaging After Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wijman, Christine A.C.; Mlynash, Michael; Caulfield, Anna Finley; Hsia, Amie W.; Eyngorn, Irina; Bammer, Roland; Fischbein, Nancy; Albers, Gregory W.; Moseley, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective Outcome prediction is challenging in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors. We assessed the feasibility and prognostic utility of brain diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) during the first week. Methods Consecutive comatose post-cardiac arrest patients were prospectively enrolled. MRI data of patients who met predefined specific prognostic criteria were used to determine distinguishing ADC thresholds. Group 1: death at 6 months and absent motor response or absent pupillary reflexes or bilateral absent cortical responses at 72 hours, or vegetative at 1 month. Group 2A: Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score of 4 or 5 at 6 months. Group 2B: GOS of 3 at 6 months. The percentage of voxels below different apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) thresholds was calculated at 50 × 10−6 mm2/sec intervals. Results Overall, 86% of patients underwent MR imaging. Fifty-one patients with 62 brain MRIs were included in the analyses. Forty patients met the specific prognostic criteria. The percentage of brain volume with an ADC value below 650–700 × 10−6 mm2/sec best differentiated between group 1 and groups 2A and 2B combined (p<0.001), while the 400–450 × 10−6 mm2/sec threshold best differentiated between groups 2A and 2B (p=0.003). The ideal time window for prognostication using DWI was between 49 to 108 hours after the arrest. When comparing MRI in this time window with the 72 hour neurological examination MRI improved the sensitivity for predicting poor outcome by 38% while maintaining 100% specificity (p=0.021). Interpretation Quantitative DWI in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors holds great promise as a prognostic adjunct. PMID:19399889

  6. Dynamic cardiac imaging using a focused, phased-array ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Kisslo, J A; vonRamm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1977-07-01

    A two-dimensional ultrasound imaging system capable of producing high resolution, cross-sectional images of the heart in real-time has been developed. This system relies upon phased-array principles to rapidly steer and focus the ultrasound beam through the cardiac structures under investigation. A hand-held, linear array of 24 transducers is manipulated on the anterior chest wall to image various cardiac structures. Images of high line density are presented in selectable sector arcs to a maximum of 90 degrees. This imaging system has proved particularly useful for the detection of a variety of left ventricular and cardiac valvular disease.

  7. How much image noise can be added in cardiac x-ray imaging without loss in perceived image quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; Kumcu, Asli; Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Rhodes, Laura A.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic X-ray imaging systems are used for interventional cardiac procedures to treat coronary heart disease. X-ray settings are controlled automatically by specially-designed X-ray dose control mechanisms whose role is to ensure an adequate level of image quality is maintained with an acceptable radiation dose to the patient. Current commonplace dose control designs quantify image quality by performing a simple technical measurement directly from the image. However, the utility of cardiac X-ray images is in their interpretation by a cardiologist during an interventional procedure, rather than in a technical measurement. With the long term goal of devising a clinically-relevant image quality metric for an intelligent dose control system, we aim to investigate the relationship of image noise with clinical professionals' perception of dynamic image sequences. Computer-generated noise was added, in incremental amounts, to angiograms of five different patients selected to represent the range of adult cardiac patient sizes. A two alternative forced choice staircase experiment was used to determine the amount of noise which can be added to a patient image sequences without changing image quality as perceived by clinical professionals. Twenty-five viewing sessions (five for each patient) were completed by thirteen observers. Results demonstrated scope to increase the noise of cardiac X-ray images by up to 21% +/- 8% before it is noticeable by clinical professionals. This indicates a potential for 21% radiation dose reduction since X-ray image noise and radiation dose are directly related; this would be beneficial to both patients and personnel.

  8. Segmentation of the thoracic aorta in noncontrast cardiac CT images.

    PubMed

    Avila-Montes, Olga C; Kurkure, Uday; Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S; Dey, Damini; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2013-09-01

    Studies have shown that aortic calcification is associated with cardiovascular disease. In this study, a method for localization, centerline extraction, and segmentation of the thoracic aorta in noncontrast cardiac-computed tomography (CT) images, toward the detection of aortic calcification, is presented. The localization of the right coronary artery ostium slice is formulated as a regression problem whose input variables are obtained from simple intensity features computed from a pyramid representation of the slice. The localization, centerline extraction, and segmentation of the aorta are formulated as optimal path detection problems. Dynamic programming is applied in the Hough space for localizing key center points in the aorta which guide the centerline tracing using a fast marching-based minimal path extraction framework. The input volume is then resampled into a stack of 2-D cross-sectional planes orthogonal to the obtained centerline. Dynamic programming is again applied for the segmentation of the aorta in each slice of the resampled volume. The obtained segmentation is finally mapped back to its original volume space. The performance of the proposed method was assessed on cardiac noncontrast CT scans and promising results were obtained.

  9. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  10. A hybrid displacement estimation method for ultrasonic elasticity imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lujie; Housden, R; Treece, Graham; Gee, Andrew; Prager, Richard

    2010-04-01

    Axial displacement estimation is fundamental to many freehand quasistatic ultrasonic strain imaging systems. In this paper, we present a novel estimation method that combines the strengths of quality-guided tracking, multi-level correlation, and phase-zero search to achieve high levels of accuracy and robustness. The paper includes a full description of the hybrid method, in vivo examples to illustrate the method's clinical relevance, and finite element simulations to assess its accuracy. Quantitative and qualitative comparisons are made with leading single- and multi-level alternatives. In the in vivo examples, the hybrid method produces fewer obvious peak-hopping errors, and in simulation, the hybrid method is found to reduce displacement estimation errors by 5 to 50%. With typical clinical data, the hybrid method can generate more than 25 strain images per second on commercial hardware; this is comparable with the alternative approaches considered in this paper.

  11. The use of nuclear imaging for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Boogers, Mark J; Boogers, Mark M; Bax, Jeroen J; Soman, Prem; Garcia, Ernest V

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has shown benefits in patients with end-stage heart failure, depressed left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (< or = 35%), and prolonged QRS duration (> or = 120 ms). However, based on the conventional criteria, 20% to 40% of patients fail to respond to CRT. Studies have focused on important parameters for predicting CRT response, such as LV dyssynchrony, scar burden, LV lead position, and site of latest activation. Phase analysis allows nuclear cardiology modalities, such as gated blood-pool imaging and gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (GMPS), to assess LV dyssynchrony. Most importantly, GMPS with phase analysis has the potential of assessing LV dyssynchrony, scar burden, and site of late activation from a single acquisition, so that this technique may provide a one-stop shop for predicting CRT response. This article provides a summary on the role of nuclear cardiology in selecting patients for CRT, with emphasis on GMPS with phase analysis.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of an ultrasonic multiple transducer cardiac imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, R. L.; Brown, O. R.; Harrison, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    An ultrasonic multiple-transducer imaging system for intracardiac structure visualization is developed in order to simplify visualization of the human heart in vivo without radiation hazard or invasion of the body. Results of the evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the devised system in a clinical setting for adult patients are presented and discussed. Criteria are presented for recognition of mitral valva prolapse, mitral stenosis, pericardial effusion, atrial septal defect, and left ventricular dyssynergy. The probable cause for false-positive and false-negative diagnoses is discussed. However, hypertrophic myopathy and congestive myopathy were unable to be detected. Since only qualitative criteria were used, it was not possible to differentiate patients with left ventricular volume overload from patients without cardiac pathology.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of an ultrasonic multiple transducer cardiac imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, R. L.; Brown, O. R.; Harrison, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    An ultrasonic multiple-transducer imaging system for intracardiac structure visualization is developed in order to simplify visualization of the human heart in vivo without radiation hazard or invasion of the body. Results of the evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the devised system in a clinical setting for adult patients are presented and discussed. Criteria are presented for recognition of mitral valva prolapse, mitral stenosis, pericardial effusion, atrial septal defect, and left ventricular dyssynergy. The probable cause for false-positive and false-negative diagnoses is discussed. However, hypertrophic myopathy and congestive myopathy were unable to be detected. Since only qualitative criteria were used, it was not possible to differentiate patients with left ventricular volume overload from patients without cardiac pathology.

  14. Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Cardiac Venous Anatomic Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Eckart, Robert E. Leitch, W. Shad; Shry, Eric A.; Krasuski, Richard A.; Lane, Michael J.; Leclerc, Kenneth M.

    2003-06-15

    The incidence of persistent left superior venacava (PLSVC) is approximately 0.5% in the general population; however,the coexistent absence of the right SVC has a reported incidence in tertiary centers of 0.1%. The vast majority of reports are limited to pediatric cardiology. Likewise, sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is a rare congenital anomaly, with a reported incidence of 0.1-3.5% of all congenital heart defects. We present a 71-year-old patient undergoing preoperative evaluation for incidental finding of aortic root aneurysm,and found to have all three in coexistence. Suggestive findings were demonstrated on cardiac catheterization and definitive diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging. The use of MRI for the diagnosis of asymptomatic adult congenital heart disease will be reviewed.

  15. Performance of hybrid programming models for multiscale cardiac simulations: preparing for petascale computation.

    PubMed

    Pope, Bernard J; Fitch, Blake G; Pitman, Michael C; Rice, John J; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-10-01

    Future multiscale and multiphysics models that support research into human disease, translational medical science, and treatment can utilize the power of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We anticipate that computationally efficient multiscale models will require the use of sophisticated hybrid programming models, mixing distributed message-passing processes [e.g., the message-passing interface (MPI)] with multithreading (e.g., OpenMP, Pthreads). The objective of this study is to compare the performance of such hybrid programming models when applied to the simulation of a realistic physiological multiscale model of the heart. Our results show that the hybrid models perform favorably when compared to an implementation using only the MPI and, furthermore, that OpenMP in combination with the MPI provides a satisfactory compromise between performance and code complexity. Having the ability to use threads within MPI processes enables the sophisticated use of all processor cores for both computation and communication phases. Considering that HPC systems in 2012 will have two orders of magnitude more cores than what was used in this study, we believe that faster than real-time multiscale cardiac simulations can be achieved on these systems.

  16. Determining cardiac velocity fields and intraventricular pressure distribution from a sequence of Ultrafast CT cardiac images

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.M.; Napel, S. ); Leahy, R.M. . Signal and Image Processing Inst.); Brundage, B.H. . Div. of Cardiology); Boyd, D.P.

    1994-06-01

    A method of computing the velocity field and pressure distribution from a sequence of Ultrafast CT (UFCT) cardiac images is demonstrated. UFCT multi-slice cine imaging gives a series of tomographic slices covering the volume of the heart at a rate of 17 frames per second. The complete volume data set can be modeled using equations of continuum theory and through regularization, velocity vectors of both blood and tissue can be determined at each voxel in the volume. The authors present a technique to determine the pressure distribution throughout the volume of the left ventricle using the computed velocity field. A numerical algorithm is developed by discretizing the pressure Poisson equation (PPE), which is based on the Navier-Stokes equation. The algorithm is evaluated using a mathematical phantom of known velocity and pressure -- Couette flow. It is shown that the algorithm based on the PPE can reconstruct the pressure distribution using only the velocity data. Furthermore, the PPE is shown to be robust in the presence of noise. The velocity field and pressure distribution derived from a UFCT study of a patient are also presented.

  17. Computational Chemical Imaging for Cardiovascular Pathology: Chemical Microscopic Imaging Accurately Determines Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Saumya; Reddy, Vijaya B.; Bhargava, Rohit; Raman, Jaishankar

    2015-01-01

    Rejection is a common problem after cardiac transplants leading to significant number of adverse events and deaths, particularly in the first year of transplantation. The gold standard to identify rejection is endomyocardial biopsy. This technique is complex, cumbersome and requires a lot of expertise in the correct interpretation of stained biopsy sections. Traditional histopathology cannot be used actively or quickly during cardiac interventions or surgery. Our objective was to develop a stain-less approach using an emerging technology, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging to identify different components of cardiac tissue by their chemical and molecular basis aided by computer recognition, rather than by visual examination using optical microscopy. We studied this technique in assessment of cardiac transplant rejection to evaluate efficacy in an example of complex cardiovascular pathology. We recorded data from human cardiac transplant patients’ biopsies, used a Bayesian classification protocol and developed a visualization scheme to observe chemical differences without the need of stains or human supervision. Using receiver operating characteristic curves, we observed probabilities of detection greater than 95% for four out of five histological classes at 10% probability of false alarm at the cellular level while correctly identifying samples with the hallmarks of the immune response in all cases. The efficacy of manual examination can be significantly increased by observing the inherent biochemical changes in tissues, which enables us to achieve greater diagnostic confidence in an automated, label-free manner. We developed a computational pathology system that gives high contrast images and seems superior to traditional staining procedures. This study is a prelude to the development of real time in situ imaging systems, which can assist interventionists and surgeons actively during procedures. PMID:25932912

  18. Sudden Cardiac Death Substrate Imaged by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: From Investigational Tool to Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Katherine C

    2017-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a devastating event afflicting 350 000 Americans annually despite the availability of life-saving preventive therapy, the implantable cardioverter defibrillator. SCD prevention strategies are hampered by over-reliance on global left ventricular ejection fraction <35% as the most important criterion to determine implantable cardioverter defibrillator candidacy. Annually in the United States alone, this results in ≈130 000 implantable cardioverter defibrillator placements at a cost of >$3 billion but only a 5% incidence per year of appropriate firings. This approach further fails to identify individuals who experience the majority, as many as 80%, of SCD events, which occur in the setting of more preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Better risk stratification is needed to improve care and should be guided by direct pathophysiologic markers of arrhythmic substrate, such as specific left ventricular structural abnormalities. There is an increasing body of literature to support the prognostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement in phenotyping the left ventricular to identify those at highest risk for SCD. Cardiac magnetic resonance has unparalleled tissue characterization ability and provides exquisite detail about myocardial structure and composition, abnormalities of which form the direct, pathophysiologic substrate for SCD. Here, we review the evolution and the current state of cardiac magnetic resonance for imaging the arrhythmic substrate, both as a research tool and for clinical applications. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Hybrid Pixel-Based Method for Cardiac Ultrasound Fusion Based on Integration of PCA and DWT

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Puteri Suhaiza; Wirza, Rahmita; Dimon, Mohd Zamrin; Khalid, Fatimah; Moosavi Tayebi, Rohollah

    2015-01-01

    Medical image fusion is the procedure of combining several images from one or multiple imaging modalities. In spite of numerous attempts in direction of automation ventricle segmentation and tracking in echocardiography, due to low quality images with missing anatomical details or speckle noises and restricted field of view, this problem is a challenging task. This paper presents a fusion method which particularly intends to increase the segment-ability of echocardiography features such as endocardial and improving the image contrast. In addition, it tries to expand the field of view, decreasing impact of noise and artifacts and enhancing the signal to noise ratio of the echo images. The proposed algorithm weights the image information regarding an integration feature between all the overlapping images, by using a combination of principal component analysis and discrete wavelet transform. For evaluation, a comparison has been done between results of some well-known techniques and the proposed method. Also, different metrics are implemented to evaluate the performance of proposed algorithm. It has been concluded that the presented pixel-based method based on the integration of PCA and DWT has the best result for the segment-ability of cardiac ultrasound images and better performance in all metrics. PMID:26089965

  20. Dose optimization in pediatric cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, Amber J.; Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to explore x-ray beam parameters with intent to optimize pediatric x-ray settings in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp) and of copper (Cu) x-ray beam filtration independently on the image quality to dose balance for pediatric patient sizes. The impact of antiscatter grid removal on the image quality to dose balance was also investigated. Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate phantoms approximating chest sizes typical of pediatric patients were captured using a modern flat-panel receptor based x-ray imaging system. Tin was used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium used in clinical procedures. Measurements of tin detail contrast and flat field image noise provided the contrast to noise ratio. Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose (E) measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose, which evaluated the dose efficiency of the x-ray parameters investigated. The kVp, tube current (mA), and pulse duration were set manually by overriding the system's automatic dose control mechanisms. Images were captured with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm added Cu filtration, for 50, 55, 60, 65, and 70 kVp with the antiscatter grid in place, and then with it removed. Results: For a given phantom thickness, as the Cu filter thickness was increased, lower kVp was favored. Examining kVp alone, lower values were generally favored, more so for thinner phantoms. Considering ESD, the 8.5 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration. The 12 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.9 mm Cu, and the 16 cm phantom had highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.4 mm Cu. With regard to E, the 8.5 and 12 cm phantoms had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration, and the 16 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.25 mm Cu. Antiscatter grid removal improved the FOM for a given set of x

  1. Development of a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Hamamura, Fuka; Kato, Katsuhiko; Ogata, Yoshimune; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov-light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects visible photons from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. However, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging remains unclear. If a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system were developed, the merit of Cerenkov-light imaging would be clarified by directly comparing these two imaging modalities. Methods: The authors developed and tested a PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system that consists of a dual-head PET system, a reflection mirror located above the subject, and a high sensitivity charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The authors installed these systems inside a black box for imaging the Cerenkov-light. The dual-head PET system employed a 1.2 × 1.2 × 10 mm{sup 3} GSO arranged in a 33 × 33 matrix that was optically coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier tube to form a GSO block detector. The authors arranged two GSO block detectors 10 cm apart and positioned the subject between them. The Cerenkov-light above the subject is reflected by the mirror and changes its direction to the side of the PET system and is imaged by the high sensitivity CCD camera. Results: The dual-head PET system had a spatial resolution of ∼1.2 mm FWHM and sensitivity of ∼0.31% at the center of the FOV. The Cerenkov-light imaging system's spatial resolution was ∼275μm for a {sup 22}Na point source. Using the combined PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid imaging system, the authors successfully obtained fused images from simultaneously acquired images. The image distributions are sometimes different due to the light transmission and absorption in the body of the subject in the Cerenkov-light images. In simultaneous imaging of rat, the authors found that {sup 18}F-FDG accumulation was observed mainly in the Harderian gland on the PET image, while the distribution of Cerenkov-light was observed in the eyes. Conclusions: The authors conclude that their developed PET/Cerenkov-light hybrid

  2. Automatic cable artifact removal for cardiac C-arm CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Kim, M.; Chen, S. J.; Carroll, J.; Eshuis, P.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac C-arm computed tomography (CT) imaging using interventional C-arm systems can be applied in various areas of interventional cardiology ranging from structural heart disease and electrophysiology interventions to valve procedures in hybrid operating rooms. In contrast to conventional CT systems, the reconstruction field of view (FOV) of C-arm systems is limited to a region of interest in cone-beam (along the patient axis) and fan-beam (in the transaxial plane) direction. Hence, highly X-ray opaque objects (e.g. cables from the interventional setup) outside the reconstruction field of view, yield streak artifacts in the reconstruction volume. To decrease the impact of these streaks a cable tracking approach on the 2D projection sequences with subsequent interpolation is applied. The proposed approach uses the fact that the projected position of objects outside the reconstruction volume depends strongly on the projection perspective. By tracking candidate points over multiple projections only objects outside the reconstruction volume are segmented in the projections. The method is quantitatively evaluated based on 30 simulated CT data sets. The 3D root mean square deviation to a reference image could be reduced for all cases by an average of 50 % (min 16 %, max 76 %). Image quality improvement is shown for clinical whole heart data sets acquired on an interventional C-arm system.

  3. Optical image encryption using Kronecker product and hybrid phase masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravi; Bhaduri, Basanta

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a new technique for security enhancement in optical image encryption system. In this technique we have used the Kronecker product of two random matrices along with the double random phase encoding (DRPE) scheme in the Fresnel domain for optical image encryption. The phase masks used here are different than the random masks used in conventional DRPE scheme. These hybrid phase masks are generated by using the combination of random phase masks and a secondary image. For encryption, the input image is first randomized and then the DRPE in the Fresnel domain is performed using the hybrid phase masks. Secondly, the Kronecker product of two random matrices is multiplied with the DRPE output to get the final encoded image for transmission. The proposed technique consists of more unknown keys for enhanced security and robust against various attacks. The simulation results along with effects under various attacks are presented in support of the proposed technique.

  4. Optical-digital hybrid image search system in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Kodate, Kashiko; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    To improve the versatility and usability of optical correlators, we developed an optical-digital hybrid image search system consisting of digital servers and an optical correlator that can be used to perform image searches in the cloud environment via a web browser. This hybrid system employs a simple method to obtain correlation signals and has a distributed network design. The correlation signals are acquired by using an encoder timing signal generated by a rotating disk, and the distributed network design facilitates the replacement and combination of the digital correlation server and the optical correlator.

  5. Segmentation of left atrial intracardiac ultrasound images for image guided cardiac ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Stephens, T.; Holmes, D. R.; Linte, C.; Packer, D. L.; Robb, R. A.

    2013-03-01

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE), a technique in which structures of the heart are imaged using a catheter navigated inside the cardiac chambers, is an important imaging technique for guidance in cardiac ablation therapy. Automatic segmentation of these images is valuable for guidance and targeting of treatment sites. In this paper, we describe an approach to segment ICE images by generating an empirical model of blood pool and tissue intensities. Normal, Weibull, Gamma, and Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distributions are fit to histograms of tissue and blood pool pixels from a series of ICE scans. A total of 40 images from 4 separate studies were evaluated. The model was trained and tested using two approaches. In the first approach, the model was trained on all images from 3 studies and subsequently tested on the 40 images from the 4th study. This procedure was repeated 4 times using a leave-one-out strategy. This is termed the between-subjects approach. In the second approach, the model was trained on 10 randomly selected images from a single study and tested on the remaining 30 images in that study. This is termed the within-subjects approach. For both approaches, the model was used to automatically segment ICE images into blood and tissue regions. Each pixel is classified using the Generalized Liklihood Ratio Test across neighborhood sizes ranging from 1 to 49. Automatic segmentation results were compared against manual segmentations for all images. In the between-subjects approach, the GEV distribution using a neighborhood size of 17 was found to be the most accurate with a misclassification rate of approximately 17%. In the within-subjects approach, the GEV distribution using a neighborhood size of 19 was found to be the most accurate with a misclassification rate of approximately 15%. As expected, the majority of misclassified pixels were located near the boundaries between tissue and blood pool regions for both methods.

  6. False dyssynchrony: problem with image-based cardiac functional analysis using x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Shen, Zeyang; Suzuki, Yuki; Ciuffo, Luisa; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Fung, George S. K.; Otake, Yoshito; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Lima, Joao A. C.; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lee, Okkyun; Sato, Yoshinobu; Becker, Lewis C.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a digitally synthesized patient which we call "Zach" (Zero millisecond Adjustable Clinical Heart) phantom, which allows for an access to the ground truth and assessment of image-based cardiac functional analysis (CFA) using CT images with clinically realistic settings. The study using Zach phantom revealed a major problem with image-based CFA: "False dyssynchrony." Even though the true motion of wall segments is in synchrony, it may appear to be dyssynchrony with the reconstructed cardiac CT images. It is attributed to how cardiac images are reconstructed and how wall locations are updated over cardiac phases. The presence and the degree of false dyssynchrony may vary from scan-to-scan, which could degrade the accuracy and the repeatability (or precision) of image-based CT-CFA exams.

  7. Feasibility study of 3D cardiac imaging using a portable conebeam scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Ivailo; Helm, Patrick A.; Drangova, Maria

    2012-03-01

    While the Medtronic O-arm was developed for image-guidance applications during orthopedic procedures, it has potential to assist in cardiac surgical and electrophysiological applications; the purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a mobile conebeam imaging system (O-arm) for gated cardiac imaging. In an in vivo study (two pigs), projection data from four independently acquired breath-held scans were combined to obtain cardiac gated 3D images. Projection images were acquired during the infusion of contrast agent and while tracking the ECG. Both standard and high-definition modes of the O-arm were evaluated. Projection data were retrospectively combined to generate images corresponding to systole and diastole; different acceptance windows were investigated. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) between blood and myocardium was compared for the different gating strategies. Gated cardiac images were successfully reconstructed with as few as two scans combined (CNR = 2.5) and a window of 200 ms. Improved image quality was achieved when selecting views based on the minimum time from the selected phase point in the cardiac cycle, rather than a fixed window; in this case the effective temporal window increased to 475 ms for two scans. The O-arm has the potential to be used as a mobile cardiac imaging system, capable of three-dimensional imaging.

  8. APPLYING A SPATIOTEMPORAL MODEL FOR LONGITUDINAL CARDIAC IMAGING DATA

    PubMed Central

    George, Brandon; Denney, Thomas; Gupta, Himanshu; Dell’Italia, Louis; Aban, Inmaculada

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies have both spatial and temporal correlation among the multiple outcome measurements from a subject. Statistical methods of analysis must properly account for this autocorrelation. In this work we discuss how a linear model with a separable parametric correlation structure could be used to analyze data from such a study. The goal of this paper is to provide an easily understood description of how such a model works and discuss how it can be applied to real data. Model assumptions are discussed and the process of selecting a working correlation structure is thoroughly discussed. The steps necessitating collaboration between statistical and scientific investigators have been highlighted, as have considerations for missing data or uneven follow-up. The results from a completed longitudinal cardiac imaging study were considered for illustration purposes. The data comes from a clinical trial for medical therapy for patients with mitral regurgitation, with repeated measurements taken at sixteen locations from the left ventricle to measure disease progression. The spatiotemporal correlation model was compared to previously used summary measures to demonstrate improved power as well as increased flexibility in the use of time- and space-varying predictors. PMID:27087884

  9. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  10. Hybrid micro-/nanogels for optical sensing and intracellular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weitai; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid micro-/nanogels are playing an increasing important part in a diverse range of applications, due to their tunable dimensions, large surface area, stable interior network structure, and a very short response time. We review recent advances and challenges in the developments of hybrid micro-/nanogels toward applications for optical sensing of pH, temperature, glucose, ions, and other species as well as for intracellular imaging. Due to their unique advantages, hybrid micro-/nanogels as optical probes are attracting substantial interests for continuous monitoring of chemical parameters in complex samples such as blood and bioreactor fluids, in chemical research and industry, and in food quality control. In particular, their intracellular probing ability enables the monitoring of the biochemistry and biophysics of live cells over time and space, thus contributing to the explanation of intricate biological processes and the development of novel diagnoses. Unlike most other probes, hybrid micro-/nanogels could also combine other multiple functions into a single probe. The rational design of hybrid micro-/nanogels will not only improve the probing applications as desirable, but also implement their applications in new arenas. With ongoing rapid advances in bionanotechnology, the well-designed hybrid micro-/nanogel probes will be able to provide simultaneous sensing, imaging diagnosis, and therapy toward clinical applications. PMID:22110866

  11. Cardiac sarcoidosis demonstrated by Tl-201 and Ga-67 SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Taki, J.; Nakajima, K.; Bunko, H.; Ohguchi, M.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K. )

    1990-09-01

    Ga-67 and Tl-201 SPECT was performed to evaluate cardiac sarcoidosis in a 15-year-old boy. Tl-201 SPECT imaging showed decreased uptake in the inferior to lateral wall and Ga-67 accumulation in the area of decreased Tl-201 uptake. These findings suggested cardiac sarcoidosis, and cardiac biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. After corticosteroid therapy, myocardial uptake of Ga-67 disappeared and myocardial TI-201 uptake became more homogeneous.

  12. Hybrid Expert Systems In Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mark J.; Gregory, Paul J.

    1987-04-01

    Vision systems capable of inspecting industrial components and assemblies have a large potential market if they can be easily programmed and produced quickly. Currently, vision application software written in conventional high-level languages such as C or Pascal are produced by experts in program design, image analysis, and process control. Applications written this way are difficult to maintain and modify. Unless other similar inspection problems can be found, the final program is essentially one-off redundant code. A general-purpose vision system targeted for the Visual Machines Ltd. C-VAS 3000 image processing workstation, is described which will make writing image analysis software accessible to the non-expert both in programming computers and image analysis. A significant reduction in the effort required to produce vision systems, will be gained through a graphically-driven interactive application generator. Finally, an Expert System will be layered on top to guide the naive user through the process of generating an application.

  13. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi; Rouchota, Maritina; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast.

  14. Filters in 2D and 3D Cardiac SPECT Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ploussi, Agapi; Synefia, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiac imaging is a noninvasive, sensitive method providing information on cardiac structure and physiology. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) evaluates myocardial perfusion, viability, and function and is widely used in clinical routine. The quality of the tomographic image is a key for accurate diagnosis. Image filtering, a mathematical processing, compensates for loss of detail in an image while reducing image noise, and it can improve the image resolution and limit the degradation of the image. SPECT images are then reconstructed, either by filter back projection (FBP) analytical technique or iteratively, by algebraic methods. The aim of this study is to review filters in cardiac 2D, 3D, and 4D SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality mirroring the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT images. Several filters, including the Hanning, Butterworth, and Parzen filters, were evaluated in combination with the two reconstruction methods as well as with a specified MatLab program. Results showed that for both 3D and 4D cardiac SPECT the Butterworth filter, for different critical frequencies and orders, produced the best results. Between the two reconstruction methods, the iterative one might be more appropriate for cardiac SPECT, since it improves lesion detectability due to the significant improvement of image contrast. PMID:24804144

  15. Detection of benign cardiac fibroma on thallium-201 imaging in an adult

    SciTech Connect

    Helmer, S.; Abghari, R.; Stone, A.J.; Lee, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    A rare case of benign cardiac fibroma causing a focal defect on Tl-201 imaging in an adult patient is presented. The abnormalities on the Tl-201 scan are correlated with other studies performed on the same patient. The usefulness of the Tl-201 myocardial perfusion scan as an early, noninvasive test in cardiac workup is stressed.

  16. Image Reconstruction for Hybrid True-Color Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Bennett, James; He, Peng; Zainon, Rafidah; Doesburg, Robert; Opie, Alex; Walsh, Mike; Shen, Haiou; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Mou, Xuanqin; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    X-ray micro-CT is an important imaging tool for biomedical researchers. Our group has recently proposed a hybrid “true-color” micro-CT system to improve contrast resolution with lower system cost and radiation dose. The system incorporates an energy-resolved photon-counting true-color detector into a conventional micro-CT configuration, and can be used for material decomposition. In this paper, we demonstrate an interior color-CT image reconstruction algorithm developed for this hybrid true-color micro-CT system. A compressive sensing-based statistical interior tomography method is employed to reconstruct each channel in the local spectral imaging chain, where the reconstructed global gray-scale image from the conventional imaging chain served as the initial guess. Principal component analysis was used to map the spectral reconstructions into the color space. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by numerical simulations, physical phantom experiments, and animal studies. The results confirm the merits of the proposed algorithm, and demonstrate the feasibility of the hybrid true-color micro-CT system. Additionally, a “color diffusion” phenomenon was observed whereby high-quality true-color images are produced not only inside the region of interest, but also in neighboring regions. It appears harnessing that this phenomenon could potentially reduce the color detector size for a given ROI, further reducing system cost and radiation dose. PMID:22481806

  17. Image reconstruction for hybrid true-color micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Bennett, James; He, Peng; Zainon, Rafidah; Doesburg, Robert; Opie, Alex; Walsh, Mike; Shen, Haiou; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Mou, Xuanqin; Wang, Ge

    2012-06-01

    X-ray micro-CT is an important imaging tool for biomedical researchers. Our group has recently proposed a hybrid "true-color" micro-CT system to improve contrast resolution with lower system cost and radiation dose. The system incorporates an energy-resolved photon-counting true-color detector into a conventional micro-CT configuration, and can be used for material decomposition. In this paper, we demonstrate an interior color-CT image reconstruction algorithm developed for this hybrid true-color micro-CT system. A compressive sensing-based statistical interior tomography method is employed to reconstruct each channel in the local spectral imaging chain, where the reconstructed global gray-scale image from the conventional imaging chain served as the initial guess. Principal component analysis was used to map the spectral reconstructions into the color space. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by numerical simulations, physical phantom experiments, and animal studies. The results confirm the merits of the proposed algorithm, and demonstrate the feasibility of the hybrid true-color micro-CT system. Additionally, a "color diffusion" phenomenon was observed whereby high-quality true-color images are produced not only inside the region of interest, but also in neighboring regions. It appears harnessing that this phenomenon could potentially reduce the color detector size for a given ROI, further reducing system cost and radiation dose.

  18. Pixel-feature hybrid fusion for PET/CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yang-Ming; Nortmann, Charles A

    2011-02-01

    Color blending is a popular display method for functional and anatomic image fusion. The underlay image is typically displayed in grayscale, and the overlay image is displayed in pseudo colors. This pixel-level fusion provides too much information for reviewers to analyze quickly and effectively and clutters the display. To improve the fusion image reviewing speed and reduce the information clutter, a pixel-feature hybrid fusion method is proposed and tested for PET/CT images. Segments of the colormap are selectively masked to have a few discrete colors, and pixels displayed in the masked colors are made transparent. The colormap thus creates a false contouring effect on overlay images and allows the underlay to show through to give contours an anatomic context. The PET standardized uptake value (SUV) is used to control where colormap segments are masked. Examples show that SUV features can be extracted and blended with CT image instantaneously for viewing and diagnosis, and the non-feature part of the PET image is transparent. The proposed pixel-feature hybrid fusion highlights PET SUV features on CT images and reduces display clutters. It is easy to implement and can be used as complementarily to existing pixel-level fusion methods.

  19. A multimodal (MRI/ultrasound) cardiac phantom for imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Kendrick, Michael; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alshaher, Motaz; Stoddard, Marcus F.; Amini, Amir

    2013-03-01

    A dynamic cardiac phantom can play a significant role in the evaluation and development of ultrasound and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) motion tracking and registration methods. A four chamber multimodal cardiac phantom has been designed and built to simulate normal and pathologic hearts with different degrees of "infarction" and "scar tissues". In this set up, cardiac valves have been designed and modeled as well. The four-chamber structure can simulate the asymmetric ventricular, atrial and valve motions. Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) is used as the principal material since it can simulate the shape, elasticity, and MR and ultrasound properties of the heart. The cardiac shape is simulated using a four-chamber mold made of polymer clay. An additional pathologic heart phantom containing stiff inclusions has been manufactured in order to simulate an infracted heart. The stiff inclusions are of different shapes and different degrees of elasticity and are able to simulate abnormal cardiac segments. The cardiac elasticity is adjusted based on freeze-thaw cycles of the PVA cryogel for normal and scarred regions. Ultrasound and MRI markers were inserted in the cardiac phantom as landmarks for validations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multimodal phantom that models a dynamic four-chamber human heart including the cardiac valve.

