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Sample records for cardiac microvascular endothelial

  1. Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells express a functional Ca+ -sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Berra Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Laforenza, Umberto; Scaffino, Manuela Federica; Moccia, Francesco; Avelino-Cruz, Josè Everardo; Oldani, Amanda; Coltrini, Daniela; Milesi, Veronica; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism whereby extracellular Ca(2+) exerts the endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone is still unclear. In this study, we assessed whether cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) express a functional extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) using a variety of techniques. CaSR mRNA was detected using RT-PCR, and CaSR protein was identified by immunocytochemical analysis. In order to assess the functionality of the receptor, CMEC were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorochrome, Fura-2/AM. A number of CaSR agonists, such as spermine, Gd(3+), La(3+) and neomycin, elicited a heterogeneous intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which was abolished by disruption of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) signaling and by depletion of intracellular stores with cyclopiazonic acid. The inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger upon substitution of extracellular Na(+) unmasked the Ca(2+) signal triggered by an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) levels. Finally, aromatic amino acids, which function as allosteric activators of CaSR, potentiated the Ca(2+) response to the CaSR agonist La(3+). These data provide evidence that CMEC express CaSR, which is able to respond to physiological agonists by mobilizing Ca(2+) from intracellular InsP(3)-sensitive stores. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Expression and significance of fgl2 prothrombinase in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells of rats with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanping; Liu, Kun; Wang, Yan; Su, Guanhua; Deng, Heping; Zeng, Qiutang; Liao, Yuhua; Wang, Zhaohui

    2010-10-01

    Microthrombosis may be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac microangiopathy due to diabetes. Recent studies have shown that fibrinogen-like protein 2 (fgl2) plays a pivotal role in microthrombosis in viral hepatitis, acute vascular xenograft rejection and cytokine-induced fetal loss syndrome. The current study was designed to examine the expression of fgl2 in microvascular endothelial cells and investigate the effects of microthrombi due to fgl2 on cardiac function and structure in rats with type 2 diabetes. Following induction of type 2 diabetes, 24 rats were observed dynamically. Fgl2 expression and related cardiac microthrombosis were examined. Local or circulating TNF-α was measured. Coronary flow (CF) per min was calculated as an index of cardiac microcirculation. Cardiac function and morphology were evaluated. It was found that Fgl2 was highly expressed in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells of rats with type 2 diabetes, which was promoted by local or circulating TNF-α. The Fgl2 expression was associated with cardiac hyaline microthrombosis. In parallel with the fgl2 expression, CF per min, cardiac diastolic or systolic function and cardiac morphology were aggravated to some extent. It was concluded that in rats with type 2 diabetes, microthrombosis due to fgl2 contributes to the impairment of cardiac diastolic or systolic function and morphological changes.

  3. Tongxinluo Reverses the Hypoxia-suppressed Claudin-9 in Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Xiu-Juan; Li, Yan-Ning; Li, Bin; Qi, Jin-Sheng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Claudin-5, claudin-9, and claudin-11 are expressed in endothelial cells to constitute tight junctions, and their deficiency may lead to hyperpermeability, which is the initiating process and pathological basis of cardiovascular disease. Although tongxinluo (TXL) has satisfactory antianginal effects, whether and how it modulates claudin-5, claudin-9, and claudin-11 in hypoxia-stimulated human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) have not been reported. Methods: In this study, HCMECs were stimulated with CoCl2 to mimic hypoxia and treated with TXL. First, the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of claudin-5, claudin-9, and claudin-11 was confirmed. Then, the protein content and distribution of claudin-9, as well as cell morphological changes were evaluated after TXL treatment. Furthermore, the distribution and content histone H3K9 acetylation (H3K9ac) in the claudin-9 gene promoter, which guarantees transcriptional activation, were examined to explore the underlying mechanism, by which TXL up-regulates claudin-9 in hypoxia-stimulated HCMECs. Results: We found that hypoxia-suppressed claudin-9 gene expression in HCMECs (F = 7.244; P = 0.011) and the hypoxia-suppressed claudin-9 could be reversed by TXL (F = 61.911; P = 0.000), which was verified by its protein content changes (F = 29.142; P = 0.000). Moreover, high-dose TXL promoted the cytomembrane localization of claudin-9 in hypoxia-stimulated HCMECs, with attenuation of cell injury. Furthermore, high-dose TXL elevated the hypoxia-inhibited H3K9ac in the claudin-9 gene promoter (F = 37.766; P = 0.000), activating claudin-9 transcription. Conclusions: The results manifested that TXL reversed the hypoxia-suppressed claudin-9 by elevating H3K9ac in its gene promoter, playing protective roles in HCMECs. PMID:26879018

  4. [Knockdown of RUNX3 inhibits hypoxia-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition of human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhua; Li, Bingong; Wang, Yuqin; Wang, Delong; Zou, Jin; Ke, Xuan; Hao, Yanqin

    2016-12-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) knockdown on hypoxia-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) of human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs), and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism. Methods HCMECs were cultured in hypoxic conditions and infected with RUNX3-RNAi lentivirus to knock-down the expression of RUNX3. Reverse transcription PCR was performed to detect the mRNA expressions of RUNX3 and EndoMT related genes such as CD31, vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1); Western blotting was used to determine the protein expressions of RUNX3, CD31, α-SMA and another molecules involved in EndoMT; and immunofluorescence cytochemistry was applied to observe the colocalization of CD31 and α-SMA. Results Hypoxia induced the transition of HCMECs to mesenchymal cells. Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of TGF-β2, Smad2/3, phosphorylation of Smad2/3 (p-Smad2/3), Notch-1, Hes1, and Hey1; knockdown of RUNX3 down-regulated the levels of Smad2/3, p-Smad2/3, Hes1, and Hey1 to different extents, and raised the levels of TGF-β2 and Notch-1. Conclusion Knockdown of RUNX3 in HCMECs attenuates hypoxia-induced EndoMT via partially inhibiting TGF-β and Notch signaling pathway.

  5. Streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies induce microvascular cardiac endothelial proinflammatory phenotype in rheumatic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Delunardo, F; Scalzi, V; Capozzi, A; Camerini, S; Misasi, R; Pierdominici, M; Pendolino, M; Crescenzi, M; Sorice, M; Valesini, G; Ortona, E; Alessandri, C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is characterized by the presence of anti-streptococcal group A antibodies and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA). Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and self proteins is a hallmark of the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever. We aimed to identify, in RHD patients, autoantibodies specific to endothelial autoantigens cross-reactive with streptococcal proteins and to evaluate their role in inducing endothelial damage. We used an immunoproteomic approach with endothelial cell-surface membrane proteins in order to identify autoantigens recognized by AECA of 140 RHD patients. Cross-reactivity of purified antibodies with streptococcal proteins was analysed. Homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies were found through comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal antigens with human antigens. To investigate interleukin (IL)-1R-associated kinase (IRAK1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, we performed a Western blot analysis of whole extracts proteins from unstimulated or stimulated human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC-C). Adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors were studied by multiplex bead based immunoassay kits. We observed anti-vimentin antibodies in sera from 49% RHD AECA-positive patients. Cross-reactivity of purified anti-vimentin antibodies with heat shock protein (HSP)70 and streptopain streptococcal proteins was shown. Comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal HSP70 and streptopain with human vimentin, we found two homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were able to stimulate HMVEC-C inducing IRAK and NF-κB activation, adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In conclusion, streptococcal–vimentin cross-reactive antibodies were able to activate microvascular cardiac endothelium by amplifying the inflammatory

  6. EGb 761 Protects Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury and Exerts Inhibitory Effect on the ATM Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wang, Deng-Feng; Zhang, Zhuang; Han, Dong; Yang, Kan

    2017-03-28

    Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) has been widely used clinically to reduce myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (MIRI). Microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) may be a proper cellular model in vitro for the effect and mechanism study against MIRI. However, the protective effect of EGb 761 on MVECs resisting hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury is little reported. In this study, H/R-injured MVECs were treated with EGb 761, and then the cell viability, apoptosis, ROS production, SOD activity, caspase-3 activity, and protein level of ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax were measured. ATM siRNA was transfected to study the changes of protein in the ATM pathway. EGb 761 presented protective effect on H/R-injured MVECs, with decreasing cell death, apoptosis, and ROS, and elevated SOD activity. Next, EGb 761 could inhibit H/R-induced ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, ATM siRNA also could inhibit H/R-induced ATM, γ-H2AX, p53, and Bax. Overall, these findings verify that EGb 761 protects cardiac MVECs from H/R injury, and for the first time, illustrate the influence on the ATM pathway and apoptosis by EGb 761 via dampening ROS.

  7. Hypoxia/ischemia promotes CXCL10 expression in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells by NFkB activation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing-Bo; Liu, Guang-Hui; Chen, Zhuo-Ying; Mao, Cheng-Zhou; Zhou, Deng-Cheng; Wu, Hai-Yan; Park, Kyu-Sang; Zhao, Hui; Kim, Soo-Ki; Cai, Dong-Qing; Qi, Xu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    CXCL10, the chemokine with potent chemotactic activity on immune cells and other non-immune cells expressing its receptor CXCR3, has been demonstrated to involve in myocardial infarction, which was resulted from hypoxia/ischemia. The cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) are the first cell type which is implicated by hypoxia/ischemia. However, the potential molecular mechanism by which hypoxia/ischemia regulates the expression of CXCL10 in CMECs remains unclear. In the present study, the expression of CXCL10 was firstly examined by real-time PCR and ELISA analysis. Several potential binding sites (BS) for transcription factors including NF-kappaB (NFkB), HIF1 alpha (HIF1α) and FoxO3a were identified in the promoter region of CXCL10 gene from -2000 bp to -1 bp using bioinformatics software. Luciferase reporter gene vectors for CXCL10 promoter and for activation of above transcription factors were constructed. The activation of NFkB, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and FoxO3a was also analyzed by Western blotting. It was shown that the production of CXCL10 in CMECs was significantly increased by hypoxia/ischemia treatment, in parallel with the activation of CXCL10 promoter examined by reporter gene vector system. Furthermore, transcription factors including NFkB, HIF1α and FoxO3a were activated by hypoxia/ischemia in CMECs. However, over-expression of NFkB, but not that of HIF1α or FoxO3a, significantly promoted the activation of CXCL10 promoter reporter gene. These findings indicated that CXCL10 production in CMECs was significantly increased by hypoxia/ischemia, at least in part, through activation of NFkB pathway and subsequently binding to CXCL10 promoter, finally promoted the transcription of CXCL10 gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improvement of RNA fingerprinting efficiency for the analysis of differential gene expression in human cardiac macro- and microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bongrazio, M; Gräfe, M; Pries, A R; Gaehtgens, P; Zakrzewicz, A

    2001-06-01

    RNA fingerprinting by arbitrarily primed PCR (RAP-PCR) is a powerful tool to screen differential gene expression. However, PCR-based screening techniques show a high incidence of false positive results (40-90%). In order to increase the efficiency and feasibility of RAP-PCR, the original protocol was modified and applied to analyse differential gene expression in human coronary macro- (HCEC) and microvascular (HCMEC) endothelial cells. The major modifications introduced were: (i) the use of two primers for PCR amplification, instead of reverse-transcription primer alone; (ii) the use of three cycles at low stringency followed by further amplification at high stringency; (iii) optimization of amplification cycle number, template amount, and concentration of primers, dNTP, Mg(2+); (iv) detection of fingerprints by silver staining; and (v) direct sequencing using RAP-PCR primers. Analysis of untreated and TNF alpha -stimulated (100 U ml(-1)for 1, 4, and 24 h) HCEC and HCMEC displayed 11 differentially expressed products by 18 primer combinations. Confirmation of results by RT-PCR showed that the rate of false positives attributable to our screening method was less than 20%. Among detected RAP-PCR products, the expression of Mn-superoxide dismutase, A20 zinc finger protein, and three novel genes (A/a, 4/d, 7/c) was more strongly modulated by TNF in HCEC than HCMEC. A further novel gene (B/e) was strongly expressed in HCMEC while only barely detectable in HCEC. In conclusion, modification of RAP-PCR strongly reduced the incidence of false positives, eliminated a radioactive requirement, and allowed sequencing without prior cloning, supplying an improved technology able to identify new differentially expressed genes between macro- and microvascular endothelial cells.

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 preserves coronary microvascular endothelial function after cardiac arrest and resuscitation: potential antioxidant effects.

    PubMed

    Dokken, Betsy B; Piermarini, Charles V; Teachey, Mary K; Gura, Michael T; Dameff, Christian J; Heller, Brian D; Krate, Jonida; Ashgar, Aeen M; Querin, Lauren; Mitchell, Jennifer L; Hilwig, Ronald W; Kern, Karl B

    2013-02-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has protective effects in the heart. We hypothesized that GLP-1 would mitigate coronary microvascular and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction if administered after cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR). Eighteen swine were subjected to ventricular fibrillation followed by resuscitation. Swine surviving to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) were randomized to receive an intravenous infusion of either human rGLP-1 (10 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1); n = 8) or 0.9% saline (n = 8) for 4 h, beginning 1 min after ROSC. CAR caused a decline in coronary flow reserve (CFR) in control animals (pre-arrest, 1.86 ± 0.20; 1 h post-ROSC, 1.3 ± 0.05; 4 h post-ROSC, 1.25 ± 0.06; P < 0.05). GLP-1 preserved CFR for up to 4 h after ROSC (pre-arrest, 1.31 ± 0.17; 1 h post-ROSC, 1.5 ± 0.01; 4 h post-ROSC, 1.55 ± 0.22). Although there was a trend toward improvement in LV relaxation in the GLP-1-treated animals, overall LV function was not consistently different between groups. 8-iso-PGF(2α), a measure of reactive oxygen species load, was decreased in post-ROSC GLP-1-treated animals [placebo, control (NS): 38.1 ± 1.54 pg/ml; GLP-1: 26.59 ± 1.56 pg/ml; P < 0.05]. Infusion of GLP-1 after CAR preserved coronary microvascular and LV diastolic function. These effects may be mediated through a reduction in oxidative stress.

  10. N-n-butyl haloperidol iodide ameliorates hypoxia/reoxygenation injury through modulating the LKB1/AMPK/ROS pathway in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Binger; Wang, Bin; Zhong, Shuping; Zhang, Yanmei; Gao, Fenfei; Chen, Yicun; Zheng, Fuchun; Shi, Ganggang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells are highly sensitive to hypoxia and contribute to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. We have reported that N-n-butyl haloperidol iodide (F2) can attenuate hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs). However, the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Neonatal rat CMECs were isolated and subjected to H/R. Pretreatment of F2 leads to a reduction in H/R injury, as evidenced by increased cell viability, decreased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and apoptosis, together with enhanced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and liver kinase B1 (LKB1) phosphorylation in H/R ECs. Blockade of AMPK with compound C reversed F2-induced inhibition of H/R injury, as evidenced by decreased cell viability, increased LDH release and apoptosis. Moreover, compound C also blocked the ability of F2 to reduce H/R-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Supplementation with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reduced ROS levels, increased cell survival rate, and decreased both LDH release and apoptosis after H/R. In conclusion, our data indicate that F2 may mitigate H/R injury by stimulating LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway and subsequent suppression of ROS production in CMECs. PMID:27166184

  11. Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills Promote Angiogenesis of Ischemic Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Regulating MicroRNA-223-3p Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Guo-Hua; Liu, Ning; Zhu, Jing-Wei; Yao, Jing; Yang, Chun; Ma, Pei-Ze; Song, Xian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research shows that Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills (QSYQ) can promote ischemic cardiac angiogenesis. Studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are the key component of gene regulation networks, which play a vital role in angiogenesis and cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms involving miRNA by which TCM promotes ischemic cardiac angiogenesis have not been reported. We found that microRNA-223-3p (mir-223-3p) was the core miRNA of angiogenesis of rats ischemic cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) and inhibited angiogenesis by affecting RPS6KB1/HIF-1α signal pathway in previous study. Based on the results, we observed biological characteristics and optimal dosage for QSYQ intervening in rats ischemic CMECs angiogenesis and concluded that QSYQ low-dose group had the strongest ability to promote angiogenesis of ischemic myocardium. Using miRNA chip and real-time PCR techniques in this study, we identified mir-223-3p as the pivotal miRNA in QSYQ that regulated angiogenesis of ischemic CMECs. From real-time PCR and western blot analysis, research showed that gene and protein expression of factors located RPS6KB1/HIF-1α signaling pathway, including HIF-1α, VEGF, MAPK, PI3K, and AKT, were significantly upregulated by QSYQ to regulate angiogenesis of ischemic CMECs. This study showed that QSYQ promote ischemic cardiac angiogenesis by downregulating mir-223-3p expression in rats ischemic CMECs. PMID:27057198

  12. The CXCL10/CXCR3 axis promotes cardiac microvascular endothelial cell migration via the p38/FAK pathway in a proliferation-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing-Bo; Mao, Cheng-Zhou; Chen, Zhuo-Ying; Liu, Guang-Hui; Wu, Hai-Yan; Zhou, Deng-Cheng; Park, Kyu-Sang; Zhao, Hui; Kim, Soo-Ki; Cai, Dong-Qing; Qi, Xu-Feng

    2016-04-01

    CXCL10 is a chemokine with potent chemotactic activity for immune and non-immune cells expressing its receptor CXCR3. Previous studies have demonstrated that CXCL10 is involved in myocardial infarction. However, the role of CXCL10 in cardiac microvascular endothelial cell (CMEC) regulation and related mechanisms remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of CXCL10 on the CMEC migration and explored its potential molecular mechanism by wound healing, cell proliferation and viability analysis. Furthermore, migration-related signaling pathways, including FAK, Erk, p38 and Smad, were examined by Western blotting. We found that CXCL10 significantly promotes CMEC migration under normal conditions and during hypoxia/ischemia. However, no significant differences in CMEC proliferation and viability were observed with or without CXCL10 treatment. CXCL10-mediated CMEC migration was greatly blocked by treatment with an anti-CXCR3 antibody. Although CXCL10 treatment promoted phosphorylation and activation of the FAK, Erk, and p38 pathways during hypoxia/ischemia, CXCL10-mediated CMEC migration was significantly blocked by p38 and FAK inhibitors, but not by an Erk inhibitor. Furthermore, CXCL10-mediated FAK activation was suppressed by the p38 inhibitor. These findings indicated that the CXCL10/CXCR3 pathway promotes the migration of CMECs under normal conditions and during hypoxia/ischemia in a proliferation-independent manner, at least in part, through regulation of the p38/FAK pathways.

  13. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury-Modulated Proteins in Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells and the Protective Role of Tongxinluo.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Cui, He-He; Yang, Yue-Jin; Li, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Gui-Hao; Tian, Xia-Qiu; Jin, Chen; Dong, Qiu-Ting; Huang, Pei-Sen; Xu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The protection of endothelial cells (ECs) against reperfusion injury has received little attention. In this study, we used Tandem Mass Tag (TMT) labeling proteomics to investigate the modulated proteins in an in vitro model of cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and their alteration by traditional Chinese medicine Tongxinluo (TXL). Human CMECs were subjected to 2 h of hypoxia followed by 2 h of reoxygenation with different concentrations of TXL Protein expression profiles of CMECs were determined using tandem mass spectrometry. We evaluated several proteins with altered expression in I/R injury and summarized some reported proteins related to I/R injury. TXL dose-dependently decreased CMEC apoptosis, and the optimal concentration was 800 µg/mL. I/R significantly altered proteins in CMECs, and 30 different proteins were detected between a normal group and a hypoxia and serum deprivation group. In I/R injury, TXL treatment up-regulated 6 types of proteins including acyl-coenzyme A synthetase ACSM2B mitochondrial (ACSM2B), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B), heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), transcription factor SOX-17 (SOX17), sequestosome-1 isoform 1 (SQSTM1), and TBC1 domain family member 10B (TBC1D10B). Also, TXL down-regulated 5 proteins including angiopoietin-2 isoform c precursor (ANGPT2), cytochrome c oxidase assembly factor 5 (COA5), connective tissue growth factor precursor (CTGF), cathepsin L1 isoform 2 (CTSL), and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (LOC101930123). These types of proteins mainly had vital functions, including cell proliferation, stress response, and regulation of metabolic process. The study presented differential proteins upon I/R injury through a proteomic analysis. TXL modulated the expression of proteins in CMECs and has a protective role in response to I/R. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. N-n-butyl Haloperidol Iodide Protects against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Regulating the ROS/MAPK/Egr-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shishi; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhong, Shuping; Gao, Fenfei; Chen, Yicun; Li, Weiqiu; Zheng, Fuchun; Shi, Ganggang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelium dysfunction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important initial event at the onset of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in which the Egr-1 transcription factor often serves as a master switch for various damage pathways following reperfusion injury. We hypothesized that an intracellular ROS/MAPK/Egr-1 signaling pathway is activated in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) following hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). ROS generation, by either H/R or the ROS donor xanthine oxidase-hypoxanthine (XO/HX) activated all three MAPKs (ERK1/2, JNK, p38), and induced Egr-1 expression and Egr-1 DNA-binding activity in CMECs, whereas ROS scavengers (EDA and NAC) had the opposite effect following H/R. Inhibitors of all three MAPKs individually inhibited induction of Egr-1 expression by H/R in CMECs. Moreover, N-n-butyl haloperidol (F2), previously shown to protect cardiomyocytes subjected to I/R, dose-dependently downregulated H/R-induced ROS generation, MAPK activation, and Egr-1 expression and activity in CMECs, whereas XO/HX and MAPK activators (EGF, anisomycin) antagonized the effects of F2. Inhibition of the ROS/MAPK/Egr-1 signaling pathway, by either F2, NAC, or inhibition of MAPK, increased CMEC viability and the GSH/GSSG ratio, and decreased Egr-1 nuclear translocation. These results show that the ROS/MAPK/Egr-1 signaling pathway mediates H/R injury in CMECs, and F2 blocks this pathway to protect against H/R injury and further alleviate myocardial I/R injury.

  15. Statins suppress glucose-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression by regulating RhoA and nuclear factor-κB activities in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Yao, Ning-Hua; Qian, Juan; Yang, Xiang-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible proinflammatory signaling pathways involved in statin inhibition of glucose-induced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs). Primary rat CMECs were grown in the presence of 5.7 or 23 mmol/L glucose. PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were measured by realtime polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. A pull-down assay was performed to determine RhoA activity. IκBα protein expression was measured by Western blotting, nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and its transcription activity was determined by a dual luciferase reporter gene assay. PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were both increased with high glucose concentrations, but they were significantly suppressed by simvastatin and atorvastatin treatment (P < 0.01) and the effects were reversed by mevalonate (100 μmol/L) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (10 μmol/L) but not farnesyl pyrophosphate (10 μmol/L). Such effects were similar to those of a RhoA inhibitor, C3 exoenzyme (5 μg/mL), inhibitors of RhoA kinase (ROCK), Y-27632 (10 μmol/L) and hydroxyfasudil (10 μmol/L) and an NF-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 (5 μmol/L). High glucose-induced RhoA and NF-κB activations in CMECs were both significantly inhibited by statins (P < 0.01). Simvastatin and atorvastatin equally suppress high glucose-induced PAI-1 expression. These effects of statins may occur partly by regulating the RhoA/ROCK-NF-κB pathway. The multifunctional roles of statins may be particularly beneficial for patients with metabolic syndrome.

  16. N-n-butyl Haloperidol Iodide Protects against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Regulating the ROS/MAPK/Egr-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shishi; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhong, Shuping; Gao, Fenfei; Chen, Yicun; Li, Weiqiu; Zheng, Fuchun; Shi, Ganggang

    2017-01-01

    Endothelium dysfunction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important initial event at the onset of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in which the Egr-1 transcription factor often serves as a master switch for various damage pathways following reperfusion injury. We hypothesized that an intracellular ROS/MAPK/Egr-1 signaling pathway is activated in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) following hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). ROS generation, by either H/R or the ROS donor xanthine oxidase-hypoxanthine (XO/HX) activated all three MAPKs (ERK1/2, JNK, p38), and induced Egr-1 expression and Egr-1 DNA-binding activity in CMECs, whereas ROS scavengers (EDA and NAC) had the opposite effect following H/R. Inhibitors of all three MAPKs individually inhibited induction of Egr-1 expression by H/R in CMECs. Moreover, N-n-butyl haloperidol (F2), previously shown to protect cardiomyocytes subjected to I/R, dose-dependently downregulated H/R-induced ROS generation, MAPK activation, and Egr-1 expression and activity in CMECs, whereas XO/HX and MAPK activators (EGF, anisomycin) antagonized the effects of F2. Inhibition of the ROS/MAPK/Egr-1 signaling pathway, by either F2, NAC, or inhibition of MAPK, increased CMEC viability and the GSH/GSSG ratio, and decreased Egr-1 nuclear translocation. These results show that the ROS/MAPK/Egr-1 signaling pathway mediates H/R injury in CMECs, and F2 blocks this pathway to protect against H/R injury and further alleviate myocardial I/R injury. PMID:28111550

  17. Rapid homogeneous endothelialization of high aspect ratio microvascular networks.

    PubMed

    Naik, Nisarga; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Haller, Carolyn A; Allen, Mark G; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2015-08-01

    Microvascularization of an engineered tissue construct is necessary to ensure the nourishment and viability of the hosted cells. Microvascular constructs can be created by seeding the luminal surfaces of microfluidic channel arrays with endothelial cells. However, in a conventional flow-based system, the uniformity of endothelialization of such an engineered microvascular network is constrained by mass transfer of the cells through high length-to-diameter (L/D) aspect ratio microchannels. Moreover, given the inherent limitations of the initial seeding process to generate a uniform cell coating, the large surface-area-to-volume ratio of microfluidic systems demands long culture periods for the formation of confluent cellular microconduits. In this report, we describe the design of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) microvascular constructs with reentrant microchannels that facilitates rapid, spatially homogeneous endothelial cell seeding of a high L/D (2 cm/35 μm; > 550:1) aspect ratio microchannels. MEMS technology was employed for the fabrication of a monolithic, elastomeric, reentrant microvascular construct. Isotropic etching and PDMS micromolding yielded a near-cylindrical microvascular channel array. A 'stretch - seed - seal' operation was implemented for uniform incorporation of endothelial cells along the entire microvascular area of the construct yielding endothelialized microvascular networks in less than 24 h. The feasibility of this endothelialization strategy and the uniformity of cellularization were established using confocal microscope imaging.

  18. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  19. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Muffley, Lara A.; Pan, Shin-Chen; Smith, Andria N.; Ga, Maricar; Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. PMID:22683922

  20. Targeting brain microvascular endothelial cells: a therapeutic approach to neuroprotection against stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qi-jin; Tao, Hong; Wang, Xin; Li, Ming-chang

    2015-01-01

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells form the interface between nervous tissue and circulating blood, and regulate central nervous system homeostasis. Brain microvascular endothelial cells differ from peripheral endothelial cells with regards expression of specific ion transporters and receptors, and contain fewer fenestrations and pinocytotic vesicles. Brain microvascular endothelial cells also synthesize several factors that influence blood vessel function. This review describes the morphological characteristics and functions of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and summarizes current knowledge regarding changes in brain microvascular endothelial cells during stroke progression and therapies. Future studies should focus on identifying mechanisms underlying such changes and developing possible neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. PMID:26807131

  1. Xiang-Qi-Tang and its active components exhibit anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant properties by inhibiting MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways in LPS-treated rat cardiac microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    He, Chang-Liang; Yi, Peng-Fei; Fan, Qiao-Jia; Shen, Hai-Qing; Jiang, Xiao-Lin; Qin, Qian-Qian; Song, Zhou; Zhang, Cui; Wu, Shuai-Cheng; Wei, Xu-Bin; Li, Ying-Lun; Fu, Ben-Dong

    2013-04-01

    Xiang-Qi-Tang (XQT) is a Chinese herbal formula containing Cyperus rotundus, Astragalus membranaceus and Andrographis paniculata. Alpha-Cyperone (CYP), astragaloside IV (AS-IV) and andrographolide (AND) are the three major active components in this formula. XQT may modulate the inflammatory or coagulant responses. We therefore assessed the effects of XQT on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory model of rat cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (RCMECs). XQT, CYP, AS-IV and AND inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and up-regulated the mRNA expression of Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). XQT and CYP inhibited the secretion of tissue factor (TF). To further explore the mechanism, we found that XQT, or its active components CYP, AS-IV and AND significantly inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 phosphorylation protein expression as well as decreased the phosphorylation levels of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65 proteins in LPS-stimulated RCMECs. These results suggested that XQT and its active components inhibited the expression of inflammatory and coagulant mediators via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) and NF-κB signaling pathways. These findings may contribute to future research on the action mechanisms of this formula, as well as therapy for inflammation- or coagulation-related diseases.

  2. Non-invasive Assessment of Microvascular and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cynthia; Daskalakis, Constantine; Falkner, Bonita

    2013-01-01

    The authors have utilized capillaroscopy and forearm blood flow techniques to investigate the role of microvascular dysfunction in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Capillaroscopy is a non-invasive, relatively inexpensive methodology for directly visualizing the microcirculation. Percent capillary recruitment is assessed by dividing the increase in capillary density induced by postocclusive reactive hyperemia (postocclusive reactive hyperemia capillary density minus baseline capillary density), by the maximal capillary density (observed during passive venous occlusion). Percent perfused capillaries represents the proportion of all capillaries present that are perfused (functionally active), and is calculated by dividing postocclusive reactive hyperemia capillary density by the maximal capillary density. Both percent capillary recruitment and percent perfused capillaries reflect the number of functional capillaries. The forearm blood flow (FBF) technique provides accepted non-invasive measures of endothelial function: The ratio FBFmax/FBFbase is computed as an estimate of vasodilation, by dividing the mean of the four FBFmax values by the mean of the four FBFbase values. Forearm vascular resistance at maximal vasodilation (FVRmax) is calculated as the mean arterial pressure (MAP) divided by FBFmax. Both the capillaroscopy and forearm techniques are readily acceptable to patients and can be learned quickly. The microvascular and endothelial function measures obtained using the methodologies described in this paper may have future utility in clinical patient cardiovascular risk-reduction strategies. As we have published reports demonstrating that microvascular and endothelial dysfunction are found in initial stages of hypertension including prehypertension, microvascular and endothelial function measures may eventually aid in early identification, risk-stratification and prevention of end-stage vascular pathology, with its potentially fatal consequences. PMID

  3. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Friends or Foes?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cai-Guo; Zhang, Ning; Yuan, Sha-Sha; Ma, Yan; Yang, Long-Yan; Feng, Ying-Mei; Zhao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Despite being featured as metabolic disorder, diabetic patients are largely affected by hyperglycemia-induced vascular abnormality. Accumulated evidence has confirmed the beneficial effect of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in coronary heart disease. However, antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment is the main therapy for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, indicating the uncertain role of EPCs in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular disease. In this review, we first illustrate how hyperglycemia induces metabolic and epigenetic changes in EPCs, which exerts deleterious impact on their number and function. We then discuss how abnormal angiogenesis develops in eyes and kidneys under diabetes condition, focusing on “VEGF uncoupling with nitric oxide” and “competitive angiopoietin 1/angiopoietin 2” mechanisms that are shared in both organs. Next, we dissect the nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular complications. After we overview the current EPCs-related strategies, we point out new EPCs-associated options for future exploration. Ultimately, we hope that this review would uncover the mysterious nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular disease for therapeutics. PMID:27313624

  4. The expression of ADAMTS13 in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anyou; Duan, Qiaohong; Wu, Jingsheng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Zimin

    2016-06-01

    ADAMTS13, as a specific von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease, prevents microvascular thrombosis of VWF/platelet thrombi. It has been reported that human vascular endothelial cells could also synthesize and secrete ADAMTS13, and these reports were focused in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Considering the particularity of its huge quantity and structure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) in the body, whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs also needs to be confirmed. To investigate whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) amplification detected ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1 cell line. The expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF were detected by fluorescence immunoassay and western blot. We observed the expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 in HMECs. We confirmed the expression of ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1, and found that there were some partly common distributions of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF. This study provides the evidence that HMECs also express ADAMTS13. HMECs might also be a primary source for human plasma ADAMTS13. The overlap region for the distribution of ADAMTS13 and VWF suggests that ADAMTS13 might have a potential regulation role for VWF inside cells.

  5. Serum factors involved in human microvascular endothelial cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Kevin; Siddiqui, Rafat A; Sliva, Daniel; Garcia, Joe G N; English, Denis

    2002-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that lipid and protein angiogenic factors operate in tandem to induce optimal angiogenic responses in vivo. This study was undertaken to clarify the nature of the substances in human serum that are responsible for its remarkable ability to promote capillary morphogenesis in vitro. The ability of dilute (2%) human serum to promote the morphogenic differentiation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells on Matrigel supports was depleted by more than 50% by treatment of the serum with activated charcoal, a procedure that effectively removes biologically active lipid growth factors. The remainder of the activity within serum was lost on heating to 60 degrees C for 60 minutes, indicating the involvement of a protein in the response. The ability of charcoal-treated serum to promote capillary morphogenesis was completely restored by the addition of sphingosine 1-phosphate (SPP, 500 nmol/L), but other lipids thought to be released into serum during clotting were ineffective. In addition, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) effectively restored the ability of heat-treated serum to promote endothelial cell morphogenesis, but other protein growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, were ineffective. Together, SPP and bFGF were as effective as whole serum in promoting capillary morphogenesis. Responses to purified SPP were entirely sensitive to the effects of preexposure of the cells to pertussis toxin, whereas responses to bFGF were entirely pertussis toxin-resistant. Consistent with our hypothesis that two distinct factors in serum play a role in promoting capillary morphogenesis, responses induced by serum were inhibited approximately 50% by preexposure of endothelial cells to pertussis toxin. We conclude that platelet-released SPP acts in conjunction with circulating bFGF to promote capillary formation by microvascular endothelial cells. Lipid and protein growth factors

  6. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  7. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  8. Methodological issues in the assessment of skin microvascular endothelial function in humans.

    PubMed

    Cracowski, Jean-Luc; Minson, Christopher T; Salvat-Melis, Muriel; Halliwill, John R

    2006-09-01

    The study of microvascular function can be performed in humans using laser Doppler flowmetry of the skin. This technology lends itself to a wide range of applications for studying the endothelial function of skin blood vessels. We review the advantages and limitations of postocclusive hyperemia, local thermal hyperemia, acetylcholine iontophoresis, flowmotion and association with microdialysis as tools with which to investigate skin microvascular endothelial function in humans. Postocclusive hyperemia, thermal hyperemia and acetylcholine iontophoresis provide integrated indexes of microvascular function rather than specific endothelial markers. However, they are valuable tools and can be used as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials in which the assessment of microvascular function in humans is required.

  9. Transcellular transport of CCL2 across brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shujun; Song, Li; Serwanski, David R; Kuziel, William A; Pachter, Joel S

    2008-03-01

    The means by which the chemokine CCL2 produced in the brain parenchyma can recruit leukocytes lying behind the highly impervious endothelium of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has remained a paradox. As other chemokines have been evidenced to stimulate their own synthesis and release by peripheral microvascular endothelial cells, and/or undergo transcytosis in the abluminal-to-luminal direction, we determined whether CCL2 experiences similar fates across brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Using cultured BMEC as a paradigm of the BBB, it was observed that exogenous unlabeled CCL2 actually depressed the release of endogenous CCL2, and further caused diminished CCL2 mRNA levels in these cells. On the other hand, exogenous (125)I-labeled CCL2 exhibited transport across BMEC in a manner that was sensitive to temperature, competition by excess unlabeled CCL2 but not unlabeled CCL3, knockdown of caveolin-1/caveolae, and elimination of the cognate CCL2 receptor CCR2. These results implied a facet of CCL2 transport by a transcellular mechanism partly involving binding of CCL2 to CCR2, and subsequent transfer to caveolae vesicles for transcytosis. This notion was supported by double-label immuno-electronmicroscopy, which revealed co-localization of caveolin-1 with exogenous CCL2, during this chemokine's transit across BMEC. Collectively, these findings provide a rationale by which CCL2, deposited on the abluminal side of the brain microvasculature during inflammatory episodes, can be relayed across the BBB to foster leukocyte recruitment.

  10. NAP reduces murine microvascular endothelial cells proliferation induced by hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Scuderi, Soraya; Maugeri, Grazia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; Drago, Filippo; D'Agata, Velia

    2014-11-01

    Hyperglycemia has been identified as a risk factor responsible for micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetes. NAP (Davunetide) is a peptide whose neuroprotective actions are widely demonstrated, although its biological role on endothelial dysfunctions induced by hyperglycemia remains uninvestigated. In the present study we hypothesized that NAP could play a protective role on hyperglycemia-induced endothelial cell proliferation. To this end we investigated the effects of NAP on an in vitro model of murine microvascular endothelial cells grown in high glucose for 7 days. The MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and cyclin D1 protein expression analysis revealed that NAP treatment significantly reduces viability and proliferation of the cells. Hyperglycemia induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and/or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathways in a time-dependent manner. NAP treatment reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK and AKT in cells grown in high glucose. These evidences suggest that NAP might be effective in the regulation of endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia.

  11. Hypoxia induces angiogenic factors in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Martinez, J; Yin, X; Sanchez, A; Tripathy, D; Grammas, P

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia is increasingly recognized as an important contributing factor to the development of brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the periphery, hypoxia is a powerful regulator of angiogenesis. However, vascular endothelial cells are remarkably heterogeneous and little is known about how brain endothelial cells respond to hypoxic challenge. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of hypoxic challenge on the angiogenic response of cultured brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells. Brain endothelial cell cultures were initiated from isolated rat brain microvessels and subjected to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for various time periods. The results showed that hypoxia induced rapid (≤ 0.5h) expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and that cell viability, assessed by MTT assay, was unaffected within the first 8h. Examination of brain endothelial cell cultures for pro- and anti-angiogenic proteins by western blot, RT-PCR and ELISA revealed that within 0.5 to 2h of hypoxia levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and endothelin-1 mRNA and protein were elevated. The expression of heme oxygenase-1 also increased but only after 8h of hypoxia. In contrast, similar hypoxia exposure evoked a decrease in endothelial nitric oxide synthase and thrombospondin-2 levels. Exposure of brain endothelial cell cultures to hypoxia resulted in a significant (p<0.001) decrease (94%) in tube length, an in vitro index of angiogenesis, compared to control cultures. The data indicate that, despite a shift toward a pro-angiogenic phenotype, hypoxia inhibited vessel formation in brain endothelial cells. These results suggest that in brain endothelial cells expression of angiogenic factors is not sufficient for the development of new vessels. Further work is needed to determine what factors/conditions prevent hypoxia-induced angiogenic changes from culminating in the formation of new brain blood vessels and what role this may play in the pathologic

  12. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia.

  13. Syndecan-2 downregulation impairs angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noguer, Oriol Villena, Joan; Lorita, Jordi; Vilaro, Senen; Reina, Manuel

    2009-03-10

    The formation of new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, is a necessary process during development but also for tumour growth and other pathologies. It is promoted by different growth factors that stimulate endothelial cells to proliferate, migrate, and generate new tubular structures. Syndecans, transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans, bind such growth factors through their glycosaminoglycan chains and could transduce the signal to the cytoskeleton, thus regulating cell behaviour. We demonstrated that syndecan-2, the major syndecan expressed by human microvascular endothelial cells, is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins, in both bidimensional and tridimensional culture conditions. The role of syndecan-2 in 'in vitro' tumour angiogenesis was also examined by inhibiting its core protein expression with antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. Downregulation of syndecan-2 reduces spreading and adhesion of endothelial cells, enhances their migration, but also impairs the formation of capillary-like structures. These results suggest that syndecan-2 has an important function in some of the necessary steps that make up the angiogenic process. We therefore propose a pivotal role of this heparan sulphate proteoglycan in the formation of new blood vessels.

  14. Isolation of primary murine brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Epping, Lisa; Herrmann, Alexander M; Meuth, Sven G

    2014-11-14

    The blood-brain-barrier is ultrastructurally assembled by a monolayer of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) interconnected by a junctional complex of tight and adherens junctions. Together with other cell-types such as astrocytes or pericytes, they form the neurovascular unit (NVU), which specifically regulates the interchange of fluids, molecules and cells between the peripheral blood and the CNS. Through this complex and dynamic system BMECs are involved in various processes maintaining the homeostasis of the CNS. A dysfunction of the BBB is observed as an essential step in the pathogenesis of many severe CNS diseases. However, specific and targeted therapies are very limited, as the underlying mechanisms are still far from being understood. Animal and in vitro models have been extensively used to gain in-depth understanding of complex physiological and pathophysiological processes. By reduction and simplification it is possible to focus the investigation on the subject of interest and to exclude a variety of confounding factors. However, comparability and transferability are also reduced in model systems, which have to be taken into account for evaluation. The most common animal models are based on mice, among other reasons, mainly due to the constantly increasing possibilities of methodology. In vitro studies of isolated murine BMECs might enable an in-depth analysis of their properties and of the blood-brain-barrier under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Further insights into the complex mechanisms at the BBB potentially provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies. This protocol describes a method to isolate primary murine microvascular endothelial cells by a sequence of physical and chemical purification steps. Special considerations for purity and cultivation of MBMECs as well as quality control, potential applications and limitations are discussed.

  15. The role of intrinsic apoptotic signaling in hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Devendra A; Tharakan, Binu; Hunter, Felicia A; Childs, Ed W

    2014-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock leads to endothelial cell barrier dysfunction resulting in microvascular hyperpermeability. Hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular hyperpermeability is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with traumatic injuries. The results from our laboratory have illustrated a possible pathophysiological mechanism showing involvement of mitochondria-mediated "intrinsic" apoptotic signaling in regulating hemorrhagic shock-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Hemorrhagic shock results in overexpression of Bcl-2 family of pro-apoptotic protein, BAK, in the microvascular endothelial cells. The increase in BAK initiates "intrinsic" apoptotic signaling cascade with the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in the cytoplasm and activation of downstream effector caspase-3, leading to loss of endothelial cell barrier integrity. Thus, this review article offers a brief overview of important findings from our past and present research work along with new leads for future research. The summary of our research work will provide information leading to different avenues in developing novel strategies against microvascular hyperpermeability following hemorrhagic shock.

  16. Increased human dermal microvascular endothelial cell survival induced by cysteamine.

    PubMed

    Besouw, M; van den Heuvel, L; van Eijsden, R; Bongaers, I; Kluijtmans, L; Dewerchin, M; Levtchenko, E

    2013-11-01

    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease caused by intralysosomal cystine accumulation, treated with cysteamine. Recently, new adverse effects of cysteamine were reported. Skin biopsies showed microvascular proliferation (angioendotheliomatosis). To examine the mechanism of angioendotheliomatosis associated with cysteamine toxicity, we examined the effect of cysteamine on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC). After cysteamine exposure (range 0-3.0 mM) during 24 h, cell viability was measured using water soluble tetrazolium salt-1 (WST-1) in both control HDMVEC and fibroblasts. Cell proliferation and apoptosis rate were measured in HDMVEC by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and caspase 3 and caspase 7 activity, respectively. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) was measured in HDMVEC after cysteamine exposure of 0, 0.1 or 1.0 mM. Medium and cysteamine were refreshed every 6 h to mimic the in vivo situation. Next, cell viability in HDMVEC was measured after 24 h of GSH exposure (range 0-10.0 mM). HDMVEC viability and proliferation increased after cysteamine exposure 0.03-3.0 mM (p < 0.01) and 0.03-1.0 mM (p = 0.01) respectively; cell viability in fibroblasts was not affected by incubation with cysteamine. Apoptosis remained unaffected by incubation with 0-1.0 mM cysteamine, 3.0 mM caused increased apoptosis. Intracellular GSH was significantly increased after incubation with cysteamine 0.1 mM (p = 0.02) and 1.0 mM (p < 0.01). HDMVEC viability increased after exposure to GSH 1.0-5.0 mM (p < 0.01). Cysteamine concentrations, similar to those described in plasma of cystinosis patients, stimulate HDMVEC viability and proliferation and increase intracellular GSH content. We postulate that this mechanism might underlie angioendotheliomatosis induced by cysteamine.

  17. Intrinsic sex-specific differences in microvascular endothelial cell phosphodiesterases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjie; Bingaman, Susan; Huxley, Virginia H

    2010-04-01

    The importance of gonadal hormones in the regulation of vascular function has been documented. An alternate and essential contribution of the sex chromosomes to sex differences in vascular function is poorly understood. We reported previously sex differences in microvessel permeability (P(s)) responses to adenosine that were mediated by the cAMP signaling pathway (Wang J, PhD thesis, 2005; Wang J and Huxley V, Proceedings of the VIII World Congress of Microcirculation, 2007; Wang J and Huxley VH, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291: H3094-H3105, 2006). The two cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, central to the regulation of vascular barrier integrity, are hydrolyzed by phosphodiesterases (PDE). We hypothesized that microvascular endothelial cells (EC) would retain intrinsic and inheritable sexually dimorphic genes with respect to the PDEs modulating EC barrier function. Primary cultured microvascular EC from skeletal muscles isolated from male and female rats, respectively, were used. SRY (a sex-determining region Y gene) mRNA expression was observed exclusively in male, not female, cells. The predominant isoform among PDE1-5, present in both XY and XX EC, was PDE4. Expression mRNA levels of PDE1A (male > female) and PDE3B (male < female) were sex dependent; PDE2A, PDE4D, and PDE5A were sex independent. Barrier function, P(s), was determined from measures of albumin flux across confluent primary cultured microvessel XY and XX EC monolayers. Consistent with intact in situ microvessels, basal monolayer P(s) did not differ between XY (1.7 +/- 0.2 x 10(-6) cm/s; n = 8) and XX (1.8 +/- 0.1 x 10(-6) cm/s; n = 10) EC. Cilostazol, a PDE3 inhibitor, reduced (11%, P < 0.05) P(s) in XX, not XY, cells. These findings demonstrate the presence and maintenance of intrinsic sex-related differences in gene expression and cellular phenotype by microvascular EC in a gonadal-hormone-free environment. Furthermore, intrinsic cell-sex likely contributes significantly to sexual dimorphism

  18. Intrinsic sex-specific differences in microvascular endothelial cell phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Bingaman, Susan; Huxley, Virginia H.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of gonadal hormones in the regulation of vascular function has been documented. An alternate and essential contribution of the sex chromosomes to sex differences in vascular function is poorly understood. We reported previously sex differences in microvessel permeability (Ps) responses to adenosine that were mediated by the cAMP signaling pathway (Wang J, PhD thesis, 2005; Wang J and Huxley V, Proceedings of the VIII World Congress of Microcirculation, 2007; Wang J and Huxley VH, Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 291: H3094–H3105, 2006). The two cyclic nucleotides, cAMP and cGMP, central to the regulation of vascular barrier integrity, are hydrolyzed by phosphodiesterases (PDE). We hypothesized that microvascular endothelial cells (EC) would retain intrinsic and inheritable sexually dimorphic genes with respect to the PDEs modulating EC barrier function. Primary cultured microvascular EC from skeletal muscles isolated from male and female rats, respectively, were used. SRY (a sex-determining region Y gene) mRNA expression was observed exclusively in male, not female, cells. The predominant isoform among PDE1–5, present in both XY and XX EC, was PDE4. Expression mRNA levels of PDE1A (male > female) and PDE3B (male < female) were sex dependent; PDE2A, PDE4D, and PDE5A were sex independent. Barrier function, Ps, was determined from measures of albumin flux across confluent primary cultured microvessel XY and XX EC monolayers. Consistent with intact in situ microvessels, basal monolayer Ps did not differ between XY (1.7 ± 0.2 × 10−6 cm/s; n = 8) and XX (1.8 ± 0.1 × 10−6 cm/s; n = 10) EC. Cilostazol, a PDE3 inhibitor, reduced (11%, P < 0.05) Ps in XX, not XY, cells. These findings demonstrate the presence and maintenance of intrinsic sex-related differences in gene expression and cellular phenotype by microvascular EC in a gonadal-hormone-free environment. Furthermore, intrinsic cell-sex likely contributes significantly to sexual dimorphism in

  19. Dobesilate enhances endothelial nitric oxide synthase-activity in macro- and microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suschek, Christoph; Kolb, Hubert; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria

    1997-01-01

    Dobesilate is used for normalizing vascular dysfunction in a number of diseases. In search for an effect on endothelial NO production, macrovascular endothelial cells from rat aorta, microvascular endothelial cells from rat exocrine pancreatic tissue, and capillary endothelial cells from rat islets, were cultured in the presence or absence of Mg-Dobesilate. The activity of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (ecNOS) in resident cells as well as of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in cytokine-activated cells was measured indirectly by recording the citrulline concentrations in culture supernatants.In each of the different endothelial cells Mg-Dobesilate incubation (0.25–1 mM) for 24 h led to a significant and concentration-dependent increase in ecNOS-activities. With cytokine-activated endothelial cell cultures only moderate effects were seen with little or no concentration-dependency. Addition of the NOS-inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine led to a significant suppression of citrulline formation in all cultures as an evidence for the enzyme specificity of these effects.iNOS- and ecNOS-specific reverse transcription and semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) with RNA from resident or cytokine-activated endothelial cells gave no evidence for an increase in NOS-specific mRNA after Mg-Dobesilate-treatment. Furthermore, Dobesilate-mediated enhancement of NO synthesis in resting endothelial cells was not due to iNOS induction in these cells, as no iNOS-specific signal was found by RT–PCR. PMID:9421302

  20. Pathophysiology of hypertension: interactions between macro and microvascular alterations through endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yannoutsos, Alexandra; Levy, Bernard I; Safar, Michel E; Slama, Gerard; Blacher, Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial systemic chronic disorder through functional and structural macrovascular and microvascular alterations. Macrovascular alterations are featured by arterial stiffening, disturbed wave reflection and altered central to peripheral pulse pressure amplification. Microvascular alterations, including altered wall-to-lumen ratio of larger arterioles, vasomotor tone abnormalities and network rarefaction, lead to disturbed tissue perfusion and susceptibility to ischemia. Central arterial stiffness and microvascular alterations are common denominators of organ damages. Vascular alterations are intercorrelated, amplifying the haemodynamic load and causing further damage in the arterial network. A plausible precursor role of vascular alterations in incident hypertension provides new insights for preventive and therapeutic strategies targeting macro and microvasculature. Cumulative metabolic burden and oxidative stress lead to chronic endothelial injury, promoting structural and functional vascular alterations, especially in the microvascular network. Pathophysiology of hypertension may then be revisited, based on both macrovascular and microvascular alterations, with a precursor role of endothelial dysfunction for the latter.

  1. Conditioned Media from Microvascular Endothelial Cells Cultured in Simulated Microgravity Inhibit Osteoblast Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Castiglioni, Sara; Maier, Jeanette A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims. Gravity contributes to the maintenance of bone integrity. Accordingly, weightlessness conditions during space flight accelerate bone loss and experimental models in real and simulated microgravity show decreased osteoblastic and increased osteoclastic activities. It is well known that the endothelium and bone cells cross-talk and this intercellular communication is vital to regulate bone homeostasis. Because microgravity promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction, we anticipated that the molecular cross-talk between endothelial cells exposed to simulated microgravity and osteoblasts might be altered. Results. We cultured human microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel device developed by NASA. Endothelial cells in microgravity show growth inhibition and release higher amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6 than controls. Conditioned media collected from microvascular endothelial cells in simulated microgravity were used to culture human osteoblasts and were shown to retard osteoblast proliferation and inhibit their activity. Discussion. Microvascular endothelial cells in microgravity are growth retarded and release high amounts of matrix metalloproteases type 2 and interleukin-6, which might play a role in retarding the growth of osteoblasts and impairing their osteogenic activity. Conclusions. We demonstrate that since simulated microgravity modulates microvascular endothelial cell function, it indirectly impairs osteoblastic function. PMID:25210716

  2. Myocardial microvascular permeability, interstitial oedema, and compromised cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Dongaonkar, Ranjeet M.; Stewart, Randolph H.; Geissler, Hans J.; Laine, Glen A.

    2010-01-01

    The heart, perhaps more than any other organ, is exquisitely sensitive to increases in microvascular permeability and the accumulation of myocardial interstitial oedema fluid. Whereas some organs can cope with profound increases in the interstitial fluid volume or oedema formation without a compromise in function, heart function is significantly compromised with only a few percent increase in the interstitial fluid volume. This would be of little consequence if myocardial oedema were an uncommon pathology. On the contrary, myocardial oedema forms in response to many disease states as well as clinical interventions such as cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest common to many cardiothoracic surgical procedures. The heart's inability to function effectively in the presence of myocardial oedema is further confounded by the perplexing fact that the resolution of myocardial oedema does not restore normal cardiac function. We will attempt to provide some insight as to how microvascular permeability and myocardial oedema formation compromise cardiac function and discuss the acute changes that might take place in the myocardium to perpetuate compromised cardiac function following oedema resolution. We will also discuss compensatory changes in the interstitial matrix of the heart in response to chronic myocardial oedema and the role they play to optimize myocardial function during chronic oedemagenic disease. PMID:20472566

  3. Host defenses to Rickettsia rickettsii infection contribute to increased microvascular permeability in human cerebral endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael E; Olano, Juan P

    2008-03-01

    Rickettsiae are arthropod-borne intracellular bacterial pathogens that primarily infect the microvascular endothelium leading to systemic spread of the organisms and the major pathophysiological effect, increased microvascular permeability, and edema in vital organs such as the lung and brain. Much work has been done on mechanisms of immunity to rickettsiae, as well as the responses of endothelial cells to rickettsial invasion. However, to date, no one has described the mechanisms of increased microvascular permeability during acute rickettsiosis. We sought to establish an in vitro model of human endothelial-target rickettsial infection using the etiological agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Rickettsia rickettsii, and human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells infected with R. rickettsii exhibited a dose-dependent decrease in trans-endothelial electrical resistance, which translates into increased monolayer permeability. Additionally, we showed that the addition of pro-inflammatory stimuli essential to rickettsial immunity dramatically enhanced this effect. This increase in permeability correlates with dissociation of adherens junctions between endothelial cells and is not dependent on the presence of nitric oxide. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that increased microvascular permeability associated with rickettsial infection is partly attributable to intracellular rickettsiae and partly attributable to the immune defenses that have evolved to protect the host from rickettsial spread.

  4. Influence of VEGF stimulated human macrophages on the proliferation of dermal microvascular endothelial cells: Coculture experiments.

    PubMed

    Hiebl, B; Bog, S; Mrowietz, C; Jünger, M; Jung, F; Lendlein, A; Franke, R-P

    2010-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are known to exhibit pro-angiogenic activities after VEGF stimulation. Recently, it was shown that VEGF stimulated macrophages can support growth of microvascular endothelial cells from the lung when both cell types were cocultured using a cell ratio of 1:1. However, endothelial cells can have different phenotypic characteristics and metabolism depending on the originating vascular bed and tissues, and only few data have been published regarding the regiospecific sensitivity of microvascular endothelial cells for angiogenic stimuli. Reports about differences in the microvascular bed of the lung and the skin motivated to investigate angiogenic effects of VEGF stimulated macrophages (mΦa) on the doubling time and the cell growth behaviour of skin derived microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC/S). During the study period of 60 days, mΦa supported growth and proliferation of the HMVEC/S, when mΦa and HMVEC/S were cocultured at a ratio of 0.5:1. However, these effects were not seen in a 1:1 coculture. This result indicates that there is a positive correlation between the pro-angiogenic effects of mΦa and the number of endothelial cells in the direct neighbourhood of the mΦa and also suggests a different sensitivity of microvascular endothelial cells to angiogenic stimuli depending on the tissue from which they were isolated.

  5. The effects of Secondhand Smoke (SHS) exposure on microvascular endothelial function among healthy women.

    PubMed

    Sanip, Zulkefli; Hanaffi, Siti Hajar Mohd; Ahmad, Imran; Yusoff, Siti Suhaila Mohd; Rasool, Aida Hanum Ghulam; Yusoff, Harmy Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure could impair endothelial function. However, the effect of SHS exposure specifically on microvascular endothelial function is not well understood. This study aimed to determine the effects of SHS exposure on microvascular endothelial function among non-smoking, generally healthy women. We studied 127 women; and based on their hair nicotine levels measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, 25 of them were categorized as having higher hair nicotine levels, 25 were grouped as having lower hair nicotine and 77 women were grouped into the non-detected group. The non-detected group did not have detectable levels of hair nicotine. Anthropometry, blood pressure (BP), lipid profile and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were measured accordingly. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed non-invasively using laser Doppler fluximetry and the process of iontophoresis involving acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside as endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilators respectively. The mean hair nicotine levels for higher and lower hair nicotine groups were 0.74 (1.04) and 0.05 (0.01) ng/mg respectively. There were no significant differences in anthropometry, BP, lipid profile and hsCRP between these groups. There were also no significant differences in the microvascular perfusion and endothelial function between these groups. In this study, generally healthy non-smoking women who have higher, lower and non-detected hair nicotine levels did not show significant differences in their microvascular endothelial function. Low levels of SHS exposure among generally healthy non-smoking women may not significantly impair their microvascular endothelial function.

  6. Cardiac microvascular rarefaction in hyperthyroidism-induced left ventricle dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Felipe; Estato, Vanessa; Carvalho, Vinícius Frias; Torres, Rafael Carvalho; Lessa, Marcos Adriano; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2013-10-01

    The pathophysiology underlying hyperthyroidism-induced left ventricle (LV) dysfunction and hypertrophy directly involves the heart and indirectly involves the neuroendocrine systems. The effects of hyperthyroidism on the microcirculation are still controversial in experimental models. We investigated the effects of hyperthyroidism on the cardiac function and microcirculation of an experimental rat model. Male Wistar rats (170-250 g) were divided into two groups: the euthyroid group (n = 10), which was treated with 0.9% saline solution, and the hyperthyroid group (n = 10), which was treated with l-thyroxine (600 μg/kg/day, i.p.) during 14 days. An echocardiographic study was performed to evaluate the alterations in cardiac function, structure and geometry. The structural capillary density and the expression of angiotensin II AT1 receptor in the LV were analyzed using histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Hyperthyroidism was found to induce profound cardiovascular alterations, such as systolic hypertension, tachycardia, LV dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy, and myocardial fibrosis. This study demonstrates the existence of structural capillary rarefaction and the down-regulation of the cardiac angiotensin II AT1 receptor in the myocardium of hyperthyroid rats in comparison with euthyroid rats. Microvascular rarefaction may be involved in the pathophysiology of hyperthyroidism-induced cardiovascular alterations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Deeper Penetration of Erythrocytes into the Endothelial Glycocalyx Is Associated with Impaired Microvascular Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Boels, Margien G. S.; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W.; de Mutsert, Renée; den Heijer, Martin; Rosendaal, Frits R.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in endothelial glycocalyx are one of the earliest changes in development of cardiovascular disease. The endothelial glycocalyx is both an important biological modifier of interactions between flowing blood and the vessel wall, and a determinant of organ perfusion. We hypothesize that deeper penetration of erythrocytes into the glycocalyx is associated with reduced microvascular perfusion. The population-based prospective cohort study (the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity [NEO] study) includes 6,673 middle-aged individuals (oversampling of overweight and obese individuals). Within this cohort, we have imaged the sublingual microvasculature of 915 participants using sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging together with a recently developed automated acquisition and analysis approach. Presence of RBC (as a marker of microvascular perfusion) and perfused boundary region (PBR), a marker for endothelial glycocalyx barrier properties for RBC accessibility, were assessed in vessels between 5 and 25 µm RBC column width. A wide range of variability in PBR measurements, with a mean PBR of 2.14 µm (range: 1.43–2.86 µm), was observed. Linear regression analysis showed a marked association between PBR and microvascular perfusion, reflected by RBC filling percentage (regression coefficient β: −0.034; 95% confidence interval: −0.037 to −0.031). We conclude that microvascular beds with a thick (“healthy”) glycocalyx (low PBR), reflects efficient perfusion of the microvascular bed. In contrast, a thin (“risk”) glycocalyx (high PBR) is associated with a less efficient and defective microvascular perfusion. PMID:24816787

  8. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M.; Borradaile, Nica M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors “Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity” (Hughes-Large et al. 2014). Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA) values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR. PMID:26937468

  9. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Borradaile, Nica M

    2016-03-01

    The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors "Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity" (Hughes-Large et al. 2014). Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA) values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR.