  20. Current cardiac imaging techniques for detection of left ventricular mass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of left ventricular (LV) mass has both prognostic and therapeutic value independent of traditional risk factors. Unfortunately, LV mass evaluation has been underestimated in clinical practice. Assessment of LV mass can be performed by a number of imaging modalities. Despite inherent limitations, conventional echocardiography has fundamentally been established as most widely used diagnostic tool. 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) is now feasible, fast and accurate for LV mass evaluation. 3DE is also superior to conventional echocardiography in terms of LV mass assessment, especially in patients with abnormal LV geometry. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and cardiovascular computed tomography (CCT) are currently performed for LV mass assessment and also do not depend on cardiac geometry and display 3-dimensional data, as well. Therefore, CMR is being increasingly employed and is at the present standard of reference in the clinical setting. Although each method demonstrates advantages over another, there are also disadvantages to receive attention. Diagnostic accuracy of methods will also be increased with the introduction of more advanced systems. It is also likely that in the coming years new and more accurate diagnostic tests will become available. In particular, CMR and CCT have been intersecting hot topic between cardiology and radiology clinics. Thus, good communication and collaboration between two specialties is required for selection of an appropriate test. PMID:20515461

  1. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Safety during Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, You Mi; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Minsu; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Kim, You-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) have become recently available, non-MRI conditional devices and the presence of epicardial and abandoned leads remain a contraindication for MRIs. Subjects and Methods This was a single center retrospective study, evaluating the clinical outcomes and device parameter changes in patients with CIEDs who underwent an MRI from June 1992 to March 2015. Clinical and device related information was acquired by a thorough chart review. Results A total of 40 patients, 38 with a pacemaker (including epicardially located pacemaker leads) and 2 with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, underwent 50 MRI examinations. Among the patients, 11 had MRI conditional CIEDs, while the remaining had non-MRI conditional devices. Among these patients, 23 patients had traditional contraindications for an MRI: (1) nonfunctional leads (n=1, 2.5%), (2) epicardially located leads (n=9, 22.5%), (3) scanning area in proximity to a device (n=9, 22.5%), (4) devices implanted within 6 weeks (n=2, 5%), and (5) MRI field strength at 3.0 Tesla (n=6, 15%). All patients underwent a satisfactory MRI examination with no adverse events during or after the procedure. There were no significant changes in parameters or malfunctioning devices in any patients with CIEDs. Conclusion Under careful monitoring, MRI is safe to perform on patients with non-MRI conditional CIEDs, remnant leads, and epicardially located leads, as well as MRI-conditional devices. PMID:27826339

  2. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    SciTech Connect

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed

  3. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L; Bardo, Dianna M E; Patel, Amit R

    2010-11-01

    In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the softwareNCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed similarly (AUCOBS1

  4. Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Nathaniel T.; Steiner, Stefan H.; Smith, Ian R.; MacKay, R. Jock

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment performance

  5. The Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Cardiac Structure and Function: a Systematic Review of Cardiac Imaging Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ravi; Harling, Leanne; Efthimiou, Evangelos; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos; Ashrafian, Hutan

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with cardiac dysfunction, atherosclerosis, and increased cardiovascular risk. It can be lead to obesity cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure, which in turn raise morbidity and mortality while carrying a negative impact on quality of life. There is increasing clinical and mechanistic evidence on the metabolic and weight loss effects of bariatric surgery on improving cardiac structure and function in obese patients. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of bariatric surgery on cardiac structure and function by appraising cardiac imaging changes before and after metabolic operations. This is a comprehensive systematic review of studies reporting pre-operative and post-operative echocardiographic or magnetic resonance cardiac indices in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Studies were quality scored, and data were meta-analyzed using random effects modeling. Bariatric surgery is associated with significant improvements in the weighted incidence of a number of cardiac indices including a decrease in left ventricular mass index (11.2%, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 8.2-14.1%), left ventricular end-diastolic volume (13.28 ml, 95% CI 5.22-21.34 ml), and left atrium diameter (1.967 mm, 95% CI 0.980-2.954). There were beneficial increases in left ventricular ejection fraction (1.198%, 95%CI -0.050-2.347) and E/A ratio (0.189%, 95%CI -0.113-0.265). Bariatric surgery offers beneficial cardiac effects on diastolic function, systolic function, and myocardial structure in obese patients. These may derive from surgical modulation of an enterocardiac axis. Future studies must focus on higher evidence levels to better identify the most successful bariatric approaches in preventing and treating the broad spectrum of obesity-associated heart disease while also enhancing treatment strategies in the management of obesity cardiomyopathy.

  6. Hybrid system calibration for multidimensional magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    von Gladiss, A; Graeser, M; Szwargulski, P; Knopp, T; Buzug, T M

    2017-05-07

    Magnetic particle imaging visualizes the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Because of its key features of excellent sensitivity, high temporal and spatial resolution and biocompatibility of the tracer material it can be used in multiple medical imaging applications. The common reconstruction technique for Lissajous-type trajectories uses a system matrix that has to be previously acquired in a time-consuming calibration scan, leading to long downtimes of the scanning device. In this work, the system matrix is determined by a hybrid approach. Using the hybrid system matrix for reconstruction, the calibration downtime of the scanning device can be neglected. Furthermore, the signal to noise ratio of the hybrid system matrix is much higher, since the size of the required nanoparticle sample can be chosen independently of the desired voxel size. As the signal to noise ratio influences the reconstruction process, the resulting images have better resolution and are less affected by artefacts. Additionally, a new approach is introduced to address the background signal in image reconstruction. The common technique of subtraction of the background signal is replaced by extending the system matrix with an entry that represents the background. It is shown that this approach reduces artefacts in the reconstructed images.

  7. Hybrid system calibration for multidimensional magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Gladiss, A.; Graeser, M.; Szwargulski, P.; Knopp, T.; Buzug, T. M.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging visualizes the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Because of its key features of excellent sensitivity, high temporal and spatial resolution and biocompatibility of the tracer material it can be used in multiple medical imaging applications. The common reconstruction technique for Lissajous-type trajectories uses a system matrix that has to be previously acquired in a time-consuming calibration scan, leading to long downtimes of the scanning device. In this work, the system matrix is determined by a hybrid approach. Using the hybrid system matrix for reconstruction, the calibration downtime of the scanning device can be neglected. Furthermore, the signal to noise ratio of the hybrid system matrix is much higher, since the size of the required nanoparticle sample can be chosen independently of the desired voxel size. As the signal to noise ratio influences the reconstruction process, the resulting images have better resolution and are less affected by artefacts. Additionally, a new approach is introduced to address the background signal in image reconstruction. The common technique of subtraction of the background signal is replaced by extending the system matrix with an entry that represents the background. It is shown that this approach reduces artefacts in the reconstructed images.

  8. Patient-centered imaging: shared decision making for cardiac imaging procedures with exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Berman, Daniel S; Min, James K; Hendel, Robert C; Gerber, Thomas C; Carr, J Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Cullom, S James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal W; Dorbala, Sharmila; Fazel, Reza; Garcia, Ernest V; Gibbons, Raymond J; Halliburton, Sandra S; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R; Raff, Gilbert L; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A; Shaw, Leslee J

    2014-04-22

    The current paper details the recommendations arising from an NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium held in November 2012, aiming to identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Symposium participants, working in 3 tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. The use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3 mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written informed consent. However, a protocol effective dose >20 mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization.

  9. Patient-Centered Imaging: Shared Decision Making for Cardiac Imaging Procedures with Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Berman, Daniel S.; Min, James K.; Hendel, Robert C.; Gerber, Thomas C.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Cerqueira, Manuel D.; Cullom, S. James; DeKemp, Robert; Dickert, Neal; Dorbala, Sharmila; Garcia, Ernest V.; Gibbons, Raymond J.; Halliburton, Sandra S.; Hausleiter, Jörg; Heller, Gary V.; Jerome, Scott; Lesser, John R.; Fazel, Reza; Raff, Gilbert L.; Tilkemeier, Peter; Williams, Kim A.; Shaw, Leslee J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify key components of a radiation accountability framework fostering patient-centered imaging and shared decision-making in cardiac imaging. Background An NIH-NHLBI/NCI-sponsored symposium was held in November 2012 to address these issues. Methods Symposium participants, working in three tracks, identified key components of a framework to target critical radiation safety issues for the patient, the laboratory, and the larger population of patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease. Results Use of ionizing radiation during an imaging procedure should be disclosed to all patients by the ordering provider at the time of ordering, and reinforced by the performing provider team. An imaging protocol with effective dose ≤3mSv is considered very low risk, not warranting extensive discussion or written consent. However, a protocol effective dose <20mSv was proposed as a level requiring particular attention in terms of shared decision-making and either formal discussion or written informed consent. Laboratory reporting of radiation dosimetry is a critical component of creating a quality laboratory fostering a patient-centered environment with transparent procedural methodology. Efforts should be directed to avoiding testing involving radiation, in patients with inappropriate indications. Standardized reporting and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography and nuclear cardiology are important for the goal of public reporting of laboratory radiation dose levels in conjunction with diagnostic performance. Conclusions The development of cardiac imaging technologies revolutionized cardiology practice by allowing routine, noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion and anatomy. It is now incumbent upon the imaging community to create an accountability framework to safely drive appropriate imaging utilization. PMID:24530677

  10. Marketing image categorization using hybrid human-machine combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasambandam, Nathan; Madhu, Himanshu

    2012-03-01

    Marketing instruments with nested, short-form, symbol loaded content need to be studied differently. Image classification in the Web2.0 world can dynamically use a configurable amount of internal and external data as well as varying levels of crowd-sourcing. Our work is one such examination of how to construct a hybrid technique involving learning and crowd-sourcing. Through a parameter called turkmix and a multitude of crowd-sourcing techniques available we show that we can control the trend of metrics such as precision and recall on the hybrid categorizer.

  11. Hybrid lidar radar receiver for underwater imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetamraju, Madhavi; Gurjar, Rajan; Squillante, Michael; Derderian, Jeffrey P.

    2009-05-01

    In this work, we present research performed to improve the receiver characteristics for underwater imaging applications using the hybrid lidar-radar detection technique. We report the development of the next-generation coherent heterodyne receiver using modulation of the optical receiver's amplifier gain. Significant advantages in the receiver specifications are achieved using a large-area, high gain, low-noise silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) as the photodetector cum frequency mixer-demodulator. We demonstrate that heterodyne detection by gain modulation of APD can be used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, detection sensitivity and bandwidth for the hybrid receiver system.

  12. Remote-sensing image encryption in hybrid domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, Guiliang; Ma, Shilong

    2012-04-01

    Remote-sensing technology plays an important role in military and industrial fields. Remote-sensing image is the main means of acquiring information from satellites, which always contain some confidential information. To securely transmit and store remote-sensing images, we propose a new image encryption algorithm in hybrid domains. This algorithm makes full use of the advantages of image encryption in both spatial domain and transform domain. First, the low-pass subband coefficients of image DWT (discrete wavelet transform) decomposition are sorted by a PWLCM system in transform domain. Second, the image after IDWT (inverse discrete wavelet transform) reconstruction is diffused with 2D (two-dimensional) Logistic map and XOR operation in spatial domain. The experiment results and algorithm analyses show that the new algorithm possesses a large key space and can resist brute-force, statistical and differential attacks. Meanwhile, the proposed algorithm has the desirable encryption efficiency to satisfy requirements in practice.

  13. Hybrid coded aperture and Compton imaging using an active mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. J.; Wallace, M. S.; Galassi, M. C.; Hoover, A. S.; Mocko, M.; Palmer, D. M.; Tornga, S. R.; Kippen, R. M.; Hynes, M. V.; Toolin, M. J.; Harris, B.; McElroy, J. E.; Wakeford, D.; Lanza, R. C.; Horn, B. K. P.; Wehe, D. K.

    2009-09-01

    The trimodal imager (TMI) images gamma-ray sources from a mobile platform using both coded aperture (CA) and Compton imaging (CI) modalities. In this paper we will discuss development and performance of image reconstruction algorithms for the TMI. In order to develop algorithms in parallel with detector hardware we are using a GEANT4 [J. Allison, K. Amako, J. Apostolakis, H. Araujo, P.A. Dubois, M. Asai, G. Barrand, R. Capra, S. Chauvie, R. Chytracek, G. Cirrone, G. Cooperman, G. Cosmo, G. Cuttone, G. Daquino, et al., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-53 (1) (2006) 270] based simulation package to produce realistic data sets for code development. The simulation code incorporates detailed detector modeling, contributions from natural background radiation, and validation of simulation results against measured data. Maximum likelihood algorithms for both imaging methods are discussed, as well as a hybrid imaging algorithm wherein CA and CI information is fused to generate a higher fidelity reconstruction.

  14. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    microdialysis cassette against PBS, pH 7.5 for 1 hour. Radio TLC was used to assess radiochemical purity before and after a test-decaging. The presence of... TLC and in vivo imaging results. Radio TLC in bottom left shows multiple labeled species following photodeprotection in the presence and absence of...portion of both DTPA and DOTA-chelated radioindium complex, which is also suggested by the radio TLC data. 7    Labeling with radioiodine, however

  15. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    from enlarged lymph nodes. Figure 3. Ex vivo NIRF imaging of PC-3 PIP xenograft. AI = androgen independent, AR = androgen receptor negative, PSMA ...center O.D. rim/focal ROI PC-3 rapid 0.25 ± .09 1.21 ± 0.40 PC-3 ( PSMA +) PIP rapid 0.26 ± .12 NA DU-145 slow 0.01 ± 0.01 0.06 ± 0.02 HP LNCaP

  16. Hyperspectral image super-resolution: a hybrid color mapping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Kwan, Chiman; Budavari, Bence

    2016-07-01

    NASA has been planning a hyperspectral infrared imager mission which will provide global coverage using a hyperspectral imager with 60-m resolution. In some practical applications, such as special crop monitoring or mineral mapping, 60-m resolution may still be too coarse. There have been many pansharpening algorithms for hyperspectral images by fusing high-resolution (HR) panchromatic or multispectral images with low-resolution (LR) hyperspectral images. We propose an approach to generating HR hyperspectral images by fusing high spatial resolution color images with low spatial resolution hyperspectral images. The idea is called hybrid color mapping (HCM) and involves a mapping between a high spatial resolution color image and a low spatial resolution hyperspectral image. Several variants of the color mapping idea, including global, local, and hybrid, are proposed and investigated. It was found that the local HCM yielded the best performance. Comparison of the local HCM with >10 state-of-the-art algorithms using five performance metrics has been carried out using actual images from the air force and NASA. Although our HCM method does not require a point spread function (PSF), our results are comparable to or better than those methods that do require PSF. More importantly, our performance is better than most if not all methods that do not require PSF. After applying our HCM algorithm, not only the visual performance of the hyperspectral image has been significantly improved, but the target classification performance has also been improved. Another advantage of our technique is that it is very efficient and can be easily parallelized. Hence, our algorithm is very suitable for real-time applications.

  17. An active contour framework based on the Hermite transform for shape segmentation of cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba-J, Leiner; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of cardiac affections is fundamental to address a correct treatment that allows preserving the patient's life. Since heart disease is one of the main causes of death in most countries, analysis of cardiac images is of great value for cardiac assessment. Cardiac MR has become essential for heart evaluation. In this work we present a segmentation framework for shape analysis in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. The method consists of an active contour model which is guided by the spectral coefficients obtained from the Hermite transform (HT) of the data. The HT is used as model to code image features of the analyzed images. Region and boundary based energies are coded using the zero and first order coefficients. An additional shape constraint based on an elliptical function is used for controlling the active contour deformations. The proposed framework is applied to the segmentation of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of the left ventricle using MR images with short axis view. The segmentation is sequential for both regions: the endocardium is segmented followed by the epicardium. The algorithm is evaluated with several MR images at different phases of the cardiac cycle demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method. Several metrics are used for performance evaluation.

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of thoracic ectopia cordis by real-time fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and by echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Moniotte, Stéphane; Powell, Andrew J; Barnewolt, Carol E; Annese, David; Geva, Tal

    2008-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect commonly associated with intra- and extra-cardiac anomalies. This report highlights the complimentary use of echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for detailed prenatal characterization of the anomaly at 23-week gestation.

  19. Cardiac imaging for the assessment of patients being evaluated for kidney or liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Kalindi; Appis, Andrew; Doukky, Rami

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac risk assessment prior to kidney and liver transplantation is controversial. Given the paucity of available organs, selecting appropriate recipients with favorable short- and long-term cardiovascular risk profile is crucial. Using noninvasive cardiac imaging tools to guide cardiovascular risk assessment and management can also be challenging and controversial. In this article, we address the burden of coronary artery disease among kidney and liver transplant candidates and review the literature pertaining to the diagnostic accuracy and the prognostic value of noninvasive cardiac imaging techniques in this population.

  20. Qualitative Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lacks Sensitivity in Detecting Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colvin-Adams, Monica; Petros, Salam; Raveendran, Ganesh; Missov, Emil; Medina, Eduardo; Wilson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major complication after heart transplantation, requiring frequent surveillance angiography. Though cardiac angiography is the gold standard, it is insensitive in detecting transplant vasculopathy and invasive. Perfusion MRI provides a noninvasive alternative and possibly a useful modality for studying CAV. We sought to compare the accuracy of qualitative perfusion MRI to coronary angiography in detecting CAV. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 68 heart transplant recipients who had simultaneous surveillance cardiac MRI and coronary angiogram and who underwent transplantation between 2000 and 2007. We compared results of qualitative MRI to those of the cardiac angiogram. Sensitivity and specificity of MR were calculated. Results Sixty-eight patients underwent both cardiac MRI and coronary angiogram. 73.5% were male; mean age was 45.37 ± 14 years. Mean duration of heart transplantation was 7.9 ± 5.2 years. The mean ejection fraction was 55% in the patients without CAV and 57.4% in those with CAV. There were 48 normal and 24 abnormal MRI studies. The overall sensitivity was 41% and specificity was 74%. Conclusions Qualitative assessment of perfusion cardiac MR has low sensitivity and moderate specificity for detecting CAV. The sensitivity of MRI was slightly improved with severity of disease.

  1. Chromatic visualization of reflectivity variance within hybridized directional OCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhijani, Vikram S.; Roorda, Austin; Bayabo, Jan Kristine; Tong, Kevin K.; Rivera-Carpio, Carlos A.; Lujan, Brandon J.

    2013-03-01

    This study presents a new method of visualizing hybridized images of retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) data comprised of varied directional reflectivity. Due to the varying reflectivity of certain retinal structures relative to angle of incident light, SDOCT images obtained with differing entry positions result in nonequivalent images of corresponding cellular and extracellular structures, especially within layers containing photoreceptor components. Harnessing this property, cross-sectional pathologic and non-pathologic macular images were obtained from multiple pupil entry positions using commercially-available OCT systems, and custom segmentation, alignment, and hybridization algorithms were developed to chromatically visualize the composite variance of reflectivity effects. In these images, strong relative reflectivity from any given direction visualizes as relative intensity of its corresponding color channel. Evident in non-pathologic images was marked enhancement of Henle's fiber layer (HFL) visualization and varying reflectivity patterns of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) and photoreceptor inner/outer segment junctions (IS/OS). Pathologic images displayed similar and additional patterns. Such visualization may allow a more intuitive understanding of structural and physiologic processes in retinal pathologies.

  2. Image quality based x-ray dose control in cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Andrew G.; Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.

    2015-03-01

    An automated closed-loop dose control system balances the radiation dose delivered to patients and the quality of images produced in cardiac x-ray imaging systems. Using computer simulations, this study compared two designs of automatic x-ray dose control in terms of the radiation dose and quality of images produced. The first design, commonly in x-ray systems today, maintained a constant dose rate at the image receptor. The second design maintained a constant image quality in the output images. A computer model represented patients as a polymethylmetacrylate phantom (which has similar x-ray attenuation to soft tissue), containing a detail representative of an artery filled with contrast medium. The model predicted the entrance surface dose to the phantom and contrast to noise ratio of the detail as an index of image quality. Results showed that for the constant dose control system, phantom dose increased substantially with phantom size (x5 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm thick phantom), yet the image quality decreased by 43% for the same thicknesses. For the constant quality control, phantom dose increased at a greater rate with phantom thickness (>x10 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm phantom). Image quality based dose control could tailor the x-ray output to just achieve the quality required, which would reduce dose to patients where the current dose control produces images of too high quality. However, maintaining higher levels of image quality for large patients would result in a significant dose increase over current practice.

  3. Sparsely-Bonded CMOS Hybrid Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor); Sun, Chao (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Dickie, Matthew R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Wrigley, Christopher J. (Inventor); Newton, Kenneth W. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and device for imaging or detecting electromagnetic radiation is provided. A device structure includes a first chip interconnected with a second chip. The first chip includes a detector array, wherein the detector array comprises a plurality of light sensors and one or more transistors. The second chip includes a Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC) that reads out, via the transistors, a signal produced by the light sensors. A number of interconnects between the ROIC and the detector array can be less than one per light sensor or pixel.

  4. Assessment of inpatient multimodal cardiac imaging appropriateness at large academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Remfry, Andrew; Abrams, Howard; Dudzinski, David M; Weiner, Rory B; Bhatia, R Sacha

    2015-11-14

    Responding to concerns regarding the growth of cardiac testing, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) published Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for various cardiac imaging modalities. Single modality cardiac imaging appropriateness has been reported but there have been no studies assessing the appropriateness of multiple imaging modalities in an inpatient environment. A retrospective study of the appropriateness of cardiac tests ordered by the inpatient General Internal Medicine (GIM) and Cardiology services at three Canadian academic hospitals was conducted over two one-month periods. Cardiac tests characterized were transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), single-photon emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT), and diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Overall, 553 tests were assessed, of which 99.8% were classifiable by AUC. 91% of all studies were categorized as appropriate, 4% may be appropriate and 5% were rarely appropriate. There were high rates of appropriate use of all modalities by GIM and Cardiology throughout. Significantly more appropriate diagnostic catheterizations were ordered by Cardiology than GIM (93% vs. 82%, p = <0.01). Cardiology ordered more appropriate studies overall (94% vs. 88%, p = 0.03) but there was no difference in the rate of rarely appropriate studies (3% vs. 6%, p = 0.23). The ACCF AUC captured the vast majority of clinical scenarios for multiple cardiac imaging modalities in this multi-centered study on Cardiology and GIM inpatients in the acute care setting. The rate of appropriate ordering was high across all imaging modalities. We recommend further work towards improving appropriate utilization of cardiac imaging resources focus on the out-patient setting.

  5. Cardiac image super-resolution with global correspondence using multi-atlas patchmatch.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenzhe; Caballero, Jose; Ledig, Christian; Zhuang, Xiahai; Bai, Wenjia; Bhatia, Kanwal; de Marvao, Antonio M Simoes Monteiro; Dawes, Tim; O'Regan, Declan; Rueckert, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The accurate measurement of 3D cardiac function is an important task in the analysis of cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, short-axis image acquisitions with thick slices are commonly used in clinical practice due to constraints of acquisition time, signal-to-noise ratio and patient compliance. In this situation, the estimation of a high-resolution image can provide an approximation of the underlaying 3D measurements. In this paper, we develop a novel algorithm for the estimation of high-resolution cardiac MR images from single short-axis cardiac MR image stacks. First, we propose to use a novel approximate global search approach to find patch correspondence between the short-axis MR image and a set of atlases. Then, we propose an innovative super-resolution model which does not require explicit motion estimation. Finally, we build an expectation-maximization framework to optimize the model. We validate the proposed approach using images from 19 subjects with 200 atlases and show that the proposed algorithm significantly outperforms conventional interpolation such as linear or B-spline interpolation. In addition, we show that the super-resolved images can be used for the reproducible estimation of 3D cardiac functional indices.

  6. A sparse Bayesian representation for super-resolution of cardiac MR images.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Nelson F; Rueda, Andrea; Santa Marta, Cristina; Romero, Eduardo

    2017-02-01

    High-quality cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images can be hardly obtained when intrinsic noise sources are present, namely heart and breathing movements. Yet heart images may be acquired in real time, the image quality is really limited and most sequences use ECG gating to capture images at each stage of the cardiac cycle during several heart beats. This paper presents a novel super-resolution algorithm that improves the cardiac image quality using a sparse Bayesian approach. The high-resolution version of the cardiac image is constructed by combining the information of the low-resolution series -observations from different non-orthogonal series composed of anisotropic voxels - with a prior distribution of the high-resolution local coefficients that enforces sparsity. In addition, a global prior, extracted from the observed data, regularizes the solution. Quantitative and qualitative validations were performed in synthetic and real images w.r.t to a baseline, showing an average increment between 2.8 and 3.2 dB in the Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR), between 1.8% and 2.6% in the Structural Similarity Index (SSIM) and 2.% to 4% in quality assessment (IL-NIQE). The obtained results demonstrated that the proposed method is able to accurately reconstruct a cardiac image, recovering the original shape with less artifacts and low noise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CT and MR imaging findings in patients with acquired heart disease at risk for sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Patrick J; Merchant, Naeem; Provost, Yves L; Doyle, Deirdre J; Nguyen, Elsie T; Paul, Narinder S

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is an important screening and diagnostic tool in conditions associated with sudden cardiac death. The most common cause of sudden cardiac death is coronary artery disease, with myocarditis, cardiac sarcoidosis, and dilated and infiltrative cardiomyopathies being less common acquired causes. Common risk factors for sudden cardiac death, regardless of the disease process, include severe ventricular dysfunction and the presence of macroscopic scar seen at delayed contrast material-enhanced imaging. Recent advances in electrocardiographically (ECG) gated cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and multidetector computed tomography (CT) have led to increased referrals for cross-sectional imaging; thus, cardiac radiologists should be familiar with the disease entities associated with sudden cardiac death. Inflammatory processes and cardiomyopathies are best depicted with cardiac MR imaging. Steady-state free precession cine sequences coupled with inversion-recovery prepared gradient-echo T1-weighted sequences performed after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material should form the basis of cardiac MR imaging protocols for cardiomyopathy. A clinical history that is suggestive of myocardial ischemia, specific requests to exclude coronary artery disease, or contraindications for MR imaging may imply that multidetector CT would be more appropriate. Nevertheless, both cardiac MR imaging and ECG-gated multidetector CT offer robust diagnosis and risk stratification for individual disease processes associated with sudden cardiac death.

  8. Hybrid simulation using mixed reality for interventional ultrasound imaging training.

    PubMed

    Freschi, C; Parrini, S; Dinelli, N; Ferrari, M; Ferrari, V

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging offers advantages over other imaging modalities and has become the most widespread modality for many diagnostic and interventional procedures. However, traditional 2D US requires a long training period, especially to learn how to manipulate the probe. A hybrid interactive system based on mixed reality was designed, implemented and tested for hand-eye coordination training in diagnostic and interventional US. A hybrid simulator was developed integrating a physical US phantom and a software application with a 3D virtual scene. In this scene, a 3D model of the probe with its relative scan plane is coherently displayed with a 3D representation of the phantom internal structures. An evaluation study of the diagnostic module was performed by recruiting thirty-six novices and four experts. The performances of the hybrid (HG) versus physical (PG) simulator were compared. After the training session, each novice was required to visualize a particular target structure. The four experts completed a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. Seventy-eight percentage of the HG novices successfully visualized the target structure, whereas only 45% of the PG reached this goal. The mean scores from the questionnaires were 5.00 for usefulness, 4.25 for ease of use, 4.75 for 3D perception, and 3.25 for phantom realism. The hybrid US training simulator provides ease of use and is effective as a hand-eye coordination teaching tool. Mixed reality can improve US probe manipulation training.

  9. Analysis of four-dimensional cardiac ventricular magnetic resonance images using statistical models of ventricular shape and cardiac motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Walker, Nicholas; Mitchell, Steven C.; Thomas, Matthew; Wahle, Andreas; Scholz, Thomas; Sonka, Milan

    2006-03-01

    Conventional analysis of cardiac ventricular magnetic resonance images is performed using short axis images and does not guarantee completeness and consistency of the ventricle coverage. In this paper, a four-dimensional (4D, 3D+time) left and right ventricle statistical shape model was generated from the combination of the long axis and short axis images. Iterative mutual intensity registration and interpolation were used to merge the long axis and short axis images into isotropic 4D images and simultaneously correct existing breathing artifact. Distance-based shape interpolation and approximation were used to generate complete ventricle shapes from the long axis and short axis manual segmentations. Landmarks were automatically generated and propagated to 4D data samples using rigid alignment, distance-based merging, and B-spline transform. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used in model creation and analysis. The two strongest modes of the shape model captured the most important shape feature of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients, right ventricle enlargement. Classification of cardiac images into classes of normal and TOF subjects performed on 3D and 4D models showed 100% classification correctness rates for both normal and TOF subjects using k-Nearest Neighbor (k=1 or 3) classifier and the two strongest shape modes.

  10. Feasibility of using respiration-averaged MR images for attenuation correction of cardiac PET/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hua; Pan, Tinsu

    2015-07-08

    Cardiac imaging is a promising application for combined PET/MR imaging. However, current MR imaging protocols for whole-body attenuation correction can produce spatial mismatch between PET and MR-derived attenuation data owing to a disparity between the two modalities' imaging speeds. We assessed the feasibility of using a respiration-averaged MR (AMR) method for attenuation correction of cardiac PET data in PET/MR images. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of motion imaging with MR, we used a 3T MR system and a two-dimensional fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (SPGR) sequence to obtain AMR images ofa moving phantom. Then, we used the same sequence to obtain AMR images of a patient's thorax under free-breathing conditions. MR images were converted into PET attenuation maps using a three-class tissue segmentation method with two sets of predetermined CT numbers, one calculated from the patient-specific (PS) CT images and the other from a reference group (RG) containing 54 patient CT datasets. The MR-derived attenuation images were then used for attenuation correction of the cardiac PET data, which were compared to the PET data corrected with average CT (ACT) images. In the myocardium, the voxel-by-voxel differences and the differences in mean slice activity between the AMR-corrected PET data and the ACT-corrected PET data were found to be small (less than 7%). The use of AMR-derived attenuation images in place of ACT images for attenuation correction did not affect the summed stress score. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using the proposed SPGR-based MR imaging protocol to obtain patient AMR images and using those images for cardiac PET attenuation correction. Additional studies with more clinical data are warranted to further evaluate the method.

  11. The Feasibility of Dual-Energy Computed Tomography in Cardiac Contusion Imaging for Mildest Blunt Cardiac Injury.

    PubMed

    Sade, Recep; Kantarci, Mecit; Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Uzkeser, Mustafa; Aslan, Sahin; Aksakal, Enbiya; Becit, Necip

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and feasibility of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) used in the diagnosis of cardiac contusion with the mildest blunt cardiac injury. This study was performed between February 2014 and September 2015; a total of 17 consecutive patients (10 men and 7 women; median age, 51 years [range: 20-78]) were enrolled in the study. The DECT was performed within 48 hours of the trauma and a subsequent follow-up DECT was performed a little less than 1 year after the first examination. All examinations were analyzed on iodine map images by 2 experienced radiologists. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement was calculated. The correlation of initial troponin level, age, and sex with number of contusion areas in the left ventricle and complete recovery of contusion were measured. The contusion areas were amorphous, with considerable variation in their size, shape, and density. Contusions were primarily located in the left free wall of the ventricle, the ventricular septum, and the apex, respectively. In 10 patients, contusion areas disappeared on follow-up examination. In 4 patients, the contusion areas decreased but were still present in the follow-up examination. The interobserver agreements were almost perfect with respect to the presence of cardiac contusion, the anatomic location of contusions, and the contusion areas (kappa values of 1.0, 1.0, and 0.9 for intraobserver agreement and 1.0, 1.0, and 1.0 for intraobserver agreement, respectively). Correlations were found between age of patients and complete recovery of contusion (P = 0.01). Dual-energy computed tomography can show cardiac contusion and could be useful and feasible for the diagnosis and follow-up of blunt cardiac injuries. Dual-energy computed tomography is a new, user-independent, and valuable imaging technique.

  12. Hybrid Image Fusion for Sharpness Enhancement of Multi-Spectral Lunar Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awumah, Anna; Mahanti, Prasun; Robinson, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Image fusion enhances the sharpness of a multi-spectral (MS) image by incorporating spatial details from a higher-resolution panchromatic (Pan) image [1,2]. Known applications of image fusion for planetary images are rare, although image fusion is well-known for its applications to Earth-based remote sensing. In a recent work [3], six different image fusion algorithms were implemented and their performances were verified with images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Camera. The image fusion procedure obtained a high-resolution multi-spectral (HRMS) product from the LRO Narrow Angle Camera (used as Pan) and LRO Wide Angle Camera (used as MS) images. The results showed that the Intensity-Hue-Saturation (IHS) algorithm results in a high-spatial quality product while the Wavelet-based image fusion algorithm best preserves spectral quality among all the algorithms. In this work we show the results of a hybrid IHS-Wavelet image fusion algorithm when applied to LROC MS images. The hybrid method provides the best HRMS product - both in terms of spatial resolution and preservation of spectral details. Results from hybrid image fusion can enable new science and increase the science return from existing LROC images.[1] Pohl, Cle, and John L. Van Genderen. "Review article multisensor image fusion in remote sensing: concepts, methods and applications." International journal of remote sensing 19.5 (1998): 823-854.[2] Zhang, Yun. "Understanding image fusion." Photogramm. Eng. Remote Sens 70.6 (2004): 657-661.[3] Mahanti, Prasun et al. "Enhancement of spatial resolution of the LROC Wide Angle Camera images." Archives, XXIII ISPRS Congress Archives (2016).

  13. GPU-based visualization and synchronization of 4-D cardiac MR and ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Peters, Terry M

    2012-09-01

    In minimally invasive image-guided interventions, different imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and 3-D ultrasound (US), can provide complementary, multispectral image information. Dynamic image registration is a well-established approach that permits real-time diagnostic information to be enhanced by placing lower-quality real-time images within a high quality anatomical context. For the guidance of cardiac interventions, it would be valuable to register dynamic MRI or CT with intra-operative US. However, in practice, either the high computational cost prohibits such real-time visualization, or else the resulting image quality is not satisfactory for accurate interventional guidance. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) provide the programmability, parallelism and increased computational precision to address this problem. In this paper, we first outline our research on dynamic 3-D cardiac MR and US image acquisition, real-time dual-modality registration and US tracking. Next, we describe our contributions on image processing and optimization techniques for 4-D (3-D + time) cardiac image rendering, and our GPU-accelerated methodologies for multimodality 4-D medical image visualization and optical blending, along with real-time synchronization of dual-modality dynamic cardiac images. Finally, multiple transfer functions, various image composition schemes, and an extended window-level setting and adjustment approach are proposed and applied to facilitate the dynamic volumetric MR and US cardiac data exploration and enhance the feature of interest of US image that is usually restricted to a narrow voxel intensity range.

  14. Motion estimation and segmentation in CT cardiac images using the Hermite transform and active shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Barba-J, Leiner; Arambula Cosio, Fernando; Vallejo, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    Considering the importance of studying the movement of certain cardiac structures such as left ventricle and myocardial wall for better medical diagnosis, we propose a method for motion estimation and image segmentation in sequential Computed Tomography images. Two main tasks are tackled. The first one consists of a method to estimate the heart's motion based on a bio-inspired image representation model. Our proposal for optical flow estimation incorporates image structure information extracted from the steered Hermite transform coefficients that is later used as local motion constraints in a differential estimation approach. The second task deals with cardiac structure segmentation in time series of cardiac images based on deformable models. The goal is to extend active shape models (ASM) of 2D objects to the problem of 3D (2D + time) cardiac CT image modeling. The segmentation is achieved by constructing a point distribution model (PDM) that encodes the spatio-temporal variability of a training set. Combination of both motion estimation and image segmentation allows isolating motion in cardiac structures of medical interest such as ventricle walls.

  15. Evaluation of cardiac valvular disease with MR imaging: qualitative and quantitative techniques.

    PubMed

    Glockner, James F; Johnston, Donald L; McGee, Kiaran P

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is almost never performed as the initial imaging test in cardiac valvular disease; that role is dominated by echocardiography. Nevertheless, MR imaging has much to offer in selected patients. Quantitative information regarding the severity of regurgitant or stenotic lesions can be obtained by using a combination of cine gradient-echo or steady-state free precession and cine phase-contrast sequences. In addition to providing measurements of peak velocity and flow, MR imaging is the standard of reference for evaluation of ventricular function, which can be a critical factor in determining when surgical intervention is indicated. Improvements in cardiac MR imaging technology have been particularly striking in the past few years, and these developments can easily be applied to the examination of cardiac valves. The authors briefly describe the pathophysiology of valvular disease, discuss standard MR techniques for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of valvular lesions, and illustrate these concepts with several case studies.

  16. Fusion of structural and functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging data for studying ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Magtibay, K; Beheshti, M; Foomany, F H; Balasundaram, K; Masse, S; Lai, P; Asta, J; Zamiri, N; Jaffray, D A; Nanthakumar, K; Krishnan, S; Umapathy, K

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques such as Current Density Imaging (CDI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) provide a complementing set of imaging data that can describe both the functional and structural states of biological tissues. This paper presents a Joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) based fusion approach which can be utilized to fuse CDI and DTI data to quantify the differences between two cardiac states: Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) and Asystolic/Normal (AS/NM). Such an approach could lead to a better insight on the mechanism of VF. Fusing CDI and DTI data from 8 data sets from 6 beating porcine hearts, in effect, detects the differences between two cardiac states, qualitatively and quantitatively. This initial study demonstrates the applicability of MRI-based imaging techniques and jICA-based fusion approach in studying cardiac arrhythmias.

  17. Fast automatic delineation of cardiac volume of interest in MSCT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Lessick, Jonathan; Lavi, Guy; Bulow, Thomas; Renisch, Steffen

    2004-05-01

    Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) is an emerging modality for assessing cardiac anatomy. The delineation of the cardiac volume of interest (VOI) is a pre-processing step for subsequent visualization or image processing. It serves the suppression of anatomic structures being not in the primary focus of the cardiac application, such as sternum, ribs, spinal column, descending aorta and pulmonary vasculature. These structures obliterate standard visualizations such as direct volume renderings or maximum intensity projections. In addition, outcome and performance of post-processing steps such as ventricle suppression, coronary artery segmentation or the detection of short and long axes of the heart can be improved. The structures being part of the cardiac VOI (coronary arteries and veins, myocardium, ventricles and atria) differ tremendously in appearance. In addition, there is no clear image feature associated with the contour (or better cut-surface) distinguishing between cardiac VOI and surrounding tissue making the automatic delineation of the cardiac VOI a difficult task. The presented approach locates in a first step chest wall and descending aorta in all image slices giving a rough estimate of the location of the heart. In a second step, a Fourier based active contour approach delineates slice-wise the border of the cardiac VOI. The algorithm has been evaluated on 41 multi-slice CT data-sets including cases with coronary stents and venous and arterial bypasses. The typical processing time amounts to 5-10s on a 1GHz P3 PC.

  18. Current Status of Hybrid PET/MRI in Oncologic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Friedman, Kent; Chandarana, Hersh; Melsaether, Amy; Moy, Linda; Ding, Yu-Shin; Jhaveri, Komal; Beltran, Luis; Jain, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review article explores recent advancements in PET/MRI for clinical oncologic imaging. CONCLUSION Radiologists should understand the technical considerations that have made PET/MRI feasible within clinical workflows, the role of PET tracers for imaging various molecular targets in oncology, and advantages of hybrid PET/MRI compared with PET/CT. To facilitate this understanding, we discuss clinical examples (including gliomas, breast cancer, bone metastases, prostate cancer, bladder cancer, gynecologic malignancy, and lymphoma) as well as future directions, challenges, and areas for continued technical optimization for PET/MRI. PMID:26491894

  19. Challenges of cardiac image analysis in large-scale population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Suinesiaputra, Avan; Young, Alistair A

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale population-based imaging studies of preclinical and clinical heart disease are becoming possible due to the advent of standardized robust non-invasive imaging methods and infrastructure for big data analysis. This gives an exciting opportunity to gain new information about the development and progression of heart disease across population groups. However, the large amount of image data and prohibitive time required for image analysis present challenges for obtaining useful derived data from the images. Automated analysis tools for cardiac image analysis are only now becoming available. This paper reviews the challenges and possible solutions to the analysis of big imaging data in population studies. We also highlight the potential of recent large epidemiological studies using cardiac imaging to discover new knowledge on heart health and well-being.

  20. A study of image reconstruction algorithms for hybrid intensity interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, Peter N.; Murray-Krezan, Jeremy; Picard, Richard H.

    2011-09-01

    Phase retrieval is explored for image reconstruction using outputs from both a simulated intensity interferometer (II) and a hybrid system that combines the II outputs with partially resolved imagery from a traditional imaging telescope. Partially resolved imagery provides an additional constraint for the iterative phase retrieval process, as well as an improved starting point. The benefits of this additional a priori information are explored and include lower residual phase error for SNR values above 0.01, increased sensitivity, and improved image quality. Results are also presented for image reconstruction from II measurements alone, via current state-of-the-art phase retrieval techniques. These results are based on the standard hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm, as well as a recent enhancement to HIO that optimizes step lengths in addition to step directions. The additional step length optimization yields a reduction in residual phase error, but only for SNR values greater than about 10. Image quality for all algorithms studied is quite good for SNR>=10, but it should be noted that the studied phase-recovery techniques yield useful information even for SNRs that are much lower.

  1. Concrete Crack Identification Using a UAV Incorporating Hybrid Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjun; Lee, Junhwa; Ahn, Eunjong; Cho, Soojin; Shin, Myoungsu; Sim, Sung-Han

    2017-09-07

    Crack assessment is an essential process in the maintenance of concrete structures. In general, concrete cracks are inspected by manual visual observation of the surface, which is intrinsically subjective as it depends on the experience of inspectors. Further, it is time-consuming, expensive, and often unsafe when inaccessible structural members are to be assessed. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technologies combined with digital image processing have recently been applied to crack assessment to overcome the drawbacks of manual visual inspection. However, identification of crack information in terms of width and length has not been fully explored in the UAV-based applications, because of the absence of distance measurement and tailored image processing. This paper presents a crack identification strategy that combines hybrid image processing with UAV technology. Equipped with a camera, an ultrasonic displacement sensor, and a WiFi module, the system provides the image of cracks and the associated working distance from a target structure on demand. The obtained information is subsequently processed by hybrid image binarization to estimate the crack width accurately while minimizing the loss of the crack length information. The proposed system has shown to successfully measure cracks thicker than 0.1 mm with the maximum length estimation error of 7.3%.

  2. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  3. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, free-standing electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on-demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function. PMID:26974408

  4. SU-E-P-10: Imaging in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab - Technologies and Clinical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterly, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is often aided by a multitude of imaging technologies. The purpose of this work is to highlight the contributions to patient care offered by the various imaging systems used during cardiovascular interventional procedures. Methods: Imaging technologies used in the cardiac catheterization lab were characterized by their fundamental technology and by the clinical applications for which they are used. Whether the modality is external to the patient, intravascular, or intracavity was specified. Specific clinical procedures for which multiple modalities are routinely used will be highlighted. Results: X-ray imaging modalities include fluoroscopy/angiography and angiography CT. Ultrasound imaging is performed with external, trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and intravascular (IVUS) transducers. Intravascular infrared optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is used to assess vessel endothelium. Relatively large (>0.5 mm) anatomical structures are imaged with x-ray and ultrasound. IVUS and IVOCT provide high resolution images of vessel walls. Cardiac CT and MRI images are used to plan complex cardiovascular interventions. Advanced applications are used to spatially and temporally merge images from different technologies. Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease frequently utilizes angiography and intra-vascular imaging, and treatment of complex structural heart conditions routinely includes use of multiple imaging modalities. Conclusion: There are several imaging modalities which are routinely used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory to diagnose and treat both coronary artery and structural heart disease. Multiple modalities are frequently used to enhance the quality and safety of procedures. The cardiac catheterization laboratory includes many opportunities for medical physicists to contribute substantially toward advancing patient care.

  5. Hybrid CMOS SiPIN detectors as astronomical imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simms, Lance Michael

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) have dominated optical and x-ray astronomy since their inception in 1969. Only recently, through improvements in design and fabrication methods, have imagers that use Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology gained ground on CCDs in scientific imaging. We are now in the midst of an era where astronomers might begin to design optical telescope cameras that employ CMOS imagers. The first three chapters of this dissertation are primarily composed of introductory material. In them, we discuss the potential advantages that CMOS imagers offer over CCDs in astronomical applications. We compare the two technologies in terms of the standard metrics used to evaluate and compare scientific imagers: dark current, read noise, linearity, etc. We also discuss novel features of CMOS devices and the benefits they offer to astronomy. In particular, we focus on a specific kind of hybrid CMOS sensor that uses Silicon PIN photodiodes to detect optical light in order to overcome deficiencies of commercial CMOS sensors. The remaining four chapters focus on a specific type of hybrid CMOS Silicon PIN sensor: the Teledyne Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN Imager (HyViSI). In chapters four and five, results from testing HyViSI detectors in the laboratory and at the Kitt Peak 2.1m telescope are presented. We present our laboratory measurements of the standard detector metrics for a number of HyViSI devices, ranging from 1k×1k to 4k×4k format. We also include a description of the SIDECAR readout circuit that was used to control the detectors. We then show how they performed at the telescope in terms of photometry, astrometry, variability measurement, and telescope focusing and guiding. Lastly, in the final two chapters we present results on detector artifacts such as pixel crosstalk, electronic crosstalk, and image persistence. One form of pixel crosstalk that has not been discussed elsewhere in the literature, which we refer to as Interpixel Charge

  6. Synergistic image reconstruction for hybrid ultrasound and photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Wang, Kun; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  7. Carbon Tube Electrodes for Electrocardiography-Gated Cardiac Multimodality Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, Philippe; Goetz, Christian; Aubertin, Gaelle; Hubele, Fabrice; Sannié, Sébastien; Constantinesco, André

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a simple design of noninvasive carbon tube electrodes that facilitates electrocardiography (ECG) in mice during cardiac multimodality preclinical imaging. Both forepaws and the left hindpaw, covered by conductive gel, of mice were placed into the openings of small carbon tubes. Cardiac ECG-gated single-photon emission CT, X-ray CT, and MRI were tested (n = 60) in 20 mice. For all applications, electrodes were used in a warmed multimodality imaging cell. A heart rate of 563 ± 48 bpm was recorded from anesthetized mice regardless of the imaging technique used, with acquisition times ranging from 1 to 2 h. PMID:21333165

  8. Emerging Cardiac Imaging Modalities for the Early Detection of Cardiotoxicity due to Anticancer Therapies.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Teresa; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh

    2017-02-08

    The undeniable advances in the field of oncology have finally led to a decrease in overall cancer-related mortality. However, this population of long-term cancer survivors is now facing a shift toward a substantial increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Because the development of overt cardiotoxicity can be associated with poor outcomes, preclinical identification of cardiac toxicity is important. This will promote early instauration of treatments to prevent overt heart dysfunction and allow oncologists to continue cancer therapy in an uninterrupted manner. Surveillance strategies for the early detection of cardiac injury include cardiac imaging and biomarkers during treatment. In this review, we outline existing cardiac imaging modalities to detect myocardial changes in patients undergoing cancer treatment and in survivors, and their strengths and limitations.

  9. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Investigation of Cardiovascular Disorders. Part 2: Emerging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Ajit H.; Wang, Hui; Flamm, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging has emerged as a robust noninvasive technique for the investigation of cardiovascular disorders. The coming-of-age of cardiac magnetic resonance—and especially its widening span of applications—has generated both excitement and uncertainty in regard to its potential clinical use and its role vis-à-vis conventional imaging techniques. The purpose of this evidence-based review is to discuss some of these issues by highlighting the current (Part 1, previously published) and emerging (Part 2) applications of cardiac magnetic resonance. Familiarity with the versatile uses of cardiac magnetic resonance will facilitate its wider clinical acceptance for improving the management of patients with cardiovascular disorders. PMID:24808772

  10. Recent Advances and Clinical Applications of PET Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boutagy, Nabil E; Sinusas, Albert J

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarize current advances in positron emission tomography (PET) cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) imaging, with a specific focus on clinical applications of novel and established tracers. [(11)C]-Meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED) has provided useful information in evaluation of normal and pathological cardiovascular function. Recently, [(11)C]-HED PET imaging was able to predict lethal arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death (SCD), and all-cause mortality in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). In addition, initial [(11)C]-HED PET imaging studies have shown the potential of this agent in elucidating the relationship between impaired cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) innervation and the severity of diastolic dysfunction in HF patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and in predicting the response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in HFrEF patients. Longer half-life (18)F-labeled presynaptic SNS tracers (e.g., [(18)F]-LMI1195) have been developed to facilitate clinical imaging, although no PET radiotracers that target the ANS have gained wide clinical use in the cardiovascular system. Although the use of parasympathetic nervous system radiotracers in cardiac imaging is limited, the novel tracer, [(11)C]-donepezil, has shown potential utility in initial studies. Many ANS radioligands have been synthesized for PET cardiac imaging, but to date, the most clinically relevant PET tracer has been [(11)C]-HED. Recent studies have shown the utility of [(11)C]-HED in relevant clinical issues, such as in the elusive clinical syndrome of HFpEF. Conversely, tracers that target cardiac PNS innervation have been used less clinically, but novel tracers show potential utility for future work. The future application of [(11)C]-HED and newly designed (18)F-labeled tracers for targeting the ANS hold promise for the evaluation and management of a wide range of cardiovascular diseases, including the

  11. Automated segmentation of cardiac visceral fat in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac visceral fat was segmented from low-dose non-contrast chest CT images using a fully automated method. Cardiac visceral fat is defined as the fatty tissues surrounding the heart region, enclosed by the lungs and posterior to the sternum. It is measured by constraining the heart region with an Anatomy Label Map that contains robust segmentations of the lungs and other major organs and estimating the fatty tissue within this region. The algorithm was evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets. Based on visual inspection, 343 cases had good cardiac visceral fat segmentation. For quantitative evaluation, manual markings of cardiac visceral fat regions were made in 3 image slices for 45 low-dose scans and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was computed. The automated algorithm achieved an average DSC of 0.93. Cardiac visceral fat volume (CVFV), heart region volume (HRV) and their ratio were computed for each case. The correlation between cardiac visceral fat measurement and coronary artery and aortic calcification was also evaluated. Results indicated the automated algorithm for measuring cardiac visceral fat volume may be an alternative method to the traditional manual assessment of thoracic region fat content in the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk.

  12. MELAS Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Multimodality Imaging Approach

    PubMed Central

    Massobrio, Laura; Rubegni, Anna; Nesti, Claudia; Castiglione Morelli, Margherita; Boccalini, Sara; Galletto Pregliasco, Athena; Budaj, Irilda; Deferrari, Luca; Rosa, Gian Marco; Valbusa, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with chest pain, dyspnea, and lactic acidosis. Left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis were detected. The sequencing of mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) revealed the presence of A to G mtDNA point mutation at position 3243 (m.3243A>G) in tRNALeu(UUR) gene. Diagnosis of cardiac involvement in a patient with Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes syndrome (MELAS) was made. Due to increased risk of sudden cardiac death, cardioverter defibrillator was implanted. PMID:27891257

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Iron Oxide-Labeled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, Rhys J.P.; Khoja, Suhail; Almeida, Shone; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Han, Fei; Engel, James; Zhao, Peng; Hu, Peng; Stanley, Edouard G.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Kwon, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Given the limited regenerative capacity of the heart, cellular therapy with stem cell-derived cardiac cells could be a potential treatment for patients with heart disease. However, reliable imaging techniques to longitudinally assess engraftment of the transplanted cells are scant. To address this issue, we used ferumoxytol as a labeling agent of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells (hESC-CPCs) to facilitate tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a large animal model. Differentiating hESCs were exposed to ferumoxytol at different time points and varying concentrations. We determined that treatment with ferumoxytol at 300 μg/ml on day 0 of cardiac differentiation offered adequate cell viability and signal intensity for MRI detection without compromising further differentiation into definitive cardiac lineages. Labeled hESC-CPCs were transplanted by open surgical methods into the left ventricular free wall of uninjured pig hearts and imaged both ex vivo and in vivo. Comprehensive T2*-weighted images were obtained immediately after transplantation and 40 days later before termination. The localization and dispersion of labeled cells could be effectively imaged and tracked at days 0 and 40 by MRI. Thus, under the described conditions, ferumoxytol can be used as a long-term, differentiation-neutral cell-labeling agent to track transplanted hESC-CPCs in vivo using MRI. Significance The development of a safe and reproducible in vivo imaging technique to track the fate of transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitor cells (hESC-CPCs) is a necessary step to clinical translation. An iron oxide nanoparticle (ferumoxytol)-based approach was used for cell labeling and subsequent in vivo magnetic resonance imaging monitoring of hESC-CPCs transplanted into uninjured pig hearts. The present results demonstrate the use of ferumoxytol labeling and imaging techniques in tracking the location and dispersion of cell grafts

  14. Hybrid PET/MR Imaging and Brain Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, Marco; Cavaliere, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, brain connectivity is gaining ever-increasing interest from the interdisciplinary research community. The study of brain connectivity is characterized by a multifaceted approach providing both structural and functional evidence of the relationship between cerebral regions at different scales. Although magnetic resonance (MR) is the most established imaging modality for investigating connectivity in vivo, the recent advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/MR scanners paved the way for more comprehensive investigation of brain organization and physiology. Due to the high sensitivity and biochemical specificity of radiotracers, combining MR with PET imaging may enrich our ability to investigate connectivity by introducing the concept of metabolic connectivity and cometomics and promoting new insights on the physiological and molecular bases underlying high-level neural organization. This review aims to describe and summarize the main methods of analysis of brain connectivity employed in MR imaging and nuclear medicine. Moreover, it will discuss practical aspects and state-of-the-art techniques for exploiting hybrid PET/MR imaging to investigate the relationship of physiological processes and brain connectivity. PMID:26973446

  15. Effects of radiation exposure from cardiac imaging: how good are the data?

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J

    2012-02-07

    Concerns about medical exposure to ionizing radiation have become heightened in recent years as a result of rapid growth in procedure volumes and the high radiation doses incurred from some procedures. This paper summarizes the evidence base undergirding concerns about radiation exposure in cardiac imaging. After classifying radiation effects, explaining terminology used to quantify the radiation received by patients, and describing typical doses from cardiac imaging procedures, this paper will address the major epidemiological studies having bearing on radiation effects at doses comparable to those received by patients undergoing cardiac imaging. These include studies of atomic bomb survivors, nuclear industry workers, and children exposed in utero to x-rays, all of which have evidenced increased cancer risks at low doses. Additional higher-dose epidemiological studies of cohorts exposed to radiation in the context of medical treatment are described and found to be generally compatible with these cardiac dose-level studies, albeit with exceptions. Using risk projection models developed by the U.S. National Academies that incorporate these data and reflect several evidence-based assumptions, cancer risk from cardiac imaging can be estimated and compared with the benefits from imaging. Several ongoing epidemiological studies will provide better understanding of radiation-associated cancer risks. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Radiation Exposure From Cardiac Imaging: How Good Are the Data?

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about medical exposure to ionizing radiation have become heightened in recent years due to rapid growth in procedure volumes and the high radiation doses incurred from some procedures. This article summarizes the evidence base undergirding concerns about radiation exposure in cardiac imaging. After classifying radiation effects, explaining terminology used to quantify the radiation received by patients, and describing typical doses from cardiac imaging procedures, I address the major epidemiological studies having bearing on radiation effects at doses comparable to those received by patients undergoing cardiac imaging. These include studies of atomic bomb survivors, nuclear industry workers, and children exposed in utero to x-rays, all of which have evidenced increased cancer risks at low doses. Additional higher dose epidemiological studies of cohorts exposed to radiation in the context of medical treatment are described and found to be generally compatible with these cardiac-dose-level studies, albeit with exceptions. Using risk projection models developed by the US National Academies that incorporate these data and reflect several evidence-based assumptions, cancer risk from cardiac imaging can be estimated and compared to benefits from imaging. Several ongoing epidemiological studies will provide better understanding of radiation-associated cancer risks. PMID:22300689

  17. Horizontal Long Axis Imaging Plane for Evaluation of Right Ventricular Function on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Whitnah, Joseph; Maki, Jeffrey H; Baran, Timothy; Mitsumori, Lee M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a horizontal long axis (HLA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plane aligned to the long axis of the right ventricular (RV) cavity for functional analysis by comparing the measurement variability and time required for the analysis with that using a short-axis (SAX) image orientation. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four cardiac MRI exams with cine balanced steady-state free precession image stacks in both the SAX and the HLA of the RV (RHLA) were evaluated. Two reviewers independently traced RV endocardial borders on each image of the cine stacks. The time required to complete each set of traces was recorded, and the RV end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction were calculated. Analysis times and RV measurements were compared between the two orientations. Results: Analysis time for each reviewer was significantly shorter for the RHLA stack (reviewer 1 = 6.4 ± 1.8 min, reviewer 2 = 6.0 ± 3.3 min) than for the SAX stack (7.5 ± 2.1 and 6.9 ± 3.6 min, respectively; P < 0.002). Bland–Altman analysis revealed lower mean differences, limits of agreement, and coefficients of variation for RV measurements obtained with the RHLA stack. Conclusions: RV functional analysis using a RHLA stack resulted in shorter analysis times and lower measurement variability than for a SAX stack orientation. PMID:28123842

  18. Ensuring quality of service for image transmission: hybrid loss protection.

    PubMed

    Grangetto, Marco; Magli, Enrico; Olmo, Gabriella

    2004-06-01

    We present hybrid loss protection as a new channel coding and packetization scheme for image transmission over nonprioritized lossy packet networks. The scheme employs an interleaver-based structure, and attempts to maximize the expected peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) at the receiver given the constraint that the probability of failure, i.e., the probability that the PSNR of the decoded image is below a given threshold, is upper-bounded by a user-defined value. A new code-allocation algorithm is proposed, which employs Gilbert-Elliot modeling of the network statistics. Experimental results are provided in the case of transmission of images encoded by SPIHT and JPEG 2000 over a wireline, as well as a wireless UMTS-based Internet connection.

  19. ASCI 2010 standardized practice protocol for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a report of the Asian society of cardiovascular imaging cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging guideline working group.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carmen W S; Choi, Byoung Wook; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Tsai, I-Chen; Yong, Hwan Seok; Yu, Wei

    2010-12-01

    These practice guidelines are recommended by the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (ASCI), the sole society in Asia designated for cardiovascular imaging, to provide a framework to healthcare providers for suggested essential elements in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations of different disease spectra. The guideline is composed of recommendations on the general technique, acquisition of some basic modules, and protocols on stress tests. The protocols for specific diseases are provided in a table format for quick reference to be easily utilized for everyday clinical CMR.

  20. A novel dual gating approach using joint inertial sensors: implications for cardiac PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Jafari Tadi, Mojtaba; Teuho, Jarmo; Lehtonen, Eero Lennart; Saraste, Antti; Pänkäälä, Mikko; Koivisto, Tero; Teras, Mika

    2017-09-07

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique which may be considered as the state of art for the examination of cardiac inflammation due to atherosclerosis. A fundamental limitation of PET is that cardiac and respiratory motions reduce the quality of the achieved images. Current approaches for motion compensation involve gating the PET data based on the timing of quiescent periods of cardiac and respiratory cycles. In this study, we present a novel gating method called microelectromechanical (MEMS) dual gating which relies on joint non-electrical sensors, i.e. tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope. This approach can be used for optimized selection of quiescent phases of cardiac and respiratory cycles. Cardiomechanical activity according to echocardiography observations was investigated to confirm whether this dual sensor solution can provide accurate trigger timings for cardiac gating. Additionally, longitudinal chest motions originating from breathing were measured by accelerometric- and gyroscopic-derived respiratory (ADR and GDR) tracking. The ADR and GDR signals were evaluated against Varian Real-time position management (RPM) signals in terms of amplitude and phase. Accordingly, high linear correlation and agreement were achieved between the reference electrocardiography (ECG), RPM, and measured MEMS signals. We also performed a Ge-68 phantom study to evaluate possible metal artifacts caused by the integrated read-out electronics including mechanical sensors and semiconductors. The reconstructed phantom images did not reveal any image artifacts. Thus, it was concluded that MEMS-driven dual gating can be used in PET studies without an effect on the quantitative or visual accuracy of the PET images. Finally, the applicability of MEMS dual gating for cardiac PET imaging was investigated with two atherosclerosis patients. Dual gated PET images were successfully reconstructed using only MEMS signals and both qualitative and quantitative

  1. Imaging Performance of the Si/Ge Hybrid Compton Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Cunningham, M; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Hull, E; Lange, D; Manini, H; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-10

    The point spread function (PSF) of a fully-instrumented silicon/germanium Compton telescope has been measured as a function of energy and angle. Overall, the resolution ranged from 3{sup o} to 4{sup o} FWHM over most of the energy range and field of view. The various contributions to the resolution have been quantified. These contributions include the energy uncertainty and position uncertainty of the detector; source energy; Doppler broadening; and the 1/r broadening characteristic of Compton back-projection. Furthermore, a distortion of the PSF is observed for sources imaged off-axis from the detector. These contributions are discussed and compared to theory and simulations.

  2. Hybrid test bench for evaluation of any device related to mechanical cardiac assistance.

    PubMed

    Colacino, F M; Arabia, M; Danieli, G A; Moscato, F; Nicosia, S; Piedimonte, F; Valigi, P; Pagnottelli, S

    2005-08-01

    Hydraulic mock circulatory systems have low flexibility to allow tests of different cardiovascular devices and low precision when a reference model must be reproduced. In this paper a new bench is described. It combines the computer model of the environment in which the device will operate and the electro-hydraulic interfaces by which device and computer are connected. A models library provided with basic functions allows implementing many layouts of the bench, which in turn depend both on the device properties and the desired experiment. In case of an apical LVAD evaluation, the bench can reproduce right and left ventricles, pulmonary and systemic circulations, inlet and outlet LVAD cannulas. An interface forces the instantaneous calculated flow at the VAD input and feeds back the measured pressure to the computer; another interface works in a similar -but complementary- way at the VAD output. The paper focuses on the operating principle of the electro hydraulic interfaces which represent a relevant component of the bench, on the RT-Linux-based software architecture, on the models of the basic elements of the bench. A patent is under preparation. At the moment, only a portion of the bench has been developed. It consists of a piston-cylinder mechanism, which mimics the elastance-based mechanism of a natural ventricle, and a hydraulic circuit representing the arterial load according to a modified windkessel model and the venous return according to the Guyton's model. The pump is driven by a real-time simulation of the cardiovascular system. This preliminary layout allowed testing the piston-cylinder mechanism, its control, and the software. This electro-hydraulic interface has been used to reproduce a pulsatile pump working in different modes. The hybrid model approach can support the development of new cardiac assist devices from their computer model to their manufacture.

  3. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 20-year Survivors of Mediastinal Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad; Breunig, Margret; Stoerk, Stefan; Angermann, Christiane; Seufert, Ines; Schwab, Franz; Koelbl, Oliver; Flentje, Michael; Vordermark, Dirk

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The recognition of the true prevalence of cardiac toxicity after mediastinal radiotherapy requires very long follow-up and a precise diagnostic procedure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits excellent quantification of cardiac function and identification of localized myocardial defects and has now been applied to a group of 20-year Hodgkin's disease survivors. Methods and materials: Of 143 patients treated with anterior mediastinal radiotherapy (cobalt-60, median prescribed dose 40 Gy) for Hodgkin's disease between 1978 and 1985, all 53 survivors were invited for cardiac MRI. Of those, 36 patients (68%) presented for MRI, and in 31 patients (58%) MRI could be performed 20-28 years (median, 24) after radiotherapy. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5-T MRI: transversal T1-weighted TSE and T2-weighted half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, a steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine sequence in the short heart axis and in the four-chamber view, SSFP perfusion sequences under rest and adenosine stress, and a SSFP inversion recovery sequence for late enhancement. The MRI findings were correlated with previously reconstructed doses to cardiac structures. Results: Clinical characteristics and reconstructed doses were not significantly different between survivors undergoing and not undergoing MRI. Pathologic findings were reduced left ventricular function (ejection fraction <55%) in 7 (23%) patients, hemodynamically relevant valvular dysfunction in 13 (42%), late myocardial enhancement in 9 (29%), and any perfusion deficit in 21 (68%). An association of regional pathologic changes and reconstructed dose to cardiac structures could not be established. Conclusions: In 20-year survivors of Hodgkin's disease, cardiac MRI detects pathologic findings in approximately 70% of patients. Cardiac MRI has a potential role in cardiac imaging of Hodgkin's disease patients after mediastinal radiotherapy.

  4. Evaluation of apical subtype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kebed, Kalie Y; Al Adham, Raed I; Bishu, Kalkidan; Askew, J Wells; Klarich, Kyle W; Araoz, Philip A; Foley, Thomas A; Glockner, James F; Nishimura, Rick A; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2014-09-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is an uncommon variant of HC. We sought to characterize cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among apical HC patients. This was a retrospective review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of apical HC who underwent cardiac MRI examinations at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from August 1999 to October 2011. Clinical and demographic data at the time of cardiac MRI study were abstracted. Cardiac MRI study and 2-dimensional echocardiograms performed within 6 months of the cardiac MRI were reviewed; 96 patients with apical HC underwent cardiac MRI examinations. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 130.7 ± 39.1 ml and 44.2 ± 20.9 ml, respectively. Maximum LV thickness was 19 ± 5 mm. Hypertrophy extended beyond the apex into other segments in 57 (59.4%) patients. Obstructive physiology was seen in 12 (12.5%) and was more common in the mixed apical phenotype than the pure apical (19.3 vs 2.6%, p = 0.02). Apical pouches were noted in 39 (40.6%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 70 (74.5%) patients. LGE was associated with severe symptoms and increased maximal LV wall thickness. In conclusion, cardiac MRI is well suited for studying the apical form of HC because of difficulty imaging the cardiac apex with standard echocardiography. Cardiac MRI is uniquely suited to delineate the presence or absence of an apical pouch and abnormal myocardial LGE that may have implications in the natural history of apical HM. In particular, the presence of abnormal LGE is associated with clinical symptoms and increased wall thickness.

  5. Nuclear cardiac imaging for the diagnosis and management of heart failure: what can be learned from recent guidelines?

    PubMed

    Vervloet, Delphine M; DE Sutter, Johan

    2016-01-20

    The aim of this review is to provide the clinical cardiologist and nuclear medicine specialist a brief overview of the currently accepted clinical use of cardiac nuclear imaging for the diagnosis and management of patients with heart failure based on recent (2012-2015) European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. We used the most recent ESC guidelines on heart failure, management of stable coronary artery disease, cardiac pacing, myocardial revascularisation, non-cardiac surgery and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. Nowadays cardiac nuclear imaging is useful in almost every step in heart failure from diagnostics to treatment. In first diagnosis of heart failure radionuclide imaging can provide information on ventricular function and volumes and nuclear imaging techniques provide accurate and reproducible left ventricular function assessment. In work out of the aetiology of the heart failure CMR, SPECT and PET imaging can demonstrate presence of inducible ischemia and myocardial viability. For prognostic information MIBG might be promising in the future. In treatment planning cardiac nuclear imaging is important to evaluate new angina and to assess accurate left ventricular ejection fraction before cardiac resynchronization therapy. Imaging stress testing is useful in the preoperative evaluation for non-cardiac surgery of heart failure patients. There is until now no recommended place for cardiac nuclear imaging in the follow-up of heart failure patients or prior to the initiation of cardiac rehabilitation.

  6. Role of Imaging Techniques for Diagnosis, Prognosis and Management of Heart Failure Patients: Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jorge A.; Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) has evolved into a major tool for the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of patients suffering from heart failure. Anatomical and structural imaging, functional assessment, T1 and T2 mapping tissue characterization and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) have provided clinicians with tools to distinguish between non-ischemic and ischemic cardiomyopathies and to identify the etiology of non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. LGE is a useful tool to predict the likelihood of functional recovery after revascularization in patients with CAD and to guide the LV lead placement in those who qualify for cardiac resynchronization (CRT) therapy. In addition, the presence of LGE and its extent in myocardial tissue relates to overall cardiovascular outcomes. Emerging roles for cardiac imaging in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) are being studied and CMR continues to be among the most promising noninvasive imaging alternatives in the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26041670

  7. Noninvasive detection of human cardiac transplant rejection with indium-111 antimyosin (Fab) imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frist, W.; Yasuda, T.; Segall, G.; Khaw, B.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Gold, H.; Stinson, E.; Oyer, P.; Baldwin, J.; Billingham, M.

    1987-11-01

    Diagnosis of rejection after cardiac transplantation is currently made by right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy. To evaluate antimyosin imaging as a noninvasive means of detecting human cardiac rejection, the Fab fragment of murine monoclonal antimyosin antibodies was labeled with indium-111 and given intravenously to 18 patients (age 45 +/- 12 years) in 20 studies 7 days to 9 years after transplantation. Endomyocardial biopsy specimens were obtained at the time of each imaging study. Eight patients had positive scans confirmed by biopsy as rejection, and eight patients had negative scans and no evidence of rejection on biopsy. Discordance was observed in four studies, two with positive scans and no rejection on biopsy and two with negative scans and positive biopsy. The sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy of the technique were each 80%. Imaging with radiolabeled antimyosin antibody Fab fragments may be of value in the noninvasive identification of rejection in the cardiac transplant recipient.

  8. Tetralogy of Fallot Cardiac Function Evaluation and Intelligent Diagnosis Based on Dual-Source Computed Tomography Cardiac Images.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ken; Rongqian, Yang; Li, Lihua; Xie, Zi; Ou, Shanxing; Chen, Yuke; Dou, Jianhong

    2016-05-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common complex congenital heart disease (CHD) of the cyanotic type. Studies on ventricular functions have received an increasing amount of attention as the development of diagnosis and treatment technology for CHD continues to advance. Reasonable options for imaging examination and accurate assessment of preoperative and postoperative left ventricular functions of TOF patients are important in improving the cure rate of TOF radical operation, therapeutic evaluation, and judgment prognosis. Therefore, with the aid of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT), cardiac images with high temporal resolution and high definition, we measured the left ventricular time-volume curve using image data and calculating the left ventricular function parameters to conduct the preliminary evaluation on TOF patients. To comprehensively evaluate the cardiac function, the segmental ventricular wall function parameters were measured, and the measurement results were mapped to a bull's eye diagram to realize the standardization of segmental ventricular wall function evaluation. Finally, we introduced a new clustering method based on auto-regression model parameters and combined this method with Euclidean distance measurements to establish an intelligent diagnosis of TOF. The results of this experiment show that the TOF evaluation and the intelligent diagnostic methods proposed in this article are feasible. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. CCD/CMOS hybrid FPA for low light level imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinqiao; Fowler, Boyd A.; Onishi, Steve K.; Vu, Paul; Wen, David D.; Do, Hung; Horn, Stuart

    2005-08-01

    We present a CCD / CMOS hybrid focal plane array (FPA) for low light level imaging applications. The hybrid approach combines the best of CCD imaging characteristics (e.g. high quantum efficiency, low dark current, excellent uniformity, and low pixel cross talk) with the high speed, low power and ultra-low read noise of CMOS readout technology. The FPA is comprised of two CMOS readout integrated circuits (ROIC) that are bump bonded to a CCD imaging substrate. Each ROIC is an array of Capacitive Transimpedence Amplifiers (CTIA) that connect to the CCD columns via indium bumps. The proposed column parallel readout architecture eliminates the slow speed, high noise, and high power limitations of a conventional CCD. This results in a compact, low power, ultra-sensitive solid-state FPA that can be used in low light level applications such as live-cell microscopy and security cameras at room temperature operation. The prototype FPA has a 1280×1024 format with 12-um square pixels. Measured dark current is less than 5.8 pA/cm2 at room temperature and the overall read noise is as low as 2.9e at 30 frames/sec.

  10. Usefulness of Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Imaging Using (123)Iodine-Metaiodobenzylguanidine Scintigraphy for Predicting Sudden Cardiac Death in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the human heart. Activation of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system is a cardinal pathophysiological abnormality associated with the failing human heart. Myocardial imaging using (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, can be used to investigate the activity of norepinephrine, the predominant neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system. Many clinical trials have demonstrated that (123)I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters predict cardiac adverse events, especially sudden cardiac death, in patients with heart failure. In this review, we summarize results from published studies that have focused on the use of cardiac sympathetic nerve imaging using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy for risk stratification of sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure.

  11. MR CAT scan: a modular approach for hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Hillenbrand, C; Hahn, D; Haase, A; Jakob, P M

    2000-07-01

    In this study, a modular concept for NMR hybrid imaging is presented. This concept essentially integrates different imaging modules in a sequential fashion and is therefore called CAT (combined acquisition technique). CAT is not a single specific measurement sequence, but rather a sequence design concept whereby distinct acquisition techniques with varying imaging parameters are employed in rapid succession in order to cover k-space. The power of the CAT approach is that it provides a high flexibility toward the acquisition optimization with respect to the available imaging time and the desired image quality. Important CAT sequence optimization steps include the appropriate choice of the k-space coverage ratio and the application of mixed bandwidth technology. Details of both the CAT methodology and possible CAT acquisition strategies, such as FLASH/EPI-, RARE/EPI- and FLASH/BURST-CAT are provided. Examples from imaging experiments in phantoms and healthy volunteers including mixed bandwidth acquisitions are provided to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed CAT concept.

  12. Hybrid detection of lung nodules on CT scan images

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Lin; Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The diversity of lung nodules poses difficulty for the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes for lung nodule detection on computed tomography (CT) scan images, especially in large-scale CT screening studies. We proposed a novel CAD scheme based on a hybrid method to address the challenges of detection in diverse lung nodules. Methods: The hybrid method proposed in this paper integrates several existing and widely used algorithms in the field of nodule detection, including morphological operation, dot-enhancement based on Hessian matrix, fuzzy connectedness segmentation, local density maximum algorithm, geodesic distance map, and regression tree classification. All of the adopted algorithms were organized into tree structures with multi-nodes. Each node in the tree structure aimed to deal with one type of lung nodule. Results: The method has been evaluated on 294 CT scans from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. The CT scans were randomly divided into two independent subsets: a training set (196 scans) and a test set (98 scans). In total, the 294 CT scans contained 631 lung nodules, which were annotated by at least two radiologists participating in the LIDC project. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the training set were 87% and 2.61%. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the testing set were 85.2% and 3.13%. Conclusions: The proposed hybrid method yielded high performance on the evaluation dataset and exhibits advantages over existing CAD schemes. We believe that the present method would be useful for a wide variety of CT imaging protocols used in both routine diagnosis and screening studies.