  10. Novel cardiolipin therapeutic protects endothelial mitochondria during renal ischemia and mitigates microvascular rarefaction, inflammation, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoyi; Soong, Yi; Seshan, Surya V; Szeto, Hazel H

    2014-05-01

    Microvascular rarefaction, or loss of microvascular density, is increasingly implicated in the progression from acute ischemic kidney injury to chronic kidney disease. Microvascular dropout results in chronic tissue hypoxia, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis. There is currently no therapeutic intervention for microvascular rarefaction. We hypothesize that capillary dropout begins with ischemic damage to endothelial mitochondria due to cardiolipin peroxidation, resulting in loss of cristae and the failure to regenerate ATP upon reperfusion. SS-31 is a cell-permeable peptide that targets the inner mitochondrial membrane and binds selectively to cardiolipin. It was recently shown to inhibit cardiolipin peroxidation by cytochrome c peroxidase activity, and it has been shown to protect mitochondrial cristae in proximal tubular cells during ischemia, and accelerated ATP recovery upon reperfusion. We found mitochondrial swelling and loss of cristae membranes in endothelial and medullary tubular epithelial cells after 45-min ischemia in the rat. The loss of cristae membranes limited the ability of these cells to regenerate ATP upon reperfusion and led to loss of vascular integrity and to tubular cell swelling. SS-31 prevented mitochondria swelling and protected cristae membranes in both endothelial and epithelial cells. By minimizing endothelial and epithelial cell injury, SS-31 prevented "no-reflow" after ischemia and significantly reduced the loss of peritubular capillaries and cortical arterioles, interstitial inflammation, and fibrosis at 4 wk after ischemia. These results suggest that mitochondria protection represents an upstream target for pharmacological intervention in microvascular rarefaction and fibrosis.

  11. Human microvascular endothelial cells express receptors for platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.G.; Kim, Insoon; Calabresi, P.; Frackelton, A.R. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Endothelial cells have been widely thought to be unresponsive to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, a major growth factor released from stimulated platelets at the sites of vascular insults) and devoid of PDGF receptors. Nevertheless, in examining the growth-factor responses of microvascular endothelial cells isolated from human omental adipose tissue, the authors were surprised to detect PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180-kDa glycoprotein, subsequently identified as the cellular receptor for PDGF by specific immunoprecipitation. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF binding to human microvascular endothelial cells revealed 30,000 PDGF receptors per cell with a K{sub d} of 0.14 nM. Normal cellular consequences of receptor activation were also observed, including tyrosine phosphorylation of a 42-kDa protein and serine phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Furthermore, PDGF was mitogenic for these cells. Microvascular endothelial cells play a central role in neovascularization required for wound healing and solid tumor growth. Thus, the discovery of functional PFDG receptors on human microvascular endothelial cells suggests a direct role for PDGF in this process.

  12. Ascorbate inhibits NADPH oxidase subunit p47phox expression in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Schuster, David P; Tyml, Karel; Wilson, John X

    2007-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is central to the etiology of endothelial dysfunction in sepsis. Endothelial cells respond to infection by activating NADPH oxidases that are sources of intracellular ROS and potential targets for therapeutic administration of antioxidants. Ascorbate is an antioxidant that accumulates in these cells and improves capillary blood flow, vascular reactivity, arterial blood pressure, and survival in experimental sepsis. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that ascorbate regulates NADPH oxidases in microvascular endothelial cells exposed to septic insult. We observed that incubation with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) increased NADPH oxidase activity and expression of the enzyme subunit p47phox in mouse microvascular endothelial cells of skeletal muscle origin. Pretreatment of the cells with ascorbate prevented these increases. Polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase and selective inhibitors of Jak2 also abrogated induction of p47phox. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide induced p47phox expression that was prevented by pretreatment of the cells with ascorbate. LPS+IFNgamma or hydrogen peroxide activated the Jak2/Stat1/IRF1 pathway and this effect was also inhibited by ascorbate. In conclusion, ascorbate blocks the stimulation by septic insult of redox-sensitive Jak2/Stat1/IRF1 signaling, p47phox expression, and NADPH oxidase activity in microvascular endothelial cells. Because endothelial NADPH oxidases produce ROS that can cause endothelial dysfunction, their inhibition by ascorbate may represent a new strategy for sepsis therapy.

  13. Capsule Independent Uptake of the Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans into Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sabiiti, Wilber; May, Robin C.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a life-threatening fungal disease with a high rate of mortality among HIV/AIDS patients across the world. The ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is central to the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis, but the way in which this occurs remains unclear. Here we use both mouse and human brain derived endothelial cells (bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3) to accurately quantify fungal uptake and survival within brain endothelial cells. Our data indicate that the adherence and internalisation of cryptococci by brain microvascular endothelial cells is an infrequent event involving small numbers of cryptococcal yeast cells. Interestingly, this process requires neither active signalling from the fungus nor the presence of the fungal capsule. Thus entry into brain microvascular endothelial cells is most likely a passive event that occurs following ‘trapping’ within capillary beds of the BBB. PMID:22530025

  14. Capsule independent uptake of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans into brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sabiiti, Wilber; May, Robin C

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a life-threatening fungal disease with a high rate of mortality among HIV/AIDS patients across the world. The ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is central to the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis, but the way in which this occurs remains unclear. Here we use both mouse and human brain derived endothelial cells (bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3) to accurately quantify fungal uptake and survival within brain endothelial cells. Our data indicate that the adherence and internalisation of cryptococci by brain microvascular endothelial cells is an infrequent event involving small numbers of cryptococcal yeast cells. Interestingly, this process requires neither active signalling from the fungus nor the presence of the fungal capsule. Thus entry into brain microvascular endothelial cells is most likely a passive event that occurs following 'trapping' within capillary beds of the BBB.

  15. The effect of moesin overexpression on ageing of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hee; Hong, In Ae; Oh, Sang Ho; Kwon, Yeon Sook; Cho, Soo Hyun; Lee, Kwang Hoon

    2009-11-01

    Senescence of microvascular endothelial cells is known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of vascular diseases related to ageing, but the accurate mechanism or related genes are not known. Moesin, a cytoskeletal protein and the most potent candidate as an ageing-related protein, showed obvious changes in expression when compared before and after ageing. In this study, a lentivirus was used to overexpress moesin in endothelial cells. The expression of cell cycle mediators such as p16, cyclin D1 and cdk4, which can be the markers of ageing, was compared by RNA and was shown to be suppressed in moesin overexpressed endothelial cells. In conclusion, it can be said that the expression of moesin delays senescence of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and this fundamental discovery can be used as a basis for understanding the mechanism of ageing and age-related diseases.

  16. Associations of Macro- and Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction With Subclinical Ventricular Dysfunction in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ruth F; Guajardo, Isabella; Ayer, Amrita; Mills, Claire; Donovan, Catherine; Beussink, Lauren; Scherzer, Rebecca; Ganz, Peter; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-10-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) suffer high rates of heart failure and cardiovascular mortality, and we lack a thorough understanding of what, if any, modifiable factors contribute to cardiac dysfunction in these high-risk patients. To evaluate endothelial function as a potentially modifiable cause of cardiac dysfunction in ESRD, we investigated cross-sectional associations of macro- and microvascular dysfunction with left and right ventricular dysfunction in a well-controlled ESRD cohort. We performed comprehensive echocardiography, including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle-tracking echocardiography of the left and right ventricle, in 149 ESRD patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational study. Of these participants, 123 also underwent endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery (macrovascular function). Microvascular function was measured as the velocity time integral of hyperemic blood flow after cuff deflation. Impaired flow-mediated dilation was associated with higher left ventricular mass, independently of age and blood pressure: per 2-fold lower flow-mediated dilation, left ventricular mass was 4.1% higher (95% confidence interval, 0.49-7.7; P=0.03). After adjustment for demographics, blood pressure, comorbidities, and medications, a 2-fold lower velocity time integral was associated with 9.5% higher E/e' ratio (95% confidence interval, 1.0-16; P=0.03) and 6.7% lower absolute right ventricular longitudinal strain (95% confidence interval, 2.0-12; P=0.003). Endothelial dysfunction is a major correlate of cardiac dysfunction in ESRD, particularly diastolic and right ventricular dysfunction, in patients whose volume status is well controlled. Future investigations are needed to determine whether therapies targeting the vascular endothelium could improve cardiac outcomes in ESRD. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Antioxidant therapy and pharmacological

  18. Propionyl-L-Carnitine Enhances Wound Healing and Counteracts Microvascular Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Lo Giudice, Pietro; Bielli, Alessandra; Tarallo, Valeria; De Rosa, Alfonso; De Falco, Sandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing represents a high cost for health care systems. Endothelial dysfunction characterizes dermal microangiopathy and contributes to delayed wound healing and chronic ulcers. Endothelial dysfunction impairs cutaneous microvascular blood flow by inducing an imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction as a consequence of reduced nitric oxide (NO) production and the increase of oxidative stress and inflammation. Propionyl-L-carnitine (PLC) is a natural derivative of carnitine that has been reported to ameliorate post-ischemic blood flow recovery. Methods and Results We investigated the effects of PLC in rat skin flap and cutaneous wound healing. A daily oral PLC treatment improved skin flap viability and associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO up-regulation, accelerated wound healing and increased capillary density, likely favoring dermal angiogenesis by up-regulation for iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF) and reduction of NADPH-oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. In serum-deprived human dermal microvascular endothelial cell cultures, PLC ameliorated endothelial dysfunction by increasing iNOS, PlGF, VEGF receptors 1 and 2 expression and NO level. In addition, PLC counteracted serum deprivation-induced impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation, Nox4 and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM) expression, ROS generation and leukocyte adhesion. Moreover, dermal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction was prevented by Nox4 inhibition. Interestingly, inhibition of β-oxidation counteracted the beneficial effects of PLC on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. Conclusion PLC treatment improved rat skin flap viability, accelerated wound healing and dermal angiogenesis. The beneficial effects of PLC likely derived from improvement of mitochondrial β-oxidation and reduction of Nox4-mediated oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction

  19. Dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-Cadherin Involved in Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Barrier Injury Induced by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiwei; Dai, Feifeng; Liu, Huagang; Ren, Wei; Chang, Jinxing; Li, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) caused pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier injury, which induced acute aortic dissection (AAD) combined with acute lung injury (ALI). However, the exact mechanism is unclear. We investigated the role of dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin in the AngII induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier injury. Mice or pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) were divided into control group, AngII group, AngII+PP2 (Src kinase inhibitor) group, and PP2 group. PP2 was used to inhibit the phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin. Pathological changes, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils, and pulmonary microvascular permeability were used to determine the pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier function. Flow cytometry was used to determine the apoptosis of PMVECs, and immunofluorescence was used to determine the skeletal arrangement. Transendothelial resistance was used to detect the permeability of endothelial barrier. Phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin was significantly reduced after AngII stimulation (P < 0.05), together with skeletal rearrangement, and elevation of endothelial permeability which finally induced endothelial barrier injury. After PP2 interference, the phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin was further reduced and the endothelial permeability was further elevated. These data indicated that AngII could induce pulmonary injury by triggering endothelial barrier injury, and such process may be related to the dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin and the endothelial skeletal rearrangement. PMID:28119542

  20. Dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-Cadherin Involved in Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Barrier Injury Induced by Angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhiwei; Dai, Feifeng; Liu, Huagang; Ren, Wei; Chang, Jinxing; Li, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) caused pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier injury, which induced acute aortic dissection (AAD) combined with acute lung injury (ALI). However, the exact mechanism is unclear. We investigated the role of dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin in the AngII induced pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier injury. Mice or pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) were divided into control group, AngII group, AngII+PP2 (Src kinase inhibitor) group, and PP2 group. PP2 was used to inhibit the phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin. Pathological changes, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils, and pulmonary microvascular permeability were used to determine the pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier function. Flow cytometry was used to determine the apoptosis of PMVECs, and immunofluorescence was used to determine the skeletal arrangement. Transendothelial resistance was used to detect the permeability of endothelial barrier. Phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin was significantly reduced after AngII stimulation (P < 0.05), together with skeletal rearrangement, and elevation of endothelial permeability which finally induced endothelial barrier injury. After PP2 interference, the phosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin was further reduced and the endothelial permeability was further elevated. These data indicated that AngII could induce pulmonary injury by triggering endothelial barrier injury, and such process may be related to the dephosphorylation of Y685-VE-cadherin and the endothelial skeletal rearrangement.

  1. Myocardial Microvascular Responsiveness During Acute Cardiac Sympathectomy Induced by Thoracic Epidural Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bulte, Carolien S E; Boer, Christa; Hartemink, Koen J; Kamp, Otto; Heymans, Martijn W; Loer, Stephen A; de Marchi, Stefano F; Vogel, Rolf; Bouwman, R Arthur

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute cardiac sympathectomy by thoracic epidural anesthesia on myocardial blood flow and microvascular function. A prospective observational study. The study was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital. Ten patients with a mean age of 48 years (range 22-63 years) scheduled for thoracic surgery. Myocardial contrast echocardiography was used to study myocardial blood flow and microvascular responsiveness at rest, during adenosine-induced hyperemia, and after sympathetic stimulation by the cold pressor test. Repeated measurements were performed without and with thoracic epidural anesthesia. An increased myocardial blood volume was observed with thoracic epidural anesthesia compared to baseline (from 0.08±0.02 to 0.10±0.03 mL/mL; p = 0.02). No difference existed in resting myocardial blood flow between baseline conditions and epidural anesthesia (0.85±0.24 v 1.03±0.27 mL/min/g, respectively). Hyperemia during thoracic epidural anesthesia increased myocardial blood flow to 4.31±1.07 mL/min/g (p = 0.0008 v baseline) and blood volume to 0.17±0.04 mL/mL (p = 0.005 baseline). After sympathetic stimulation, no difference in myocardial blood flow parameters was observed CONCLUSIONS: Acute cardiac sympathectomy by thoracic epidural anesthesia increased the blood volume in the myocardial capillary system. Also, thoracic epidural anesthesia increased hyperemic myocardial blood flow, indicating augmented endothelial-independent vasodilator capacity of the myocardium. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Parasite Biomass-Related Inflammation, Endothelial Activation, Microvascular Dysfunction and Disease Severity in Vivax Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Bridget E.; William, Timothy; Grigg, Matthew J.; Parameswaran, Uma; Piera, Kim A.; Price, Ric N.; Yeo, Tsin W.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax can cause severe malaria, however its pathogenesis is poorly understood. In contrast to P. falciparum, circulating vivax parasitemia is low, with minimal apparent sequestration in endothelium-lined microvasculature, and pathogenesis thought unrelated to parasite biomass. However, the relationships between vivax disease-severity and total parasite biomass, endothelial autocrine activation and microvascular dysfunction are unknown. We measured circulating parasitemia and markers of total parasite biomass (plasma parasite lactate dehydrogenase [pLDH] and PvLDH) in adults with severe (n = 9) and non-severe (n = 53) vivax malaria, and examined relationships with disease-severity, endothelial activation, and microvascular function. Healthy controls and adults with non-severe and severe falciparum malaria were enrolled for comparison. Median peripheral parasitemia, PvLDH and pLDH were 2.4-fold, 3.7-fold and 6.9-fold higher in severe compared to non-severe vivax malaria (p = 0.02, p = 0.02 and p = 0.015, respectively), suggesting that, as in falciparum malaria, peripheral P. vivax parasitemia underestimates total parasite biomass, particularly in severe disease. P. vivax schizonts were under-represented in peripheral blood. Severe vivax malaria was associated with increased angiopoietin-2 and impaired microvascular reactivity. Peripheral vivax parasitemia correlated with endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2, von-Willebrand-Factor [VWF], E-selectin), whereas markers of total vivax biomass correlated only with systemic inflammation (IL-6, IL-10). Activity of the VWF-cleaving-protease, ADAMTS13, was deficient in proportion to endothelial activation, IL-6, thrombocytopenia and vivax disease-severity, and associated with impaired microvascular reactivity in severe disease. Impaired microvascular reactivity correlated with lactate in severe vivax malaria. Findings suggest that tissue accumulation of P. vivax may occur, with the hidden

  3. Involvement of ROCK-mediated endothelial tension development in neutrophil-stimulated microvascular leakage

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Jerome W.; Sun, Hengrui; Xu, Wenjuan; Rodarte, Charles; Moy, Alan B.; Wu, Mack H.; Yuan, Sarah Y.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil-induced coronary microvascular barrier dysfunction is an important pathophysiological event in heart disease. Currently, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms of neutrophil-induced microvascular leakage are not clear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that rho kinase (ROCK) increases coronary venular permeability in association with elevated endothelial tension. We assessed permeability to albumin (Pa) in isolated porcine coronary venules and in coronary venular endothelial cell (CVEC) monolayers. Endothelial barrier function was also evaluated by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) of CVEC monolayers. In parallel, we measured isometric tension of CVECs grown on collagen gels. Transference of constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein into isolated coronary venules or CVEC monolayers caused a significant increase in Pa and decreased TER in CVECs. The ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 blocked the ca-ROCK-induced changes. C5a-activated neutrophils (106/ml) also significantly elevated venular Pa, which was dose-dependently inhibited by Y-27632 and a structurally distinct ROCK inhibitor, H-1152. In CVEC monolayers, activated neutrophils increased permeability with a concomitant elevation in isometric tension, both of which were inhibited by Y-27632 or H-1152. Treatment with ca-ROCK also significantly increased CVEC monolayer permeability and isometric tension, coupled with actin polymerization and elevated phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain on Thr18/Ser19. The data suggest that during neutrophil activation, ROCK promotes microvascular leakage in association with actin-myosin-mediated tension development in endothelial cells. PMID:16172166

  4. Angiopoietin-1 alters microvascular permeability coefficients in vivo via modification of endothelial glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Andrew H J; Neal, Christopher R; Sage, Leslie M; Glass, Catherine A; Harper, Steven J; Bates, David O

    2009-07-01

    In this study, we wished to determine whether angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) modified the permeability coefficients of non-inflamed, intact continuous, and fenestrated microvessels in vivo and to elucidate the underlying cellular mechanisms. Permeability coefficients were measured using the Landis-Michel technique (in frog and rat mesenteric microvessels) and an oncopressive permeability technique (in glomeruli). Ang1 decreased water permeability (L(P): hydraulic conductivity) in continuous and fenestrated microvessels and increased the retention of albumin (sigma: reflection coefficient) in continuous microvessels. Endothelial glycocalyx is common to these anatomically distinct microvascular beds, and contributes to the magnitude of both L(P) and sigma. Ang1 treatment increased the depth of endothelial glycocalyx in intact microvessels and increased the content of glycosaminoglycan of cultured microvascular endothelial cell supernatant. Ang1 also prevented the pronase-induced increase in L(P) (attributable to selective removal of endothelial glycocalyx by pronase) by restoration of glycocalyx at the endothelial cell surface. The reduction in permeability was inhibited by a cell transport inhibitor, Brefeldin. Ang1 modifies basal microvessel permeability coefficients, in keeping with previous reports demonstrating reduced solute flux in inflamed vessels. Anatomical, biochemical, and physiological evidence indicates that modification of endothelial glycocalyx is a novel mechanism of action of Ang1 that contributes to these effects.

  5. Pneumolysin Is the Main Inducer of Cytotoxicity to Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zysk, Gregor; Schneider-Wald, Barbara Katharina; Hwang, Jae Hyuk; Bejo, Levente; Kim, Kwang Sik; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Hakenbeck, Regine; Heinz, Hans-Peter

    2001-01-01

    In pneumococcal meningitis it is assumed that bacteria cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which consists mainly of cerebral endothelial cells. The effect of Streptococcus pneumoniae on the BBB was investigated with an in vitro BBB model using a human brain microvascular endothelial cell line (HBMEC) and primary cultures of bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BBMEC). Within a few hours of incubation with pneumococci, rounding and detachment of the HBMEC were observed, and the transendothelial electrical resistance of the BBMEC monolayer decreased markedly. An S. pneumoniae mutant deficient in pneumolysin did not affect the integrity of the endothelial cell monolayer. Neither cell wall fragments nor isolated pneumococcal cell walls induced changes of endothelial cell morphology. However, purified pneumolysin caused endothelial cell damage comparable to that caused by the viable pneumococci. The cell detachment was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and required the activities of caspase and tyrosine kinases. The results show that pneumolysin is an important component for damaging the BBB and may contribute to the entry of pneumococci into the cerebral compartment and to the development of brain edema in pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:11159977

  6. Demonstration of actin filament stress fibers in microvascular endothelial cells in situ.

    PubMed

    Nehls, V; Drenckhahn, D

    1991-07-01

    We have developed a method for immunostaining the microvascular tree of rat mesenteric windows in situ. The procedure consists of three steps, i.e., mild fixation with formaldehyde, controlled proteolytic digestion of the mesothelial layer, and permeabilization with acetone. Discrimination between different microvascular segments was possible by double-fluorescent staining with antibodies to the smooth muscle isoform of alpha-actin and to nonmuscle myosin from platelets. Antibodies to nonmuscle myosin labeled numerous longitudinally oriented cables in endothelial cells of all microvascular segments (arterioles, metarterioles, pre-, mid-, and postcapillaries, small venules). Occasionally, the myosin-containing cables displayed the interrupted sarcomere-like staining pattern that is diagnostic for stress fibers. In contrast, staining of actin filaments with phalloidin-rhodamin resulted in a noninterrupted, continuous fluorescence of the stress fibers. A possible functional role of microvascular endothelial stress fibers is to serve as a tensile cytoskeletal scaffold that stabilizes the tubular, three-dimensional geometry of microvessels and, in addition, to help the endothelium resist the shear forces created by blood flow and by collision with red and white blood cells.

  7. Emerging therapeutic strategies to prevent infection-related microvascular endothelial activation and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Ilyse; Liles, W Conrad

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that loss of endothelial barrier function and resulting microvascular leak play important mechanistic roles in the pathogenesis of infection-related end-organ dysfunction and failure. Several distinct therapeutic strategies, designed to prevent or limit infection-related microvascular endothelial activation and permeability, thereby mitigating end-organ injury/dysfunction, have recently been investigated in pre-clinical models. In this review, these potential therapeutic strategies, namely, VEGFR2/Src antagonists, sphingosine-1-phosphate agonists, fibrinopeptide Bβ15–42, slit2N, secinH3, angiopoietin-1/tie-2 agonists, angiopoietin-2 antagonists, statins, atrial natriuretic peptide, and mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells, are discussed in terms of their translational potential for the management of clinical infectious diseases. PMID:23863603

  8. Venlafaxine protects methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis in the cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qinghua; Gu, Chengyao; Chen, Caijing

    2014-05-21

    It was reported that venlafaxine protects microvascular endothelial cells injury in several models. But the mechanisms of venlafaxine protects cell injury still poor understanding. Here, we shows that in the cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), we found that venlafaxine protects methylglyoxal (MGO)-induced cell injury, and the venlafaxine significant reduction in the level of reactive oxygen species, down-regulated expression of pro-apoptotic activated caspase-3 and Bax, increased BDNF release and expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 in the cultured HBMEC. Furthermore, we found that venlafaxine inhibits MGO-induced phosphorylation of JNK. Moreover, venlafaxine increased AKT phosphorylation and the protective effects of venlafaxine was inhibited by PI3K/AKT inhibitor. These findings suggest that venlafaxine protects MGO-induced HBMEC injury through PI3K/AKT and JNK pathway as the potential underlying mechanisms of HBMEC injury in diabetes.

  9. Characterizing nanoscale changes in the activity of VEGFR-2 on glioma microvascular endothelial cell membranes using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dexiang; Zhan, Shengquan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Peng; Chen, Guangzhong; Qin, Kun; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to demonstrate the distribution of VEGFR-2 on glioma microvascular endothelial cells on a nanoscale and investigate changes in VEGFR-2 activity following treatment with the VEGFR-2 inhibitor and agonist sorafenib and bradykinin, respectively. Three groups were evaluated in this study: Control glioma microvascular endothelial cells, sorafenib-treated glioma microvascular endothelial cells and bradykinin-treated glioma microvascular endothelial cells. Changes in the activity of VEGFR-2 on the glioma microvascular endothelial cell membranes following treatment with sorafenib and bradykinin were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Colloidal gold-labeled immune complexes and AFM were used to visualize the distribution of VEGFR-2 on the cell membranes. In the control group, VEGFR-2, which was observed as numerous globular structures, was evenly distributed on the cell surface membranes. The majority of the receptors were active. In the sorafenib group, only a few globular structures were observed on the cell membranes, with a density significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, compared with the control group, fewer of the receptors were active. In the bradykinin group, numerous globular structures were densely distributed on the cell membranes, with a density significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). The distribution and activity of VEGFR-2 on glioma microvascular endothelial cell membranes treated with sorafenib and bradykinin suggested that the activity of VEGFR-2 could be regulated by its inhibitor or agonist.

  10. Induction of Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cell Urokinase Expression by Cryptococcus neoformans Facilitates Blood-Brain Barrier Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Stie, Jamal; Fox, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    The invasive ability of the blood-borne fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans can be enhanced through interactions with host plasma components, such as plasminogen. Previously we showed by in vitro studies that plasminogen coats the surface of C. neoformans and is converted to the active serine protease, plasmin, by host plasminogen activators. Viable, but not formaldehyde- or sodium azide-killed, cryptococcal strains undergo brain microvascular endothelial cell-dependent plasminogen-to-plasmin activation, which results in enhanced, plasmin-dependent cryptococcal invasion of primary bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells and fungal ability to degrade plasmin substrates. In the present work, brain microvascular endothelial cells cultured with viable, but not killed, cryptococcal strains led to significant increases in both urokinase mRNA transcription and cell-associated urokinase protein expression. Soluble urokinase was also detected in conditioned medium from brain microvascular endothelial cells cultured with viable, but not killed, C. neoformans. Exposure of plasminogen pre-coated viable C. neoformans to conditioned medium from strain-matched brain microvascular endothelial cell-fungal co-cultures resulted in plasminogen-to-plasmin activation and plasmin-dependent cryptococcal invasion. siRNA-mediated silencing of urokinase gene expression or the use of specific inhibitors of urokinase activity abrogated both plasminogen-to-plasmin activation on C. neoformans and cryptococcal-brain microvascular endothelial cell invasion. Our results suggest that pathogen exploitation of the host urokinase-plasmin(ogen) system may contribute to C. neoformans virulence during invasive cryptococcosis. PMID:23145170

  11. Characterizing nanoscale changes in the activity of VEGFR-2 on glioma microvascular endothelial cell membranes using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dexiang; Zhan, Shengquan; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Peng; Chen, Guangzhong; Qin, Kun; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to demonstrate the distribution of VEGFR-2 on glioma microvascular endothelial cells on a nanoscale and investigate changes in VEGFR-2 activity following treatment with the VEGFR-2 inhibitor and agonist sorafenib and bradykinin, respectively. Three groups were evaluated in this study: Control glioma microvascular endothelial cells, sorafenib-treated glioma microvascular endothelial cells and bradykinin-treated glioma microvascular endothelial cells. Changes in the activity of VEGFR-2 on the glioma microvascular endothelial cell membranes following treatment with sorafenib and bradykinin were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Colloidal gold-labeled immune complexes and AFM were used to visualize the distribution of VEGFR-2 on the cell membranes. In the control group, VEGFR-2, which was observed as numerous globular structures, was evenly distributed on the cell surface membranes. The majority of the receptors were active. In the sorafenib group, only a few globular structures were observed on the cell membranes, with a density significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.01). Furthermore, compared with the control group, fewer of the receptors were active. In the bradykinin group, numerous globular structures were densely distributed on the cell membranes, with a density significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.01). The distribution and activity of VEGFR-2 on glioma microvascular endothelial cell membranes treated with sorafenib and bradykinin suggested that the activity of VEGFR-2 could be regulated by its inhibitor or agonist. PMID:28352319

  12. Cathepsin S Cleavage of Protease-Activated Receptor-2 on Endothelial Cells Promotes Microvascular Diabetes Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kumar VR, Santhosh; Darisipudi, Murthy N.; Steiger, Stefanie; Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Tato, Maia; Kukarni, Onkar P.; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Thomasova, Dana; Popper, Bastian; Demleitner, Jana; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Reichel, Christoph; Cohen, Clemens D.; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Liapis, Helen; Moll, Solange; Reid, Emma; Stitt, Alan W.; Schott, Brigitte; Gruner, Sabine; Haap, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Martin; Hartmann, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a central pathomechanism in diabetes-associated complications. We hypothesized a pathogenic role in this dysfunction of cathepsin S (Cat-S), a cysteine protease that degrades elastic fibers and activates the protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) on endothelial cells. We found that injection of mice with recombinant Cat-S induced albuminuria and glomerular endothelial cell injury in a PAR2-dependent manner. In vivo microscopy confirmed a role for intrinsic Cat-S/PAR2 in ischemia–induced microvascular permeability. In vitro transcriptome analysis and experiments using siRNA or specific Cat-S and PAR2 antagonists revealed that Cat-S specifically impaired the integrity and barrier function of glomerular endothelial cells selectively through PAR2. In human and mouse type 2 diabetic nephropathy, only CD68+ intrarenal monocytes expressed Cat-S mRNA, whereas Cat-S protein was present along endothelial cells and inside proximal tubular epithelial cells also. In contrast, the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C was expressed only in tubules. Delayed treatment of type 2 diabetic db/db mice with Cat-S or PAR2 inhibitors attenuated albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis (indicators of diabetic nephropathy) and attenuated albumin leakage into the retina and other structural markers of diabetic retinopathy. These data identify Cat-S as a monocyte/macrophage–derived circulating PAR2 agonist and mediator of endothelial dysfunction–related microvascular diabetes complications. Thus, Cat-S or PAR2 inhibition might be a novel strategy to prevent microvascular disease in diabetes and other diseases. PMID:26567242

  13. Thrombin stimulates albumin transcytosis in lung microvascular endothelial cells via activation of acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Wittenberg, Claudia; Lee, Warren L; Reppien, Eike; Goldenberg, Neil M; Lindner, Karsten; Gao, Yizhuo; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Drab, Marek; Mühlfeld, Christian; Dombrowsky, Heike; Ochs, Matthias; Schütze, Stefan; Uhlig, Stefan

    2016-04-15

    Transcellular albumin transport occurs via caveolae that are abundant in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation of albumin transcytosis by proinflammatory mediators may contribute to alveolar protein leak in lung injury, yet the regulation of albumin transport and its underlying molecular mechanisms are so far incompletely understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that thrombin may stimulate transcellular albumin transport across lung microvascular endothelial cells in an acid-sphingomyelinase dependent manner. Thrombin increased the transport of fluorescently labeled albumin across confluent human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) monolayers to an extent that markedly exceeds the rate of passive diffusion. Thrombin activated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and increased ceramide production in HMVEC-L, but not in bovine pulmonary artery cells, which showed little albumin transport in response to thrombin. Thrombin increased total caveolin-1 (cav-1) content in both whole cell lysates and lipid rafts from HMVEC-L, and this effect was blocked by inhibition of ASM or de novo protein biosynthesis. Thrombin-induced uptake of albumin into lung microvascular endothelial cells was confirmed in isolated-perfused lungs by real-time fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of gold-labeled albumin. Inhibition of ASM attenuated thrombin-induced albumin transport both in confluent HMVEC-L and in intact lungs, whereas HMVEC-L treatment with exogenous ASM increased albumin transport and enriched lipid rafts in cav-1. Our findings indicate that thrombin stimulates transcellular albumin transport in an acid sphingomyelinase-dependent manner by inducing de novo synthesis of cav-1 and its recruitment to membrane lipid rafts.

  14. Early Activation of Primary Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Nipah Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Particles

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Tanja C.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes pronounced infection of brain endothelia and central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Using primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells, we showed that upregulation of E-selectin precedes cytokine induction and is induced not only by infectious NiV but also by NiV-glycoprotein-containing virus-like particles. This demonstrates that very early events in NiV brain endothelial infection do not depend on NiV replication but can be triggered by the NiV glycoproteins alone. PMID:26676791

  15. Platelets play an important role in TNF-induced microvascular endothelial cell pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Lou, J.; Donati, Y. R.; Juillard, P.; Giroud, C.; Vesin, C.; Mili, N.; Grau, G. E.

    1997-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is known to be an important mediator in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. Vascular endothelial cells represent a major target of TNF effects. Platelet sequestration has been found in brain microvessels during experimental cerebral malaria and lung in experimental pulmonary fibrosis, implying that it may participate in TNF-dependent microvascular pathology. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of platelet-endothelial interaction, using co-cultures between platelets and TNF-activated mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs). Adhesion and fusion of platelets to MVECs was evidenced by electron microscopy, dye transfer, and flow cytometry. It was induced by TNF and interferon-gamma and depended on LFA-1 expressed on the platelet surface and ICAM-1 expressed on MVECs. The adhesion and fusion also led to the transfer of platelet markers on the MVEC surface, rendering these more adherent for leukocytes, and to an enhanced MVEC sensitivity to TNF-induced injury. These results suggest that platelets can participate in TNF-induced microvascular pathology. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9358766

  16. Involvement of the cellular prion protein in the migration of brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takuya; Yasutaka, Yuki; Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Kusakabe, Sae; Futagami, Koujiro; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2011-06-01

    The conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to its protease-resistant isoform is involved in the pathogenesis of prion disease. Although PrP(C) is a ubiquitous glycoprotein that is present in various cell types, the physiological role of PrP(C) remains obscure. The present study aimed to determine whether PrP(C) mediates migration of brain microvascular endothelial cells. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting PrP(C) were transfected into a mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell line (bEND.3 cells). siPrP1, selected among three siRNAs, reduced mRNA and protein levels of PrP(C) in bEND.3 cells. Cellular migration was evaluated with a scratch-wound assay. siPrP1 suppressed migration without significantly affecting cellular proliferation. This study provides the first evidence that PrP(C) may be necessary for brain microvascular endothelial cells to migrate into damaged regions in the brain. This function of PrP(C) in the brain endothelium may be a mechanism by which the neurovascular unit recovers from an injury such as an ischemic insult.

  17. TNF activates P-glycoprotein in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanhui; Kastin, Abba J; Tu, Hong; Waters, Sarah; Pan, Weihong

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance proteins (MDRs, including P-glycoproteins) are efflux pumps that serve important biological functions but hinder successful drug delivery to the CNS. Many chemotherapeutic agents, anti-epileptics, anti-HIV drugs, and opiates are substrates for MDRs. Therefore, understanding the regulation of MDRs in the endothelial cells composing the blood-brain barrier has therapeutic implications. We used microarray, real time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and uptake of vinblastine by RBE4 cerebral endothelial cells to test the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) on the expression and functions of P-glycoprotein (MDR1). The proinflammatory cytokine TNF specifically induced the expression and enhanced the function of MDR1 in RBE4 cells. The persistent upregulation of MDR1 mRNA was shown by cDNA microarray at 6, 12, and 24 h after TNF treatment. This was confirmed by real-time RT-PCR between 2 and 24 h. MDR1 protein expression was increased 6 to 24 h after TNF treatment and resulted in a significant reduction in the cellular uptake of (3)H-vinblastine. The drug efflux transporter in cerebral endothelial cells can be upregulated by TNF. This suggests that adjunctive anti-TNF treatment has novel therapeutic potential in conditions such as brain cancer, epilepsy, neuroAIDS, and chronic pain.

  18. Caveolae protect endothelial cells from membrane rupture during increased cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jade P.X.; Mendoza-Topaz, Carolina; Howard, Gillian; Chadwick, Jessica; Shvets, Elena; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; Crosby, Alexi; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Caveolae are strikingly abundant in endothelial cells, yet the physiological functions of caveolae in endothelium and other tissues remain incompletely understood. Previous studies suggest a mechanoprotective role, but whether this is relevant under the mechanical forces experienced by endothelial cells in vivo is unclear. In this study we have sought to determine whether endothelial caveolae disassemble under increased hemodynamic forces, and whether caveolae help prevent acute rupture of the plasma membrane under these conditions. Experiments in cultured cells established biochemical assays for disassembly of caveolar protein complexes, and assays for acute loss of plasma membrane integrity. In vivo, we demonstrate that caveolae in endothelial cells of the lung and cardiac muscle disassemble in response to acute increases in cardiac output. Electron microscopy and two-photon imaging reveal that the plasma membrane of microvascular endothelial cells in caveolin 1−/− mice is much more susceptible to acute rupture when cardiac output is increased. These data imply that mechanoprotection through disassembly of caveolae is important for endothelial function in vivo. PMID:26459598

  19. Shear stress-induced Ets-1 modulates protease inhibitor expression in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Milkiewicz, Malgorzata; Uchida, Cassandra; Gee, Eric; Fudalewski, Tomasz; Haas, Tara L

    2008-11-01

    Elevated shear stress within the skeletal muscle microvasculature is implicated in the induction of a longitudinal splitting form of angiogenesis, which is characterized by the lack of basement membrane breakage. We investigated whether the transcriptional regulator, Ets-1, is responsive to changes in hemodynamic forces and if so, whether Ets-1 controls microvascular endothelial cell integrity by inducing the expression of inhibitors of matrix degrading proteases. Rats were treated with prazosin for 2, 4, and 7 days to increase in microvascular shear stress in hindlimb skeletal muscles. In complimentary in vitro experiments, rat microvascular skeletal muscle endothelial cells were exposed to laminar shear stress (15 dyne/cm(2)) for 0.5, 2, and 24 h. TaqMan PCR analysis of laser microdissected capillaries isolated from EDL muscles demonstrated transient (after 2 days) induction of Ets-1 gene expression. In cultured cells, a transient up-regulation of Ets-1 mRNA was observed after 2 h shear stimulation, accompanied by increased phosphorylation of Ets-1 and enhanced Ets-1 DNA binding activity. This response was modulated by ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinases, but was not dependent on NOS or COX-2 activity. PAI-1, TIMP-1 and TIMP-3 mRNA were elevated significantly in prazosin treated EDL, and in response to shear stimulation in vitro. In cultured endothelial cells, Ets-1 RNA interference abolished the shear-induced increases in Ets-1, PAI-1, TIMP-1, and TIMP-3 mRNA expression. These results suggest that enhanced laminar shear stress may act to preserve the integrity of microvascular walls in part through Ets-1-dependent induction of protease inhibitors.

  20. The Proangiogenic Effect of Iroquois Homeobox Transcription Factor Irx3 in Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Scarlett, Kisha; Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Barnett, Petrina; Liu, Dong; Anderson, Leonard M.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a dynamic process required for embryonic development. However, postnatal vascular growth is characteristic of multiple disease states. Despite insights into the multistep process in which adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, and their receptors work in concert to form new vessels from the preexisting vasculature, there remains a lack of insight of the nuclear transcriptional mechanisms that occur within endothelial cells (ECs) in response to VEGF. Iroquois homeobox gene 3 (Irx3) is a transcription factor of the Iroquois family of homeobox genes. Irx homeodomain transcription factors are involved in the patterning and development of several tissues. Irx3 is known for its role during embryogenesis in multiple organisms. However, the expression and function of Irx3 in human postnatal vasculature remains to be investigated. Here we show that Irx3 is expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells, and expression is elevated by VEGF stimulation. Genetic Irx3 gain and loss of function studies in human microvascular endothelial cells resulted in the modulation of EC migration during wound healing, chemotaxis and invasion, and tubulogenesis. Additionally, we observed increased delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) expression, which suggests an increase in EC tip cell population. Finally, siRNA screening studies revealed that transient knockdown of Hey1, a downstream Notch signaling mediator, resulted in increased Irx3 expression in response to VEGF treatment. Strategies to pharmacologically regulate Irx3 function in adult endothelial cells may provide new therapies for angiogenesis. PMID:25512384

  1. Ghrelin stimulates angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells: Implications beyond GH release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Aihua; Cheng Guangli; Zhu Genghui; Tarnawski, Andrzej S. . E-mail: atarnawski@yahoo.com

    2007-02-09

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone isolated from the stomach, releases growth hormone and stimulates appetite. Ghrelin is also expressed in pancreas, kidneys, cardiovascular system and in endothelial cells. The precise role of ghrelin in endothelial cell functions remains unknown. We examined the expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1) mRNAs and proteins in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and determined whether ghrelin affects in these cells proliferation, migration and in vitro angiogenesis; and whether MAPK/ERK2 signaling is important for the latter action. We found that ghrelin and GHSR1 are constitutively expressed in HMVEC. Treatment of HMVEC with exogenous ghrelin significantly increased in these cells proliferation, migration, in vitro angiogenesis and ERK2 phosphorylation. MEK/ERK2 inhibitor, PD 98059 abolished ghrelin-induced in vitro angiogenesis. This is First demonstration that ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells and that ghrelin stimulates HMVEC proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis through activation of ERK2 signaling.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium influx in lung microvascular endothelial cells involves TRPV4

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Karthik; Servinsky, Laura; Reyes, Jose; Baksh, Syeda; Undem, Clark; Caterina, Michael; Pearse, David B.

    2015-01-01

    In acute respiratory distress syndrome, both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) are thought to play important roles in promoting endothelial paracellular permeability, but the mechanisms linking ROS and [Ca2+]i in microvascular endothelial cells are not known. In this study, we assessed the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on [Ca2+]i in mouse and human lung microvascular endothelial cells (MLMVEC and HLMVEC, respectively). We found that in both MLMVECs and HLMVECs, exogenously applied H2O2 increased [Ca2+]i through Ca2+ influx and that pharmacologic inhibition of the calcium channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) attenuated the H2O2-induced Ca2+ influx. Additionally, knockdown of TRPV4 in HLMVEC also attenuated calcium influx following H2O2 challenge. Administration of H2O2 or TRPV4 agonists decreased transmembrane electrical resistance (TER), suggesting increased barrier permeability. To explore the regulatory mechanisms underlying TRPV4 activation by ROS, we examined H2O2-induced Ca2+ influx in MLMVECs and HLMVECs with either genetic deletion, silencing, or pharmacologic inhibition of Fyn, a Src family kinase. In both MLMVECs derived from mice deficient for Fyn and HLMVECs treated with either siRNA targeted to Fyn or the Src family kinase inhibitor SU-6656 for 24 or 48 h, the H2O2-induced Ca2+ influx was attenuated. Treatment with SU-6656 decreased the levels of phosphorylated, but not total, TRPV4 protein and had no effect on TRPV4 response to the external agonist, GSK1016790A. In conclusion, our data suggest that application of exogenous H2O2 increases [Ca2+]i and decreases TER in microvascular endothelial cells via activation of TRPV4 through a mechanism that requires the Src kinase Fyn. PMID:26453519

  3. Differential Effects of Bartonella henselae on Human and Feline Macro- and Micro-Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, a zoonotic agent, induces tumors of endothelial cells (ECs), namely bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis in immunosuppressed humans but not in cats. In vitro studies on ECs represent to date the only way to explore the interactions between Bartonella henselae and vascular endothelium. However, no comparative study of the interactions between Bartonella henselae and human (incidental host) ECs vs feline (reservoir host) ECs has been carried out because of the absence of any available feline endothelial cell lines. To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development sites such as skin, versus macro-vascular ECs, such as umbilical vein. Our model revealed intrinsic differences between human (Human Skin Microvascular ECs –HSkMEC and Human Umbilical Vein ECs – iHUVEC) and feline ECs susceptibility to Bartonella henselae infection. While no effect was observed on the feline ECs upon Bartonella henselae infection, the human ones displayed accelerated angiogenesis and wound healing. Noticeable differences were demonstrated between human micro- and macro-vasculature derived ECs both in terms of pseudo-tube formation and healing. Interestingly, Bartonella henselae effects on human ECs were also elicited by soluble factors. Neither Bartonella henselae-infected Human Skin Microvascular ECs clinically involved in bacillary angiomatosis, nor feline ECs increased cAMP production, as opposed to HUVEC. Bartonella henselae could stimulate the activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) in homologous cellular systems and trigger VEGF production by HSkMECs only, but not iHUVEC or any feline ECs tested. These results may explain the decreased pathogenic potential of Bartonella henselae infection for cats as compared to humans and strongly suggest that an autocrine secretion of VEGF by human

  4. Differential effects of Bartonella henselae on human and feline macro- and micro-vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, a zoonotic agent, induces tumors of endothelial cells (ECs), namely bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis in immunosuppressed humans but not in cats. In vitro studies on ECs represent to date the only way to explore the interactions between Bartonella henselae and vascular endothelium. However, no comparative study of the interactions between Bartonella henselae and human (incidental host) ECs vs feline (reservoir host) ECs has been carried out because of the absence of any available feline endothelial cell lines.To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development sites such as skin, versus macro-vascular ECs, such as umbilical vein.Our model revealed intrinsic differences between human (Human Skin Microvascular ECs -HSkMEC and Human Umbilical Vein ECs - iHUVEC) and feline ECs susceptibility to Bartonella henselae infection.While no effect was observed on the feline ECs upon Bartonella henselae infection, the human ones displayed accelerated angiogenesis and wound healing.Noticeable differences were demonstrated between human micro- and macro-vasculature derived ECs both in terms of pseudo-tube formation and healing. Interestingly, Bartonella henselae effects on human ECs were also elicited by soluble factors.Neither Bartonella henselae-infected Human Skin Microvascular ECs clinically involved in bacillary angiomatosis, nor feline ECs increased cAMP production, as opposed to HUVEC.Bartonella henselae could stimulate the activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) in homologous cellular systems and trigger VEGF production by HSkMECs only, but not iHUVEC or any feline ECs tested.These results may explain the decreased pathogenic potential of Bartonella henselae infection for cats as compared to humans and strongly suggest that an autocrine secretion of VEGF by human skin

  5. Hydrogen peroxide-induced calcium influx in lung microvascular endothelial cells involves TRPV4.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Karthik; Servinsky, Laura; Reyes, Jose; Baksh, Syeda; Undem, Clark; Caterina, Michael; Pearse, David B; Shimoda, Larissa A

    2015-12-15

    In acute respiratory distress syndrome, both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) are thought to play important roles in promoting endothelial paracellular permeability, but the mechanisms linking ROS and [Ca(2+)]i in microvascular endothelial cells are not known. In this study, we assessed the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on [Ca(2+)]i in mouse and human lung microvascular endothelial cells (MLMVEC and HLMVEC, respectively). We found that in both MLMVECs and HLMVECs, exogenously applied H2O2 increased [Ca(2+)]i through Ca(2+) influx and that pharmacologic inhibition of the calcium channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) attenuated the H2O2-induced Ca(2+) influx. Additionally, knockdown of TRPV4 in HLMVEC also attenuated calcium influx following H2O2 challenge. Administration of H2O2 or TRPV4 agonists decreased transmembrane electrical resistance (TER), suggesting increased barrier permeability. To explore the regulatory mechanisms underlying TRPV4 activation by ROS, we examined H2O2-induced Ca(2+) influx in MLMVECs and HLMVECs with either genetic deletion, silencing, or pharmacologic inhibition of Fyn, a Src family kinase. In both MLMVECs derived from mice deficient for Fyn and HLMVECs treated with either siRNA targeted to Fyn or the Src family kinase inhibitor SU-6656 for 24 or 48 h, the H2O2-induced Ca(2+) influx was attenuated. Treatment with SU-6656 decreased the levels of phosphorylated, but not total, TRPV4 protein and had no effect on TRPV4 response to the external agonist, GSK1016790A. In conclusion, our data suggest that application of exogenous H2O2 increases [Ca(2+)]i and decreases TER in microvascular endothelial cells via activation of TRPV4 through a mechanism that requires the Src kinase Fyn. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Cardiac Microvascular Barrier Function Mediates the Protection of Tongxinluo against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Kang; Li, Lujin; Li, Xiangdong; Zhao, Jinglin; Wang, Yang; You, Shijie; Hu, Fenghuan; Zhang, Haitao; Cheng, Yutong; Kang, Sheng; Cui, Hehe; Duan, Lian; Jin, Chen; Zheng, Qingshan; Yang, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Tongxinluo (TXL) has been shown to decrease myocardial necrosis after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) by simulating ischemia preconditioning (IPC). However, the core mechanism of TXL remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the key targets of TXL against I/R injury (IRI) among the cardiac structure-function network. Materials and Methods To evaluate the severity of lethal IRI, a mathematical model was established according to the relationship between myocardial no-reflow size and necrosis size. A total of 168 mini-swine were employed in myocardial I/R experiment. IRI severity among different interventions was compared and IPC and CCB groups were identified as the mildest and severest groups, respectively. Principal component analysis was applied to further determine 9 key targets of IPC in cardioprotection. Then, the key targets of TXL in cardioprotection were confirmed. Results Necrosis size and no-reflow size fit well with the Sigmoid Emax model. Necrosis reduction space (NRS) positively correlates with I/R injury severity and necrosis size (R2=0.92, R2=0.57, P<0.01, respectively). Functional and structural indices correlate positively with NRS (R2=0.64, R2=0.62, P<0.01, respectively). TXL recovers SUR2, iNOS activity, eNOS activity, VE-cadherin, β-catenin, γ-catenin and P-selectin with a trend toward the sham group. Moreover, TXL increases PKA activity and eNOS expression with a trend away from the sham group. Among the above nine indices, eNOS activity, eNOS, VE-cadherin, β-catenin and γ-catenin expression were significantly up-regulated by TXL compared with IPC (P>0.05) or CCB (P<0.05) and these five microvascular barrier-related indices may be the key targets of TXL in minimizing IRI. Conclusions Our study underlines the lethal IRI as one of the causes of myocardial necrosis. Pretreatment with TXL ameliorates myocardial IRI through promoting cardiac microvascular endothelial barrier function by simulating IPC. PMID:25781461

  7. Platelet lysate gel and endothelial progenitors stimulate microvascular network formation in vitro: tissue engineering implications

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Tiago M.; Beltrami, Cristina; Emanueli, Costanza; De Bank, Paul A.; Pula, Giordano

    2016-01-01

    Revascularisation is a key step for tissue regeneration and complete organ engineering. We describe the generation of human platelet lysate gel (hPLG), an extracellular matrix preparation from human platelets able to support the proliferation of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) in 2D cultures and the formation of a complete microvascular network in vitro in 3D cultures. Existing extracellular matrix preparations require addition of high concentrations of recombinant growth factors and allow only limited formation of capillary-like structures. Additional advantages of our approach over existing extracellular matrices are the absence of any animal product in the composition hPLG and the possibility of obtaining hPLG from patients to generate homologous scaffolds for re-implantation. This discovery has the potential to accelerate the development of regenerative medicine applications based on implantation of microvascular networks expanded ex vivo or the generation of fully vascularised organs. PMID:27141997

  8. Platelet lysate gel and endothelial progenitors stimulate microvascular network formation in vitro: tissue engineering implications.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Beltrami, Cristina; Emanueli, Costanza; De Bank, Paul A; Pula, Giordano

    2016-05-04

    Revascularisation is a key step for tissue regeneration and complete organ engineering. We describe the generation of human platelet lysate gel (hPLG), an extracellular matrix preparation from human platelets able to support the proliferation of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) in 2D cultures and the formation of a complete microvascular network in vitro in 3D cultures. Existing extracellular matrix preparations require addition of high concentrations of recombinant growth factors and allow only limited formation of capillary-like structures. Additional advantages of our approach over existing extracellular matrices are the absence of any animal product in the composition hPLG and the possibility of obtaining hPLG from patients to generate homologous scaffolds for re-implantation. This discovery has the potential to accelerate the development of regenerative medicine applications based on implantation of microvascular networks expanded ex vivo or the generation of fully vascularised organs.

  9. Human microvascular lymphatic and blood endothelial cells produce fibrillin: deposition patterns and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Antonella; Gabbrielli, Erica; Villano, Marilisa; Messina, Mario; Ferrara, Francesco; Weber, Elisabetta

    2010-12-01

    Fibrillin microfibrils constitute a scaffold for elastin deposition in the wall of arteries and form the anchoring filaments that connect the lymphatic endothelium to surrounding elastic fibers. We previously reported that fibrillin is deposited in a honeycomb pattern in bovine arterial endothelial cells, which also deposit microfibril-associated glycoprotein (MAGP)-1, whereas thoracic duct endothelial cells form an irregular web. The present immunohistochemical study was designed to verify whether lymphatic and blood human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) isolated from human foreskin by the sequential use of a pan-endothelial marker, CD31, and the lymphatic specific marker, D2-40, deposit fibrillin and MAGP-1. In both cell types, fibrillin and MAGP-1 co-localized and were deposited with different patterns of increasing complexity co-existing in the same culture. Fibrillin microfibrils formed a wide-mesh honeycomb leaving fibrillin-free spaces that were gradually filled. This modality of fibrillin deposition, similar to that of bovine large artery endothelial cells, was basically the same in blood and lymphatic HDMECs. In some lymphatic HDMECs, fibrillin was initially deposited as uniformly scattered short fibrillin strands probably as a result of anchoring filaments carried over from the vessels of origin. Our findings show that blood and lymphatic endothelial cells participate in fibrillin deposition in human skin.

  10. Association of Microvascular Function and Endothelial Biomarkers With Clinical Outcome in Dengue: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Sophie; Lam, Phung Khanh; Vu, Le Hoang Mai; Le, Thi Lien; Ha, Ngo Thanh; Toan, Tran Thi; Van, Nguyen Thu; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Le Duyen, Huynh Thi; Van Kinh, Nguyen; Fox, Annette; Mongkolspaya, Juthathip; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron Paul; Screaton, Gavin Robert; Wertheim, Heiman; Wills, Bridget

    2016-09-01

    The hallmark of severe dengue is increased microvascular permeability, but alterations in the microcirculation and their evolution over the course of dengue are unknown. We conducted a prospective observational study to evaluate the sublingual microcirculation using side-stream dark-field imaging in patients presenting early (<72 hours after fever onset) and patients hospitalized with warning signs or severe dengue in Vietnam. Clinical findings, microvascular function, global hemodynamics assessed with echocardiography, and serological markers of endothelial activation were determined at 4 time points. A total of 165 patients were enrolled. No difference was found between the microcirculatory parameters comparing dengue with other febrile illnesses. The proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) and the mean flow index (MFI) were lower in patients with dengue with plasma than those without leakage (PPV, 88.1% vs 90.6% [P = .01]; MFI, 2.1 vs 2.4 [P = .007]), most markedly during the critical phase. PPV and MFI were correlated with the endothelial activation markers vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (P < .001 for both) and angiopoietin 2 (P < .001 for both), negatively correlated. Modest microcirculatory alterations occur in dengue, are associated with plasma leakage, and are correlate with molecules of endothelial activation, angiopoietin 2 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  11. Association of Microvascular Function and Endothelial Biomarkers With Clinical Outcome in Dengue: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Sophie; Lam, Phung Khanh; Vu, Le Hoang Mai; Le, Thi Lien; Ha, Ngo Thanh; Toan, Tran Thi; Van, Nguyen Thu; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Le Duyen, Huynh Thi; Van Kinh, Nguyen; Fox, Annette; Mongkolspaya, Juthathip; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron Paul; Screaton, Gavin Robert; Wertheim, Heiman; Wills, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Background. The hallmark of severe dengue is increased microvascular permeability, but alterations in the microcirculation and their evolution over the course of dengue are unknown. Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study to evaluate the sublingual microcirculation using side-stream dark-field imaging in patients presenting early (<72 hours after fever onset) and patients hospitalized with warning signs or severe dengue in Vietnam. Clinical findings, microvascular function, global hemodynamics assessed with echocardiography, and serological markers of endothelial activation were determined at 4 time points. Results. A total of 165 patients were enrolled. No difference was found between the microcirculatory parameters comparing dengue with other febrile illnesses. The proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) and the mean flow index (MFI) were lower in patients with dengue with plasma than those without leakage (PPV, 88.1% vs 90.6% [P = .01]; MFI, 2.1 vs 2.4 [P = .007]), most markedly during the critical phase. PPV and MFI were correlated with the endothelial activation markers vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (P < .001 for both) and angiopoietin 2 (P < .001 for both), negatively correlated. Conclusions. Modest microcirculatory alterations occur in dengue, are associated with plasma leakage, and are correlate with molecules of endothelial activation, angiopoietin 2 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. PMID:27230099

  12. Differential susceptibility of equine and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells to equine herpesvirus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, R; Kimura, T; Nakamura, K; Ochiai, K; Okazaki, K; Wada, R; Umemura, T

    2006-04-01

    Equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) shows endotheliotropism in the central nervous system (CNS) of infected horses. However, infection of endothelial cells has not been observed in the CNS of infected mice. To explore the basis for this difference in endotheliotropism, we compared the susceptibility of equine brain microvascular endothelial cells (EBMECs) and mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) to EHV-1 infection. The kinetics of viral growth in EBMECs was typical of a fully productive infection whereas viral infection in MBMECs seemed to be nonproductive. Immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-EHV-1 polyclonal antibody demonstrated viral antigen in infected EBMECs, but not infected MBMECs. EHV-1 immediate early (IE), early (ICP0), and late (gB, gD and gK) transcripts were expressed in infected EBMECs. However, none of these genes was detected in infected MBMECs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Electron microscopic examination at the stage of viral entry showed that viral particles were present within uncoated vesicles in the cytoplasm of EBMECs, but absent from those of MBMECs. These results suggest that viral entry is an important determinant of the susceptibility of EBMECs and MBMECs to EHV-1 infection.

  13. A novel paradigm for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: comorbidities drive myocardial dysfunction and remodeling through coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Walter J; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2013-07-23

    Over the past decade, myocardial structure, cardiomyocyte function, and intramyocardial signaling were shown to be specifically altered in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). A new paradigm for HFPEF development is therefore proposed, which identifies a systemic proinflammatory state induced by comorbidities as the cause of myocardial structural and functional alterations. The new paradigm presumes the following sequence of events in HFPEF: 1) a high prevalence of comorbidities such as overweight/obesity, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and salt-sensitive hypertension induce a systemic proinflammatory state; 2) a systemic proinflammatory state causes coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation; 3) coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation reduces nitric oxide bioavailability, cyclic guanosine monophosphate content, and protein kinase G (PKG) activity in adjacent cardiomyocytes; 4) low PKG activity favors hypertrophy development and increases resting tension because of hypophosphorylation of titin; and 5) both stiff cardiomyocytes and interstitial fibrosis contribute to high diastolic left ventricular (LV) stiffness and heart failure development. The new HFPEF paradigm shifts emphasis from LV afterload excess to coronary microvascular inflammation. This shift is supported by a favorable Laplace relationship in concentric LV hypertrophy and by all cardiac chambers showing similar remodeling and dysfunction. Myocardial remodeling in HFPEF differs from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, in which remodeling is driven by loss of cardiomyocytes. The new HFPEF paradigm proposes comorbidities, plasma markers of inflammation, or vascular hyperemic responses to be included in diagnostic algorithms and aims at restoring myocardial PKG activity.

  14. Chinese medicine Tongxinluo increases tight junction protein levels by inducing KLF5 expression in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Min; Zheng, Bing; Zhang, Ruo-Nan; Jin, Li-Shuang; Zheng, Cui-Ying; Wang, Chang; Zhou, Pei-Pei; Guo, Zong-Wei; Ma, Dong; Wen, Jin-Kun

    2015-06-01

    Tongxinluo (TXL) is a compound prescription formulated according to the meridian theory of traditional Chinese medicine. It may play an important role in cardiovascular protection by improving endothelial cell function. The aim of present study was to investigate whether endothelial protection with TXL is related to its regulation of tight junction protein expression. Human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) were cultured and treated with 10(-7)  mol l(-1) angiotensin II (Ang II) and the different doses of TXL; the expression of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin, VE-cadherin and beta-catenin was determined by Western blotting and real-time PCR. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function of Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) were carried out in HCMEC transfected with either KLF5 adenovirus pAd-KLF5 or siRNA specific for KLF5. Angiotensinogen transgenic mice were treated with TXL by oral administration of TXL of 0.75 g kg(-1)  day(-1) , and immunohistochemical staining was performed with antioccludin, anticlaudin, anti-VE-cadherin, antibeta-catenin and anti-KLF5 antibodies. Ang II treatment significantly reduced the expression of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin, VE-cadherin and beta-catenin in cultured HCMECs. TXL pretreatment could abrogate the down-regulation of these tight junction proteins induced by Ang II. Ang II treatment also decreased KLF5 expression at the mRNA and protein levels; TXL pretreatment markedly reversed the inhibitory effect of Ang II on KLF5 expression. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function of KLF5 showed that KLF5 mediated the expression of tight junction proteins in HCMECs. TXL-enhanced expression of the tight junction proteins was mediated by KLF5. In angiotensinogen transgenic mice, TXL also increased the tight junction protein levels by inducing KLF5 expression. Chinese medicine TXL increases tight junction protein levels by inducing KLF5 expression in microvascular endothelial cells. Copyright © 2015 John

  15. Modulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor expression in microvascular endothelial cells during in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Marx, M; Perlmutter, R A; Madri, J A

    1994-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cells in vivo exhibit a plastic phenotype, forming a nonproliferative, differentiated capillary network, while retaining their ability to respond to injury by proliferation, migration and neovascularization. The presence of PDGF receptors and PDGF responsiveness in microvascular endothelial cells and the significance of PDGF isoforms in the control of endothelial cell growth and differentiation remain controversial. Since culture of microvascular endothelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D) system induced cell differentiation and angiogenesis and inhibited proliferation, the present study investigates the role of different extracellular matrix environments in inducing different microvascular endothelial cell phenotypes on microvascular endothelial cell PDGF receptor expression and PDGF responsiveness. In conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture, microvascular endothelial cells expressed both PDGF receptor alpha and beta chains. Suramin treatment demonstrated continuous downregulation of the alpha receptor surface expression. PDGF BB and, to a lesser extent, PDGF AB were mitogenic in 2D-culture, PDGF AA failed to induce any proliferative response despite inducing receptor autophosphorylation. During in vitro angiogenesis induced by 3D-culture, both PDGF receptors were rapidly downregulated. Assessment of cell proliferation showed quiescent cells and PDGF unresponsiveness. We conclude that the induction of a differentiated phenotype during in vitro angiogenesis (tube formation) driven in part by the spatial organization of the surrounding matrix is associated with a downregulation of PDGF receptors. Identification of the molecular cell-matrix interactions involved in this receptor regulation may allow for targeted manipulation of cell growth in vivo and lead to novel therapeutic applications for PDGF. Images PMID:7506710

  16. Calcium influx through TRPV4 channels modulates the adherens contacts between retinal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Phuong, Tam T T; Redmon, Sarah N; Yarishkin, Oleg; Winter, Jacob M; Li, Dean Y; Križaj, David

    2017-09-26

    The identity of microvascular endothelial (MVE) mechanosensors that sense blood flow in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli and regulate vascular permeability in the retina is unknown. Taking advantage of immunohistochemistry, calcium imaging, electrophysiology, impedance measurements and vascular permeability assays, we show that the transient receptor potential isoform 4 (TRPV4) plays a major role in Ca(2+) /cation signalling, cytoskeletal remodelling and barrier function in retinal microvasculature in vitro and in vivo. Human retinal MVECs (HrMVECs) predominantly expressed Trpv1 and Trpv4 transcripts, and TRPV4 was broadly localized to the plasma membrane of cultured cells and intact blood vessels in the inner retina. Treatment with the selective TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A (GSK101) activated a nonselective cation current, robustly elevated [Ca(2+) ]i and reversibly increased the permeability of MVEC monolayers. This was associated with disrupted organization of endothelial F-actin, downregulated expression of occludin and remodelling of adherens contacts consisting of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and β-catenin. In vivo, GSK101 increased the permeability of retinal blood vessels in wild type, but not in TRPV4 knockout mice. Agonist-evoked effects on barrier permeability and cytoskeletal reorganization were antagonized by the selective TRPV4 blocker HC 067047. Human choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) showed lower TRPV4 mRNA/protein levels and less pronounced agonist-evoked calcium signals compared to MVECs. These findings demonstrate a major role for TRPV4 in Ca(2+) homeostasis and barrier function in the human retinal microvascular endothelial barrier and suggest TRPV4 may differentially contribute to the inner vis à vis outer blood-retinal barrier function. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Macro- and microvascular endothelial cells in vitro: maintenance of biochemical heterogeneity despite loss of ultrastructural characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, D.B.; Jacobson, B.S. )

    1991-02-01

    Microvascular endothelial cells from bovine adrenal medulla and brain and macrovessel endothelial cells from bovine aorta were isolated and cultured under similar conditions in order to determine morphologic and biochemical heterogeneity in vitro. All three cell types exhibited nearly identical ultrastructural morphology and two-dimensional gel protein patterns of {sup 35}S-methionine-labeled whole cells. Two-dimensional gel analysis of {sup 35}S-methionine-labeled plasma membrane proteins however, revealed two-dimensional gel protein patterns unique to the tissue type from which the endothelial cells were isolated. This suggests that the functional significance of these specific endothelial cell types is manifested primarily in surface-associated proteins and that many of the differences are sustained in culture. To determine the potential of aorta, brain, and adrenal medulla endothelial cell (EC) cultures to respond to developmentally significant signals, morphology, growth pattern, and cell surface proteins were monitored in the presence and absence of growth factors. A 17 to 26% increase in cell density as well as an increase in the number of elongated and overlapping cells resulted when all three EC types were exposed to a mitogenic medium. Additionally, expression of specific glycoprotein profiles, as determined by Concanavalin A Western blotting of two-dimensional gels, was dependent on the presence or absence of growth factors in the medium. The ability to induce this morphologic and biochemical variation in the three endothelial cell types was maintained into later passage. Taken together, these data imply that endothelial cells isolated from different tissues exhibit and maintain biochemical heterogeneity and do not completely dedifferentiate into a common endothelial cell type in culture.

  18. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human microvascular endothelial cells: role in endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yong; Ducatman, Alan; Ward, Rebecca; Leonard, Steve; Bukowski, Valerie; Guo, Nancy Lan; Shi, Xianglin; Vallyathan, Val; Castranova, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a member of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) containing an 8-carbon backbone. PFOS is a man-made chemical with carbon-fluorine bonds that are one of the strongest in organic chemistry and widely used in industry. Human occupational and environmental exposure to PFOS occurs globally. PFOS is non-biodegradable and persistent in the human body and environment. In this study, data demonstrated that exposure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) to PFOS induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at both high and low concentrations. Morphologically, it was found that exposure to PFOS induced actin filament remodeling and endothelial permeability changes in HMVEC. Furthermore, data demonstrated the production of ROS plays a regulatory role in PFOS-induced actin filament remodeling and the increase in endothelial permeability. Our results indicate that the generation of ROS may play a role in PFOS-induced aberrations of the endothelial permeability barrier. The results generated from this study may provide a new insight into the potential adverse effects of PFOS exposure on humans at the cellular level. PMID:20391123

  19. Ca2+ uptake by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase in rat microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Francesco; Berra-Romani, Roberto; Baruffi, Silvana; Spaggiari, Santina; Signorelli, Silvia; Castelli, Loretta; Magistretti, Jacopo; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2002-01-01

    In non-excitable cells, many agonists increase the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) by inducing an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-mediated Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores. Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular medium may then sustain the Ca(2+) signal. [Ca(2+)](i) recovers its resting level as a consequence of Ca(2+)-removing mechanisms, i.e. plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) pump, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pump. In a study performed in pancreatic acinar cells, evidence has been provided suggesting that, during the decay phase of the agonist-evoked Ca(2+) transients, the Ca(2+) concentration within the intracellular stores remains essentially constant [Mogami, Tepikin and Petersen (1998) EMBO J. 17, 435-442]. It was therefore hypothesized that, in such a situation, intracellular Ca(2+) is not only picked up by the SERCA pump, but is also newly released through IP(3)-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, with the balance between these two processes being approximately null. The main aim of the present work was to test this hypothesis by a different experimental approach. Using cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, we found that inhibition of the SERCA pump has no effect on the time course of agonist-evoked Ca(2+) transients. This result was not due to a low capacity of the SERCA pump since, after agonist removal, this pump proved to be very powerful in clearing the excess of intracellular Ca(2+). We showed further that: (i) in order to avoid a rapid removal of Ca(2+) by the SERCA pump, continuous IP(3) production appears to be required throughout all of the decay phase of the Ca(2+) transient; and (ii) Ca(2+) picked up by the SERCA pump can be fully and immediately released by agonist application. All these results support the model of Mogami, Tepikin and Petersen [(1998) EMBO J. 17, 435-442]. Since the SERCA pump did not appear to be involved in shaping the decay phase of the

  20. Aging impairs transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in human microvascular endothelial cells: implications for angiogenesis and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, A; Jones, M K; Szabo, S; Tarnawski, A S

    2014-04-01

    In some tissues, aging impairs angiogenesis and reduces expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF), a fundamental regulator of angiogenesis. We previously examined angiogenesis in aging and young gastric mucosa in vivo and in vitro and showed that an imbalance between expressions of VEGF (pro-angiogenic factor) and endostatin (anti-angiogenic protein) results in an aging-related impairment of angiogenesis in rats. However, the human relevance of these findings, and whether these mechanisms apply to endothelial cells derived from other tissues, is not clear. Since P-STAT3 and P-CREB are transcription factors that, in association with HIF-1α, can activate VEGF gene expression in some cells (e.g., liver cancer cells, vascular smooth muscle cells), we examined the expression of these two proteins in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) derived from aging and neonatal individuals. We examined and quantified in vitro angiogenesis, expression of VEGF, P-STAT3, P-CREB and importin-α in HMVECs isolated from neonates (neonatal) and a 66 year old subject (aging). We also examined the effects of treatment with exogenous VEGF and endostatin on in vitro angiogenesis in these cells. Endothelial cells isolated from aging individuals had impaired angiogenesis (vs. neonatal endothelial cells) and reduced expression of VEGF mRNA and protein. Aged HMVECs also had reduced importin-α expression, and reduced expression and nuclear translocation of P-STAT3 and P-CREB. Reduced VEGF gene expression in aged HMVECs strongly correlated with the decreased levels of P-STAT3, P-CREB and importin-α in these cells. Our study clearly demonstrates that endothelial cells from aging individuals have impaired angiogenesis and reduced expression of VEGF likely due to impaired nuclear transport of P-STAT3 and P-CREB transcription factors in these cells.

  1. Neuregulin1-β decreases IL-1β-induced neutrophil adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Limin; Walas, Samantha; Leung, Wendy; Sykes, David B; Wu, Jiang; Lo, Eng H; Lok, Josephine

    2015-04-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis, resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of neurological function. The response of the microvascular endothelium often contributes to neuroinflammation. One such response is the upregulation of endothelial adhesion molecules which facilitate neutrophil adhesion to the endothelium and their migration from blood to tissue. Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is an endogenous growth factor which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in experimental stroke models. We hypothesized that NRG1 would decrease the endothelial response to inflammation and result in a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. We tested this hypothesis in an in vitro model of cytokine-induced endothelial injury, in which human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) were treated with IL-1β, along with co-incubation with vehicle or NRG1-β. Outcome measures included protein levels of endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin, as well as the number of neutrophils that adhere to the endothelial monolayer. Our data show that NRG1-β decreased the levels of VCAM-1, E-selectin, and neutrophil adhesion to brain microvascular endothelial cells activated by IL1-β. These findings open new possibilities for investigating NRG1 in neuroprotective strategies in brain injury.

  2. Neuregulin1-β decreases IL-1β-induced neutrophil adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Limin; Walas, Samantha; Leung, Wendy; Sykes, David B.; Wu, Jiang; Lo, Eng H.; Lok, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and multiple sclerosis, resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of neurological function. The response of the microvascular endothelium often contributes to neuroinflammation. One such response is the up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules which facilitate neutrophil adhesion to the endothelium and their migration from blood to tissue. Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is an endogenous growth factor which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in experimental stroke models. We hypothesized that NRG1 would decrease the endothelial response to inflammation, and result in a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. We tested this hypothesis in an in-vitro model of cytokine-induced endothelial injury, in which human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) were treated with IL-1β, along with co-incubation with vehicle or NRG1-β. Outcome measures included protein levels of endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin; as well as the number of neutrophils that adhere to the endothelial monolayer. Our data show that NRG1-β decreased the levels of VCAM-1, E-selectin, and neutrophil adhesion to brain microvascular endothelial cells activated by IL1-β. These findings open new possibilities for investigating NRG1 in neuroprotective strategies in brain injury. PMID:24863743

  3. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood-brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood-brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  4. Nitric oxide disrupts VE-cadherin complex in murine microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    González, D; Herrera, B; Beltrán, A; Otero, K; Quintero, G; Rojas, A

    2003-04-25

    Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), which is localized at adherent junctions, is involved in the control of vascular permeability. A growing body of evidence indicates that NO modulates the movement of fluid and proteins out of the vasculature. In this paper, we investigated whether NO can disrupt the VE-cadherin complex. We found that treatment with two NO donors (SIN-1 and SNAP) markedly reduced the amount of VE-cadherin in a murine microvascular endothelial cell line (H5V) as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation analysis, cellular ELISA, and Northern blot analysis. Beta- and gamma-catenins were also found to be affected by the two NO donors. Moreover, the disruption of the complex, induced by NO donors, correlated with increases in vascular permeability using both in vivo and in vitro models. These results clearly demonstrate a role for NO in vascular permeability.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the CRLR gene in human microvascular endothelial cells by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, Leonid L; Smith, Dave M; Bicknell, Roy; Rees, Margaret C P

    2003-08-01

    Adrenomedullin is a 52 amino acid peptide that shows a remarkable range of effects on the vasculature that include inter alia, vasodilatation, regulation of permeability, inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis, and promotion of angiogenesis. Recently the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMPs) have become recognized as integral components of the adrenomedullin signaling system. However, mechanisms of regulation of CRLR expression are still largely unknown. This is in part due to lack of information on the gene promoter. In this study we have determined the transcriptional start of human CRLR cDNA by 5'-RACE and cloned the proximal 5'-flanking region of the gene by PCR. The 2318 bp genomic fragment contains the basal promoter of human CRLR, including potential TATA-boxes and several GC boxes. Regulatory elements binding known transcription factors, such as Sp-1, Pit-1, glucocorticoid receptor, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) were also identified. When cloned into reporter gene vectors, the genomic fragment showed significant promoter activity, indicating that the 5'-flanking region isolated by PCR contains the gene promoter of human CRLR. Of significance is that the cloned promoter fragments were activated by hypoxia when transfected in primary microvascular endothelial cells. Site-directed mutagenesis of the consensus hypoxia-response element (HRE) in the 5'-flanking region abolished such a response. We also demonstrated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR that transcription of the gene is activated by hypoxia in microvascular endothelial cells. In contrast, expression of RAMPs 1, 2, and 3 was unaffected by low oxygen tension. We conclude that simultaneous transcriptional up-regulation of CRLR and its ligand adrenomedullin in endothelial cells could lead to a potent survival loop and therefore might play a significant role in vascular responses to hypoxia and ischemia.

  6. Pericyte abundance affects sucrose permeability in cultures of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Fiona E; Hacking, Cindy

    2005-07-05

    The blood-brain barrier is a physical and metabolic barrier that restricts diffusion of blood-borne substances into brain. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier are used to characterize this structure, examine mechanisms of damage and repair and measure permeability of test substances. The core component of in vitro models of the blood-brain barrier is brain microvascular endothelial cells. We cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMEC) from isolated rat cortex microvessels. After 2-14 days in vitro (DIV), immunohistochemistry of these cells showed strong labeling for zona occludens 1 (ZO-1), a tight junction protein expressed in endothelial cells. Pericytes were also present in these cultures, as determined by expression of alpha-actin. The present study was performed to test different cell isolation methods and to compare the resulting cell cultures for abundance of pericytes and for blood-brain barrier function, as assessed by 14C-sucrose flux. Two purification strategies were used. First, microvessels were preabsorbed onto uncoated plastic for 4 h, then unattached microvessels were transferred to coated culture ware. Second, microvessels were incubated with an antibody to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1; CD31) precoupled to magnetic beads, and a magnetic separation procedure was performed. Our results indicate that immunopurification, but not preadsorption, was an effective method to purify microvessels and reduce pericyte abundance in the resulting cultures. This purification significantly reduced 14C-sucrose fluxes across cell monolayers. These data indicate that pericytes can interfere with the development of blood-brain barrier properties in in vitro models that utilize primary cultures of RBMECs.

  7. Metformin and sulodexide restore cardiac microvascular perfusion capacity in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    van Haare, Judith; Kooi, M Eline; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W G E; Vink, Hans; Slenter, Jos; Cobelens, Hanneke; Strijkers, Gustav J; Koehn, Dennis; Post, Mark J; van Bilsen, Marc

    2017-04-11

    Disturbances in coronary microcirculatory function, such as the endothelial glycocalyx, are early hallmarks in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, in the present study myocardial microcirculatory perfusion during rest and stress was assessed following metformin or sulodexide therapy in a rat model of diet-induced obesity. Additionally, the effect of degradation of the glycocalyx on myocardial perfusion was assessed in chow-fed rats. Rats were fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks and were divided into a group without therapy, and groups that received the anti-diabetic drug metformin or the glycocalyx-stabilizing drug sulodexide in their drinking water during the last 4 weeks of the feeding period. Myocardial microvascular perfusion was determined using first-pass perfusion MRI before and after adenosine infusion. The effect of HFD on microcirculatory properties was also assessed by sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging of the gastrocnemius muscle. In an acute experimental setting, hyaluronidase was administered to chow-fed control rats to determine the effect of enzymatical degradation of the glycocalyx on myocardial perfusion. HFD-rats developed central obesity and insulin sensitivity was reduced as evidenced by the marked reduction in insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt in both cardiac and gastrocnemius muscle. We confirmed our earlier findings that the robust increase in myocardial perfusion in chow-fed rats after an adenosine challenge (+56%, p = 0.002) is blunted in HFD rats (+8%, p = 0.68). In contrast, 4-weeks treatment with metformin or sulodexide partly restored the increase in myocardial perfusion during adenosine infusion in HFD rats (+81%, p = 0.002 and +37%, p = 0.02, respectively). Treating chow-fed rats acutely with hyaluronidase, to enzymatically degrade the glyocalyx, completely blunted the increase in myocardial perfusion during stress. In early stages of HFD-induced insulin resistance myocardial perfusion

  8. Assessment of cellular mechanisms contributing to cAMP compartmentalization in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Wei P; Zhu, Bing; Leavesley, Silas J; Sayner, Sarah L; Rich, Thomas C

    2012-03-15

    Cyclic AMP signals encode information required to differentially regulate a wide variety of cellular responses; yet it is not well understood how information is encrypted within these signals. An emerging concept is that compartmentalization underlies specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. This concept is based on a series of observations indicating that cAMP levels are distinct in different regions of the cell. One such observation is that cAMP production at the plasma membrane increases pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier integrity, whereas cAMP production in the cytosol disrupts barrier integrity. To better understand how cAMP signals might be compartmentalized, we have developed mathematical models in which cellular geometry as well as total adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities were constrained to approximate values measured in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. These simulations suggest that the subcellular localizations of adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities are by themselves insufficient to generate physiologically relevant cAMP gradients. Thus, the assembly of adenylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterase, and protein kinase A onto protein scaffolds is by itself unlikely to ensure signal specificity. Rather, our simulations suggest that reductions in the effective cAMP diffusion coefficient may facilitate the formation of substantial cAMP gradients. We conclude that reductions in the effective rate of cAMP diffusion due to buffers, structural impediments, and local changes in viscosity greatly facilitate the ability of signaling complexes to impart specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway.

  9. The Effects of Copper on Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Claudin Via Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Junquan; Tang, Zhaoxin; Li, Ying; Hu, Lianmei; Pan, Jiaqiang

    2016-11-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are related to copper although the effects on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are poorly understood. In the present study, a primary BMEC culture model was established to evaluate the effects of copper on brain microvascular endothelial cells and whether claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-5, and claudin-12 isoforms contribute to apoptosis and intrinsic antioxidant activity. Our results showed that copper ions had dual effects on BMECs by regulating intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Copper levels between 30 and 120 μM could enhance viability and promote proliferation. On the other hand, copper cytotoxicity was a result of apoptosis indicating a redox-independent manner of cell death. Expression levels of claudins were also regulated by copper in a concentration-dependent manner. We identified four claudin isoforms (1, 3, 5, and 12) and showed that their expression levels were regulated as a group by copper. Antioxidant activity of BMECs was also copper regulated, and superoxide dismutase and catalase were the main contributors to BMEC antioxidant functions. Together, our results indicated that copper had dual effects on BMEC growth and intrinsic antioxidant activities played a crucial role in BMEC survival and tight junction.

  10. Decellularized Human Kidney Cortex Hydrogels Enhance Kidney Microvascular Endothelial Cell Maturation and Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Ryan J; Xu, Jin; Luo, Ping; Xue, Jun; Wang, Yi; Kotha, Surya; Zeng, Wen; Fu, Xiaoyun; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Zheng, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The kidney peritubular microvasculature is highly susceptible to injury from drugs and toxins, often resulting in acute kidney injury and progressive chronic kidney disease. Little is known about the process of injury and regeneration of human kidney microvasculature, resulting from the lack of appropriate kidney microvascular models that can incorporate the proper cells, extracellular matrices (ECMs), and architectures needed to understand the response and contribution of individual vascular components in these processes. In this study, we present methods to recreate the human kidney ECM (kECM) microenvironment by fabricating kECM hydrogels derived from decellularized human kidney cortex. The majority of native matrix proteins, such as collagen-IV, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and their isoforms were preserved in similar proportions as found in normal kidneys. Human kidney peritubular microvascular endothelial cells (HKMECs) became more quiescent when cultured on this kECM gel compared with culture on collagen-I-assessed using phenotypic, genotypic, and functional assays; whereas human umbilical vein endothelial cells became stimulated on kECM gels. We demonstrate for the first time that human kidney cortex can form a hydrogel suitable for use in flow-directed microphysiological systems. Our findings strongly suggest that selecting the proper ECM is a critical consideration in the development of vascularized organs on a chip and carries important implications for tissue engineering of all vascularized organs.

  11. Mechanisms of modulation of brain microvascular endothelial cells function by thrombin.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, Eugen; Shipsky, Megan M; Yan, Guang; Abood, Mary E; Brailoiu, G Cristina

    2017-02-15

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the blood-brain barrier. They form a tight monolayer which is essential for maintaining the brain homeostasis. Blood-derived proteases such as thrombin may enter the brain during pathological conditions like trauma, stroke, and inflammation and further disrupts the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, via incompletely characterized mechanisms. We examined the underlying mechanisms evoked by thrombin in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Our results indicate that thrombin, acting on protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) increases cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in RBMVEC via Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular space. Thrombin increases nitric oxide production; the effect is abolished by inhibition of the nitric oxide synthase or by antagonism of PAR1 receptors. In addition, thrombin increases mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species production via PAR1-dependent mechanisms. Immunocytochemistry studies indicate that thrombin increases F-actin stress fibers, and disrupts the tight junctions. Thrombin increased the RBMVEC permeability assessed by a fluorescent flux assay. Taken together, our results indicate multiple mechanisms by which thrombin modulates the function of RBMVEC and may contribute to the blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

  12. Establishment of a new conditionally immortalized human skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hironori; Sano, Yasuteru; Ishiguchi, Eri; Shimizu, Fumitaka; Omoto, Masatoshi; Maeda, Toshihiko; Nishihara, Hideaki; Takeshita, Yukio; Takahashi, Shiori; Oishi, Mariko; Kanda, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    In skeletal muscle, the capillaries have tight junctions (TJs) that are structurally similar to those in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-nerve barrier (BNB). Although many findings have been clarified in the territory of BBB and BNB, few have so far examined the TJs of capillaries in the skeletal muscle. In addition, no in vitro human skeletal muscle microvasculature models have been reported thus far. We newly established a new human skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cell (HSMMEC) line. HSMMECs were isolated from human skeletal muscle and were infected with retroviruses harboring temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen and telomerase genes. This cell line, termed TSM15, showed a spindle fiber-shaped morphology, an immunoreactivity to anti-factor VIII and anti-VE-cadherin antibodies, and a temperature-sensitive growth. TSM15 cells grew stably for more than 40 passages when they were cultured at 33°C, thereby retaining their spindle fiber-shaped morphology and contact inhibition at confluence. The cells expressed tight junctional molecules such as claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occludens-1, as well as transporters such as a glucose transporter 1. The transendothelial electrical resistance of TSM15 was as high as those of the human brain microvascular endothelial cell line. This novel cell line might facilitate the analyses of the pathophysiology of inflammatory myopathy, such as dermatomyositis, and can improve our understanding of the physiological and biochemical properties of the microvasculature in human skeletal muscle. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Endothelial connexin43 mediates acid-induced increases in pulmonary microvascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acid aspiration, a common cause of acute lung injury, leads to alveolar edema. Increase in lung vascular permeability underlies this pathology. To define mechanisms, isolated rat lungs were perfused with autologous blood. Hydrochloric acid and rhodamine-dextran 70 kDa (RDx70) were coinstilled into an alveolus by micropuncture. RDx70 fluorescence was used to establish the spatial distribution of acid. Subsequently, FITC-dextran 20 kDa (FDx20) was infused into microvessels for 60 min followed by a 10-min HEPES-buffered saline wash. During the infusion, FITC fluorescence changes were recorded to quantify the ratio of peak to postwash fluorescence. The ratio, termed normalized fluorescence, was low for acid compared with buffer instillation both in microvessels abutting acid-treated alveoli and those located more than 700 μm away. In contrast, the normalized fluorescence was similar to buffer controls when a higher molecular weight tracer (FITC-dextran 70 kDa) was infused instead of FDx20, suggesting that normalized FDx20 fluorescence faithfully represented microvascular permeability. Inhibiting endothelial connexin43 (Cx43) gap junction communication with Gap27 blunted the acid-induced reduction in normalized fluorescence, although scrambled Gap27 did not have any effect. The blunting was evident not only in microvessels away from the site of injury, but also in those abutting directly injured alveoli. Thus the new fluorescence-based method reveals that acid increases microvascular permeability both at acid-instilled and away sites. Inhibiting endothelial Cx43 blocked the permeability increase even at the direct injury sites. These data indicate for the first time that Cx43-dependent mechanisms mediate acid-induced increases in microvascular permeability. Cx43 may be a therapeutic target in acid injury. PMID:22561459

  14. EFFECT OF IRRADIATION ON MICROVASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS OF PAROTID GLANDS IN THE MINIATURE PIG

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junji; Yan, Xing; Gao, Runtao; Mao, Lisha; Cotrim, Ana P.; Zheng, Changyu; Zhang, Chunmei; Baum, Bruce J.; Wang, Songlin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of irradiation on microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. Methods and Materials A single 25-Gy dose of irradiation (IR) was delivered to parotid glands of 6 miniature pigs. Three other animals served as non-IR controls. Local blood flow rate in glands was measured pre- and post-IR with an ultrasonic Doppler analyzer. Samples of parotid gland tissue were taken at 4 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks after IR for microvascular density (MVD) analysis and sphingomyelinase (SMase) assay. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining (anti-CD31 and anti-AQP1) were used to assess morphological changes. MVD was determined by calculating the number of CD31- or AQP1-stained cells per field. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. The activity of acid and neutral Mg2+-dependent SMase (ASMase and NSMase, respectively) was also assayed. Results Local parotid gland blood flow rate decreased rapidly at 4 h post-IR and remained below control levels throughout the 14-day observation period. Parotid MVD also declined from 4 to 24 hours and remained below control levels thereafter. The activity levels of ASMase and NSMase in parotid glands increased rapidly from 4 to 24 h post-IR and then declined gradually. The frequency of detecting apoptotic nuclei in the glands followed similar kinetics. Conclusions Single-dose IR led to a significant reduction of MVD and local blood flow rate, indicating marked damage to microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. The significant and rapid increases of ASMase and NSMase activity levels may be important in this IR-induced damage. PMID:20832188

  15. Effect of Irradiation on Microvascular Endothelial Cells of Parotid Glands in the Miniature Pig

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Junji; Yan Xing; Gao Runtao; Mao Lisha; Cotrim, Ana P.; Zheng Changyu; Zhang Chunmei; Baum, Bruce J.; Wang Songlin

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of irradiation on microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. Methods and Materials: A single 25-Gy dose of irradiation (IR) was delivered to parotid glands of 6 miniature pigs. Three other animals served as non-IR controls. Local blood flow rate in glands was measured pre- and post-IR with an ultrasonic Doppler analyzer. Samples of parotid gland tissue were taken at 4 h, 24 h, 1 week, and 2 weeks after IR for microvascular density (MVD) analysis and sphingomyelinase (SMase) assay. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining (anti-CD31 and anti-AQP1) were used to assess morphological changes. MVD was determined by calculating the number of CD31- or AQP1-stained cells per field. A terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) apoptosis assay was used to detect apoptotic cells. The activity of acid and neutral Mg{sup 2+}-dependent SMase (ASMase and NSMase, respectively) was also assayed. Results: Local parotid gland blood flow rate decreased rapidly at 4 h post-IR and remained below control levels throughout the 14-day observation period. Parotid MVD also declined from 4 to 24 hours and remained below control levels thereafter. The activity levels of ASMase and NSMase in parotid glands increased rapidly from 4 to 24 h post-IR and then declined gradually. The frequency of detecting apoptotic nuclei in the glands followed similar kinetics. Conclusions: Single-dose IR led to a significant reduction of MVD and local blood flow rate, indicating marked damage to microvascular endothelial cells in miniature pig parotid glands. The significant and rapid increases of ASMase and NSMase activity levels may be important in this IR-induced damage.

  16. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier.

  17. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 regulates microvascular endothelial growth induced by inflammatory cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Takasawa, Wataru; Ohnuma, Kei; Hatano, Ryo; Endo, Yuko; Dang, Nam H.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} induces EC proliferation with reduction of CD26 expression. {yields} CD26 siRNA or DPP-4 inhibition enhances TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}-induced EC proliferation. {yields} Loss of CD26/DPP-4 enhances aortic sprouting induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta}. {yields} Capillary formation induced by TNF-{alpha} or IL-1{beta} is enahced in the CD26{sup -/-} mice. -- Abstract: CD26/DPP-4 is abundantly expressed on capillary of inflamed lesion as well as effector T cells. Recently, CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition has been used as a novel oral therapeutic approach for patients with type 2 diabetes. While accumulating data indicate that vascular inflammation is a key feature of both micro- and macro-vascular complications in diabetes, the direct role of CD26/DPP-4 in endothelial biology is to be elucidated. We herein showed that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor or interleukin-1 reduce expression of CD26 on microvascular endothelial cells, and that genetical or pharmacological inhibition of CD26/DPP-4 enhances endothelial growth both in vitro and in vivo. With DPP-4 inhibitors being used widely in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, our data strongly suggest that DPP-4 inhibition plays a pivotal role in endothelial growth and may have a potential role in the recovery of local circulation following diabetic vascular complications.

  18. Impaired microvascular reactivity and endothelial function in patients with Cushing's syndrome: influence of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Prázný, M; Jezková, J; Horová, E; Lazárová, V; Hána, V; Kvasnicka, J; Pecen, L; Marek, J; Skrha, J; Krsek, M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate skin microvascular reactivity (MVR) and possible influencing factors (fibrinolysis, oxidative stress, and endothelial function) in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Twenty-nine patients with active Cushing's syndrome (ten of them also examined after a successful operation) and 16 control subjects were studied. Skin MVR was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry during post-occlusive (PORH) and thermal hyperemia (TH). Malondialdehyde and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase were used as markers of oxidative stress. Fibrinolysis was estimated by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its inhibitor (PAI-1). N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase, E-selectin, P-selectin, and ICAM-1 were used as markers of endothelial function. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction was present in patients with hypercortisolism, however, increased concentration of ICAM-1 was also found in patients after the operation as compared to controls (290.8+/-74.2 vs. 210.9+/-56.3 ng.ml(-1), p<0.05). Maximal perfusion was significantly lower in patients with arterial hypertension during PORH and TH (36.3+/-13.0 vs. 63.3+/-32.4 PU, p<0.01, and 90.4+/-36.6 vs. 159.2+/-95.3 PU, p<0.05, respectively) and similarly the velocity of perfusion increase during PORH and TH was lower (3.2+/-1.5 vs. 5.2+/-3.4 PU.s(-1), p<0.05, and 0.95+/-0.6 vs. 1.8+/-1.1 PU.s(-1), p<0.05, respectively). The most pronounced impairment of microvascular reactivity was present in patients with combination of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  19. Increased susceptibility to amyloid-β toxicity in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells under hyperglycemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristina; Katz, Paige S; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V G; Moreira, Paula I; Busija, David W

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are closely associated with amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in endothelial cells. Brain microvascular endothelial cells from rat (RBMEC) and mice (MBMEC) were isolated from adult Sprague-Dawley rats and homozygous db/db (Leprdb/Leprdb) and heterozygous (Dock7m/Leprdb) mice, and cultured under normo- and hyperglycemic conditions for 7 d followed by 24 h exposure to Aβ1-40. Some experiments were also performed with two mitochondrial superoxide (O2•-) scavengers, MitoTempo and Peg-SOD. Cell viability was measured by the Alamar blue assay and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by confocal microscopy. Mitochondrial O2•- and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and H2O2 production was confirmed by microplate reader. Hyperglycemia or Aβ1-40 alone did not affect cell viability in RBMEC. However, the simultaneous presence of high glucose and Aβ1-40 reduced cell viability and ΔΨm, and enhanced mitochondrial O2•- and H2O2 production. MitoTempo and PEG-SOD prevented Aβ1-40 toxicity. Interestingly, MBMEC presented a similar pattern of alterations with db/db cultures presenting higher susceptibility to Aβ1-40. Overall, our results show that high glucose levels increase the susceptibility of brain microvascular endothelial cells to Aβ toxicity supporting the idea that hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for vascular injury associated with AD.

  20. Acute microvascular action of vascular endothelial growth factor in skeletal muscle ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei Z; Fang, Xin-Hua; Stepheson, Linda L; Khiabani, Kayvan T; Zamboni, William A

    2005-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute action of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the microcirculation of skeletal muscle subject to ischemia/reperfusion in vivo and to determine the role of nitric oxide synthase in VEGF-induced microvascular protection. A vascular pedicle isolated rat cremaster muscle model coupled with local intraarterial infusion technique was used. Each muscle underwent 4 hours of zero-flow warm ischemia followed by 2 hours of reperfusion. Femoral artery cannulation was performed before reperfusion. The infusate was administered by continuous infusion into the arterial tree of the muscle beginning at 1 minute before reperfusion and at the rate of 0.1 ml/hour throughout the entire reperfusion period. Three groups were designed: (1) the ischemia/reperfusion group, with infusion normal saline; (2) the VEGF plus ische-mia/reperfusion group, with infusion of recombinant human VEGF165 protein; and (3) the L-NA plus VEGF plus ischemia/reperfusion group, with infusion of N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA; a nonselective nitric oxide synthase antagonist) mixed with VEGF165 protein. After 2 hours of reperfusion, microcirculation measurements including arteriole diameter, capillary perfusion, and endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatation were performed. The muscle was harvested and processed for reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for measuring eNOS and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression. Reperfusion caused significant microvascular alterations including vasoconstriction, poor capillary perfusion, and endothelial dysfunction in the skeletal muscle. These alterations were significantly attenuated by intraarterial infusion of VEGF during reperfusion, but the beneficial effect of VEGF was reduced significantly by coadministration of L-NA. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction study revealed that ischemia/reperfusion depressed e

  1. Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Pang, Dominic K T; Robson, Debra L; Chan, Pak; Toma, Jelena; Borradaile, Nica M

    2014-12-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) as a monotherapy can reduce vascular disease risk, but its mechanism of action remains controversial, and may not be dependent on systemic lipid modifying effects. Niacin has recently been shown to improve endothelial function and vascular regeneration, independent of correcting dyslipidemia, in rodent models of vascular injury and metabolic disease. As a potential biosynthetic precursor for NAD(+), niacin could elicit these vascular benefits through NAD(+)-dependent, sirtuin (SIRT) mediated responses. Alternatively, niacin may act through its receptor, GPR109A, to promote endothelial function, though endothelial cells are not known to express this receptor. We hypothesized that niacin directly improves endothelial cell function during exposure to lipotoxic conditions and sought to determine the potential mechanism(s) involved. Angiogenic function in excess palmitate was assessed by tube formation following treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) with either a relatively low concentration of niacin (10 μM), or nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) (1 μM), a direct NAD(+) precursor. Although both niacin and NMN improved HMVEC tube formation during palmitate overload, only NMN increased cellular NAD(+) and SIRT1 activity. We further observed that HMVEC express GRP109A. Activation of this receptor with either acifran or MK-1903 recapitulated niacin-induced improvements in HMVEC tube formation, while GPR109A siRNA diminished the effect of niacin. Niacin, at a low concentration, improves HMVEC angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, likely independent of NAD(+) biosynthesis and SIRT1 activation, but rather through niacin receptor activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Paracrine crosstalk between human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bassino, Eleonora; Gasparri, Franco; Giannini, Valentina; Munaron, Luca

    2015-05-01

    Human follicle dermal papilla cells (FDPC) are a specialized population of mesenchymal cells located in the skin. They regulate hair follicle (HF) development and growth, and represent a reservoir of multipotent stem cells. Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that HF cycling is associated with vascular remodeling. Follicular keratinocytes release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that sustains perifollicular angiogenesis leading to an increase of follicle and hair size. Furthermore, several human diseases characterized by hair loss, including Androgenetic Alopecia, exhibit alterations of skin vasculature. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HF vascularization remain largely unknown. In vitro coculture approaches can be successfully employed to greatly improve our knowledge and shed more light on this issue. Here we used Transwell-based co-cultures to show that FDPC promote survival, proliferation and tubulogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) more efficiently than fibroblasts. Accordingly, FDPC enhance the endothelial release of VEGF and IGF-1, two well-known proangiogenic growth factors. Collectively, our data suggest a key role of papilla cells in vascular remodeling of the hair follicle.

  3. Hyperoxic sheep pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells generate free radicals via mitochondrial electron transport.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, S P; Zweier, J L; Kuppusamy, P; Harrison, S J; Bassett, D J; Gabrielson, E W; Sylvester, J T

    1993-01-01

    Free radical generation by hyperoxic endothelial cells was studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). Studies were performed to determine the radical species produced, whether mitochondrial electron transport was involved, and the effect of the radical generation on cell mortality. Sheep pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell suspensions exposed to 100% O2 for 30 min exhibited prominent DMPO-OH and, occasionally, additional smaller DMPO-R signals thought to arise from the trapping of superoxide anion (O2-.), hydroxyl (.OH), and alkyl (.R) radicals. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) quenched both signals suggesting that the observed radicals were derived from O2-.. Studies with deferoxamine suggested that the generation of .R occurred secondary to the formation of .OH from O2-. via an iron-mediated Fenton reaction. Blocking mitochondrial electron transport with rotenone (20 microM) markedly decreased radical generation. Cell mortality increased slightly in oxygen-exposed cells. This increase was not significantly altered by SOD or deferoxamine, nor was it different from the mortality observed in air-exposed cells. These results suggest that endothelial cells exposed to hyperoxia for 30 min produce free radicals via mitochondrial electron transport, but under the conditions of these experiments, this radical generation did not appear cause cell death. PMID:8380815

  4. Characterization of cationic amino acid transporters and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human placental microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dye, J F; Vause, S; Johnston, T; Clark, P; Firth, J A; D'Souza, S W; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the expression and activity of arginine transporters and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human placental microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). Using RT-PCR amplification products for eNOS, CAT1, CAT2A, CAT2B, CAT4, 4F2hc (CD98), rBAT and the light chains y+LAT1, y+LAT2, and b0+T1 were detected in HPMEC, but not B0+. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed the presence of 4F2hc and CAT1 protein in HPMEC. 4F2hc-light chain dimers were indicated by a shift in molecular mass detected under nonreducing conditions. L-Arginine transport into HPMEC was independent of Na+ or Cl- and was inhibited by the neutral amino acid glutamine, but not by cystine. The Ki for glutamine inhibition was greater in the absence of Na+. Kinetic analysis supported a two-transporter model attributed to system y+L and system y+. Expression of eNOS in HPMEC was detectable by immunohistochemistry and ELISA but not by Western blotting. Activity of eNOS in HPMEC, measured over 48 h, either as the basal production of nitric oxide (NO) or as the accumulation of intracellular cGMP was not detectable. We conclude that HPMEC transport cationic amino acids by systems y+ and y+L and that basal eNOS expression and activity in these cells is low.

  5. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling and microvascular dysfunction in the mesentery of mice deficient in α-galactosidase A

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Justin J.; Shu, Liming; Park, James L.; Bodary, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    A defect in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A (Gla) results in globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) accumulation in Fabry disease and leads to premature death from cardiac and cerebrovascular events. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are often first observed during childhood in these patients and are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate an age-dependent microvasculopathy of the mesenteric artery (MA) in a murine model of Fabry disease (Gla-knockout mice) resulting from dysregulation of the vascular homeostatic enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The progressive accumulation of Gb3 in the MA was confirmed by thin-layer chromatographic analysis. A total absence of endothelium-dependent dilation was observed in MAs from mice at 8 mo of age, while suppression of ACh-mediated vasodilation was evident from 2 mo of age. Endothelium-independent dilation with sodium nitroprusside was normal compared with age-matched wild-type mice. The microvascular defect in MAs from Fabry mice was endothelium-dependent and associated with suppression of the active homodimer of eNOS. Phosphorylation of eNOS at the major activation site (Ser1179) was significantly downregulated, while phosphorylation at the major inhibitory site (Thr495) was remarkably enhanced in MAs from aged Fabry mice. These profound alterations in eNOS bioavailability at 8 mo of age were observed in parallel with high levels of 3-nitrotyrosine, suggesting increased reactive oxygen species along with eNOS uncoupling in this vascular bed. Overall, the mesenteric microvessels in the setting of Fabry disease were observed to have an early and profound endothelial dysfunction associated with elevated reactive nitrogen species and decreased nitric oxide bioavailability. PMID:24232002

  6. The Association of Serum Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Ferritin in Diabetic Microvascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Jiang, Fang; Tang, Yue-Ting; Si, Meng-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular disease. Most diabetes patients have higher serum levels of ferritin that may participate in diabetic vascular complications through high oxidative stress induced by iron. However, the mechanistic link between ferritin and VEGF is obscure. The study investigated the association of VEGF and ferritin in patients with diabetic microvascular disease. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 26 healthy individuals were selected in this study. Serum ferritin, VEGF, hematological parameters, and clinical data were assessed in this cohort. The Spearman rank method was used to evaluate the associations among them. Results: Serum levels of VEGF and ferritin were significantly higher in diabetes patients compared with the controls; levels of both were elevated with development of the disease. There were positive correlations between VEGF and glucose levels and between VEGF and ferritin in diabetes groups, especially in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Positive correlations were also found between VEGF level and the parameters of age, hemoglobin, and albumin in patients with diabetes hypertension. Conclusions: Our data suggest that high ferritin levels in T2DM are closely related to the development of diabetic vascular complications through interaction with VEGF. PMID:24279470

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  8. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells, microvascular density and fibrosis in obesity before and after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Rossini, Claudia; Porteri, Enzo; La Boria, Elisa; Corbellini, Claudia; Mittempergher, Francesco; Di Betta, Ernesto; Petroboni, Beatrice; Sarkar, Annamaria; Agabiti-Rosei, Claudia; Casella, Claudio; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi F; Bonomini, Francesca; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2013-06-01

    It is not known whether, in obesity, the capillary density or the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are reduced, or whether fibrosis of small vessels is also present. In addition, possible effects of weight reduction on these parameters have never been evaluated. Therefore, we investigated EPCs and capillary density in 25 patients with severe obesity, all submitted to bariatric surgery, and in 18 normotensive lean subjects and 12 hypertensive lean patients as controls. All patients underwent a biopsy of subcutaneous fat during bariatric surgery. In five patients, a second biopsy was obtained after consistent weight loss, about 1 year later, during a surgical intervention for abdominoplasty. EPCs and capillary density were reduced in obesity, and EPCs were significantly increased after weight reduction. Vascular collagen content was clearly increased in obese patients. No significant difference in vascular collagen was observed between normotensive obese patients and hypertensive obese patients. After pronounced weight reduction, collagen content was nearly normalized. No difference in stress-strain relation was observed among groups or before and after weight loss. In conclusion, our data suggest that microvascular rarefaction occurs in obesity. EPCs were significantly reduced in obese patients. Pronounced weight loss induced by bariatric surgery seems to induce a significant improvement of EPC number, but not of capillary rarefaction. A pronounced fibrosis of subcutaneous small resistance arteries is present in obese patients, regardless of the presence of increased blood pressure values. Consistent weight loss induced by bariatric surgery may induce an almost complete regression of microvascular fibrosis.

  9. Inhibition of Murine Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Promotes Recovery of Barrier Function under Septic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lefeng; Mehta, Sanjay; Brock, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is characterized by injury of the pulmonary microvasculature and the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC), leading to barrier dysfunction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Our recent work identified a strong correlation between PMVEC apoptosis and microvascular leak in septic mice in vivo, but the specific role of apoptosis in septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction remains unclear. Thus, we hypothesize that PMVEC apoptosis is likely required for PMVEC barrier dysfunction under septic conditions in vitro. Septic stimulation (mixture of tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, and interferon γ [cytomix]) of isolated murine PMVEC resulted in a significant loss of barrier function as early as 4 h after stimulation, which persisted until 24 h. PMVEC apoptosis, as reflected by caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, and loss of membrane polarity, was first apparent at 8 h after cytomix. Pretreatment of PMVEC with the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD significantly decreased septic PMVEC apoptosis and was associated with reestablishment of PMVEC barrier function at 16 and 24 h after stimulation but had no effect on septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction over the first 8 h. Collectively, our data suggest that early septic murine PMVEC barrier dysfunction driven by proinflammatory cytokines is not mediated through apoptosis, but PMVEC apoptosis contributes to late septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction. PMID:28250575

  10. Early gene response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells to Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chinling; Chou, Chung-Hsi; Tseng, Charles; Ge, Xijin; Pinchuk, Lesya M.

    2012-01-01

    The gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) in response to 4 h of infection by Listeria monocytogenes was analyzed. Four hours after infection, the expression of 456 genes of HBMEC had changed (p < 0.05). We noted that many active genes were involved in the formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine pathway in infected HBMEC. In the upregulated genes, mRNA levels of interleukin-8 and interleukin-15 in infected cells increased according to microarray and real-time reverse transcription – PCR analyses. Since both cytokines are regarded as potent chemotactic factors, the results suggest that HBMEC are capable of recruiting cells of innate and adaptive immune responses during early L. monocytogenes infection. PMID:21542783

  11. GPR40/FFA1 and Neutral Sphingomyelinase Are Involved in Palmitate-Boosted Inflammatory Response of Microvascular Endothelial Cells to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongyang; Li, Yanchun; Jin, Junfei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Increased levels of both saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are associated with type 2 diabetes. However, it remains largely unknown how SFAs interact with LPS to regulate inflammatory responses in microvascular endothelial cells (MIC ECs) that are critically involved in atherosclerosis as a diabetic complication. In this study, we compared the effects of LPS, palmitic acid (PA), the most abundant saturated fatty acid, or the combination of LPS and PA on interleukin (IL)-6 expression by MIC ECs and explored the underlying mechanisms. Methods Human cardiac MIC ECs were treated with LPS, PA and LPS plus PA and the regulatory pathways including receptors, signal transduction, transcription and post-transcription, and sphingolipid metabolism for IL-6 expression were investigated. Results G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)40 or free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1), but not toll-like receptor 4, was involved in PA-stimulated IL-6 expression. PA not only stimulated IL-6 expression by itself, but also remarkably enhanced LPS-stimulated IL-6 expression via a cooperative stimulation on mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathways, and both transcriptional and post-transcriptional activation. Furthermore, PA induced a robust neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase)-mediated sphingomyelin hydrolysis that was involved in PA-augmented IL-6 upregulation. Conclusion PA boosted inflammatory response of microvascular endothelial cells to LPS via GPR40 and nSMase. PMID:25795558

  12. Lipopolysaccharide impairs permeability of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells via Connexin40.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua-Song; Li, Meng; Sui, Bing-Dong; Wei, Lei; Hou, Rui; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Li, Qiang; Bi, Sheng-Hui; Zhang, Jin-Zhou; Yi, Ding-Hua

    2017-09-01

    The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary endothelial barrier disruption is a key pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying LPS-impaired permeability of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) are not fully understood. Gap junctions, particularly Connexin40 (Cx40), are necessary for the maintenance of normal vascular function. In this study, we for the first time investigated the role of Cx40 in LPS-impaired permeability of PMVECs and provided potential therapeutic approaches based on mechanistic findings of Cx40 regulation by LPS stimuli. Rat PMVECs were isolated, cultured and identified with cell morphology, specific markers, ultrastructural characteristics and functional tests. Western blot analysis demonstrated that Cx40 is the major connexin highly expressed in PMVECs. Furthermore, by inhibiting Cx40 in a time-dependent manner, LPS impaired gap junction function and induced permeability injury of PMVECs. The key role of Cx40 decline in mediating detrimental effects of LPS was further confirmed in rescue experiments through Cx40 overexpression. Mechanistically, LPS stress on PMVECs inhibited the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, which may synergize with the inflammatory nuclear factor kappaB (NFκB) signaling activation in suppressing Cx40 expression level and phosphorylation. Moreover, through pharmacological PKC activation or NFκB inhibition, Cx40 activity in PMVECs could be restored, leading to maintained barrier function under LPS stress. Our findings uncover a previously unrecognized role of Cx40 and its regulatory mechanisms in impaired endothelial integrity under endotoxin and inflammation, shedding light on intervention approaches to improve pulmonary endothelial barrier function in ALI and ARDS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A simple method for isolating and culturing the rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xue, Qiang; Tang, Qing; Hou, Min; Qi, Hongyi; Chen, Gang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jifen; Chen, Yi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2013-11-01

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), a main component of the blood-brain barrier, play a critical role in the pathogenesis of many brain diseases. The primary culture of BMECs has been used in various models for studying cerebrovascular diseases in vitro. However, there are still several problems existing in the isolation and cultivation of primary rat BMECs, such as low yield, contamination with other cell types, and requirement of a large number of animals and expensive growth factor. In this study, we describe a simple, economical (without any growth factor) and repeatable method to obtain endothelial cells with high purity (>99%) and yield (about 2.2×10(7) per rat) from cerebral cortexes of neonatal rat, mainly from gray matter. In vitro examinations determined that the isolated cells expressed typical phenotypic markers of differentiated brain endothelium such as multiple drug resistant protein, von Willebrand factor, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31), and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM). These cells also possessed morphological and ultra-structural characteristics that were observed by phase contrast microscope and electric microscope. Then GFAP and α-SMA were used, respectively, to identify astrocyte and pericyte which were potential to contaminate primary culturing of BMECs. And specific reaction of endothelial cells to external stimulation was tested by culture with TNF-α for 24h. All these results of our experiments supply that our protocol provides an effective and reliable method to obtain high purity and yield of rat BMECs and offers a useful tool for studying cellular physiology, cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, blood-brain barrier and neurovascular units, etc.

  14. Impact of Calcium Signaling during Infection of Neisseria meningitidis to Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells. PMID:25464500

  15. Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Obesity Is Driven by Macrophage-Dependent Hydrogen Sulfide Depletion.

    PubMed

    Candela, Joseph; Wang, Rui; White, Carl

    2017-05-01

    The function of perivascular adipose tissue as an anticontractile mediator in the microvasculature is lost during obesity. Obesity results in inflammation and recruitment of proinflammatory macrophages to the perivascular adipose tissue that is paralleled by depletion of the vasorelaxant signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the vessel. The current objective was to assess the role of macrophages in determining vascular [H2S] and defining how this impinged on vasodilation. Contractility and [H2S] were measured in mesenteric resistance arterioles from lean and obese mice by using pressure myography and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vasodilation was impaired and smooth muscle and endothelial [H2S] decreased in vessels from obese mice compared with those from lean controls. Coculturing vessels from lean mice with macrophages from obese mice, or macrophage-conditioned media, recapitulated obese phenotypes in vessels. These effects were mediated by low molecular weight species and dependent on macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. The inducible nitric oxide synthase activity of perivascular adipose tissue-resident proinflammatory macrophages promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction by reducing the bioavailability of H2S in the vessel. These findings support a model in which vascular H2S depletion underpins the loss of perivascular adipose tissue anticontractile function in obesity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Microvascular endothelial cells exhibit optimal aspect ratio for minimizing flow resistance.

    PubMed

    Sumagin, Ronen; Brown, Carl W; Sarelius, Ingrid H; King, Michael R

    2008-04-01

    A recent analytical solution of the three-dimensional Stokes flow through a bumpy tube predicts that for a given bump area, there exists an optimal circumferential wavenumber which minimizes flow resistance. This study uses measurements of microvessel endothelial cell morphology to test whether this prediction holds in the microvasculature. Endothelial cell (EC) morphology was measured in blood perfused in situ microvessels in anesthetized mice using confocal intravital microscopy. EC borders were identified by immunofluorescently labeling the EC surface molecule ICAM-1 which is expressed on the surface but not in the EC border regions. Comparison of this theory with extensive in situ measurements of microvascular EC geometry in mouse cremaster muscle using intravital microscopy reveals that the spacing of EC nuclei in venules ranging from 27 to 106 microm in diameter indeed lies quite close to this predicted optimal configuration. Interestingly, arteriolar ECs are configured to minimize flow resistance not in the resting state, but at the dilated vessel diameter. These results raise the question of whether less organized circulatory systems, such as that found in newly formed solid tumors or in the developing embryo, may deviate from the optimal bump spacing predicted to minimize flow resistance.

  17. Transfer of functional microRNAs between glioblastoma and microvascular endothelial cells through gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Thuringer, Dominique; Boucher, Jonathan; Jego, Gaetan; Pernet, Nicolas; Cronier, Laurent; Hammann, Arlette; Solary, Eric; Garrido, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Extensive invasion and angiogenesis are hallmark features of malignant glioblastomas. Here, we co-cultured U87 human glioblastoma cells and human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) to demonstrate the exchange of microRNAs that initially involve the formation of gap junction communications between the two cell types. The functional inhibition of gap junctions by carbenoxolone blocks the transfer of the anti-tumor miR-145-5p from HMEC to U87, and the transfer of the pro-invasive miR-5096 from U87 to HMEC. These two microRNAs exert opposite effects on angiogenesis in vitro. MiR-5096 was observed to promote HMEC tubulogenesis, initially by increasing Cx43 expression and the formation of heterocellular gap junctions, and secondarily through a gap-junction independent pathway. Our results highlight the importance of microRNA exchanges between tumor and endothelial cells that in part involves the formation of functional gap junctions between the two cell types. PMID:27661112

  18. Alteration of tight junctions in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in bleomycin-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Nan, Haiyan; Yan, Linfeng; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Guangbin; Wei, Jingguo

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages and eosinophils that infiltrate the lung interstitium are active promoters of bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Leukocyte infiltration indicates disrupted barrier function in endothelial cells. The aims of this study were to investigate tight junctions (TJs) and their regulation of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) proteins in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) during BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and to compare the BLM model with the pneumococcus-induced pneumonia model of lung injury. The results revealed that the majority of PMVEC TJs were in an open state in BLM-treated tissue, where PMVEC paracellular permeability remained consistently higher than in controls. Macrophage accumulation in the lung interstitium was also significantly higher than in controls. Alteration of ZO-1 protein expression further supported the apparent disruption in PMVEC TJs in tissues from BLM-treated rats. These changes were markedly different from the concurrent changes in pneumococcus-infected rats. The findings suggest that changes in the ZO-1 proteins of PMVECs underlie the sustained disruption of TJs in BLM-treated animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. This dysfunction of paracellular barriers directly leads to the sustained infiltration of leukocytes and corresponding cytokine secretion, proliferation of fibroblasts, and progression of pulmonary fibrosis. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Concise Review: Tissue-Specific Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Hannah K.; Canfield, Scott G.; Shusta, Eric V.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) display significant heterogeneity across tissue types, playing an important role in tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Recent work demonstrating the derivation of tissue-specific microvascular endothelial cells (TS-MVECs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has ignited the potential to generate tissue-specific models which may be applied to regenerative medicine and in vitro modeling applications. Here we review techniques by which hPSC-derived TS-MVECs have been made to date and discuss how current hPSC-EC differentiation protocols may be directed towards tissue-specific fates. We begin by discussing the nature of EC tissue specificity in vivo and review general hPSC-EC differentiation protocols generated over the last decade. Finally, we describe how specificity can be integrated into hPSC-EC protocols to generate hPSC-derived TS-MVECs in vitro, including EC and parenchymal cell co-culture, directed differentiation, and direct reprogramming strategies. PMID:25070152

  20. TGFB1 disrupts the angiogenic potential of microvascular endothelial cells of the corpus luteum.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Dulce; Davis, John S

    2011-07-15

    Cyclical formation and regression of the ovarian corpus luteum is required for reproduction. During luteal regression, the microvasculature of the corpus luteum is extensively disrupted. Prostaglandin F2α, a primary signal for luteal regression, induces the expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFB1) in the corpus luteum. This study determined the actions of TGFB1 on microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the bovine corpus luteum (CLENDO cells). We hypothesized that TGFB1 participates in the disruption of the microvasculature during luteal regression. TGFB1 activated the canonical SMAD signaling pathway in CLENDO cells. TGFB1 (1 ng/ml) significantly reduced both basal and fetal-calf-serum-stimulated DNA synthesis, without reducing cell viability. TGFB1 also significantly reduced CLENDO cell transwell migration and disrupted the formation of capillary-like structures when CLENDO cells were plated on Matrigel. By contrast, CLENDO cells plated on fibrillar collagen I gels did not form capillary-like structures and TGFB1 induced cell death. Additionally, TGFB1 caused loss of VE-cadherin from cellular junctions and loss of cell-cell contacts, and increased the permeability of confluent CLENDO cell monolayers. These studies demonstrate that TGFB1 acts directly on CLENDO cells to limit endothelial cell function and suggest that TGFB1 might act in the disassembly of capillaries observed during luteal regression.

  1. Transfer of functional microRNAs between glioblastoma and microvascular endothelial cells through gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Thuringer, Dominique; Boucher, Jonathan; Jego, Gaetan; Pernet, Nicolas; Cronier, Laurent; Hammann, Arlette; Solary, Eric; Garrido, Carmen

    2016-11-08

    Extensive invasion and angiogenesis are hallmark features of malignant glioblastomas. Here, we co-cultured U87 human glioblastoma cells and human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) to demonstrate the exchange of microRNAs that initially involve the formation of gap junction communications between the two cell types. The functional inhibition of gap junctions by carbenoxolone blocks the transfer of the anti-tumor miR-145-5p from HMEC to U87, and the transfer of the pro-invasive miR-5096 from U87 to HMEC. These two microRNAs exert opposite effects on angiogenesis in vitro. MiR-5096 was observed to promote HMEC tubulogenesis, initially by increasing Cx43 expression and the formation of heterocellular gap junctions, and secondarily through a gap-junction independent pathway. Our results highlight the importance of microRNA exchanges between tumor and endothelial cells that in part involves the formation of functional gap junctions between the two cell types.