  13. Development of a high frame rate ultrasonic system for cardiac imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.; Yen, Jesse T.; Feng, Ching; Shung, K. Kirk

    2006-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a well established technology for echocardiography on humans. For cardiac imaging in small animals whose hearts beat at a rate higher than 300 beats per minute, the spatial and temporal resolution of current clinical ultrasonic scanners are far from ideal and simply inadequate for such applications. In this research, a real-time high frequency ultrasound imaging system was developed with a frame rate higher than 80 frames per second (fps) for cardiac applications in small animals. The device has a mechanical sector scanner using magnetic drive mechanism to reduce moving parts and ensure longevity. A very lightweight (< 0.28 g) single element transducer was specially designed and constructed for this research to achieve a frame rate of at least 80 fps. The 30-50 MHz transducers swept through an arc at the end of a pendulum for imaging the heart of small animals. The imaging electronics consisted of a low noise pulser/receiver, a high-speed data acquisition board, and digital signal processing algorithms. In vivo results on mouse embryos showed that real time ultrasound imaging at frame rate exceeding 80 fps could demonstrate detailed depiction of cardiac function with a spatial resolution of around 50 microns, which allows researchers to fully examine and monitor small animal cardiac functions.

  14. From 3D to 4D imaging: is that useful for interventional cardiac electrophysiology?

    PubMed

    Fenici, R; Brisinda, D

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional electroanatomical imaging is increasingly used in interventional cardiac electrophysiology, to guide catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias. At the same time, there is a growing interest for non-invasive methods, such as magnetocardiographic mapping (MCG), to localize the arrhythmogenic substrates, to test their reproducibility and to plan the most appropriate interventional approach. So far electroanatomical imaging has relayed on static mathematical modeling of the heart and more recently on direct merging with three-dimensional rendering of cardiac anatomy from multidetector computer tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Merging electrophysiological information with static anatomical structures, can surely be a source of uncertainty for MCG-based pre-interventional localization of the arrhythmogenic substrate and causes mismatch between the real-time imaging of moving catheters and the static geometry of the cardiac chambers reconstructed with invasive electroanatomical imaging. The implementation of recent realistic numerical models of the beating heart in a breathing thorax can improve accuracy and fill the gap between non-invasive and interventional electroanatomical imaging.

  15. Calcium Imaging in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Walter, Anna; Šarić, Tomo; Hescheler, Jürgen; Papadopoulos, Symeon

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate cardiomyocytes (CMs) from disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is a powerful tool for the investigation of various cardiac diseases in vitro. The pathological course of various cardiac conditions, causatively heterogeneous, often converges into disturbed cellular Ca(2+) cycling. The gigantic Ca(2+) channel of the intracellular Ca(2+) store of CMs, the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2), controls Ca(2+) release and therefore plays a crucial role in Ca(2+) cycling of CMs. In the present protocol we describe ways to measure and analyze global as well as local cellular Ca(2+) release events in CMs derived from a patient carrying a CPVT-causing RyR2 mutation.

  16. Positron emission tomographic imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation and function

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D.S.; Chang, P.C.; Eisenhofer, G.; Miletich, R.; Finn, R.; Bacher, J.; Kirk, K.L.; Bacharach, S.; Kopin, I.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Sites of uptake, storage, and metabolism of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine and excretion of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine and its metabolites were visualized using positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning after intravenous injection of the tracer into anesthetized dogs. Radioactivity was concentrated in the renal pelvis, heart, liver, spleen, salivary glands, and gall bladder. Uptake of 18F by the heart resulted in striking delineation of the left ventricular myocardium. Pretreatment with desipramine markedly decreased cardiac positron emission, consistent with dependence of the heart on neuronal uptake (uptake-1) for removal of circulating catecholamines. In reserpinized animals, cardiac positron emission was absent within 30 minutes after injection of ({sup 18}F)-6-fluorodopamine, demonstrating that the emission in untreated animals was from radioactive labeling of the sympathetic storage vesicles. Decreased positron emission from denervated salivary glands confirmed that the tracer was concentrated in sympathetic neurons. Radioactivity in the gall bladder and urinary system depicted the hepatic and renal excretion of the tracer and its metabolites. Administration of tyramine or nitroprusside increased and ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan decreased the rate of loss of myocardial radioactivity. The results show that PET scanning after administration of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine can be used to visualize sites of sympathetic innervation, follow the metabolism and renal and hepatic excretion of catecholamines, and examine cardiac sympathetic function.

  17. Gene expression profiling and cardiac allograft rejection monitoring: is IMAGE just a mirage?

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Parameshwar, Jayan

    2010-06-01

    The search for an effective non-invasive monitoring technique for cardiac allograft rejection eluded us until the discovery and validation of a commercially available gene-based peripheral blood bio-signature signal. The Invasive Monitoring Attenuation through Gene Expression (IMAGE) trial tested the hypothesis of cardiac biopsy minimization using this gene-based panel in stable, low-risk survivors, late after cardiac transplantation and demonstrated non-inferiority of this strategy. We present a clinician's critical perspective on this important effort and outline the key caveats and highlights for the potential way forward in using these results. Furthermore, we contend that it may not be necessary to replace an invasive cardiac biopsy strategy with anything other than better standardized clinical and functional allograft vigilance in low-risk survivors. Copyright 2010 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Effects of hybrid comprehensive cardiac telerehabilitation conducted under the pension prevention program of the Social Insurance Institution].

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Orzechowski, Piotr; Jasionowska, Anna; Banaszak-Bednarczyk, Maria; Rosłaniec, Monika; Piotrowski, Walerian; Piotrowicz, Ryszard

    2017-02-28

    The Polish Social Insurance Institution (SII), under its pension prevention initiative, has taken measures to support the patients return to work and thus developed a new model of hybrid, comprehensive, cardiac telerehabilitation (HCCT). The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of HCCT in terms of its acceptance, adherence to and influence on patients' physical capacity and ability to return to work. The study included 99 patients, aged 54.6±6.3 years, who suffered from cardiovascular diseases. They participated in a 24-day HCCT consisting of preliminary and final examinations, 10 days of out-patients rehabilitation based on cycloergometer training (5 sessions) and Nordic walking training (10 sessions), and 12 days of home telerehabilitation based on Nordic walking training. The effectiveness of HCCT was assessed by comparing changes in functional capacity expressed by metabolic equivalent of task (MET) and a 6-min walking test (6-MWT) distance from the beginning and the end of HCCT. Acceptance of HCCT was evaluated using a questionnaire. Adherence to HCCT was assessed by the patients' participation in the training sessions. Effectiveness of HCCT in terms of return to work was assessed according to SII definition. Hybrid, comprehensive, cardiac telerehabilitation resulted in significant improvement of functional capacity 7.6±2.0 vs. 8.1±2.4 MET (p < 0.0001) and distance in 6-MWT 448.5±79.2 m vs. 480.5±84.1 m (p < 0.0001). There were 82.8% of adherent, 16.2% of partially adherent and 1% of non-adherent patients. After HCCT 48 patients were able to return to work. Hybrid, comprehensive, cardiac telerehabilitation was well accepted and led to the improvement of the patients' physical capacity. Adherence to HCCT was high and allowed 48.48% of patients return to work. Med Pr 2017;68(1):61-74.

  19. Multimodal SHG-2PF Imaging of Microdomain Ca2+-Contraction Coupling in Live cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Samir; Izu, Leighton T.; Mao, Ziliang; Jian, Zhong; Landas, Trevor; Lerner, Aaron; Shimkunas, Rafael; Woldeyesus, Rahwa; Bossuyt, Julie; Wood, Brittani; Chen, Yi-Je; Matthews, Dennis L.; Lieu, Deborah K.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Lam, Kit S.; Chen-Izu, Ye; Chan, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale cardiac myocyte contraction is caused by Ca2+ binding to troponin C, which triggers the cross-bridge power stroke and myofilament sliding in sarcomeres. Synchronized Ca2+ release causes whole cell contraction and is readily observable with current microscopy techniques. However, it is unknown whether localized Ca2+ release, such as Ca2+ sparks and waves, can cause local sarcomere contraction. Contemporary imaging methods fall short of measuring microdomain Ca2+-contraction coupling in live cardiac myocytes. Objective To develop a method for imaging sarcomere-level Ca2+-contraction coupling in healthy and disease-model cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results Freshly isolated cardiac myocytes were loaded with the Ca2+-indicator Fluo-4. A confocal microscope equipped with a femtosecond-pulsed near-infrared laser was used to simultaneously excite second harmonic generation (SHG) from A-bands of myofibrils and two-photon fluorescence (2PF) from Fluo-4. Ca2+ signals and sarcomere strain correlated in space and time with short delays. Furthermore, Ca2+ sparks and waves caused contractions in subcellular microdomains, revealing a previously underappreciated role for these events in generating subcellular strain during diastole. Ca2+ activity and sarcomere strain were also imaged in paced cardiac myocytes under mechanical load, revealing spontaneous Ca2+ waves and correlated local contraction in pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy. Conclusions Multi-modal SHG-2PF microscopy enables the simultaneous observation of Ca2+ release and mechanical strain at the sub-sarcomere level in living cardiac myocytes. The method benefits from the label-free nature of SHG, which allows A-bands to be imaged independently of T-tubule morphology and simultaneously with Ca2+ indicators. SHG-2PF imaging is widely applicable to the study of Ca2+-contraction coupling and mechano-chemo-transduction in both health and disease. PMID:26643875

  20. [Hybrid imaging: present and future of non-invasive diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Panetta, Daniele; Marinelli, Martina; Todiere, Giancarlo; Tripodi, Maria; Salvadori, Piero A; Neglia, Danilo

    2012-05-01

    The integration of complementary information from different medical imaging techniques opened, since the 90s, new scenarios and possibilities for non-invasive diagnosis. The anatomo-functional information obtained with the image fusion (i.e., by composing PET and CT or SPECT and CT), is greater than the sum of information given by each modality, and allows quantitative evaluation of functional parameters through the application of specific model-based image processing. Before the introduction of integrated multimodal scanners from most manufacturers (hardware fusion), many software techniques have been used to allow image fusion from different modalities; such methods of software fusion is still important for all modalities that cannot by merged in a single scanner, or whenever the patient movement can introduce inter-modality misalignments within the same exam in an integrated scanner or if each modality is utilized at different times and on separate scanners. This article summarizes the software and hardware evolution of clinical and preclinical hybrid imaging, and discusses the outcome of this technology in the clinical environment with particular emphasis on the cardiovascular application.

  1. A statistical method for retrospective cardiac and respiratory motion gating of interventional cardiac x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Panayiotou, Maria King, Andrew P.; Housden, R. James; Ma, YingLiang; Rhode, Kawal S.; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Image-guided cardiac interventions involve the use of fluoroscopic images to guide the insertion and movement of interventional devices. Cardiorespiratory gating can be useful for 3D reconstruction from multiple x-ray views and for reducing misalignments between 3D anatomical models overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Methods: The authors propose a novel and potentially clinically useful retrospective cardiorespiratory gating technique. The principal component analysis (PCA) statistical method is used in combination with other image processing operations to make our proposed masked-PCA technique suitable for cardiorespiratory gating. Unlike many previously proposed techniques, our technique is robust to varying image-content, thus it does not require specific catheters or any other optically opaque structures to be visible. Therefore, it works without any knowledge of catheter geometry. The authors demonstrate the application of our technique for the purposes of retrospective cardiorespiratory gating of normal and very low dose x-ray fluoroscopy images. Results: For normal dose x-ray images, the algorithm was validated using 28 clinical electrophysiology x-ray fluoroscopy sequences (2168 frames), from patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy procedures for heart failure. The authors established end-systole, end-expiration, and end-inspiration success rates of 97.0%, 97.9%, and 97.0%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was tested on ten x-ray sequences from the RFA procedures with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of√(5)0, √(1)0, √(8), √(6), √(5), √(2), and √(1) to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. Even at the low SNR value of √(2), representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times, gating success rates of 89.1%, 88.8%, and 86.8% were established. Conclusions: The proposed

  2. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging of the heart in idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy and cardiac transplants

    SciTech Connect

    Glowniak, J.V.; Turner, F.E.; Gray, L.L.; Palac, R.T.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Woodward, W.R.

    1989-07-01

    Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ((/sup 123/I)MIBG) is a norepinephrine analog which can be used to image the sympathetic innervation of the heart. In this study, cardiac imaging with (/sup 123/I)MIBG was performed in patients with idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy and compared to normal controls. Initial uptake, half-time of tracer within the heart, and heart to lung ratios were all significantly reduced in patients compared to normals. Uptake in lungs, liver, salivary glands, and spleen was similar in controls and patients with cardiomyopathy indicating that decreased MIBG uptake was not a generalized abnormality in these patients. Iodine-123 MIBG imaging was also performed in cardiac transplant patients to determine cardiac nonneuronal uptake. Uptake in transplants was less than 10% of normals in the first 2 hr and nearly undetectable after 16 hr. The decreased uptake of MIBG suggests cardiac sympathetic nerve dysfunction while the rapid washout of MIBG from the heart suggests increased cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in idiopathic congestive cardiomyopathy.

  3. Cardiac Radionuclide Imaging in Rodents: A Review of Methods, Results, and Factors at Play

    PubMed Central

    Cicone, Francesco; Viertl, David; Quintela Pousa, Ana Maria; Denoël, Thibaut; Gnesin, Silvano; Scopinaro, Francesco; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Prior, John O.

    2017-01-01

    The interest around small-animal cardiac radionuclide imaging is growing as rodent models can be manipulated to allow the simulation of human diseases. In addition to new radiopharmaceuticals testing, often researchers apply well-established probes to animal models, to follow the evolution of the target disease. This reverse translation of standard radiopharmaceuticals to rodent models is complicated by technical shortcomings and by obvious differences between human and rodent cardiac physiology. In addition, radionuclide studies involving small animals are affected by several extrinsic variables, such as the choice of anesthetic. In this paper, we review the major cardiac features that can be studied with classical single-photon and positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals, namely, cardiac function, perfusion and metabolism, as well as the results and pitfalls of small-animal radionuclide imaging techniques. In addition, we provide a concise guide to the understanding of the most frequently used anesthetics such as ketamine/xylazine, isoflurane, and pentobarbital. We address in particular their mechanisms of action and the potential effects on radionuclide imaging. Indeed, cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism can all be significantly affected by varying anesthetics and animal handling conditions. PMID:28424774

  4. Algebraic reconstruction technique for parallel imaging reconstruction of undersampled radial data: application to cardiac cine.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chan, Cheong; Stockmann, Jason P; Tagare, Hemant; Adluru, Ganesh; Tam, Leo K; Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R Todd; Kozerke, Sebastian; Peters, Dana C

    2015-04-01

    To investigate algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of radial data, applied to accelerated cardiac cine. A graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated ART reconstruction was implemented and applied to simulations, point spread functions and in 12 subjects imaged with radial cardiac cine acquisitions. Cine images were reconstructed with radial ART at multiple undersampling levels (192 Nr × Np  = 96 to 16). Images were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for sharpness and artifacts, and compared to filtered back-projection, and conjugate gradient SENSE. Radial ART provided reduced artifacts and mainly preserved spatial resolution, for both simulations and in vivo data. Artifacts were qualitatively and quantitatively less with ART than filtered back-projection using 48, 32, and 24 Np , although filtered back-projection provided quantitatively sharper images at undersampling levels of 48-24 Np (all P < 0.05). Use of undersampled radial data for generating auto-calibrated coil-sensitivity profiles resulted in slightly reduced quality. ART was comparable to conjugate gradient SENSE. GPU-acceleration increased ART reconstruction speed 15-fold, with little impact on the images. GPU-accelerated ART is an alternative approach to image reconstruction for parallel radial MR imaging, providing reduced artifacts while mainly maintaining sharpness compared to filtered back-projection, as shown by its first application in cardiac studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of undersampled radial data: Application to cardiac cine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Chan, Cheong; Stockmann, Jason P.; Tagare, Hemant; Adluru, Ganesh; Tam, Leo K.; Galiana, Gigi; Constable, R. Todd; Kozerke, Sebastian; Peters, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for parallel imaging reconstruction of radial data, applied to accelerated cardiac cine. Methods A GPU-accelerated ART reconstruction was implemented and applied to simulations, point spread functions (PSF) and in twelve subjects imaged with radial cardiac cine acquisitions. Cine images were reconstructed with radial ART at multiple undersampling levels (192 Nr x Np = 96 to 16). Images were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed for sharpness and artifacts, and compared to filtered back-projection (FBP), and conjugate gradient SENSE (CG SENSE). Results Radial ART provided reduced artifacts and mainly preserved spatial resolution, for both simulations and in vivo data. Artifacts were qualitatively and quantitatively less with ART than FBP using 48, 32, and 24 Np, although FBP provided quantitatively sharper images at undersampling levels of 48-24 Np (all p<0.05). Use of undersampled radial data for generating auto-calibrated coil-sensitivity profiles resulted in slightly reduced quality. ART was comparable to CG SENSE. GPU-acceleration increased ART reconstruction speed 15-fold, with little impact on the images. Conclusion GPU-accelerated ART is an alternative approach to image reconstruction for parallel radial MR imaging, providing reduced artifacts while mainly maintaining sharpness compared to FBP, as shown by its first application in cardiac studies. PMID:24753213

  6. Concepts leading to the IMAGE-100 hybrid interactive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, T. F.; Sulester, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    As LACIE Procedure 1 evolved from the Classification and Mensuration Subsystem smallfields procedures, it became evident that two computational systems would have merit-the LACIE/Earth Resources Interactive Processing System based on a large IBM-360 computer oriented for operational use with high computational throughput, and a smaller, highly interactive system based on a PDP 11-45 minicomputer and its display system, the IMAGE-100. The latter had advantages for certain phases; notably, interactive spectral aids could be implemented quite rapidly. This would allow testing and development of Procedure 1 before its implementation on the LACIE/Earth Resources Interactive Processing System. The resulting minicomputer system, called the Classification and Mensuration Subsystem IMAGE-100 Hybrid System, allowed Procedure-1 operations to be performed interactively, except for clustering, classification, and automatic selection of best acquisitions, which were offloaded to the LACIE/Earth Resources Interactive Processing System.

  7. Development of a Hybrid Nanoprobe for Triple-Modality MR/SPECT/Optical Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Madru, Renata; Svenmarker, Pontus; Ingvar, Christian; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Engels, Stefan-Andersson; Knutsson, Linda; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid clinical imaging is an emerging technology, which improves disease diagnosis by combining already existing technologies. With the combination of high-resolution morphological imaging, i.e., MRI/CT, and high-sensitive molecular detection offered by SPECT/PET/Optical, physicians can detect disease progression at an early stage and design patient-specific treatments. To fully exploit the possibilities of hybrid imaging a hybrid probe compatible with each imaging technology is required. Here, we present a hybrid nanoprobe for triple modality MR/SPECT/Fluorescence imaging. Our imaging agent is comprised of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), labeled with 99mTc and an Alexa fluorophore (AF), together forming 99mTc-AF-SPIONs. The agent was stable in human serum, and, after subcutaneous injection in the hind paw of Wistar rats, showed to be highly specific by accumulating in the sentinel lymph node. All three modalities clearly visualized the imaging agent. Our results show that a single imaging agent can be used for hybrid imaging. The use of a single hybrid contrast agent permits simultaneous hybrid imaging and, more conventionally, allow for single modality imaging at different time points. For example, a hybrid contrast agent enables pre-operative planning, intra-operative guidance, and post-operative evaluation with the same contrast agent. PMID:26852675

  8. Automatic image-driven segmentation of cardiac ventricles in cine anatomical MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocosco, Chris A.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Netsch, Thomas; Vonken, Evert-jan P. A.; Viergever, Max A.

    2005-08-01

    The automatic segmentation of the heart's two ventricles from dynamic ("cine") cardiac anatomical images, such as 3D+time short-axis MRI, is of significant clinical importance. Previously published automated methods have various disadvantages for routine clinical use. This work reports about a novel automatic segmentation method that is very fast, and robust against anatomical variability and image contrast variations. The method is mostly image-driven: it fully exploits the information provided by modern 4D (3D+time) balanced Fast Field Echo (bFFE) cardiac anatomical MRI, and makes only few and plausible assumptions about the images and the imaged heart. Specifically, the method does not need any geometrical shape models nor complex gray-level appearance models. The method simply uses the two ventricles' contraction-expansion cycle, as well as the ventricles' spatial coherence along the time dimension. The performance of the cardiac ventricles segmentation method was demonstrated through a qualitative visual validation on 32 clinical exams: no gross failures for the left-ventricle (right-ventricle) on 32 (30) of the exams were found. Also, a clinical validation of resulting quantitative cardiac functional parameters was performed against a manual quantification of 18 exams; the automatically computed Ejection Fraction (EF) correlated well to the manually computed one: linear regression with RMS=3.7% (RMS expressed in EF units).

  9. Delayed cardiac tamponade after open heart surgery - is supplemental CT imaging reasonable?

    PubMed

    Floerchinger, Bernhard; Camboni, Daniele; Schopka, Simon; Kolat, Philipp; Hilker, Michael; Schmid, Christof

    2013-06-24

    Cardiac tamponade is a severe complication after open heart surgery. Diagnostic imaging is challenging in postoperative patients, especially if tamponade develops with subacute symptoms. Hypothesizing that delayed tamponade after open heart surgery is not sufficiently detected by transthoracic echocardiography, in this study CT scans were used as standard reference and were compared with transthoracic echocardiography imaging in patients with suspected cardiac tamponade. Twenty-five patients after open heart surgery were enrolled in this analysis. In case of suspected cardiac tamponade patients underwent both echocardiography and CT imaging. Using CT as standard of reference sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of ultrasound imaging in detecting pericardial effusion/hematoma were analyzed. Clinical appearance of tamponade, need for re-intervention as well as patient outcome were monitored. In 12 cases (44%) tamponade necessitated surgical re-intervention. Most common symptoms were deterioration of hemodynamic status and dyspnea. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of echocardiography were 75%, 64%, 75%, and 64% for detecting pericardial effusion, and 33%, 83%, 50, and 71% for pericardial hematoma, respectively. In-hospital mortality of the re-intervention group was 50%. Diagnostic accuracy of transthoracic echocardiography is limited in patients after open heart surgery. Suplemental CT imaging provides rapid diagnostic reliability in patients with delayed cardiac tamponade.

  10. Delayed cardiac tamponade after open heart surgery - is supplemental CT imaging reasonable?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac tamponade is a severe complication after open heart surgery. Diagnostic imaging is challenging in postoperative patients, especially if tamponade develops with subacute symptoms. Hypothesizing that delayed tamponade after open heart surgery is not sufficiently detected by transthoracic echocardiography, in this study CT scans were used as standard reference and were compared with transthoracic echocardiography imaging in patients with suspected cardiac tamponade. Method Twenty-five patients after open heart surgery were enrolled in this analysis. In case of suspected cardiac tamponade patients underwent both echocardiography and CT imaging. Using CT as standard of reference sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of ultrasound imaging in detecting pericardial effusion/hematoma were analyzed. Clinical appearance of tamponade, need for re-intervention as well as patient outcome were monitored. Results In 12 cases (44%) tamponade necessitated surgical re-intervention. Most common symptoms were deterioration of hemodynamic status and dyspnea. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of echocardiography were 75%, 64%, 75%, and 64% for detecting pericardial effusion, and 33%, 83%, 50, and 71% for pericardial hematoma, respectively. In-hospital mortality of the re-intervention group was 50%. Conclusion Diagnostic accuracy of transthoracic echocardiography is limited in patients after open heart surgery. Suplemental CT imaging provides rapid diagnostic reliability in patients with delayed cardiac tamponade. PMID:23800191

  11. Stress Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Effectively Risk Stratifies Diabetic Patients With Suspected Myocardial Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Bobak; Juan, Yu-Hsiang; Liu, Hui; Abbasi, Siddique; Shah, Ravi; Blankstein, Ron; Steigner, Michael; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2016-04-01

    Diabetics remain at high risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality despite advancements in medical therapy. Noninvasive cardiac risk profiling is often more difficult in diabetics owing to the prevalence of silent ischemia with unrecognized myocardial infarction, reduced exercise capacity, nondiagnostic electrocardiographic changes, and balanced ischemia from diffuse epicardial coronary atherosclerosis and microvascular dysfunction. A consecutive cohort of 173 patients with diabetes mellitus (mean age, 61.7±11.9 years; 37% women) with suspected myocardial ischemia underwent stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were evaluated for adverse cardiac events after cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with mean follow-up time of 2.9±2.5 years. Mean hemoglobin A1c for the population was 7.9±1.8%. Primary end point was a composite of cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction. Diabetics with no inducible ischemia (n=94) experienced an annualized event rate of 1.4% compared with 8.2% (P=0.0003) in those with inducible ischemia (n=79). Diabetics without late gadolinium enhancement or inducible ischemia had a low annual cardiac event rate (0.5% per year). The presence of inducible ischemia was the strongest unadjusted predictor (hazard ratio, 4.86; P<0.01) for cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction. This association remained robust in adjusted stepwise multivariable Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio, 4.28; P=0.02). In addition, categorical net reclassification index using 5-year risk cutoffs of 5% and 10% resulted in reclassification of 43.4% of the diabetic cohort with net reclassification index of 0.38 (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.56; P<0.0001). Stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provided independent prognostic utility and effectively reclassified risk in patients with diabetes mellitus referred for ischemic assessment. Further evaluation is required to determine whether a noninvasive imaging strategy with

  12. ACR-SPR-STR Practice Parameter for the Performance of Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Imaging.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rathan M; Janowitz, Warren R; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Lodge, Martin A; Parisi, Marguerite T; Ferguson, Mark R; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Gladish, Gregory W; Gupta, Narainder K

    2017-09-15

    This clinical practice parameter has been developed collaboratively by the American College of Radiology (ACR), the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR), and the Society of Thoracic Radiology (STR). This document is intended to act as a guide for physicians performing and interpreting positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) of cardiac diseases in adults and children. The primary value of cardiac PET/CT imaging include evaluation of perfusion, function, viability, inflammation, anatomy, and risk stratification for cardiac-related events such as myocardial infarction and death. Optimum utility of cardiac PET/CT is achieved when images are interpreted in conjunction with clinical information and laboratory data. Measurement of myocardial blood flow, coronary flow reserve and detection of balanced ischemia are significant advantages of cardiac PET perfusion studies. Increasingly cardiac PET/CT is used in diagnosis and treatment response assessment for cardiac sarcoidosis.

  13. Standardization of the first-trimester fetal cardiac examination using spatiotemporal image correlation with tomographic ultrasound and color Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Turan, S; Turan, O M; Ty-Torredes, K; Harman, C R; Baschat, A A

    2009-06-01

    The challenges of the first-trimester examination of the fetal heart may in part be overcome by technical advances in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound techniques. Our aim was to standardize the first-trimester 3D imaging approach to the cardiac examination to provide the most consistent and accurate display of anatomy. Low-risk women with normal findings on first-trimester screening at 11 to 13 + 6 weeks had cardiac ultrasound using the following sequence: (1) identification of the four-chamber view; (2) four-dimensional (4D) volume acquisition with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) and color Doppler imaging (angle = 20 degrees, sweep 10 s); (3) offline, tomographic ultrasound imaging (TUI) analysis with standardized starting plane (four-chamber view), slice number and thickness; (4) assessment of fetal cardiac anatomy (four-chamber view, cardiac axis, size and symmetry, atrioventricular valves, great arteries and descending aorta) with and without color Doppler. 107 consecutive women (age, 16-42 years, body mass index 17.2-50.2 kg/m(2)) were studied. A minimum of three 3D volumes were obtained for each patient, transabdominally in 91.6%. Fetal motion artifact required acquisition of more than three volumes in 20%. The median time for TUI offline analysis was 100 (range, 60-240) s. Individual anatomic landmarks were identified in 89.7-99.1%. Visualization of all structures in one panel was observed in 91 patients (85%). Starting from a simple two-dimensional cardiac landmark-the four-chamber view-the standardized STIC-TUI technique enables detailed segmental cardiac evaluation of the normal fetal heart in the first trimester. (c) 2009 ISUOG.

  14. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  15. Current challenges and future directions in cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Wann, Samuel; Tunio, Javed

    2010-07-01

    Imaging is one of the most important accomplishments of medicine during the last 1000 years. The contribution of modern imaging to progress in the delivery of health care is unquestioned. However, we need to refine our use of imaging, limiting its use to those occasions when it can contribute directly or indirectly to improving and lengthening the lives of patients. Technology prowess in imaging alone is not sufficient to deliver value to individuals or to society. Continued investment in imaging technology requires critical appraisal of its use in clinical decision making and patient outcomes.

  16. Current challenges and future directions in cardiac imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wann, Samuel; Tunio, Javed

    2010-01-01

    Imaging is one of the most important accomplishments of medicine during the last 1000 years. The contribution of modern imaging to progress in the delivery of health care is unquestioned. However, we need to refine our use of imaging, limiting its use to those occasions when it can contribute directly or indirectly to improving and lengthening the lives of patients. Technology prowess in imaging alone is not sufficient to deliver value to individuals or to society. Continued investment in imaging technology requires critical appraisal of its use in clinical decision making and patient outcomes. PMID:23960604

  17. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cardiac imaging shows initial promise

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-15

    Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3-D MRI) of the heart is already receiving encouraging reviews from heart surgeons, says Michael Vannier, MD, an associate professor of radiology at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. In fact, the demand for his group's 3-D images is becoming overwhelming, Vannier says. So far, the group has used 3-D MRI to evaluate congenital heart disease. The advantage of the 3-D system is that, even to an untrained eye, anomalies are apparent and the images can even be animated. Many of the patients are infants, who are sedated while the images are acquired. When the information is combined, the averaged image produced represents a slice about 5 mm thick. The computer then stacks a number of those images together to make the 3-D image. Total scanning takes about one hour.

  18. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography: state of the art in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lang, Christopher; Atalay, Michael K

    2014-02-03

    Recent technological innovations in CT and MR imaging of the heart have vastly expanded the clinical utility of these modalities allowing them to complement and in some ways surpass the capabilities of more traditional methods. Cardiac MR (CMR) has an unrivaled ability to assess contractile function, characterize tissue, and detect minute areas of scar. In turn, CMR can reliably risk stratify ischemic heart disease and has emerged as a non-invasive gold standard technique for imaging non-ischemic cardiomyopathies.1 Cardiac CT (CCT) by comparison reveals cardiac structure and, in particular, coronary anatomy with remarkable sub-millimeter detail. For the first time, coronary stenoses can be directly and reliably visualized non-invasively. Owing to its very high negative predictive value for the detection of significant coronary obstruction, CCT can accurately exclude coronary disease as a cause of chest pain in low- to intermediate-risk populations. This article describes these modalities and their recent clinical advances.

  19. [Evaluation of cardiac tumors by multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Mercado-Guzman, Marcela P; Meléndez-Ramírez, Gabriela; Castillo-Castellon, Francisco; Kimura-Hayama, Eric

    Cardiac tumors, are a rare pathology (0.002-0.3%) in all age groups, however, they have a clinic importance, due the affected organ. They are classified in primary (benign or malignant) and secondary (metastasis) types. Among primary type, mixoma, is the most common benign tumor, and sarcoma represents most of the malignant injuries. Cardiac metastasis are more frequent than primary tumors. Clinic effects of cardiac tumors are unspecific and vary according their location, size and agresivity. The use of Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) assist on the location, sizing, anatomical relationships and the compromise of adyacents structures, besides, MRI is useful for tissue characterization of the tumor. Due to the previous reasons, studies based on noninvasive cardiovascular imaging, have an important role on the characterization of these lesions and the differential diagnosis among them.

  20. Automatic localization of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI images using deep learning.

    PubMed

    Emad, Omar; Yassine, Inas A; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic localization of the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac MRI images is an essential step for automatic segmentation, functional analysis, and content based retrieval of cardiac images. In this paper, we introduce a new approach based on deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to localize the LV in cardiac MRI in short axis views. A six-layer CNN with different kernel sizes was employed for feature extraction, followed by Softmax fully connected layer for classification. The pyramids of scales analysis was introduced in order to take account of the different sizes of the heart. A publically-available database of 33 patients was used for learning and testing. The proposed method was able it localize the LV with 98.66%, 83.91% and 99.07% for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity respectively.

  1. NOTE: Cardiac phase-specific shimming (CPSS) for SSFP MR cine imaging at 3 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubach, Miriam R.; Bornstedt, Axel; Hombach, Vinzenz; Merkle, Nico; Schär, Michael; Spiess, Jochen; Nienhaus, Gerd U.; Rasche, Volker

    2009-10-01

    The application of steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) techniques at 3 T systems is still limited by their sensitivity to magnetic field inhomogeneities. Especially during imaging of the heart, the arising signal voids and distortions in the myocardium currently often limit the diagnostic value of the resulting images. Dedicated shim systems providing higher order shimming capabilities have been applied to improve the field homogeneity across the heart. In this study, the potential benefit of applying a cardiac phase-specific shim (CPSS) was investigated. The cardiac phase dependence of the magnetic field distortions over the heart was assessed and the potential gain in field homogeneity by CPSS was evaluated. CPSS was successfully applied in volunteers and yielded significant improvement in the main magnetic field homogeneity over the entire cardiac cycle.

  2. Hybrid no-reference natural image quality assessment of noisy, blurry, JPEG2000, and JPEG images.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ji; Li, Qin; Erlebacher, Gordon

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new image quality assessment method based on a hybrid of curvelet, wavelet, and cosine transforms called hybrid no-reference (HNR) model. From the properties of natural scene statistics, the peak coordinates of the transformed coefficient histogram of filtered natural images occupy well-defined clusters in peak coordinate space, which makes NR possible. Compared to other methods, HNR has three benefits: 1) It is an NR method applicable to arbitrary images without compromising the prediction accuracy of full-reference methods; 2) as far as we know, it is the only general NR method well suited for four types of filters: noise, blur, JPEG2000, and JPEG compression; and 3) it can classify the filter types of the image and predict filter levels even when the image is results from the application of two different filters. We tested HNR on very intensive video image database (our image library) and Laboratory for Image & Video Engineering (a public library). Results are compared to the state-of-the-art methods including peak SNR, structural similarity, visual information fidelity, and so on.

  3. Hybrid-array-based optoacoustic and ultrasound (OPUS) imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. L.; Merčep, E.; Razansky, D.

    2017-05-01

    Hybrid optoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound imaging is an attractive multi-modal combination owing to the highly complementary contrast of the two techniques. Efficient hybridization is often hampered by significant dissimilarities between their optimal data acquisition and image formation strategies. Herein, we introduce an approach for combined optoacoustic and ultrasound imaging based on a plano-concave detector array design with a non-uniform pitch distribution. The hybrid design optimized for both modalities allows for maintaining an extended field of view for efficient ultrasound navigation while simultaneously providing broad tomographic coverage for optimal optoacoustic imaging performance. Imaging sessions performed in tissue-mimicking phantoms and healthy volunteers demonstrate that the suggested approach renders an enhanced imaging performance as compared with the previously reported hybrid optoacoustic and ultrasound imaging approaches. Thus, it can greatly facilitate clinical translation of the optoacoustic imaging technology by means of its efficient combination with ultrasonography, a well-established clinical imaging modality.

  4. 3D X-ray imaging methods in support catheter ablations of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a very frequent illness. Pharmacotherapy is not very effective in persistent arrhythmias and brings along a number of risks. Catheter ablation has became an effective and curative treatment method over the past 20 years. To support complex arrhythmia ablations, the 3D X-ray cardiac cavities imaging is used, most frequently the 3D reconstruction of CT images. The 3D cardiac rotational angiography (3DRA) represents a modern method enabling to create CT like 3D images on a standard X-ray machine equipped with special software. Its advantage lies in the possibility to obtain images during the procedure, decreased radiation dose and reduction of amount of the contrast agent. The left atrium model is the one most frequently used for complex atrial arrhythmia ablations, particularly for atrial fibrillation. CT data allow for creation and segmentation of 3D models of all cardiac cavities. Recently, a research has been made proving the use of 3DRA to create 3D models of other cardiac (right ventricle, left ventricle, aorta) and non-cardiac structures (oesophagus). They can be used during catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias to improve orientation during the construction of 3D electroanatomic maps, directly fused with 3D electroanatomic systems and/or fused with fluoroscopy. An intensive development in the 3D model creation and use has taken place over the past years and they became routinely used during catheter ablations of arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Further development may be anticipated in the future in both the creation and use of these models.