  2. Role of JNK in network formation of human lung microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Medhora, Meetha; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha; Pratt, Phillip F.; Cook, Craig R.; Dunn, Laurel K.; Gruenloh, Stephanie K.; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    The signaling mechanisms in vasculogenesis and/or angiogenesis remain poorly understood, limiting the ability to regulate growth of new blood vessels in vitro and in vivo. Cultured human lung microvascular endothelial cells align into tubular networks in the three-dimensional matrix, Matrigel. Overexpression of MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), an enzyme that inactivates the ERK, JNK, and p38 pathways, inhibited network formation of these cells. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of recombinant MKP-3 (a dual specificity phosphatase that specifically inactivates the ERK pathway) and dominant negative or constitutively active MEK did not attenuate network formation in Matrigel compared with negative controls. This result suggested that the ERK pathway may not be essential for tube assembly, a conclusion which was supported by the action of specific MEK inhibitor PD 184352, which also did not alter network formation. Inhibition of the JNK pathway using SP-600125 or L-stereoisomer (L-JNKI-1) blocked network formation, whereas the p38 MAPK blocker SB-203580 slightly enhanced it. Inhibition of JNK also attenuated the number of small vessel branches in the developing chick chorioallantoic membrane. Our results demonstrate a specific role for the JNK pathway in network formation of human lung endothelial cells in vitro while confirming that it is essential for the formation of new vessels in vivo. PMID:18263671

  3. Adherence to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For years Plasmodium vivax has been considered the cause of benign malaria. Nevertheless, it has been observed that this parasite can produce a severe disease comparable to Plasmodium falciparum. It has been suggested that some physiopathogenic processes might be shared by these two species, such as cytoadherence. Recently, it has been demonstrated that P. vivax-infected erythrocytes (Pv-iEs) have the capacity to adhere to endothelial cells, in which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) seems to be involved in this process. Methods Adherence capacity of 21 Colombian isolates, from patients with P. vivax mono-infection to a microvascular line of human lung endothelium (HMVEC-L) was assessed in static conditions and binding was evaluated at basal levels or in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) stimulated cells. The adherence specificity for the ICAM-1 receptor was determined through inhibition with an anti-CD54 monoclonal antibody. Results The majority of P. vivax isolates, 13 out of 21 (61.9%), adhered to the HMVEC-L cells, but P. vivax adherence was at least seven times lower when compared to the four P. falciparum isolates. Moreover, HMVEC-L stimulation with TNF led to an increase of 1.6-fold in P. vivax cytoadhesion, similar to P. falciparum isolates (1.8-fold) at comparable conditions. Also, blockage of ICAM-1 receptor with specific antibodies showed a significant 50% adherence reduction. Conclusions Plasmodium vivax isolates found in Colombia are also capable of adhering specifically in vitro to lung endothelial cells, via ICAM-1 cell receptor, both at basal state and after cell stimulation with TNF. Collectively, these findings reinforce the concept of cytoadherence for P. vivax, but here, to a different endothelial cell line and using geographical distinct isolates, thus contributing to understanding P. vivax biology. PMID:24080027

  4. Impaired endothelial function and microvascular asymmetrical dimethylarginine in angiotensin II-infused rats: effects of tempol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Luo, Zaiming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jose, Pedro A; Falck, John R; Welch, William J; Aslam, Shakil; Teerlink, Tom; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II causes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular risk. We investigated the hypothesis that Ang II increases microvascular reactive oxygen species and asymmetrical dimethylarginine and switches endothelial function from vasodilator to vasoconstrictor pathways. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent responses of mesenteric resistance arterioles were assessed in a myograph and vascular NO and reactive oxygen species by fluorescent probes in groups (n=6) of male rats infused for 14 days with Ang II (200 ng/kg per minute) or given a sham infusion. Additional groups of Ang or sham-infused rats were given oral Tempol (2 mmol · L(-1)). Ang II infusion increased mean blood pressure (119±5 versus 89±7 mm Hg; P<0.005) and plasma malondialdehyde (0.57±0.02 versus 0.37±0.05 μmol · L(-1); P<0.035) and decreased maximal endothelium-dependent relaxation (18±5% versus 54±6%; P<0.005) and hyperpolarizing (19±3% versus 29±3%; P<0.05) responses and NO activity (0.9±0.1 versus 1.6±0.2 U; P<0.01) yet enhanced endothelium-dependent contraction responses (23±5% versus 5±5%; P<0.05) and reactive oxygen species production (0.82±0.05 versus 0.15±0.03 U; P<0.01). Ang II decreased the expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 and increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine in vessels (450±50 versus 260±35 pmol/mg of protein; P<0.01) but not plasma. Tempol prevented any significant changes with Ang II. In conclusion, Ang redirected endothelial responses from relaxation to contraction, reduced vascular NO, and increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine. These effects were dependent on reactive oxygen species and could, therefore, be targeted with effective antioxidant therapy.

  5. Regulation of endothelial VCAM-1 expression in murine cardiac grafts. Roles for TNF and IL4.

    PubMed Central

    Bergese, S.; Pelletier, R.; Vallera, D.; Widmer, M.; Orosz, C.

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo mechanisms of vascular endothelial activation and VCAM-1 expression were studied in murine heterotopic cardiac grafts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that cardiac allograft endothelia develop reactivity with MECA-32 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and M/K-2 (anti-VCAM-1) MAb within 3 days of transplantation, whereas cardiac isografts develop MECA-32 reactivity but no M/K-2 reactivity. Additional studies demonstrated that a single treatment of cardiac isograft recipients with the anti-CD3 MAb 145-2C11 induces VCAM-1 expression on isograft microvascular endothelia within 24 hours. We have used this experimental system to identify the cytokines responsible for expression of VCAM-1 and MECA-32 MAb reactivity on graft vascular endothelia. We report that the expression of VCAM-1 on isograft endothelia that was induced with anti-CD3 MAb was blocked by simultaneous treatment with either pentoxifylline, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor (TNFR-Fc), anti-IL4 MAb, or soluble IL4R, but not by anti-IFN-gamma MAb. Alternatively, a similar pattern of isograft endothelial VCAM-1 expression was stimulated in the absence of anti-CD3 MAbs with a single injection of human recombinant TNF-alpha, or with recombinant murine IL4 provided as IL4/anti-IL4 MAb complexes. In addition, the IL4-induced VCAM-1 expression was completely blocked by a single intravenous treatment of the isograft recipients with TNFR:Fc. This suggests that high concentrations of TNF-alpha can stimulate endothelial VCAM-1 expression, but these concentrations are apparently not achieved in cardiac isografts. In the absence of an inducing agent such as anti-CD3 MAb, the stimulation of VCAM-1 expression with exogenous IL4 may reflect functional interaction between endogenous TNF and exogenous IL4, as suggested by the blocking experiments with TNFR:Fc. Although cardiac isograft endothelia normally develop reactivity with MECA-32 MAb within 3 days of transplantation, treatment of cardiac isograft

  6. Tetracycline suppresses ATP gamma S-induced CXCL8 and CXCL1 production by the human dermal microvascular endothelial cell-1 (HMEC-1) cell line and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bender, Anna; Zapolanski, Tamar; Watkins, Shannon; Khosraviani, Ava; Seiffert, Kristina; Ding, Wanhong; Wagner, John A; Granstein, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    Tetracyclines (TCN) have powerful anti-inflammatory properties in addition to their anti-microbial effects. These anti-inflammatory effects are thought to play a role in inhibiting cutaneous inflammation in patients with rosacea and acne; however, the mechanism(s) of this action remains poorly understood. We have previously shown that adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)gamma S, a hydrolysis-resistant ATP analogue, augments secretion of pro-inflammatory messengers by a human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1). ATP released by the sympathetic nerves during stress may stimulate release of pro-inflammatory chemokines by dermal vessel endothelial cells, resulting in recruitment of inflammatory cells and exacerbation of inflammatory skin disease. Here we demonstrate that TCN inhibits ATP gamma S-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators by HMEC-1 cells and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. TCN dose-dependently inhibited ATP gamma S-induced augmentation of CXCL8 (interleukin-8) and CXCL1 (growth-regulated oncogene-alpha) production by HMEC-1 cells and primary human dermal endothelial cells in vitro. TCN and ATP gamma S did not affect HMEC-1 cell viability as determined by trypan-blue exclusion and cell counts. Inhibition of production of inflammatory mediators by endothelial cells may be one mechanism by which TCN improves inflammatory skin diseases. The ability to inhibit release of inflammatory mediators induced in HMEC-1 cells by purinergic agonists may be a useful way to screen for potential therapeutic agents for cutaneous inflammation.

  7. The anti-apoptotic effect of fluid mechanics preconditioning by cells membrane and mitochondria in rats brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shan; Zhu, Fengping; Hu, Ruiping; Tian, Song; Chen, Xingxing; Lou, Dan; Cao, Bing; Chen, Qiulei; Li, Bai; Li, Fang; Bai, Yulong; Wu, Yi; Zhu, Yulian

    2017-10-05

    Exercise preconditioning is a simple and effective way to prevent ischemia. This paper further provided the mechanism in hemodynamic aspects at the cellular level. To study the anti-apoptotic effects of fluid mechanics preconditioning, Cultured rats brain microvascular endothelial cells were given fluid intervention in a parallel plate flow chamber before oxygen glucose deprivation. It showed that fluid mechanics preconditioning could inhibit the apoptosis of endothelial cells, and this process might be mediated by the shear stress activation of Tie-2 on cells membrane surface and Bcl-2 on the mitochondria surface. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Effect of interleukin-6 inhibition on coronary microvascular and endothelial function in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Holte, Espen; Kleveland, Ola; Ueland, Thor; Kunszt, Gabor; Bratlie, Marte; Broch, Kaspar; Michelsen, Annika E; Bendz, Bjørn; Amundsen, Brage H; Aakhus, Svend; Damås, Jan Kristian; Gullestad, Lars; Aukrust, Pål; Wiseth, Rune

    2017-04-21

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a driver of inflammation and associated endothelial cell activation in acute coronary syndromes. We evaluated the effect of the IL-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab on coronary microvascular function and endothelial dysfunction measured by coronary flow reserve (CFR) and markers of endothelial cell activation in patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). This substudy was part of a two-centre, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the effect of a single dose of tocilizumab in NSTEMI. Markers of endothelial cell activation (vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and von Willebrand factor) were assessed in 117 patients. In 42 of these patients, 20 assigned to placebo and 22 to tocilizumab, we measured CFR. Blood samples were obtained at seven consecutive time points between day 1 and 3. CFR was measured by transthoracic echocardiography during hospitalisation and after 6 months. Tocilizumab did not affect CFR during hospitalisation (tocilizumab: 3.4±0.8 vs placebo: 3.3±1.2, p=0.80). CFR improved significantly in both groups at 6 months. Patients in the tocilizumab group had significantly higher area under the curve for VCAM-1 (median 622 vs 609 ng/mL/hour, tocilizumab and placebo respectively, p=0.003). There were inverse correlations between VCAM-1 and CFR in the placebo (hospitalisation: r=-0.74, p<0.01, 6 months: r=-0.59, p<0.01), but not in the tocilizumab group (hospitalisation: r=0.20, p=0.37, 6 months r=-0.28, p=0.20). Tocilizumab did not affect CFR during hospitalisation or after 6 months. Tocilizumab increased VCAM-1 levels during hospitalisation, but this was not associated with reduced CFR in these patients. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Bcl-2 silencing attenuates hypoxia-induced apoptosis resistance in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yongmei; Jiang, Zhen; Zeng, Zhen; Liu, Yujing; Gu, Yuchun; Ji, Yingying; Zhao, Yupeng; Li, Yingchuan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disorder that ultimately causes heart failure. While the underlying causes of this condition are not well understood, previous studies suggest that the anti-apoptotic nature of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) in hypoxic environments contributes to PAH pathogenesis. In this study, we focus on the contribution of Bcl-2 and hypoxia response element (HRE) to apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells and investigate the mechanism. PMVECs obtained from either normal rats or apoptosis-resistant PMVECs obtained from PAH rats were transduced with recombinant lentiviral vectors carrying either Bcl-2-shRNA or HRE combined Bcl-2-shRNA, and then cultured these cells for 24 h under hypoxic (5% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) conditions. In normal PMVECs, Bcl-2-shRNA or HRE combined with Bcl-2-shRNA transduction successfully decreased Bcl-2 expression, while increasing apoptosis as well as caspase-3 and P53 expression in a normoxic environment. In a hypoxic environment, the effects of Bcl-2-shRNA treatment on cell apoptosis, and on Bcl-2, caspase-3, P53 expression were significantly suppressed. Conversely, HRE activation combined with Bcl-2-shRNA transduction markedly enhanced cell apoptosis and upregulated caspase-3 and P53 expression, while decreasing Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, in apoptosis-resistant PMVECs, HRE-mediated Bcl-2 silencing effectively enhanced cell apoptosis and caspase-3 activity. The apoptosis rate was significantly depressed when Lv-HRE-Bcl-2-shRNA was combined with Lv-P53-shRNA or Lv-caspase3-shRNA transduction in a hypoxic environment. These results suggest that HRE-mediated Bcl-2 inhibition can effectively attenuate hypoxia-induced apoptosis resistance in PMVECs by downregulating Bcl-2 expression and upregulating caspase-3 and P53 expression. This study therefore reveals critical insight into potential therapeutic targets for treating PAH.

  10. Hyperosmolarity attenuates TNFα–mediated pro-inflammatory activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Anirban; Moore, Ernest E.; McLaughlin, Nathan J.; Lee, Luis; Jones, Wilbert L.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Nydam, Trevor L.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Firm neutrophil (PMN)-endothelial (EC) adhesion is crucial to the PMN-mediated hyperinflammation observed in acute lung injury. Hypertonic saline (HTS) used for resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock has been associated with a decreased incidence of PMN-mediated lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. We hypothesize that physiologically accessible hypertonic incubation (170mM vs. 140mM, osmolarity ranging from 360-300 mOsm/L) inhibits pro-inflammatory activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). Pro-inflammatory activation of HMVECs was investigated in response to TNFα including IL-8 release, ICAM-1 surface expression, PMN adhesion, and signaling mechanisms under both isotonic (control) and hypertonic conditions. Hyperosmolarity alone had no effect on either basal IL-8 release or ICAM-1 surface expression, but did lead to concentration-dependent decreases in TNFα–induced IL-8 release, ICAM-1 surface expression, and PMN:HMVEC adhesion. Conversely, HTS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and enhanced TNFα activation of p38 MAPK. Despite this basal activation, hyperosmolar incubation attenuated TNFα stimulated IL-8 release and ICAM-1 surface expression and subsequent PMN adherence, while p38 MAPK inhibition did not further influence the effects of hyperosmolar conditions on ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, TNFα induced NF-kB DNA binding, but HTS conditions attenuated this by 31% (p<0.01). In conclusion, HTS reduces PMN:HMVEC adhesion as well as TNFα-induced pro-inflammatory activation of primary HMVECs via attenuation of NF-kB signaling. PMID:23364439

  11. Trigemino-cardiac reflex during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) is a well-recognized phenomenon consisting of bradycardia, arterial hypotension, apnea, and gastric hypermotility during ocular surgery or other manipulations in and around the orbit. Thus far, it could bee shown that central stimulation of the trigeminal nerve during transsphenoidal surgery and surgery for tumors in the cerebellopontine angle can lead to TCR. In cases of microvascular trigeminal decompression for trigeminal neuralgia, no data of the possible occurrence of TCR are available. TCR was defined as a drop in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and the heart rate (HR) of more than 20% to the baseline values before the stimulus and coinciding with the manipulation of the trigeminal nerve. Electronic anesthetic recorded perioperative HR and MABP values were reviewed retrospectively in 28 patients who received microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia and were divided into two subgroups on the basis of occurrence of TCR during surgery. Of the 28 patients, 5 (18%) showed evidence of TCR during manipulation at the trigeminal radix by separation from microvascular structures. Their HR fell 46% and their MABP 57% during operative procedures near the trigeminal nerve as compared with levels immediately before the stimulus. After cessation of manipulation, HR and MABP returned (spontaneously) to levels before the stimulus. Risk factors of TCR were compared with results from the literature. In conclusion, the present results give evidence of TCR during manipulation of the central part of the trigeminal nerve during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia under a standardized anesthetic protocol.

  12. Dermal microvascular endothelial cells express CD32 receptors in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gröger, M; Sarmay, G; Fiebiger, E; Wolff, K; Petzelbauer, P

    1996-02-15

    Immune complexes are thought to be the major cause of cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis, but the mechanism of immune complex targeting to specific vessels is largely unknown. In myelomonocytic cells, immune complex binding and receptor-mediated endocytosis are mediated by Fc gamma R. We asked whether dermal microvascular endothelial cells (DMEC) express Fc gamma Rs. In cryostat sections of normal human skin, mAb IV.3 or AT10, both recognizing CD32 (Fc gamma RII), localizes to the luminal surface of DMEC of the superficial but not of the deep vascular plexus. All DMEC do not express CD16 (Fc gamma RIII) or CD64 (Fc gamma RI) molecules. Adult skin-derived DMEC in culture express CD32 (Fc gamma RII) molecules, as measured by FACS, but are negative for CD16 or CD64. HUVEC, tested for comparison, do not express CD16, 32, or 64 proteins. By reverse-transcriptase PCR and subsequent Southern blot analysis, the isoform of the CD32 molecule expressed on DMEC is determined as Fc gamma RIIa. HUVEC do not contain Fc gamma RIIa or Fc gamma RIIb mRNA. In DMEC, Fc gamma RIIa cross-linking results in immediate intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) concentration fluxes and in rapid internalization of the occupied receptors. We conclude that DMEC are equipped with fully functional Fc gamma RIIa molecules.

  13. Differentiation and characterization of human pluripotent stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, Matthew J; Wilson, Hannah K; Canfield, Scott G; Qian, Tongcheng; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-05-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a critical component of the central nervous system (CNS) that regulates the flux of material between the blood and the brain. Because of its barrier properties, the BBB creates a bottleneck to CNS drug delivery. Human in vitro BBB models offer a potential tool to screen pharmaceutical libraries for CNS penetration as well as for BBB modulators in development and disease, yet primary and immortalized models respectively lack scalability and robust phenotypes. Recently, in vitro BBB models derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have helped overcome these challenges by providing a scalable and renewable source of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). We have demonstrated that hPSC-derived BMECs exhibit robust structural and functional characteristics reminiscent of the in vivo BBB. Here, we provide a detailed description of the methods required to differentiate and functionally characterize hPSC-derived BMECs to facilitate their widespread use in downstream applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effective plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA delivery to diseased human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Slanina, H; Schmutzler, M; Christodoulides, M; Kim, K S; Schubert-Unkmeir, A

    2012-01-01

    Expression of exogenous DNA or small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro is significantly affected by the particular delivery system utilized. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA and siRNA into human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and meningioma cells, which constitute the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, a target of meningitis-causing pathogens. Chemical transfection methods and various lipofection reagents including Lipofectamin™, FuGene™, or jetPRIME®, as well as physical transfection methods and electroporation techniques were applied. To monitor the transfection efficiencies, HBMEC and meningioma cells were transfected with the reporter plasmid pTagGFP2-actin vector, and efficiency of transfection was estimated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. We established protocols based on electroporation using Cell Line Nucleofector® Kit V with the Amaxa® Nucleofector® II system from Lonza and the Neon® Transfection system from Invitrogen resulting in up to 41 and 82% green fluorescent protein-positive HBMEC, respectively. Optimal transfection solutions, pulse programs and length were evaluated. We furthermore demonstrated that lipofection is an efficient method to transfect meningioma cells with a transfection efficiency of about 81%. Finally, we applied the successful electroporation protocols to deliver synthetic siRNA to HBMEC and analyzed the role of the actin-binding protein cortactin in Neisseria meningitidis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Hydroxysafflor yellow A protects methylglyoxal-induced injury in the cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlu; Liu, Jie; He, Ping; Ni, Zhenzhen; Hu, Yangmin; Xu, Huimin; Dai, Haibin

    2013-08-09

    Individuals with diabetes have high concentration of methylglyoxal (MGO) and have advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) which play an important role in vascular complications, such as stroke. Our previous data demonstrated that hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), a major active chemical component of the safflower yellow pigment, had antiglycation effect on the AGEs formation in vitro. It is not known whether HSYA can protect against MGO-induced injury in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Using cultured HBMEC, cell injury was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) formation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and AnnexinV/PI staining. Advanced glycogen end-products and caspase-3 formation were measured by Western blotting. Incubation of MGO for 24h concentration-dependently induced HBMEC injury, which was protected by HSYA from 10 to 100 μmol/l. Caspase-3 expression and AnnexinV/PI staining illustrated that the protection of HSYA was probably associated with inhibiting cell apoptosis. What's more, MGO promoted AGEs accumulation in the cultured HBMEC, which was also inhibited by 100 μmol/l HSYA. Thus, our results proved that HSYA could inhibit MGO-induced injury in the cultured HBMEC, which was associated with its antiglycation effect.

  16. Fermented Chinese Formula Shuan-Tong-Ling Protects Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lingjing; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Jinfeng; Li, Xiaoli; Huang, Weifeng; Yang, Songbai

    2016-01-01

    Fermented Chinese formula Shuan-Tong-Ling (STL), composed of fourteen medicinal herbs, was an experiential formula by Dr. Zhigang Mei for treating vascular encephalopathy, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of fermented STL on hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced injury in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and the possible mechanisms. Cultured BMECs were treated with H2O2, STL, or nicotinamide (NAM, a SIRT1 inhibitor). Then, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was employed to detect cell proliferation and senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) was used to examine cell senescence. Cell nuclei were observed by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Additionally, changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) levels were measured. Expression of SIRT1, p21, and PGC-1α was determined by western blot. Cell proliferation significantly increased with STL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. H2O2 treatment could intensify cell senescence and nuclei splitting or pyknosis. With STL treatment, the reduced ROS level was accompanied by increased SOD and GSH activity. Further assays showed upregulation of SIRT1 and PGC-1α and downregulation of p21 after STL treatment. The results revealed that STL could protect BMECs against oxidative stress injury at least partially through the SIRT1 pathway. PMID:28096886

  17. Microvascular permeability changes might explain cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Jung-Jung; Chung, Chang-Min; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li

    2014-04-01

    Various sequelae of alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy have been reported. Of note, some cases of cardiac tamponade after alcohol septal ablation cannot be well explained. We describe the case of a 78-year-old woman with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in whom cardiac tamponade developed one hour after alcohol septal ablation, probably unrelated to mechanical trauma. At that time, we noted a substantial difference in the red blood cell-to-white blood cell ratio between the pericardial effusion (1,957.4) and the peripheral blood (728.3). In addition to presenting the patient's case, we speculate that a possible mechanism for acute tamponade--alcohol-induced changes in microvascular permeability--is a reasonable explanation for cases of alcohol septal ablation that are complicated by otherwise-unexplainable massive pericardial effusions.

  18. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 mediates endothelial-cardiomyocyte communication and regulates cardiac function.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Margaret E; Collins, Caitlin; Makarewich, Catherine A; Chen, Zhongming; Rojas, Mauricio; Willis, Monte S; Houser, Steven R; Tzima, Ellie

    2015-01-19

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by impaired contractility of cardiomyocytes, ventricular chamber dilatation, and systolic dysfunction. Although mutations in genes expressed in the cardiomyocyte are the best described causes of reduced contractility, the importance of endothelial-cardiomyocyte communication for proper cardiac function is increasingly appreciated. In the present study, we investigate the role of the endothelial adhesion molecule platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) in the regulation of cardiac function. Using cell culture and animal models, we show that PECAM-1 expressed in endothelial cells (ECs) regulates cardiomyocyte contractility and cardiac function via the neuregulin-ErbB signaling pathway. Conscious echocardiography revealed left ventricular (LV) chamber dilation and systolic dysfunction in PECAM-1(-/-) mice in the absence of histological abnormalities or defects in cardiac capillary density. Despite deficits in global cardiac function, cardiomyocytes isolated from PECAM-1(-/-) hearts displayed normal baseline and isoproterenol-stimulated contractility. Mechanistically, absence of PECAM-1 resulted in elevated NO/ROS signaling and NRG-1 release from ECs, which resulted in augmented phosphorylation of its receptor ErbB2. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with conditioned media from PECAM-1(-/-) ECs resulted in enhanced ErbB2 activation, which was normalized by pre-treatment with an NRG-1 blocking antibody. To determine whether normalization of increased NRG-1 levels could correct cardiac function, PECAM-1(-/-) mice were treated with the NRG-1 blocking antibody. Echocardiography showed that treatment significantly improved cardiac function of PECAM-1(-/-) mice, as revealed by increased ejection fraction and fractional shortening. We identify a novel role for PECAM-1 in regulating cardiac function via a paracrine NRG1-ErbB pathway. These data highlight the importance of tightly regulated cellular communication for proper

  19. Mycoplasmal cerebral vasculopathy in a lymphoma patient: presumptive evidence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae microvascular endothelial cell invasion in a brain biopsy.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Roy H; Monastersky, Bruce T; Tyagi, Rachana; Coyne, Thomas

    2011-10-15

    A 73-year-old man had episodic encephalopathy, ataxia and neuropathy. Symptoms largely resolved but adenopathy later lead to the diagnosis of a low-grade follicular lymphoma. The neurological symptoms soon recurred with new pontine calcifications identified by computed tomography. Brain biopsy revealed microvascular endothelial cell nuclear changes. Electron microscopy identified small polymorphic bacteria without a cell wall and with terminal and attachment organelles within endothelial cells and clustered in some microvascular lumina. Immunostaining was positive for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and convalescent serum enzyme immunoassay was positive for M. pneumoniae IgG. The patient again recovered and he was neurologically stable 33 months after the initial episode. The ultrastructural findings of the bacterial cells are distinctive of some mycoplasmal species when compared to other small bacteria. Mycoplasma-like organisms are reported in four autopsied patients who had chronic encephalopathy, movement disorders, and some of the same light- and electron-microscopic findings in the brain as our patient. Direct neuroinvasion by Mycoplasma species has been suggested, while anatomic observations in our patient and in the four autopsy cases show microvascular invasion but not parenchymal invasion. Most mycoplasmal encephalitis may be immune-mediated. The frequency of neurovascular invasion is not known. It may be rare and it may persist.

  20. Cocaine Inhibits Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry in Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells: Critical Role for Sigma-1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Console-Bram, Linda M; Soboloff, Jonathan; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an intracellular chaperone protein with many ligands, located at the endoplasmic reticulum. Binding of cocaine to Sig-1R has previously been found to modulate endothelial functions. In the present study, we show that cocaine dramatically inhibits store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), a Ca2+ influx mechanism promoted by depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells. Using either Sig-1R shRNA or pharmacological inhibition with the unrelated Sig-1R antagonists BD-1063 and NE-100, we show that cocaine-induced SOCE inhibition is dependent on Sig-1R. In addition to revealing new insight into fundamental mechanisms of cocaine-induced changes in endothelial function, these studies provide an unprecedented role for Sig-1R as a SOCE inhibitor. PMID:26467159

  1. Cocaine inhibits store-operated Ca2+ entry in brain microvascular endothelial cells: critical role for sigma-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Console-Bram, Linda M; Soboloff, Jonathan; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an intracellular chaperone protein with many ligands, located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of cocaine to Sig-1R has previously been found to modulate endothelial functions. In the present study, we show that cocaine dramatically inhibits store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a Ca(2+) influx mechanism promoted by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Using either Sig-1R shRNA or pharmacological inhibition with the unrelated Sig-1R antagonists BD-1063 and NE-100, we show that cocaine-induced SOCE inhibition is dependent on Sig-1R. In addition to revealing new insight into fundamental mechanisms of cocaine-induced changes in endothelial function, these studies indicate an unprecedented role for Sig-1R as a SOCE inhibitor.

  2. A model of anti-angiogenesis: differential transcriptosome profiling of microvascular endothelial cells from diffuse systemic sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Fibbi, Gabriella; Margheri, Francesca; Serratì, Simona; Rossi, Luciana; Poggi, Filippo; Lapini, Ilaria; Magi, Alberto; Del Rosso, Angela; Cinelli, Marina; Guiducci, Serena; Kahaleh, Bashar; Bazzichi, Laura; Bombardieri, Stefano; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Gensini, Gian Franco; Del Rosso, Mario; Abbate, Rosanna

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work was to identify genes involved in impaired angiogenesis by comparing the transcriptosomes of microvascular endothelial cells from normal subjects and patients affected by systemic sclerosis (SSc), as a unique human model disease characterized by insufficient angiogenesis. Total RNAs, prepared from skin endothelial cells of clinically healthy subjects and SSc patients affected by the diffuse form of the disease, were pooled, labeled with fluorochromes, and hybridized to 14,000 70 mer oligonucleotide microarrays. Genes were analyzed based on gene expression levels and categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology (GO) consortium to identify statistically significant terms. Quantitative PCR was used to validate the array results. After data processing and application of the filtering criteria, the analyzable features numbered 6,724. About 3% of analyzable transcripts (199) were differentially expressed, 141 more abundantly and 58 less abundantly in SSc endothelial cells. Surprisingly, SSc endothelial cells over-express pro-angiogenic transcripts, but also show up-regulation of genes exerting a powerful negative control, and down-regulation of genes critical to cell migration and extracellular matrix-cytoskeleton coupling, all alterations that provide an impediment to correct angiogenesis. We also identified transcripts controlling haemostasis, inflammation, stimulus transduction, transcription, protein synthesis, and genome organization. An up-regulation of transcripts related to protein degradation and ubiquitination was observed in SSc endothelial cells. We have validated data on the main anti-angiogenesis-related genes by RT-PCR, western blotting, in vitro angiogenesis and immunohistochemistry. These observations indicate that microvascular endothelial cells of patients with SSc show abnormalities in a variety of genes that are able to account for defective angiogenesis. PMID:16859528

  3. T-cell receptor-negative natural killer cells display antigen-specific cytotoxicity for microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bender, J R; Pardi, R; Engleman, E

    1990-09-01

    Based upon prior demonstrations that human microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) could serve as natural killer (NK) cell targets, we established NK cell lines and clones by repeated stimulation of highly purified CD16-positive, CD3/T-cell receptor (Ti)-negative cells with allogeneic ECs. After 3 weeks in culture these lymphoid cells, which neither expressed surface CD3/Ti molecules nor rearranged Ti beta- or gamma-chain genes and which lysed K562 human erythroleukemia cells, displayed specific cytotoxicity for the stimulating ECs. Furthermore, freshly isolated NK cells bound and then removed from each of several allogeneic EC lines displayed selective cytotoxicity for the adsorbing EC line. These results provide evidence for alloantigen-specific recognition of microvascular ECs by NK cells that appears to be determined, at least in part, at the level of adherence. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to the rejection of vascularized organ allografts.

  4. 3D Anastomosed Microvascular Network Model with Living Capillary Networks and Endothelial Cell-Lined Microfluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes detailed practical procedures for generating 3D intact and perfusable microvascular network that connects to microfluidic channels without appreciable leakage. This advanced 3D microvascular network model incorporates different stages of vascular development including vasculogenesis, endothelial cell (EC) lining, sprouting angiogenesis, and anastomosis in sequential order. The capillary network is first induced via vasculogenesis in a middle tissue chamber and then EC linings along the microfluidic channel on either side serve as artery and vein. The anastomosis is then induced by sprouting angiogenesis to facilitate tight interconnection between the artery/vein and the capillary network. This versatile device design and its robust construction methodology establish a physiological microcirculation transport model of interconnected perfused vessels from artery to vascularized tissue to vein.

  5. Alveolar macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase-dependent pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell septic barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Farley, K S; Wang, L F; Law, C; Mehta, S

    2008-11-01

    Inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) from neutrophils and alveolar macrophages (AM) contributes to the pathophysiology of murine septic acute lung injury (ALI). It is not known if AM iNOS has a direct effect on septic pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (PMVEC) permeability. We hypothesized that AM iNOS mediates PMVEC permeability in vitro under septic conditions through NO and peroxynitrite. 100,000 confluent PMVEC on cell-culture inserts were co-incubated with iNOS+/+ vs. iNOS-/- AM, in various ratios of AM to PMVEC. PMVEC injury was assessed by trans-PMVEC Evans Blue-labelled albumin flux in the presence or absence of cytomix (equimolar TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IFN-gamma). Cytomix stimulation dose-dependently increased trans-PMVEC EB-albumin flux, which was exaggerated (1.4+/-0.1% vs. 0.4+/-0.1% in unstimulated PMVEC, p<0.05) in the presence of iNOS+/+, but not iNOS-/-, AM in the upper compartment. Similarly, iNOS+/+, but not iNOS-/-, AM in the lower compartment also enhanced septic trans-PMVEC albumin leak. The mechanism of iNOS-dependent septic PMVEC permeability was pursued through pharmacologic studies with inhibitors of NOS, and scavengers of NO, superoxide, and peroxynitrite, and treatment of PMVEC with the NO donor, DETA-NONOate. Septic iNOS+/+ AM-dependent trans-PMVEC albumin leak was significantly attenuated by pharmacologic iNOS inhibition (L-NAME and 1400W), and scavenging of either NO (oxyhemoglobin), superoxide (PEG-SOD), or peroxynitrite (FeTPPS). Exogenous NO (DETA-NONOate) had no effect on PMVEC permeability. These data are consistent with a direct role of AM iNOS in septic PMVEC barrier dysfunction, which is likely mediated, in part, through peroxynitrite.

  6. Zika Virus Persistently Infects and Is Basolaterally Released from Primary Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mladinich, Megan C.; Schwedes, John

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus that has emerged as the cause of encephalitis and fetal microencephaly in the Americas. ZIKV uniquely persists in human bodily fluids for up to 6 months, is sexually transmitted, and traverses the placenta and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to damage neurons. Cells that support persistent ZIKV replication and mechanisms by which ZIKV establishes persistence remain enigmatic but central to ZIKV entry into protected neuronal compartments. The endothelial cell (EC) lining of capillaries normally constrains transplacental transmission and forms the BBB, which selectively restricts access of blood constituents to neurons. We found that ZIKV (strain PRVABC59) persistently infects and continuously replicates in primary human brain microvascular ECs (hBMECs), without cytopathology, for >9 days and following hBMEC passage. ZIKV did not permeabilize hBMECs but was released basolaterally from polarized hBMECs, suggesting a direct mechanism for ZIKV to cross the BBB. ZIKV-infected hBMECs were rapidly resistant to alpha interferon (IFN-α) and transiently induced, but failed to secrete, IFN-β and IFN-λ. Global transcriptome analysis determined that ZIKV constitutively induced IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), IRF9, and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) 1 to 9 days postinfection, despite persistently replicating in hBMECs. ZIKV constitutively induced ISG15, HERC5, and USP18, which are linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV) persistence and IFN regulation, chemokine CCL5, which is associated with immunopathogenesis, as well as cell survival factors. Our results reveal that hBMECs act as a reservoir of persistent ZIKV replication, suggest routes for ZIKV to cross hBMECs into neuronal compartments, and define novel mechanisms of ZIKV persistence that can be targeted to restrict ZIKV spread. PMID:28698279

  7. Ocimum sanctum Linn. stimulate the expression of choline acetyltransferase on the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusindarta, Dwi Liliek; Wihadmadyatami, Hevi; Haryanto, Aris

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This research was conducted to identify the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs) and to clarify the capability of Ocimum sanctum Linn. ethanolic extract to stimulate the presence of ChAT in the aging HCMECs. Materials and Methods: In this study, we perform an in vitro analysis some in the presence of an ethanolic extract of O. sanctum Linn. as a stimulator for the ChAT expression. HCMECs are divided become two groups, the first is in low passage cells as a model of young aged and the second is in a high passage as a model of aging. Furthermore to analysis the expression of ChAT without and with extract treatments, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis were performed. In addition, ChAT sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is developed to detect the increasing activity of the ChAT under normal, and aging HCMECs on the condition treated and untreated cells. Results: In our in vitro models using HCMECs, we found that ChAT is expressed throughout intracytoplasmic areas. On the status of aging, the ethanolic extract from O. sanctum Linn. is capable to stimulate and restore the expression of ChAT. The increasing of ChAT expression is in line with the increasing activity of this enzyme on the aging treated HCMECs. Conclusions: Our observation indicates that HCMECs is one of the noncholinergic cells which is produced ChAT. The administrated of O. sanctum Linn. ethanolic extract may stimulate and restore the expression of ChAT on the deteriorating cells of HCMECs, thus its may give nerve protection and help the production of acetylcholine. PMID:28096604

  8. Cinnamaldehyde reduces IL-1beta-induced cyclooxygenase-2 activity in rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian-You; Huo, Hai-Ru; Zhao, Bao-Sheng; Liu, Hong-Bin; Li, Lan-Fang; Ma, Yue-Ying; Guo, Shu-Ying; Jiang, Ting-Liang

    2006-05-10

    Cinnamaldehyde is a principle compound isolated from Guizhi-Tang, which is a famous traditional Chinese medical formula used to treat influenza, common cold and other pyretic conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cinnamaldehyde on expression and activity of cyclooxygenase (COX) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (RCMEC). RCMEC were cultured, and identified by immunohistochemistry for von Willebrand factor in cytoplasm of the cells. Then cells were incubated in M199 medium containing interleukin (IL)-1beta in the presence or absence of cinnamaldehyde. After incubation, the medium was collected and the amount of PGE(2) was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cells were harvested, mRNA expression and activity of COX were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with SYBR Green dye and ELISA respectively. Positive immunostaining for von Willebrand factor was present diffusely in the cytoplasm of >95% RCMEC. IL-1beta increased the mRNA expression and activity of COX-2, and production of PGE(2) in a dose- and time-dependent manner in RCMEC, while mRNA and activity of COX-1 were not significantly altered. Cinnamaldehyde significantly decreased IL-1beta-induced COX-2 activity and PGE(2) production in a dose-dependent manner, while it showed no inhibitory effect on IL-1beta-induced COX-2 mRNA expression in cultured RCMEC. In conclusion, cinnamaldehyde reduces IL-1beta-induced COX-2 activity, but not IL-1beta-induced COX-2 mRNA expression, and consequently inhibits production of PGE(2) in cultured RCMEC.

  9. 2,3,7,8-TCDD exposure, endothelial dysfunction and impaired microvascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Pelclová, Daniela; Prázny, Martin; Skrha, Jan; Fenclová, Zdenka; Kalousová, Marta; Urban, Pavel; Navrátil, Tomás; Senholdová, Zdenka; Smerhovsky, Zdenek

    2007-09-01

    Vascular function was examined in subjects with long-term high level of serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p-dioxin (TCDD) during their follow-up visits. Their earlier mean peak TCDD level at the time of exposure in 1965-1968 was estimated in the range of 3300-74 000 pg/g lipids. Ten former pesticide production workers heavily exposed to TCDD (age 57 +/- 2 years, TCDD about 170 pg/g lipids) were examined in 2001. Extended group of 15 TCDD-exposed men (age 59 +/- 3 years, TCDD about 130 pg/g lipids) underwent the same examination in 2004. Findings were compared with a control group of 14 healthy men (age 54 +/- 2 years). Skin microvascular reactivity (MVR) was measured by laser Doppler perfusion monitoring in the forearm during post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and thermal hyperemia (TH). Several parameters of MVR in men exposed to TCDD were significantly impaired, compared with the control group and further progression of the impairment of MVR has been observed between years 2001 and 2004. Serum concentration of E-selectin and inhibitor of tissue plasminogen activator 1 (PAI-1) was significantly higher in exposed subjects (56.0 +/- 18.4 ng/mL versus 40.0 +/- 12.0 ng/mL, P = 0.022 and 90.9 +/- 33.3 ng/mL versus 45.0 +/- 18.0, P = 0.002, respectively). In addition, PORH in the forearm was significantly negatively associated with SOD activity (r = -0.77, P = 0.009) as well as the velocity of perfusion increase during TH (r = -0.68, P = 0.03) and TH% (r = -0.78, P = 0.008). Our data document the presence of endothelial dysfunction in TCDD-exposed men.

  10. Modulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor levels on microvascular endothelial cells during in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, S; Mahooti-Brooks, N; Bensen, L; McCarthy, T L; Centrella, M; Madri, J A

    1996-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cells (RFCs) cultured in two-dimensional (2D) cultures proliferate rapidly and exhibit an undifferentiated phenotype. Addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1) increases fibronectin expression and inhibits proliferation. RFCs cultured in three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels proliferate slowly and are refractory to the anti-proliferative effects of TGF beta1. TGF beta1 promotes tube formation in 3D cultures. TGF beta1 increases fibronectin expression and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) activity and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels in 3D cultures. Since the TGF beta type I and II receptors have been reported to regulate different activities induced by TGF beta1, we compared the TGF beta receptor profiles on cells in 2D and 3D cultures. RFCs in 3D cultures exhibited a significant loss of cell surface type II receptor compared with cells in 2D cultures. The inhibitory effect of TGF beta1 on proliferation is suppressed in transfected 2D cultures expressing a truncated form of the type II receptor, while its stimulatory effect on fibronectin production is reduced in both 2D and 3D transfected cultures expressing a truncated form of the type I receptor. These data suggest that the type II receptor mediates the antiproliferative effect of TGF beta1 while the type I receptor mediates the matrix response of RFCs to TGF beta1 and demonstrate that changes in the matrix environment can modulate the surface expression of TGF beta receptors, altering the responsiveness of RFCs to TGF beta1. PMID:8617876

  11. Phloretin ameliorates 2-chlorohexadecanal-mediated brain microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Üllen, Andreas; Fauler, Günter; Bernhart, Eva; Nusshold, Christoph; Reicher, Helga; Leis, Hans-Jörg; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    2-Chlorohexadecanal (2-ClHDA), a chlorinated fatty aldehyde, is formed via attack on ether-phospholipids by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) that is generated by the myeloperoxidase–hydrogen peroxide–chloride system of activated leukocytes. 2-ClHDA levels are elevated in atherosclerotic lesions, myocardial infarction, and neuroinflammation. Neuroinflammatory conditions are accompanied by accumulation of neutrophils (an ample source of myeloperoxidase) in the brain. Microvessel damage by inflammatory mediators and/or reactive oxidants can induce blood–brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, a pathological condition leading to cerebral edema, brain hemorrhage, and neuronal death. In this in vitro study we investigated the impact of 2-ClHDA on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC), which constitute the morphological basis of the BBB. We show that exogenously added 2-ClHDA is subject to rapid uptake and metabolism by BMVEC. Using C16 structural analogues of 2-ClHDA we found that the cytotoxic potential decreases in the following order: 2-ClHDA>hexadecanal>palmitic acid>2-ClHDA-dimethylacetal. 2-ClHDA induces loss of barrier function, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis via activation of caspase 3, and altered intracellular redox balance. Finally we investigated potential protective effects of several natural polyphenols on in vitro BBB function. Of the compounds tested, phloretin almost completely abrogated 2-ClHDA-induced BMVEC barrier dysfunction and cell death. These data suggest that 2-ClHDA has the potential to induce BBB breakdown under inflammatory conditions and that phloretin confers protection in this experimental setting. PMID:22982051

  12. BMPRII influences the response of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells to inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Vengethasamy, Leanda; Hautefort, Aurélie; Tielemans, Birger; Belge, Catharina; Perros, Frédéric; Verleden, Stijn; Fadel, Elie; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Delcroix, Marion; Quarck, Rozenn

    2016-11-01

    Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR2) gene have been observed in 70 % of patients with heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) and in 11-40 % with idiopathic PAH (IPAH). However, carriers of a BMPR2 mutation have only 20 % risk of developing PAH. Since inflammatory mediators are increased and predict survival in PAH, they could act as a second hit inducing the development of pulmonary hypertension in BMPR2 mutation carriers. Our specific aim was to determine whether inflammatory mediators could contribute to pulmonary vascular cell dysfunction in PAH patients with and without a BMPR2 mutation. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMEC) and arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) were isolated from lung parenchyma of transplanted PAH patients, carriers of a BMPR2 mutation or not, and from lobectomy patients or lung donors. The effects of CRP and TNFα on mitogenic activity, adhesiveness capacity, and expression of adhesion molecules were investigated in PMECs and PASMCs. PMECs from BMPR2 mutation carriers induced an increase in PASMC mitogenic activity; moreover, endothelin-1 secretion by PMECs from carriers was higher than by PMECs from non-carriers. Recruitment of monocytes by PMECs isolated from carriers was higher compared to PMECs from non-carriers and from controls, with an elevated ICAM-1 expression. CRP increased adhesion of monocytes to PMECs in carriers and non-carriers, and TNFα only in carriers. PMEC from BMPR2 mutation carriers have enhanced adhesiveness for monocytes in response to inflammatory mediators, suggesting that BMPR2 mutation could generate susceptibility to an inflammatory insult in PAH.

  13. Metformin represses glucose starvation induced autophagic response in microvascular endothelial cells and promotes cell death.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Samson Mathews; Ghosh, Suparna; Majeed, Yasser; Arunachalam, Gnanapragasam; Emara, Mohamed M; Ding, Hong; Triggle, Chris R

    2017-05-15

    Metformin, the most frequently administered drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is being investigated for its potential in the treatment of various types of cancer; however, the cellular basis for this putative anti-cancer action remains controversial. In the current study we examined the effect of metformin on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy in glucose-starved micro-vascular endothelial cells (MECs). The rationale for our experimental protocol is that in a growing tumor MECs are subjected to hypoxia and nutrient/glucose starvation that results from the reduced supply and relatively high consumption of glucose. Mouse MECs (MMECs) were glucose-starved for up to 48h in the absence or presence of metformin (50μM and 2mM) and the status of ER stress, autophagic, cell survival and apoptotic markers were assessed. Activation of ER stress and autophagy was observed in glucose starved MECs as evidenced by the significant increase in the levels of ER stress and autophagic markers while accumulation of LC3B stained punctae in the MECs confirmed autophagic activation. Treatment with 2mM metformin, independent of AMPK, significantly reversed glucose starvation induced ER stress and autophagy in MECs, but, at 24h, did not decrease cell viability; however, at 48h, persistent ER stress and metformin associated inhibition of autophagy decreased cell viability, caused cell cycle arrest in G2/M and increased the number of cells in the sub-G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. Treatment with metformin reduced phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR and inhibited downstream targets of mTOR. Our findings support the argument that treatment with metformin when used in combination with glycolytic inhibitors will inhibit pro-survival autophagy and promote cell death and potentially prove to be the basis for an effective anti-cancer strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Genomic Comparison of In vivo and In vitro Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabria, Anthony R.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2009-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is comprised of uniquely differentiated brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Oftentimes, it is of interest to replicate these attributes in the form of an in vitro model, and such models are widely used in the research community. However, the BMEC used to create in vitro BBB models de-differentiate in culture and lose many specialized characteristics. These changes are poorly understood at a molecular level, and little is known regarding the consequences of removing BMEC from their local in vivo microenvironment. To address these issues, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify 25 gene transcripts that were differentially-expressed between in vivo and in vitro BMEC. Genes affected included those involved in angiogenesis, transport and neurogenesis, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) verified transcripts were primarily and significantly downregulated. Since this panel of genes represented those BMEC characteristics lost upon culture, we used it to assess how culture manipulation, specifically BMEC purification and barrier induction by hydrocortisone, influenced the quality of in vitro models with reference to the quantitative in vivo gene panel. Puromycin purification of BMEC elicited minimal differences compared with untreated BMEC as assessed by qPCR. In contrast, qPCR-based gene panel analysis after induction with hydrocortisone indicated a modest shift of 10 of 23 genes towards a more “in vivo-like” gene expression profile, which correlated with improved barrier phenotype. Genomic analysis of BMEC de-differentiation in culture has thus yielded a functionally diverse set of genes useful for comparing the in vitro and in vivo BBB. PMID:17565361

  15. Piperine Decreases Binding of Drugs to Human Plasma and Increases Uptake by Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Raghvendra K; Leeners, Brigitte; Imthurn, Bruno; Merki-Feld, Gabriele Susanne; Rosselli, Marinella

    2017-09-26

    We previously reported that piperine, an active alkaloidal principal of black and long peppers, enhances drug bioavailability by inhibiting drug metabolism. Another mechanism influencing drug availability/uptake is its free fraction. Since piperine is highly lipophilic, we hypothesize that it could also interact with drugs through binding displacement and influence their bioavailability. Accordingly, using equilibrium dialysis, we investigated whether piperine alters the binding of model drug ligands, that is flunitrazepam, diazepam, warfarin, salicylic acid, propranolol, lidocaine, and disopyramide to human plasma (n = 4). Since alterations in binding influence drug disposition, we also studied the effects of piperine on the uptake of plasma bound (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by cultured bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Piperine (1-1000 μM) increased the free fraction (fu) of both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein bound drugs in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.01). Moreover, piperine (10 μM) increased the uptake of (3) H-propranolol and (14) C-warfarin by BMECs (p < 0.01). In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that piperine displaces plasma bound drugs from both albumin and alpha-acid glycoprotein and facilitates drug uptake across biological membranes (e.g. BMEC). Moreover, it is feasible that piperine may similarly facilitate the transport of drugs into tissues, in vivo, and alter both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of administered drugs. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. High microvascular endothelial water permeability in mouse lung measured by a pleural surface fluorescence method.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, E P; Olveczky, B P; Matthay, M A; Verkman, A S

    1998-01-01

    Transport of water between the capillary and airspace compartments in lung encounters serial barriers: the alveolar epithelium, interstitium, and capillary endothelium. We previously reported a pleural surface fluorescence method to measure net capillary-to-airspace water transport. To measure the osmotic water permeability across the microvascular endothelial barrier in intact lung, the airspace was filled with a water-immiscible fluorocarbon. The capillaries were perfused via the pulmonary artery with solutions of specified osmolalites containing a high-molecular-weight fluorescent dextran. An increase in perfusate osmolality produced a prompt decrease in surface fluorescence due to dye dilution in the capillaries, followed by a slower return to initial fluorescence as capillary and lung interstitial osmolality equilibrate. A mathematical model was developed to determine the osmotic water permeability coefficient (Pf) of lung microvessels from the time course of pleural surface fluorescence. As predicted, the magnitude of the prompt change in surface fluorescence increased with decreased pulmonary artery perfusion rate and increased osmotic gradient size. With raffinose used to induce the osmotic gradient, Pf was 0.03 cm/s at 23 degrees C and was reduced 54% by 0.5 mM HgCl2. Temperature dependence measurements gave an Arrhenius activation energy (Ea) of 5.4 kcal/mol (12-37 degrees C). The apparent Pf induced by the smaller osmolytes mannitol and glycine was 0.021 and 0.011 cm/s (23 degrees C). Immunoblot analysis showed approximately 1.4 x 10(12) aquaporin-1 water channels/cm2 of capillary surface, which accounted quantitatively for the high Pf. These results establish a novel method for measuring osmotically driven water permeability across microvessels in intact lung. The high Pf, low Ea, and mercurial inhibition indicate the involvement of molecular water channels in water transport across the lung endothelium. PMID:9545071

  17. Galantamine and carbon monoxide protect brain microvascular endothelial cells by heme oxygenase-1 induction

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Atsunori; Kaczorowski, David J.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Lei Jing; Faleo, Gaetano; Deguchi, Kentaro; McCurry, Kenneth R.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kanno, Shinichi

    2008-03-14

    Galantamine, a reversible inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE), is a novel drug treatment for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Interestingly, it has been suggested that galantamine treatment is associated with more clinical benefit in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease compared to other AChE inhibitors. We hypothesized that the protective effects of galantamine would involve induction of the protective gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in addition to enhancement of the cholinergic system. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (mvECs) were isolated from spontaneous hypertensive rats. Galantamine significantly reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death of mvECs in association with HO-1 induction. These protective effects were completely reversed by nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) inhibition or HO inhibition. Furthermore, galantamine failed to induce HO-1 in mvECs which lack inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), supplementation of a nitric oxide (NO) donor or iNOS gene transfection on iNOS-deficient mvECs resulted in HO-1 induction with galantamine. These data suggest that the protective effects of galantamine require NF-{kappa}B activation and iNOS expression, in addition to HO-1. Likewise, carbon monoxide (CO), one of the byproducts of HO, up-regulated HO-1 and protected mvECs from oxidative stress in a similar manner. Our data demonstrate that galantamine mediates cytoprotective effects on mvECs through induction HO-1. This pharmacological action of galantamine may, at least in part, account for the superior clinical efficacy of galantamine in vascular dementia and Alzheimer disease.

  18. Biomarkers of microvascular endothelial dysfunction predict incident dementia: a population-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Holm, H; Nägga, K; Nilsson, E D; Ricci, F; Melander, O; Hansson, O; Bachus, E; Magnusson, M; Fedorowski, A

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral endothelial dysfunction occurs in a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. Whether biomarkers of microvascular endothelial dysfunction can predict dementia is largely unknown. We explored the longitudinal association of midregional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), C-terminal endothelin-1 (CT-proET-1) and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) with dementia and subtypes amongst community-dwelling older adults. A population-based cohort of 5347 individuals (men, 70%; age, 69 ± 6 years) without prevalent dementia provided plasma for determination of MR-proANP, CT-proET-1 and MR-proADM. Three-hundred-and-seventy-three patients (7%) were diagnosed with dementia (120 Alzheimer's disease, 83 vascular, 102 mixed, and 68 other aetiology) over a period of 4.6 ± 1.3 years. Relations between baseline biomarker plasma concentrations and incident dementia were assessed using multivariable Cox regression analysis. Higher levels of MR-proANP were significantly associated with increased risk of all-cause and vascular dementia (hazard ratio [HR] per 1 SD: 1.20, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.36; P = 0.002, and 1.52; 1.21-1.89; P < 0.001, respectively). Risk of all-cause dementia increased across the quartiles of MR-proANP (p for linear trend = 0.004; Q4, 145-1681 pmol L(-1) vs. Q1, 22-77 pmol L(-1) : HR: 1.83; 95%CI: 1.23-2.71) and was most pronounced for vascular type (p for linear trend = 0.005: HR: 2.71; 95%CI: 1.14-6.46). Moreover, the two highest quartiles of CT-proET-1 predicted vascular dementia with a cut-off value at 68 pmol L(-1) (Q3-Q4, 68-432 pmol L(-1) vs. Q1-Q2,4-68 pmol L(-1) ; HR: 1.94; 95%CI: 1.12-3.36). Elevated levels of MR-proADM indicated no increased risk of developing dementia after adjustment for traditional risk factors. Elevated plasma concentration of MR-proANP is an independent predictor of all-cause and vascular dementia. Pronounced increase in CT-proET-1 indicates higher risk of vascular dementia.

  19. [Effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Qiao, L; Yang, H Z; Li, X C; Huang, X Q; Yuan, B; Zhou, Z D

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To observe the effects of transient exposure to high glucose on biological behaviors of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured in vitro. Methods: The dividing method and treatment of cells for the detection of all indexes in this study were as follows. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells of the 4th passage were divided into 3 groups according to the random number table, with 12 wells in each group. Cells in control group (C) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. Cells in transient high glucose group (THG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 2 d and complete culture solution containing 5 mmol/L D-glucose for 5 d. Cells in prolonged high glucose group (PHG) were cultured with complete culture solution containing 30 mmol/L D-glucose for 7 d. (1) The cell morphology in groups C and PHG on culture day 7 and that in group THG on culture day 2 and 7 was observed by inverted optical microscope. (2) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, cell proliferation rate was determined by cell viability analyzing counter. (3) After culture day 2, the scratch experiment was performed, and the cells were further cultured. At post scratch hour (PSH) 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120, the scratch area was measured, and the cell migration rates of the latter 5 time points were calculated. (4) On culture day 0, 2, 4, and 7, the cell apoptosis rate was determined by cell analyzer. (5) Cells were seeded into Matrigel to culture for 24 h after culture day 7. The formation of vessel-like structure was observed by inverted optical microscope. The length and number of branch point of vessel-like structure were calculated. (6) On culture day 2, 4, and 7, mRNA expression of vascularization-related gene tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3) was determined with real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Data were processed with

  20. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions.

  1. Collagen-nanofiber hydrogel composites promote contact guidance of human lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells and directed capillary tube formation.

    PubMed

    Laco, Filip; Grant, M Helen; Black, Richard A

    2013-06-01

    Collagen and fibronectin matrices are known to stimulate migration of microvascular endothelial cells and the process of tubulogenesis, but the physical, chemical, and topographical cues for directed vessel formation have yet to be determined. In this study, growth, migration, elongation, and tube formation of human lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (LECs) were investigated on electrospun poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(L-lactic-co-D-lactic acid) (PLDL) nanofiber-coated substrates, and correlated with fiber density and diameter. Directed migration of LECs was observed in the presence of aligned nanofibers, whereas random fiber alignment slowed down migration and growth of LECs. Cell guidance was significantly enhanced in the presence of more hydrophobic PLDL polymer nanofibers compared to PLGA (10:90). Subsequent experiments with tube-forming assays reveal the ability of resorbable hydrophobic nanofibers >300 nm in diameter to promote cell guidance in collagen gels without direct cell-fiber contact, in contrast to the previously reported contact-guidance phenomena. Our results show that endothelial cell guidance is possible within nanofiber/collagen-gel constructs that mimic the native extracellular matrix in terms of size and orientation of fibrillar components.

  2. Early angiogenic response to shock waves in a three-dimensional model of human microvascular endothelial cell culture (HMEC-1).

    PubMed

    Sansone, V; D' Agostino, M C; Bonora, C; Sizzano, F; De Girolamo, L; Romeo, P

    2012-01-01

    The exact nature of shock wave (SW) action is not, as yet, fully understood, although a possible hypothesis may be that shock waves induce neoangiogenesis. To test this hypothesis, a three-dimensional (3D) culture model on Matrigel was developed employing a human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) which was stimulated with low energy soft- focused SW generated by an SW lithotripter. After 12 hours we observed a statistically significant increase in capillary connections subsequent to shock-wave treatment in respect to the control group and a marked 3-hour down-regulation in genes involved in the apoptotic processes (BAX, BCL2LI, GADD45A, PRKCA), in cell cycle (CDKN2C, CEBPB, HK2, IRF1, PRKCA), oncogenes (JUN, WNT1), cell adhesion (ICAM-1), and proteolytic systems (CTSD, KLK2, MMP10). Our preliminary results indicate that microvascular endothelial cells in vitro quickly respond to SW, proliferating and forming vessel-like structures, depending on the energy level employed and the number of shocks released. The early decreased expression in the analysed genes could be interpreted as the first reactive response of the endothelial cells to the external stimuli and the prelude to the events characterizing the neo-angiogenic sequence.

  3. Chemokine-Like Factor 1-Derived C-Terminal Peptides Induce the Proliferation of Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yaqi; Wang, Yixuan; Li, Li; Xia, Jinyu; Peng, Shiguang; He, Yanling

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease characterized by the abnormal proliferation of skin cells, including dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Recently, chemokine-like factor 1 (CKLF1) was found to participate in the local inflammation and cell proliferation. To explore its role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the expression of both CKLF1 and its receptor (CCR4) was determined in the psoriatic lesions. Also, the effect of the C-terminal peptides (C19 and C27) of CKLF1 on the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells was studied in vitro. By immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, the expression of both CKLF1 and CCR4 was determined in the psoriatic lesions. The effect of C-terminal peptides on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was studied in vitro by the evaluation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. The in vivo assessment was performed accordingly through the subcutaneous injection peptides on BALB/c mice. The results showed that, by immunohistochemistry, both CKLF1 and CCR4 were increasingly expressed in psoriatic lesions as compared to normal skins. Moreover, the primary umbilical vein endothelial cells exhibited higher proliferation ratio under the C19 or C27 stimulation, which was even enhanced by the addition of psoriatic sera or TNF-α. Furthermore, the enhancement of peptide simulation was accompanied with the activation of ERK1/2-MAPKs pathway. In addition, such effect of C19 and C27 was mirrored by the hyperproliferation of cutaneous microvessels in BALB/c mice that were subcutaneously injected with the two peptides. Therefore, we concluded that CKLF1 plays a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis by promoting the proliferation of microvascular endothelial cells that possibly correlates with ERK1/2-MAPKs activation. PMID:25915746

  4. Involvement of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in tubular morphogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells by oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Shono, T; Ono, M; Izumi, H; Jimi, S I; Matsushima, K; Okamoto, T; Kohno, K; Kuwano, M

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen radicals are induced under various pathologic conditions associated with neovascularization. Oxygen radicals modulate angiogenesis in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells by an unknown mechanism. Treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells for 15 min with 0.1 to 0.5 mM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or 100 U of tumor necrosis factor alpha per ml induced tubular morphogenesis in type I collagen gels. Gel shift assays with nuclear extracts demonstrated that H2O2 increases the binding activities of two transcription factors, NF-kappaB and AP-1, but not of Spl. Tumor necrosis factor alpha increased the binding activities of all three factors. A supershift assay with specific antibodies against JunB, JunD, and c-Jun (Jun family) showed that the antibody against c-Jun supershifted the AP-1 complex after H2O2 treatment. Coadministration of the antisense sequence of NF-kappaB inhibited H2O2-dependent tubular morphogenesis, and the antisense c-Jun oligonucleotide caused partial inhibition. The angiogenic factor responsible for H2O2-induced tubular morphogenesis was examined. Cellular mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-8 (IL-8), but not those of transforming growth factor alpha, were increased after treatment with 0.5 mM H2O2. Coadministration of anti-IL-8 antibody inhibited tubular morphogenesis enhanced by H2O2, and IL-8 itself also enhanced the formation of tube-like structures. Treatment with antisense NF-kappaB oligonucleotide completely blocked H2O2-dependent IL-8 production by endothelial cells. The tubular morphogenesis of vascular endothelial cells after treatment with oxidative stimuli and its possible association with NF-kappaB and IL-8, is examined. PMID:8754823

  5. Lipopolysaccharide plus hypoxia and reoxygenation synergistically reduce electrical coupling between microvascular endothelial cells by dephosphorylating connexin40.

    PubMed

    Bolon, Michael L; Peng, Tianqing; Kidder, Gerald M; Tyml, Karel

    2008-11-01

    We showed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R) decreases electrical coupling between microvascular endothelial cells by targeting the gap junction protein connexin40 (Cx40), tyrosine kinase-, ERK1/2-, and PKA-dependently. Since LPS can compromise microvascular blood flow, resulting in micro-regional H/R, the concurrent LPS + H/R could reduce coupling to a much greater extent than LPS or H/R alone. We examined this possibility in a model of cultured microvascular endothelial cells (mouse skeletal muscle origin) in terms of electrical coupling and the phosphorylation status of Cx40. To assess coupling, we measured the spread of electrical current injected into the cell monolayer and computed the intercellular resistance as an inversed measure of coupling. In wild type cells, but not in Cx40 null cells, concurrent LPS + H/R synergistically increased resistance by approximately 270%, well above the level observed for LPS or H/R alone. Cx37 and Cx43 protein expression did not differ between Cx40 null and wild type cells. LPS + H/R increased resistance PKA- and PKC-dependently. By immunoprecipitating Cx40, we found that LPS + H/R reduced serine phosphorylation to a much greater degree than that observed for LPS or H/R alone. Further, PKA-specific, but not PKC-specific serine phosphorylation of Cx40 was also significantly reduced following LPS + H/R. This reduction was prevented by tyrosine kinase and MEK1/2 inhibition, by PKA activation, and mimicked in control cells by PKA inhibition. We conclude that LPS + H/R initiates tyrosine kinase- and ERK1/2-sensitive signaling that synergistically reduces inter-endothelial electrical coupling by dephosphorylating PKA-specific serine residues of Cx40. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  6. Ca2+ homeostasis in microvascular endothelial cells from an insulin-dependent diabetic model: role of endosomes/lysosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanka, Shankar C.; Bennett, David C.; Rojas, Jose D.; Tasby, Geraldine B.; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Wu, Guoyao; Wesson, Donald E.; Pfarr, Curtis M.; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2000-04-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) regulates several cellular functions, e.g. cell growth, contraction, secretion, etc. In many cell types, ion homeostasis appears to be coupled with glucose metabolism. In certain cell types, a strict coupling between glycolysis and the activity of Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA) has been suggested. Glucose metabolism is altered in diabetes. We hypothesize that: (1) Ca2+ homeostasis is altered in microvascular endothelial cells from diabetic animals due to the dysfunction of glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA; (2) endosomal/lysosomal compartments expressing SERCA are involved in the dysfunction associated with diabetes.

  7. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is related to abnormalities in myocardial structure and function in cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Dorbala, Sharmila; Vangala, Divya; Bruyere, John; Quarta, Christina; Kruger, Jenna; Padera, Robert; Foster, Courtney; Hanley, Michael; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Falk, Rodney

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that coronary microvascular function is impaired in subjects with cardiac amyloidosis. Effort angina is common in subjects with cardiac amyloidosis, even in the absence of epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD). Thirty-one subjects were prospectively enrolled in this study, including 21 subjects with definite cardiac amyloidosis without epicardial CAD and 10 subjects with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). All subjects underwent rest and vasodilator stress N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography and 2-dimensional echocardiography. Global left ventricular myocardial blood flow (MBF) was quantified at rest and during peak hyperemia, and coronary flow reserve (CFR) was computed (peak stress MBF/rest MBF) adjusting for rest rate pressure product. Compared with the LVH group, the amyloid group showed lower rest MBF (0.59 ± 0.15 ml/g/min vs. 0.88 ± 0.23 ml/g/min; p = 0.004), stress MBF (0.85 ± 0.29 ml/g/min vs. 1.85 ± 0.45 ml/g/min; p < 0.0001), and CFR (1.19 ± 0.38 vs. 2.23 ± 0.88; p < 0.0001) and higher minimal coronary vascular resistance (111 ± 40 ml/g/min/mm Hg vs. 70 ± 19 ml/g/min/mm Hg; p = 0.004). Of note, almost all subjects with amyloidosis (>95%) had significantly reduced peak stress MBF (<1.3 ml/g/min). In multivariable linear regression analyses, a diagnosis of amyloidosis, increased left ventricular mass, and age were the only independent predictors of impaired coronary vasodilator function. Coronary microvascular dysfunction is highly prevalent in subjects with cardiac amyloidosis, even in the absence of epicardial CAD, and may explain their anginal symptoms. Further study is required to understand whether specific therapy directed at amyloidosis may improve coronary vasomotion in amyloidosis. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of angiopoietin-like protein 4 on rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells exposed to LPS

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUXI; CHEN, HAILONG; LI, HAILONG; ZHANG, JINGWEN; GAO, YANYAN

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) possess highly proliferative and angiogenic capacities and are localized at the critical interface between the blood and microvessel wall; they are the primary targets of inflammatory cytokines during lung inflammation. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4) is a circulating protein that has recently been implicated in the regulation of angiogenesis and metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Angptl4 on rat PMVECs (RPMVECs) exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The cell culture was stimulated with LPS. Total Angptl4 cDNA was obtained from Source BioScience. The PCR product was cloned into the pcDNA3.1-eGFP or the pcDNA3.1-eGFP-Angptl4 vector, which were then transfected into the RPMVECs using SuperFect transfection reagent. The Angptl4 mRNA levels, protein levels and cell morphology of the RPMVECs in the experimental groups were detected using real time-PCR, western blot analysis, MTT assay, ELISA and confocal microscopy methods, respectively. The Angptl4 expression vector, pcDNA3.1-eGFP-Angptl4, was successfully constructed. The Angptl4 mRNA level in the LPS-pcDNA3.1-eGFP-transfected group (blank control) was slightly increased and was significantly higher in the experimental group compared with the empty vector and blank control group with significant differences. Pro-apoptotic caspase-8, -9 and Bax protein were inhibited, while p-AKT/AKT and p-MEK1/2 protein expression was also decreased. The rosiglitazone group had significantly decreased levels of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (P<0.01). The overexpression of Angptl4 inhibited the LPS-induced increase in the permeability of the RPMVECs, which was associated with the depolymerization of central F-actin in the RPMVECs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the overexpression of Angptl4 exerts protective, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects. It represents a novel therapeutic target gene for the treatment

  9. Exosomal signaling during hypoxia mediates microvascular endothelial cell migration and vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Carlos; Ryan, Jennifer; Sobrevia, Luis; Kobayashi, Miharu; Ashman, Keith; Mitchell, Murray; Rice, Gregory E

    2013-01-01

    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are critical processes in fetal circulation and placental vasculature development. Placental mesenchymal stem cells (pMSC) are known to release paracrine factors (some of which are contained within exosomes) that promote angiogenesis and cell migration. The aims of this study were: to determine the effects of oxygen tension on the release of exosomes from pMSC; and to establish the effects of pMSC-derived exosomes on the migration and angiogenic tube formation of placental microvascular endothelial cells (hPMEC). pMSC were isolated from placental villi (8-12 weeks of gestation, n = 6) and cultured under an atmosphere of 1%, 3% or 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-pMSC) isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The dose effect (5-20 µg exosomal protein/ml) of pMSC-derived exosomes on hPMEC migration and tube formation were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™). The exosome pellet was resuspended in PBS and protein content was established by mass spectrometry (MS). Protein function and canonical pathways were identified using the PANTHER program and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, respectively. Exo-pMSC were identified, by electron microscopy, as spherical vesicles, with a typical cup-shape and diameters around of 100 nm and positive for exosome markers: CD63, CD9 and CD81. Under hypoxic conditions (1% and 3% O2) exo-pMSC released increased by 3.3 and 6.7 folds, respectively, when compared to the controls (8% O2; p<0.01). Exo-pMSC increased hPMEC migration by 1.6 fold compared to the control (p<0.05) and increased hPMEC tube formation by 7.2 fold (p<0.05). MS analysis identified 390 different proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization, development, immunomodulatory, and cell-to-cell communication. The data obtained support the hypothesis that pMSC-derived exosomes may contribute to placental vascular adaptation to low oxygen tension under both

  10. Impaired Hydrogen Sulfide-Mediated Vasodilation Contributes to Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Jody L; Kutz, Jessica L; Shank, Sean W; Jandu, Sandeep; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Alexander, Lacy M

    2017-05-01

    Reductions in hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production have been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunction in animal models of hypertension; however, no studies have examined a functional role for H2S in contributing to microvascular dysfunction in hypertensive (HTN) adults. We hypothesized that endogenous production of H2S would be reduced, impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation would be mediated by reductions in H2S-dependent vasodilation, and vascular responsiveness to exogenous H2S (sodium sulfide) would be attenuated in HTN compared to normotensive adults. Fifteen normotensive (51±2 years; blood pressure, 116±3/76±3 mm Hg) and 14 HTN adults (57±2 years; blood pressure 140±3/89±2 mm Hg) participated. H2S biosynthetic enzyme expression (Western blot) and substrate-dependent H2S production (amperometric probe) were measured in cutaneous tissue homogenates. Red cell flux (laser Doppler flowmetry) was measured during graded perfusions of acetylcholine (ACh; 10(-6)-10(-1) mol/L) and sodium sulfide (10(-5)-10(1) mol/L) using intradermal microdialysis; the functional role of H2S was determined using pharmacological inhibition with aminooxyacetic acid (0.5 mmol/L). H2S biosynthetic enzyme expression and substrate-dependent H2S production were reduced in HTN adults (all P<0.05). ACh-induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation was blunted in HTN adults (P=0.012). Aminooxyacetic acid attenuated ACh-induced vasodilation in normotensive adults (ACh, 1.31±0.13 versus ACh+aminooxyacetic acid, 1.07±0.09 flux/mm Hg; P=0.025) but had no effect on vasodilation in HTN adults (ACh, 1.16±0.10 versus ACh+aminooxyacetic acid, 1.37±0.11 flux/mm Hg; P=0.47). Sodium sulfide-induced vasodilation was not different between groups. Collectively, these findings indicate that while the microvasculature maintains the ability to vasodilate in response to exogenous H2S, reductions in endogenous synthesis and H2S-dependent vasodilation contribute to endothelial

  11. Differential reactivity of brain microvascular endothelial cells to TNF reflects the genetic susceptibility to cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Lou, J; Gasche, Y; Zheng, L; Critico, B; Monso-Hinard, C; Juillard, P; Morel, P; Buurman, W A; Grau, G E

    1998-12-01

    Upon infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA), various inbred strains of mice exhibit different susceptibility to the development of cerebral malaria (CM). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) have been shown to be crucial mediators in the pathogenesis of this neurovascular complication. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC) represent an important target of both cytokines. In the present study, we show that brain MVEC purified from CM-susceptible (CM-S) CBA/J mice and CM-resistant (CM-R) BALB/c mice exhibit a different sensitivity to TNF. CBA/J brain MVEC displayed a higher capacity to produce IL-6 and to up-regulate intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in response to TNF than BALB/c brain MVEC. In contrast, no difference was found in the induction of E-selectin after TNF challenge. CM-S brain MVEC were also significantly more sensitive to TNF-induced lysis. This differential reactivity to TNF was further substantiated by comparing TNF receptor expression on CM-S and CM-R brain MVEC. Although the constitutive expression of TNF receptors was comparable on cells from the two origins, TNF induced an up-regulation of both p55 and p75 TNF receptors in CM-S, but not in CM-R brain MVEC. A similar regulation was found at the level of TNF receptor mRNA, but not for receptor shedding. Although a protein kinase C inhibitor blocked the response to TNF in both the brain MVEC, an inhibitor of protein kinase A selectively abolished the response to TNF in CM-R, but not CM-S brain MVEC, suggesting a differential protein kinase involvement in TNF-induced activation of CM-S and CM-R brain MVEC. These results indicate that brain MVEC purified from CM-S and CM-R mice exhibit distinctive sensitivity to TNF This difference may be partly due to a differential regulation of TNF receptors and via distinct protein kinase pathways.

  12. Involvement of RhoA/ROCK1 signaling pathway in hyperglycemia-induced microvascular endothelial dysfunction in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qian-Yi; Chen, Wei; Lu, Li; Zheng, Zhi; Xu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a well-known serious complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), and can eventually advance to end-stage blindness. In the early stage of DR, endothelial cell barrier disorganized primarily and tight junction (TJ) protein composition transformed subsequently. The small GTPase RhoA and its downstream effector Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) regulate a mass of cellular processes, including cell adherence, proliferation, permeability and apoptosis. Although RhoA inhibitors have provided substantial clinical benefit as hypertonicity therapeutics, their use is limited by complex microenvironment as DR. While ample evidence indicates that TJ can be influenced by the RhoA/ROCK1 signaling, the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here, we have uncovered a significant signaling network involved in diabetic retinal microvascular endothelial dysfunction (RMVED). Our results indicated that the activation of RhoA/ROCK1 pathway due to high glucose played a key role in microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction (MVED) by way of directly inducing TJ proteins over-expression during DR. We demonstrated that inhibition of RhoA/ROCK1 may attenuate the hypertonicity of endothelial cell caused by high glucose microenvironment meanwhile. Besides, chemical and pharmacological inhibitors of RhoA/ROCK1 pathway may partly block inflammation due to DR. Simultaneously, the apoptosis aroused by high glucose was also prevented considerably by fasudil, a kind of pharmacological inhibitor of RhoA/ROCK1 pathway. These findings indicate that RhoA/ROCK1 signaling directly modulates MVED, suggesting a novel therapeutic target for DR. PMID:25400825

  13. Endothelial RAGE exacerbates acute postischaemic cardiac inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Tilman; Horstkotte, Melanie; Lange, Philipp; Ng, Judy; Bongiovanni, Dario; Hinkel, Rabea; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Sperandio, Markus; Horstkotte, Jan; Kupatt, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) interact with their receptor RAGE, leading to an inflammatory state. We investigated the role of RAGE in postischaemic leukocyte adhesion after myocardial infarction and its effect on postischaemic myocardial function. Wildtype (WT), ICAM-1-/-, RAGE-/- or ICAM-1/RAGE-/- mice underwent 20 minutes (min) of LAD-occlusion followed by 15 min of reperfusion. We applied in vivo fluorescence microscopy visualising Rhodamine-6G labelled leukocytes. To differentiate between endothelial and leukocyte RAGE, we generated bone marrow chimeric mice. Invasive hemodynamic measurements were performed in mice undergoing 45 min of myocardial ischaemia (via LAD-occlusion) followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Left-ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) was assessed by insertion of a millar-tip catheter into the left ventricle. In the acute model of myocardial ischaemia, leukocyte retention (WT 68 ± 4 cells/hpf) was significantly reduced in ICAM-1-/- (40 ± 3 cells/hpf) and RAGE-/- mice (38 ± 4 cells/hpf). ICAM-1/RAGE-/- mice displayed an additive reduction of leukocyte retention (ICAM-1/RAGE-/- 15 ± 3 cells/hpf). Ly-6G+ neutrophil were predominantly reduced in ICAM-1/RAGE-/- hearts (28 %), whereas Ly-6C+ proinflammatory monocytes decreased to a lesser extent (55 %). Interestingly, PMN recruitment was not affected in chimeric mice with RAGE deficiency in BM cells (WT mice reconstituted with ICAM-1/RAGE-/- BM: 55 ± 4 cells/hpf) while in mice with global RAGE deficiency (ICAM-1/RAGE-/- mice reconstituted with ICAM-1/RAGE-/- BM) leucocyte retention was significantly reduced (13 ± 1 cells/hpf), similar to non-transplanted ICAM/RAGE-/- mice. Furthermore, postischaemic LVDP increased in ICAM-1/RAGE-/- animals (98 ± 4 mmHg vs 86 ± 4 mmHg in WT mice). In conclusion, combined deficiency of ICAM-1 and RAGE reduces leukocyte influx into infarcted myocardium and improves LV function during the acute phase after myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion

  14. [Resveratrol attenuates hypoxia-reperfusion injury induced rat myocardium microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction through upregulating PI3K/Akt/SVV pathways].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Huirong; Liao, Dongchu; Lin, Long; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Xiujuan

    2014-08-01

    To detect the role of surviving (SVV) in the protective effect of resveratrol against hypoxia/reperfusion injury (H/RI) of cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs). CMECs isolated from the hearts of adult rats were exposed to hypoxia (94% N₂, 5% CO₂, 1% O₂) for 2 h followed by 4 h reoxygenation (95% O₂, 5% CO₂). The cell proliferation of CMECs was measured by MTT assay and Transwell method was used to detect migration ability of CMEC, PI-AnnexinV double staining and flow cytometry technique were employed to observe the apoptotic rate of CMECs. The SVV protein expression was detected with Western blot method. Compared to control group, the proliferation (0.19 ± 0.03 vs. 0.42 ± 0.07, P < 0.01) and migration ((28 ± 2)/5HPF vs. (50 ± 3)/5 HPF, P < 0.01) abilities were impaired and the apoptosis index ((19.7 ± 0.8)% vs. (5.4 ± 0.3)%, (P < 0.05) of CMEC was increased after H/RI. The proliferation (0.36 ± 0.07 vs. 0.19 ± 0.03, P < 0.05) and migration ((55 ± 3)/5HPF vs. (28 ± 2)/5HPF, P < 0.05) abilities of CMEC were significantly improved while the apoptosis index ((9.6 ± 0.7)% vs. (19.7 ± 0.8)%, P < 0.05) was significantly decreased in H/RI+resveratrol group compared to H/RI group.SVV protein expression was also upregulated in H/RI+resveratrol group compared to H/RI group (P < 0.05). To further ascertain the role of SVV in the protective effects of resveratrol, PI3K specific inhibitor LY294002 was added to H/RI+resveratrol group, the proliferation (0.25 ± 0.05 vs. 0.36 ± 0.07, P < 0.05) and migration ((34 ± 3)/5HPF vs. (55 ± 3)/5HPF, P < 0.05) abilities were significantly decreased, the apoptosis index ((16.2 ± 0.6)% vs. (9.6 ± 0.7)%, P < 0.05) was increased and the protein expression of SVV was downregulated (P < 0.05) in LY294002+H/RI+resveratrol group compared to H/RI+resveratrol group. Resveratrol could significantly reduce H/RI induced apoptosis and attenuate H/RI induced cardiac microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction through

  15. The Balance Between Metalloproteinases and TIMPs: Critical Regulator of Microvascular Endothelial Cell Function in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Masciantonio, Marcello G; Lee, Christopher K S; Arpino, Valerie; Mehta, Sanjay; Gill, Sean E

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC), especially the microvascular EC (MVEC), have critical functions in health and disease. For example, healthy MVEC provide a barrier between the fluid and protein found within the blood, and the surrounding tissue. Following tissue injury or infection, the microvascular barrier is often disrupted due to activation and dysfunction of the MVEC. Multiple mechanisms promote MVEC activation and dysfunction, including stimulation by cytokines, mechanical interaction with activated leukocytes, and exposure to harmful leukocyte-derived molecules, which collectively result in a loss of MVEC barrier function. However, MVEC activation is also critical to facilitate recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils (PMNs) and monocytes, into the injured or infected tissue. Metalloproteinases, including the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the closely related, a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs), have been implicated in regulating both MVEC barrier function, through cleavage of adherens and tight junctions proteins between adjacent MVEC and through degradation of the extracellular matrix, as well as PMN-MVEC interaction, through shedding of cell surface PMN receptors. Moreover, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), which collectively inhibit most MMPs and ADAMs, are critical regulators of MVEC activation and dysfunction through their ability to inhibit metalloproteinases and thereby promote MVEC stability. However, TIMPs have been also found to modulate MVEC function through metalloproteinase-independent mechanisms, such as regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. This chapter is focused on examining the role of the metalloproteinases and TIMPs in regulation of MVEC function in both health and disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Relationship between Endothelial Progenitor Cell Populations and Epicardial and Microvascular Coronary Disease—A Cellular, Angiographic and Physiologic Study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kim H.; Simpson, Philippa J. L.; Yong, Andy S.; Dunn, Louise L.; Chawantanpipat, Chirapan; Hsu, Chijen; Yu, Young; Keech, Anthony C.; Celermajer, David S.; Ng, Martin K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are implicated in protection against vascular disease. However, studies using angiography alone have reported conflicting results when relating EPCs to epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD) severity. Moreover, the relationship between different EPC types and the coronary microcirculation is unknown. We therefore investigated the relationship between EPC populations and coronary epicardial and microvascular disease. Methods Thirty-three patients with a spectrum of isolated left anterior descending artery disease were studied. The coronary epicardial and microcirculation were physiologically interrogated by measurement of fractional flow reserve (FFR), index of microvascular resistance (IMR) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). Two distinct EPC populations (early EPC and late outgrowth endothelial cells [OECs]) were isolated from these patients and studied ex vivo. Results There was a significant inverse relationship between circulating OEC levels and epicardial CAD severity, as assessed by FFR and angiography (r = 0.371, p = 0.04; r = -0.358, p = 0.04; respectively). More severe epicardial CAD was associated with impaired OEC migration and tubulogenesis (r = 0.59, p = 0.005; r = 0.589, p = 0.004; respectively). Patients with significant epicardial CAD (FFR<0.75) had lower OEC levels and function compared to those without hemodynamically significant stenoses (p<0.05). In contrast, no such relationship was seen for early EPC number and function, nor was there a relationship between IMR and EPCs. There was a significant relationship between CFR and OEC function. Conclusions EPC populations differ in regards to their associations with CAD severity. The number and function of OECs, but not early EPCs, correlated significantly with epicardial CAD severity. There was no relationship between EPCs and severity of coronary microvascular disease. PMID:24736282

  17. Microvascular reactivity and endothelial glycocalyx degradation when administering hydroxyethyl starch or crystalloid during off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, T K; Nam, K; Cho, Y J; Min, J J; Hong, Y J; Park, K U; Hong, D M; Jeon, Y

    2017-02-01

    The infusion of fluids to patients may affect tissue microcirculation and the endothelial glycocalyx. However, the effects of hydroxyethyl starch and crystalloid on endothelial glycocalyx degradation and microvascular reactivity have not been evaluated in detail. We hypothesised that hydroxyethyl starch may cause less endothelial glycocalyx degradation and better microvascular reactivity than that caused by crystalloid. We randomly allocated 120 patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery to receive up to 20 ml.kg(-1) of either hydroxyethyl starch 670/0.75 or crystalloid for intra-operative fluid resuscitation. Crystalloid was then infused to meet ongoing fluid requirements. During the peri-operative period, vascular occlusion tests were performed to assess microvascular reactivity, and serum syndecan-1 was measured as an index of endothelial glycocalyx degradation. The median (IQR [range]) fluid infused during surgery was significantly less in the hydroxyethyl starch group than the crystalloid group; 2800 (2150-3550 [1400-7300]) vs. 3925 (3100-4725 [1900-6700]) ml, respectively, p < 0.001. Vascular occlusion test parameters, including tissue oxygen saturation, occlusion and recovery slope did not differ significantly between the groups. Peri-operative changes in syndecan-1 were not significantly different between the groups. We conclude that, in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery, compared with crystalloid, the use of hydroxyethyl starch 670/0.75 did not result in significant differences in microvascular reactivity or endothelial glycocalyx degradation. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  18. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Platelet (PF-4) Factor 4 Inputs Modulate Human Microvascular Endothelial Signaling in a Three-Dimensional Matrix Migration Context*

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ta-Chun; Tedford, Nathan C.; Reddy, Raven J.; Rimchala, Tharathorn; Wells, Alan; White, Forest M.; Kamm, Roger D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of angiogenesis is under complex regulation in adult organisms, particularly as it often occurs in an inflammatory post-wound environment. As such, there are many impacting factors that will regulate the generation of new blood vessels which include not only pro-angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, but also angiostatic factors. During initial postwound hemostasis, a large initial bolus of platelet factor 4 is released into localized areas of damage before progression of wound healing toward tissue homeostasis. Because of its early presence and high concentration, the angiostatic chemokine platelet factor 4, which can induce endothelial anoikis, can strongly affect angiogenesis. In our work, we explored signaling crosstalk interactions between vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet factor 4 using phosphotyrosine-enriched mass spectrometry methods on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured under conditions facilitating migratory sprouting into collagen gel matrices. We developed new methods to enable mass spectrometry-based phosphorylation analysis of primary cells cultured on collagen gels, and quantified signaling pathways over the first 48 h of treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor in the presence or absence of platelet factor 4. By observing early and late signaling dynamics in tandem with correlation network modeling, we found that platelet factor 4 has significant crosstalk with vascular endothelial growth factor by modulating cell migration and polarization pathways, centered around P38α MAPK, Src family kinases Fyn and Lyn, along with FAK. Interestingly, we found EphA2 correlational topology to strongly involve key migration-related signaling nodes after introduction of platelet factor 4, indicating an influence of the angiostatic factor on this ambiguous but generally angiogenic signal in this complex environment. PMID:24023389

  19. Beneficial effect of Lisosan G on cultured human microvascular endothelial cells exposed to oxidised low density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Baldi, Simona; Napoli, Debora; Longo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Nutritional compounds which display anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects have specific applications in preventing oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction. In this study we evaluated the effect of Lisosan G (powder of Triticum sativum grains) on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) exposed to oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Methods: The protective effects of Lisosan G were evaluated on human microvascular endothelial cells exposed to ox-LDL. Intercellular adhesion molecular-1 (ICAM-1), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations and the expression of the respective genes were evaluated in response to incubation with ox-LDL, after co-incubation with ox-LDL and Lisosan G or exposed to Lisosan G alone. The analysis of LOX-1 gene was performed with RT-PCR semi quantitative method. The degree of oxidation induced in relation to control, was established by measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Results: The incubation with ox-LDL induced a significant increase in ICAM-1, IL-6 and ET-1 levels compared to the basal condition (P<0.01, P<0.05, and P<0.01, respectively), while in presence of Lisosan G, ICAM-1 levels showed a significant reduction both compared to the cultures treated with ox-LDL and control (P<0.01). IL-6 levels did not show any difference; ET-1 levels showed a partial reduction after co-treatment with Lisosan G, and also with Lisosan G alone, reduced the concentration below control (P<0.01). The modulation of these markers was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. An association between MDA formation and the three markers production was observed. Semi-quantitative analysis of LOX-1 gene expression showed a significant up-regulation only after ox-LDL exposure. Interpretation & conclusions: The results demonstrate that Lisosan G may have an important role in the prevention of microcirculatory dysfunction. PMID:22885268

  20. Palmitate-induced inflammatory pathways in human adipose microvascular endothelial cells promote monocyte adhesion and impair insulin transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Azizi, Paymon M; Li, Yujin E; Liu, Jun; Wang, Changsen; Chan, Kenny L; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P; Heit, Bryan; Bilan, Philip J; Lee, Warren L; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and immune cell recruitment to adipose tissue, muscle and intima of atherosclerotic blood vessels. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are also associated with tissue insulin resistance and can compromise insulin delivery to muscle. The muscle/fat microvascular endothelium mediates insulin delivery and facilitates monocyte transmigration, yet its contribution to the consequences of hyperlipidemia is poorly understood. Using primary endothelial cells from human adipose tissue microvasculature (HAMEC), we investigated the effects of physiological levels of fatty acids on endothelial inflammation and function. Expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules was measured by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were evaluated by pharmacological manipulation and immunoblotting. Surface expression of adhesion molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. THP1 monocyte interaction with HAMEC was measured by cell adhesion and migration across transwells. Insulin transcytosis was measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, elevated the expression of IL-6, IL-8, TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). HAMEC had markedly low fatty acid uptake and oxidation, and CD36 inhibition did not reverse the palmitate-induced expression of adhesion molecules, suggesting that inflammation did not arise from palmitate uptake/metabolism. Instead, inhibition of TLR4 to NF-κB signaling blunted palmitate-induced ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, palmitate-induced surface expression of ICAM-1 promoted monocyte binding and transmigration. Conversely, palmitate reduced insulin transcytosis, an effect reversed by TLR4 inhibition. In summary, palmitate activates inflammatory pathways in primary microvascular endothelial cells, impairing insulin transport and increasing monocyte transmigration. This behavior may contribute in vivo to reduced tissue insulin action and enhanced tissue

  1. Anti inflammatory and anti angiogenic effect of black raspberry extract on human esophageal and intestinal microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Medda, Rituparna; Lyros, Orestis; Schmidt, Jamie L.; Jovanovic, Nebojsa; Nie, Linghui; Link, Benjamin J.; Otterson, Mary F.; Stoner, Gary D.; Shaker, Reza; Rafiee, Parvaneh

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds (anthocyanins, flavonoid glycosides) in berries prevent the initiation, promotion, and progression of carcinogenesis in rat’s digestive tract and esophagus, in part, via anti-inflammatory pathways. Angiogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects of black raspberry extract (BRE) on two organ specific primary human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells, (HIMEC) and human esophageal microvascular endothelial cells (HEMEC), isolated from surgically resected human intestinal and donor discarded esophagus, respectively. HEMEC and HIMEC were stimulated with TNF-α/IL-1β with or without BRE. The anti-inflammatory effects of BRE were assessed based upon COX-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 gene and protein expression, PGE2 production, NFκB p65 subunit nuclear translocation as well as endothelial-leukocyte adhesion. The anti-angiogenic effects of BRE were assessed on cell migration, proliferation and tube formation following VEGF stimulation as well as on activation of Akt, MAPK and JNK signaling pathways. BRE inhibited TNF-α/IL-1β-induced NFκB p65 nuclear translocation, PGE2 production, up-regulation of COX-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 gene and protein expression and leukocyte binding in HEMEC but not in HIMEC. BRE attenuated VEGF-induced cell migration, proliferation and tube formation in both HEMEC and HIMEC. The anti-angiogenic effect of BRE is mediated by inhibition of Akt, MAPK and JNK phosphorylations. BRE exerted differential anti-inflammatory effects between HEMEC and HIMEC following TNF-α/IL-1β activation whereas demonstrated similar anti-angiogenic effects following VEGF stimulation in both cell lines. These findings may provide more insight into the anti-tumorigenic capacities of BRE in human disease and cancer. PMID:25446010

  2. Anti inflammatory and anti angiogenic effect of black raspberry extract on human esophageal and intestinal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Medda, Rituparna; Lyros, Orestis; Schmidt, Jamie L; Jovanovic, Nebojsa; Nie, Linghui; Link, Benjamin J; Otterson, Mary F; Stoner, Gary D; Shaker, Reza; Rafiee, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds (anthocyanins, flavonoid glycosides) in berries prevent the initiation, promotion, and progression of carcinogenesis in rat's digestive tract and esophagus, in part, via anti-inflammatory pathways. Angiogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects of black raspberry extract (BRE) on two organ specific primary human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells, (HIMEC) and human esophageal microvascular endothelial cells (HEMEC), isolated from surgically resected human intestinal and donor discarded esophagus, respectively. HEMEC and HIMEC were stimulated with TNF-α/IL-1β with or without BRE. The anti-inflammatory effects of BRE were assessed based upon COX-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 gene and protein expression, PGE2 production, NFκB p65 subunit nuclear translocation as well as endothelial cell-leukocyte adhesion. The anti-angiogenic effects of BRE were assessed on cell migration, proliferation and tube formation following VEGF stimulation as well as on activation of Akt, MAPK and JNK signaling pathways. BRE inhibited TNF-α/IL-1β-induced NFκB p65 nuclear translocation, PGE2 production, up-regulation of COX-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 gene and protein expression and leukocyte binding in HEMEC but not in HIMEC. BRE attenuated VEGF-induced cell migration, proliferation and tube formation in both HEMEC and HIMEC. The anti-angiogenic effect of BRE is mediated by inhibition of Akt, MAPK and JNK phosphorylations. BRE exerted differential anti-inflammatory effects between HEMEC and HIMEC following TNF-α/IL-1β activation whereas demonstrated similar anti-angiogenic effects following VEGF stimulation in both cell lines. These findings may provide more insight into the anti-tumorigenic capacities of BRE in human disease and cancer.

  3. Cardiac microvascular rarefaction in hyperthyroid rats is reversed by losartan, diltiazem, and propranolol.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Felipe; Estato, Vanessa; Lessa, Marcos A; Tibiriçá, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac microvascular rarefaction appears to be involved in hyperthyroidism-induced left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction. We investigated the effects of losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist; diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker; and propranolol, a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cardiac function and structural microcirculatory cardiac alterations in an experimental model of l-thyroxin-induced hyperthyroidism in rats. Hyperthyroidism (HYPER) was induced by intraperitoneal injections of l-thyroxin for 35 days (600 μg/kg/day; n = 32). The euthyroid group was treated with distilled water (EUT + VEH; n = 8). On the 14th day, the HYPER group was divided into four groups that received an oral treatment for 21 days with saline (HYPER + VEH; n = 8), losartan (10 mg/kg/day; HYPER + LOS, n = 8), diltiazem (10 mg/kg/day; HYPER + DILT, n = 8), or propranolol (10 mg/kg/day; HYPER + PROP, n = 8). An echocardiographic study was performed at baseline, at the beginning and at the end of the pharmacological treatment protocol (35th day). The structural capillary density in the left ventricle (LV) was analyzed using histochemical analysis with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated Griffonia simplicifolia lectin. HYPER + VEH (182 ± 5 mmHg; P < 0.001) presented higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) compared with EUT + VEH (132 ± 3 mmHg). HYPER + LOS (144 ± 2 mmHg), HYPER + DILT (147 ± 3 mmHg) and HYPER + PROP (153 ± 4 mmHg) presented lower SBP compared with HYPER + VEH (P < 0.001). Chronic treatment with losartan, diltiazem, and propranolol reversed cardiac structural microvascular rarefaction (HYPER + VEH 0.16 ± 0.01; EUT + VEH 0.35 ± 0.02; HYPER + LOS 0.46 ± 0.03; HYPER + DILT 0.49 ± 0.02; HYPER + PROP 0.58 ± 0.04 (Vv[cap]/Vv[fib]); P < 0.001) and enhanced the LV ejection fraction of hyperthyroid rats (HYPER + VEH 71 ± 3; EUT + VEH 85 ± 2; HYPER + LOS 90 ± 3; HYPER

  4. Suppression of MMP-9 expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a gold nanorod (GNR)-siRNA nanoplex.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Reynolds, Jessica L; Nair, Bindukumar; Sykes, Donald E; Bonoiu, Adela; Roy, Indrajit; Yong, Ken-Tye; Law, Wing-Cheung; Bergey, Earl J; Prasad, Paras N; Schwartz, Stanley A

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity using delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules to brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) that constitute the BBB may have a significant impact on reducing the BBB permeability. Gold nano rods (GNRs) can electrostatically bind with MMP-9 siRNA to form a nanoplex and the uptake of this nanoplex by BMVEC cells can result in suppression of MMP-9 expression. The current study explores if this GNR-MMP-9 siRNA nanoplex gene silencing modulates the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the BMVEC. The endothelial TJ's of the BBB play a critical role in controlling cellular traffic into the central nervous system. We hypothesize that silencing of the MMP-9 gene expression in BMVEC will increase the expression of TJ proteins thereby decrease endothelial permeability. Our results showed a significant increase in the gene and protein expression of TJ proteins: ZO-1, Occludin and Claudin-5 in BMVEC cells that were transfected with the GNRs-siRNA-MMP-9 nanoplex suggesting that BBB disruption, which results from loss of TJ function due to MMP-9 activation during neuroinflammation can be prevented by silencing MMP-9 expression.

  5. Expression of VEGF-related proteins in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes after exposure to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Chika; Yasutake, Akira; Eto, Komyo; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The localization of neuropathological lesions along deep sulci and fissures is one of the characteristics of a cerebrum damaged by methylmercury. Edematous changes in white matter have been proposed as the cause of the localization of lesions; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying methylmercury-induced edema remain unclear. Since the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) system regulates vascular permeability and can be involved in the progression of edematous changes, we examined the effect of methylmercury on the expression of VEGF-related proteins in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes. After methylmercury exposure, mRNA and protein levels of VEGF-A in pericytes and placenta growth factor (PlGF) and VEGF-receptor-1/-2 in endothelial cells were elevated. The induction of pericyte VEGF-A expression was independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-α and hypoxia-response element signaling. Taken together, these results suggest that methylmercury activates the VEGF system in brain microvessels in a paracrine fashion. When the activation occurs in narrow areas such as along the deep sulci in the cerebrum, hyperpermeability and subsequent edematous changes would cause a circulatory disturbance and result in neural cell damage. We propose this as a reason for the localization of the neuropathological lesions along the deep sulci and fissures in the cerebral cortex, such as the calcarine fissure, in patients with Minamata disease.

  6. Activation of sonic hedgehog signaling attenuates oxidized low-density lipoprotein-stimulated brain microvascular endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiu-Long; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The study was performed to investigate the role of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to oxLDL. The results indicated that treatment of MBMECs with oxLDL decreased the cell viability, and oxidative stress was involved in oxLDL-induce MBMECs dysfunction with increasing intracellular ROS and MDA formation as well as decreasing NO release and eNOS mRNA expression. In addition, SHH signaling components, such as SHH, Smo and Gli1, mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased after incubation with increasing concentrations of oxLDL. Treatment with oxLDL alone or SHH loss-of-function significantly increased the permeability of MBMECs, and overexpression of SHH attenuated oxLDL-induced elevation of permeability in MBMECs. Furthermore, SHH gain-of-function could reverse oxLDL-induced apoptosis through inhibition caspase3 and caspase8 levels in MBMECs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the suppression of SHH in MBMECs might contribute to the oxLDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. However, the overexpression of SHH could reverse oxLDL-induced endothelial cells dysfunction in vitro.

  7. An ultrastructural analysis of endothelial change paralleling platelet aggregation in a light/dye model of microvascular insult.

    PubMed Central

    Povlishock, J. T.; Rosenblum, W. I.; Sholley, M. M.; Wei, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    Those microvascular endothelial events that parallel the evolution of platelet aggregation were evaluated in a well-controlled animal model. Cat pial microvessels were observed through a cranial window while local platelet aggregation was produced by intravenous injection of sodium fluorescein and simultaneous exposure of the pial vessels to light from a filtered mercury lamp that excited the fluorescein. The vessels were fixed in situ when the in vivo observations of a preselected vessel indicated early, intermediate, or advanced aggregation in that vessel. The preselected vessel was then harvested for ultrastructural study together with adjacent vessels from the illuminated field. These vessels and appropriate controls were compared in semiserial thin sections. The onset of platelet aggregation in both venules and arterioles was accompanied by focal endothelial lucency, vacuole formation, luminal membrane rupture, and swelling of the nuclear envelope. These changes were not found in control material. With intermediate aggregation these changes were more common, while with advanced aggregation these abnormalities occurred together with focal endothelial denudation. Thus, in this model denudation occurred only with advanced aggregation and was not a prerequisite for aggregation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:6824062

  8. Rickettsia rickettsii infection of human macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells reveals activation of both common and cell type-specific host response mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rydkina, Elena; Turpin, Loel C; Sahni, Sanjeev K

    2010-06-01

    Although inflammation and altered barrier functions of the vasculature, due predominantly to the infection of endothelial cell lining of small and medium-sized blood vessels, represent salient pathological features of human rickettsioses, the interactions between pathogenic rickettsiae and microvascular endothelial cells remain poorly understood. We have investigated the activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and secretion of chemokines and prostaglandins after Rickettsia rickettsii infection of human cerebral, dermal, and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in comparison with pulmonary artery cells of macrovascular origin. NF-kappaB and p38 kinase activation and increased HO-1 mRNA expression were clearly evident in all cell types, along with relatively similar susceptibility to R. rickettsii infection in vitro but considerable variations in the intensities/kinetics of the aforementioned host responses. As expected, the overall activation profiles of macrovascular endothelial cells derived from human pulmonary artery and umbilical vein were nearly identical. Interestingly, cerebral endothelial cells displayed a marked refractoriness in chemokine production and secretion, while all other cell types secreted various levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) in response to infection. A unique feature of all microvascular endothelial cells was the lack of induced COX-2 expression and resultant inability to secrete prostaglandin E(2) after R. rickettsii infection. Comparative evaluation thus yields the first experimental evidence for the activation of both common and unique cell type-specific host response mechanisms in macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells infected with R. rickettsii, a prototypical species known to cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever in humans.

  9. Tissue factor inflammatory response regulated by promoter genotype and p38 MAPK in neonatal vs. adult microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Buzby, Jeffrey S; Williams, Shirley A; Imfeld, Karen L; Kunicki, Thomas J; Nugent, Diane J

    2014-04-01

    Variable tissue factor (TF) expression by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) may be regulated by two promoter haplotypes, distinguished by an 18-basepair deletion (D) or insertion (I) at -1,208. We sought to determine the relationship between these haplotypes and interleukin-1α (IL-1α)-induced TF expression in neonatal versus adult HMVEC. IL-1-stimulated TF mRNA, protein, and activity were significantly higher in neonatal compared to adult D/D donors. IL-1-stimulated HMVEC from neonatal D/D donors expressed threefold higher levels of TF mRNA, twofold higher TF protein, and fourfold increased TF activity compared to HMVEC from adult D/D donors. These results indicate that homozygosity for the D haplotype is characterized by increased response to IL-1 in neonates, but not adults. IL-1 induced increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which was significantly greater in neonatal compared to adult HMVEC. Moreover, inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway reduced IL-1-stimulated TF mRNA expression in D/D neonatal but not adult HMVEC. Upregulation of D/D neonatal HMVEC TF expression by IL-1 is mediated through the p38 MAPK pathway. This heightened response of D/D neonatal HMVEC to inflammatory stimuli may contribute to increased microvascular coagulopathies in susceptible newborn infants.

  10. Tissue Factor Inflammatory Response Regulated by Promoter Genotype and p38 MAPK in Neonatal vs. Adult Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buzby, Jeffrey S.; Williams, Shirley A.; Imfeld, Karen L.; Kunicki, Thomas J.; Nugent, Diane J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective and design Variable tissue factor (TF) expression by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) may be regulated by two promoter haplotypes, distinguished by an 18 base pair deletion (D) or insertion (I) at -1208. We sought to determine the relationship between these haplotypes and interleukin-1 (IL-1α)-induced TF expression in neonatal versus adult HMVEC. Results IL-1-stimulated TF mRNA, protein, and activity were significantly higher in neonatal compared to adult D/D donors. IL-1-stimulated HMVEC from neonatal D/D donors expressed 3-fold higher levels of TF mRNA, 2-fold higher TF protein, and 4-fold increased TF activity compared to HMVEC from adult D/D donors. These results indicate that homozygosity for the D haplotype is characterized by increased response to IL-1 in neonates but not adults. IL-1 induced increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which was significantly greater in neonatal compared to adult HMVEC. Moreover, inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway reduced IL-1-stimulated TF mRNA expression in D/D neonatal but not adult HMVEC. Conclusions Up-regulation of D/D neonatal HMVEC TF expression by IL-1 is mediated through the p38 MAPK pathway. This heightened response of D/D neonatal HMVEC to inflammatory stimuli may contribute to increased microvascular coagulopathies in susceptible newborn infants. PMID:24385191

  11. Anti-TNFα therapy transiently improves high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and microvascular endothelial function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). This can be only partially attributed to traditional CVD risk factors such as dyslipidaemia and their downstream effects on endothelial function. The most common lipid abnormality in RA is reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, probably due to active inflammation. In this longitudinal study we hypothesised that anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNFα) therapy in patients with active RA improves HDL cholesterol, microvascular and macrovascular endothelial function. Methods Twenty-three RA patients starting on anti-TNFα treatment were assessed for HDL cholesterol level, and endothelial-dependent and -independent function of microvessels and macrovessels at baseline, 2-weeks and 3 months of treatment. Results Disease activity (CRP, fibrinogen, DAS28) significantly decreased during the follow-up period. There was an increase in HDL cholesterol levels at 2 weeks (p < 0.05) which was paralleled by a significant increase in microvascular endothelial-dependent function (p < 0.05). However, both parameters returned towards baseline at 12 weeks. Conclusion Anti-TNFα therapy in RA patients appears to be accompanied by transient but significant improvements in HDL cholesterol levels, which coexists with an improvement in microvascular endothelial-dependent function. PMID:22824166

  12. Functional expression of choline transporter like-protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Iwao, Beniko; Yara, Miki; Hara, Naomi; Kawai, Yuiko; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takeshi; Inazu, Masato

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline transporter in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs). Choline uptake into hBMECs was a saturable process that was mediated by a Na(+)-independent, membrane potential and pH-dependent transport system. The cells have two different [(3)H]choline transport systems with Km values of 35.0 ± 4.9 μM and 54.1 ± 8.1 μM, respectively. Choline uptake was inhibited by choline, acetylcholine (ACh) and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3). Various organic cations also interacted with the choline transport system. Choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) and CTL2 mRNA were highly expressed, while mRNA for high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT1) and organic cation transporters (OCTs) were not expressed in hBMECs. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were localized to brain microvascular endothelial cells in human brain cortical sections. Both CTL1 and CTL2 proteins were expressed on the plasma membrane and mitochondria. CTL1 and CTL2 proteins are mainly expressed in plasma membrane and mitochondria, respectively. We conclude that choline is mainly transported via an intermediate-affinity choline transport system, CTL1 and CTL2, in hBMECs. These transporters are responsible for the uptake of extracellular choline and organic cations. CTL2 participate in choline transport mainly in mitochondria, and may be the major site for the control of choline oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thrombospondin-1 modulates VEGF signaling via CD36 by recruiting SHP-1 to VEGFR2 complex in microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ling-Yun; Ramakrishnan, Devi Prasadh

    2013-01-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) inhibits growth factor signaling at the receptor level in microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC), and CD36 has been suggested to be involved in this inhibition, but the mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that CD36-TSP-1 interaction recruits Src homology 2 domain–containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling complex and attenuates vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling. Western blots of anti-CD36 and anti-VEGFR2 immunoprecipitates from VEGF-treated MVEC showed that exposure of the cells to a recombinant protein containing the CD36 binding domain of thrombospondin-1 (known as the TSR domain) induced association of SHP-1 with the VEGFR2/CD36 signaling complex and thereby suppressed VEGFR2 phosphorylation. SHP-1 phosphatase activity was increased in immunoprecipitated VEGFR2 complexes from TSR-treated cells. Silencing CD36 expression in MVEC by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or genetic deletion of cd36 in mice showed that TSR-induced SHP-1/VEGFR2 complex formation required CD36 in vitro and in vivo. Silencing SHP-1 expression in MVEC by siRNA abrogated TSR-mediated inhibition of VEGFR2 phosphorylation as well as TSR-mediated inhibition of VEGF-induced endothelial cell migration and tube formation. These studies reveal a SHP-1–mediated antiangiogenic pathway induced by CD36-TSP-1 interaction that inhibits VEGFR2 signaling and they provide a novel target to modulate angiogenesis therapeutically. PMID:23896411

  14. Human microvascular endothelial cellular interaction with atomic N-doped DLC compared with Si-doped DLC thin films.

    PubMed

    Okpalugo, T I T; Murphy, H; Ogwu, A A; Abbas, G; Ray, S C; Maguire, P D; McLaughlin, J; McCullough, R W

    2006-08-01

    This article reports results of endothelial cell interaction with atom beam source N-doped a-C:H (diamond-like carbon, DLC) as it compares with that of Si-doped DLC thin films. The RF plasma source exhibits up to 40% N-dissociation and N-atomic fluxes of approximately 0.85 x 10(18) atoms/s, which ensures better atomic nitrogen incorporation. Two different types of nitrogen species (with and without the use of sweep plates to remove charged ions) were employed for nitrogen doping. The number of attached endothelial cells is highest on Si-DLC, followed by the N-DLC (where the sweep plates were used to remove ions), the N-DLC (without the use of sweep plates), undoped DLC, and finally the uncoated sample. The contact angle values for these films suggest that water contact angle is higher in the atomic nitrogen neutral films and Si-DLC films compared to the ionized-nitrogen specie doped films and undoped DLC thin films, suggesting that the more hydrophobic films, semiconducting films, and film with relieved stress have better interaction with human microvascular endothelial cells. It seems evident that N-doping increases the Raman I(D)/I(G) ratios, whereas N-neutral doping decreases it slightly and Si-doping decreases it even further. In this study, lower Raman I(D)/I(G) ratios are associated with increased sp(3)/sp(2) ratio, an increased H concentration, photoluminescence intensity, and a higher endothelial cellular adhesion. These investigations could be relevant to biocompatibility assessment of nanostructured biomaterials and tissue engineering.

  15. Effects of the physicochemical properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, commonly used as sun protection agents, on microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Claudia; Torrano, Adriano A.; Herrmann, Rudolf; Malissek, Marcelina; Bräuchle, Christoph; Reller, Armin; Treuel, Lennart; Hilger, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Until now, the potential effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on endothelial cells are not well understood, despite their already wide usage. Therefore, the present work characterizes six TiO2 nanoparticle samples in the size range of 19 × 17 to 87 × 13 nm, which are commonly present in sun protection agents with respect to their physicochemical properties (size, shape, ζ-potential, agglomeration, sedimentation, surface coating, and surface area), their interactions with serum proteins and biological impact on human microvascular endothelial cells (relative cellular dehydrogenase activity, adenosine triphosphate content, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release). We observed no association of nanoparticle morphology with the agglomeration and sedimentation behavior and no variations of the ζ-potential (-14 to -19 mV) in dependence on the surface coating. In general, the impact on endothelial cells was low and only detectable at concentrations of 100 μg/ml. Particles containing a rutile core and having rod-like shape had a stronger effect on cell metabolism than those with anatase core and elliptical shape (relative cellular dehydrogenase activity after 72 h: 60 vs. 90 %). Besides the morphology, the nanoparticle shell constitution was found to influence the metabolic activity of the cells. Upon cellular uptake, the nanoparticles were localized perinuclearly. Considering that in the in vivo situation endothelial cells would come in contact with considerably lower nanoparticle amounts than the lowest-observable adverse effects level (100 μg/ml), TiO2 nanoparticles can be considered as rather harmless to humans under the investigated conditions.

  16. Cytotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1 on human brain microvascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Humaira; Hamid, Saeed S; Ali, Syed Shayan; Anwar, Javeria; Siddiqui, Anwar Ali; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus spp. Although AFB1 is implicated as a carcinogen in hepatocellular carcinoma, brain autopsies in affected areas have revealed its presence in 81% of cases. Given its haematogenous spread, here we determined the cytotoxic effects of AFB1 on primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as well as immortalized epithelial cells of human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh7). The cell types were exposed to AFB1 (3-32 nM) for 24 h and release of lactate dehydrogenase was measured as cell cytotoxicity marker. Furthermore, DNA was collected from both cell types and DNA adduct formation was determined by immunoblot using anti-AFB1-DNA adduct antibody. At 32 nM, AFB1 killed >85% HBMEC, while controls showed minimal effects (P < .05). Similar concentrations of AFB1 showed 22% cell death of HUVEC, while the same concentration did not kill Huh7. At low concentrations, in other words, 3.2 nM, AFB1 produced DNA adduct formation in HBMEC, while high concentration (32 nM) did not form DNA adducts. For HUVEC, 16 nM and 32 nM exhibited DNA adduct formation. For Huh7, 3.2 nM did not form DNA adducts, while 32 nM exhibited DNA adduct formation. For the first time, we report that AFB1 affected the viability of primary endothelial cells but not immortalized Huh7 cells. Cytotoxicity of brain endothelial cells suggests extra-hepatic complications post-AFB1 exposure.

  17. Metoprolol Improves Endothelial Function in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Majidinia, Maryam; Rasmi, Yousef; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad Hassan; Seyed-Mohammadzad, MirHossein; Saboory, Ehsan; Shirpoor, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction which is manifested by the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability, is an increasingly recognized cause of cardiac syndrome X (CSX) and beta blockers are used for the treatment of this syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate effects of metoprolol, as a beta blocker, on endothelial function in CSX patients. The study included 25 CSX patients (20 female/ 5 male, mean age: 55.36±10.31 years) who received metoprolol (50 mg BID) for one month. In addition, 25 healthy controls (20 female/ 5 male, mean age: 54.32 ±9.27 years) were enrolled. Levels of endothelin-1, E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in controls and CSX patients were measured, both at the baseline and after the treatment, by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In CSX patients, at the baseline, levels of E-selectin and VCAM-1 were significantly higher than those of the controls. In addition, levels of these biomarkers in CSX patients after the treatment significantly decreased compared to the baseline. In spite of similar tendency, these differences were not significant for endothelin-1. In conclusion, metoprolol therapy improves endothelial function. Thus, it may be a suggested choice for CSX treatment. However, further studies are needed to confirm the clinical significance of metoprolol therapy for CSX patients. PMID:27980592

  18. Determining Microvascular Obstruction and Infarct Size with Steady-State Free Precession Imaging Cardiac MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Wolfgang; Lell, Michael; May, Matthias; Scharf, Michael; Schlundt, Christian; Achenbach, Stephan; Uder, Michael; Schmid, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In cardiac MRI (cMRI) injection of contrast medium may be performed prior to the acquisition of cine steady-state free precession (SSFP) imaging to speed up the protocol and avoid delay before late Gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. Aim of this study was to evaluate whether a condensed clinical protocol with contrast cine SSFP imaging is able to detect early microvascular obstruction (MO) and determine the infarct size compared to the findings of LGE inversion recovery sequences. Materials and Methods The study complies with the Declaration of Helsinki and was performed following approval by the ethic committee of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. Written informed consent was obtained from every patient. 68 consecutive patients (14 females/54 males) with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated by percutaneous coronary revascularization were included in this study. CMRI was performed 6.6±2 days after symptom onset and MO and infarct size in early contrast SSFP cine imaging were compared to LGE imaging. Results MO was detected in 47/68 (69%) patients on cine SSFP and in 41/68 (60%) patients on LGE imaging. In 6 patients MO was found on cine SSFP imaging but was not detectable on LGE imaging. Infarct size on cine SSFP showed a strong agreement to LGE imaging (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] of 0.96 for enddiastolic, p<0.001 and 0.96 for endsystolic, p<0.001 respectively). Significant interobserver agreement was found measuring enddiastolic and endsystolic infarct size on cine SSFP imaging (p<0.01). Conclusions In patients after STEMI infarct size and presence of MO can be detected with contrast cine SSFP imaging. This could be an option in patients who are limited in their ability to comply with the demands of a cMRI protocol. PMID:25793609

  19. Hsp90 inhibition suppresses NF-κB transcriptional activation via Sirt-2 in human lung microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thangjam, Gagan S; Birmpas, Charalampos; Barabutis, Nektarios; Gregory, Betsy W; Clemens, Mary Ann; Newton, Joseph R; Fulton, David; Catravas, John D

    2016-05-15

    The ability of anti-heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) drugs to attenuate NF-κB-mediated transcription is the major basis for their anti-inflammatory properties. While the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect are not clear, they appear to be distinct in human endothelial cells. We now show for the first time that type 2 sirtuin (Sirt-2) histone deacetylase binds human NF-κB target gene promoter and prevents the recruitment of NF-κB proteins and subsequent assembly of RNA polymerase II complex in human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Hsp90 inhibitors stabilize the Sirt-2/promoter interaction and impose a "transcriptional block," which is reversed by either inhibition or downregulation of Sirt-2 protein expression. Furthermore, this process is independent of NF-κB (p65) Lysine 310 deacetylation, suggesting that it is distinct from known Sirt-2-dependent mechanisms. We demonstrate that Sirt-2 is recruited to NF-κB target gene promoter via interaction with core histones. Upon inflammatory challenge, chromatin remodeling and core histone H3 displacement from the promoter region removes Sirt-2 and allows NF-κB/coactivator recruitment essential for RNA Pol II-dependent mRNA induction. This novel mechanism may have important implications in pulmonary inflammation.

  20. Evaluation of multiwalled carbon nanotube cytotoxicity in cultures of human brain microvascular endothelial cells grown on plastic or basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Brittany N; Xing, Fei; Fahrenholtz, Cale D; Singh, Ravi N

    2017-03-09

    There is a growing interest in the use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to treat diseases of the brain. Little is known about the effects of MWCNTs on human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), which make up the blood vessels in the brain. In our studies, we evaluate the cytotoxicity of MWCNTs and acid oxidized MWNCTs, with or without a phospholipid-polyethylene glycol coating. We determined the cytotoxic effects of MWCNTs on both tissue-mimicking cultures of HBMECs grown on basement membrane and on monolayer cultures of HBMECs grown on plastic. We also evaluated the effects of MWCNT exposure on the capacity of HBMECs to form rings after plating on basement membrane, a commonly used assay to evaluate angiogenesis. We show that tissue-mimicking cultures of HBMECs are less sensitive to all types of MWCNTs than monolayer cultures of HBMECs. Furthermore, we found that MWCNTs have little impact on the capacity of HBMECs to form rings. Our results indicate that relative cytotoxicity of MWCNTs is significantly affected by the type of cell culture model used for testing, and supports further research into the use of tissue-mimicking endothelial cell culture models to help bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo toxicology.

  1. Quantitative in vitro assay to measure neutrophil adhesion to activated primary human microvascular endothelial cells under static conditions.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Farrar, Katherine; Hellman, Judith

    2013-08-23

    The vascular endothelium plays an integral part in the inflammatory response. During the acute phase of inflammation, endothelial cells (ECs) are activated by host mediators or directly by conserved microbial components or host-derived danger molecules. Activated ECs express cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules that mobilize, activate and retain leukocytes at the site of infection or injury. Neutrophils are the first leukocytes to arrive, and adhere to the endothelium through a variety of adhesion molecules present on the surfaces of both cells. The main functions of neutrophils are to directly eliminate microbial threats, promote the recruitment of other leukocytes through the release of additional factors, and initiate wound repair. Therefore, their recruitment and attachment to the endothelium is a critical step in the initiation of the inflammatory response. In this report, we describe an in vitro neutrophil adhesion assay using calcein AM-labeled primary human neutrophils to quantitate the extent of microvascular endothelial cell activation under static conditions. This method has the additional advantage that the same samples quantitated by fluorescence spectrophotometry can also be visualized directly using fluorescence microscopy for a more qualitative assessment of neutrophil binding.