  5. Diagnostic support for glaucoma using retinal images: a hybrid image analysis and data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza; Artes, Paul; McIntyre, Andy; Heywood, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The availability of modern imaging techniques such as Confocal Scanning Laser Tomography (CSLT) for capturing high-quality optic nerve images offer the potential for developing automatic and objective methods for diagnosing glaucoma. We present a hybrid approach that features the analysis of CSLT images using moment methods to derive abstract image defining features. The features are then used to train classifers for automatically distinguishing CSLT images of normal and glaucoma patient. As a first, in this paper, we present investigations in feature subset selction methods for reducing the relatively large input space produced by the moment methods. We use neural networks and support vector machines to determine a sub-set of moments that offer high classification accuracy. We demonstratee the efficacy of our methods to discriminate between healthy and glaucomatous optic disks based on shape information automatically derived from optic disk topography and reflectance images.

  6. Students’ satisfaction to hybrid problem-based learning format for basic life support/advanced cardiac life support teaching

    PubMed Central

    Chilkoti, Geetanjali; Mohta, Medha; Wadhwa, Rachna; Saxena, Ashok Kumar; Sharma, Chhavi Sarabpreet; Shankar, Neelima

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Students are exposed to basic life support (BLS) and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) training in the first semester in some medical colleges. The aim of this study was to compare students’ satisfaction between lecture-based traditional method and hybrid problem-based learning (PBL) in BLS/ACLS teaching to undergraduate medical students. Methods: We conducted a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey among 118 1st-year medical students from a university medical college in the city of New Delhi, India. We aimed to assess the students’ satisfaction between lecture-based and hybrid-PBL method in BLS/ACLS teaching. Likert 5-point scale was used to assess students’ satisfaction levels between the two teaching methods. Data were collected and scores regarding the students’ satisfaction levels between these two teaching methods were analysed using a two-sided paired t-test. Results: Most students preferred hybrid-PBL format over traditional lecture-based method in the following four aspects; learning and understanding, interest and motivation, training of personal abilities and being confident and satisfied with the teaching method (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Implementation of hybrid-PBL format along with the lecture-based method in BLS/ACLS teaching provided high satisfaction among undergraduate medical students. PMID:27942055

  7. Successful bipolar ablation for ventricular tachycardia with potential substrate identification by pre-procedural cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kazuo; Nozoe, Masatsugu; Tsutsui, Yoshitomo; Suematsu, Nobuhiro; Kubota, Toru; Okabe, Masanori; Yamamoto, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful tool for detecting the arrhythmogenic substrate in cardiac sarcoidosis. We herein present a case of bipolar radiofrequency catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia (VT) complicated with cardiac sarcoidosis, guided by pre-procedural cardiac MRI. Neither echocardiography nor endocardial voltage mapping suggested a septal VT substrate. However, MRI alone detected intramural lesions in the septum. Although application of endocardial energy failed to treat the VT, bipolar ablation targeting the potential substrate identified by MRI successfully eliminated the VT. Even when no abnormalities are depicted on echocardiography and endocardial voltage mapping, intramural scar tissue identified by cardiac MRI could be critical for VT. PMID:28546773

  8. Optimal Magnetic Sensor Vests for Cardiac Source Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephan; Petković, Bojana; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) non-invasively provides functional information about the heart. New room-temperature magnetic field sensors, specifically magnetoresistive and optically pumped magnetometers, have reached sensitivities in the ultra-low range of cardiac fields while allowing for free placement around the human torso. Our aim is to optimize positions and orientations of such magnetic sensors in a vest-like arrangement for robust reconstruction of the electric current distributions in the heart. We optimized a set of 32 sensors on the surface of a torso model with respect to a 13-dipole cardiac source model under noise-free conditions. The reconstruction robustness was estimated by the condition of the lead field matrix. Optimization improved the condition of the lead field matrix by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to a regular array at the front of the torso. Optimized setups exhibited distributions of sensors over the whole torso with denser sampling above the heart at the front and back of the torso. Sensors close to the heart were arranged predominantly tangential to the body surface. The optimized sensor setup could facilitate the definition of a standard for sensor placement in MCG and the development of a wearable MCG vest for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27231910

  9. Optimal Magnetic Sensor Vests for Cardiac Source Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stephan; Petković, Bojana; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-05-24

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) non-invasively provides functional information about the heart. New room-temperature magnetic field sensors, specifically magnetoresistive and optically pumped magnetometers, have reached sensitivities in the ultra-low range of cardiac fields while allowing for free placement around the human torso. Our aim is to optimize positions and orientations of such magnetic sensors in a vest-like arrangement for robust reconstruction of the electric current distributions in the heart. We optimized a set of 32 sensors on the surface of a torso model with respect to a 13-dipole cardiac source model under noise-free conditions. The reconstruction robustness was estimated by the condition of the lead field matrix. Optimization improved the condition of the lead field matrix by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to a regular array at the front of the torso. Optimized setups exhibited distributions of sensors over the whole torso with denser sampling above the heart at the front and back of the torso. Sensors close to the heart were arranged predominantly tangential to the body surface. The optimized sensor setup could facilitate the definition of a standard for sensor placement in MCG and the development of a wearable MCG vest for clinical diagnostics.

  10. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  11. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Geiger, B; Schreiner, A; Back, C; Beissel, J

    2005-12-07

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 microGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min(-1) (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  12. Internet-based transfer of cardiac ultrasound images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Garcia, M. J.; Morehead, A. J.; Cardon, L. A.; Klein, A. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    A drawback to large-scale multicentre studies is the time required for the centralized evaluation of diagnostic images. We evaluated the feasibility of digital transfer of echocardiographic images to a central laboratory for rapid and accurate interpretation. Ten patients undergoing trans-oesophageal echocardiographic scanning at three sites had representative single images and multiframe loops stored digitally. The images were analysed in the ordinary way. All images were then transferred via the Internet to a central laboratory and reanalysed by a different observer. The file sizes were 1.5-72 MByte and the transfer rates achieved were 0.6-4.8 Mbit/min. Quantitative measurements were similar between most on-site and central laboratory measurements (all P > 0.25), although measurements differed for left atrial width and pulmonary venous systolic velocities (both P < 0.05). Digital transfer of echocardiographic images and data to a central laboratory may be useful for multicentre trials.

  13. Internet-based transfer of cardiac ultrasound images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Garcia, M. J.; Morehead, A. J.; Cardon, L. A.; Klein, A. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    A drawback to large-scale multicentre studies is the time required for the centralized evaluation of diagnostic images. We evaluated the feasibility of digital transfer of echocardiographic images to a central laboratory for rapid and accurate interpretation. Ten patients undergoing trans-oesophageal echocardiographic scanning at three sites had representative single images and multiframe loops stored digitally. The images were analysed in the ordinary way. All images were then transferred via the Internet to a central laboratory and reanalysed by a different observer. The file sizes were 1.5-72 MByte and the transfer rates achieved were 0.6-4.8 Mbit/min. Quantitative measurements were similar between most on-site and central laboratory measurements (all P > 0.25), although measurements differed for left atrial width and pulmonary venous systolic velocities (both P < 0.05). Digital transfer of echocardiographic images and data to a central laboratory may be useful for multicentre trials.

  14. Image-based models of cardiac structure in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Prassl, Anton J.; Chen, Junjie; Kickinger, Ferdinand; Kohl, Peter; Plank, Gernot; Trayanova, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Computational approaches to investigating the electromechanics of healthy and diseased hearts are becoming essential for the comprehensive understanding of cardiac function. In this article, we first present a brief review of existing image-based computational models of cardiac structure. We then provide a detailed explanation of a processing pipeline which we have recently developed for constructing realistic computational models of the heart from high resolution structural and diffusion tensor (DT) magnetic resonance (MR) images acquired ex vivo. The presentation of the pipeline incorporates a review of the methodologies that can be used to reconstruct models of cardiac structure. In this pipeline, the structural image is segmented to reconstruct the ventricles, normal myocardium, and infarct. A finite element mesh is generated from the segmented structural image, and fiber orientations are assigned to the elements based on DTMR data. The methods were applied to construct seven different models of healthy and diseased hearts. These models contain millions of elements, with spatial resolutions in the order of hundreds of microns, providing unprecedented detail in the representation of cardiac structure for simulation studies. PMID:20582162

  15. Primary cardiac lymphoma: utility of multimodality imaging in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Mato, Anthony R; Morgans, Alicia K; Roullet, Michele R; Bagg, Adam; Glatstein, Eli; Litt, Harold I; Downs, Lisa H; Chong, Elise A; Olson, Erin R; Andreadis, Charalambos; Schuster, Stephen J

    2007-12-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) is an extremely rare disease defined as a lymphoma strictly confined to the heart or pericardium without dissemination. We present the case of an 82 yr old male with newly diagnosed PCL and two years of subsequent follow up. This report highlights the utility of a multimodality imaging approach in the diagnosis and management of PCL.

  16. Integrative computed tomographic imaging of cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Christian; Hanley, Michael; Bastarrika, Gorka; Ruzsics, Balazs; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) technology have created new opportunities in cardiac imaging and provided new insights into a variety of disease states. Use of 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography has been validated for the evaluation of clinically relevant coronary artery stenosis with high negative predictive values for ruling out significant obstructive disease. This technology has also advanced the care of patients with acute chest pain by simultaneous assessment of acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome ("triple rule out"). Although MDCT has been instrumental in the advancement of cardiac imaging, there are still limitations in patients with high or irregular heart rates. Newer MDCT scanner generations hold promise to improve some of these limitations for noninvasive cardiac imaging. The evaluation of coronary artery stenosis remains the primary clinical indication for cardiac computed tomography angiography. However, the use of MDCT for simultaneous assessment of coronary artery stenosis, atherosclerotic plaque formation, ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, and viability with a single modality is under intense investigation. Recent technical developments hold promise for accomplishing this goal and establishing MDCT as a comprehensive stand-alone test for integrative imaging of coronary heart disease.

  17. Low Cost Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Stepper Exercise Device for Use in Cardiac Stress Tests.

    PubMed

    Forouzan, Omid; Flink, Evan; Warczytowa, Jared; Thate, Nick; Hanske, Andrew; Lee, Tongkeun; Roldan-Alzate, Alejandro; François, Chris; Wieben, Oliver; Chesler, Naomi C

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Many cardiovascular diseases are better diagnosed during a cardiac stress test. Current approaches include either exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography and pharmacological stress magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is the most accurate noninvasive method of assessing cardiac function. Currently there are very few exercise devices that allow collection of cardiovascular MRI data during exercise. We developed a low-cost exercise device that utilizes adjustable weight resistance and is compatible with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. It is equipped with electronics that measure power output. Our device allows subjects to exercise with a leg-stepping motion while their torso is in the MR imager. The device is easy to mount on the MRI table and can be adjusted for different body sizes. Pilot tests were conducted with 5 healthy subjects (3 male and 2 female, 29.2 ± 3.9 yr old) showing significant exercise-induced changes in heart rate (+42%), cardiac output (+40%) and mean pulmonary artery (PA) flow (+%49) post exercise. These data demonstrate that our MR compatible stepper exercise device successfully generated a hemodynamically stressed state while allowing for high quality imaging. The adjustable weight resistance allows exercise stress testing of subjects with variable exercise capacities. This low-cost device has the potential to be used in a variety of pathologies that require a cardiac stress test for diagnosis and assessment of disease progression.

  18. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update*

    PubMed Central

    Assunção, Fernanda Boldrini; de Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro; Souza, Vitor Frauches; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complementarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies. PMID:26929458

  19. Simple RF design for human functional and morphological cardiac imaging at 7tesla.

    PubMed

    Versluis, M J; Tsekos, N; Smith, N B; Webb, A G

    2009-09-01

    Morphological and functional cardiac MRI can potentially benefit greatly from the recent advent of commercial high-field (7tesla and above) MRI systems. However, conventional hardware configurations at lower field using a body-coil for homogeneous transmission are not available at these field strengths. Sophisticated multiple-transmit-channel systems have been shown to be able to image the human heart at 7tesla but such systems are currently not widely available. In this paper, we empirically optimize the design of a simple quadrature coil for cardiac imaging at 7tesla. The size, geometry, and position have been chosen to produce a B(1) field with no tissue-induced signal voids within the heart. Standard navigator echoes for gating were adapted for operation at the heart/lung interface, directly along the head-foot direction. Using this setup, conventional and high-resolution cine functional imaging have been successfully performed, as has morphological imaging of the right coronary artery.

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in ischemic cardiomyopathy: an update.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Fernanda Boldrini; de Oliveira, Diogo Costa Leandro; Souza, Vitor Frauches; Nacif, Marcelo Souto

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy is one of the major health problems worldwide, representing a significant part of mortality in the general population nowadays. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) and cardiac computed tomography (CCT) are noninvasive imaging methods that serve as useful tools in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and may also help in screening individuals with risk factors for developing this illness. Technological developments of CMRI and CCT have contributed to the rise of several clinical indications of these imaging methods complementarily to other investigation methods, particularly in cases where they are inconclusive. In terms of accuracy, CMRI and CCT are similar to the other imaging methods, with few absolute contraindications and minimal risks of adverse side-effects. This fact strengthens these methods as powerful and safe tools in the management of patients. The present study is aimed at describing the role played by CMRI and CCT in the diagnosis of ischemic cardiomyopathies.

  1. High resolution 3-Dimensional imaging of the human cardiac conduction system from microanatomy to mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Robert S; Atkinson, Andrew; Kottas, Petros; Perde, Filip; Jafarzadeh, Fatemeh; Bateman, Mike; Iaizzo, Paul A; Zhao, Jichao; Zhang, Henggui; Anderson, Robert H; Jarvis, Jonathan C; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2017-08-03

    Cardiac arrhythmias and conduction disturbances are accompanied by structural remodelling of the specialised cardiomyocytes known collectively as the cardiac conduction system. Here, using contrast enhanced micro-computed tomography, we present, in attitudinally appropriate fashion, the first 3-dimensional representations of the cardiac conduction system within the intact human heart. We show that cardiomyocyte orientation can be extracted from these datasets at spatial resolutions approaching the single cell. These data show that commonly accepted anatomical representations are oversimplified. We have incorporated the high-resolution anatomical data into mathematical simulations of cardiac electrical depolarisation. The data presented should have multidisciplinary impact. Since the rate of depolarisation is dictated by cardiac microstructure, and the precise orientation of the cardiomyocytes, our data should improve the fidelity of mathematical models. By showing the precise 3-dimensional relationships between the cardiac conduction system and surrounding structures, we provide new insights relevant to valvar replacement surgery and ablation therapies. We also offer a practical method for investigation of remodelling in disease, and thus, virtual pathology and archiving. Such data presented as 3D images or 3D printed models, will inform discussions between medical teams and their patients, and aid the education of medical and surgical trainees.

  2. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: a new tool to identify cardioaortic sources in ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Yaghi, Shadi; Liberman, Ava L; Atalay, Michael; Song, Christopher; Furie, Karen L; Kamel, Hooman; Bernstein, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Stroke of undetermined aetiology or 'cryptogenic' stroke accounts for 30-40% of ischaemic strokes despite extensive diagnostic evaluation. The role and yield of cardiac imaging is controversial. Cardiac MRI (CMR) has been used for cardiac disorders, but its use in cryptogenic stroke is not well established. We reviewed the literature (randomised trials, exploratory comparative studies and case series) on the use of CMR in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with ischaemic stroke. The literature on the use of CMR in the diagnostic evaluation of ischaemic stroke is sparse. However, studies have demonstrated a potential role for CMR in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with cryptogenic stroke to identify potential aetiologies such as cardiac thrombi, cardiac tumours, aortic arch disease and other rare cardiac anomalies. CMR can also provide data on certain functional and structural parameters of the left atrium and the left atrial appendage which have been shown to be associated with ischaemic stroke risk. CMR is a non-invasive modality that can help identify potential mechanisms in cryptogenic stroke and patients who may be targeted for enrolment into clinical trials comparing anticoagulation to antiplatelet therapy in secondary stroke prevention. Prospective studies are needed to compare the value of CMR as compared to transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cryptogenic stroke. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Detectability of perfusion defect in five-dimensional gated-dynamic cardiac SPECT images.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongyi; King, Michael A; Wernick, Miles N

    2010-09-01

    In previous work, the authors developed and demonstrated the concept of an image reconstruction procedure aimed to unify gated and dynamic nuclear cardiac imaging, which the authors have termed five-dimensional (5D) SPECT. Gated imaging permits the clinician to evaluate wall motion and, through the use of stress and rest scans, allows perfusion defects to be observed. Dynamic imaging depicts kinetics in the myocardium, which can be used to evaluate perfusion, but traditional dynamic images are motionless and do not depict wall motion. In this article, the authors investigate the degree to which perfusion defects can be detected from the dynamic information conveyed by 5D images, a problem that is particularly challenging in the absence of multiple fast camera rotations. The authors first demonstrate the usefulness of dynamic reconstructed images for perfusion detection by using linear discriminant analyses (Fisher linear discriminant analysis and principal component analysis) and a numerical channelized Hotelling observer. The authors then derive three types of discriminant metrics for characterizing the temporal kinetic information in reconstructed dynamic images for differentiating perfusion defects from normal cardiac perfusion, which are the Fisher linear discriminant map, temporal derivative map, and kinetic parametric images. Results are based on the NURBS-based cardiac-torso phantom with simulation of Tc99m-teboroxime as the imaging agent. The derived metric maps and quantitative contrast-to-noise ratio results demonstrate that the reconstructed dynamic images could yield higher detectability of the perfusion defect than conventional gated reconstruction while providing wall motion information simultaneously. The proposed metrics can be used to produce new types of visualizations, showing wall motion and perfusion information, that may potentially be useful for clinical evaluation. Since 5D imaging permits wall motion and kinetics to be observed

  4. Developing Targeted Hybrid Imaging Probes by Chelator Scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) as well as optical imaging (OI) with peptide receptor targeting probes have proven their value for oncological applications but also show restrictions depending on the clinical field of interest. Therefore, the combination of both methods, particularly in a single molecule, could improve versatility in clinical routine. This proof of principle study aims to show that a chelator, Fusarinine C (FSC), can be utilized as scaffold for novel dimeric dual-modality imaging agents. Two targeting vectors (a minigastrin analogue (MG11) targeting cholecystokinin-2 receptor overexpression (CCK2R) or integrin αVβ3 targeting cyclic pentapeptides (RGD)) and a near-infrared fluorophore (Sulfo-Cyanine7) were conjugated to FSC. The probes were efficiently labeled with gallium-68 and in vitro experiments including determination of logD, stability, protein binding, cell binding, internalization, and biodistribution studies as well as in vivo micro-PET/CT and optical imaging in U-87MG αVβ3- and A431-CCK2R expressing tumor xenografted mice were carried out. Novel bioconjugates showed high receptor affinity and highly specific targeting properties at both receptors. Ex vivo biodistribution and micro-PET/CT imaging studies revealed specific tumor uptake accompanied by slow blood clearance and retention in nontargeted tissues (spleen, liver, and kidneys) leading to visualization of tumors at early (30 to 120 min p.i.). Excellent contrast in corresponding optical imaging studies was achieved especially at delayed time points (24 to 72 h p.i.). Our findings show the proof of principle of chelator scaffolding for hybrid imaging agents and demonstrate FSC being a suitable bifunctional chelator for this approach. Improvements to fine-tune pharmacokinetics are needed to translate this into a clinical setting. PMID:28462989

  5. Evaluation of optical imaging and spectroscopy approaches for cardiac tissue depth assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B; Matthews, D; Chernomordik, V; Gandjbakhche, A; Lane, S; Demos, S G

    2008-02-13

    NIR light scattering from ex vivo porcine cardiac tissue was investigated to understand how imaging or point measurement approaches may assist development of methods for tissue depth assessment. Our results indicate an increase of average image intensity as thickness increases up to approximately 2 mm. In a dual fiber spectroscopy configuration, sensitivity up to approximately 3 mm with an increase to 6 mm when spectral ratio between selected wavelengths was obtained. Preliminary Monte Carlo results provided reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  6. Influence of x-ray pulse parameters on the image quality for moving objects in digital cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Guibelalde, Eduardo; Vano, Eliseo; Vaquero, Francisco; Gonzalez, Luciano

    2004-10-01

    The image quality of a single frame in a modern cardiac imaging x-ray facility can be improved by adjusting the automatic pulse exposure parameters. The effects of acquisition rate on patient dose and the detectability of moving objects have been fully described in scientific literature. However, the influence of automatic pulse exposure parameters is still to be determined. Images of a moving wheel (with lead wires) were acquired using an H5000 Philips Integris cardiac x-ray system. Poly(methylmethacrylate) plastic samples 20 and 30 cm thick were employed as the build-up phantom to simulate a patient. The images were obtained using preset clinical parameters for cardiac imaging procedures. The signal detectability and motion blur of a contrast bar at a transversal speed in the range of 100-150 mm/s were evaluated with a cine pulse width of 3, 5, 7, and 10 ms under automatic mA kV regulation. Two levels of exposure at the image intensifier entrance were included in this study. Signal detectability was analyzed in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the value of SNR{sup 2}/entrance surface dose. The blurring was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped blurring function, and the motion blur was expressed in terms of the peak full width at half maximum and amplitude (apparent contrast) of the resolution functions. A contrast bar simulating a vessel in motion at the maximum velocities of typical cardiac structures was exposed. Severe loss of image quality occurred at pulse widths {>=}7 ms. It is also shown that below 5 ms static nonlinearities, likely caused by the need to use a large focus for cine acquisition, dominate the blurring process.

  7. Cardiac image registration via global and local warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugelmass, Steven D.; Labovitz, C. H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1993-07-01

    Image produced with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography (PET), produce complimentary anatomic and physiologic information. The synthesis of a single image, combining the structural information from MRI, with the corresponding physiologic and metabolic information from PET or CT would provide physicians and researchers with a means to correlate function with structure. We adapted a method originating with Goshtasby and later described by Wolberg which decomposes the anatomic image into regions which are then individually mapped to corresponding regions in the functional image. The mapping function is found by a least squares solution to a set of polynomial basis functions. The selection of the set of basis functions varies the 'order' of the mapping function from affine to the inclusion of shear and higher order deformations. Local deformations in the contour of the heart wall are adjusted by our method. Global high order deformations can also be effected. We tested our approach by developing a software module for use with our laboratory's image visualization and analysis system (VIDATM), and mapping MRI image of the canine heart (with extrinsic markers) to hand-traced contours from pathology slides of the heart from the same animal. We will present illustrations of these image mappings and show that this method successfully accounts and corrects for local deformations in the object boundaries as well as global scale and orientation mismatches, which are not addressed by previously described techniques.

  8. Free-breathing 3D cardiac MRI using iterative image-based respiratory motion correction.

    PubMed

    Moghari, Mehdi H; Roujol, Sébastien; Chan, Raymond H; Hong, Susie N; Bello, Natalie; Henningsson, Markus; Ngo, Long H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V; Manning, Warren J; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory motion compensation using diaphragmatic navigator gating with a 5 mm gating window is conventionally used for free-breathing cardiac MRI. Because of the narrow gating window, scan efficiency is low resulting in long scan times, especially for patients with irregular breathing patterns. In this work, a new retrospective motion compensation algorithm is presented to reduce the scan time for free-breathing cardiac MRI that increasing the gating window to 15 mm without compromising image quality. The proposed algorithm iteratively corrects for respiratory-induced cardiac motion by optimizing the sharpness of the heart. To evaluate this technique, two coronary MRI datasets with 1.3 mm(3) resolution were acquired from 11 healthy subjects (seven females, 25 ± 9 years); one using a navigator with a 5 mm gating window acquired in 12.0 ± 2.0 min and one with a 15 mm gating window acquired in 7.1 ± 1.0 min. The images acquired with a 15 mm gating window were corrected using the proposed algorithm and compared to the uncorrected images acquired with the 5 and 15 mm gating windows. The image quality score, sharpness, and length of the three major coronary arteries were equivalent between the corrected images and the images acquired with a 5 mm gating window (P-value > 0.05), while the scan time was reduced by a factor of 1.7. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Free-breathing 3D Cardiac MRI Using Iterative Image-Based Respiratory Motion Correction

    PubMed Central

    Moghari, Mehdi H.; Roujol, Sébastien; Chan, Raymond H.; Hong, Susie N.; Bello, Natalie; Henningsson, Markus; Ngo, Long H.; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Manning, Warren J.; Nezafat, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory motion compensation using diaphragmatic navigator (NAV) gating with a 5 mm gating window is conventionally used for free-breathing cardiac MRI. Due to the narrow gating window, scan efficiency is low resulting in long scan times, especially for patients with irregular breathing patterns. In this work, a new retrospective motion compensation algorithm is presented to reduce the scan time for free-breathing cardiac MRI that increasing the gating window to 15 mm without compromising image quality. The proposed algorithm iteratively corrects for respiratory-induced cardiac motion by optimizing the sharpness of the heart. To evaluate this technique, two coronary MRI datasets with 1.3 mm3 resolution were acquired from 11 healthy subjects (7 females, 25±9 years); one using a NAV with a 5 mm gating window acquired in 12.0±2.0 minutes and one with a 15 mm gating window acquired in 7.1±1.0 minutes. The images acquired with a 15 mm gating window were corrected using the proposed algorithm and compared to the uncorrected images acquired with the 5 mm and 15 mm gating windows. The image quality score, sharpness, and length of the three major coronary arteries were equivalent between the corrected images and the images acquired with a 5 mm gating window (p-value>0.05), while the scan time was reduced by a factor of 1.7. PMID:23132549

  10. Radionuclide imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation in heart failure: unlocking untapped potential.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shuchita; Amanullah, Aman

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with sympathetic overactivity, which contributes to disease progression and arrhythmia development. Cardiac sympathetic innervation imaging can be performed using radiotracers that are taken up in the presynaptic nerve terminal of sympathetic nerves. The commonly used radiotracers are (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-mIBG) for planar and single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and (11)C-hydroxyephedrine for positron emission tomography imaging. Sympathetic innervation imaging has been used in assessing prognosis, response to treatment, risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death and prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with HF. Other potential applications of these techniques are in patients with chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy, predicting myocardial recovery in patients with left ventricular assist devices, and assessing reinnervation following cardiac transplantation. There is a lack of standardization with respect to technique of (123)I-mIBG imaging that needs to be overcome for the imaging modality to gain popularity in clinical practice.

  11. Assessment of Myocardial Infarction by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Long-Term Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Petriz, João Luiz Fernandes; Gomes, Bruno Ferraz de Oliveira; Rua, Braulio Santos; Azevedo, Clério Francisco; Hadlich, Marcelo Souza; Mussi, Henrique Thadeu Periard; Taets, Gunnar de Cunto; do Nascimento, Emília Matos; Pereira, Basílio de Bragança; e Silva, Nelson Albuquerque de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed anatomical information on infarction. However, few studies have investigated the association of these data with mortality after acute myocardial infarction. Objective To study the association between data regarding infarct size and anatomy, as obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, and long-term mortality. Methods A total of 1959 reports of “infarct size” were identified in 7119 cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies, of which 420 had clinical and laboratory confirmation of previous myocardial infarction. The variables studied were the classic risk factors – left ventricular ejection fraction, categorized ventricular function, and location of acute myocardial infarction. Infarct size and acute myocardial infarction extent and transmurality were analyzed alone and together, using the variable named “MET-AMI”. The statistical analysis was carried out using the elastic net regularization, with the Cox model and survival trees. Results The mean age was 62.3 ± 12 years, and 77.3% were males. During the mean follow-up of 6.4 ± 2.9 years, there were 76 deaths (18.1%). Serum creatinine, diabetes mellitus and previous myocardial infarction were independently associated with mortality. Age was the main explanatory factor. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging variables independently associated with mortality were transmurality of acute myocardial infarction (p = 0.047), ventricular dysfunction (p = 0.0005) and infarcted size (p = 0.0005); the latter was the main explanatory variable for ischemic heart disease death. The MET-AMI variable was the most strongly associated with risk of ischemic heart disease death (HR: 16.04; 95%CI: 2.64-97.5; p = 0.003). Conclusion The anatomical data of infarction, obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after acute myocardial infarction, were independently associated with long-term mortality, especially for

  12. Age-related changes in cardiac structure and function in Fischer 344 x Brown Norway hybrid rats.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Timothy A; McKiernan, Susan H; Douglas, Pamela S; Wanagat, Jonathan; Aiken, Judd M

    2006-01-01

    The effects of aging on cardiovascular function and cardiac structure were determined in a rat model recommended for gerontological studies. A cross-sectional analysis assessed cardiac changes in male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats (FBN) from adulthood to the very aged (n = 6 per 12-, 18-, 21-, 24-, 27-, 30-, 33-, 36-, and 39-mo-old group). Rats underwent echocardiographic and hemodynamic analyses to determine standard values for left ventricular (LV) mass, LV wall thickness, LV chamber diameter, heart rate, LV fractional shortening, mitral inflow velocity, LV relaxation time, and aortic/LV pressures. Histological analyses were used to assess LV fibrotic infiltration and cardiomyocyte volume density over time. Aged rats had an increased LV mass-to-body weight ratio and deteriorated systolic function. LV systolic pressure declined with age. Histological analysis demonstrated a gradual increase in fibrosis and a decrease in cardiomyocyte volume density with age. We conclude that, although significant physiological and morphological changes occurred in heart function and structure between 12 and 39 mo of age, these changes did not likely contribute to mortality. We report reference values for cardiac function and structure in adult FBN male rats through very old age at 3-mo intervals.

  13. Defining the mid-diastolic imaging period for cardiac CT - lessons from tissue Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Otton, James M; Phan, Justin; Feneley, Michael; Yu, Chung-yao; Sammel, Neville; McCrohon, Jane

    2013-02-01

    Aggressive dose reduction strategies for cardiac CT require the prospective selection of limited cardiac phases. At lower heart rates, the period of mid-diastole is typically selected for image acquisition. We aimed to identify the effect of heart rate on the optimal CT acquisition phase within the period of mid-diastole. We utilized high temporal resolution tissue Doppler to precisely measure coronary motion within diastole. Tissue-Doppler waveforms of the myocardium corresponding to the location of the circumflex artery (100 patients) and mid-right coronary arteries (50 patients) and the duration and timing of coronary motion were measured. Using regression analysis an equation was derived for the timing of the period of minimal coronary motion within the RR interval. In a validation set of 50 clinical cardiac CT examinations, we assessed coronary motion artifact and the effect of using a mid-diastolic imaging target that was adjusted according to heart rate vs a fixed 75% phase target. Tissue Doppler analysis shows the period of minimal cardiac motion suitable for CT imaging decreases almost linearly as the RR interval decreases, becoming extinguished at an average heart rate of 91 bpm for the circumflex (LCX) and 78 bpm for the right coronary artery (RCA). The optimal imaging phase has a strong linear relationship with RR duration (R2 = 0.92 LCX, 0.89 RCA). The optimal phase predicted by regression analysis of the tissue-Doppler waveforms increases from 74% at a heart rate of 55 bpm to 77% at 75 bpm. In the clinical CT validation set, the optimal CT acquisition phase similarly occurred later with increasing heart rate. When the selected cardiac phase was adjusted according to heart rate the result was closer to the optimal phase than using a fixed 75% phase. While this effect was statistically significant (p < 0.01 RCA/LCx), the mean effect of heart-rate adjustment was minor relative to typical beat-to-beat variability and available precision of

  14. Defining the mid-diastolic imaging period for cardiac CT – lessons from tissue Doppler echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aggressive dose reduction strategies for cardiac CT require the prospective selection of limited cardiac phases. At lower heart rates, the period of mid-diastole is typically selected for image acquisition. We aimed to identify the effect of heart rate on the optimal CT acquisition phase within the period of mid-diastole. Methods We utilized high temporal resolution tissue Doppler to precisely measure coronary motion within diastole. Tissue-Doppler waveforms of the myocardium corresponding to the location of the circumflex artery (100 patients) and mid-right coronary arteries (50 patients) and the duration and timing of coronary motion were measured. Using regression analysis an equation was derived for the timing of the period of minimal coronary motion within the RR interval. In a validation set of 50 clinical cardiac CT examinations, we assessed coronary motion artifact and the effect of using a mid-diastolic imaging target that was adjusted according to heart rate vs a fixed 75% phase target. Results Tissue Doppler analysis shows the period of minimal cardiac motion suitable for CT imaging decreases almost linearly as the RR interval decreases, becoming extinguished at an average heart rate of 91 bpm for the circumflex (LCX) and 78 bpm for the right coronary artery (RCA). The optimal imaging phase has a strong linear relationship with RR duration (R2 = 0.92 LCX, 0.89 RCA). The optimal phase predicted by regression analysis of the tissue-Doppler waveforms increases from 74% at a heart rate of 55 bpm to 77% at 75 bpm. In the clinical CT validation set, the optimal CT acquisition phase similarly occurred later with increasing heart rate. When the selected cardiac phase was adjusted according to heart rate the result was closer to the optimal phase than using a fixed 75% phase. While this effect was statistically significant (p < 0.01 RCA/LCx), the mean effect of heart-rate adjustment was minor relative to typical beat-to-beat variability and

  15. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, Paul; Lodge, Martin; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-03-02

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the measurement of EF. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimation of the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction is shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  16. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, W. Paul; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac-gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the EF measurement. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimating the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction has been shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  17. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  18. A hybrid framework for 3D medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2005-12-01

    In this paper we propose a novel hybrid 3D segmentation framework which combines Gibbs models, marching cubes and deformable models. In the framework, first we construct a new Gibbs model whose energy function is defined on a high order clique system. The new model includes both region and boundary information during segmentation. Next we improve the original marching cubes method to construct 3D meshes from Gibbs models' output. The 3D mesh serves as the initial geometry of the deformable model. Then we deform the deformable model using external image forces so that the model converges to the object surface. We run the Gibbs model and the deformable model recursively by updating the Gibbs model's parameters using the region and boundary information in the deformable model segmentation result. In our approach, the hybrid combination of region-based methods and boundary-based methods results in improved segmentations of complex structures. The benefit of the methodology is that it produces high quality segmentations of 3D structures using little prior information and minimal user intervention. The modules in this segmentation methodology are developed within the context of the Insight ToolKit (ITK). We present experimental segmentation results of brain tumors and evaluate our method by comparing experimental results with expert manual segmentations. The evaluation results show that the methodology achieves high quality segmentation results with computational efficiency. We also present segmentation results of other clinical objects to illustrate the strength of the methodology as a generic segmentation framework.

  19. 18F-NaF PET/CT Images of Cardiac Metastasis From Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsien; Ko, Kuan-Yin; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Chen, Wei-Wu; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Osteosarcomas are aggressive with a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis. Cardiac osteosarcoma metastasis is rare. We described a 17-year-old boy who had right distal femoral osteosarcoma with lung metastases. During follow-up, right ventricular (RV) metastasis was noted and confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgical specimen. F-NaF PET/CT was then arranged 1 month after debulking surgery for residual tumor survey. The images showed intense F-NaF uptake at RV region, suggestive of residual cardiac metastases.

  20. Failure to diagnose cardiac treatment rejection with Tc99m-PYP images

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; McDougall, I.R.; Goris, M.L.; Mason, J.W.; Reitz, B.A.

    1981-08-01

    The possibility of diagnosing transplant rejection using Tc-99m-PYP imaging was examined in 12 cardiac transplant recipients. Two patients were studied on two occasions. The presence or absence of active rejection was established by endomyocardial biopsy. The intensity and pattern of myocardial uptake of the tracer did not differ significantly in the two patients studied at the time of rejection compared to the remainder. It is concluded that a single Tc-99m-PYP study cannot be used to diagnose cardiac transplant rejection.

  1. Hybrid regularizers-based adaptive anisotropic diffusion for image denoising.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Tan, Jieqing; Ai, Liefu

    2016-01-01

    To eliminate the staircasing effect for total variation filter and synchronously avoid the edges blurring for fourth-order PDE filter, a hybrid regularizers-based adaptive anisotropic diffusion is proposed for image denoising. In the proposed model, the [Formula: see text]-norm is considered as the fidelity term and the regularization term is composed of a total variation regularization and a fourth-order filter. The two filters can be adaptively selected according to the diffusion function. When the pixels locate at the edges, the total variation filter is selected to filter the image, which can preserve the edges. When the pixels belong to the flat regions, the fourth-order filter is adopted to smooth the image, which can eliminate the staircase artifacts. In addition, the split Bregman and relaxation approach are employed in our numerical algorithm to speed up the computation. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed model outperforms the state-of-the-art models cited in the paper in both the qualitative and quantitative evaluations.