  2. Pitfalls in assessing microvascular endothelial barrier function: impedance-based devices versus the classic macromolecular tracer assay

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Iris; Hornburger, Michael C.; Mayer, Bettina A.; Beyerle, Andrea; Wegener, Joachim; Fürst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently used parameters to describe the barrier properties of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro are (i) the macromolecular permeability, indicating the flux of a macromolecular tracer across the endothelium, and (ii) electrical impedance of ECs grown on gold-film electrodes reporting on the cell layer’s tightness for ion flow. Due to the experimental differences between these approaches, inconsistent observations have been described. Here, we present the first direct comparison of these assays applied to one single cell type (human microvascular ECs) under the same experimental conditions. The impact of different pharmacological tools (histamine, forskolin, Y-27632, blebbistatin, TRAP) on endothelial barrier function was analyzed by Transwell® tracer assays and two commercial impedance devices (xCELLigence®, ECIS®). The two impedance techniques provided very similar results for all compounds, whereas macromolecular permeability readings were found to be partly inconsistent with impedance. Possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed. We conclude that the complementary combination of both approaches is highly recommended to overcome the restrictions of each assay. Since the nature of the growth support may contribute to the observed differences, structure-function relationships should be based on cells that are consistently grown on either permeable or impermeable growth supports in all experiments. PMID:27025965

  3. Molecular and Cellular Characterization of Space Flight Effects on Microvascular Endothelial Cell Function - PreparatoryWork for the SFEF Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, Michele; Barravecchia, Ivana; Mariotti, Sara; Merenda, Alessandra; De Cesari, Chiara; Vukich, Marco; Angeloni, Debora

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to microgravity during space flight (SF) of variable length induces suffering of the endothelium (the cells lining all blood vessels), mostly responsible for health problems found in astronauts and animals returning from space. Of interest to pre-nosological medicine, the effects of microgravity on astronauts are strikingly similar to the consequences of sedentary life, senescence and degenerative diseases on Earth, although SF effects are accelerated and reversible. Thus, microgravity is a significant novel model for better understanding of common pathologies. A comprehensive cell and molecular biology study is needed in order to explain pathophysiological findings after SFs. This project will study the effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation on endothelial cells (ECs) cultured on the International Space Station through analysis of 1) cell transcriptome, 2) DNA methylome, 3) DNA damage and cell senescence, 4) variations in cell cycle and cell morphology. This project has been selected by the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency and is presently in preparation. The ground study presented here was performed to determine the biological and engineering requirements that will allow us to retrieve suitable samples after culturing, fixing and storing ECs in space. We expect to identify molecular pathways activated by space microgravity in microvascular ECs, which may shed light on pathogenic molecular mechanisms responsible for endothelial suffering shared by astronauts and individuals affected with aging, degenerative and sedentary life-associated pathologies on Earth.

  4. Fibrin and collagen differentially but synergistically regulate sprout angiogenesis of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells in 3-dimensional matrix.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaodong; Tonnesen, Marcia G; Mousa, Shaker A; Clark, Richard A F

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly regulated event involving complex, dynamic interactions between microvascular endothelial cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Alteration of ECM composition and architecture is a hallmark feature of wound clot and tumor stroma. We previously reported that during angiogenesis, endothelial cell responses to growth factors are modulated by the compositional and mechanical properties of a surrounding three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) that is dominated by either cross-linked fibrin or type I collagen. However, the role of 3D ECM in the regulation of angiogenesis associated with wound healing and tumor growth is not well defined. This study investigates the correlation of sprout angiogenesis and ECM microenvironment using in vivo and in vitro 3D angiogenesis models. It demonstrates that fibrin and type I collagen 3D matrices differentially but synergistically regulate sprout angiogenesis. Thus blocking both integrin alpha v beta 3 and integrin alpha 2 beta 1 might be a novel strategy to synergistically block sprout angiogenesis in solid tumors.

  5. Prostaglandin F2-alpha receptor (FPr) expression on porcine corpus luteum microvascular endothelial cells (pCL-MVECs)

    PubMed Central

    Zannoni, Augusta; Bernardini, Chiara; Rada, Tommaso; Ribeiro, Luciana A; Forni, Monica; Bacci, Maria L

    2007-01-01

    Background The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient endocrine gland and prostaglandin F2-alpha is considered to be the principal luteolysin in pigs. In this species, the in vivo administration of prostaglandin F2-alpha induces apoptosis in large vessels as early as 6 hours after administration. The presence of the prostaglandin F2-alpha receptor (FPr) on the microvascular endothelial cells (pCL-MVECs) of the porcine corpus luteum has not yet been defined. The aim of the study was to assess FPr expression in pCL-MVECs in the early and mid-luteal phases (EL-p, ML-p), and during pregnancy (P-p). Moreover, the effectiveness of prostaglandin F2-alpha treatment in inducing pCL-MVEC apoptosis was tested. Methods Porcine CLs were collected in the EL and ML phases and during P-p. All CLs from each animal were minced together and the homogenates underwent enzymatic digestion. The pCL-MVECs were then positively selected by an immunomagnetic separation protocol using Dynabeads coated with anti-CD31 monoclonal antibody and seeded in flasks in the presence of EGM 2-MV (Microvascular Endothelial Cell Medium-2). After 4 days of culture, the cells underwent additional immunomagnetic selection and were seeded in flasks until the confluent stage. PCR Real time, western blot and immunodetection assays were utilized to assess the presence of FPr on pCL-MVEC primary cultures. Furthermore, the influence of culture time (freshly isolated, cultured overnight and at confluence) and hormonal treatment (P4 and E2) on FPr expression in pCL-MVECs was also investigated. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay of pCL-MVECs exposed to prostaglandin F2-alpha. Results We obtained primary cultures of pCL-MVECs from all animals. FPr mRNA and protein levels showed the highest value (ANOVA) in CL-MVECs derived from the early-luteal phase. Moreover, freshly isolated MVECs showed a higher FPr mRNA value than those cultured overnight and confluent cells (ANOVA). prostaglandin F2-alpha treatment failed to induce

  6. ADAMTS9 Is a Cell-Autonomously Acting, Anti-Angiogenic Metalloprotease Expressed by Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bon-Hun; Coe, David M.; Dixon, Laura J.; Somerville, Robert P.T.; Nelson, Courtney M.; Wang, Lauren W.; Young, Mary Elizabeth; Lindner, Daniel J.; Apte, Suneel S.

    2010-01-01

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS9 participates in melanoblast development and is a tumor suppressor in esophageal and nasopharyngeal cancer. ADAMTS9 null mice die before gastrulation, but, ADAMTS9+/− mice were initially thought to be normal. However, when congenic with the C57Bl/6 strain, 80% of ADAMTS9+/− mice developed spontaneous corneal neovascularization. β-Galactosidase staining enabled by a lacZ cassette targeted to the ADAMTS9 locus showed that capillary endothelial cells (ECs) in embryonic and adult tissues and in capillaries growing into heterotopic tumors expressed ADAMTS9. Heterotopic B.16-F10 melanomas elicited greater vascular induction in ADAMTS9+/− mice than in wild-type littermates, suggesting a potential inhibitory role in tumor angiogenesis. Treatment of cultured human microvascular ECs with ADAMTS9 small-interfering RNA resulted in enhanced filopodial extension, decreased cell adhesion, increased cell migration, and enhanced formation of tube-like structures on Matrigel. Conversely, overexpression of catalytically active, but not inactive, ADAMTS9 in ECs led to fewer tube-like structures, demonstrating that the proteolytic activity of ADAMTS9 was essential. However, unlike the related metalloprotease ADAMTS1, which exerts anti-angiogenic effects by cleavage of thrombospondins and sequestration of vascular endothelial growth factor165, ADAMTS9 neither cleaved thrombospondins 1 and 2, nor bound vascular endothelial growth factor165. Taken together, these data identify ADAMTS9 as a novel, constitutive, endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that operates cell-autonomously in ECs via molecular mechanisms that are distinct from those used by ADAMTS1. PMID:20093484

  7. Primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells: biochemical and functional characterisation as a model for drug transport and targeting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mathew; Omidi, Yadollah; Gumbleton, Mark

    2007-05-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a significant obstacle to the delivery of therapeutic agents into the central nervous system (CNS). Primary cell cultures of brain capillary endothelial cells represent the closest possible phenotype to the in vivo BBB cell providing a convenient model for the study of transport systems and events that mediate solute delivery to the CNS. In this investigation we have characterized an in vitro primary BBB model from porcine brain microvascular endothelial capillary (PBMVEC) cells after recovery from cryopreservation of upto 12 months and studied their modulation by astrocytes. Co-cultures of PBMVECs with astrocytes (C6 astroglioma) resulted in trans-endothelial electrical resistance of up to approximately 900Omega cm2 and marked discrimination between the para- and trans- cellular markers sucrose and propranolol. Micrographs of confluent monolayers of PBMVECs showed the presence of tight junction complexes and vesicles with the morphological characteristics of either caveolae or clathrin coated pits. Extensive RT-PCR evaluation highlighted the expression of tight junction transcripts, ABC transporters, leptin receptor and select nutrient transporters. Functional studies examined the kinetics of transport of glucose, large neutral amino acids and p-glycoprotein (P-gp). Our findings indicate primary PBMVECs retain many barrier characteristics and transport pathways of the in vivo BBB. Further, primary cells can be stored as frozen stocks which can be thawed and cultured without phenotypic drift many months after isolation. Frozen PBMVECs therefore serve as a robust and convenient in vitro cell culture tool for research programs involving CNS drug delivery and targeting and in studies addressing blood-brain barrier transport mechanisms.

  8. Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide and/or Unconjugated Bilirubin Impair the Integrity and Function of Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Filipa L.; Kittel, Ágnes; Veszelka, Szilvia; Palmela, Inês; Tóth, Andrea; Brites, Dora; Deli, Mária A.; Brito, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sepsis and jaundice are common conditions in newborns that can lead to brain damage. Though lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to alter the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), little is known on the effects of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and even less on the joint effects of UCB and LPS on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Methodology/Principal Findings Monolayers of primary rat BMEC were treated with 1 µg/ml LPS and/or 50 µM UCB, in the presence of 100 µM human serum albumin, for 4 or 24 h. Co-cultures of BMEC with astroglial cells, a more complex BBB model, were used in selected experiments. LPS led to apoptosis and UCB induced both apoptotic and necrotic-like cell death. LPS and UCB led to inhibition of P-glycoprotein and activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 in mono-cultures. Transmission electron microscopy evidenced apoptotic bodies, as well as damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum in BMEC by either insult. Shorter cell contacts and increased caveolae-like invaginations were noticeable in LPS-treated cells and loss of intercellular junctions was observed upon treatment with UCB. Both compounds triggered impairment of endothelial permeability and transendothelial electrical resistance both in mono- and co-cultures. The functional changes were confirmed by alterations in immunostaining for junctional proteins β-catenin, ZO-1 and claudin-5. Enlargement of intercellular spaces, and redistribution of junctional proteins were found in BMEC after exposure to LPS and UCB. Conclusions LPS and/or UCB exert direct toxic effects on BMEC, with distinct temporal profiles and mechanisms of action. Therefore, the impairment of brain endothelial integrity upon exposure to these neurotoxins may favor their access to the brain, thus increasing the risk of injury and requiring adequate clinical management of sepsis and jaundice in the neonatal period. PMID:22586454

  9. Influence of curvature on the morphology of brain microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Mao; Yang, Zhen; Wong, Andrew; Searson, Peter; Searson Group Team

    2013-03-01

    There are hundreds or thousands of endothelial cells around the perimeter of a single artery or vein, and hence an individual cell experiences little curvature. In contrast, a single endothelial cell may wrap around itself to form the lumen of a brain capillary. Curvature plays a key role in many biological, chemical and physical processes, however, its role in dictating the morphology and polarization of brain capillary endothelial cells has not been investigated. We hypothesize that curvature and shear flow play a key role in determining the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have developed the ``rod'' assay to study the influence of curvature on the morphology of confluent monolayers of endothelial cells. In this assay cells are plated onto glass rods pulled down to the desired diameter in the range from 5 - 500 μm and coated with collagen. We show that curvature has a significant influence on the morphology of endothelial cells and may have an important role in blood-brain barrier function.

  10. Gene expression analysis reveals marked differences in the transcriptome of infantile hemangioma endothelial cells compared to normal dermal microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infantile hemangiomas are benign vascular tumors primarily found on the skin in 10% of the pediatric population. The etiology of this disease is largely unknown and while large scale genomic studies have examined the transcriptomes of infantile hemangioma tumors as a whole, no study to date has compared the global gene expression profiles of pure infantile hemangioma endothelial cells (HEMECs) to that of normal human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVECs). Methods To shed light on the molecular differences between these normal and aberrant dermal endothelial cell types, we performed whole genome microarray analysis on purified cultures of HEMECs and HDMVECs. We then utilized qPCR and immunohistochemistry to confirm our microarray results. Results Our array analysis identified 125 genes whose expression was upregulated and 104 genes whose expression was downregulated by greater than two fold in HEMECs compared to HDMVECs. Bioinformatics analysis revealed three major classifications of gene functions that were altered in HEMECs including cell adhesion, cell cycle, and arachidonic acid production. Several of these genes have been reported to be critical regulators and/or mutated in cancer, vascular tumors, and vascular malformations. We confirmed the expression of a subset of these differentially expressed genes (ANGPT2, ANTXR1, SMARCE1, RGS5, CTAG2, LTBP2, CLDN11, and KISS1) using qPCR and utilized immunohistochemistry on a panel of paraffin embedded infantile hemangioma tumor tissues to demonstrate that the cancer/testis antigen CTAG2 is highly abundant in vessel-dense proliferating infantile hemangiomas and with significantly reduced levels during tumor involution as vascular density decreases. Conclusion Our data reveal that the transcriptome of HEMECs is reflective of a pro-proliferative cell type with altered adhesive characteristics. Moveover, HEMECs show altered expression of many genes that are important in the progression and prognosis

  11. Caveolin-1 mediates tissue plasminogen activator-induced MMP-9 up-regulation in cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xinchun; Sun, Yanyun; Xu, Ji; Liu, Wenlan

    2015-03-01

    Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. The mechanism through which tPA enhances MMP-9 activity is not well understood. Here we report an important role of caveolin-1 in mediating tPA-induced MMP-9 synthesis. Brain microvascular endothelial cell line bEnd3 cells were incubated with 5 or 20 μg/ml tPA for 24 hrs before analyzing MMP-9 levels in the conditioned media and cellular extracts by gelatin zymography. tPA at a dose of 20 μg/mL tPA, but not 5 μg/mL, significantly increased MMP-9 level in cultured media while decreasing it in cellular extracts. Concurrently, tPA treatment induced a 2.3-fold increase of caveolin-1 protein levels in endothelial cells. Interestingly, knockdown of Cav-1 with siRNA inhibited tPA-induced MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and MMP-9 increase in the conditioned media, but did not affect MMP-9 decrease in cellular extracts. These results suggest that caveolin-1 critically contributes to tPA-mediated MMP-9 up-regulation, but may not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in the ischemic brain, which exacerbates ischemic blood brain barrier (BBB) injury and increases the risk of symptomatic cerebral hemorrhage. Our results suggest a novel mechanism underlying this tPA-MMP 9 axis. In response to tPA treatment, caveolin-1 protein levels increased in endothelial cells, which mediate MMP-9 mRNA up-regulation and its secretion into extracellular space. Caveolin-1 may, however, not facilitate MMP-9 secretion in endothelial cells. Our data suggest caveolin-1 as a novel therapeutic target for protecting the BBB against ischemic damage. The schematic outlines tPA-induced MMP-9 upreguation.

  12. The efficiency of glutamate uptake differs between neonatal and adult cortical microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lecointre, Maryline; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Chaussivert, Armelle; Marret, Stéphane; Leroux, Philippe; Jegou, Sylvie; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Henry, Vincent J

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate transporters (excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs)) are essential for brain homeostasis. While previous studies indicate that the vascular endothelium contributes to glutamate efflux in the adult brain, little information is available regarding glutamate uptake in the immature brain. The present study shows a differential expression pattern of EAATs between cortical microvessels in adults and newborns. In addition, adult cortical endothelial cells take up glutamate more efficiently than neonatal cells. Our findings indicate age-specific changes in extracellular glutamate regulation by brain endothelial cells, suggesting differences in the efficiency of glutamate efflux during an excitotoxic process that, in turn, may contribute to age-specific brain vulnerability. PMID:24517976

  13. Circulating plasma vascular endothelial growth factor and microvascular complications of type 1 diabetes mellitus: the influence of ACE inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, N; Fuller, J H; Pokras, F; Rottiers, R; Papazoglou, N; Aiello, L P

    2001-04-01

    To determine whether circulating plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is elevated in the presence of diabetic microvascular complications, and whether the impact of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors on these complications can be accounted for by changes in circulating VEGF. Samples (299/354 of those with retinal photographs) from the EUCLID placebo-controlled clinical trial of the ACE inhibitor lisinopril in mainly normoalbuminuric non-hypertensive Type 1 diabetic patients were used. Albumin excretion rate (AER) was measured 6 monthly. Geometric mean VEGF levels by baseline retinopathy status, change in retinopathy over 2 years, and by treatment with lisinopril were calculated. No significant correlation was observed between VEGF at baseline and age, diabetes duration, glycaemic control, blood pressure, smoking, fibrinogen and von Willebrand factor. Mean VEGF concentration at baseline was 11.5 (95% confidence interval 6.0--27.9) pg/ml in those without retinopathy, 12.9 (6.0--38.9) pg/ml in those with non-proliferative retinopathy, and 16.1 (8.1--33.5) pg/ml in those with proliferative retinopathy (P = 0.06 for trend). Baseline VEGF was 15.2 pg/ml in those who progressed by at least one level of retinopathy by 2 years compared to 11.8 pg/ml in those who did not (P = 0.3). VEGF levels were not altered by lisinopril treatment. Results were similar for AER. Circulating plasma VEGF concentration is not strongly correlated with risk factor status or microvascular disease in Type 1 diabetes, nor is it affected by ACE inhibition. Changes in circulating VEGF cannot account for the beneficial effect of ACE inhibition on retinopathy.

  14. Mst1 inhibits CMECs autophagy and participates in the development of diabetic coronary microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Mingming; Hu, Jianqiang; Wang, Tingting; Duan, Yu; Man, Wanrong; Wu, Bin; Feng, Jiaxu; Sun, Lei; Li, Congye; Zhang, Rongqing; Wang, Haichang; Sun, Dongdong

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications account for a substantial proportion of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Abnormalities of cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) lead to impaired cardiac microvascular vessel integrity and subsequent cardiac dysfunction, underlining the importance of coronary microvascular dysfunction. In this study, experimental diabetes models were constructed using Mst1 transgenic, Mst1 knockout and sirt1 knockout mice. Diabetic Mst1 transgenic mice exhibited impaired cardiac microvessel integrity and decreased cardiac function. Mst1 overexpression deceased CMECs autophagy as evidenced by decreased LC3 expression and enhanced protein aggregation when subjected to high glucose culture. Mst1 knockout improved cardiac microvessel integrity and enhanced cardiac functions in diabetic mice. Mst1 knockdown up-regulated autophagy as indicated by more typical autophagosomes and increased LC3 expression in CMECs subjected to high glucose cultures. Mst1 knockdown also promoted autophagic flux in the presence of bafilomycin A1. Mst1 overexpression increased CMECs apoptosis, whereas Mst1 knockout decreased CMECs apoptosis. Sirt1 knockout abolished the effects of Mst1 overexpression in cardiac microvascular injury and cardiac dysfunction. In conclusion, Mst1 knockout preserved cardiac microvessel integrity and improved cardiac functions in diabetic mice. Mst1 decreased sirt1 activity, inhibited autophagy and enhanced apoptosis in CMECs, thus participating in the pathogenesis of diabetic coronary microvascular dysfunction. PMID:27680548

  15. Carnosine protects brain microvascular endothelial cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress injury through histamine H₁ and H₂ receptors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyi; Yao, Ke; Fan, Yanying; He, Ping; Wang, Xiaofen; Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2012-12-01

    Although it is believed that carnosine has protective effects on various cell types, its effect on microvascular endothelial cells has not been well defined. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of carnosine in microvascular endothelial cells using an in vitro rotenone-induced oxidative stress model. Mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to 1 μmol/L rotenone for 18 h. In some experiments, carnosine (100 nmol/L-1 mmol/L) was added 30 min prior to rotenone exposure. When used, histamine receptor antagonists (100 nmol/L-10 μmol/L) were added 15 min before carnosine treatment. After rotenone exposure, apoptosis of microvascular cells was analysed by Hoechst 33342 staining, whereas mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed by JC-1 staining. Intracellular carnosine and histamine levels were determined using HPLC or ultra-HPLC. Over the range 1 μmol/L-1 mmol/L, carnosine concentration-dependently decreased the number of apoptotic cells after 18 h exposure to rotenone. This effect was reversed by the histamine H1 receptor antagonists pyrilamine and diphenhydramine (1 and 10 μmol/L) and the H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine (100 nmol/L-10 μmol/L) and zolatidine (10 μmol/L). α-Fluoromethylhistidine (100 μmol/L), a selective and irreversible inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, also significantly inhibited the protective effects of carnosine. At 0.1 mmol/L, carnosine restored the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential after 6 h exposure to 1 μmol/L rotenone and this effect was also reversed by the H1 and H2 receptor antagonists. Moreover, intracellular carnosine levels increased as early as 1 h after carnosine treatment, whereas intracellular histamine levels increased 18 h after carnosine treatment. The results of the present study indicate that carnosine protects brain microvascular endothelial cells against rotenone-induced oxidative stress injury via histamine H1 and H2 receptors. The

  16. Effects of Aging on Parasite Biomass, Inflammation, Endothelial Activation, Microvascular Dysfunction and Disease Severity in Plasmodium knowlesi and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Barber, Bridget E; Grigg, Matthew J; William, Timothy; Piera, Kim A; Boyle, Michelle J; Yeo, Tsin W; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2017-06-15

    In populations pauci-immune to malaria, risk of severe malaria increases with age. This is particularly apparent in Plasmodium knowlesi malaria. However, pathophysiological mechanisms underlying knowlesi malaria, and of the age-related increase in risk of severe malaria in general, are poorly understood. In Malaysian patients aged ≥12 years with severe (n = 47) and nonsevere (n = 99) knowlesi malaria, severe (n = 21) and nonsevere (n = 109) falciparum malaria, and healthy controls (n = 50), we measured parasite biomass, systemic inflammation (interleukin 6 [IL-6]), endothelial activation (angiopoietin-2), and microvascular function, and evaluated the effects of age. Plasmodium knowlesi parasitemia correlated with age (Spearman's correlation coefficient [rs] = 0.36; P < .0001). In knowlesi malaria, IL-6, angiopoietin-2, and microvascular dysfunction were increased in severe compared to nonsevere disease, and all correlated with age, independent of parasitemia. In falciparum malaria, angiopoietin-2 increased with age, independent of parasite biomass (histidine-rich protein 2 [HRP2]). Independent risk factors for severe malaria included parasitemia and angiopoietin-2 in knowlesi malaria, and HRP2, angiopoietin-2, and microvascular dysfunction in falciparum malaria. Parasite biomass, endothelial activation, and microvascular dysfunction are associated with severe disease in knowlesi malaria and likely contribute to pathogenesis. The association of each of these processes with aging may account for the greater severity of malaria observed in older adults in low-endemic regions.

  17. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with Brazil Nuts on Microvascular Endothelial Function in Hypertensive and Dyslipidemic Patients: A Randomized Crossover Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Huguenin, Grazielle V B; Moreira, Annie S B; Siant'Pierre, Tatiana D; Gonçalves, Rodrigo A; Rosa, Glorimar; Oliveira, Glaucia M M; Luiz, Ronir R; Tibirica, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with GBNs on microvascular endothelial function in hypertensive and dyslipidemic patients. Ninety-one patients of both sexes aged 62.1 ± 9.3 years received 13 g/day of GBNs or a placebo for three months with a washout period of one month between treatments. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed using LSCI coupled with iontophoresis of ACh and PORH. We also used skin video capillaroscopy to measure capillary density and recruitment at rest and during PORH. Plasma concentrations of NOx were also measured as a marker of nitric oxide bioavailability. Supplementation with GBNs significantly increased the plasma levels of Se (p < 0.05) and NOx (p < 0.05). However, we did not observe any effects of GBN consumption on microvascular vasodilator responses to ACh or PORH (p > 0.05), and GBNs did not improve capillary density at baseline or recruitment during PORH (p > 0.05). Supplementation with GBNs induced significant increases in the plasma Se concentration and systemic bioavailability of nitric oxide. Nevertheless, GBN supplementation did not lead to any improvement in systemic microvascular reactivity or density in patients with arterial hypertension and dyslipidemia who were undergoing multiple drug therapies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sex-Specific Factors in Microvascular Angina

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Karin H.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2014-01-01

    Among women presenting for evaluation of suspected ischemic symptoms, a diagnosis of normal coronary arteries is five times more common, as compared to men. These women are often labeled as cardiac syndrome X (CSX), a subset of which have microvascular angina (MA) due to microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD). MCD is not benign and is associated with an annual 2.5% cardiac event rate. Non-invasive testing for MCD remains insensitive although newer imaging modalities such as adenosine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) appear promising. The gold standard for diagnosis of MCD is coronary reactivity testing (CRT), an invasive technique which is not available in many countries. With regard to treatment, large scale trials are lacking. While research is ongoing, the current platform of therapy consists of anti-anginal, anti-platelet and endothelial modifying agents (primarily angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and statins). PMID:24582724

  19. Acute oedema in the evaluation of microvascular reperfusion and myocardial salvage in reperfused myocardial infarction with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Phrommintikul, Arintaya; Abdel-Aty, Hassan; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Friedrich, Matthias G; Taylor, Andrew J

    2010-06-01

    The accurate measurement of myocardial salvage is critical to the ongoing refinement of reperfusion strategies in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) can define the area at risk in AMI by the presence of myocardial oedema, identified by high signal intensity on T(2)-weighted imaging with a short inversion time inversion-recovery (STIR) sequence. In addition, myocardial necrosis can be identified with CMR delayed contrast enhanced imaging. In this prospective study we examined the relationship of acute oedema and necrosis with impaired microvascular reperfusion. We also evaluated acute oedema as a marker of the area at risk in AMI, for the purposes of documenting myocardial salvage. CMR was performed on 15 patients with (AMI), within 24h of successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction was defined by a systolic thickening <40% (severe <20%). Microvascular reperfusion was evaluated during the acute phase of contrast wash-in. CMR was repeated 3 months post-PCI to evaluate recovery of LV function and final infarct size. Myocardial salvage was defined as the percentage of the area at risk that was not infarcted on follow up CMR. There was a significant correlation between impaired microvascular reperfusion and the extent of segmental oedema (R=0.363, P<0.01), but not myocardial necrosis (R=0.110, P>0.5). The extent of myocardial salvage correlated with recovery of systolic function (R=0.241, P<0.05), which was strongest in LV segments with severely reduced systolic function (R=0.422, P<0.01). In acutely reperfused AMI, oedema can be used to identify the area at risk for the purpose of calculating myocardial salvage. The correlation between myocardial oedema and reperfusion status suggests a pathological role of acute oedema in the impairment of microvascular reperfusion. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Endothelial progenitor cells, microvascular obstruction, and left ventricular remodeling in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Porto, Italo; De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Leone, Antonio Maria; Dato, Ilaria; D'Amario, Domenico; Burzotta, Francesco; Niccoli, Giampaolo; Trani, Carlo; Biasucci, Luigi Marzio; Bolognese, Leonardo; Crea, Filippo

    2013-09-15

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are released from the bone marrow during cardiac ischemic events, potentially influencing vascular and myocardial repair. We assessed the clinical and angiographic correlates of EPC mobilization at the time of primary percutaneous coronary intervention in 78 patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction and the impact of both baseline and follow-up EPC levels on left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Blood samples were drawn from the aorta and the culprit coronary artery for cytofluorimetric EPC detection (CD34+CD45dimKDR+ cells, in percentage of cytofluorimetric counts). Area at risk was assessed by Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation myocardial jeopardy index, thrombotic burden as thrombus score and microvascular obstruction (MVO) as a combination of ST segment resolution and myocardial blush grade. Echocardiographic evaluation of LV remodeling was performed at 1-year follow-up in 54 patients, whereas peripheral EPC levels were reassessed in 40 patients. EPC levels during primary percutaneous coronary intervention were significantly higher in intracoronary than in aortic blood (0.043% vs 0.0006%, p <0.001). Both intracoronary and aortic EPC were related to area at risk extent, to intracoronary thrombus score (p <0.001), and inversely to MVO (p = 0.001). Peripheral EPC levels at 1-year follow-up were lower in patients with LV remodeling than in those without (0.001% [0.001 to 0.002] vs 0.003% [0.002 to 0.010]; p = 0.01) and independently predicted absence of remodeling at multivariate analysis. In conclusion, a rapid intracoronary EPC recruitment takes place in the early phases of ST elevation myocardial infarction, possibly reflecting an attempted reparative response. The extent of this mobilization seems to be correlated to the area at risk and to the amount of MVO. Persistently low levels of EPC are associated to LV remodeling.

  1. Involvement of PI3K and ROCK signaling pathways in migration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Na; Shang, De-Shu; Sun, Wei; Li, Bo; Xu, Xin; Fang, Wen-Gang; Zhao, Wei-Dong; Cao, Liu; Chen, Yu-Hua

    2013-06-04

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) represent an important and easily available source of stem cells for potential therapeutic use in neurological diseases. The entry of circulating cells into the central nervous system by intravenous administration requires, firstly, the passage of the cells across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, little is known of the details of MSC transmigration across the BBB. In the present study, we employed an in vitro BBB model constructed using a human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer to study the mechanism underlying MSC transendothelial migration. Transmigration assays, transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) flux assays showed that MSC could transmigrate through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers by a paracellular pathway. Cell fractionation and immunofluorescence assays confirmed the disruption of tight junctions. Inhibition assays showed that a Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y27632) effectively promoted MSC transendothelial migration; conversely, a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) blocked MSC transendothelial migration. Interestingly, adenovirus-mediated interference with ROCK in MSC significantly increased MSC transendothelial migration, and overexpression of a PI3K dominant negative mutant in MSC cells could block transendothelial migration. Our findings provide clear evidence that the PI3K and ROCK pathways are involved in MSC migration through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayers. The information yielded by this study may be helpful in constructing gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells that are able to penetrate the BBB effectively for cell therapy.

  2. Dexamethasone suppresses JMJD3 gene activation via a putative negative glucocorticoid response element and maintains integrity of tight junctions in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Na, Wonho; Shin, Jee Y; Lee, Jee Y; Jeong, Sangyun; Kim, Won-Sun; Yune, Tae Y; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) exhibits a highly selective permeability to support the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). The tight junctions in the BBB microvascular endothelial cells seal the paracellular space to prevent diffusion. Thus, disruption of tight junctions results in harmful effects in CNS diseases and injuries. It has recently been demonstrated that glucocorticoids have beneficial effects on maintaining tight junctions in both in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. In the present study, we found that dexamethasone suppresses the expression of JMJD3, a histone H3K27 demethylase, via the recruitment of glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) and nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) to the negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE) in the upstream region of JMJD3 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. The decreased JMJD3 gene expression resulted in the suppression of MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 gene activation. Dexamethasone also activated the expression of the claudin 5 and occludin genes. Collectively, dexamethasone attenuated the disruption of the tight junctions in the brain microvascular endothelial cells subjected to TNFα treatment. Therefore, glucocorticoids may help to preserve the integrity of the tight junctions in the BBB via transcriptional and post-translational regulation following CNS diseases and injuries.

  3. 26S Proteasome regulation of Ankrd1/CARP in adult rat ventricular myocytes and human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samaras, Susan E.; Chen, Billy; Koch, Stephen R.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Lim, Chee Chew; Davidson, Jeffrey M.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 26S proteasome regulates Ankrd1 levels in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankrd1 protein degrades 60-fold faster in endothelial cells than cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential degradation appears related to nuclear vs. sarcolemmal localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cell density shows uncoupling of Ankrd1 mRNA and protein levels. -- Abstract: Ankyrin repeat domain 1 protein (Ankrd1), also known as cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), increases dramatically after tissue injury, and its overexpression improves aspects of wound healing. Reports that Ankrd1/CARP protein stability may affect cardiovascular organization, together with our findings that the protein is crucial to stability of the cardiomyocyte sarcomere and increased in wound healing, led us to compare the contribution of Ankrd1/CARP stability to its abundance. We found that the 26S proteasome is the dominant regulator of Ankrd1/CARP degradation, and that Ankrd1/CARP half-life is significantly longer in cardiomyocytes (h) than endothelial cells (min). In addition, higher endothelial cell density decreased the abundance of the protein without affecting steady state mRNA levels. Taken together, our data and that of others indicate that Ankrd1/CARP is highly regulated at multiple levels of its expression. The striking difference in protein half-life between a muscle and a non-muscle cell type suggests that post-translational proteolysis is correlated with the predominantly structural versus regulatory role of the protein in the two cell types.

  4. Endogenous microRNAs in human microvascular endothelial cells regulate mRNAs encoded by hypertension-related genes.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Alison J; Baker, Maria Angeles; Liu, Yong; Liu, Pengyuan; Cowley, Allen W; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically identify endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) in endothelial cells that regulate mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to hypertension. Small RNA deep sequencing was performed in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Of the 50 most abundant miRNAs identified, 30 had predicted target mRNAs encoded by genes with known involvement in hypertension or blood pressure regulation. The cells were transfected with anti-miR oligonucleotides to inhibit each of the 30 miRNAs and the mRNA abundance of predicted targets was examined. Of 95 miRNA-target pairs examined, the target mRNAs were significantly upregulated in 35 pairs and paradoxically downregulated in 8 pairs. The result indicated significant suppression of the abundance of mRNA encoded by ADM by endogenous miR-181a-5p, ATP2B1 by the miR-27 family, FURIN by miR-125a-5p, FGF5 by the let-7 family, GOSR2 by miR-27a-3p, JAG1 by miR-21-5p, SH2B3 by miR-30a-5p, miR-98, miR-181a-5p, and the miR-125 family, TBX3 by the miR-92 family, ADRA1B by miR-22-3p, ADRA2A by miR-30a-5p and miR-30e-5p, ADRA2B by miR-30e-5p, ADRB1 by the let-7 family and miR-98, EDNRB by the miR-92 family, and NOX4 by the miR-92 family, miR-100-5p, and miR-99b-5p (n=3-9; P<0.05 versus scrambled anti-miR). Treatment with anti-miR-21 decreased blood pressure in mice fed a 4% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the miRNAs targeting NOX4 mRNA increased H2O2 release from endothelial cells. The findings indicate widespread, tonic control of mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to blood pressure regulation by endothelial miRNAs and provide a novel and uniquely informative basis for studying the role of miRNAs in hypertension.

  5. Transport activities involved in intracellular pH recovery following acid and alkali challenges in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Pieris A; Taylor, Caroline J; Wang, Shanshan; Barrand, Margery A; Hladky, Stephen B

    2008-08-01

    Transport activities involved in intracellular pH (pH(i)) recovery after acid or alkali challenge were investigated in cultured rat brain microvascular endothelial cells by monitoring pH(i) using a pH-sensitive dye. Following relatively small acid loads with pH(i) approximately 6.5, HCO(-)(3) influx accounted for most of the acid extrusion from the cell with both Cl(-)-independent and Cl(-)-dependent, Na(+)-dependent transporters involved. The Cl(-)-independent component has the same properties as the NBC-like transporter previously shown to account for most of the acid extrusion near the resting pH(i). Following large acid loads with pH(i) < 6.5, most of the acid extrusion was mediated by Na(+)/H(+) exchange, the rate of which was steeply dependent on pH(i). Concanamycin A, an inhibitor of V-type ATPase, had no effect on the rates of acid extrusion. Following an alkali challenge, the major component of the acid loading leading to recovery of pH(i) occurred by Cl(-)/HCO(-)(3) exchange. This exchange had the same properties as the AE-like transporter previously identified as a major acid loader near resting pH(i). These acid-loading and acid-extruding transport mechanisms together with the Na(+), K(+), ATPase may be sufficient to account not only for pH(i) regulation in brain endothelial cells but also for the net secretion of HCO(-)(3) across the blood-brain barrier.

  6. Glucose starvation is required for insulin stimulation of glucose uptake and metabolism in cultured microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritsen, M.E.; Burke, T.M.; Allen, L.A.

    1988-03-01

    In the present study we determined the uptake and disposition of glucose in serum-deprived rabbit coronary microvessel endothelial (RCME) cells. RCME cells exhibited stereospecific hexose uptake inhibited by cytochalasin B. Pretreatment of the RCME cells with potassium cyanide or 2,4-dinitrophenol inhibited 2-deoxyglucose uptake but not 3-O-methylglucose transport. A major proportion (30-60%) of the 2-deoxyglucose present in the RCME cells was not phosphorylated. These two observations suggested that the rate-limiting step in the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose was not transport but rather the phosphorylation of 2-deoxyglucose to 2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate. When glucose-deprived cells were incubated 2 hr with (U-14C)glucose the disposition of the label was as follows: glycogen 60%, acid-soluble fraction 30%, and lipid less than 5%. In contrast glucose-fed cells exhibited lower overall glucose incorporation, and a slightly different disposition: glycogen 45%, acid-soluble fraction 50%, and lipid 5%. Glucose-deprived RCME cells also exhibited greater basal levels of 2-deoxyglucose uptake compared to glucose-fed cells. RCME cells incubated in the absence of glucose and serum for 16 hr exhibited dose-dependent insulin stimulation of hexose uptake and subsequent metabolism to macromolecules (i.e., glycogen and the acid-soluble fraction). Significant effects of insulin were observed with concentrations as low as 2 x 10(-10) M, well within the physiological range. In contrast, cells preincubated in serum-free culture medium containing 5.5 mM glucose did not exhibit insulin-enhanced hexose uptake or glucose metabolism (even at doses as high as 10(-7) M). These studies indicate that the effects of insulin on rabbit coronary microvascular endothelial cell glucose uptake and metabolism require both serum and glucose deprivation.

  7. Melatonin promotes blood-brain barrier integrity in methamphetamine-induced inflammation in primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jumnongprakhon, Pichaya; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Tocharus, Chainarong; Tocharus, Jiraporn

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone and has high potent of antioxidant that is widely reported to be active against methamphetamine (METH)-induced toxicity to neuron, glial cells, and brain endothelial cells. However, the role of melatonin on the inflammatory responses which are mostly caused by blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment by METH administration has not been investigated. This study used the primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) to determine the protective mechanism of melatonin on METH-induced inflammatory responses in the BBB via nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling. Herein, we demonstrated that melatonin reduced the level of the inflammatory mediators, including intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM)-1, matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) caused by METH. These responses were related to the decrease of the expression and translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit and the activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX)-2. In addition, melatonin promoted the antioxidant processes, modulated the expression and translocation of Nrf2, and also increased the level of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, NAD (P) H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO)-1, γ-glutamylcysteine synthase (γ-GCLC), and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) through NOX2 mechanism. In addition, we found that the protective role of melatonin in METH-induced inflammatory responses in the BBB was mediated through melatonin receptors (MT1/2). We concluded that the interaction of melatonin with its receptor prevented METH-induced inflammatory responses by suppressing the NF-κB signaling and promoting the Nrf2 signaling before BBB impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Overexpression of cationic amino acid transporter-1 increases nitric oxide production in hypoxic human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongmei; Chen, Bernadette; Chicoine, Louis G; Nelin, Leif D

    2011-12-01

    1. The endogenous production of and/or the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) is decreased in pulmonary hypertensive diseases. L-arginine (L-arg) is the substrate for NO synthase (NOS). L-arg is transported into cells via the cationic amino acid transporters (CAT), of which there are two isoforms in endothelial cells, CAT-1 and CAT-2. 2. To test the hypothesis that hypoxia will decrease CAT expression and L-arg uptake resulting in decreased NO production in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (hPMVEC), cells were incubated in either normoxia (21% O(2), 5% CO(2), balance N(2)) or hypoxia (1% O(2), 5% CO(2), balance N(2)). 3. The hPMVEC incubated in hypoxia had 80% less NO production than cells incubated in normoxia (P < 0.01). The hPMVEC incubated in hypoxia had significantly lower CAT-2 mRNA levels than normoxic hPMVEC (P < 0.005), and the transport of L-arg was 40% lower in hypoxic than in normoxic hPMVEC (P < 0.01). In hypoxic cells, overexpression of CAT-1 resulted in significantly greater L-arg transport and NO production (P < 0.05). 4. These results demonstrate that in hPMVEC, hypoxia decreased CAT-2 expression, L-arg uptake and NO production. Furthermore, the hypoxia-induced decrease in NO production in hPMVEC can be attenuated by overexpressing CAT in these cells. We speculate that the CAT may represent a novel therapeutic target for treating pulmonary hypertensive disorders. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. sAPP modulates iron efflux from brain microvascular endothelial cells by stabilizing the ferrous iron exporter ferroportin

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Park, Yun-Hee; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    A sequence within the E2 domain of soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) stimulates iron efflux. This activity has been attributed to a ferroxidase activity suggested for this motif. We demonstrate that the stimulation of efflux supported by this peptide and by sAPPα is due to their stabilization of the ferrous iron exporter, ferroportin (Fpn), in the plasma membrane of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMVEC). The peptide does not bind ferric iron explaining why it does not and thermodynamically cannot promote ferrous iron autoxidation. This peptide specifically pulls Fpn down from the plasma membrane of hBMVEC; based on these results, FTP, for ferroportin-targeting peptide, correctly identifies the function of this peptide. The data suggest that in stabilizing Fpn via the targeting due to the FTP sequence, sAPP will increase the flux of iron into the cerebral interstitium. This inference correlates with the observation of significant iron deposition in the amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24867889

  10. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infects human brain microvascular endothelial cells without compromising blood-brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Palus, Martin; Vancova, Marie; Sirmarova, Jana; Elsterova, Jana; Perner, Jan; Ruzek, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a life-threating human viral neuroinfection. However, the mechanism of BBB breakdown during TBE, as well as TBE virus (TBEV) entry into the brain is unclear. Here, primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were infected with TBEV to study interactions with the BBB. Although the number of infected cells was relatively low in culture (<5%), the infection was persistent with high TBEV yields (>10(6)pfu/ml). Infection did not induce any significant changes in the expression of key tight junction proteins or upregulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and did not alter the highly organized intercellular junctions between HBMECs. In an in vitro BBB model, the virus crossed the BBB via a transcellular pathway without compromising the integrity of the cell monolayer. The results indicate that HBMECs may support TBEV entry into the brain without altering BBB integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. sAPP modulates iron efflux from brain microvascular endothelial cells by stabilizing the ferrous iron exporter ferroportin.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Ryan C; Park, Yun-Hee; Kosman, Daniel J

    2014-07-01

    A sequence within the E2 domain of soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) stimulates iron efflux. This activity has been attributed to a ferroxidase activity suggested for this motif. We demonstrate that the stimulation of efflux supported by this peptide and by sAPPα is due to their stabilization of the ferrous iron exporter, ferroportin (Fpn), in the plasma membrane of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMVEC). The peptide does not bind ferric iron explaining why it does not and thermodynamically cannot promote ferrous iron autoxidation. This peptide specifically pulls Fpn down from the plasma membrane of hBMVEC; based on these results, FTP, for ferroportin-targeting peptide, correctly identifies the function of this peptide. The data suggest that in stabilizing Fpn via the targeting due to the FTP sequence, sAPP will increase the flux of iron into the cerebral interstitium. This inference correlates with the observation of significant iron deposition in the amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. © 2014 The Authors.

  12. Proteomic analysis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells reveals differential protein expression in response to enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wenying; Zhong, Jiayu; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Renli; Peng, Liang; Hong, Wenxu; Huang, Sheng He; Cao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    2D DIGE technology was employed on proteins prepared from human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), to study the differentially expressed proteins in cells at 0 h, 1 h, 16 h, and 24 h after infection. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were identified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF/TOF MS) analysis. We identified 43 spots showing changes of at least 2.5 fold up- or downregulated expressions in EV71-infected cells at different time when comparing to control, and 28 proteins could be successfully identified by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analysis. 4 proteins were significantly upregulated, and 6 proteins were downregulated, another 18 proteins were different expression at different incubation time. We identified changes in the expression of 12 cellular metabolism-related proteins, 5 molecules involved in cytoskeleton, 3 molecules involved in energy metabolism, 2 molecules involved in signal transduction, 1 molecule involved in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, 1 molecule involved in cell cycle, 1 molecule involved in apoptosis-related protein, 1 molecular chaperone, and 2 unknown proteins. These findings build up a comprehensive profile of the HBMEC proteome and provide a useful basis for further analysis of the pathogenic mechanism that underlies EV71 infections to induce severe neural complications.

  13. The role of endothelial cell Ca2+ store release in the regulation of microvascular permeability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Glass, C A; Bates, D O

    2004-07-01

    Microvascular permeability is regulated by changes in intracellular calcium concentration. The mechanism by which this increase in calcium determines permeability under normal conditions and during stimulation with agonists remains to be elucidated. In order to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores could contribute towards the regulation of vascular permeability, hydraulic conductivity (Lp) was measured in frog mesenteric microvessels during stimulation of the endothelial cells of these vessels with agonists that release calcium from the intracellular stores. ATP (which acts through activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors) increased Lp in the absence of calcium influx across the plasma membrane 2.3 +/- 0.3 fold (mean +/- s.e.m., P < 0.01, n = 8), which was less than the increase in the presence of calcium influx (3.1 +/- 1.1 fold). Caffeine (which acts through activation of ryanodine receptors) also increased Lp in the absence of calcium influx across the plasma membrane 3.8 +/- 1.0 fold (P < 0.01, n = 9), but by at least as much as it does in the presence of calcium influx (2.8 +/- 0.5 fold). It is surprising that there was a strong positive correlation between the size of the response during store release and the baseline permeability (r = 0.91 for ATP, r = 0.75 for caffeine). This suggests that the filling state of the stores may regulate the baseline permeability of the microvessels. Copyright 2004 The Physiological Society

  14. Proteomic differences between microvascular endothelial cells and the EA.hy926 cell line forming three-dimensional structures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao; Sickmann, Albert; Pietsch, Jessica; Wildgruber, Robert; Weber, Gerhard; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann; Grimm, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    Proteomic changes of two types of human endothelial cells (ECs) were determined and compared to morphological alterations occurring during the scaffold-free in vitro formation of 3D structures resembling vascular intimas. The EA.hy926 cell line and human microvascular ECs (HMVECs) were cultured on a random positioning machine or static on ground (normal gravity) for 5 and 7 days, before their morphology was examined and their protein content was analysed by MS after free-flow electrophoretic separation. A total of 1175 types of proteins were found in EA.hy926 cells and 846 in HMVEC forming 3D structures faster than the EA.hy926 cells. Five hundred and eighty-four of these kinds of proteins were present in both types of cells. They included a number of metabolic enzymes, of structure-related and stress proteins. Comparing proteins of EA.hy926 cells growing either adherently on ground or in 3D aggregates on the random positioning machine revealed that ribosomal proteins were enhanced, while tubes are formed and various components of 26S proteasomes remained prevalent in static normal gravity control cells only. The fast developing tube-like 3D structures of HMVEC suggested a transient augmentation of ribosomal proteins during the 3D assembling of ECs.

  15. Disruption of the integrity and function of brain microvascular endothelial cells in culture by exposure to diesel engine exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Tobwala, Shakila; Zhang, Xinsheng; Zheng, Youyou; Wang, Hsiu-Jen; Banks, William A; Ercal, Nuran

    2013-06-20

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), a by-product of diesel engine exhaust (DEE), are known to produce pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory effects, thereby leading to oxidative stress-induced damage. Given the key role of DEPs in inducing oxidative stress, we investigated the role of DEPs in disrupting the integrity and function of immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVEC). To study this, HBMVEC cells were exposed to media containing three different concentrations of DEPs or plain media for 24h. Those exposed to DEPs showed significantly higher oxidative stress than the untreated group, as indicated by the glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and the glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. DEPs also induced oxidative stress-related disruption of the HBMVEC cells monolayer, as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance. Taken together, these data suggest that DEPs induce cell death and disrupt the function and integrity of HBMVEC cells, indicating a potential role of DEPs in neurotoxicities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-inflammatory effects of indirubin derivatives on influenza A virus-infected human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin; Poon, Po-Ying; Fok, Siu-Ping; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Mak, Nai-Ki; Chan, Michael Chi-Wai; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) poses global threats to human health. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ dysfunction are major complications in patients with severe influenza infection. This may be explained by the recent studies which highlighted the role of the pulmonary endothelium as the center of innate immune cells recruitment and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokines production. In this report, we examined the potential immunomodulatory effects of two indirubin derivatives, indirubin-3′-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-oximether (E804) and indirubin-3′-oxime (E231), on IAV (H9N2) infected-human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Infection of H9N2 on HPMECs induced a high level of chemokines and cytokines production including IP-10, RANTES, IL-6, IFN-β and IFN-γ1. Post-treatment of E804 or E231 could significantly suppress the production of these cytokines. H9N2 infection rapidly triggered the activation of innate immunity through phosphorylation of signaling molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Using specific inhibitors or small-interfering RNA, we confirmed that indirubin derivatives can suppress H9N2-induced cytokines production through MAPKs and STAT3 signaling pathways. These results underscore the immunomodulatory effects of indirubin derivatives on pulmonary endothelium and its therapeutic potential on IAV-infection. PMID:26732368

  17. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in type III group B streptococcal invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooan; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Maneesh, Paul-Satyaseela; Lee, Jong-Seok; Romer, Lewis H; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2006-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS), the leading cause of neonatal meningitis, has been shown to invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. GBS invasion of HBMEC has been shown to require the host cell actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. The present study examined the mechanisms underlying actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that are involved in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC. We showed that type III GBS invasion was inhibited by genistein, a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor (mean 54% invasion decrease at 100 microM), and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase inhibitor (mean 70% invasion decrease at 50 microM), but not by PP2, an inhibitor of the Src family tyrosine kinases. We subsequently showed that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was the one of the host proteins tyrosine phosphorylated by type III GBS. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of the FAK C-terminal domain significantly decreased type III GBS invasion of HBMEC (mean 51% invasion decrease). In addition, we showed that FAK phosphorylation correlated with its association of paxillin, an adapter protein of actin filament, and PI3-kinase subunit p85. This is the first demonstration that FAK phosphorylation and its association with paxillin and PI3 kinase play a key role in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC.

  18. Pulmonary microvascular hyperpermeability and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in smoke inhalation- and pneumonia-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Hamahata, Atsumori; Traber, Daniel L; Connelly, Rhykka; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-11-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and sepsis are major contributors to the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. The current study was designed further evaluate the mechanism of pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability in sheep with these injuries. Sheep were randomized to a sham-injured control group (n=6) or ALI/sepsis group (n=7). The sheep in the ALI/sepsis group received inhalation injury followed by instillation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa into the lungs. These groups were monitored for 24 h. Additional sheep (n=16) received the injury and lung tissue was harvested at different time points to measure lung wet/dry weight ratio, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expression as well as 3-nitrotyrosine protein expression in lung homogenates. The injury induced severe deterioration in pulmonary gas exchange, increases in lung lymph flow and protein content, and lung water content (P<0.01 each). These alterations were associated with elevated lung and plasma nitrite/nitrate concentrations, increased tracheal blood flow, and enhanced VEGF mRNA and protein expression in lung tissue as well as enhanced 3-nitrotyrosine protein expression (P<0.05 each). This study describes the time course of pulmonary microvascular hyperpermeability in a clinical relevant large animal model and may improve the experimental design of future studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Exosomes contribute to the transmission of anti-HIV activity from TLR3-activated brain microvascular endothelial cells to macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Run-Hong; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jie-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), the major cell type in the blood-brain barrier (BBB), play a key role in maintaining brain homeostasis. However, their role in the BBB innate immunity against HIV invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) remains to be determined. Our early work showed that TLR3 signaling of HBMECs could produce the antiviral factors that inhibit HIV replication in macrophages. The present study examined whether exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs mediate the intercellular transfer of antiviral factors to macrophages. Primary human macrophages could take up exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs. HBMECs-derived exosomes contained multiple antiviral factors, including several key IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs; ISG15, ISG56, and Mx2) at mRNA and protein levels. The depletion of exosomes from TLR3-activated HBMECs culture supernatant diminished HBMECs-mediated anti-HIV activity in macrophages. In conclusion, we demonstrate that exosomes shed by HBMECs are able to transport the antiviral molecules to macrophages. This finding suggests the possibility that HIV nonpermissive BBB cells (HBMECs) can help to restore the antiviral state in HIV-infected macrophages, which may be a defense mechanism against HIV neuroinvasion. PMID:27496004

  20. Sex differences in vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular outcomes: The cardiac, endothelial function, and arterial stiffness in ESRD (CERES) study.

    PubMed

    Guajardo, Isabella; Ayer, Amrita; Johnson, Alexander D; Ganz, Peter; Mills, Claire; Donovan, Catherine; Scherzer, Rebecca; Shah, Sanjiv J; Peralta, Carmen A; Dubin, Ruth F

    2017-03-08

    Recent studies suggest that women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may have higher rates of mortality than men, but it is unknown whether sex differences in vascular function explain this disparity. The cardiac, endothelial function, and arterial stiffness in ESRD (CERES) study is an ongoing, prospective observational study designed to investigate vascular function, myocardial injury, and cardiovascular outcomes in ESRD. Among 200 CERES participants (34% women), we evaluated arterial wave reflections as augmentation index normalized to a heart rate of 75 (AIx75), arterial stiffness as pulse wave velocity, and macro- and microvascular endothelial dysfunction as flow-mediated dilation and velocity time integral (VTI). Over a median of 14 months, participants were followed for the composite outcome of cardiovascular hospitalization or all-cause death. Women had higher arterial wave reflection (Mean, SD AIx75 30% ± 9% for women vs. 21% ± 10% for men; P < 0.001) and worse microvascular function (VTI 55 ± 30 cm for women vs. 70 ± 27 cm for men; P = 0.007). After multivariable adjustment, female sex remained associated with a 0.5-SD higher AIx75 (95% CI [0.01, 0.9]) and 0.3-SD lower VTI (95%CI [0.1, 0.7]). Women experienced higher adjusted rates of the composite outcome (HR 2.5; 95%CI [1.1, 5.6]; P = 0.03), and further adjustment for arterial wave reflection attenuated this risk. Vascular dysfunction may partly explain the association of female sex with higher cardiovascular risk and mortality in patients with ESRD. Further studies are needed to explore whether sex differences in vascular function predict long-term outcomes, and whether hormonal or inflammatory factors explain these associations. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  1. LDL-lipids from patients with hypercholesterolaemia and Alzheimer's disease are inflammatory to microvascular endothelial cells: mitigation by statin intervention.

    PubMed

    Dias, H K Irundika; Brown, Caroline L R; Polidori, M Cristina; Lip, Gregory Y H; Griffiths, Helen R

    2015-12-01

    Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentration in mid-life increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in later life. Increased oxidized LDL (oxLDL) modification and nitration is observed during dementia and hypercholesterolaemia. We investigated the hypothesis that statin intervention in mid-life mitigates the inflammatory effects of oxLDL on the microvasculature. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were maintained in transwells to mimic the microvasculature and exposed to patient and control LDL. Blood was obtained from statin-naive, normo- and hyper-lipidaemic subjects, AD with vascular dementia (AD-plus) and AD subjects (n=10/group) at baseline. Only hyperlipidaemic subjects with normal cognitive function received 40 mg of simvastatin intervention/day for 3 months. Blood was re-analysed from normo- and hyper-lipidaemic subjects after 3 months. LDL isolated from statin-naive hyperlipidaemic, AD and AD-plus subjects was more oxidized (agarose gel electrophoretic mobility, protein carbonyl content and 8-isoprostane F2α) compared with control subjects. Statin intervention decreased protein carbonyls (2.5±0.4 compared with 3.95±0.2 nmol/mg; P<0.001) and 8-isoprostane F2α (30.4±4.0 pg/ml compared with 43.5±8.42 pg/ml; P<0.05). HMVEC treatment with LDL-lipids (LDL-L) from hyperlipidaemic, AD and AD-plus subjects impaired endothelial tight junction expression and decreased total glutathione levels (AD; 18.61±1.3, AD-plus; 16.5±0.7 nmol/mg of protein) compared with untreated cells (23.8±1.2 compared with nmol/mg of protein). Basolateral interleukin (IL)-6 secretion was increased by LDL-L from hyperlipidaemic (78.4±1.9 pg/ml), AD (63.2±5.9 pg/ml) and AD-plus (80.8±0.9 pg/ml) groups compared with healthy subject lipids (18.6±3.6 pg/ml). LDL-L isolated after statin intervention did not affect endothelial function. In summary, LDL-L from hypercholesterolaemic, AD and AD-plus patients are inflammatory to HMVECs. In vivo

  2. Ornithine decarboxylase and extracellular polyamines regulate microvascular sprouting and actin cytoskeleton dynamics in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharzewska, Paulina; Welch, Johanna E.; Svensson, Katrin J.; Belting, Mattias

    2010-10-01

    The polyamines are essential for cancer cell proliferation during tumorigenesis. Targeted inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), i.e. a key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis, by {alpha}-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has shown anti-neoplastic activity in various experimental models. This activity has mainly been attributed to the anti-proliferative effect of DFMO in cancer cells. Here, we provide evidence that unperturbed ODC activity is a requirement for proper microvessel sprouting ex vivo as well as the migration of primary human endothelial cells. DFMO-mediated ODC inhibition was reversed by extracellular polyamine supplementation, showing that anti-angiogenic effects of DFMO were specifically related to polyamine levels. ODC inhibition was associated with an abnormal morphology of the actin cytoskeleton during cell spreading and migration. Moreover, our data suggest that de-regulated actin cytoskeleton dynamics in DFMO treated endothelial cells may be related to constitutive activation of the small GTPase CDC42, i.e. a well-known regulator of cell motility and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. These insights into the potential role of polyamines in angiogenesis should stimulate further studies testing the combined anti-tumor effect of polyamine inhibition and established anti-angiogenic therapies in vivo.