  2. Effect of cardiac drugs on imaging studies with thallous chloride Tl 201

    SciTech Connect

    Waschek, J.; Hinkle, G.; Basmadjian, G.; Allen, E.W.; Ice, R.

    1981-11-01

    The effects of commonly used cardiac drugs on cardiac imaging with thallium-201-labeled thallous chloride were studied. This retrospective study included 62 men ranging in age from 37 to 70 years who had cardiac imaging attempted with thallium during an eight-month period. Seven drugs were being used by at least eight patients each--propranolol, nitroglycerin ointment, isosorbide dinitrate, digoxin, hydrochlorothiazide, potassium chloride, and quinidine. Myocardial-to-background (M/Bk) ratios were calculated for each patient. No drug consistently affected the M/Bk ratios. The lowest M/Bk ratio was found in patients receiving digoxin, but there was no significant difference between the M/Bk ratios for patients taking digoxin (1.38 +/- 0.16) and those not taking digoxin (1.45 +/- 0.10) (0.05 less than p less than 0.10, Student's t test). It is concluded that the drugs studied do not affect cardiac imaging with thallous chloride Tl 201.

  3. Highly Sensitive Detection of Minimal Cardiac Ischemia using Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Activated Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Melanie; Alt, Karen; Paterson, Brett M.; Kanellakis, Peter; Bobik, Alex; Donnelly, Paul S.; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Peter, Karlheinz

    2016-01-01

    A reliable method for the diagnosis of minimal cardiac ischemia would meet a strong demand for the sensitive diagnosis of coronary artery disease in cardiac stress testing and risk stratification in patients with chest pain but unremarkable ECGs and biomarkers. We hypothesized that platelets accumulate early on in ischemic myocardium and a newly developed technology of non-invasive molecular PET imaging of activated platelets can thus detect minimal degrees of myocardial ischemia. To induce different degrees of minimal cardiac ischemia, the left anterior descending artery (LAD) was ligated for 10, 20 or 60 min. Mice were injected with a newly generated scFvanti-GPIIb/IIIa-64CuMeCOSar radiotracer, composed of a single-chain antibody that only binds to activated integrin GPIIb/IIIa (αIIbβIII) and thus to activated platelets, and a sarcophagine cage MeCOSar complexing the long half-life PET tracer copper-64. A single PET/CT scan was performed. Evans Blue/TTC staining to detect necrosis as well as classical serological biomarkers like Troponin I and heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) were negative, whereas PET imaging of activated platelets was able to detect small degrees of ischemia. Taken together, molecular PET imaging of activated platelets represents a unique and highly sensitive method to detect minimal cardiac ischemia. PMID:27909290

  4. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using an open 0.35 T system.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hans-Martin; Meyners, Werner; Neeb, Benjamin; Labenz, Joachim; Truümmler, Karl-Heinz

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 0.35 T magnetic resonance system with open design. Eleven patients were examined in an open MRI system with a field strength of 0.35 T. Myocardial function was assessed with cine true fast imaging with steady-state precession sequences in 2 planes. Perfusion images were acquired with a T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. Late enhancement was performed using an inversion recovery-prepared fast gradient echo technique. Image quality was assessed using a 4-point score in consensus. Signal-noise ratio was measured. For functional imaging, average score was 1.65 (SD, 0.6). For perfusion imaging, the value was 2.25 (SD, 0.68). For late enhancement, quality score was 2.6 (SD, 0.82). Average value of signal-noise ratio for functional, perfusion, and late enhancement imaging was 50.6 (SD, 16.4), 91.8 (SD, 52.8), and 33.2 (SD, 20.4), respectively. Open MRI with lower field strength can be used for functional imaging of the heart. For perfusion and viability imaging (late enhancement), higher field strength is needed. Open low-field cardiac MRI may provide a helpful alternative for obese or claustrophobic patients or patients who are difficult to move.

  5. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  6. Measured responsivities of generation II and hybrid image intensifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; King, N.S.P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    We have measured the absolute and coupled system responsivities of several image intensifier types at several wavelengths in the visible spectrum. Intensifiers characterized include microchannel plate (MCP) generation II proximity-focused and hybrid generation I/generation II electrostatic-focused designs. Configurations including single plate, double plate, nominal and high strip current MCPs, and standard S20 and super generation II enhanced S-20 photocathodes were evaluated. Absolute responsivity measurements were performed using NIST-traceable radiometry instrumentation. The normalized relative sensitivities and overall optical luminous gain performance provided by individual intensifiers when similarly coupled to either high resolution 10-bit RS-170 CCD or FPS cameras are presented along with their radiometric data.

  7. An Asymmetric Image Encryption Based on Phase Truncated Hybrid Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Mehak; Singh, Hukum

    2017-09-01

    To enhance the security of the system and to protect it from the attacker, this paper proposes a new asymmetric cryptosystem based on hybrid approach of Phase Truncated Fourier and Discrete Cosine Transform (PTFDCT) which adds non linearity by including cube and cube root operation in the encryption and decryption path respectively. In this cryptosystem random phase masks are used as encryption keys and phase masks generated after the cube operation in encryption process are reserved as decryption keys and cube root operation is required to decrypt image in decryption process. The cube and cube root operation introduced in the encryption and decryption path makes system resistant against standard attacks. The robustness of the proposed cryptosystem has been analysed and verified on the basis of various parameters by simulating on MATLAB 7.9.0 (R2008a). The experimental results are provided to highlight the effectiveness and suitability of the proposed cryptosystem and prove the system is secure.

  8. Magnetic resonance cardiac perfusion imaging-a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunold, Peter; Schlosser, Thomas; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2006-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) with its clinical appearance of stable or unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in developed countries. In view of increasing costs and the rising number of CAD patients, there has been a major interest in reliable non-invasive imaging techniques to identify CAD in an early (i.e. asymptomatic) stage. Since myocardial perfusion deficits appear very early in the "ischemic cascade", a major breakthrough would be the non-invasive quantification of myocardial perfusion before functional impairment might be detected. Therefore, there is growing interest in other, target-organ-specific parameters, such as relative and absolute myocardial perfusion imaging. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been proven to offer attractive concepts in this respect. However, some important difficulties have not been resolved so far, which still causes uncertainty and prevents the broad application of MR perfusion imaging in a clinical setting. This review explores recent technical developments in MR hardware, software and contrast agents, as well as their impact on the current and future clinical status of MR imaging of first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging.

  9. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeuwer, Marcel M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Quist, Marcel J.

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the myocardium (the heart muscle) from MR images, using contrast-enhanced ECG-triggered MRI. We have developed an automatic quantitative analysis method, which works as follows. First, image registration is used to compensate for translation and rotation of the myocardium over time. Next, the boundaries of the myocardium are detected and for each position within the myocardium a time-intensity profile is constructed. The time interval during which the contrast agent passes for the first time through the left ventricle and the myocardium is detected and various parameters are measured from the time-intensity profiles in this interval. The measured parameters are visualized as color overlays on the original images. Analysis results are stored, so that they can later on be compared for different stress levels of the heart. The method is described in detail in this paper and preliminary validation results are presented.

  10. Injectable biodegradable hybrid hydrogels based on thiolated collagen and oligo(acryloyl carbonate)-poly(ethylene glycol)-oligo(acryloyl carbonate) copolymer for functional cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guohui; Wang, Xiaolin; Deng, Chao; Teng, Xiaomei; Suuronen, Erik J; Shen, Zhenya; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-03-01

    Injectable biodegradable hybrid hydrogels were designed and developed based on thiolated collagen (Col-SH) and multiple acrylate containing oligo(acryloyl carbonate)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-oligo(acryloyl carbonate) (OAC-PEG-OAC) copolymers for functional cardiac regeneration. Hydrogels were readily formed under physiological conditions (37°C and pH 7.4) from Col-SH and OAC-PEG-OAC via a Michael-type addition reaction, with gelation times ranging from 0.4 to 8.1 min and storage moduli from 11.4 to 55.6 kPa, depending on the polymer concentrations, solution pH and degrees of substitution of Col-SH. The collagen component in the hybrid hydrogels retained its enzymatic degradability against collagenase, and the degradation time of the hydrogels increased with increasing polymer concentration. In vitro studies showed that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) exhibited rapid cell spreading and extensive cellular network formation on these hybrid hydrogels. In a rat infarction model, the infarcted left ventricle was injected with PBS, hybrid hydrogels, BMSCs or BMSC-encapsulating hybrid hydrogels. Echocardiography demonstrated that the hybrid hydrogels and BMSC-encapsulating hydrogels could increase the ejection fraction at 28 days compared to the PBS control group, resulting in improved cardiac function. Histology revealed that the injected hybrid hydrogels significantly reduced the infarct size and increased the wall thickness, and these were further improved with the BMSC-encapsulating hybrid hydrogel treatment, probably related to the enhanced engraftment and persistence of the BMSCs when delivered within the hybrid hydrogel. Thus, these injectable hybrid hydrogels combining intrinsic bioactivity of collagen, controlled mechanical properties and enhanced stability provide a versatile platform for functional cardiac regeneration.

  11. Gold hybrid nanoparticles for targeted phototherapy and cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirui, Dickson K.; Rey, Diego A.; Batt, Carl A.

    2010-03-01

    Gold and iron oxide hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) synthesized by the thermal decomposition technique are bio-functionalized with a single chain antibody, scFv, that binds to the A33 antigen present on colorectal cancer cells. The HNP-scFv conjugates are stable in aqueous solution with a magnetization value of 44 emu g - 1 and exhibit strong optical absorbance at 800 nm. Here we test this material in targeting, imaging and selective thermal killing of colorectal cancer cells. Cellular uptake studies showed that A33-expressing cells take up the A33scFv-conjugated HNPs at a rate five times higher than cells that do not express the A33 antigen. Laser irradiation studies showed that approximately 53% of the A33-expressing cells exposed to targeted HNPs are killed after a six-minute laser treatment at 5.1 W cm - 2 using a 808 nm continuous wave laser diode while < 5% of A33-nonexpressing cells are killed. At a higher intensity, 31.5 W cm - 2, the thermal destruction increases to 99 and 40% for A33-expressing cells and A33 nonexpressing cells, respectively, after 6 min exposure. Flow cytometric analyses of the laser-irradiated A33 antigen-expressing cells show apoptosis-related cell death to be the primary mode of cell death at 5.1 W cm - 2, with increasing necrosis-related cell death at higher laser power. These results suggest that this new class of bio-conjugated hybrid nanoparticles can potentially serve as an effective antigen-targeted photothermal therapeutic agent for cancer treatment as well as a probe for magnetic resonance-based imaging.

  12. Effect of respiratory and cardiac gating on the major diffusion-imaging metrics.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Tha, Khin Khin; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Mitsuhiro; Nakagawa, Shin; Fujiwara, Taro; Yoshida, Hirokazu; Takamori, Sayaka; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    The effect of respiratory gating on the major diffusion-imaging metrics and that of cardiac gating on mean kurtosis (MK) are not known. For evaluation of whether the major diffusion-imaging metrics-MK, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) of the brain-varied between gated and non-gated acquisitions, respiratory-gated, cardiac-gated, and non-gated diffusion-imaging of the brain were performed in 10 healthy volunteers. MK, FA, and MD maps were constructed for all acquisitions, and the histograms were constructed. The normalized peak height and location of the histograms were compared among the acquisitions by use of Friedman and post hoc Wilcoxon tests. The effect of the repetition time (TR) on the diffusion-imaging metrics was also tested, and we corrected for its variation among acquisitions, if necessary. The results showed a shift in the peak location of the MK and MD histograms to the right with an increase in TR (p ≤ 0.01). The corrected peak location of the MK histograms, the normalized peak height of the FA histograms, the normalized peak height and the corrected peak location of the MD histograms varied significantly between the gated and non-gated acquisitions (p < 0.05). These results imply an influence of respiration and cardiac pulsation on the major diffusion-imaging metrics. The gating conditions must be kept identical if reproducible results are to be achieved.

  13. Comprehensive Modeling and Visualization of Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology from CT Imaging and Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guanglei; Sun, Peng; Zhou, Haoyin; Ha, Seongmin; Hartaigh, Briain O; Truong, Quynh A; Min, James K

    2017-02-01

    In clinical cardiology, both anatomy and physiology are needed to diagnose cardiac pathologies. CT imaging and computer simulations provide valuable and complementary data for this purpose. However, it remains challenging to gain useful information from the large amount of high-dimensional diverse data. The current tools are not adequately integrated to visualize anatomic and physiologic data from a complete yet focused perspective. We introduce a new computer-aided diagnosis framework, which allows for comprehensive modeling and visualization of cardiac anatomy and physiology from CT imaging data and computer simulations, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease. The following visual information is presented: (1) Anatomy from CT imaging: geometric modeling and visualization of cardiac anatomy, including four heart chambers, left and right ventricular outflow tracts, and coronary arteries; (2) Function from CT imaging: motion modeling, strain calculation, and visualization of four heart chambers; (3) Physiology from CT imaging: quantification and visualization of myocardial perfusion and contextual integration with coronary artery anatomy; (4) Physiology from computer simulation: computation and visualization of hemodynamics (e.g., coronary blood velocity, pressure, shear stress, and fluid forces on the vessel wall). Substantially, feedback from cardiologists have confirmed the practical utility of integrating these features for the purpose of computer-aided diagnosis of ischemic heart disease.

  14. Comprehensive Modeling and Visualization of Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology from CT Imaging and Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Zhou, Haoyin; Ha, Seongmin; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Truong, Quynh A.; Min, James K.

    2016-01-01

    In clinical cardiology, both anatomy and physiology are needed to diagnose cardiac pathologies. CT imaging and computer simulations provide valuable and complementary data for this purpose. However, it remains challenging to gain useful information from the large amount of high-dimensional diverse data. The current tools are not adequately integrated to visualize anatomic and physiologic data from a complete yet focused perspective. We introduce a new computer-aided diagnosis framework, which allows for comprehensive modeling and visualization of cardiac anatomy and physiology from CT imaging data and computer simulations, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease. The following visual information is presented: (1) Anatomy from CT imaging: geometric modeling and visualization of cardiac anatomy, including four heart chambers, left and right ventricular outflow tracts, and coronary arteries; (2) Function from CT imaging: motion modeling, strain calculation, and visualization of four heart chambers; (3) Physiology from CT imaging: quantification and visualization of myocardial perfusion and contextual integration with coronary artery anatomy; (4) Physiology from computer simulation: computation and visualization of hemodynamics (e.g., coronary blood velocity, pressure, shear stress, and fluid forces on the vessel wall). Substantially, feedback from cardiologists have confirmed the practical utility of integrating these features for the purpose of computer-aided diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. PMID:26863663

  15. Light-sheet fluorescence imaging to localize cardiac lineage and protein distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yichen; Lee, Juhyun; Ma, Jianguo; Sung, Kevin; Yokota, Tomohiro; Singh, Neha; Dooraghi, Mojdeh; Abiri, Parinaz; Wang, Yibin; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Nakano, Atsushi; Nguyen, Thao P.; Fei, Peng; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2017-02-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) serves to advance developmental research and regenerative medicine. Coupled with the paralleled advances in fluorescence-friendly tissue clearing technique, our cardiac LSFM enables dual-sided illumination to rapidly uncover the architecture of murine hearts over 10 by 10 by 10 mm3 in volume; thereby allowing for localizing progenitor differentiation to the cardiomyocyte lineage and AAV9-mediated expression of exogenous transmembrane potassium channels with high contrast and resolution. Without the steps of stitching image columns, pivoting the light-sheet and sectioning the heart mechanically, we establish a holistic strategy for 3-dimentional reconstruction of the “digital murine heart” to assess aberrant cardiac structures as well as the spatial distribution of the cardiac lineages in neonates and ion-channels in adults.

  16. Light-sheet fluorescence imaging to localize cardiac lineage and protein distribution

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yichen; Lee, Juhyun; Ma, Jianguo; Sung, Kevin; Yokota, Tomohiro; Singh, Neha; Dooraghi, Mojdeh; Abiri, Parinaz; Wang, Yibin; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Nakano, Atsushi; Nguyen, Thao P.; Fei, Peng; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2017-01-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) serves to advance developmental research and regenerative medicine. Coupled with the paralleled advances in fluorescence-friendly tissue clearing technique, our cardiac LSFM enables dual-sided illumination to rapidly uncover the architecture of murine hearts over 10 by 10 by 10 mm3 in volume; thereby allowing for localizing progenitor differentiation to the cardiomyocyte lineage and AAV9-mediated expression of exogenous transmembrane potassium channels with high contrast and resolution. Without the steps of stitching image columns, pivoting the light-sheet and sectioning the heart mechanically, we establish a holistic strategy for 3-dimentional reconstruction of the “digital murine heart” to assess aberrant cardiac structures as well as the spatial distribution of the cardiac lineages in neonates and ion-channels in adults. PMID:28165052

  17. Gated cardiac magnetic resonance structural imaging: optimization by electronic axial rotation.

    PubMed

    Feiglin, D H; George, C R; MacIntyre, W J; O'Donnell, J K; Go, R T; Pavlicek, W; Meaney, T F

    1985-01-01

    Most magnetic resonance imaging has used body orthogonal axes with the Z axis placed along the length of the body and the X and Y axes at right angles to the body. This orientation is not optimum for the heart; visualization of sections along the short and long cardiac axes would best define cardiac structural detail and functional status. The new orientation was accomplished by selection of electronic angulation of the magnetic fields for each subject rather than by attempting to approximate the cardiac axes by altering the position of the patient. This technique improved visualization of comparative wall segments, valvular structures, and the true four-chamber view of the heart, and also gave the best visualization of the pericardium. In addition, more accurate estimates of chamber size and myocardial mass can be made from the short-axis orientation, since the sections are orthogonal to the myocardium.

  18. Cardiac Motion Analysis Using High-Speed Video Images in a Rat Model for Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Idaku; Okuda, Toshikazu; Nie, Yuman; Takaki, Takeshi; Orito, Kensuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    In this study, we performed a cardiac motion analysis by using 1000-frames per second (fps) stereo images to capture the three-dimensional motion of small color markers in a rat heart. This method of recording cardiac motion could quantify the rate of change in the myocardial area, which indicated localized myocardial activity of rhythmic expansion and contraction. We analyzed the three-dimensional motion distributions in a rat model for myocardial infarction, in which the heart rate was 4 times/s or more. In the analysis, we spatiotemporally quantified the characteristic cardiac motion in ischemic heart diseases and found that infarction due to ischemia in the rat heart was spread around the left ventricle.

  19. Imaging Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy: Translations to Human Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wendy Y.; Ebert, Antje D.; Narula, Jagat; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy promises to open exciting new options in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Although feasible and clinically safe, the in vivo behavior and integration of stem cell transplants still remain largely unknown. Thus, the development of innovative non-invasive imaging techniques capable of effectively tracking such therapy in vivo is vital for a more in-depth investigation into future clinical applications. Such imaging modalities will not only generate further insight into the mechanisms behind stem cell-based therapy, but also address some major concerns associated with translational cardiovascular stem cell therapy. In the present review, we summarize the principles underlying three major stem cell tracking methods: (1) radioactive labeling for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, (2) iron particle labeling for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (3) reporter gene labeling for bioluminescence, fluorescence, MRI, SPECT, and PET imaging. We then discuss recent clinical studies that have utilized these modalities to gain biological insights into stem cell fate. PMID:21538182

  20. Imaging cardiac stem cell therapy: translations to human clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wendy Y; Ebert, Antje D; Narula, Jagat; Wu, Joseph C

    2011-08-01

    Stem cell therapy promises to open exciting new options in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Although feasible and clinically safe, the in vivo behavior and integration of stem cell transplants still remain largely unknown. Thus, the development of innovative non-invasive imaging techniques capable of effectively tracking such therapy in vivo is vital for a more in-depth investigation into future clinical applications. Such imaging modalities will not only generate further insight into the mechanisms behind stem cell-based therapy, but also address some major concerns associated with translational cardiovascular stem cell therapy. In the present review, we summarize the principles underlying three major stem cell tracking methods: (1) radioactive labeling for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, (2) iron particle labeling for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (3) reporter gene labeling for bioluminescence, fluorescence, MRI, SPECT, and PET imaging. We then discuss recent clinical studies that have utilized these modalities to gain biological insights into stem cell fate.

  1. Diagnostic and Prognostic Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Light-Chain Cardiac Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruberg, Frederick L.; Appelbaum, Evan; Davidoff, Ravin; Ozonoff, Al; Kissinger, Kraig V.; Harrigan, Caitlin; Skinner, Martha; Manning, Warren J.

    2009-01-01

    While the presence of abnormal late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in cardiac amyloidosis has been well established, its prognostic implication and utility to identify cardiac involvement in patients with systemic amyloidosis is unknown. We sought to assess the diagnostic and prognostic significance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in patients with light chain (AL) amyloidosis but unknown cardiac involvement. CMR with LGE was performed in 28 patients with systemic amyloidosis. The presence of cardiac amyloidosis was determined by a separate clinical evaluation. The performance of LGE for the prediction of cardiac amyloidosis and prognostic implications of LGE were determined. LGE was observed in 19 (68%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of LGE for the identification of clinical cardiac involvement was 86%, 86%, 95%, and 67% respectively. During a median follow-up of 29 months, there were 5 deaths (82% survival). LGE itself did not predict survival (p=0.62). LGE volume positively correlated to serum level of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (R=0.64, p≤0.001) and in multivariable analysis, LGE volume proved the strongest independent predictor of BNP. BNP was correlated to New York Heart Association class (p=0.03). Reduced right ventricular end-diastolic volume (p < 0.01) and stroke volume (p = 0.02) were associated with mortality. In conclusion, in patients with systemic amyloidosis, LGE is highly sensitive and specific for the identification of cardiac involvement, but does not predict survival. LGE does correlate strongly to heart failure severity as assessed by BNP. PMID:19195518

  2. Analysis of Two-Dimensional Ultrasound Cardiac Strain Imaging using Joint Probability Density Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound frame rates play a key role for accurate cardiac deformation tracking. Insufficient frame rates lead to an increase in signal decorrelation artifacts; resulting in erroneous displacement and strain estimation. Joint probability density distributions generated from estimated axial strain and its associated signal-to-noise ratio provide a useful approach to assess the minimum frame rate requirements. Previous reports have demonstrated that bimodal distributions in the joint probability density indicate inaccurate strain estimation over a cardiac cycle. In this study, we utilize similar analysis to evaluate a two-dimensional multi-level displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithm for cardiac strain imaging. The impact of different frame rates, final kernel dimensions, and a comparison of radiofrequency and envelope based processing are evaluated using echo signals derived from a three-dimensional finite element cardiac model and 5 healthy volunteers. Cardiac simulation model analysis demonstrate that the minimum frame rates required to obtain accurate joint probability distributions for the signal to noise ratio and strain, for a final kernel dimension of 1 λ by 3 A-lines, was around 42 Hz for radiofrequency signals. On the other hand, even a frame rate of 250Hz with envelope signals did not replicate the ideal joint probability distribution. For the volunteer study, clinical data was acquired only at a 34 Hz frame rate which appears to be sufficient for radiofrequency analysis. We also show that an increase in the final kernel dimensions significantly impact the strain probability distribution and joint probability density function generated; with a smaller impact on the variation in the accumulated mean strain estimated over a cardiac cycle. Our results demonstrate that radiofrequency frame rates currently achievable on clinical cardiac ultrasound systems are sufficient for accurate analysis of the strain probability distribution, when a multi

  3. The influence of patient size on dose conversion coefficients: a hybrid phantom study for adult cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Lee, Choonsik; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2009-06-01

    In this study, the influence of patient size on organ and effective dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) was investigated for a representative interventional fluoroscopic procedure—cardiac catheterization. The study was performed using hybrid phantoms representing an underweight, average and overweight American adult male. Reference body sizes were determined using the NHANES III database and parameterized based on standing height and total body mass. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients were calculated for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left anterior oblique and right anterior oblique projections using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.5.0 with the metric dose area product being used as the normalization factor. Results show body size to have a clear influence on DCCs which increased noticeably when body size decreased. It was also shown that if patient size is neglected when choosing a DCC, the organ and effective dose will be underestimated to an underweight patient and will be overestimated to an underweight patient, with errors as large as 113% for certain projections. Results were further compared with those published for a KTMAN-2 Korean patient-specific tomographic phantom. The published DCCs aligned best with the hybrid phantom which most closely matched in overall body size. These results highlighted the need for and the advantages of phantom-patient matching, and it is recommended that hybrid phantoms be used to create a more diverse library of patient-dependent anthropomorphic phantoms for medical dose reconstruction.

  4. An efficient method for accurate segmentation of LV in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana K., Venkata; Mitra, Abhishek; Srikrishnan, V.; Jo, Hyun Hee; Bidesi, Anup

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images is a challenging task because of high variability in the image intensity. This is due to a) wash-in and wash-out of the contrast agent over time and b) poor contrast around the epicardium (outer wall) region. Current approaches for segmentation of the endocardium (inner wall) usually involve application of a threshold within the region of interest, followed by refinement techniques like active contours. A limitation of this method is under-segmentation of the inner wall because of gradual loss of contrast at the wall boundary. On the other hand, the challenge in outer wall segmentation is the lack of reliable boundaries because of poor contrast. There are four main contributions in this paper to address the aforementioned issues. First, a seed image is selected using variance based approach on 4D time-frame images over which initial endocardium and epicardium is segmented. Secondly, we propose a patch based feature which overcomes the problem of gradual contrast loss for LV endocardium segmentation. Third, we propose a novel Iterative-Edge-Refinement (IER) technique for epicardium segmentation. Fourth, we propose a greedy search algorithm for propagating the initial contour segmented on seed-image across other time frame images. We have experimented our technique on five contrast-enhanced cardiac MR Datasets (4D) having a total of 1097 images. The segmentation results for all 1097 images have been visually inspected by a clinical expert and have shown good accuracy.

  5. Automatic identification of ROI in figure images toward improving hybrid (text and image) biomedical document retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Daekeun; Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Rahman, Md Mahmudur; Govindaraju, Venu; Thoma, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical images are often referenced for clinical decision support (CDS), educational purposes, and research. They appear in specialized databases or in biomedical publications and are not meaningfully retrievable using primarily textbased retrieval systems. The task of automatically finding the images in an article that are most useful for the purpose of determining relevance to a clinical situation is quite challenging. An approach is to automatically annotate images extracted from scientific publications with respect to their usefulness for CDS. As an important step toward achieving the goal, we proposed figure image analysis for localizing pointers (arrows, symbols) to extract regions of interest (ROI) that can then be used to obtain meaningful local image content. Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) techniques can then associate local image ROIs with identified biomedical concepts in figure captions for improved hybrid (text and image) retrieval of biomedical articles. In this work we present methods that make robust our previous Markov random field (MRF)-based approach for pointer recognition and ROI extraction. These include use of Active Shape Models (ASM) to overcome problems in recognizing distorted pointer shapes and a region segmentation method for ROI extraction. We measure the performance of our methods on two criteria: (i) effectiveness in recognizing pointers in images, and (ii) improved document retrieval through use of extracted ROIs. Evaluation on three test sets shows 87% accuracy in the first criterion. Further, the quality of document retrieval using local visual features and text is shown to be better than using visual features alone.

  6. Hybrid Imaging for Extended Depth of Field Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahreddine, Ramzi Nicholas

    An inverse relationship exists in optical systems between the depth of field (DOF) and the minimum resolvable feature size. This trade-off is especially detrimental in high numerical aperture microscopy systems where resolution is pushed to the diffraction limit resulting in a DOF on the order of 500 nm. Many biological structures and processes of interest span over micron scales resulting in significant blurring during imaging. This thesis explores a two-step computational imaging technique known as hybrid imaging to create extended DOF (EDF) microscopy systems with minimal sacrifice in resolution. In the first step a mask is inserted at the pupil plane of the microscope to create a focus invariant system over 10 times the traditional DOF, albeit with reduced contrast. In the second step the contrast is restored via deconvolution. Several EDF pupil masks from the literature are quantitatively compared in the context of biological microscopy. From this analysis a new mask is proposed, the incoherently partitioned pupil with binary phase modulation (IPP-BPM), that combines the most advantageous properties from the literature. Total variation regularized deconvolution models are derived for the various noise conditions and detectors commonly used in biological microscopy. State of the art algorithms for efficiently solving the deconvolution problem are analyzed for speed, accuracy, and ease of use. The IPP-BPM mask is compared with the literature and shown to have the highest signal-to-noise ratio and lowest mean square error post-processing. A prototype of the IPP-BPM mask is fabricated using a combination of 3D femtosecond glass etching and standard lithography techniques. The mask is compared against theory and demonstrated in biological imaging applications.

  7. In vivo imaging of cardiac development and function in zebrafish using light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Detailed studies of heart development and function are crucial for our understanding of cardiac failures and pave the way for better diagnostics and treatment. However, the constant motion and close incorporation into the cardiovascular system prevent in vivo studies of the living, unperturbed heart. The complementary strengths of the zebrafish model and light sheet microscopy provide a useful platform to fill this gap. High-resolution images of the embryonic vertebrate heart are now recorded from within the living animal: deep inside the unperturbed heart we can follow cardiac contractions and measure action potentials and calcium transients. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the entire beating heart with cellular resolution give new insights into its ever-changing morphology and facilitate studies into how individual cells form the complex cardiac network. In addition, cardiac dynamics and robustness are now examined with targeted optical manipulation. Overall, the combination of zebrafish and light sheet microscopy represents a promising addition for cardiac research and opens the door to a better understanding of heart function and development.

  8. Modeling and imaging cardiac sympathetic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Joers, Valerie; Emborg, Marina E

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently recognized as a multisystem disorder affecting several components of the central and peripheral nervous system. This new understanding of PD helps explain the complexity of the patients’ symptoms while challenges researchers to identify new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Cardiac neurodegeneration and dysautonomia affect PD patients and are associated with orthostatic hypotension, fatigue, and abnormal control of electrical heart activity. They can seriously impact daily life of PD patients, as these symptoms do not respond to classical anti-parkinsonian medications and can be worsened by them. New diagnostic tools and therapies aiming to prevent cardiac neurodegeneration and dysautonomia are needed. In this manuscript we critically review the relationship between the cardiovascular and nervous system in normal and PD conditions, current animal models of cardiac dysautonomia and the application of molecular imaging methods to visualize cardiac neurodegeneration. Our goal is to highlight current progress in the development of tools to understand cardiac neurodegeneration and dysautonomia and monitor the effects of novel therapies aiming for global neuroprotection. PMID:24753981

  9. Cardiac multidetector computed tomography: basic physics of image acquisition and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Bardo, Dianna M E; Brown, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Cardiac MDCT is here to stay. And, it is more than just imaging coronary arteries. Understanding the differences in and the benefits of one CT scanner from another will help you to optimize the capabilities of the scanner, but requires a basic understanding of the MDCT imaging physics.This review provides key information needed to understand the differences in the types of MDCT scanners, from 64 - 320 detectors, flat panels, single and dual source configurations, step and shoot prospective and retrospective gating, and how each factor influences radiation dose, spatial and temporal resolution, and image noise.

  10. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum

  11. Real-time SPARSE-SENSE cardiac cine MR imaging: optimization of image reconstruction and sequence validation.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Bomas, Bettina; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Improved real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequences have currently been introduced, but so far only limited practical experience exists. This study aimed at image reconstruction optimization and clinical validation of a new highly accelerated real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE sequence. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis stacks of a real-time free-breathing SPARSE-SENSE sequence with high spatiotemporal resolution and of a standard segmented cine SSFP sequence were acquired at 1.5 T in 11 volunteers and 15 patients. To determine the optimal iterations, all volunteers' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed using 10-200 iterations, and contrast ratios, image entropies, and reconstruction times were assessed. Subsequently, the patients' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed with the clinically optimal iterations. LV volumetric values were evaluated and compared between both sequences. Sufficient image quality and acceptable reconstruction times were achieved when using 80 iterations. Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression showed good agreement for all volumetric parameters. 80 iterations are recommended for iterative SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction in clinical routine. Real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE yielded comparable volumetric results as the current standard SSFP sequence. Due to its intrinsic low image acquisition times, real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE imaging with iterative image reconstruction seems to be an attractive alternative for LV function analysis. • A highly accelerated real-time CMR sequence using SPARSE-SENSE was evaluated. • SPARSE-SENSE allows free breathing in real-time cardiac cine imaging. • For clinically optimal SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction, 80 iterations are recommended. • Real-time SPARSE-SENSE imaging yielded comparable volumetric results as the reference SSFP sequence. • The fast SPARSE-SENSE sequence is an attractive alternative to standard SSFP sequences.

  12. The Future of Cardiac Imaging: Report of a Think Tank Convened by the American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Berman, Daniel S; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Cohen, Meryl S; Lundbye, Justin B; Patel, Rajan A G; Sengupta, Partho P; Soman, Prem; Weissman, Neil J; Wong, Timothy C

    2016-10-01

    The American College of Cardiology's Executive Committee and Cardiovascular Imaging Section Leadership Council convened a discussion regarding the future of cardiac imaging among thought leaders in the field during a 2 day Think Tank. Participants were charged with thinking broadly about the future of imaging and developing a roadmap to address critical challenges. Key areas of discussion included: 1) how can cardiac imaging services thrive in our new world of value-based health care? 2) Who is the cardiac imager of the future and what is the role of the multimodality imager? 3) How can we nurture innovation and research in imaging? And 4) how can we maximize imaging information and optimize outcomes? This document describes the proceedings of this Think Tank.

  13. Noninvasive computational imaging of cardiac electrophysiology for 3-D infarct.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linwei; Wong, Ken C L; Zhang, Heye; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2011-04-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) creates electrophysiologically altered substrates that are responsible for ventricular arrhythmias, such as tachycardia and fibrillation. The presence, size, location, and composition of infarct scar bear significant prognostic and therapeutic implications for individual subjects. We have developed a statistical physiological model-constrained framework that uses noninvasive body-surface-potential data and tomographic images to estimate subject-specific transmembrane-potential (TMP) dynamics inside the 3-D myocardium. In this paper, we adapt this framework for the purpose of noninvasive imaging, detection, and quantification of 3-D scar mass for postMI patients: the framework requires no prior knowledge of MI and converges to final subject-specific TMP estimates after several passes of estimation with intermediate feedback; based on the primary features of the estimated spatiotemporal TMP dynamics, we provide 3-D imaging of scar tissue and quantitative evaluation of scar location and extent. Phantom experiments were performed on a computational model of realistic heart-torso geometry, considering 87 transmural infarct scars of different sizes and locations inside the myocardium, and 12 compact infarct scars (extent between 10% and 30%) at different transmural depths. Real-data experiments were carried out on BSP and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data from four postMI patients, validated by gold standards and existing results. This framework shows unique advantage of noninvasive, quantitative, computational imaging of subject-specific TMP dynamics and infarct mass of the 3-D myocardium, with the potential to reflect details in the spatial structure and tissue composition/heterogeneity of 3-D infarct scar.

  14. Cardiac imaging of congenital heart diseases during interventional procedures continues to evolve: Pros and cons of the main techniques.

    PubMed

    Hascoët, Sebastien; Warin-Fresse, Karine; Baruteau, Alban-Elouen; Hadeed, Khaled; Karsenty, Clement; Petit, Jérôme; Guérin, Patrice; Fraisse, Alain; Acar, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac catheterization has contributed to the progress made in the management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). First, it allowed clarification of the diagnostic assessment of CHD, by offering a better understanding of normal cardiac physiology and the pathophysiology and anatomy of complex malformations. Then, it became an alternative to surgery and a major component of the therapeutic approach for some CHD lesions. Nowadays, techniques have evolved and cardiac catheterization is widely used to percutaneously close intracardiac shunts, to relieve obstructive valvar or vessel lesions, and for transcatheter valve replacement. Accurate imaging is mandatory to guide these procedures. Cardiac imaging during catheterization of CHD must provide accurate images of lesions, surrounding cardiac structures, medical devices and tools used to deliver them. Cardiac imaging has to be 'real-time' with an excellent temporal resolution to ensure 'eyes-hands' synchronization and 'device-target area' accurate positioning. In this comprehensive review, we provide an overview of conventional cardiac imaging tools used in the catheterization laboratory in daily practice, as well as the effect of recent evolution and future imaging modalities.