  3. Cardiac endothelial transport and metabolism of adenosine and inosine

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Lisa M.; Bukowski, Thomas R.; Revkin, James H.; Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of transmembrane flux limitations on cellular metabolism of purine nucleosides was assessed in whole organ studies. Transcapillary transport of the purine nucleosides adenosine (Ado) and inosine (Ino) via paracellular diffusion through interendothelial clefts in parallel with carrier-mediated transendothelial fluxes was studied in isolated, Krebs-Henseleit-perfused rabbit and guinea pig hearts. After injection into coronary inflow, multiple-indicator dilution curves were obtained from coronary outflow for 90 s for 131I-labeled albumin (intravascular reference tracer), [3H]arabinofuranosyl hypoxanthine (AraH; extracellular reference tracer and nonreactive adenosine analog), and either [14C]Ado or [14C]Ino. Ado or Ino was separated from their degradative products, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid, in each outflow sample by HPLC and radioisotope counting. Ado and Ino, but not AraH, permeate the luminal membrane of endothelial cells via a saturable transporter with permeability-surface area product PSecl and also diffuse passively through interendothelial clefts with the same conductance (PSg) as AraH. These parallel conductances were estimated via fitting with an axially distributed, multi-pathway, four-region blood-tissue exchange model. PSg for AraH were ~4 and 2.5 ml · g−1 · min−1 in rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. In contrast, transplasmalemmal conductances (endothelial PSecl) were ~0.2 ml · g−1 · min−1 for both Ado and Ino in rabbit hearts but ~2 ml · g−1 · min−1 in guinea pig hearts, an order of magnitude different. Purine nucleoside metabolism also differs between guinea pig and rabbit cardiac endothelium. In guinea pig heart, 50% of the tracer Ado bolus was retained, 35% was washed out as Ado, and 15% was lost as effluent metabolites; 25% of Ino was retained, 50% washed out, and 25% was lost as metabolites. In rabbit heart, 45% of Ado was retained and 5% lost as metabolites, and 7% of Ino was retained and 3% lost as

  4. VE-cadherin involved in the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell barrier injury induced by angiotensin II through modulating the cellular apoptosis and skeletal rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiyong; Liu, Huagang; Ren, Wei; Dai, Feifeng; Chang, Jinxing; Li, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Angiotensin II (AngII) involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary injury through impairing the integrity of pulmonary microvascular endothelial barrier, but the mechanism is still not clear. We aim to determine the roles of VE-cadherin, playing crucial roles in the adhesion of the vascular endothelial barrier and the barrier function, in the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (PMVEC) barrier injury mediated by AngII. Methods: Mice acute lung injury (ALI) model was induced through pumping of AngII. The infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils as well as the PMVEC permeability were determined in order to determine the barrier injury in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of VE-cadherin was established using siRNA technique, and its roles in the apoptosis and skeletal rearrangement in the PMVECs were evaluated. Results: After AngII interference, the expression of VE-cadherin in the PMVECs and pulmonary tissues in mice was down-regulated. Upon VE-cadherin knockdown through siRNA technique, AngII induced susceptibility of PMVECs to apoptosis. Knockdown of VE-cadherin contributed to the skeletal rearrangement in the endothelial cells, together with increase of permeability. Conclusions: VE-cadherin expression is closely related to the apoptosis and skeletal rearrangement of PMVECs induced by AngII. PMID:27830014

  5. Scleroderma dermal microvascular endothelial cells exhibit defective response to pro-angiogenic chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Rabquer, Bradley J.; Ohara, Ray A.; Stinson, William A.; Campbell, Phillip L.; Amin, M. Asif; Balogh, Beatrix; Zakhem, George; Renauer, Paul A.; Lozier, Ann; Arasu, Eshwar; Haines, G. Kenneth; Kahaleh, Bashar; Schiopu, Elena; Khanna, Dinesh; Koch, Alisa E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Angiogenesis plays a critical role in SSc (scleroderma). The aim of this study was to examine the expression of growth-regulated protein-γ (Gro-γ/CXCL3), granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2/CXCL6) and their receptor CXCR2 in endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from SSc skin and determine whether these cells mount an angiogenic response towards pro-angiogenic chemokines. The downstream signalling pathways as well as the pro-angiogenic transcription factor inhibitor of DNA-binding protein 1 (Id-1) were also examined. Methods. Skin biopsies were obtained from patients with dcSSc. ECs were isolated via magnetic positive selection. Angiogenesis was measured by EC chemotaxis assay. Results. Gro-γ/CXCL3 and GCP-2/CXCL6 were minimally expressed in both skin types but elevated in SSc serum. Pro-angiogenic chemokine mRNA was greater in SSc ECs than in normal ECs. SSc ECs did not migrate to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Gro-γ/CXCL3, GCP-2/CXCL6 or CXCL16. The signalling pathways stimulated by these chemokines were also dysregulated. Id-1 mRNA in SSc ECs was lower compared with normal ECs, and overexpression of Id-1 in SSc ECs increased their ability to migrate towards VEGF and CXCL16. Conclusion. Our results show that SSc ECs are unable to respond to pro-angiogenic chemokines despite their increased expression in serum and ECs. This might be due to the differences in the signalling pathways activated by these chemokines in normal vs SSc ECs. In addition, the lower expression of Id-1 also decreases the angiogenic response. The inability of pro-angiogenic chemokines to promote EC migration provides an additional mechanism for the impaired angiogenesis that characterizes SSc. PMID:26705326

  6. Phenotypic and functional characterization of lymphocytes that bind human microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. Evidence for preferential binding of natural killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, J R; Pardi, R; Karasek, M A; Engleman, E G

    1987-01-01

    The microvascular endothelium has been postulated to be a critical target in the rejection of vascularized allografts. This study was undertaken to examine the ability of human sheep erythrocyte rosette forming lymphocytes (E-RFC) to form stable conjugates with microvascular endothelial cells (EC), and to assess whether a receptor-ligand interaction mediates this event. Human foreskin microvascular EC monolayers were used as targets of chromium-51-labeled E-RFC in a quantitative adherence assay. Binding was saturable, displaceable by unlabeled E-RFC, augmented by recombinant interleukin 1 (rIL-1) and inhibited by anti-LFA1 antibody. The Leu-11+ lymphocyte subset, known to be enriched for natural killer (NK) cells, bound preferentially. Only the EC-adherent lymphocyte fraction contained NK effectors, which lysed EC and classical NK targets. Thus, NK cells adhere to microvascular EC via a specific receptor-ligand interaction. The possibility exists that such binding occurs in recipients of vascularized allografts, representing the initial stage of graft rejection. Images PMID:3495552

  7. Brain microvascular endothelial cell association and distribution of a 5 nm ceria engineered nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Mo; Tseng, Michael T; Wu, Peng; Unrine, Jason M; Grulke, Eric A; Yokel, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Ceria engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have current commercial applications and both neuroprotective and toxic effects. Our hypothesis is that ceria ENMs can associate with brain capillary cells and/or cross the blood–brain barrier. Methods: An aqueous dispersion of ∼5 nm ceria ENM was synthesized and characterized in house. Its uptake space in the Sprague Dawley rat brain was determined using the in situ brain perfusion technique at 15 and 20 mL/minute flow rates; 30, 100, and 500 μg/mL ceria perfused for 120 seconds at 20 mL/minute; and 30 μg/mL perfused for 20, 60, and 120 seconds at 20 mL/minute. The capillary depletion method and light and electron microscopy were used to determine its capillary cell and brain parenchymal association and localization. Results: The vascular space was not significantly affected by brain perfusion flow rate or ENM, demonstrating that this ceria ENM did not influence blood–brain barrier integrity. Cerium concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, were significantly higher in the choroid plexus than in eight brain regions in the 100 and 500 μg/mL ceria perfusion groups. Ceria uptake into the eight brain regions was similar after 120-second perfusion of 30, 100, and 500 μg ceria/mL. Ceria uptake space significantly increased in the eight brain regions and choroid plexus after 60 versus 20 seconds, and it was similar after 60 and 120 seconds. The capillary depletion method showed 99.4% ± 1.1% of the ceria ENM associated with the capillary fraction. Electron microscopy showed the ceria ENM located on the endothelial cell luminal surface. Conclusion: Ceria ENM association with brain capillary endothelial cells saturated between 20 and 60 seconds and ceria ENM brain uptake was not diffusion-mediated. During the 120-second ceria ENM perfusion, ceria ENM predominately associated with the surface of the brain capillary cells, providing the opportunity for its cell uptake or redistribution

  8. Alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols reduce inflammatory angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wells, Shannon R; Jennings, Merilyn H; Rome, Courtney; Hadjivassiliou, Vicky; Papas, Konstantinos A; Alexander, Jonathon S

    2010-07-01

    Vitamin E, a micronutrient (comprising alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols, alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienols), has documented antioxidant and non-antioxidant effects, some of which inhibit inflammation and angiogenesis. We compared the abilities of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols to regulate human blood cytotoxicity (BEC) and lymphatic endothelial cytotoxicity (LEC), proliferation, invasiveness, permeability, capillary formation and suppression of TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 as in vitro models of inflammatory angiogenesis. alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols were not toxic to either cell type up to 40 microM. In BEC, confluent cell density was decreased by all concentrations of delta- and gamma-tocopherol (10-40 microM) but not by alpha-tocopherol. LEC showed no change in cell density in response to tocopherols. delta-Tocopherol (40 microM), but not other isomers, decreased BEC invasiveness. In LEC, all doses of gamma-tocopherol, as well as the highest dose of alpha-tocopherol (40 microM), decreased cell invasiveness. delta-Tocopherol had no effect on LEC invasiveness at any molarity. delta-Tocopherol dose dependently increased cell permeability at 48 h in BEC and LEC; alpha- and gamma-tocopherols showed slight effects. Capillary tube formation was decreased by high dose (40 microM) concentrations of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherol, but showed no effects with smaller doses (10-20 microM) in BEC. gamma-Tocopherol (10-20 microM) and alpha-tocopherol (10 microM), but not delta-tocopherol, increased LEC capillary tube formation. Lastly, in BEC, alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherol each dose-dependently reduced TNF-alpha-induced expression of VCAM-1. In LEC, there was no significant change to TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression with any concentration of alpha-, gamma- or delta-tocopherol. These data demonstrate that physiological levels (0-40 microM) of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols are nontoxic and dietary tocopherols, especially delta

  9. [Extracorporeal cardiac shock wave therapy improved myocardial micro-vascular circulation after acute myocardial infarction at early stage in pigs].

    PubMed

    Tao, Si-ming; Guo, Tao; Wang, Yue; Cai, Hong-yan; Yang, Chao

    2011-03-01

    To explore the effect of low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy to improve myocardial micro-vascular circulation after acute myocardial infarction at the early stage in pig model. A total of 25 domestic pigs were used in this study. Model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was created successfully by the implantation of angioplasty balloon in mid-distal segment of left anterior descending coronary artery (n=20). These AMI animals were divided two groups. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy to the ischemic myocardial region was performed for the group of shock wave therapy (n=15) at 3 days after acute myocardial infarction; The remaining AMI animals were treated in the same manner, but without the shock wave therapy (n=5), The other health animals (n=5) were used as blank control group. The number of endothelium cell, capillary density, VEGF mRNA level and collateral vessel Rentrop score in each group were evaluated and compared. Shock wave treatment up-regulated the mRNA expression of VEGF in the model of acute myocardial infarction (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the number of capillaries was significantly higher in the shock wave group than that of positive and blank control group (P < 0.05). The Rentrop score of collateral vessel indicated the reconstruction of collateral circulation in shock wave group. Extracorporeal cardiac shock wave therapy could effectively induce angiogenesis, up-regulate the expression of angiogenic factor, resulting in an improvement in micro-vascular circulation reconstruction of ischemic myocardial region.

  10. Protective effects of total flavonoids in Caragana against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced injury in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    He, Qian-Song; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zi-Yuan; Feng, Guo; Wang, Fu-Jiang; Liu, Zheng-Qi; Tang, Ting; Kuang, Shi-Xiang

    2017-02-22

    This study aimed to explore the protective effect of total flavonoids in Caragana against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced injury in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Human BMECs were selected and assigned into control, H/R, H/R+NMP, H/R+Low dose, H/R+Moderate dose, H/R+High dose groups. MTT and Transwell assays were used to detect cell viability and migration, respectively. Cell adhesion rate and tube formation were also detected. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed to test HIF-1α, VEGF and Notch1 mRNA and protein expressions. Compared with the H/R group, the cell viability rates in the H/R+NMP, H/R+Moderate dose and H/R+High dose groups were increased. The cell adhesion rates in the H/R+NMP, H/R+Moderate dose and H/R+High dose groups were significantly different from those in the H/R group. As compared to the H/R group, the cell migration abilities in the H/R+NMP, H/R+Moderate dose and H/R+High dose groups were enhanced. Compared with the H/R group, the number and length of tubes of BMECs in the H/R+NMP, H/R+High dose and H/R+Moderate dose groups were increased. HIF-1α, VEGF and Notch1 mRNA and protein expressions were higher in the H/R+Low dose, H/R+Moderate dose and H/R+High dose groups than in the H/R group. These findings revealed that total flavonoids in Caragana can protect BMECs from H/R-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner and it also may promote angiogenesis in BMECs by activating HIF- 1α-VEGF-Notch 1 signaling pathway.

  11. Microvascular density and endothelial area correlate with Ki-67 proliferative index in surgically-treated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    AMMENDOLA, MICHELE; SACCO, ROSARIO; MARECH, ILARIA; SAMMARCO, GIUSEPPE; ZUCCALÀ, VALERIA; LUPOSELLA, MARIA; PATRUNO, ROSA; GIORDANO, MARCELLA; RUGGIERI, EUSTACHIO; ZIZZO, NICOLA; GADALETA, COSMO DAMIANO; RANIERI, GIROLAMO

    2015-01-01

    Previous experimental and clinical data have indicated that tumour cell proliferation is associated with angiogenesis; in addition, an increased microvascular density (MVD) of tumours has been associated with poor prognosis in solid and haematological malignancies. However, limited data exists regarding the association between tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis in primary tumour tissue from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients; therefore, the present study aimed to investigate this association. A series of 31 PDAC patients with stage Tumour (T)2–3 Node (N)0–1 Metastasis (M)0 were recruited into the present study and subsequently underwent surgery. PDAC tissue and adjacent normal tissue (ANT), resected during surgery, were evaluated using immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods to determine MVD, endothelial area (EA) and Ki-67 expression, which is an indicator of cell proliferation rate. The results demonstrated a correlation between the above parameters with each other as well as the main clinico-pathological features of PDAC. Significant differences were identified in MVD, EA and Ki-67 proliferation index between PDAC and ANT. It was demonstrated that MVD, EA and Ki-67 proliferation index were significantly correlated with each other in tumour tissue (r=0.69–0.81; P=0.001–0.003). However, no other significant correlations were identified. These data therefore suggested that angiogenesis and cell proliferation rate were significantly increased in PDAC compared with ANT, which provides a biological basis for the potential use of novel combinations of angiogenesis inhibitors and anti-proliferative chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:26622606

  12. Cerebral hypoxia/ischemia selectively disrupts tight junctions complexes in stem cell-derived human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Page, Shyanne; Munsell, Alli; Al-Ahmad, Abraham J

    2016-10-11

    Cerebral hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) is an important stress factor involved in the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following stroke injury, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms on how the human BBB responds to such injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cellular response of the human BBB to chemical and environmental H/I in vitro. In this study, we used immortalized hCMEC/D3 and IMR90 stem-cell derived human brain microvascular endothelial cell lines (IMR90-derived BMECs). Hypoxic stress was achieved by exposure to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) or by exposure to 1 % hypoxia and oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) was used to model ischemic injury. We assessed barrier function using both transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and sodium fluorescein permeability. Changes in cell junction integrity were assessed by immunocytochemistry and cell viability was assessed by trypan-blue exclusion and by MTS assays. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). CoCl2 selectively disrupted the barrier function in IMR90-derived BMECs but not in hCMEC/D3 monolayers and cytotoxic effects did not drive such disruption. In addition, hypoxia/OGD stress significantly disrupted the barrier function by selectively disrupting tight junctions (TJs) complexes. In addition, we noted an uncoupling between cell metabolic activity and barrier integrity. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of IMR90-derived BMECs to respond to hypoxic/ischemic injury triggered by both chemical and environmental stress by showing a disruption of the barrier function. Such disruption was selectively targeting TJ complexes and was not driven by cellular apoptosis. In conclusion, this study suggests the suitability of stem cell-derived human BMECs monolayers as a model of cerebral hypoxia/ischemia in vitro.

  13. Edaravone protected human brain microvascular endothelial cells from methylglyoxal-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlu; Xu, Hongjiao; Hu, Yangmin; He, Ping; Ni, Zhenzhen; Xu, Huimin; Zhang, Zhongmiao; Dai, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    Subjects with diabetes experience an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease and stroke compared with nondiabetic age-matched individuals. Increased formation of reactive physiological dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO) seems to be implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complication due to its protein glycation and oxidative stress effect. Edaravone, a novel radical scavenger, has been reported to display the advantageous effects on ischemic stroke both in animals and clinical trials; however, little is known about whether edaravone has protective effects on diabetic cerebrovascular injury. Using cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), protective effects of edaravone on MGO and MGO enhancing oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) induced injury were investigated. Cell injury was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) formation, cell account, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and Rhodamine 123 staining. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) formation and receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) expression were measured by western blotting. Cellular oxidative stress was measured by reactive oxygen species (ROS) release. Treatment of MGO for 24 h significantly induced HBMEC injury, which was inhibited by pretreatment of edaravone from 10-100 µmol/l. What's more, treatment of MGO enhanced AGEs accumulation, RAGE expression and ROS release in the cultured HBMEC, which were inhibited by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Finally, treatment of MGO for 24 h and then followed by 3 h OGD insult significantly enhanced cell injury when compared with OGD insult only, which was also protected by 100 µmol/l edaravone. Thus, edaravone protected HBMEC from MGO and MGO enhancing OGD-induced injury by inhibiting AGEs/RAGE/oxidative stress.

  14. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from bleomycin-induced rats promote the transformation and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Nan, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Wen-Hu; Yan, Lin-Feng; Cui, Guang-Bin; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Wei, Jing-Guo

    2011-08-01

    Accumulation and activation of myofibroblasts are the hallmark of progressive pulmonary fibrosis, and the resident fibroblasts are the major source of myofibroblasts. However, the key factors involved in the transformation of fibroblasts are unknown. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs), major effector cells against pathogenesis in early stages of the disease, can secrete cytokines to induce the differentiation of mesenchymal cells. We speculated that PMVECs could secrete pro-fibrotic cytokines and promote the transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Accordingly, we established a co-culture system with PMVECs and fibroblasts to examine the specific transformation and collagen synthesis of the co-cultured fibroblasts by FACS and Western blot, prior to and after treatment with neutralizing antibodies against transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). We also analyzed expression of TGF-β1 and CTGF in PMVECs. The synthesis and secretion of TGF-β1 and CTGF protein were up-regulated in PMVECs isolated from bleomycin (BLM)-treated rats, most prominently at 7 days post-instillation. We showed that the PMVECs isolated from BLM-induced rats could induce the transformation of normal fibroblasts and their secretion of collagen I, which was inhibited by both neutralizing anti-TGF-β1 and anti-CTGF antibodies. Therefore, up-regulation of TGF-β1 and CTGF in PMVECs plays an important role in activation, transformation, and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts; in particular, these effects in PMVECs are likely to be the key factors for activation and stimulation of static fibroblasts in lung interstitium in early stages of pulmonary fibrosis disease. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Human pericyte-endothelial cell interactions in co-culture models mimicking the diabetic retinal microvascular environment.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Sonia; Beltramo, Elena; Berrone, Elena; Porta, Massimo

    2012-12-01

    Pericytes regulate vascular tone, perfusion pressure and endothelial cell (EC) proliferation in capillaries. Thiamine and benfotiamine counteract high glucose-induced damage in vascular cells. We standardized two human retinal pericyte (HRP)/EC co-culture models to mimic the diabetic retinal microvascular environment. We aimed at evaluating the interactions between co-cultured HRP and EC in terms of proliferation/apoptosis and the possible protective role of thiamine and benfotiamine against high glucose-induced damage. EC and HRP were co-cultured in physiological glucose and stable or intermittent high glucose, with or without thiamine/benfotiamine. No-contact model: EC were plated on a porous membrane suspended into the medium and HRP on the bottom of the same well. Cell-to-cell contact model: EC and HRP were plated on the opposite sides of the same membrane. Proliferation (cell counts and DNA synthesis), apoptosis and tubule formation in Matrigel were assessed. In the no-contact model, stable high glucose reduced proliferation of co-cultured EC/HRP and EC alone and increased co-cultured EC/HRP apoptosis. In the contact model, both stable and intermittent high glucose reduced co-cultured EC/HRP proliferation and increased apoptosis. Stable high glucose had no effects on HRP in separate cultures. Both EC and HRP proliferated better when co-cultured. Thiamine and benfotiamine reversed high glucose-induced damage in all cases. HRP are sensitive to soluble factors released by EC when cultured in high glucose conditions, as suggested by conditioned media assays. In the Matrigel models, addition of thiamine and benfotiamine re-established the high glucose-damaged interactions between EC/HRP and stabilized microtubules.

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-1 secreted by brain microvascular endothelial cells attenuates neuron injury upon ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Tang, Yibo; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Haiping; Wang, Runjun; Yan, Yangyang; Xu, Liwei; Li, Pengtao

    2013-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 is essential for the development of the nervous system, and is present in many cell types. Relatively little is known about IGF-1 expression in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). For in vivo studies, we examined the expression of IGF-1 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-2 after focal cerebral ischemia for 12 h, 24 h, 3 days and 7 days, utilizing a permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in rats. For in vitro studies, we examined the levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-2 in the culture medium or primary culture of BMECs injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Then, we elucidated the protective effects of IGF-1 on cortical neurons injured by OGD and the possible mechanism. In addition, we investigated the effect of BMEC-conditioned medium on IGF-1 receptor expression in neurons. The results showed that IGF-1 expression increased in serum and brain tissue, whereas IGFBP-2 expression decreased in brain tissue of MCAO-injured rats. In primary culture of BMECs, the expression levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-2 were significantly higher under OGD conditions in culture. IGF-1 administration improved neuron viability upon normoxia or OGD, and upregulated p-Akt expression. This effect was reversed by LY294002, a specific inhibitor of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, conditioned medium from OGD-treated BMECs substantially suppressed neuron viability and the expression of IGF-1 receptor simultaneously. These data demonstrate that therapeutic strategies that prioritize the early recovery of the IGF-1 system in BMECs might be promising in ischemic injury.

  17. AM966, an Antagonist of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1, Increases Lung Microvascular Endothelial Permeability through Activation of Rho Signaling Pathway and Phosphorylation of VE-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Junting; Suber, Tomeka

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity is important for reducing severity of lung injury. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) regulates cell motility, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and cell growth. Knockdown of LPA receptor 1 (LPA1) has been shown to mitigate lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. AM966, an LPA1 antagonist exhibiting an antifibrotic property, has been considered to be a future antifibrotic medicine. Here, we report an unexpected effect of AM966, which increases lung endothelial barrier permeability. An electric cell-substrate sensing (ECIS) system was used to measure permeability in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). AM966 decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value immediately in a dose-dependent manner. VE-cadherin and f-actin double immunostaining reveals that AM966 increases stress fibers and gap formation between endothelial cells. AM966 induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) through activation of RhoA/Rho kinase pathway. Unlike LPA treatment, AM966 had no effect on phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk). Further, in LPA1 silencing cells, we observed that AM966-increased lung endothelial permeability as well as phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were attenuated. This study reveals that AM966 induces lung endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is regulated by LPA1-mediated activation of RhoA/MLC and phosphorylation of VE-cadherin. PMID:28348461

  18. AM966, an Antagonist of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1, Increases Lung Microvascular Endothelial Permeability through Activation of Rho Signaling Pathway and Phosphorylation of VE-Cadherin.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junting; Wei, Jianxin; Li, Shuang; Suber, Tomeka; Zhao, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of pulmonary endothelial barrier integrity is important for reducing severity of lung injury. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) regulates cell motility, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and cell growth. Knockdown of LPA receptor 1 (LPA1) has been shown to mitigate lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. AM966, an LPA1 antagonist exhibiting an antifibrotic property, has been considered to be a future antifibrotic medicine. Here, we report an unexpected effect of AM966, which increases lung endothelial barrier permeability. An electric cell-substrate sensing (ECIS) system was used to measure permeability in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). AM966 decreased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value immediately in a dose-dependent manner. VE-cadherin and f-actin double immunostaining reveals that AM966 increases stress fibers and gap formation between endothelial cells. AM966 induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) through activation of RhoA/Rho kinase pathway. Unlike LPA treatment, AM966 had no effect on phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk). Further, in LPA1 silencing cells, we observed that AM966-increased lung endothelial permeability as well as phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were attenuated. This study reveals that AM966 induces lung endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is regulated by LPA1-mediated activation of RhoA/MLC and phosphorylation of VE-cadherin.

  19. Recent insights in the paracrine modulation of cardiomyocyte contractility by cardiac endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Noireaud, Jacques; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac endothelium is formed by a continuous monolayer of cells that line the cavity of the heart (endocardial endothelial cells (EECs)) and the luminal surface of the myocardial blood vessels (intramyocardial capillary endothelial cells (IMCEs)). EECs and IMCEs can exercise substantial control over the contractility of cardiomyocytes by releasing various factors such as nitric oxide (NO) via a constitutive endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1, prostaglandins, angiotensin II, peptide growth factors, and neuregulin-1. The purpose of the present paper is actually to shortly review recent new information concerning cardiomyocytes as effectors of endothelium paracrine signaling, focusing particularly on contractile function. The modes of action and the regulatory paracrine role of the main mediators delivered by cardiac endothelial cells upon cardiac contractility identified in cardiomyocytes are complex and not fully described. Thus, careful evaluation of new therapeutic approaches is required targeting important physiological signaling pathways, some of which have been until recently considered as deleterious, like reactive oxygen species. Future works in the field of cardiac endothelial cells and cardiac function will help to better understand the implication of these mediators in cardiac physiopathology.

  20. Recent Insights in the Paracrine Modulation of Cardiomyocyte Contractility by Cardiac Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac endothelium is formed by a continuous monolayer of cells that line the cavity of the heart (endocardial endothelial cells (EECs)) and the luminal surface of the myocardial blood vessels (intramyocardial capillary endothelial cells (IMCEs)). EECs and IMCEs can exercise substantial control over the contractility of cardiomyocytes by releasing various factors such as nitric oxide (NO) via a constitutive endothelial NO-synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1, prostaglandins, angiotensin II, peptide growth factors, and neuregulin-1. The purpose of the present paper is actually to shortly review recent new information concerning cardiomyocytes as effectors of endothelium paracrine signaling, focusing particularly on contractile function. The modes of action and the regulatory paracrine role of the main mediators delivered by cardiac endothelial cells upon cardiac contractility identified in cardiomyocytes are complex and not fully described. Thus, careful evaluation of new therapeutic approaches is required targeting important physiological signaling pathways, some of which have been until recently considered as deleterious, like reactive oxygen species. Future works in the field of cardiac endothelial cells and cardiac function will help to better understand the implication of these mediators in cardiac physiopathology. PMID:24745027

  1. Systemic sclerosis sera affect fibrillin-1 deposition by dermal blood microvascular endothelial cells: therapeutic implications of cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by endothelial cell injury, autoimmunity and fibrosis. The following three fibrillin-1 alterations have been reported in SSc. (1) Fibrillin-1 microfibrils are disorganized in SSc dermis. (2) Fibrillin-1 microfibrils produced by SSc fibroblasts are unstable. (3) Mutations in the FBN1 gene and anti-fibrillin-1 autoantibodies have been reported in SSc. Fibrillin-1 microfibrils, which are abundantly produced by blood and lymphatic microvascular endothelial cells (B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs, respectively), sequester in the extracellular matrix the latent form of the potent profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SSc sera on the deposition of fibrillin-1 and microfibril-associated glycoprotein 1 (MAGP-1) and the expression of focal adhesion molecules by dermal B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs. Methods Dermal B-MVECs and Ly-MVECs were challenged with sera from SSc patients who were treatment-naïve or under cyclophosphamide (CYC) treatment and with sera from healthy controls. Fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 synthesis and deposition and the expression of αvβ3 integrin/phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase and vinculin/actin were evaluated by immunofluorescence and quantified by morphometric analysis. Results Fibrillin-1 and MAGP-1 colocalized in all experimental conditions, forming a honeycomb pattern in B-MVECs and a dense mesh of short segments in Ly-MVECs. In B-MVECs, fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 production and αvβ3 integrin expression significantly decreased upon challenge with sera from naïve SSc patients compared with healthy controls. Upon challenge of B-MVECs with sera from CYC-treated SSc patients, fibrillin-1/MAGP-1 and αvβ3 integrin levels were comparable to those of cells treated with healthy sera. Ly-MVECs challenged with SSc sera did not differ from those treated with healthy control sera in the expression of any of the molecules assayed

  2. PJ-34 inhibits PARP-1 expression and ERK phosphorylation in glioma-conditioned brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Motta, Carla; D'Angeli, Floriana; Scalia, Marina; Satriano, Cristina; Barbagallo, Davide; Naletova, Irina; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Lupo, Gabriella; Spina-Purrello, Vittoria

    2015-08-15

    Inhibitors of PARP-1(Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1) act by competing with NAD(+), the enzyme physiological substrate, which play a protective role in many pathological conditions characterized by PARP-1 overactivation. It has been shown that PARP-1 also promotes tumor growth and progression through its DNA repair activity. Since angiogenesis is an essential requirement for these activities, we sought to determine whether PARP inhibition might affect rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (GP8.3) migration, stimulated by C6-glioma conditioned medium (CM). Through wound-healing experiments and MTT analysis, we demonstrated that PARP-1 inhibitor PJ-34 [N-(6-Oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide] abolishes the migratory response of GP8.3 cells and reduces their viability. PARP-1 also acts in a DNA independent way within the Extracellular-Regulated-Kinase (ERK) signaling cascade, which regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. By western analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM), we analyzed the effects of PJ-34 on PARP-1 expression, phospho-ERK and phospho-Elk-1 activation. The effect of MEK (mitogen-activated-protein-kinase-kinase) inhibitor PD98059 (2-(2-Amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4 H-1-benzopyran-4-one) on PARP-1 expression in unstimulated and in CM-stimulated GP8.3 cells was analyzed by RT-PCR. PARP-1 expression and phospho-ERK activation were significantly reduced by treatment of GP8.3 cells with PJ-34 or PD98059. By LSM, we further demonstrated that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK are coexpressed and share the same subcellular localization in GP8.3 cells, in the cytoplasm as well as in nucleoplasm. Based on these data, we propose that PARP-1 and phospho-ERK interact in the cytosol and then translocate to the nucleus, where they trigger a proliferative response. We also propose that PARP-1 inhibition blocks CM-induced endothelial migration by interfering with ERK signal-transduction pathway.

  3. Anti-platelet factor 4/heparin antibodies from patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia provoke direct activation of microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Tavor, Sigal; Praprotnik, Sonja; Boffa, Marie Claire; Weksler, Babette; Walenga, M Jeanine; Amiral, Jean; Eldor, Amiram

    2002-02-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a serious complication that occurs in approximately 1-5% of patients treated with heparin and may be associated with severe thrombotic events. HIT is mediated by antibodies directed mostly to epitope(s) formed by complexes between heparin or other anionic mucopolysaccharides and platelet factor 4 (PF4). Anti-PF4/heparin IgG antibodies from six patients with HIT were affinity purified and assessed for interaction with human microvascular and macrovascular endothelial cells (EC). The antibodies directly activated primary cultures of human bone marrow microvascular EC (HBMEC) and SV40 immortalized HBMEC (TrHBMEC) only in the presence of PF4, but did not activate macrovascular human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) under the same conditions. These antibodies were found to bind to TrHBMEC through the F(ab)(2) portion of the anti-PF4/heparin IgG. TrHBMEC activation was characterized by an augmented release of IL-6, von Willebrand factor, soluble thrombomodulin, and by an elevated expression of the adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and vascular cellular endothelial molecule-I to different degrees. Enhanced monocyte adhesion to PF4/heparin antibody-treated TrHBMEC (33-72% adhesion) was also observed. None of these effects occurred with unstimulated HUVEC. However, pre-treatment of HUVEC with tumor necrosis factor-alpha resulted in the same changes observed with microvascular EC exposed to the HIT antibodies. Our findings indicate that anti-PF4/heparin antibodies directly activate microvascular EC while interaction with macrovascular EC requires pre-activation. These results may explain some of the specific clinical manifestations in HIT.

  4. Measures of endothelial dysfunction predict response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warriner, David R; Lawford, Patricia; Sheridan, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) improves morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF). Impaired endothelial function, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in HF and may help to differentiate responders from non-responders. Methods 19 patients were recruited, comprising 94% men, mean age 69±8 years, New York Heart Association functional classes II–IV, QRSd 161±21 ms and mean left ventricular ejection fraction 26±8%. Markers of response and FMD were measured at baseline, 6 and 12 months following CRT. Results 14 patients were responders to CRT. Responders had significant improvements in VO2 (12.6±1.7 to 14.7±1.5 mL/kg/min, p<0.05), quality of life score (44.4±22.9–24.1±21.3, p<0.01), left ventricular end diastolic volume (201.5±72.5 mL–121.3±72.0 mL, p<0.01) and 6-min walk distance (374.0±112.8 m at baseline to 418.1±105.3 m, p<0.05). Baseline FMD in responders was 2.9±1.9% and 7.4±3.73% in non-responders (p<0.05). Conclusions Response to CRT at 6 and 12 months is predicted by baseline FMD. This study confirms that FMD identifies responders to CRT, due to endothelium-dependent mechanisms alone. PMID:27335654

  5. Association between endothelial function and micro-vascular remodeling measured by synchrotron radiation pulmonary micro-angiography in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Satoko; Matsushita, Shonosuke; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Osaka, Motoo; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Miyakawa, Kazunori; Kubota, Misao; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Tokunaga, Chiho

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease which causes increased vascular resistance. In this study, our purpose was to quantify the micro-vascular remodeling in monocrotaline-induced PAH rats using synchrotron radiation pulmonary micro-angiography (SRPA), a method we have previously established in an in vivo rat model. To determine the relationship between endothelial function and vascular remodeling, the local expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was evaluated using immunohistochemical staining. Monocrotaline-induced PAH rats were created by subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline. After 2 weeks, SRPA was performed at the Photon Factory of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. The internal diameters of pulmonary arterioles were measured using SRPA images. Semi-quantified analyses of ET-1, eNOS and VEGF expression in pulmonary arterioles were performed by immunohistochemical staining. Micro-vascular density and the internal diameters of pulmonary arterioles were significantly decreased in PAH. ET-1 expression was significantly increased in PAH compared with the control (1.53 ± 0.45 vs. 0.80 ± 0.14) and eNOS expression was significantly decreased in PAH compared with the control (1.12 ± 0.59 vs. 1.91 ± 0.66), although VEGF expression did not differ between the groups. SRPA can be effectively used for visualizing the decreased pulmonary micro-vasculature associated with PAH. Increased ET-1 expression and decreased eNOS expression may contribute to the proliferation and vasospasm of pulmonary arterioles induced by endothelial dysfunction due to PAH. This SRPA technology may help to identify a correlation between endothelial function and micro-vasculature remodeling in PAH.

  6. NEU1 and NEU3 sialidase activity expressed in human lung microvascular endothelia: NEU1 restrains endothelial cell migration, whereas NEU3 does not.

    PubMed

    Cross, Alan S; Hyun, Sang Won; Miranda-Ribera, Alba; Feng, Chiguang; Liu, Anguo; Nguyen, Chinh; Zhang, Lei; Luzina, Irina G; Atamas, Sergei P; Twaddell, William S; Guang, Wei; Lillehoj, Erik P; Puché, Adam C; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lai-Xi; Passaniti, Antonino; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2012-05-04

    The microvascular endothelial surface expresses multiple molecules whose sialylation state regulates multiple aspects of endothelial function. To better regulate these sialoproteins, we asked whether endothelial cells (ECs) might express one or more catalytically active sialidases. Human lung microvascular EC lysates contained heat-labile sialidase activity for a fluorogenic substrate, 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4-MU-NANA), that was dose-dependently inhibited by the competitive sialidase inhibitor, 2,3-dehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid but not its negative control. The EC lysates also contained sialidase activity for a ganglioside mixture. Using real time RT-PCR to detect mRNAs for the four known mammalian sialidases, NEU1, -2, -3, and -4, NEU1 mRNA was expressed at levels 2700-fold higher that those found for NEU2, -3, or -4. Western analyses indicated NEU1 and -3 protein expression. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, NEU1 was immunolocalized to both the plasma membrane and the perinuclear region. NEU3 was detected both in the cytosol and nucleus. Prior siRNA-mediated knockdown of NEU1 and NEU3 each decreased EC sialidase activity for 4-MU-NANA by >65 and >17%, respectively, and for the ganglioside mixture by 0 and 40%, respectively. NEU1 overexpression in ECs reduced their migration into a wound by >40%, whereas NEU3 overexpression did not. Immunohistochemical studies of normal human tissues immunolocalized NEU1 and NEU3 proteins to both pulmonary and extrapulmonary vascular endothelia. These combined data indicate that human lung microvascular ECs as well as other endothelia express catalytically active NEU1 and NEU3. NEU1 restrains EC migration, whereas NEU3 does not.

  7. Metformin induces up-regulation of blood-brain barrier functions by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takata, Fuyuko; Dohgu, Shinya; Matsumoto, Junichi; Machida, Takashi; Kaneshima, Shuji; Matsuo, Mai; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Takeshige, Yuki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2013-04-19

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption occurs frequently in CNS diseases and injuries. Few drugs have been developed as therapeutic candidates for facilitating BBB functions. Here, we examined whether metformin up-regulates BBB functions using rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBECs). Metformin, concentration- and time-dependently increased transendothelial electrical resistance of RBEC monolayers, and decreased RBEC permeability to sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin. These effects of metformin were blocked by compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK stimulation with an AMPK activator, AICAR, enhanced BBB functions. These findings indicate that metformin induces up-regulation of BBB functions via AMPK activation.

  8. MiR-466b-1-3p regulates P-glycoprotein expression in rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobo; Ren, Weimin; Shao, Yiye; Chen, Yinghui

    2017-04-03

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, and approximately one-third of epilepsy cases are resistant to treatment with anti-epileptic drug (AED). P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a multi-drug transporter that is thought to play a pivotal role in multiple drug resistance (MDR) in epilepsy. The regulatory mechanism of P-gp remains largely unknown; however, recent studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) may regulate the chemo-resistance mediated by P-gp. This study investigated the effect of specific miRNAs that regulate P-gp expression in rat cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (RCMECs). Primary cultures of RCMECs were treated with phenobarbital (PB) at various concentrations to induce P-gp overexpression. MiRNA microarrays were used to investigate the expression profiles of miRNAs in the resistant RCMECs induced by PB and corresponding non-resistant cells. Our data demonstrated decreased miR-466b-1-3p expression in the resistant cells compared with the non-resistant cells. Moreover, the recombinant RNA of 466b-1-3p (mimic) and the artificial antisense RNA of miR-466b-1-3p (inhibitor) were constructed and transfected into resistant RCMECs. The expression and function of P-gp were measured by Western blotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and flow cytometry using rhodamine efflux. The mRNA and protein levels of P-gp increased as the concentration of PB increased, whereas miR-466b-1-3p levels decreased with increasing PB concentrations (P<0.05). The miR-466b-1-3p mimic down-regulated P-gp expression, whereas the miR-466b-1-3p inhibitor up-regulated P-gp expression (P<0.05). These findings demonstrate that miR-466b-1-3p may regulate PB-induced P-gp expression in RCMECs.

  9. Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Support Productive Replication of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses: Possible Involvement in the Pathogenesis of Human H5N1 Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Pappas, Claudia; Belser, Jessica A.; Houser, Katherine V.; Zhong, Weiming; Wadford, Debra A.; Stevens, Troy; Balczon, Ron; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to cause sporadic human infections with a high fatality rate. Respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complication among hospitalized patients. Since progressive pulmonary endothelial damage is the hallmark of ARDS, we investigated host responses following HPAI virus infection of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. Evaluation of these cells for the presence of receptors preferred by influenza virus demonstrated that avian-like (α2-3-linked) receptors were more abundant than human-like (α2-6-linked) receptors. To test the permissiveness of pulmonary endothelial cells to virus infection, we compared the replication of selected seasonal, pandemic (2009 H1N1 and 1918), and potentially pandemic (H5N1) influenza virus strains. We observed that these cells support productive replication only of HPAI H5N1 viruses, which preferentially enter through and are released from the apical surface of polarized human endothelial monolayers. Furthermore, A/Thailand/16/2004 and A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN/1203) H5N1 viruses, which exhibit heightened virulence in mammalian models, replicated to higher titers than less virulent H5N1 strains. VN/1203 infection caused a significant decrease in endothelial cell proliferation compared to other subtype viruses. VN/1203 virus was also found to be a potent inducer of cytokines and adhesion molecules known to regulate inflammation during acute lung injury. Deletion of the H5 hemagglutinin (HA) multibasic cleavage site did not affect virus infectivity but resulted in decreased virus replication in endothelial cells. Our results highlight remarkable tropism and infectivity of the H5N1 viruses for human pulmonary endothelial cells, resulting in the potent induction of host inflammatory responses. PMID:22072765

  10. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells support productive replication of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses: possible involvement in the pathogenesis of human H5N1 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hui; Pappas, Claudia; Belser, Jessica A; Houser, Katherine V; Zhong, Weiming; Wadford, Debra A; Stevens, Troy; Balczon, Ron; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses continue to cause sporadic human infections with a high fatality rate. Respiratory failure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a complication among hospitalized patients. Since progressive pulmonary endothelial damage is the hallmark of ARDS, we investigated host responses following HPAI virus infection of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells. Evaluation of these cells for the presence of receptors preferred by influenza virus demonstrated that avian-like (α2-3-linked) receptors were more abundant than human-like (α2-6-linked) receptors. To test the permissiveness of pulmonary endothelial cells to virus infection, we compared the replication of selected seasonal, pandemic (2009 H1N1 and 1918), and potentially pandemic (H5N1) influenza virus strains. We observed that these cells support productive replication only of HPAI H5N1 viruses, which preferentially enter through and are released from the apical surface of polarized human endothelial monolayers. Furthermore, A/Thailand/16/2004 and A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN/1203) H5N1 viruses, which exhibit heightened virulence in mammalian models, replicated to higher titers than less virulent H5N1 strains. VN/1203 infection caused a significant decrease in endothelial cell proliferation compared to other subtype viruses. VN/1203 virus was also found to be a potent inducer of cytokines and adhesion molecules known to regulate inflammation during acute lung injury. Deletion of the H5 hemagglutinin (HA) multibasic cleavage site did not affect virus infectivity but resulted in decreased virus replication in endothelial cells. Our results highlight remarkable tropism and infectivity of the H5N1 viruses for human pulmonary endothelial cells, resulting in the potent induction of host inflammatory responses.

  11. Quantitative assessment of brain microvascular and tissue oxygenation during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Ramadeen, A; Tsui, A K Y; Hu, X; Zou, L; Wilson, D F; Esipova, T V; Vinogradov, S A; Leong-Poi, H; Zamiri, N; Mazer, C D; Dorian, P; Hare, G M T

    2013-07-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with a very high rate of mortality, in part due to inadequate tissue perfusion during attempts at resuscitation. Parameters such as mean arterial pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide may not accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during cardiac resuscitation. We hypothesised that quantitative measurements of tissue oxygen tension would more accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during experimental cardiac arrest. Using oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence, we made measurements of oxygen in the microcirculation and in the interstitial space of the brain and muscle in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Measurements were performed at baseline, during untreated ventricular fibrillation, during resuscitation and after return of spontaneous circulation. After achieving stable baseline brain tissue oxygen tension, as measured using an Oxyphor G4-based phosphorescent microsensor, ventricular fibrillation resulted in an immediate reduction in all measured parameters. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, brain oxygen tension remained unchanged. After the return of spontaneous circulation, all measured parameters including brain oxygen tension recovered to baseline levels. Muscle tissue oxygen tension followed a similar trend as the brain, but with slower response times. We conclude that measurements of brain tissue oxygen tension, which more accurately reflect adequacy of tissue perfusion during cardiac arrest and resuscitation, may contribute to the development of new strategies to optimise perfusion during cardiac resuscitation and improve patient outcomes after cardiac arrest.

  12. Treatment of Angina and Microvascular Coronary Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Samim, Arang; Nugent, Lynn; Mehta, Puja K.; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD) is an increasingly recognized cause of cardiac ischemia and angina, more commonly diagnosed in women. Patients with MCD present with the triad of persistent chest pain, ischemic changes on stress testing, and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) on cardiac catheterization. Data from National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) study has shown that the diagnosis of MCD is not benign, with a 2.5% annual risk of adverse cardiac events including myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, or death. The gold standard diagnostic test for MCD is an invasive coronary reactivity test (CRT), which uses acetylcholine, adenosine, and nitroglycerin to test the endothelial dependent and independent, microvascular and macrovascular coronary function. The CRT allows for diagnostic and treatment options as well as further risk stratifying patients for future cardiovascular events. Treatment of angina and MCD should be aimed at ischemia disease management to reduce risk of adverse cardiac events, ameliorating symptoms to improve quality of life, and to decrease the morbidity from unnecessary and repeated cardiac catheterization in patients with open coronary arteries. A comprehensive treatment approach aimed at risk factor managment, including lifestyle counseling regarding smoking cessation, nutrition and physical activity should be initiated. Current pharmacotherapy for MCD can include the treatment of microvascular endothelial dysfunction (statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, low dose aspirin), as well as treatment for angina and myocardial ischemia (beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, nitrates, ranolazine). Additional symptom management techniques can include tri-cyclic medication, enhanced external counterpulsation, autogenic training, and spinal cord stimulation. While our current therapies are effective in the treatment

  13. Development of a coculture system and use of confocal laser fluorescent microscopy to study human microvascular endothelial cell and mural cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Burch, Marcia G; Pepe, Gerald J; Dobrian, Anca D; Lattanzio, Frank A; Albrecht, Eugene D

    2005-07-01

    In the present study, human myometrial microvascular endothelial cells (HMMEC) were cocultured with human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) labeled with fluorescent dyes to examine their morphological interaction using confocal laser fluorescent microscopy. HMMEC and VSMC labeled with fluorescent green and red dyes, respectively, attached to opposite sides of polyethyleneterephthalate membranes and remained viable for up to 96 h. In defined medium, 5%+/-3% of the VSMC cytoplasmic processes and 71%+/-17% of the HMMEC processes extended completely across the 13 microm thickness of the transmembrane. However, 41%+/-21% of the VSMC projections and 10%+/-3% of the HMMEC processes that traversed the membrane made contact with the opposing cell type. In cocultures incubated with angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), although the number of VSMC or HMMEC projections was not significantly increased, the number of VSMC extending across the membrane and making contact with HMMEC was increased (P<0.05) to 88%+/-2%. The results of the current study demonstrate that coculture of fluorescent-labeled HMMEC and VSMC on a semipermeable transmembrane coupled with confocal laser fluorescent microscopy provides an in vitro experimental model to study morphological association of microvascular endothelial cells with mural cells. We propose that this system will greatly facilitate study of remodeling of the microvasculature in various organ systems.

  14. Endothelial to mesenchymal transition contributes to arsenic-trioxide-induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Wu, Xianxian; Li, Yang; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Zhange; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Longyin; Ju, Jiaming; Liu, Xin; Chen, Xiaohui; Glybochko, Peter V.; Nikolenko, Vladimir; Kopylov, Philipp; Xu, Chaoqian; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested the critical role of endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in fibrotic diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether EndMT is involved in arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-induced cardiac fibrosis and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Cardiac dysfunction was observed in rats after exposure to As2O3 for 15 days using echocardiography, and the deposition of collagen was detected by Masson’s trichrome staining and electron microscope. EndMT was indicated by the loss of endothelial cell markers (VE-cadherin and CD31) and the acquisition of mesenchymal cell markers (α-SMA and FSP1) determined by RT-PCR at the mRNA level and Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis at the protein level. In the in-vitro experiments, endothelial cells acquired a spindle-shaped morphology accompanying downregulation of the endothelial cell markers and upregulation of the mesenchymal cell markers when exposed to As2O3. As2O3 activated the AKT/GSK-3β/Snail signaling pathway, and blocking this pathway with PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) abolished EndMT in As2O3-treated endothelial cells. Our results highlight that As2O3 is an EndMT-promoting factor during cardiac fibrosis, suggesting that targeting EndMT is beneficial for preventing As2O3-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:27671604

  15. Uncaria tomentosa alkaloidal fraction reduces paracellular permeability, IL-8 and NS1 production on human microvascular endothelial cells infected with dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Lima-Junior, Raimundo Sousa; Mello, Cintia da Silva; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Valente, Ligia M Marino; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2013-11-01

    Dengue is the major Arbovirus in the world, annually causing morbidity and death. Severe dengue is associated with changes in the endothelial barrier function due to the production of inflammatory mediators by immune cells and by the endothelium. Dengue virus (DENV) replicates efficiently in human endothelial cells in vitro and elicits immune responses resulting in endothelial permeability. Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC.(Rubiaceae), known as cat's claw, has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of a wide-array of symptoms, and several scientific studies reported its antiviral, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Here we infected a human lineage of dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) with DENV-2 and treated it with an alkaloidal fraction from U. tomentosa bark (AFUT). We showed antiviral and immunomodulatory activities of U. tomentosa by determining the NS1 antigen and IL-8 in supernatant of DENV-2 infected HMEC-1. Furthermore, by measurement of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) we demonstrated, for the first time, that a plant derivative contributed to the reduction of paracellular permeability in DENV-2 infected HMEC-1. We also showed that IL-8 contributed significantly to the induction of permeability. Although further investigations should be conducted before a new drug can be suggested, our in vitro data support evidence that AFUT could be potentially useful in developing a treatment for severe dengue.

  16. Role of Endothelial AADC in Cardiac Synthesis of Serotonin and Nitrates Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Rouzaud-Laborde, Charlotte; Hanoun, Naïma; Baysal, Ipek; Rech, Jean-Simon; Mias, Céline; Calise, Denis; Sicard, Pierre; Frugier, Céline; Seguelas, Marie-Helène; Parini, Angelo; Pizzinat, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates different cardiac functions by acting directly on cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Today, it is widely accepted that activated platelets represent a major source of 5-HT. In contrast, a supposed production of 5-HT in the heart is still controversial. To address this issue, we investigated the expression and localization of 5-HT synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) and L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the heart. We also evaluated their involvement in cardiac production of 5-HT. TPH1 was weakly expressed in mouse and rat heart and appeared restricted to mast cells. Degranulation of mast cells by compound 48/80 did not modify 5-HT cardiac content in mice. Western blots and immunolabelling experiments showed an abundant expression of AADC in the mouse and rat heart and its co-localization with endothelial cells. Incubation of cardiac homogenate with the AADC substrate (5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan) 5-HTP or intraperitoneal injection of 5-HTP in mice significantly increased cardiac 5-HT. These effects were prevented by the AADC inhibitor benserazide. Finally, 5-HTP administration in mice increased phosphorylation of aortic nitric oxide synthase 3 at Ser (1177) as well as accumulation of nitrates in cardiac tissue. This suggests that the increase in 5-HT production by AADC leads to activation of endothelial and cardiac nitric oxide pathway. These data show that endothelial AADC plays an important role in cardiac synthesis of 5-HT and possibly in 5-HT-dependent regulation of nitric oxide generation. PMID:22829864

  17. Increased cardiac output and microvascular blood flow during mild hemoconcentration in hamster window model.

    PubMed

    Martini, Judith; Tsai, Amy G; Cabrales, Pedro; Johnson, Paul C; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2006-07-01

    The effect of small hematocrit (Hct) increases on cardiac index (cardiac output/body wt) and oxygen release to the microcirculation was investigated in the awake hamster window chamber model by means of exchange transfusions of homologous packed red blood cells. Increasing Hct between 8 and 13% from baseline increased cardiac index by 5-31% from baseline (P < 0.05) and significantly lowered systemic blood pressure (P < 0.05). The relationship between Hct and cardiac index is described by a second-order polynomial (R2 = 0.84; P < 0.05) showing that Hct increases up to 20% from baseline increase cardiac index, whereas increases over 20% from baseline decrease cardiac index. Combining this data with measurements of blood pressure allowed to determine total peripheral vascular resistance, which was a minimum at 8-13% Hct increase and was described by a second-order polynomial (R2 = 0.83; P < 0.05). Oxygen measurements in arterioles, venules, and the tissue at 8-13% Hct increase were identical to control; thus, as a consequence of increased flow and oxygen-carrying capacity, oxygen delivery and extraction increased, but the change was not statistically significant. Previous results with the same model showed that the observed effects are related to shear stress-mediated release of nitric oxide, an effect that should be also present in the heart microcirculation, leading to increased blood flow, myocardial oxygen consumption, and contractility. We conclude that a minimum viscosity level is necessary for generating the shear stress required for maintaining normal cardiovascular function.

  18. Angiopoietin-1 regulates microvascular reactivity and protects the microcirculation during acute endothelial dysfunction: role of eNOS and VE-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Alfieri, Alessio; Ong, Albert C M; Kammerer, Richard A; Solanky, Tirupa; Bate, Simon; Tasab, Mohammed; Brown, Nicola J; Brookes, Zoe L

    2014-02-01

    The growth factor angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) plays an essential role in angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis. Nevertheless, the role of Ang-1 in regulating vascular tone and blood flow is largely unexplored. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the junctional protein VE-cadherin are part of the complex signalling cascade initiated by Ang-1 in endothelial cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying acute effects of Ang-1 on microvascular reactivity, permeability and blood flow, and hypothesise that eNOS and VE-cadherin underpin Ang-1 mediated vascular effects that are independent of angiogenesis and proliferation. Myography of isolated microarterioles from male C3H/HeN mice (7-10 weeks) was employed to measure vascular reactivity in vitro. Microcirculatory function in vivo was evaluated by intravital microscopy and Doppler fluximetry in dorsal window chambers. Ang-1 and its stable variant MAT.Ang-1 induced a concentration-dependent vasodilation of arterioles in vitro, which was blocked with nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibitor l-NAME. In vivo, MAT.Ang-1 restored to control levels l-NAME induced peripheral vasoconstriction, decreased blood flow and microvascular hyperpermeability. Tissue protein expression of VE-cadherin was reduced by NOS inhibition and restored to control levels by MAT.Ang-1, whilst VE-cadherin phosphorylation was increased by l-NAME and subsequently reduced by MAT.Ang-1 administration. Moreover, MAT.Ang-1 alone did not modulate systemic levels of angiogenetic factors. Our novel findings report that Ang-1 induces arteriolar vasodilation via release of NO, suggesting that Ang-1 is an important regulator of microvascular tone. As MAT.Ang-1 ameliorates detrimental effects on the microcirculation induced by inhibition of NO synthesis and stabilizes the endothelial barrier function through VE-cadherin, we propose that this Ang-1 variant may serve as a novel therapeutic agent to protect the microcirculation against

  19. Modulatory effect of curcumin on survival of irradiated human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells: role of Akt/mTOR and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Binion, David G.; Wellner, Michael; Behmaram, Behnaz; Floer, Martin; Mitton, Elizabeth; Nie, Linghui; Zhang, Zhihong; Otterson, Mary F.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an essential modality in the treatment of colorectal cancers. Radiation exerts an antiangiogenic effect on tumors, inhibiting endothelial proliferation and survival in the tumor microvasculature. However, damage from low levels of irradiation can induce a paradoxical effect, stimulating survival in endothelial cells. We used human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC) to define effects of radiation on these gut-specific endothelial cells. Low-level irradiation (1–5 Gy) activates NF-κB and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, which is involved in cell cycle reentry and cell survival in HIMEC. A downstream target of PI3K/Akt is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which contributes to endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the signaling molecules involved in the radiosensitizing effects of curcumin on HIMEC subjected to low levels of irradiation. We have demonstrated that exposure of HIMEC to low levels of irradiation induced Akt and mTOR phosphorylation, which was attenuated by curcumin, rapamycin, LY294002, and mTOR small interference RNA (siRNA). Activation of NF-κB by low levels of irradiation was inhibited by curcumin, SN-50, and mTOR siRNA. Curcumin also induced apoptosis by induction of caspase-3 cleavage in irradiated HIMEC. In conclusion, curcumin significantly inhibited NF-κB and attenuated the effect of irradiation-induced prosurvival signaling through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathways in these gut-specific endothelial cells. Curcumin may be a potential radiosensitizing agent for enhanced antiangiogenic effect in colorectal cancer radiation therapy. PMID:20299603

  20. Analysis of correlations between selected endothelial cell activation markers, disease activity, and nailfold capillaroscopy microvascular changes in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Ciołkiewicz, Mariusz; Kuryliszyn-Moskal, Anna; Klimiuk, Piotr Adrian

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between selected serum endothelial cell activation markers such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1), soluble thrombomodulin (sTM), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin), disease activity, and microvascular changes determined by nailfold capillaroscopy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Serum levels of VEGF, ET-1, sTM, and sE-selectin were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 80 SLE patients. The disease activity was measured with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index score. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed in all patients. Positive correlation was found between VEGF and both ET-1 (r = 0.294, p < 0.01) and sE-selectin (r = 0.274, p < 0.05) serum levels as well as between sTM and ET-1 (r = 0.273, p < 0.05) serum concentrations. We noticed also positive correlation between VEGF (r = 0.224, p < 0.05) and ET-1 (r = 0.471, p < 0.001) serum levels and disease activity, and also between VEGF serum concentration and grade of morphological changes observed by nailfold capillaroscopy (r = 0.458, p < 0.001). There was also positive correlation between capillaroscopic score and disease activity (r = 0.339, p < 0.01). Our data suggest that correlation between VEGF and both ET-1 and E-selectin serum levels as well as between sTM and ET-1 serum concentrations may reflect their participation in the pathogenesis of SLE. VEGF seems to reflect changes in microcirculation in the course of SLE, visualised by nailfold capillaroscopy. The relationship between changes in nailfold capillaroscopy, endothelial cell activation markers, and the clinical activity of SLE points to an important role of microvascular abnormalities in the clinical manifestation of the disease.

  1. Peoniflorin suppresses tumor necrosis factor-α induced chemokine production in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells by blocking nuclear factor-κB and ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Guo, Zai-Pei; Jiao, Xiao-Yan; Jia, Rui-Zhen; Zhang, Yu-Hong; Li, Jing-Yi; Huang, Xu-Lei; Liu, Hong-Jie

    2011-07-01

    Peoniflorin (PF) extracted from the root of Paeonia lactiflora pall displays anti-inflammation and antioxidant properties in several animal models. Chemokines are vital for directing the movement of circulating leukocytes to the sites of inflammation and are involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory skin diseases. Herein, we investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of PF on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced chemokine production in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was treated by TNF-α with or without PF. PF markedly attenuated TNF-α-induced chemokines (including CCL2, CCL5, CCL20, CXCL8, CXCL16 and CX3CL1) mRNA expression in HMEC-1. PF also reduced the secretion of these chemokines in culture supernatants. In addition, endothelial activation in the presence of PF markedly blocked the chemotactic activities of TNF-α-stimulated HMEC-1 supernatant on promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) or the acute mature monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) cell migration. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed TNF-α upregulated phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB-α (IκBα) and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, which was almost completely reversed by PF. Finally, PF inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation to the nucleus. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that PF has an anti-inflammatory ability against TNF-α-induced chemokine production and leukocyte migration, which may be at least partly related to the inhibition of NF-κB and ERK pathway. PF may be a candidate medicine for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

  2. The microvascular effects of insulin resistance and diabetes on cardiac structure, function, and perfusion: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    Larghat, Abdulghani M.; Swoboda, Peter P.; Biglands, John D.; Kearney, Mark T.; Greenwood, John P.; Plein, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Aims Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure. To better understand the mechanism by which this occurs, we investigated cardiac structure, function, and perfusion in patients with and without diabetes. Methods and results Sixty-five patients with no stenosis >30% on invasive coronary angiography were categorized into diabetes (19) and non-diabetes (46) which was further categorized into prediabetes (30) and controls (16) according to the American Diabetes Association guidelines. Each patient underwent comprehensive cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment. Left-ventricular (LV) mass, relative wall mass (RWM), Lagrangian circumferential strain, LV torsion, and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) were calculated. LV mass was higher in diabetics than non-diabetics (112.8 ± 39.7 vs. 91.5 ± 21.3 g, P = 0.01) and in diabetics than prediabetics (112.8 ± 39.7 vs. 90.3 ± 18.7 g, P = 0.02). LV torsion angle was higher in diabetics than non-diabetics (9.65 ± 1.90 vs. 8.59 ± 1.91°, P = 0.047), and MPR was lower in diabetics than non-diabetics (2.10 ± 0.76 vs. 2.84 ± 1.25 mL/g/min, P = 0.01). There was significant correlation between MPR and early diastolic strain rate (r = −0.310, P = 0.01) and LV torsion (r = −0.306, P = 0.01). In multivariable linear regression analysis, non-diabetics waist–hip ratio, but not body mass index, had a significant association with RWM (Beta = 0.34, P = 0.02). Conclusion Patients with diabetes have increased LV mass, LV torsion, and decreased MPR. There is a significant association between decreased MPR and increased LV torsion suggesting a possible mechanistic link between microvascular disease and cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:25117473

  3. Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis after Ischemia: Role of Enolase-Phosphatase 1 Activation and Aci-Reductone Dioxygenase 1 Translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Ting; Yang, Ke; Xu, Ji; Ren, Lijie; Li, Weiping; Liu, Wenlan

    2016-01-01

    Enolase-phosphatase 1 (ENOPH1), a newly discovered enzyme of the methionine salvage pathway, is emerging as an important molecule regulating stress responses. In this study, we investigated the role of ENOPH1 in blood brain barrier (BBB) injury under ischemic conditions. Focal cerebral ischemia induced ENOPH1 mRNA and protein expression in ischemic hemispheric microvessels in rats. Exposure of cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEND3 cells) to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) also induced ENOPH1 upregulation, which was accompanied by increased cell death and apoptosis reflected by increased 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide formation, lactate dehydrogenase release and TUNEL staining. Knockdown of ENOPH1 expression with siRNA or overexpressing ENOPH1 with CRISPR-activated plasmids attenuated or potentiated OGD-induced endothelial cell death, respectively. Moreover, ENOPH1 knockdown or overexpression resulted in a significant reduction or augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis-associated proteins (caspase-3, PARP, Bcl-2 and Bax) and Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins (Ire-1, Calnexin, GRP78 and PERK) in OGD-treated endothelial cells. OGD upregulated the expression of ENOPH1's downstream protein aci-reductone dioxygenase 1 (ADI1) and enhanced its interaction with ENOPH1. Interestingly, knockdown of ENOPH1 had no effect on OGD-induced ADI1 upregulation, while it potentiated OGD-induced ADI1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Lastly, knockdown of ENOPH1 significantly reduced OGD-induced endothelial monolayer permeability increase. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that ENOPH1 activation may contribute to OGD-induced endothelial cell death and BBB disruption through promoting ROS generation and the activation of apoptosis associated proteins, thus representing a new therapeutic target for ischemic stroke.