  15. Nonuniformity effects in a hybrid platinum silicide imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereniak, E. L.; Perry, D. L.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this project was twofold. The first objective was to characterize the Hughes Aircraft Company CRC-365 platinum silicide imaging device in a staring infrared sensor system. The CRC-365 is a hybrid 256 x 256 IR focal plane array that operates in the 3-5 micrometer thermal infrared band. A complete sensor and computer interface were built for these tests, using plans provided by the Rome Laboratory at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts. Testing of the device revealed largely satisfactory performance, with notable exceptions in the areas of temporal response, temporal noise, and electrical crosstalk. The second objective of this research was to advance the understanding of how detector nonuniformity effects reduce the performance of sensors of this type. Notable accomplishments in this included a complete linear analysis of corrected thermal imaging in platinum silicide sensors, a nonlinear analysis of the CRC-365s expected performance, analysis of its actual performance when operated with nonuniformity correction, and the development of a new figure of merit. It was demonstrated that the CRC-365 is capable of maintaining background-noise-limited performance over at least a 40 K target temperature range, when operated with two-point nonuniformity correction.

  16. Nonuniformity effects in a hybrid platinum silicide imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Perry, David L.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this project was twofold. The first objective was to characterize the Hughes Aircraft Company CRC-365 platinum silicide imaging device in a starting infrared sensor system. The CRC-365 is a hybrid 256 x 256 IR focal plane array that operates in the 3-5 micrometer thermal infrared band. A complete sensor and computer interface were built for these tests, using, plans provided by the Rome Laboratory at Hanscom AFB. Testing of the device revealed largely satisfactory performance, with notable exception in the areas of temporal response, temporal noise, and electrical crosstalk. The second objective of this research was to advance the understanding of how detector nonuniformity effects reduce the performance of sensors of this type. Notable accomplishments in this area included a complete linear analysis of corrected thermal imaging in platinum silicide sensors, a nonlinear analysis of the CRC-365's expected performance, analysis of its actual performance when operated with nonuniformity correction, and the development of a new figure of merit. It was demonstrated that the CRC-365 is capable of maintaining background-noise-limited performance over at least a 40 K target temperature range, when operated with two-point nonuniformity correction.

  17. A Collaborative Resource to Build Consensus for Automated Left Ventricular Segmentation of Cardiac MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Suinesiaputra, Avan; Cowan, Brett R.; Al-Agamy, Ahmed O.; AlAttar, Mustafa A.; Ayache, Nicholas; Fahmy, Ahmed S.; Khalifa, Ayman M.; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Kadish, Alan H.; Lee, Daniel C.; Margeta, Ján; Warfield, Simon K.; Young, Alistair A.

    2013-01-01

    A collaborative framework was initiated to establish a community resource of ground truth segmentations from cardiac MRI. Multi-site, multi-vendor cardiac MRI datasets comprising 95 patients (73 men, 22 women; mean age 62.73 ± 11.24 years) with coronary artery disease and prior myocardial infarction, were randomly selected from data made available by the Cardiac Atlas Project (Fonseca et al., 2011). Three semi- and two fully-automated raters segmented the left ventricular myocardium from short-axis cardiac MR images as part of a challenge introduced at the STACOM 2011 MICCAI workshop (Suinesiaputra et al., 2012). Consensus myocardium images were generated based on the Expectation-Maximization principle implemented by the STAPLE algorithm (Warfield et al., 2004). The mean sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values ranged between 0.63-0.85, 0.60-0.98, 0.56-0.94 and 0.83-0.92, respectively, against the STAPLE consensus. Spatial and temporal agreement varied in different amounts for each rater. STAPLE produced high quality consensus images if the region of interest was limited to the area of discrepancy between raters. To maintain the quality of the consensus, an objective measure based on the candidate automated rater performance distribution is proposed. The consensus segmentation based on a combination of manual and automated raters were more consistent than any particular rater, even those with manual input. The consensus is expected to improve with the addition of new automated contributions. This resource is open for future contributions, and is available as a test bed for the evaluation of new segmentation algorithms, through the Cardiac Atlas Project (www.cardiacatlas.org). PMID:24091241

  18. High-quality anatomical structure enhancement for cardiac image dynamic volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Eagleson, Roy; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2008-03-01

    Dynamic volume rendering of the beating heart is an important element in cardiac disease diagnosis and therapy planning, providing the clinician with insight into the internal cardiac structure and functional behavior. Most clinical applications tend to focus upon a particular set of organ structures, and in the case of cardiac imaging, it would be helpful to embed anatomical features into the dynamic volume that are of particular importance to an intervention. A uniform transfer function (TF), such as is generally employed in volume rendering, cannot effectively isolate such structures because of the lack of spatial information and the small intensity differences between adjacent tissues. Explicit segmentation is a powerful way to approach this problem, which usually yields a single binary mask volume (MV), where a unit value in a voxel within the MV acts as a tag label representing the anatomical structure of interest (ASOI). These labels are used to determine the TF employed to adjust the ASOI display. Traditional approaches for rendering such segmented volumetric datasets usually deliver unsatisfactory results, such as noninteractive rendering speed, low image quality, intermixing artifacts along the rendered subvolume boundaries, and speckle noise. In this paper, we introduce a new "color coding" approach, based on the graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated raycasting algorithm and a pre-integrated voxel classification method, to address this problem. The mask tag labels derived from segmentation are first smoothed with a Gaussian filter, and multiple TFs are designed for each of the MVs and the source cardiac volume respectively, mapping the voxel's intensity to color and opacity at each sampling point along the casting ray. The resultant values are composited together using a boundary color adjustment technique, which acts as "coding" the segmented anatomical structure information into the rendered source volume of the beating heart. Our algorithm

  19. Three-dimensional deformable model for segmentation and tracking of anisotropic cine cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Alok; O'Donnell, Tom; Singh, Ajit

    1994-05-01

    MR imaging is increasingly being used as a method for analyzing and diagnosing cardiac function. Segmentation of heart chambers facilitates volume computation, as well as ventricular motion analysis. Successful techniques have been developed for segmentation of individual 2D slices. However 2D models limit the description of a 3D phenomenon to two dimensions and use only 2D constraints. The resulting model lacks interslice coherency, making interslice interpolation necessary. In addition, the model is more susceptible to corruption due to noise local to one or more slices. We present work towards an approach to segmenting cine MR images using a 3D deformable model with rigid and nonrigid components. Past approaches have used models without rigid components or used isotropic CT data. Our model adaptively subdivides the mesh in response to the forces extracted from image data. Additionally, the local mesh of the model encodes surface orientation to align the model with the desired edge directions, a crucial constraint for distinguishing close anatomical structures. The modified subdivision algorithm preserves orientation of the elements by vertex ordering. We present results of segmenting two multi-slice cardiac MR image series with interslice resolutions of 8 and 4 mm/slice, and intraslice resolution of 1mm/pixel. We also include work in progress on tracking multislice, multiphase cine cardiac MR sequences with 4mm interslice, and 1mm intraslice resolution.

  20. Projection reconstruction balanced fast field echo for interactive real-time cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Schaeffter, T; Weiss, S; Eggers, H; Rasche, V

    2001-12-01

    A balanced fast field echo (FFE) sequence (also referred to as true fast imaging with steady precession (true FISP)), based on projection reconstruction (PR) is evaluated in combination with real-time reconstruction and interactive scanning capabilities for cardiac function studies. Cardiac image sequences obtained with the balanced PR-FFE method are compared with images obtained with a spin-warp (2D Fourier transform (2DFT)) technique. In particular, the representation of motion artifacts in both techniques is investigated. Balanced PR-FFE provides a similar contrast to spin-warp-related techniques, but is less sensitive to motion artifacts. The use of angular undersampling within balanced PR-FFE is examined as a means to increase temporal resolution while causing only minor artifacts. Furthermore, a modification of the profile order allows the reconstruction of PR images at different spatial and temporal resolution levels from the same data. This study shows that balanced PR-FFE is a robust tool for cardiac function studies. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Imaging Techniques in Percutaneous Cardiac Structural Interventions: Atrial Septal Defect Closure and Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Fernández, Antonio; Bethencourt González, Armando

    2016-08-01

    Because of advances in cardiac structural interventional procedures, imaging techniques are playing an increasingly important role. Imaging studies show sufficient anatomic detail of the heart structure to achieve an excellent outcome in interventional procedures. Up to 98% of atrial septal defects at the ostium secundum can be closed successfully with a percutaneous procedure. Candidates for this type of procedure can be identified through a systematic assessment of atrial septum anatomy, locating and measuring the size and shape of all defects, their rims, and the degree and direction of shunting. Three dimensional echocardiography has significantly improved anatomic assessments and the end result itself. In the future, when combined with other imaging techniques such as cardiac computed tomography and fluoroscopy, 3-dimensional echocardiography will be particularly useful for procedure guidance. Percutaneous closure of the left atrial appendage offers an alternative for treating patients with atrial fibrillation and contraindication for oral anticoagulants. In the future, the clinical focus may well turn to stroke prevention in selected patients. Percutaneous closure is effective and safe; device implantation is successful in 94% to 99% of procedures. However, the procedure requires an experienced cardiac structural interventional team. At present, 3-dimensional echocardiography is the most appropriate imaging technique to assess anatomy suitability, select device type and size, guide the procedure alongside fluoroscopy, and to follow-up the patient afterwards.

  2. Fully automated segmentation of left ventricle using dual dynamic programming in cardiac cine MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Luan; Ling, Shan; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are becoming a leading cause of death all over the world. The cardiac function could be evaluated by global and regional parameters of left ventricle (LV) of the heart. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for segmentation of LV in short axis cardiac cine MR images. Our fully automated method consists of three major steps, i.e., LV localization, LV segmentation at end-diastolic phase, and LV segmentation propagation to the other phases. First, the maximum intensity projection image along the time phases of the midventricular slice, located at the center of the image, was calculated to locate the region of interest of LV. Based on the mean intensity of the roughly segmented blood pool in the midventricular slice at each phase, end-diastolic (ED) and end-systolic (ES) phases were determined. Second, the endocardial and epicardial boundaries of LV of each slice at ED phase were synchronously delineated by use of a dual dynamic programming technique. The external costs of the endocardial and epicardial boundaries were defined with the gradient values obtained from the original and enhanced images, respectively. Finally, with the advantages of the continuity of the boundaries of LV across adjacent phases, we propagated the LV segmentation from the ED phase to the other phases by use of dual dynamic programming technique. The preliminary results on 9 clinical cardiac cine MR cases show that the proposed method can obtain accurate segmentation of LV based on subjective evaluation.

  3. Neonatal cardiac MRI using prolonged balanced SSFP imaging at 3T with active frequency stabilization.

    PubMed

    Price, Anthony N; Malik, Shaihan J; Broadhouse, Kathryn M; Finnemore, Anna E; Durighel, Giuliana; Cox, David J; Edwards, A David; Groves, Alan M; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2013-09-01

    Cardiac MRI in neonates holds promise as a tool that can provide detailed functional information in this vulnerable group. However, their small size, rapid heart rate, and inability to breath-hold, pose particular challenges that require prolonged high-contrast and high-SNR methods. Balanced-steady state free precession (SSFP) offers high SNR efficiency and excellent contrast, but is vulnerable to off-resonance effects that cause banding artifacts. This is particularly problematic in the blood-pool, where off-resonance flow artifacts severely degrade image quality. In this article, we explore active frequency stabilization, combined with image-based shimming, to achieve prolonged SSFP imaging free of banding artifacts. The method was tested using 2D multislice SSFP cine acquisitions on 18 preterm infants, and the functional measures derived were validated against phase-contrast flow assessment. Significant drifts in the resonant frequency (165 ± 23Hz) were observed during 10-min SSFP examinations. However, full short-axis stacks free of banding artifacts were achieved in 16 subjects with stabilization; the cardiac output obtained revealed a mean difference of 9.0 ± 8.5% compared to phase-contrast flow measurements. Active frequency stabilization has enabled the use of prolonged SSFP acquisitions for neonatal cardiac imaging at 3T. The findings presented could have broader implications for other applications using prolong SSFP acquisitions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Lp-Norm Regularization in Volumetric Imaging of Cardiac Current Sources

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Azar; Xu, Jingjia; Wang, Linwei

    2013-01-01

    Advances in computer vision have substantially improved our ability to analyze the structure and mechanics of the heart. In comparison, our ability to observe and analyze cardiac electrical activities is much limited. The progress to computationally reconstruct cardiac current sources from noninvasive voltage data sensed on the body surface has been hindered by the ill-posedness and the lack of a unique solution of the reconstruction problem. Common L2- and L1-norm regularizations tend to produce a solution that is either too diffused or too scattered to reflect the complex spatial structure of current source distribution in the heart. In this work, we propose a general regularization with Lp-norm (1 < p < 2) constraint to bridge the gap and balance between an overly smeared and overly focal solution in cardiac source reconstruction. In a set of phantom experiments, we demonstrate the superiority of the proposed Lp-norm method over its L1 and L2 counterparts in imaging cardiac current sources with increasing extents. Through computer-simulated and real-data experiments, we further demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method in imaging the complex structure of excitation wavefront, as well as current sources distributed along the postinfarction scar border. This ability to preserve the spatial structure of source distribution is important for revealing the potential disruption to the normal heart excitation. PMID:24348735

  5. Current artefacts in cardiac and chest magnetic resonance imaging: tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    Alfudhili, Khalid; Masci, Pier G; Delacoste, Jean; Ledoux, Jean-B; Berchier, Grégoire; Dunet, Vincent; Qanadli, Salah D; Schwitter, Juerg; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Currently MRI is extensively used for the evaluation of cardiovascular and thoracic disorders because of the well-established advantages that include use of non-ionizing radiation, good contrast and high spatial resolution. Despite the advantages of this technique, numerous categories of artefacts are frequently encountered. They may be related to the scanner hardware or software functionalities, environmental factors or the human body itself. In particular, some artefacts may be exacerbated with high-field-strength MR machines (e.g. 3 T). Cardiac imaging poses specific challenges with respect to breath-holding and cardiac motion. In addition, new cardiac MR-conditional devices may also be responsible for peculiar artefacts. The image quality may thus be impaired and give rise to a misdiagnosis. Knowledge of acquisition and reconstruction techniques is required to understand and recognize the nature of these artefacts. This article will focus on the origin and appearance of the most common artefacts encountered in cardiac and chest MRI along with possible correcting methods to avoid or reduce them.

  6. Estimating cardiac fiber orientations in pig hearts using registered ultrasound and MR image volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormer, James D.; Meng, Yuguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Rong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2017-03-01

    Heart fiber mechanics can be important predictors in current and future cardiac function. Accurate knowledge of these mechanics could enable cardiologists to provide a diagnosis before conditions progress. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) has been used to determine cardiac fiber orientations. Ultrasound is capable of providing anatomical information in real time, enabling a physician to quickly adjust parameters to optimize image scans. If known fiber orientations from a template heart measured using DTI can be accurately deformed onto a cardiac ultrasound volume, fiber orientations could be estimated for the patient without the need for a costly MR scan while still providing cardiologists valuable information about the heart mechanics. In this study, we apply the method to pig hearts, which are a close representation of human heart anatomy. Experiments from pig hearts show that the registration method achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.819 +/- 0.050 between the ultrasound and deformed MR volumes and that the proposed ultrasound-based method is able to estimate the cardiac fiber orientation in pig hearts.

  7. Determination of cardiac risk by dipyridamole-thallium imaging before peripheral vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, C.A.; Brewster, D.C.; Darling, R.C.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1985-02-14

    To evaluate the severity of coronary artery disease in patients with severe peripheral vascular disease requiring surgery, preoperative dipyridamole-thallium imaging was performed in 54 stable patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Of the 54 patients, 48 had peripheral vascular surgery as scheduled without coronary angiography, of whom 8 (17 per cent) had postoperative cardiac ischemic events. The occurrence of these eight cardiac events could not have been predicted preoperatively by any clinical factors but did correlate with the presence of thallium redistribution. Eight of 16 patients with thallium redistribution had cardiac events, whereas there were no such events in 32 patients whose thallium scan either was normal or showed only persistent defects (P less than 0.0001). Six other patients also had thallium redistribution but underwent coronary angiography before vascular surgery. All had severe multivessel coronary artery disease, and four underwent coronary bypass surgery followed by uncomplicated peripheral vascular surgery. These data suggest that patients without thallium redistribution are at a low risk for postoperative ischemic events and may proceed to have vascular surgery. Patients with redistribution have a high incidence of postoperative ischemic events and should be considered for preoperative coronary angiography and myocardial revascularization in an effort to avoid postoperative myocardial ischemia and to improve survival. Dipyridamole-thallium imaging is superior to clinical assessment and is safer and less expensive than coronary angiography for the determination of cardiac risk.

  8. Cardiac sympathetic nervous system imaging with (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine: Perspectives from Japan and Europe.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Scholte, Arthur J H A; Nakata, Tomoaki; Dimitriu-Leen, Aukelien C; Chikamori, Taishiro; Vitola, João V; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro

    2017-03-13

    Cardiac sympathetic nervous system dysfunction is closely associated with risk of serious cardiac events in patients with heart failure (HF), including HF progression, pump-failure death, and sudden cardiac death by lethal ventricular arrhythmia. For cardiac sympathetic nervous system imaging, (123)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) was approved by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in 1992 and has therefore been widely used since in clinical settings. (123)I-MIBG was also later approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States of America (USA) and it was expected to achieve broad acceptance. In Europe, (123)I-MIBG is currently used only for clinical research. This review article is based on a joint symposium of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Cardiology (JSNC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), which was held in the annual meeting of JSNC in July 2016. JSNC members and a member of ASNC discussed the standardization of (123)I-MIBG parameters, and clinical aspects of (123)I-MIBG with a view to further promoting (123)I-MIBG imaging in Asia, the USA, Europe, and the rest of the world.

  9. Dual-Enzyme-Loaded Multifunctional Hybrid Nanogel System for Pathological Responsive Ultrasound Imaging and T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Niu, Dechao; Li, Pei; Wu, Qing; Bo, Xiaowan; Liu, Boji; Bao, Song; Su, Teng; Xu, Huixiong; Wang, Qigang

    2015-06-23

    A dual-enzyme-loaded multifunctional hybrid nanogel probe (SPIO@GCS/acryl/biotin-CAT/SOD-gel, or SGC) has been developed for dual-modality pathological responsive ultrasound (US) imaging and enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This probe is composed of functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles, a dual enzyme species (catalase and superoxide dismutase), and a polysaccharide cationic polymer glycol chitosan gel. The dual-modality US/MR imaging capabilities of the hybrid nanogel for responsive US imaging and enhanced T2-weighted MR imaging have been evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. These results show that the hybrid nanogel SGC can exhibit efficient dual-enzyme biocatalysis with pathological species for responsive US imaging. SGC also demonstrates increased accumulation in acidic environments for enhanced T2-weighted MR imaging. Further research on these nanogel systems may lead to the development of more efficient US/MR contrast agents.

  10. Image artefact propagation in motion estimation and reconstruction in interventional cardiac C-arm CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Maier, A. K.; Schwemmer, C.; Lauritsch, G.; De Buck, S.; Wielandts, J.-Y.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of data for cardiac imaging using a C-arm computed tomography system requires several seconds and multiple heartbeats. Hence, incorporation of motion correction in the reconstruction step may improve the resulting image quality. Cardiac motion can be estimated by deformable three-dimensional (3D)/3D registration performed on initial 3D images of different heart phases. This motion information can be used for a motion-compensated reconstruction allowing the use of all acquired data for image reconstruction. However, the result of the registration procedure and hence the estimated deformations are influenced by the quality of the initial 3D images. In this paper, the sensitivity of the 3D/3D registration step to the image quality of the initial images is studied. Different reconstruction algorithms are evaluated for a recently proposed cardiac C-arm CT acquisition protocol. The initial 3D images are all based on retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated data. ECG-gating of data from a single C-arm rotation provides only a few projections per heart phase for image reconstruction. This view sparsity leads to prominent streak artefacts and a poor signal to noise ratio. Five different initial image reconstructions are evaluated: (1) cone beam filtered-backprojection (FDK), (2) cone beam filtered-backprojection and an additional bilateral filter (FFDK), (3) removal of the shadow of dense objects (catheter, pacing electrode, etc) before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection (cathFDK), (4) removal of the shadow of dense objects before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection and a bilateral filter (cathFFDK). The last method (5) is an iterative few-view reconstruction (FV), the prior image constrained compressed sensing combined with the improved total variation algorithm. All reconstructions are investigated with respect to the final motion-compensated reconstruction quality. The algorithms were tested on a mathematical

  11. Motion correction based reconstruction method for compressively sampled cardiac MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdul Haseeb; Qureshi, Ijaz M; Shah, Jawad Ali; Zaheer, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    Respiratory motion during Magnetic Resonance (MR) acquisition causes strong blurring artifacts in the reconstructed images. These artifacts become more pronounced when used with the fast imaging reconstruction techniques like compressed sensing (CS). Recently, an MR reconstruction technique has been done with the help of compressed sensing (CS), to provide good quality sparse images from the highly under-sampled k-space data. In order to maximize the benefits of CS, it is obvious to use CS with the motion corrected samples. In this paper, we propose a novel CS based motion corrected image reconstruction technique. First, k-space data have been assigned to different respiratory state with the help of frequency domain phase correlation method. Then, multiple sparsity constraints has been used to provide good quality reconstructed cardiac cine images with the highly under-sampled k-space data. The proposed method exploits the multiple sparsity constraints, in combination with demon based registration technique and a novel reconstruction technique to provide the final motion free images. The proposed method is very simple to implement in clinical settings as compared to existing motion corrected methods. The performance of the proposed method is examined using simulated data and clinical data. Results show that this method performs better than the reconstruction of CS based method of cardiac cine images. Different acceleration rates have been used to show the performance of the proposed method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and implementation of a high-performance, cardiac-gated dual-energy imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkumat, N. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Dhanantwari, A. C.; Williams, D. B.; Richard, S.; Tward, D. J.; Paul, N. S.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2007-03-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the superposition of anatomical clutter in a projection radiograph poses a major impediment to the detectability of subtle lung nodules. Through decomposition of projections acquired at multiple kVp, dual-energy (DE) imaging offers to dramatically improve lung nodule detectability and, in part through quantitation of nodule calcification, increase specificity in nodule characterization. The development of a high-performance DE chest imaging system is reported, with design and implementation guided by fundamental imaging performance metrics. A diagnostic chest stand (Kodak RVG 5100 digital radiography system) provided the basic platform, modified to include: (i) a filter wheel, (ii) a flat-panel detector (Trixell Pixium 4600), (iii) a computer control and monitoring system for cardiac-gated acquisition, and (iv) DE image decomposition and display. Computational and experimental studies of imaging performance guided optimization of key acquisition technique parameters, including: x-ray filtration, allocation of dose between low- and high-energy projections, and kVp selection. A system for cardiac-gated acquisition was developed, directing x-ray exposures to within the quiescent period of the heart cycle, thereby minimizing anatomical misregistration. A research protocol including 200 patients imaged following lung nodule biopsy is underway, allowing preclinical evaluation of DE imaging performance relative to conventional radiography and low-dose CT.

  13. Sustained co-delivery of BIO and IGF-1 by a novel hybrid hydrogel system to stimulate endogenous cardiac repair in myocardial infarcted rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Rui; Qiao, Shupei; Liu, Yi; Meng, Qingyuan; Chen, Xiongbiao; Song, Bing; Hou, Xiaolu; Tian, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation and proliferation of endogenous cardiomyocytes in situ can effectively improve cardiac repair following myocardial infarction (MI). 6-Bromoindirubin-3-oxime (BIO) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are two potent factors that promote cardiomyocyte survival and proliferation. However, their delivery for sustained release in MI-affected areas has proved to be challenging. In the current research, we present a study on the sustained co-delivery of BIO and IGF-1 in a hybrid hydrogel system to simulate endogenous cardiac repair in an MI rat model. Both BIO and IGF-1 were efficiently encapsulated in gelatin nanoparticles, which were later cross-linked with the oxidized alginate to form a novel hybrid hydrogel system. The in vivo results indicated that the hybrid system could enhance the proliferation of cardiomyocytes in situ and could promote revascularization around the MI sites, allowing improved cardiac function. Taken together, we concluded that the hybrid hydrogel system can co-deliver BIO and IGF-1 to areas of MI and thus improve cardiac function by promoting the proliferation of cardiomyocytes and revascularization. PMID:26251592

  14. Sustained co-delivery of BIO and IGF-1 by a novel hybrid hydrogel system to stimulate endogenous cardiac repair in myocardial infarcted rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Fang, Rui; Qiao, Shupei; Liu, Yi; Meng, Qingyuan; Chen, Xiongbiao; Song, Bing; Hou, Xiaolu; Tian, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Dedifferentiation and proliferation of endogenous cardiomyocytes in situ can effectively improve cardiac repair following myocardial infarction (MI). 6-Bromoindirubin-3-oxime (BIO) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are two potent factors that promote cardiomyocyte survival and proliferation. However, their delivery for sustained release in MI-affected areas has proved to be challenging. In the current research, we present a study on the sustained co-delivery of BIO and IGF-1 in a hybrid hydrogel system to simulate endogenous cardiac repair in an MI rat model. Both BIO and IGF-1 were efficiently encapsulated in gelatin nanoparticles, which were later cross-linked with the oxidized alginate to form a novel hybrid hydrogel system. The in vivo results indicated that the hybrid system could enhance the proliferation of cardiomyocytes in situ and could promote revascularization around the MI sites, allowing improved cardiac function. Taken together, we concluded that the hybrid hydrogel system can co-deliver BIO and IGF-1 to areas of MI and thus improve cardiac function by promoting the proliferation of cardiomyocytes and revascularization.

  15. Nuclear cardiac imaging for the assessment of myocardial viability

    PubMed Central

    Slart, R.H.J.A.; Bax, J.J.; van der Wall, E.E.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Jager, P.L.; Dierckx, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    An important aspect of the diagnostic and prognostic work-up of patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy is the assessment of myocardial viability. Patients with left ventricular dysfunction who have viable myocardium are the patients at highest risk because of the potential for ischaemia but at the same time benefit most from revascularisation. It is important to identify viable myocardium in these patients, and radionuclide myocardial scintigraphy is an excellent tool for this. Single-photon emission computed tomography perfusion scintigraphy (SPECT), whether using 201thallium, 99mTc-sestamibi, or 99mTc- tetrofosmin, in stress and/or rest protocols, has consistently been shown to be an effective modality for identifying myocardial viability and guiding appropriate management. Metabolic and perfusion imaging with positron emission tomography radiotracers frequently adds additional information and is a powerful tool for predicting which patients will have an improved outcome from revascularisation. New techniques in the nuclear cardiology field, such as attenuation corrected SPECT, dual isotope simultaneous acquisition (DISA) SPECT and gated FDG PET are promising and will further improve the detection of myocardial viability. Also the combination of multislice computed tomography scanners with PET opens possibilities of adding coronary calcium scoring and noninvasive coronary angiography to myocardial perfusion imaging and quantification. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:25696432

  16. Intraoperative IR imaging in the cardiac operating room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Tamas; Fazekas, Levente; Horkay, Ferenc; Geller, Laslu; Gyongy, Tibor; Juhasz-Nagy, Alexander

    1999-07-01

    The high blood flow rate and the considerable metabolic activity render the myocardium a possible candidate for IR imaging. The study was aimed to test cardiothermography in evaluating arterial bypass graft patency and in assessing myocardial protection during open-heart surgery. Ten patients underwent arterial bypass grafting. Thermograms were obtained immediately before and after opening the grafts. As the bypasses were opened in hypothermia the warmer blood coming from the extracorporeal circulation readily delineated graft and coronary anatomy. By the end of the 5 min observation period, the revascularized area exhibited a temperature increase of 5.9 +/- 0.7 degrees C. The affectivity of antegrade cardioplegia was monitored in 38 patients undergoing either valve implantations or aorto- coronary bypass surgery. Thermographic imags were taken after sternotomy, before aortic cross-clamping and after administrating the 4 degrees C cardioplegic solution. Most of the patients displayed adequate myocardial cooling, moreover the bypass-group exhibited a more profound temperature-decrease. In conclusion, cardiothermography can visualize arterial grafts, recipient coronaries and collaterals seconds after opening by bypass, thus it properly evaluated arterial bypass graft patency. The obtained images could easily be analyzed for qualitative flow- and quantitative temperature changes. Myocardial protection could also be safely assessed with thermography.

  17. Kalman filter techniques for accelerated Cartesian dynamic cardiac imaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Salerno, Michael; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic MRI, spatial and temporal parallel imaging can be exploited to reduce scan time. Real-time reconstruction enables immediate visualization during the scan. Commonly used view-sharing techniques suffer from limited temporal resolution, and many of the more advanced reconstruction methods are either retrospective, time-consuming, or both. A Kalman filter model capable of real-time reconstruction can be used to increase the spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic MRI reconstruction. The original study describing the use of the Kalman filter in dynamic MRI was limited to non-Cartesian trajectories because of a limitation intrinsic to the dynamic model used in that study. Here the limitation is overcome, and the model is applied to the more commonly used Cartesian trajectory with fast reconstruction. Furthermore, a combination of the Kalman filter model with Cartesian parallel imaging is presented to further increase the spatial and temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations and experiments were conducted to demonstrate that the Kalman filter model can increase the temporal resolution of the image series compared with view-sharing techniques and decrease the spatial aliasing compared with TGRAPPA. The method requires relatively little computation, and thus is suitable for real-time reconstruction.

  18. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predictors of Short-Term Outcomes after High Risk Coronary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Mohammed J; Mouline, Omar; Hsu, Chijen; Grieve, Stuart M; Wilson, Michael K; Bannon, Paul G; Vallely, Michael P; Puranik, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    The euroSCORE II is a widely used pre-coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CAGS) risk score, but its predictive power lacks the specificity to predict outcomes in high-risk patients (cardiac surgery case mix, revascularisation techniques and related outcomes in recent years. We investigated the utility of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) in predicting immediate and six-week outcomes after CAGS. Fifty-two consecutive patients with high euroSCORE II (>16) and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (<40%) based on 2D-echocardiography who underwent CAGS and in whom CMRI (1.5T) was performed preoperatively were retrospectively studied. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging parameters were assessed in patients who either had complications immediately post-surgery (n=35), six weeks post-surgery (n=20) or were uncomplicated. The average age of patients recruited was 69±5 years with high euroSCORE II (22±4) and low 2D-echocardiography LV ejection fraction (38%±2%). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging results demonstrated that those with immediate complications had higher LV scar/infarct burden as a proportion of LV mass (17±3% vs 10±3%; p=0.04) with lower circumferential relaxation index (2.5±0.46 vs 2.8±0.56; p=0.05) compared to those with no complications. Early mortality from surgery was 17% (n=9) and was associated with lower RV stroke volume (55±12 vs 68±18; p=0.03) and higher LV infarct scar/burden (18±2% vs 10±2%, p=0.04). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showed patients with complications at six weeks post-surgery had higher LV scar/infarct burden (14.5±2% vs 6.8±2%, p=0.03) compared to those without complications. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging preoperative LV and RV parameters are valuable in assessing the likelihood of successful outcomes from CAGS in high-risk patients with LV dysfunction. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. NEMA image quality phantom measurements and attenuation correction in integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Susanne; Jakoby, Bjoern W; Braun, Harald; Paulus, Daniel H; Quick, Harald H

    2015-12-01

    In integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging the evaluation of PET performance characteristics according to the NEMA standard NU 2-2007 is challenging because of incomplete MR-based attenuation correction (AC) for phantom imaging. In this study, a strategy for CT-based AC of the NEMA image quality (IQ) phantom is assessed. The method is systematically evaluated in NEMA IQ phantom measurements on an integrated PET/MR system. NEMA IQ measurements were performed on the integrated 3.0 Tesla PET/MR hybrid system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). AC of the NEMA IQ phantom was realized by an MR-based and by a CT-based method. The suggested CT-based AC uses a template μ-map of the NEMA IQ phantom and a phantom holder for exact repositioning of the phantom on the systems patient table. The PET image quality parameters contrast recovery, background variability, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were determined and compared for both phantom AC methods. Reconstruction parameters of an iterative 3D OP-OSEM reconstruction were optimized for highest lesion SNR in NEMA IQ phantom imaging. Using a CT-based NEMA IQ phantom μ-map on the PET/MR system is straightforward and allowed performing accurate NEMA IQ measurements on the hybrid system. MR-based AC was determined to be insufficient for PET quantification in the tested NEMA IQ phantom because only photon attenuation caused by the MR-visible phantom filling but not the phantom housing is considered. Using the suggested CT-based AC, the highest SNR in this phantom experiment for small lesions (<= 13 mm) was obtained with 3 iterations, 21 subsets and 4 mm Gaussian filtering. This study suggests CT-based AC for the NEMA IQ phantom when performing PET NEMA IQ measurements on an integrated PET/MR hybrid system. The superiority of CT-based AC for this phantom is demonstrated by comparison to measurements using MR-based AC. Furthermore, optimized PET image reconstruction parameters are provided for the highest lesion SNR in NEMA IQ phantom

  20. Cardiac gating with a pulse oximeter for dual-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkumat, N. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Dhanantwari, A. C.; Williams, D. B.; Paul, N. S.; Yorkston, J.; Van Metter, R.

    2008-11-01

    The development and evaluation of a prototype cardiac gating system for double-shot dual-energy (DE) imaging is described. By acquiring both low- and high-kVp images during the resting phase of the cardiac cycle (diastole), heart misalignment between images can be reduced, thereby decreasing the magnitude of cardiac motion artifacts. For this initial implementation, a fingertip pulse oximeter was employed to measure the peripheral pulse waveform ('plethysmogram'), offering potential logistic, cost and workflow advantages compared to an electrocardiogram. A gating method was developed that accommodates temporal delays due to physiological pulse propagation, oximeter waveform processing and the imaging system (software, filter-wheel, anti-scatter Bucky-grid and flat-panel detector). Modeling the diastolic period allowed the calculation of an implemented delay, timp, required to trigger correctly during diastole at any patient heart rate (HR). The model suggests a triggering scheme characterized by two HR regimes, separated by a threshold, HRthresh. For rates at or below HRthresh, sufficient time exists to expose on the same heartbeat as the plethysmogram pulse [timp(HR) = 0]. Above HRthresh, a characteristic timp(HR) delays exposure to the subsequent heartbeat, accounting for all fixed and variable system delays. Performance was evaluated in terms of accuracy and precision of diastole-trigger coincidence and quantitative evaluation of artifact severity in gated and ungated DE images. Initial implementation indicated 85% accuracy in diastole-trigger coincidence. Through the identification of an improved HR estimation method (modified temporal smoothing of the oximeter waveform), trigger accuracy of 100% could be achieved with improved precision. To quantify the effect of the gating system on DE image quality, human observer tests were conducted to measure the magnitude of cardiac artifact under conditions of successful and unsuccessful diastolic gating. Six observers

  1. Murine cardiac images obtained with focusing pinhole SPECT are barely influenced by extra-cardiac activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branderhorst, Woutjan; van der Have, Frans; Vastenhouw, Brendan; Viergever, Max A.; Beekman, Freek J.

    2012-02-01

    Ultra-high-resolution SPECT images can be obtained with focused multipinhole collimators. Here we investigate the influence of unwanted high tracer uptake outside the scan volume on reconstructed tracer distributions inside the scan volume, for 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scanning in mice. Simulated projections of a digital mouse phantom (MOBY) in a focusing multipinhole SPECT system (U-SPECT-II, MILabs, The Netherlands) were generated. With this system differently sized user-defined scan volumes can be selected, by translating the animal in 3D through the focusing collimators. Scan volume selections were set to (i) a minimal volume containing just the heart, acquired without translating the animal during scanning, (ii) a slightly larger scan volume as is typically applied for the heart, requiring only small XYZ translations during scanning, (iii) same as (ii), but extended further transaxially, and (iv) same as (ii), but extended transaxially to cover the full thorax width (gold standard). Despite an overall negative bias that is significant for the minimal scan volume, all selected volumes resulted in visually similar images. Quantitative differences in the reconstructed myocardium between gold standard and the results from the smaller scan volume selections were small; the 17 standardized myocardial segments of a bull's eye plot, normalized to the myocardial mean of the gold standard, deviated on average 6.0%, 2.5% and 1.9% for respectively the minimal, the typical and the extended scan volume, while maximum absolute deviations were respectively 18.6%, 9.0% and 5.2%. Averaged over ten low-count noisy simulations, the mean absolute deviations were respectively 7.9%, 3.2% and 1.9%. In low-count noisy simulations, the mean and maximum absolute deviations for the minimal scan volume could be reduced to respectively 4.2% and 12.5% by performing a short survey scan of the exterior activity and focusing the remaining scan time at the organ of interest. We

  2. Extended Application of the Hybrid Procedure in Neonates with Left-Sided Obstructive Lesions in an Evolving Cardiac Program.

    PubMed

    Taqatqa, Anas; Diab, Karim A; Stuart, Christopher; Fogg, Louis; Ilbawi, Michel; Awad, Sawsan; Caputo, Massimo; Amin, Zahid; Abdulla, Ra-Id; Kenny, Damien; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2016-03-01

    The hybrid approach to management of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) was developed as an alternative to neonatal Norwood surgery, providing a less invasive initial palliation for HLHS. We describe our experience in extending the concept of the hybrid procedure to palliate neonates with anatomically compromised systemic arterial blood flow in a variety of congenital cardiac anomalies and supporting its application as first-line palliation in centers developing their HLHS programs. Retrospective review of patients undergoing therapy for HLHS at a single institution from June 2008 to December 2014 was performed. Subject demographics, clinical and procedural data, along with follow-up, were collected. Thirteen patients had initial hybrid palliation for HLHS during the time frame indicated at a median age of 8 days (range 1-29 days) and median weight of 3.4 kg (range 2.4-4.6 kg). Diagnoses included typical HLHS (n = 6), right-dominant unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect with arch hypoplasia (n = 4), double outlet right ventricle [subpulmonic VSD (n = 1) and intact ventricular septum (n = 1)] with hypoplastic transverse aortic arch and borderline left ventricular dimensions. Standard approach with bilateral pulmonary artery banding and ductal stenting was carried out in all thirteen patients. Two patients required two ductal stents at the time of index procedure. There were no intraprocedural complications. Median intubation length post-procedure was 4 days (range 1-74 days). Median hospital stay post-procedure was 47 days (range 15-270 days). The overall mortality rate on follow-up through comprehensive stage 2 over the 6-year experience was 38 % (5 out of 13). Of note, the mortality rate was significantly lower in the latter 3 years of the study period when the procedure was adopted as a primary palliation for HLHS (14 % or 1 out of 7) compared to the initial 3-year period when it was reserved for higher risk cohorts (67 % or 4 out of 6). Median time to

  3. Sarcomere Imaging by Quantum Dots for the Study of Cardiac Muscle Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Kobirumaki-Shimozawa, Fuyu; Oyama, Kotaro; Serizawa, Takahiro; Mizuno, Akari; Kagemoto, Tatsuya; Shimozawa, Togo; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Kurihara, Satoshi; Fukuda, Norio

    2012-01-01

    We here review the use of quantum dots (QDs) for the imaging of sarcomeric movements in cardiac muscle. QDs are fluorescence substances (CdSe) that absorb photons and reemit photons at a different wavelength (depending on the size of the particle); they are efficient in generating long-lasting, narrow symmetric emission profiles, and hence useful in various types of imaging studies. Recently, we developed a novel system in which the length of a particular, single sarcomere in cardiomyocytes can be measured at ~30 nm precision. Moreover, our system enables accurate measurement of sarcomere length in the isolated heart. We propose that QDs are the ideal tool for the study of sarcomere dynamics during excitation-contraction coupling in healthy and diseased cardiac muscle. PMID:22570526

  4. Patient-specific volume conductor modeling for non-invasive imaging of cardiac electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, B; Hanser, F; Seger, M; Fischer, G; Modre-Osprian, R; Tilg, B

    2008-01-01

    We propose a general workflow to numerically estimate the spread of electrical excitation in the patients' hearts. To this end, a semi-automatic segmentation pipeline for extracting the volume conductor model of structurally normal hearts is presented. The cardiac electrical source imaging technique aims to provide information about the spread of electrical excitation in order to assist the cardiologist in developing strategies for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. The volume conductor models of eight patients were extracted from cine-gated short-axis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The non-invasive estimation of electrical excitation was compared with the CARTO maps. The development of a volume conductor modeling pipeline for constructing a patient-specific volume conductor model in a fast and accurate way is one essential step to make the technique clinically applicable.

  5. Two-dimensional, non-Doppler strain imaging during anesthesia and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Skubas, Nikolaos J

    2009-03-01

    Transesophageal echochardiography (TEE) has become an essential intraoperative monitor during general anesthesia for cardiac surgical procedures. In clinical practice, ventricular function is visually evaluated using gray scale and Doppler modes, despite the fact that subjective interpretation is influenced by level of experience and training. Echocardiographic strain imaging measures cardiac deformation and provides objective quantification of regional myocardial function. Non-Doppler strain, which is derived by tracking speckles from two-dimensional (2D) images, bypasses the limitations of Doppler-based strain measurements and evaluates the complex myocardial deformation along three dimensions. As a result, longitudinal shortening, circumferential thinning and radial thickening can be quantified using standard midesophageal and transgastric views, being acquired during a comprehensive TEE examination. Once non-Doppler strain becomes available on "real time," it will have the potential to become a valuable tool for detection of ischemia on the regional level and objective quantification of global ventricular function.

  6. Collimator Interchange System for Adaptive Cardiac Imaging in C-SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Rozler, Mike; Chang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Compared to imaging the heart with conventional cameras, dedicated cardiac SPECT systems can achieve much higher performance through use of a small field of view. To realize this potential, however, the heart must be reliably placed in the appropriate small FOV prior to imaging, thus requiring a separate scout operation to locate the heart and estimate its size. Further-more, to achieve high performance across the general population, a system should provide several imaging configurations optimized for different size and location of the heart and the size of the patient. Because of the critical role the collimator plays in SPECT, it would be ideal if a dedicated collimator could be used for each of the different patient groups, as well as for the scout imaging. The ability to exchange collimators without moving the patient can also enable serial studies with different imaging options while preserving anatomic registration. We developed a slit exchange system for the slit-slat collimator of the C-SPECT cardiac platform. The full-scale prototype, a precision link conveyor following a curved, body contouring path, allows four distinct transaxial collimation options. The collimators can be exchanged in 10 seconds without disturbing the patient, thus allowing adaptive clinical SPECT imaging. The positioning precision for all elements of the system is within 0.1 mm and has shown no degradation over 100,000 complete revolutions of the conveyor—twice the expected usage for a clinical system. We consider the rapid and precise operation allowing optimal collimation for different imaging tasks to be an important technological step for cardiac SPECT. PMID:24499740

  7. A Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Conditional External Cardiac Defibrillator for Resuscitation Within the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner Bore.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ehud J; Watkins, Ronald D; Zviman, Menekhem M; Guttman, Michael A; Wang, Wei; Halperin, Henry A

    2016-10-01

    Subjects undergoing cardiac arrest within a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner are currently removed from the bore and then from the MRI suite, before the delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, potentially increasing the risk of mortality. This precludes many higher-risk (acute ischemic and acute stroke) patients from undergoing MRI and MRI-guided intervention. An MRI-conditional cardiac defibrillator should enable scanning with defibrillation pads attached and the generator ON, enabling application of defibrillation within the seconds of MRI after a cardiac event. An MRI-conditional external defibrillator may improve patient acceptance for MRI procedures. A commercial external defibrillator was rendered 1.5 Tesla MRI-conditional by the addition of novel radiofrequency filters between the generator and commercial disposable surface pads. The radiofrequency filters reduced emission into the MRI scanner and prevented cable/surface pad heating during imaging, while preserving all the defibrillator monitoring and delivery functions. Human volunteers were imaged using high specific absorption rate sequences to validate MRI image quality and lack of heating. Swine were electrically fibrillated (n=4) and thereafter defibrillated both outside and inside the MRI bore. MRI image quality was reduced by 0.8 or 1.6 dB, with the generator in monitoring mode and operating on battery or AC power, respectively. Commercial surface pads did not create artifacts deeper than 6 mm below the skin surface. Radiofrequency heating was within US Food and Drug Administration guidelines. Defibrillation was completely successful inside and outside the MRI bore. A prototype MRI-conditional defibrillation system successfully defibrillated in the MRI without degrading the image quality or increasing the time needed for defibrillation. It can increase patient acceptance for MRI procedures. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Alternative Cardiac Imaging Modalities to Echocardiography for the Diagnosis of Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Davie; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Keynan, Yoav

    2016-11-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening disease. Considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of IE, the modified Duke criteria rely on echocardiographic findings to satisfy its major criterion. Echocardiography is an invaluable tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected IE but suffers from certain limitations. For example, it cannot differentiate vegetation from clot, or between infected and noninfected vegetation, and may miss vegetation and periannular extensions in the presence of prosthetic material. Therefore, alternative cardiac imaging modalities are needed. Nuclear imaging, particularly (18)F-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (CT), is becoming increasingly popular in the evaluation of patients for IE and has shown promise in diagnosing valvular and device-related IE when echocardiography results were inconclusive. Other techniques such as radiolabeled leukocyte scintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomography with or without CT are less well studied, however. Cardiac CT angiography is also evolving as a powerful supplementary tool to echocardiography for the detection of perivalvular complications of IE and for preoperative evaluation of coronary anatomy. The combination of cardiac CT angiography and echocardiography is superior to either test alone in the diagnosis of IE and its complications. Although brain magnetic resonance imaging may impact prognosis and clinical management by identifying cerebral emboli in patients with IE, the role of cardiac and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging is less clear. In conclusion, with these additional diagnostic tools at our disposal, the diagnosis of IE may be achieved in a more timely and accurate manner to secure better clinical outcomes.

  9. Prediction of myocardial infarction by assessing regional cardiac wall in CMR images through active mesh modeling.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Asiaei, Sasan; Sanei, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. In this study, using Cine MRI images, the infarct region was precisely determined by examining the local migration path length of critical points on myocardium borders and the fractional thickening effects. First, MRI Cine images of Epi/Endocardium were processed in 3D for all slices, and then incorporated in all frames to build a dynamic model. Epi/Endocardium images were segmented using Heiberg algorithm, and then by a robust restricted block matching algorithm, the sparse points were tracked. Finally, by fitting a 3D active mesh model to the sparse point displacements, a dense motion field was obtained, and some useful local parameters of left ventricle in patients with myocardial infarction were estimated. The local parameters are path length, fractional thickening, and strain. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion was quantized to determine the region and extent of infarct lesion. The process was implemented, and the results were examined and modified against the cardiac perfusion scan. Data were acquired from 10 healthy individuals and 20 patients with the myocardial infarction. The findings also reveal that the infarct region can be determined by locating less than 20% in the wall thickening. In all the patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The cardiac wall kinesis in damaged regions was properly evaluated by normalized path length and presented in standard bull's-eye format. The above approach is promising and can be extended in prognosis of acute heart infraction by prediction of prone to the wall kinesis regions in the patients close to MI by examining the local indexes of the myocardium in the cardiac MRI images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extracting cardiac shapes and motion of the chick embryo heart outflow tract from four-dimensional optical coherence tomography images.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin; Liu, Aiping; Thornburg, Kent L; Wang, Ruikang K; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT), and the development of image reconstruction algorithms, enabled four-dimensional (4-D) (three-dimensional imaging over time) imaging of the embryonic heart. To further analyze and quantify the dynamics of cardiac beating, segmentation procedures that can extract the shape of the heart and its motion are needed. Most previous studies analyzed cardiac image sequences using manually extracted shapes and measurements. However, this is time consuming and subject to inter-operator variability. Automated or semi-automated analyses of 4-D cardiac OCT images, although very desirable, are also extremely challenging. This work proposes a robust algorithm to semi automatically detect and track cardiac tissue layers from 4-D OCT images of early (tubular) embryonic hearts. Our algorithm uses a two-dimensional (2-D) deformable double-line model (DLM) to detect target cardiac tissues. The detection algorithm uses a maximum-likelihood estimator and was successfully applied to 4-D in vivo OCT images of the heart outflow tract of day three chicken embryos. The extracted shapes captured the dynamics of the chick embryonic heart outflow tract wall, enabling further analysis of cardiac motion.

  11. Retrospective reconstruction of cardiac cine images from golden-ratio radial MRI using one-dimensional navigators.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Martin; Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Biermann, Judith; Reichenbach, Jurgen R

    2014-08-01

    To demonstrate radial golden-ratio-based cardiac cine imaging by using interspersed one-dimensional (1D) navigators. The 1D navigators were interspersed into the acquisition of radial spokes which were continuously rotated by an angle increment based on the golden-ratio. Performing correlation analysis between the 1D navigator projections, time points corresponding to the same cardiac motion phases were automatically identified and used to combine retrospectively golden-ratio rotated radial spokes from multiple data windows. Data windows were shifted consecutively for dynamic reconstruction of different cardiac motion frames. Experiments were performed during a single breathhold. By artificially reducing the amount of input data, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) as well as artifact level was evaluated for different breathhold durations. Analysis of the 1D navigator data provided a detailed correlation function revealing cardiac motion over time. Imaging results were comparable to images reconstructed based on a timely synchronized ECG. Cardiac cine images with a low artifact level and good image quality in terms of SNR and CNR were reconstructed from volunteer data achieving a CNR between the myocardium and the left ventricular cavity of 50 for the longest breathhold duration of 26 s. CNR maintained a value higher than 30 for acquisition times as low as 10 s. Combining radial golden-ratio-based imaging with an intrinsic navigator is a promising and robust method for performing high quality cardiac cine imaging. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Cardiac Imaging for Assessing Low-Gradient Severe Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Burwash, Ian G; Pibarot, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Up to 40% of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) harbor discordant Doppler-echocardiographic findings, the most common of which is the presence of a small aortic valve area (≤1.0 cm(2)) suggesting severe AS, but a low gradient (<40 mm Hg) suggesting nonsevere AS. The purpose of this paper is to present the role of multimodality imaging in the diagnostic and therapeutic management of this challenging entity referred to as low-gradient AS. Doppler-echocardiography is critical to determine the subtype of low-gradient AS: that is, classical low-flow, paradoxical low-flow, or normal-flow. Patients with low-flow, low-gradient AS generally have a worse prognosis compared with patients with high-gradient or with normal-flow, low-gradient AS. Patients with low-gradient AS and evidence of severe AS benefit from aortic valve replacement (AVR). However, confirmation of the presence of severe AS is particularly challenging in these patients and requires a multimodality imaging approach including low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography and aortic valve calcium scoring by multidetector computed tomography. Transcatheter AVR using a transfemoral approach may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with low-flow, low-gradient AS. Further studies are needed to confirm the best valve replacement procedure and prosthetic valve for each category of low-gradient AS and to identify patients with low-gradient AS in whom AVR is likely to be futile.

  13. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, F. Cassol; Clemens, J. C.; Hemmer, C.; Morel, C.

    2009-03-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures (~0.1-400 µGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than ~5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above ~110 µGy and ~50 µGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses (~3, 30 and 300 µGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of ~1, thanks to its high efficiency (~100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is ~0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of other digital devices in a similar radiation condition. The XPAD3-S/CdTe detector appears to be the best with the highest

  14. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F Cassol; Clemens, J C; Hemmer, C; Morel, C

    2009-03-21

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures ( approximately 0.1-400 microGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than approximately 5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above approximately 110 microGy and approximately 50 microGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses ( approximately 3, 30 and 300 microGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of approximately 1, thanks to its high efficiency ( approximately 100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is approximately 0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging after ventricular tachyarrhythmias increases diagnostic precision and reduces the need for family screening for inherited cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Marstrand, Peter; Axelsson, Anna; Thune, Jens Jakob; Vejlstrup, Niels; Bundgaard, Henning; Theilade, Juliane

    2016-12-01

    Guidelines recommend evaluation of family members of sudden cardiac death victims. However, initiation of cascade screening in families with uncertain diagnoses is not cost-effective and may cause unnecessary concern. For these reasons, we set out to assess to what extent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) would increase the diagnostic precision and thereby possibly change the indication for family screening in patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmias. We retrospectively collected data from 79 patients hospitalized with aborted cardiac arrest (resuscitated from a cardiac arrest), ventricular tachycardia (VT), or syncope who underwent a CMR at the Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. Besides CMR, the patients were evaluated with an electrocardiogram, echocardiogram (both 100%), coronary angiogram (CAG)/coronary computed tomography scan (CT-CAG) (81%), exercise stress test (47%), late potentials (54%), electrophysiological study (44%), pharmacological provocation (44%), and/or myocardial biopsy (16%). Family screening was indicated for 53 probands (67%) prior to CMR. After full workup, only 43 cases (54%) warranted evaluation of relatives (19% decrease, P = 0.034). The full evaluation changed whether family screening was indicated in 18 probands (14/18 moved to no indication for family screening). In the 18 where recommendations on family screening changed, CMR findings were the major driver for re-classification in 17 cases. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging re-defines the cardiac diagnoses in a significant proportion of cases and reduces the number of patients in whom family screening is warranted. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is highly relevant for optimal care and resource allocation when an inherited heart disease is the presumed cause of life-threatening arrhythmias. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Ultrasound Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging Quantifies Coronary Perfusion Pressure Effect on Cardiac Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Matt; Trahey, Gregg E.; Wolf, Patrick D.

    2016-01-01

    Diastolic heart failure (DHF) is a major source of cardiac related morbidity and mortality in the world today. A major contributor to, or indicator of DHF is a change in cardiac compliance. Currently, there is no accepted clinical method to evaluate the compliance of cardiac tissue in diastolic dysfunction. Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) is a novel ultrasound-based elastography technique that provides a measure of tissue stiffness. Coronary perfusion pressure affects cardiac stiffness during diastole; we sought to characterize the relationship between these two parameters using the SWEI technique. In this work, we demonstrate how changes in coronary perfusion pressure are reflected in a local SWEI measurement of stiffness during diastole. Eight Langendorff perfused isolated rabbit hearts were used in this study. Coronary perfusion pressure was changed in a randomized order (0–90 mmHg range) and SWEI measurements were recorded during diastole with each change. Coronary perfusion pressure and the SWEI measurement of stiffness had a positive linear correlation with the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the slope of 0.009–0.011 m/s/mmHg (R2 = 0.88). Furthermore, shear modulus was linearly correlated to the coronary perfusion pressure with the 95% CI of this slope of 0.035–0.042 kPa/mmHg (R2 = 0.83). In conclusion, diastolic SWEI measurements of stiffness can be used to characterize factors affecting cardiac compliance specifically the mechanical interaction (cross-talk) between perfusion pressure in the coronary vasculature and cardiac muscle. This relationship was found to be linear over the range of pressures tested. PMID:25291788

  17. Measurements in Pediatric Patients with Cardiomyopathies: Comparison of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuting; He, Ling; Cai, Jinhua; Lv, Tiewei; Yi, Qijian; Xu, Yang; Liu, Lingjuan; Zhu, Jing; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are common cardiovascular diseases in children. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) and echocardiography (Echo) are routinely applied in the detection and diagnosis of pediatric cardiomyopathies. In this study, we compared and explored the correlation between these two measurements in pediatric patients with various cardiomyopathies. A total of 53 pediatric patients with cardiomyopathy hospitalized during the recent 3 years in our hospital were analyzed. All of them and 22 normal controls were assessed by both cMRI and Echo. Cardiac function of the patients was graded according to the New York Heart Association functional classification. The cardiac function indexes measured with both cMRI and Echo included left-ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume, ejection fraction and fractional shortening. These parameters were somehow lower in cMRI measurements than in Echo measurements. The index of diastolic function, such as peak filling rate (PFR) measured with cMRI, had a good correlation with the clinical cardiac functional score, while the index of the diastolic function (early/atrial filling ratio and isovolumic relaxation time) measured with Echo was not well correlated with the clinical cardiac function score. Significant systolic dysfunction was detected by cMRI in 34 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, LV noncompaction or endocardial fibroelastosis. Significant diastolic dysfunction was detected by cMRI in 19 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or restrictive cardiomyopathy showing an alteration in PFR and EDV. Both cMRI and Echo are of great value in the diagnosis and assessment of cardiac function in pediatric patients with cardiomyopathy. cMRI could accurately display the characteristic morphological changes in the hearts affected with cardiomyopathies, and late gadolinium enhancement on cMRI may reveal myocardial fibrosis, which has obvious advantages over Echo measurements in diagnosis. Furthermore, c

  18. Imaging the pericardium: appearances on ECG-gated 64-detector row cardiac computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, S M; Williams, P L; Williams, M P; Edwards, A J; Roobottom, C A; Morgan-Hughes, G J; Manghat, N E

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) with its high spatial and temporal resolution has now become an established and complementary method for cardiac imaging. It can now be used reliably to exclude significant coronary artery disease and delineate complex coronary artery anomalies, and has become a valuable problem-solving tool. Our experience with MDCT imaging suggests that it is clinically useful for imaging the pericardium. It is important to be aware of the normal anatomy of the pericardium and not mistake normal variations for pathology. The pericardial recesses are visible in up to 44% of non-electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated MDCT images. Abnormalities of the pericardium can now be identified with increasing certainty on 64-detector row CT; they may be the key to diagnosis and therefore must not be overlooked. This educational review of the pericardium will cover different imaging techniques, with a significant emphasis on MDCT. We have a large research and clinical experience of ECG-gated cardiac CT and will demonstrate examples of pericardial recesses, their variations and a wide variety of pericardial abnormalities and systemic conditions affecting the pericardium. We give a brief relevant background of the conditions and reinforce the key imaging features. We aim to provide a pictorial demonstration of the wide variety of abnormalities of the pericardium and the pitfalls in the diagnosis of pericardial disease. PMID:20197434

  19. Fast Concomitant Gradient Field and Field Inhomogeneity Correction for Spiral Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Joseph Y.; Santos, Juan M.; Pauly, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-Cartesian imaging provides many advantages in terms of flexibility, functionality, and speed. However, a major drawback to these imaging methods is off-resonance distortion artifacts. These artifacts manifest as blurring in spiral imaging. Common techniques that remove the off-resonance field inhomogeneity distortion effects are not sufficient, because the high order concomitant gradient fields are nontrivial for common imaging conditions, such as imaging 5 cm off isocenter in an 1.5T scanner. Previous correction algorithms are either slow or do not take into account the known effects of concomitant gradient fields along with the field inhomogeneities. To ease the correction, the distortion effects are modeled as a non-stationary convolution problem. In this work, two fast and accurate post-gridding algorithms are presented and analyzed. These methods account for both the concomitant field effects and the field inhomogeneities. One algorithm operates in the frequency domain and the other in the spatial domain. To take advantage of their speed and accuracy, the algorithms are applied to a real-time cardiac study and a high-resolution cardiac study. Both of the presented algorithms provide for a practical solution to the off-resonance problem in spiral imaging. PMID:21384423

  20. MR-compatible treadmill for exercise stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Foster, Eric L; Arnold, John W; Jekic, Mihaela; Bender, Jacob A; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Dickerson, Jennifer A; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2012-03-01

    This article describes an MR-safe treadmill that enables cardiovascular exercise stress testing adjacent to the MRI system, facilitating cardiac MR imaging immediately following exercise stress. The treadmill was constructed of nonferromagnetic components utilizing a hydraulic power system. Computer control ensured precise execution of the standard Bruce treadmill protocol commonly used for cardiovascular exercise stress testing. The treadmill demonstrated no evidence of ferromagnetic attraction and did not affect image quality. Treadmill performance met design specifications both inside and outside the MRI environment. Ten healthy volunteers performed the Bruce protocol with the treadmill positioned adjacent to the MRI table. Upon reaching peak stress (98 ± 8% of age-predicted maximum heart rate), the subjects lay down directly on the MRI table, a cardiac array coil was placed, an intravenous line connected, and stress cine and perfusion imaging performed. Cine imaging commenced on average within 24 ± 4 s and was completed within 40 ± 7 s of the end of exercise. Subject heart rates were 86 ± 9% of age-predicted maximum heart rate at the start of imaging and 81 ± 9% of age-predicted maximum heart rate upon completion of cine imaging. The MRI-compatible treadmill was shown to operate safely and effectively in the MRI environment.

  1. An MR-Compatible Treadmill for Exercise Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Eric L.; Arnold, John W.; Jekic, Mihaela; Bender, Jacob; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Dickerson, Jennifer A.; Raman, Subha V.; Simonetti, Orlando P.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an MR-safe treadmill that enables cardiovascular exercise stress testing adjacent to the MRI system, facilitating cardiac MR imaging immediately following exercise stress. The treadmill was constructed of non-ferromagnetic components utilizing a hydraulic power system. Computer control ensured precise execution of the standard Bruce treadmill protocol commonly used for cardiovascular exercise stress testing. The treadmill demonstrated no evidence of ferromagnetic attraction and did not affect image quality. Treadmill performance met design specifications both inside and outside the MRI environment. Ten healthy volunteers performed the Bruce protocol with the treadmill positioned adjacent to the MRI table. Upon reaching peak stress (98% ± 8% of age-predicted maximum heart rate (APMHR)), the subjects lay down directly on the MRI table, a cardiac array coil was placed, an intravenous line connected, and stress cine and perfusion imaging performed. Cine imaging commenced on average within 24 ± 4 s and was completed within 40 ± 7 s of the end of exercise. Subject heart rates were 86% ± 9% of APMHR at the start of imaging and 81% ± 9% of APMHR upon completion of cine imaging. The MRI compatible treadmill was shown to operate safely and effectively in the MRI environment. PMID:22190228

  2. Semi-automatic segmentation of nonviable cardiac tissue using cine and delayed enhancement magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Thomas P.; Xu, Ning; Setser, Randolph M.; White, Richard D.

    2003-05-01

    Post myocardial infarction, the identification and assessment of non-viable (necrotic) tissues is necessary for effective development of intervention strategies and treatment plans. Delayed Enhancement Magnetic Resonance (DEMR) imaging is a technique whereby non-viable cardiac tissue appears with increased signal intensity. Radiologists typically acquire these images in conjunction with other functional modalities (e.g., MR Cine), and use domain knowledge and experience to isolate the non-viable tissues. In this paper, we present a technique for automatically segmenting these tissues given the delineation of myocardial borders in the DEMR and in the End-systolic and End-diastolic MR Cine images. Briefly, we obtain a set of segmentations furnished by an expert and employ an artificial intelligence technique, Support Vector Machines (SVMs), to "learn" the segmentations based on features culled from the images. Using those features we then allow the SVM to predict the segmentations the expert would provide on previously unseen images.

  3. Automated cardiac motion compensation in PET/CT for accurate reconstruction of PET myocardial perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Khawar; McGough, Robert J.; Berger, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Error-free reconstruction of PET data with a registered CT attenuation map is essential for accurate quantification and interpretation of cardiac perfusion. Misalignment of the CT and PET data can produce an erroneous attenuation map that projects lung attenuation parameters onto the heart wall, thereby underestimating the attenuation and creating artifactual areas of hypoperfusion that can be misinterpreted as myocardial ischemia or infarction. The major causes of misregistration between CT and PET images are the respiratory motion, cardiac motion and gross physical motion of the patient. The misalignment artifact problem is overcome with automated cardiac registration software that minimizes the alignment error between the two modalities. Results show that the automated registration process works equally well for any respiratory phase in which the CT scan is acquired. Further evaluation of this procedure on 50 patients demonstrates that the automated registration software consistently aligns the two modalities, eliminating artifactual hypoperfusion in reconstructed PET images due to PET/CT misregistration. With this registration software, only one CT scan is required for PET/CT imaging, which reduces the radiation dose required for CT-based attenuation correction and improves the clinical workflow for PET/CT.

  4. Cardiac perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C urea using flow sensitizing gradients.

    PubMed

    Lau, Angus Z; Miller, Jack J; Robson, Matthew D; Tyler, Damian J

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the first passage of a bolus of hyperpolarized (13)C urea through the rodent heart using flow-sensitizing gradients to reduce signal from the blood pool. A flow-sensitizing bipolar gradient was optimized to reduce the bright signal within the cardiac chambers, enabling improved contrast of the agent within the tissue capillary bed. The gradient was incorporated into a dynamic golden angle spiral (13)C imaging sequence. Healthy rats were scanned during rest (n = 3) and under adenosine stress-induced hyperemia (n = 3). A two-fold increase in myocardial perfusion relative to rest was detected during adenosine stress-induced hyperemia, consistent with a myocardial perfusion reserve of two in rodents. The new pulse sequence was used to obtain dynamic images of the first passage of hyperpolarized (13)C urea in the rodent heart, without contamination from bright signal within the neighboring cardiac lumen. This probe of myocardial perfusion is expected to enable new hyperpolarized (13)C studies in which the cardiac metabolism/perfusion mismatch can be identified. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Impact of Norwood versus hybrid palliation on cardiac size and function in hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grotenhuis, Heynric B; Ruijsink, Bram; Chetan, Devin; Dragulescu, Andreea; Friedberg, Mark K; Kotani, Yasuhiro; Caldarone, Christopher A; Honjo, Osami; Mertens, Luc L

    2016-06-15

    The hybrid approach for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) could theoretically result in better preservation of right ventricular (RV) function then the Norwood procedure. The aim of this study was to compare echocardiographic indices of RV size and function in patients after Norwood and hybrid throughout all stages of palliation. 76 HLHS patients (42 Norwood, 34 hybrid) were retrospectively studied. Echocardiography was obtained before stage I, before and after stage II, and before and after Fontan. Median follow-up was 4.9 years (range 1.1-8.5). Baseline characteristics before stage I were similar. Hybrid patients demonstrated a significant decrease in RV fractional area change (FAC) between baseline and pre-stage II (36±9% vs 27±6%; p<0.01); Norwood patients remained stable (32±10% vs 32±7%; p=0.21). At pre-stage II, moderate/severe tricuspid valve (TV) regurgitation was found in nine Norwood (33%) and four hybrid (18%) patients (p=0.19). After stage II, the difference in FAC became insignificant (29±7% vs 25±8%, p=0.08) and moderate/severe TV regurgitation (TR) was found in 13 Norwood (48%) and four hybrid patients (19%) (p=0.18). At pre-Fontan, RV FAC was similar after Norwood and hybrid (34±5% vs 33±6%, p=0.69), which remained unchanged after Fontan. After Fontan, one Norwood and one hybrid patient had moderate TR. RV and TV size were similar for both groups at each time point. Patients after Norwood and hybrid procedures had equivalent indices of RV size, and systolic and diastolic function throughout all stages of palliation. Small differences in individual RV and TV indices are likely to be explained by differences in physiology or surgical timing rather than by intrinsic differences in myocardial and valve function. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Quantification of myocardial iron deficiency in nonischemic heart failure by cardiac T2* magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Michinobu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Yonezawa, Masato; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kawanami, Satoshi; Abe, Kohtaro; Mukai, Yasushi; Higo, Taiki; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Takemura, Atsushi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Sunagawa, Kenji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to use T2* cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging to quantify myocardial iron content in patients with heart failure (HF) and to investigate the relation between iron content, cardiac function, and the cause of HF. CMR data were analyzed from 167 patients with nonischemic and 31 with ischemic HF and 50 patients with normal ventricular function. Short-axis T2* imaging was accomplished using 3-T scanner and multiecho gradient-echo sequence. Myocardial T2* value (M-T2*) was calculated by fitting the signal intensity data for the mid-left ventricular (LV) septum to a decay curve. Patients with nonischemic HF were categorized into patients with LV ejection fraction (LVEF) <35% or ≥35%. The relation between nonischemic HF with LVEF <35% and the risk for major adverse cardiac events was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis using M-T2* and HF biomarkers. M-T2* was significantly greater for patients with nonischemic HF (LVEF <35%: 29 ± 7 ms, LVEF ≥35%: 26 ± 5 ms) than for patients with normal LV function (22 ± 3 ms, p <0.0001) or ischemic HF (22 ± 4 ms, p <0.001). The odds ratio was 1.21 for M-T2* (p <0.0001) and 1.0015 for brain natriuretic peptide (p <0.0001) in relation to nonischemic HF with LVEF <35%. Furthermore, this value was 0.96 for systolic blood pressure (p = 0.012) and 1.02 for M-T2* (p = 0.03) in relation to the risk for major adverse cardiac events in patients with nonischemic HF. In conclusion, T2* CMR demonstrated the robust relation between myocardial iron deficiency and nonischemic HF. M-T2* is a biomarker that can predict adverse cardiac function in patients with nonischemic HF.

  7. First pass cable artefact correction for cardiac C-arm CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Kim, M.; Chen, S. J.; Carroll, J. D.; Eshuis, P.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac C-arm CT imaging delivers a tomographic region-of-interest reconstruction of the patient's heart during image guided catheter interventions. Due to the limited size of the flat detector a volume image is reconstructed, which is truncated in the cone-beam (along the patient axis) and the fan-beam (in the transaxial plane) direction. To practically address this local tomography problem correction methods, like projection extension, are available for first pass image reconstruction. For second pass correction methods, like metal artefact reduction, alternative correction schemes are required when the field of view is limited to a region-of-interest of the patient. In classical CT imaging metal artefacts are corrected by metal identification in a first volume reconstruction and generation of a corrected projection data set followed by a second reconstruction. This approach fails when the metal structures are located outside the reconstruction field of view. When a C-arm CT is performed during a cardiac intervention pacing leads and other cables are frequently positioned on the patients skin, which results in propagating streak artefacts in the reconstruction volume. A first pass approach to reduce this type of artefact is introduced and evaluated here. It makes use of the fact that the projected position of objects outside the reconstruction volume changes with the projection perspective. It is shown that projection based identification, tracking and removal of high contrast structures like cables, only detected in a subset of the projections, delivers a more consistent reconstruction volume with reduced artefact level. The method is quantitatively evaluated based on 50 simulations using cardiac CT data sets with variable cable positioning. These data sets are forward projected using a C-arm CT system geometry and generate artefacts comparable to those observed in clinical cardiac C-arm CT acquisitions. A C-arm CT simulation of every cardiac CT data set without

  8. Functional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the Assessment of Myocardial Viability and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness safety and cost-effectiveness of using functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Results Functional MRI has become increasingly investigated as a noninvasive method for assessing myocardial viability and perfusion. Most patients in the published literature have mild to moderate impaired LV function. It is possible that the severity of LV dysfunction may be an important factor that can alter the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques. There is some evidence of comparable or better performance of functional cardiac MRI for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion compared with other imaging techniques. However limitations to most of the studies included: Functional cardiac MRI studies that assess myocardial viability and perfusion have had small sample sizes. Some studies assessed myocardial viability/perfusion in patients who had already undergone revascularization, or excluded patients with a prior MI (Schwitter et al., 2001). Lack of explicit detail of patient recruitment. Patients with LVEF >35%. Interstudy variability in post MI imaging time(including acute or chronic MI), when patients with a prior MI were included. Poor interobserver agreement (kappa statistic) in the interpretation of the results. Traditionally, 0.80 is considered “good”. Cardiac MRI measurement of myocardial perfusion to as an adjunct tool to help diagnose CAD (prior to a definitive coronary angiography) has also been examined in some studies, with methodological limitations, yielding comparable results. Many studies examining myocardial viability and perfusion report on the accuracy of imaging methods with limited data on long-term patient outcome and management. Kim et al. (2000) revealed that the transmural

  9. An In Vitro Assessment of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging for Visualizing Cardiac Radiofrequency Ablation Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Eyerly, Stephanie A.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Agashe, Shruti H.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Li, Yang; Wolf, Patrick D.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lesion placement and transmurality are critical factors in the success of cardiac transcatheter radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments for supraventricular arrhythmias. This study investigated the capabilities of catheter transducer based acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) ultrasound imaging for quantifying ablation lesion dimensions. Methods and Results RFA lesions were created in vitro in porcine ventricular myocardium and imaged with an intracardiac ultrasound catheter transducer capable of acquiring spatially registered B-mode and ARFI images. The myocardium was sliced along the imaging plane and photographed. The maximum ARFI-induced displacement images of the lesion were normalized and spatially registered with the photograph by matching the surfaces of the tissue in the B-mode and photographic images. The lesion dimensions determined by a manual segmentation of the photographed lesion based on the visible discoloration of the tissue were compared to automatic segmentations of the ARFI image using two different calculated thresholds. ARFI imaging accurately localized and sized the lesions within the myocardium. Differences in the maximum lateral and axial dimensions were statistically below 2 mm and 1 mm respectively for the two thresholding methods, with mean percent overlap of 68.7±5.21% and 66.3±8.4% for the two thresholds used. Conclusion ARFI imaging is capable of visualizing myocardial RFA lesion dimensions to within 2 mm in vitro. Visualizing lesions during transcatheter cardiac a