  4. Cerebral Microvascular Endothelial Cell Apoptosis after Ischemia: Role of Enolase-Phosphatase 1 Activation and Aci-Reductone Dioxygenase 1 Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Ting; Yang, Ke; Xu, Ji; Ren, Lijie; Li, Weiping; Liu, Wenlan

    2016-01-01

    Enolase-phosphatase 1 (ENOPH1), a newly discovered enzyme of the methionine salvage pathway, is emerging as an important molecule regulating stress responses. In this study, we investigated the role of ENOPH1 in blood brain barrier (BBB) injury under ischemic conditions. Focal cerebral ischemia induced ENOPH1 mRNA and protein expression in ischemic hemispheric microvessels in rats. Exposure of cultured brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEND3 cells) to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) also induced ENOPH1 upregulation, which was accompanied by increased cell death and apoptosis reflected by increased 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide formation, lactate dehydrogenase release and TUNEL staining. Knockdown of ENOPH1 expression with siRNA or overexpressing ENOPH1 with CRISPR-activated plasmids attenuated or potentiated OGD-induced endothelial cell death, respectively. Moreover, ENOPH1 knockdown or overexpression resulted in a significant reduction or augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis-associated proteins (caspase-3, PARP, Bcl-2 and Bax) and Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins (Ire-1, Calnexin, GRP78 and PERK) in OGD-treated endothelial cells. OGD upregulated the expression of ENOPH1’s downstream protein aci-reductone dioxygenase 1 (ADI1) and enhanced its interaction with ENOPH1. Interestingly, knockdown of ENOPH1 had no effect on OGD-induced ADI1 upregulation, while it potentiated OGD-induced ADI1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Lastly, knockdown of ENOPH1 significantly reduced OGD-induced endothelial monolayer permeability increase. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that ENOPH1 activation may contribute to OGD-induced endothelial cell death and BBB disruption through promoting ROS generation and the activation of apoptosis associated proteins, thus representing a new therapeutic target for ischemic stroke. PMID:27630541

  5. Overexpression of actin-depolymerizing factor blocks oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced mouse brain microvascular endothelial cell barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Sun, Lu; Si, Yan-Fang; Li, Bao-Min

    2012-12-01

    The aim of present work was to elucidate the role of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF), an important regulator of actin cytoskeleton, in the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. The primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (MBMECs) were exposed to ox-LDL. Treatment with LDL served as control. It was found that ADF mRNA level and protein expression were decreased when exposed to ox-LDL in MBMECs. Then, we investigated the influence of ADF overexpression on ox-LDL-treated MBMECs. Structurally, overexpression of ADF inhibited ox-LDL-induced F-actin formation. Functionally, overexpression of ADF attenuated ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier marked by restoration of transendothelial electrical resistance, permeability of Evans Blue and expression of tight junction-associated proteins including ZO-1 and occludin, and blocked ox-LDL-induced oxidative stress marked by inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and activity of NADPH oxidase and Nox2 expression. However, overexpression of ADF in control cells had no significant effect on endothelial permeability and ROS formation. In conclusion, overexpression of ADF blocks ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier. In addition, siRNA-mediated downregulation of ADF expression aggravated ox-LDL-induced disruption of endothelial barrier and ROS formation. These findings identify ADF as a key signaling molecule in the regulation of BBB integrity and suggest that ADF might be used as a target to modulate diseases accompanied by ox-LDL-induced BBB compromise.

  6. Generation of Brain Microvascular Endothelial-Like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Co-Culture with C6 Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Haruka; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Okada, Atsumasa; Hirata, Nobue; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Takayama, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is formed by brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and tightly regulates the transport of molecules from blood to neural tissues. In vitro BBB models from human pluripotent stem cell (PSCs)-derived BMECs would be useful not only for the research on the BBB development and function but also for drug-screening for neurological diseases. However, little is known about the differentiation of human PSCs to BMECs. In the present study, human induced PSCs (iPSCs) were differentiated into endothelial cells (ECs), and further maturated to BMECs. Interestingly, C6 rat glioma cell-conditioned medium (C6CM), in addition to C6 co-culture, induced the differentiation of human iPSC-derived ECs (iPS-ECs) to BMEC-like cells, increase in the trans-endothelial electrical resistance, decreased in the dextran transport and up-regulation of gene expression of tight junction molecules in human iPS-ECs. Moreover, Wnt inhibitors attenuated the effects of C6CM. In summary, we have established a simple protocol of the generation of BMEC-like cells from human iPSCs, and have demonstrated that differentiation of iPS-ECs to BMEC-like cells is induced by C6CM-derived signals, including canonical Wnt signals. PMID:26061227

  7. Contacting co-culture of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells alters barrier function of human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Skottman, H; Muranen, J; Lähdekorpi, H; Pajula, E; Mäkelä, K; Koivusalo, L; Koistinen, A; Uusitalo, H; Kaarniranta, K; Juuti-Uusitalo, K

    2017-10-01

    Here we evaluated the effects of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) on mature human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The hESC-RPE cells (Regea08/017, Regea08/023 or Regea11/013) and hREC (ACBRI 181) were co-cultured on opposite sides of transparent membranes for up to six weeks. Thereafter barrier function, small molecule permeability, localization of RPE and endothelial cell marker proteins, cellular fine structure, and growth factor secretion of were evaluated. After co-culture, the RPE specific CRALBP and endothelial cell specific von Willebrand factor were appropriately localized. In addition, the general morphology, pigmentation, and fine structure of hESC-RPE cells were unaffected. Co-culture increased the barrier function of hESC-RPE cells, detected both with TEER measurements and cumulative permeability of FD4 - although the differences varied among the cell lines. Co-culturing significantly altered VEGF and PEDF secretion, but again the differences were cell line specific. The results of this study showed that co-culture with hREC affects hESC-RPE functionality. In addition, co-culture revealed drastic cell line specific differences, most notably in growth factor secretion. This model has the potential to be used as an in vitro outer blood-retinal barrier model for drug permeability testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oesophageal Doppler guided optimization of cardiac output does not increase visceral microvascular blood flow in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Heinink, Thomas P; Read, David J; Mitchell, William K; Bhalla, Ashish; Lund, Jonathan N; Phillips, Bethan E; Williams, John P

    2017-02-06

    Oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM) is used clinically to optimize cardiac output (CO) and guide fluid therapy. Despite limited experimental evidence, it is assumed that increasing CO increases visceral microvascular blood flow (MBF). We used contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to assess whether ODM-guided optimization of CO altered MBF. Sixteen healthy male volunteers (62 ± 3·4 years) were studied. Baseline measurements of CO were recorded via ODM. Hepatic and renal MBF was assessed via CEUS. Saline 0·9% was administered to optimize CO according to a standard protocol and repeat CEUS performed. Time-intensity curves were constructed, allowing organ perfusion calculation via time to 5% perfusion (TT5). MBF was assessed via organ perfusion rise time (RT) (5-95%). CO increased (4535 ± 241 ml/min versus 5442 ± 329 ml/min, P<0·0001) following fluid administration, whilst time to renal (22·48 ± 1·19 s versus 20·79 ± 1·31 s; P = 0·03), but not hepatic (28·13 ± 4·48 s versus 26·83 ± 1·53 s; P = 0·15) perfusion decreased. Time to renal perfusion was related to CO (renal: r = -0·43, P = 0·01). Hepatic nor renal RT altered following fluid administration (renal: 9·03 ± 0·86 versus 8·93 ± 0·85 s P = 0·86; hepatic: 27·86 ± 1·60 s versus 30·71 ± 2·19 s, P = 0·13). No relationship was observed between changes in CO and MBF in either organ (renal: r = -0·17, P = 0·54; hepatic: r = -0·07, P = 0·80). ODM-optimized CO reduces time to renal perfusion but does not alter renal or hepatic MBF. A lack of relationship between microvascular visceral perfusion and CO following ODM-guided optimization may explain the absence of improved clinical outcome with ODM monitoring. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Pulmonary Fibrosis Inducer, Bleomycin, Causes Redox-Sensitive Activation of Phospholipase D and Cytotoxicity Through Formation of Bioactive Lipid Signal Mediator, Phosphatidic Acid, in Lung Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rishi B.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Sherwani, Shariq I.; Sliman, Sean M.; Gurney, Travis O.; Loar, Brooke; Butler, Susan O’Connor; Morris, Andrew J.; Marsh, Clay B.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of lung microvascular complications and pulmonary hypertension known to be associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a debilitating lung disease, are not known. Therefore, we investigated whether bleomycin, the widely used experimental IPF inducer, would be capable of activating phospholipase D (PLD) and generating the bioactive lipid signal-mediator phosphatidic acid (PA) in our established bovine lung microvascular endothelial cell (BLMVEC) model. Our results revealed that bleomycin induced the activation of PLD and generation of PA in a dose-dependent (5, 10, and 100 μg) and time-dependent (2-12 hours) fashion that were significantly attenuated by the PLD-specific inhibitor, 5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide (FIPI). PLD activation and PA generation induced by bleomycin (5 μg) were significantly attenuated by the thiol protectant (N-acetyl-L-cysteine), antioxidants, and iron chelators suggesting the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, and iron therein. Furthermore, our study demonstrated the formation of ROS and loss of glutathione (GSH) in cells following bleomycin treatment, confirming oxidative stress as a key player in the bleomycin-induced PLD activation and PA generation in ECs. More noticeably, PLD activation and PA generation were observed to happen upstream of bleomycin-induced cytotoxicity in BLMVECs, which was protected by FIPI. This was also supported by our current findings that exposure of cells to exogenous PA led to internalization of PA and cytotoxicity in BLMVECs. For the first time, this study revealed novel mechanism of the bleomycin-induced redox-sensitive activation of PLD that led to the generation of PA, which was capable of inducing lung EC cytotoxicity, thus suggesting possible bioactive lipid-signaling mechanism/mechanisms of microvascular disorders encountered in IPF. PMID:21131602

  10. MEK5 is Activated by Shear Stress, Activates ERK5 and Induces KLF4 to Modulate TNF Responses in Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Paul R.; Jensen, Todd; Kluger, Martin S.; Morelock, Maurice; Hanidu, Adedayo; Qi, Zhenhao; Tatake, Revati J.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Endothelial cells (ECs) lining arteries respond to laminar shear stress (LSS) by suppressing pro-inflammatory changes, in part through the activation of MEK5, ERK5 and induction of KLF4. We examined if this anti-inflammatory pathway operates in human ECs lining microvessels, the principal site of inflammatory responses. Methods We used immunofluorescence microscopy of human skin to assess ERK5 activation and KLF4 expression in human dermal microvascular (HDM)ECs in situ. We applied LSS to or overexpressed constitutively active MEK5 (MEK5/CA) in cultured HDMECs and assessed gene expression by microarrays and qRT-PCR and protein expression by western blotting. We assessed effects of MEK5/CA on TNF responses using qRT-PCR, FACS and measurements of HDMEC monolayer electrical resistance. We used siRNA knockdown to assess the role of ERK5 and KLF4 in these responses. Results ERK5 phosphorylation and KLF4 expression is observed in HDMECs in situ. LSS activates ERK5 and induces KLF4 in cultured HDMECs. MEK5/CA-transduced HDMECs show activated ERK5 and increased KLF4, thrombomodulin, eNOS, and ICAM-1 expression. MEK5 induction of KLF4 is mediated by ERK5. MEK5/CA-transduced HDMECs are less responsive to TNF, an effect partly mediated by KLF4. Conclusions MEK5 activation by LSS inhibits inflammatory responses in microvascular ECs, in part through ERK5-dependent induction of KLF4. PMID:21166929

  11. Effect of caveolin-1 on the expression of tight junction-associated proteins in rat glioma-derived microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Liu, Li-Bo; Ma, Teng; Wang, Ping; Xue, Yi-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Caveolin-1 affects the permeability of blood-tumor barrier (BTB) by regulating the expression of tight junction-associated proteins. However, the effect is still controversial. In the present work, we studied the regulative effect of caveolin-1 on the expression of tight junction-associated proteins and BTB via directly silencing and overexpressing of caveolin-1 by recombinant adenovirus transduction of glioma-derived microvascular endothelial cells in rat brain. The results show that the caveolin-1 downregulation resulted in decreased expression of tight junction-associated proteins, opening of tight junctions, and increasing the permeability of BTB, whereas the overexpression of caveolin-1 presented the opposite effects. Therefore, we conclude that caveolin-1 regulates the expression of tight junction-associated proteins in a positive manner, which further plays a role in the regulation of BTB permeability. This finding provides a novel therapeutic target for selectively opening of BTB. PMID:26722502

  12. West Nile virus infection modulates human brain microvascular endothelial cells tight junction proteins and cell adhesion molecules: Transmigration across the in vitro blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Saguna; Lo, Yeung; Chapagain, Moti; Lum, Stephanie; Kumar, Mukesh; Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Luo, Haiyan; Nakatsuka, Austin; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2009-01-01

    Neurological complications such as inflammation, failure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and neuronal death contribute to the mortality and morbidity associated with WNV-induced meningitis. Compromised BBB indicates the ability of the virus to gain entry into the CNS via the BBB, however, the underlying mechanisms, and the specific cell types associated with WNV-CNS trafficking are not well understood. Brain microvascular endothelial cells, main component of the BBB, represent a barrier to virus dissemination into the CNS and could play key role in WNV spread via hematogenous route. To investigate WNV entry into the CNS, we infected primary human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVE) cells with the neurovirulent strain of WNV (NY99) and examined WNV replication kinetics together with the changes in the expressions of key tight junction proteins (TJP) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM). WNV infection of HBMVE cells was productive as analyzed by plaque assay and qRT-PCR, and did not induce cytopathic effect. Increased mRNA and protein expressions of TJP (claudin-1) and CAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule and E-selectin) were observed at days 2 and 3 after infection, respectively, which coincided with the peak in WNV replication. Further, using an in vitro BBB model comprised of HBMVE cells, we demonstrate that cell-free WNV can cross the BBB, without compromising the BBB integrity. These data suggest that infection of HBMVE cells can facilitate entry of cell-free virus into the CNS without disturbing the BBB, and increased CAM may assist in the trafficking of WNV-infected immune cells into the CNS, via ‘Trojan horse’ mechanism, thereby contributing to WNV dissemination in the CNS and associated pathology. PMID:19135695

  13. Autophagy protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells against methylglyoxal-induced injuries, reproducible in a cerebral ischemic model in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lili; Li, Xue; Zhong, Yinbo; Yu, Jing; Yu, Lina; Dai, Haibin; Yan, Min

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) are crucial for brain vascular repair and maintenance, but their physiological function may be impaired during ischemic stroke and diabetes. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive dicarbonyl produced during glucose metabolism, could exacerbate ischemia-induced EC injury and dysfunction. We investigated the protective effect of autophagy on cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) that underwent MGO treatment. A further study was conducted to explore the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect. Autophagic activity was assessed by evaluating protein levels, using western blot. 3-methyladenine (3-MA), bafilomycin A1, ammonium chloride (AC), Beclin 1 siRNA, and chloroquine (CQ) were used to cause autophagy inhibition. Alarmar blue assay and lactate dehydrogenase release assay were used to evaluate cell viability. Streptozotocin was administered to induce type I diabetes in rats and post-permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed to elicit cerebral ischemia. Blood-brain barrier permeability was also assessed. Our study found that MGO reduced HBMEC cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and triggered the responsive autophagy activation. Autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin A1, AC, 3-MA, and BECN1 siRNA exacerbated MGO-induced HBMEC injury. FAK phosphorylation inhibitor PF573228 inhibited MGO-triggered autophagy and enhanced lactate dehydrogenase release. Meanwhile, similar autophagy activation in brain vascular ECs was observed during permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats, while chloroquine-induced autophagy inhibition enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability. Taken together, our study indicates that autophagy triggered by MGO defends HBMEC against injuries.

  14. Key genes and proteins involved in CTCM-reducing microvascular endothelial cell permeability induced by SLT-IIv using gene chips and DIGE.

    PubMed

    Yi, Pengfei; Guo, Yang; Wang, Xin; Mu, Xiang; Wei, Xubin

    2010-01-01

    An Affymetrix mouse genome array and differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) techniques were used to investigate the pharmacological mechanisms of a mixture of herbs, designated CTCM, a compound of traditional Chinese medicine, for the treatment of increased permeability in mouse intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (MIMECs) induced by the Shiga-like toxin type II variant (SLT-IIv). MIMECs were challenged with 10microg/ml SLT-IIv for 12h and then treated with CTCM at a concentration of 200microg/ml for 12h. Total RNA and proteins from each treatment group were extracted from cultured MIMECs for analysis by the Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Genome 430 2.0 microarray and DIGE. The results obtained demonstrated that there were one genes downregulated and one genes upregulated, one protein downregulated and four proteins upregulated in the SLT-IIv group compared to the control group. In the CTCM group, four genes were upregulated, three genes were downregulated, a single protein was downregulated and a single protein was upregulated when compared to the control group. When the CTCM-treated group was compared to the SLT-IIv group, expression of one gene was found to be increased, and all other genes were decreased, with five proteins downregulated. Analysis of the data suggested that CTCM specifically and effectively reduced microvascular endothelial cell permeability to SLT-IIv in the treatment of pig edema disease. In the CTCM-treated group, hspa9 expression was increased in both gene chip and DIGE analysis, so it may be a key protein in reducing cell permeability and utilized in medical treatments.

  15. Endothelial Jarid2/Jumonji is required for normal cardiac development and proper Notch1 expression.

    PubMed

    Mysliwiec, Matthew R; Bresnick, Emery H; Lee, Youngsook

    2011-05-13

    Jarid2/Jumonji critically regulates developmental processes including cardiovascular development. Jarid2 knock-out mice exhibit cardiac defects including hypertrabeculation with noncompaction of the ventricular wall. However, molecular mechanisms underlying Jarid2-mediated cardiac development remain unknown. To determine the cardiac lineage-specific roles of Jarid2, we generated myocardial, epicardial, cardiac neural crest, or endothelial conditional Jarid2 knock-out mice using Cre-loxP technology. Only mice with an endothelial deletion of Jarid2 recapitulate phenotypic defects observed in whole body mutants including hypertrabeculation and noncompaction of the ventricle. To identify potential targets of Jarid2, combinatorial approaches using microarray and candidate gene analyses were employed on Jarid2 knock-out embryonic hearts. Whole body or endothelial deletion of Jarid2 leads to increased endocardial Notch1 expression in the developing ventricle, resulting in increased Notch1-dependent signaling to the adjacent myocardium. Using quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, Jarid2 was found to occupy a specific region on the endogenous Notch1 locus. We propose that failure to properly regulate Notch signaling in Jarid2 mutants likely leads to the defects in the developing ventricular chamber. The identification of Jarid2 as a potential regulator of Notch1 signaling has broad implications for many cellular processes including development, stem cell maintenance, and tumor formation.

  16. The Src family tyrosine kinases src and yes have differential effects on inflammation-induced apoptosis in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nelin, Leif D; White, Hilary A; Jin, Yi; Trittmann, Jennifer K; Chen, Bernadette; Liu, Yusen

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial cells are essential for normal lung function: they sense and respond to circulating factors and hemodynamic alterations. In inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, endothelial cell apoptosis is an inciting event in pathogenesis and a prominent pathological feature. Endothelial cell apoptosis is mediated by circulating inflammatory factors, which bind to receptors on the cell surface, activating signal transduction pathways, leading to caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. We hypothesized that yes and src have differential effects on caspase-3 activation in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (hPMVEC) due to differential downstream signaling effects. To test this hypothesis, hPMVEC were treated with siRNA against src (siRNAsrc), siRNA against yes (siRNAyes), or their respective scramble controls. After recovery, the hPMVEC were treated with cytomix (LPS, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ). Treatment with cytomix induced activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with siRNAsrc blunted cytomix-induced ERK activation and enhanced cleaved caspase-3 levels, while treatment with siRNAyes enhanced cytomix-induced ERK activation and attenuated levels of cleaved caspase-3. Inhibition of the ERK pathway using U0126 enhanced cytomix-induced caspase-3 activity. Treatment of hPMVEC with cytomix induced Akt activation, which was inhibited by siRNAsrc. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway using LY294002 prevented cytomix-induced ERK activation and augmented cytomix-induced caspase-3 cleavage. Together, our data demonstrate that, in hPMVEC, yes activation blunts the ERK cascade in response to cytomix, resulting in greater apoptosis, while cytomix-induced src activation induces the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, which leads to activation of Akt and ERK and attenuation of apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. The Src family tyrosine kinases src and yes have differential effects on inflammation-induced apoptosis in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    White, Hilary A.; Jin, Yi; Trittmann, Jennifer K.; Chen, Bernadette; Liu, Yusen

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells are essential for normal lung function: they sense and respond to circulating factors and hemodynamic alterations. In inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, endothelial cell apoptosis is an inciting event in pathogenesis and a prominent pathological feature. Endothelial cell apoptosis is mediated by circulating inflammatory factors, which bind to receptors on the cell surface, activating signal transduction pathways, leading to caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. We hypothesized that yes and src have differential effects on caspase-3 activation in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (hPMVEC) due to differential downstream signaling effects. To test this hypothesis, hPMVEC were treated with siRNA against src (siRNAsrc), siRNA against yes (siRNAyes), or their respective scramble controls. After recovery, the hPMVEC were treated with cytomix (LPS, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ). Treatment with cytomix induced activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with siRNAsrc blunted cytomix-induced ERK activation and enhanced cleaved caspase-3 levels, while treatment with siRNAyes enhanced cytomix-induced ERK activation and attenuated levels of cleaved caspase-3. Inhibition of the ERK pathway using U0126 enhanced cytomix-induced caspase-3 activity. Treatment of hPMVEC with cytomix induced Akt activation, which was inhibited by siRNAsrc. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway using LY294002 prevented cytomix-induced ERK activation and augmented cytomix-induced caspase-3 cleavage. Together, our data demonstrate that, in hPMVEC, yes activation blunts the ERK cascade in response to cytomix, resulting in greater apoptosis, while cytomix-induced src activation induces the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, which leads to activation of Akt and ERK and attenuation of apoptosis. PMID:26919896

  18. Adherence of neutrophils to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation by chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators and dependence upon the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family.

    PubMed Central

    Tonnesen, M G; Anderson, D C; Springer, T A; Knedler, A; Avdi, N; Henson, P M

    1989-01-01

    The process of neutrophil adhesion to and migration through the microvascular endothelium, an early event in the induction of the acute inflammatory response, has been attributed to the generation of extravascular chemoattractants. Although both chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators enhance neutrophil adherence in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism(s) involved in the interaction between circulating neutrophils and microvascular endothelial cells is still not completely understood. In a microtiter well adherence assay, the chemotactic peptides, FMLP and C5a, and the lipid mediators, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and platelet activating factor (PAF), enhanced human neutrophil adherence to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells as well as to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner with a rapid time course. This stimulated adhesive interaction between neutrophils and cultured human endothelial cells was dependent on the expression of the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family on the neutrophil surface since neutrophils from patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency, lacking surface expression of the adhesive glycoproteins, exhibited markedly diminished adherence to human endothelial cells in response to stimulation with chemotactic factors compared to normal control neutrophils. All four mediators enhanced expression of the glycoprotein family on the surface of normal neutrophils as determined by flow cytofluorimetry using a monoclonal antibody (TS1/18) to the glycoprotein common beta subunit. In addition, TS1/18 inhibited up to 100% the adherence of normal neutrophils to endothelial cells stimulated by maximal concentrations of FMLP, C5a, LTB4, or PAF. Moreover, HL-60 cells, human promyelocytic leukemia cells, neither increased glycoprotein surface expression nor adherence in response to stimulation. Thus, peptide and lipid mediators of the acute inflammatory response appear to enhance adherence of circulating neutrophils to the

  19. In vivo demonstration of red cell-endothelial interaction, sickling and altered microvascular response to oxygen in the sickle transgenic mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, D K; Fabry, M E; Costantini, F; Rubin, E M; Nagel, R L

    1995-01-01

    Intravascular sickling, red cell-endothelium interaction, and altered microvascular responses have been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of human sickle cell disease, but have never been demonstrated under in vivo flow. To address this issue, we have examined a transgenic mouse line, alphaHbetaSbetaS-Antilles [betaMDD] which has a combined high (78%) expression of beta S and beta S-Antilles globins. In vivo microcirculatory studies using the cremaster muscle preparation showed adhesion of red cells, restricted to postcapillary venules, in transgenic mice but not in control mice. Electron microscopy revealed distinct contacts between the red cell membrane and the endothelium surface. Some red cells exhibiting sickling were regularly observed in the venular flow. Infusion of transgenic mouse red cells into the ex vivo mesocecum vasculature also showed adhesion of mouse red cells exclusively in venules. Under resting conditions (pO2, 15-20 mmHg), there were no differences in the cremaster microvascular diameters of control and transgenic mice; however, transgenic mice showed a drastic reduction in microvascular red cell velocities (Vrbc) with maximal Vrbc decrease (> 60%) occurring in venules, the sites of red cell adhesion and sickling. Local, transient hyperoxia (pO2, 150 mmHg) resulted in striking differences between control and transgenic mice. In controls, oxygen caused a 69% arteriolar constriction, accompanied by 75% reduction in Vrbc. In contrast, in transgenic mice, hyperoxia resulted in only 8% decrease in the arteriolar diameter and in 68% increase in VrBC; the latter is probably due to an improved flow behavior of red cells as a consequence of unsickling. In summary, the high expression of human sickle hemoglobin in the mouse results not only in intravascular sickling but also red cell-endothelium interaction. The altered microvascular response to oxygen could be secondary to blood rheological changes, although possible intrinsic differences

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging myocardial perfusion reserve index assessment in women with microvascular coronary dysfunction and reference controls

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Louise E. J.; Goykhman, Pavel; Agarwal, Megha; Mehta, Puja K.; Sedlak, Tara; Li, Ning; Gill, Edward; Samuels, Bruce; Azabal, Babak; Kar, Saibal; Kothawade, Kamlesh; Minissian, Margo; Slomka, Piotr; Berman, Daniel S.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to comparatively assess cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) in women with confirmed microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD) cases and reference control women. Background Women with signs or symptoms of myocardial ischemia in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) frequently have MCD which carries an adverse prognosis. Diagnosis involves invasive coronary reactivity testing (CRT). Adenosine CMRI is a non-invasive test that may be useful for the detection of MCD. Methods Fifty-three women with MCD confirmed by CRT and 12 age- and estrogen-use matched reference controls underwent adenosine CMRI. CMRI was assessed for MPRI, calculated using the ratio of myocardial blood flow at hyperemia/rest for the whole myocardium and separately for the 16 segments as defined by the American Heart Association. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA models. Results Compared to reference controls, MCD cases had lower MPRI values globally and in subendocardial and subepicardial regions (1.63±0.39 vs. 1.98±0.38, P=0.007, 1.51±0.35 vs. 1.84±0.34, P=0.0045, 1.68±0.38 vs. 2.04±0.41, P=0.005, respectively). A perfusion gradient across the myocardium with lower MPRI in the subendocardium compared to the subepicardium was observed for both groups. Conclusions Women with MCD have lower MPRI measured by perfusion CMRI compared to reference controls. CMRI may be a useful diagnostic modality for MCD. Prospective validation of a diagnostic threshold for MPRI in patients with MCD is needed. PMID:24282764

  1. Antiangiogenic Effect of (±)-Haloperidol Metabolite II Valproate Ester [(±)-MRJF22] in Human Microvascular Retinal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Melania; Amata, Emanuele; Vinciguerra, Shila; Fiorito, Jole; Giurdanella, Giovanni; Drago, Filippo; Caporarello, Nunzia; Prezzavento, Orazio; Arena, Emanuela; Salerno, Loredana; Rescifina, Antonio; Lupo, Gabriella; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Marrazzo, Agostino

    2016-11-10

    (±)-MRJF22 [(±)-2], a novel prodrug of haloperidol metabolite II (sigma-1 receptor antagonist/sigma-2 receptor agonist ligand) obtained by conjugation to valproic acid (histone deacetylase inhibitor) via an ester bond, exhibits antiangiogenic activity, being able to reduce human retinal endothelial cell (HREC) viability in a comparable manner to bevacizumab. Moreover, (±)-2 was able to significantly reduce viable cells count, endothelial cell migration, and tube formation in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) stimulated HREC cultures.

  2. [Role of phosphorylated Moesin in the injury of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells of rats and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Sun, Gengyun

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the role of phosphorylated Moesin (p-Moesin) in the injury of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) of rats induced by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and to approach the impact of Rac1 signal pathway on Moesin phosphorylation. PMVECs of rats were cultured in vitro and passed on to the third generation, and the TNF-α time-effect experiment, dose-effect experiment and Rac1 signaling pathway intervention experiment were performed respectively. (1) Time-effect experiment: PMVECs were stimulated with 10 μg/L TNF-α for 0, 15, 30 minutes and 1, 3, 6, 12 hours, and the protein expressions of Moesin and p-Moesin were determined by Western Blot. (2) Dose-effect experiment: PMVECs were stimulated with 0, 0.1, 1, 10 μg/L TNF-α for 6 hours, and the protein expressions of Moesin and p-Moesin were determined by Western Blot. (3) Rac1 signaling pathway intervention experiment: PMVECs were divided into two parts, which were pretreated with 3 mL Rac1 specific inhibitor NSC23766 (200 μmol/L) for 0.5 hour or Rac1 specific agonist O-Me-cAMP (200 μmol/L) for 1 hour, respectively, and then incubated with 10 μg/L TNF-α for 6 hours. The PMVECs without treatment were served as blank control group, and those were treated with only O-Me-cAMP, NSC23766 or TNF-α were served as corresponding groups. The protein expressions of Moesin and p-Moesin were determined by Western Blot. (1) Time-effect experiment results: the expression of Moesin showed no change among all time points after 10 μg/L TNF-α stimulated PMVECs. But the expression of p-Moesin was sharply up-regulated at 15 minutes after TNF-α stimulation as compared with 0 minute (p-Moesin/Moesin: 4.399±0.523 vs. 1.000±0.195), peaked at 30 minutes (6.069±0.557), and then gradually decreased after 1 hour (5.005±0.544, 4.599±0.478, 1.742±0.288, 1.503±0.352 at 1, 3, 6, 12 hours, respectively) with significant difference among all time points (F = 15.397, P = 0.002). (2) Dose-effect experiment

  3. Interleukin-27 induces the endothelial differentiation in Sca-1+ cardiac resident stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Obana, Masanori; Mohri, Tomomi; Ebara, Masaki; Otani, Yuta; Maeda, Makiko; Fujio, Yasushi

    2015-10-01

    Cytokines play important roles in cardiac repair and regeneration. Recently, we demonstrated that interleukin (IL)-6 family cytokines induce the endothelial differentiation of Sca-1+ cardiac resident stem cells through STAT3/Pim-1 signaling pathway. In contrast, the biological functions of IL-12 family cytokines in heart remain to be elucidated, though they show structural homology with IL-6. In the present study, we examined the effects of IL-12 family cytokines on the transdifferentiation of cardiac Sca-1+ cells into cardiac cells. RT-PCR analyses revealed that IL-27 receptor α (IL-27Rα), but not IL-12R or IL-23R, was expressed in cardiac Sca-1+ cells. The transcript expression of IL-27 was elevated in murine hearts in cardiac injury models. Intriguingly, IL-27 stimulation for 14 days induced the endothelial cell (EC) marker genes, such as CD-31 and VE-cadherin. Immunoblot analyses clarified that IL-27 treatment rapidly phosphorylated STAT3. IL-27 upregulated the expression of Pim-1, but the overexpression of dominant negative STAT3 abrogated the induction of Pim-1 by IL-27. Finally, adenoviral transfection of dominant negative Pim-1 inhibited IL-27-induced EC differentiation of cardiac Sca-1+ cells. These findings demonstrated that IL-27 promoted the commitment of cardiac stem cells into the EC lineage, possibly leading to neovascularization as a novel biological function. IL-27 could not only regulate the inflammation but also contribute to the maintenance of the tissue homeostasis through stem cell differentiation at inflammatory sites. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. ProNGF, a cytokine induced after myocardial infarction in humans, targets pericytes to promote microvascular damage and activation

    PubMed Central

    Siao, Chia-Jen; Lorentz, Christina U.; Kermani, Pouneh; Marinic, Tina; Carter, John; McGrath, Kelly; Padow, Victoria A.; Mark, Willie; Falcone, Domenick J.; Cohen-Gould, Leona; Parrish, Diana C.; Habecker, Beth A.; Nykjaer, Anders; Ellenson, Lora H.; Tessarollo, Lino

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of acute cardiac ischemia focuses on reestablishment of blood flow in coronary arteries. However, impaired microvascular perfusion damages peri-infarct tissue, despite arterial patency. Identification of cytokines that induce microvascular dysfunction would provide new targets to limit microvascular damage. Pro–nerve growth factor (NGF), the precursor of NGF, is a well characterized cytokine in the brain induced by injury. ProNGF activates p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and sortilin receptors to mediate proapoptotic responses. We describe induction of proNGF by cardiomyocytes, and p75NTR in human arterioles after fatal myocardial infarction, but not with unrelated pathologies. After mouse cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury, rapid up-regulation of proNGF by cardiomyocytes and p75NTR by microvascular pericytes is observed. To identify proNGF actions, we generated a mouse expressing a mutant Ngf allele with impaired processing of proNGF to mature NGF. The proNGF-expressing mouse exhibits cardiac microvascular endothelial activation, a decrease in pericyte process length, and increased vascular permeability, leading to lethal cardiomyopathy in adulthood. Deletion of p75NTR in proNGF-expressing mice rescues the phenotype, confirming the importance of p75NTR-expressing pericytes in the development of microvascular injury. Furthermore, deficiency in p75NTR limits infarct size after I-R. These studies identify novel, nonneuronal actions for proNGF and suggest that proNGF represents a new target to limit microvascular dysfunction. PMID:23091165

  5. ProNGF, a cytokine induced after myocardial infarction in humans, targets pericytes to promote microvascular damage and activation.

    PubMed

    Siao, Chia-Jen; Lorentz, Christina U; Kermani, Pouneh; Marinic, Tina; Carter, John; McGrath, Kelly; Padow, Victoria A; Mark, Willie; Falcone, Domenick J; Cohen-Gould, Leona; Parrish, Diana C; Habecker, Beth A; Nykjaer, Anders; Ellenson, Lora H; Tessarollo, Lino; Hempstead, Barbara L

    2012-11-19

    Treatment of acute cardiac ischemia focuses on reestablishment of blood flow in coronary arteries. However, impaired microvascular perfusion damages peri-infarct tissue, despite arterial patency. Identification of cytokines that induce microvascular dysfunction would provide new targets to limit microvascular damage. Pro-nerve growth factor (NGF), the precursor of NGF, is a well characterized cytokine in the brain induced by injury. ProNGF activates p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) and sortilin receptors to mediate proapoptotic responses. We describe induction of proNGF by cardiomyocytes, and p75(NTR) in human arterioles after fatal myocardial infarction, but not with unrelated pathologies. After mouse cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury, rapid up-regulation of proNGF by cardiomyocytes and p75(NTR) by microvascular pericytes is observed. To identify proNGF actions, we generated a mouse expressing a mutant Ngf allele with impaired processing of proNGF to mature NGF. The proNGF-expressing mouse exhibits cardiac microvascular endothelial activation, a decrease in pericyte process length, and increased vascular permeability, leading to lethal cardiomyopathy in adulthood. Deletion of p75(NTR) in proNGF-expressing mice rescues the phenotype, confirming the importance of p75(NTR)-expressing pericytes in the development of microvascular injury. Furthermore, deficiency in p75(NTR) limits infarct size after I-R. These studies identify novel, nonneuronal actions for proNGF and suggest that proNGF represents a new target to limit microvascular dysfunction.

  6. SIRT4 inhibits cigarette smoke extracts-induced mononuclear cell adhesion to human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells via regulating NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongfeng; Wang, Haijing; Luo, Guangming; Dai, Xiaotian

    2014-05-02

    Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet its pathogenic mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Endothelial dysfunction is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of COPD. A detailed understanding of the mechanism involved in its progression would have a substantial impact on the optimization and development of treatment strategies. Here, we report that the expression of SIRT4, a mitochondrial sirtuin, is markedly down-regulated in cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-treated human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Overexpression of SIRT4 significantly inhibits CSE-induced mononuclear cell adhesion to HPMECs. Consistently, we found that overexpression of SIRT4 attenuates the induction of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin. Importantly, SIRT4 was found to negatively regulate CSE-induced NF-κB activation via inhibiting the degradation of IκBα. Moreover, we also found that proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and IL-6, the downstream target genes of NF-κB, are also inhibited by overexpression of SIRT4. These results suggest that SIRT4 protects HPMECs exposed to CSE stress via a mechanism that may involve the NF-κB pathway. Strategies based on the enhancement of SIRT4 may prove to be beneficial in the treatment of cigarette smoking caused COPD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hexachlorobenzene promotes angiogenesis in vivo, in a breast cancer model and neovasculogenesis in vitro, in the human microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1.

    PubMed

    Pontillo, Carolina; Español, Alejandro; Chiappini, Florencia; Miret, Noelia; Cocca, Claudia; Alvarez, Laura; Kleiman de Pisarev, Diana; Sales, María Elena; Randi, Andrea Silvana

    2015-11-19

    Exposure to environmental pollutants may alter proangiogenic ability and promotes tumor growth. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an organochlorine pesticide found in maternal milk and in lipid foods, and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). HCB induces migration and invasion in human breast cancer cells, as well as tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. In this study, we examined HCB action on angiogenesis in mammary carcinogenesis. HCB stimulates angiogenesis and increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in a xenograft model with the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1 exposed to HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5 and 5μM) showed an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and VEGF protein expression involving AhR. In addition, we found that HCB enhances VEGF-Receptor 2 (VEGFR2) expression, and activates its downstream pathways p38 and ERK1/2. HCB induces cell migration and neovasculogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Cells pretreatment with AhR, COX-2 and VEGFR2 selective inhibitors, suppressed these effects. In conclusion, our results show that HCB promotes angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro. HCB-induced cell migration and tubulogenesis are mediated by AhR, COX-2 and VEGFR2 in HMEC-1. These findings may help to understand the association among HCB exposure, angiogenesis and mammary carcinogenesis.

  8. Differential transcription profiles of long non-coding RNAs in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells in response to meningitic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruicheng; Huang, Fei; Fu, Jiyang; Dou, Beibei; Xu, Bojie; Miao, Ling; Liu, Wentong; Yang, Xiaopei; Tan, Chen; Chen, Huanchun; Wang, Xiangru

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating studies have indicated the influence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) on various biological processes as well as disease development and progression. However, the lncRNAs involved in bacterial meningitis and their regulatory effects are largely unknown. By RNA-sequencing, the transcriptional profiles of host lncRNAs in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) in response to meningitic Escherichia coli were demonstrated. Here, 25,257 lncRNAs were identified, including 24,645 annotated lncRNAs and 612 newly found ones. A total of 895 lncRNAs exhibited significant differences upon infection, among which 382 were upregulated and 513 were downregulated (≥2-fold, p < 0.05). Via bioinformatic analysis, the features of these lncRNAs, their possible functions, and the potential regulatory relationships between lncRNAs and mRNAs were predicted. Moreover, we compared the transcriptional specificity of these differential lncRNAs among hBMECs, human astrocyte cell U251, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and demonstrated the novel regulatory effects of proinflammatory cytokines on these differential lncRNAs. To our knowledge, this is the first time the transcriptional profiles of host lncRNAs involved in E. coli-induced meningitis have been reported, which shall provide novel insight into the regulatory mechanisms behind bacterial meningitis involving lncRNAs, and contribute to better prevention and therapy of CNS infection. PMID:27958323

  9. Effect of oxygen and glucose deprivation on VEGF and its receptors in microvascular endothelial cells co-cultured with mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihua; Tao, Jianping; Zhang, Qingyong; Wei, Meng

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between angiogenesis and the differential expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors in myocardial microvascular endothelial cells (MMVECs) co-cultured with mast cells (MCs) or mast cell granules (MCGs) under oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). MMVECs and MCs were isolated from Wistar rats. MCs spontaneously degranulated in OGD. The expression of VEGF peaked at 8 h and decreased from 16 h in OGD. However, the expression of its receptor, fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (Flt-1), and fetal liver kinase-1 (Flk-1), decreased significantly, and angiogenic potential of MMVECs decreased in OGD. Expression of VEGF, Flt-1, and Flk-1 increased significantly when MMVECs were co-cultured with MCGs or active MCs, but MCs had only a limited ability to induce angiogenesis in OGD. The angiogenic potential of MMVECs cultured in OGD (even with MCGs) was inferior to that of MMVECs cultured under normoxic conditions. OGD have a profound effect on angiogenesis, which is more pronounced than the effect of MCs on angiogenesis.

  10. Particulate matter from indoor environments of classroom induced higher cytotoxicity and leakiness in human microvascular endothelial cells in comparison with those collected from corridor.

    PubMed

    Chua, M L; Setyawati, M I; Li, H; Fang, C H Y; Gurusamy, S; Teoh, F T L; Leong, D T; George, S

    2016-09-23

    We investigated the physicochemical properties (size, shape, elemental composition, and endotoxin) of size resolved particulate matter (PM) collected from the indoor and corridor environments of classrooms. A comparative hazard profiling of these PM was conducted using human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Oxidative stress-dependent cytotoxicity responses were assessed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and high content screening (HCS), and disruption of monolayer cell integrity was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and transwell assay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis showed differences in the morphology and elemental composition of PM of different sizes and origins. While the total mass of PM collected from indoor environment was lower in comparison with those collected from the corridor, the endotoxin content was substantially higher in indoor PM (e.g., ninefold higher endotoxin level in indoor PM8.1-20 ). The ability to induce oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxicity and leakiness in cell monolayer were higher for indoor PM compared to those collected from the corridor. In conclusion, this comparative analysis suggested that indoor PM is relatively more hazardous to the endothelial system possibly because of higher endotoxin content.

  11. Regulation on Toll-like Receptor 4 and Cell Barrier Function by Rab26 siRNA-loaded DNA Nanovector in Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongli; He, Binfeng; Liu, Xueping; Li, Jingtong; Liu, Qian; Dong, Weijie; Xu, Zhi; Qian, Guisheng; Zuo, Hua; Hu, Changhua; Qian, Hang; Mao, Chengde; Wang, Guansong

    2017-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab26 is involved in multiple processes, such as vesicle-mediated secretion and autophagy. However, the mechanisms and functions of Rab26 in the human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMVECs) are not clear. In this study, we thoroughly investigated the role and novel mechanism of Rab26 in permeability and apoptosis of HPMVECs using a self-assembled Rab26 siRNA loaded DNA Y-motif nanoparticle (siRab26-DYM) and Rab26 adenovirus. We found that siRab26-DYM could be efficiently transfected into HPMVECs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Importantly, the siRab26-DYM nanovector markedly aggravated the LPS-induced apoptosis and hyper-permeability of HPMVECs by promoting the nuclear translocation of Foxo1, and subsequent activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signal pathway. Overexpression of Rab26 by Rab26 adenoviruses partially inactivated LPS-induced TLR4 signaling pathway, suppressed the cell apoptosis and attenuated the hyperpermeability of HPMVECs. These results suggest that the permeability and apoptosis of HPMVECs can be modulated by manipulating Rab26 derived TLR4 signaling pathway, and that Rab26 can be potential therapeutic target for the treatment of vascular diseases related to endothelial barrier functions.

  12. Gap junction-mediated transfer of miR-145-5p from microvascular endothelial cells to colon cancer cells inhibits angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thuringer, Dominique; Jego, Gaetan; Berthenet, Kevin; Hammann, Arlette; Solary, Eric; Garrido, Carmen

    2016-05-10

    Gap junctional communication between cancer cells and blood capillary cells is crucial to tumor growth and invasion. Gap junctions may transfer microRNAs (miRs) among cells. Here, we explore the impact of such a transfer in co-culture assays, using the antitumor miR-145 as an example. The SW480 colon carcinoma cells form functional gap junction composed of connexin-43 (Cx43) with human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC). When HMEC are loaded with miR-145-5p mimics, the miR-145 level drastically increases in SW480. The functional inhibition of gap junctions, using either a gap channel blocker or siRNA targeting Cx43, prevents this increase. The transfer of miR-145 also occurs from SW480 to HMEC but not in non-contact co-cultures, excluding the involvement of soluble exosomes. The miR-145 transfer to SW480 up-regulates their Cx43 expression and inhibits their ability to promote angiogenesis. Our results indicate that the gap junctional communication can inhibit tumor growth by transferring miRs from one endothelial cell to neighboring tumor cells. This "bystander" effect could find application in cancer therapy.

  13. A fully analytical approach to investigate the electro-viscous effect of the endothelial glycocalyx layer on the microvascular blood flow.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Arezoo; Shirazi, Hadi Asgharzadeh; Asnafi, Alireza; Karimi, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the glycocalyx lining the endothelial surface has emerged as a structure of fundamental importance to a wide range of phenomena that has undeniable effect on cardiovascular health and disease. With respect to the blood flow in small vessels, it has been experimentally reported that the glycocalyx layer causes additional resistance to the flow. The hypothesis of glycocalyx resistance against the blood flow, considered as two-phase layer fluid through a small blood vessel, was theoretically evaluated. To do that, a very thin electric double layer (EDL) was considered and the fluid flow was modeled by the well-known Poisson and Boltzmann equations in micro-fluidics alongside the general Navier-Stokes equation. Finally, a complete analytical solution for this particular case was developed. The results confirmed the previous findings indicated that the negatively charged glycocalyx layer has no effect on the macro/micro scale blood flow. Here and in the nano-scale, slightly influence was observed and reported in this study. Moreover, more details about the thin electrically significant layer, close to the EDL, would be delineate to better recognition of electro-viscous effect caused by the endothelial glycocalyx near microvascular walls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The protective role of isorhamnetin on human brain microvascular endothelial cells from cytotoxicity induced by methylglyoxal and oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlu; Chen, Zhigang; Yan, Min; He, Ping; Chen, Zhong; Dai, Haibin

    2016-02-01

    As the first target of stroke, cerebral endothelial cells play a key role in brain vascular repair and maintenance, and their function is impeded in diabetes. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive dicarbonyl produced during glucose metabolism, accumulates in diabetic patients. MGO and MGO-induced advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) could ameliorate stroke-induced brain vascular damage, closely related with ECs dysfunction. Using MGO plus oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) to mimic diabetic stroke, we reported the protective effect of isorhamnetin on OGD-induced cytotoxicity after MGO treatment on primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and explored the underlying mechanisms. Treatment of MGO for 24 h significantly enhanced 3-h OGD-induced HBMEC toxic effect, which was inhibited by pretreatment of isorhamnetin (100 μmol/L). Moreover, the protective effect of isorhamnetin is multiple function dependent, which includes anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptosis effects. Besides its well-known inhibition on the mitochondria-dependent or intrinsic apoptotic pathway, isorhamnetin also reduced activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, as characterized by the decreased expression and activity of caspase 3 and caspase 8. Furthermore, pretreatment with isorhamnetin specifically inhibited FAS/FASL expression and suppressed nuclear factor-kappa B nuclear translocation. Taken together, our results indicated that isorhamnetin protected against OGD-induced cytotoxicity after MGO treatment in cultured HBMEC due to its multiple protective effects and could inhibit Fas-mediated extrinsic apoptosis. Therefore, isorhamnetin is a promising reagent for the treatment of hyperglycemia and ischemia-induced cerebral vascular degeneration. A proposed model of the potential protective mechanism of isorhamnetin, a metabolite of quercetin, on methylglyoxal (MGO) treatment plus oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) exposure-induced cytotoxicity in cultured human

  15. Upregulation of COX-2/PGE2 by ET-1 mediated through Ca2+-dependent signals in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Hsieh, Hsi-Lung; Chi, Pei-Ling; Yang, Chien-Chung; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2014-06-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a proinflammatory mediator, is elevated in the regions of several brain inflammatory disorders, implying that ET-1 may contribute to inflammatory responses. The deleterious effects of ET-1 on brain endothelial cells may aggravate brain inflammation mediated through the upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) system. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying ET-1-induced COX-2 expression in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEnd.3 cells) remain unclear. Herein, we investigated the effects of Ca2+-dependent protein kinases on ET-1-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 release in bEnd.3 cells. The data obtained with Western blotting, reverse transcription PCR, and intracellular Ca2+ analyses showed that ET-1-induced COX-2 expression was mediated through phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and phosphatidylcholine-phospholipase C (PC-PLC)/Ca2+-dependent activation of protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-α) and calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) cascades. Next, we demonstrated that ET-1 stimulated intracellular Ca2+ increase, phoshorylation of PKC-α, CaMKII, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK1/2) and then activated the activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2)/activator protein 1 (AP-1) via Gq/i protein-coupled ETB receptors. Moreover, the data of chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter assay demonstrated that the activated ATF2/AP-1 and p300 bound to its corresponding binding sites within COX-2 promoter, thereby turning on COX-2 gene transcription. Finally, upregulation of COX-2 by ET-1 promoted PGE2 biosynthesis and release in these cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in bEnd.3 cells, Ca2+-dependent PKC-α and CaMKII linking to MAPKs, ATF2/AP-1, and p300 cascade is essential for ET-1-induced COX-2 upregulation. Understanding the mechanisms of COX-2/PGE2 system upregulated by ET-1 on brain microvascular endothelial cells may provide rational

  16. Cardiac tissue development for delivery of embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial and cardiac cells in natural matrices.

    PubMed

    Turner, William S; Wang, Xiaoling; Johnson, Scott; Medberry, Christopher; Mendez, Jose; Badylak, Stephen F; McCord, Marian G; McCloskey, Kara E

    2012-11-01

    The packaging and delivery of cells for cardiac regeneration has been explored using a variety biomaterials and delivery methods, but these studies often ignore one or more important design factors critical for rebuilding cardiac tissue. These include the biomaterial architecture, strength and stiffness, cell alignment, and/or incorporation of multiple cell types. In this article, we explore the combinatorial use of decellularized tissues, moldable hydrogels, patterned cell-seeding, and cell-sheet engineering and find that a combination of these methods is optimal in the recreation of transplantable cardiac-like tissue in vivo. We show that decellularized urinary bladder matrix (UBM), that is compliant and suturable, supports the survival of cell cultures but does not allow maintenance of cell-to-cell contacts of transferred cell-sheets (presumably, due to its rough surface). Moreover, the UBM material must be filled with hyaluronan (HA) hydrogels for smoothing rough surfaces and allowing the delivery of greater cell numbers. We additionally incorporated our previously developed "wrinkled" microchip for inducing alignment of cardiac cells with a laser-etched mask for co-seeding patterned "channels" of cells. This article also introduces a novel method of plasma coating for cell-sheet engineering that compares well with electron bean irradiation methods and may be combined with our "wrinkled" surfaces to facilitate the alignment of cardiac cells into sheets. Our data shows that an optimal design for generating cardiac tissue would include (1) decellularized matrix seeded with endothelial cells in a HA layered with (2) prealigned cardiac cell-sheets fabricated using our "wrinkled" microchips and thermo-responsive polymer [poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)] cell sheet transfer system.

  17. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptor Deletion Prevents Diet-Induced Cardiac Diastolic Dysfunction in Females.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guanghong; Habibi, Javad; DeMarco, Vincent G; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Ma, Lixin; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Aroor, Annayya R; Domeier, Timothy L; Zhu, Yi; Meininger, Gerald A; Barrett Mueller, Katelee; Jaffe, Iris Z; Sowers, James R

    2015-12-01

    Overnutrition and insulin resistance are especially prominent risk factors for the development of cardiac diastolic dysfunction in females. We recently reported that consumption of a Western diet (WD) containing excess fat (46%), sucrose (17.5%), and high fructose corn syrup (17.5%) for 16 weeks resulted in cardiac diastolic dysfunction and aortic stiffening in young female mice and that these abnormalities were prevented by mineralocorticoid receptor blockade. Herein, we extend those studies by testing whether WD-induced diastolic dysfunction and factors contributing to diastolic impairment, such as cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy, inflammation, and impaired insulin signaling, are modulated by excess endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling. Four-week-old female endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor knockout and wild-type mice were fed mouse chow or WD for 4 months. WD feeding resulted in prolonged relaxation time, impaired diastolic septal wall motion, and increased left ventricular filling pressure indicative of diastolic dysfunction. This occurred in concert with myocardial interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy that were associated with enhanced profibrotic (transforming growth factor β1/Smad) and progrowth (S6 kinase-1) signaling, as well as myocardial oxidative stress and a proinflammatory immune response. WD also induced cardiomyocyte stiffening, assessed ex vivo using atomic force microscopy. Conversely, endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency prevented WD-induced diastolic dysfunction, profibrotic, and progrowth signaling, in conjunction with reductions in macrophage proinflammatory polarization and improvements in insulin metabolic signaling. Therefore, our findings indicate that increased endothelial cell mineralocorticoid receptor signaling associated with consumption of a WD plays a key role in the activation of cardiac profibrotic, inflammatory, and growth pathways that lead to diastolic dysfunction in

  18. Endothelial cell dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the STOX1 model of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Aurélien; Doridot, Ludivine; Calicchio, Rosamaria; Méhats, Celine; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Castille, Johann; Barbaux, Sandrine; Couderc, Betty; Jacques, Sébastien; Letourneur, Franck; Buffat, Christophe; Le Grand, Fabien; Laissue, Paul; Miralles, Francisco; Vaiman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disease of pregnancy involving systemic endothelial dysfunction. However, cardiovascular consequences of preeclampsia are difficult to analyze in humans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular dysfunction induced by preeclampsia by examining the endothelium of mice suffering of severe preeclampsia induced by STOX1 overexpression. Using Next Generation Sequencing on endothelial cells of mice carrying either transgenic or control embryos, we discovered significant alterations of gene networks involved in inflammation, cell cycle, and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the heart of the preeclamptic mice revealed cardiac hypertrophy associated with histological anomalies. Bioinformatics comparison of the networks of modified genes in the endothelial cells of the preeclamptic mice and HUVECs exposed to plasma from preeclamptic women identified striking similarities. The cardiovascular alterations in the pregnant mice are comparable to those endured by the cardiovascular system of preeclamptic women. The STOX1 mice could help to better understand the endothelial dysfunction in the context of preeclampsia, and guide the search for efficient therapies able to protect the maternal endothelium during the disease and its aftermath. PMID:26758611

  19. The novel mitochondria-targeted hydrogen sulfide (H2S) donors AP123 and AP39 protect against hyperglycemic injury in microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gerő, Domokos; Torregrossa, Roberta; Perry, Alexis; Waters, Alicia; Le-Trionnaire, Sophie; Whatmore, Jacqueline L; Wood, Mark; Whiteman, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    The development of diabetic vascular complications is initiated, at least in part, by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in endothelial cells. Hyperglycemia induces superoxide production in the mitochondria and initiates changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential that leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) supplementation has been shown to reduce the mitochondrial oxidant production and shows efficacy against diabetic vascular damage in vivo. However, the half-life of H2S is very short and it is not specific for the mitochondria. We have therefore evaluated two novel mitochondria-targeted anethole dithiolethione and hydroxythiobenzamide H2S donors (AP39 and AP123 respectively) at preventing hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and metabolic changes in microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. Hyperglycemia (HG) induced significant increase in the activity of the citric acid cycle and led to elevated mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondrial oxidant production was increased and the mitochondrial electron transport decreased in hyperglycemic cells. AP39 and AP123 (30-300nM) decreased HG-induced hyperpolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane and inhibited the mitochondrial oxidant production. Both H2S donors (30-300nM) increased the electron transport at respiratory complex III and improved the cellular metabolism. Targeting H2S to mitochondria retained the cytoprotective effect of H2S against glucose-induced damage in endothelial cells suggesting that the molecular target of H2S action is within the mitochondria. Mitochondrial targeting of H2S also induced >1000-fold increase in the potency of H2S against hyperglycemia-induced injury. The high potency and long-lasting effect elicited by these H2S donors strongly suggests that these compounds could be useful against diabetic vascular complications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Tumor cells induce COX-2 and mPGES-1 expression in microvascular endothelial cells mainly by means of IL-1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Casós, Kelly; Siguero, Laura; Fernández-Figueras, María-Teresa; León, Xavier; Sardá, María-Pilar; Vila, Luis; Camacho, Mercedes

    2011-05-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E(2) plays a key role in immune response, tumor progression and metastasis. We previously showed that macrovessel-derived endothelial cells do not produce PGE(2) enzymatically because they do not express the inducible microsomal PGE-synthase-1 (mPGES-1). Nevertheless, differences between macro- and micro-vessel-derived endothelial cells regarding arachidonic acid (AAc) metabolism profile have been reported. The present work was conducted to evaluate the expression of PGE(2)-pathway-related enzymes in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) in culture and to test the hypothesis that the tumor cell-HMVEC cross talk could increase mPGES-1 expression in HMVEC. We treated HMVEC in culture with human recombinant IL-1β. IL-1β induced PGE(2) release and COX-2 and mPGES-1 expression in terms of mRNA and protein, determined by real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. HMVEC constitutively expressed mPGES-2 and cytosolic PGES (cPGES) and the IL-1β treatment did not modify their expression. PGE(2) synthesized by HMVEC from exogenous AAc was linked to mPGES-1 expression. Immunohistochemistry analysis confirmed mPGES-1 expression in microvessels in vivo. COX-2 and mPGES-1 were also induced in HMVEC by the conditioned medium from two squamous head and neck carcinoma cell lines. Conditioned medium from tumor cell cultures contained several cytokines including the IL-1β and IL-1α. Tumor cell-induced COX-2 and mPGES-1 in HMVEC was strongly inhibited by the IL-1-receptor antagonist, indicating the important implication of IL-1 in this effect. HMVEC could therefore contribute directly to PGE(2) formed in the tumor. Our findings support the concept that mPGES-1 could be a target for therapeutic intervention in patients with cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Knockout of p47 phox uncovers a critical role of p40 phox in reactive oxygen species production in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lampson M; Teng, Lei; Li, Jian-Mei

    2009-10-01

    p40(phox) is an important regulatory subunit of NADPH oxidase, but its role in endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production remains unknown. Using coronary microvascular endothelial cells isolated from wild-type and p47(phox) knockout mice, we found that knockout of p47(phox) increased the level of p40(phox) expression, whereas depletion of p40(phox) in wild-type cells increased p47(phox) expression. In both cases, the basal ROS production (without agonist stimulation) was well preserved. Double knockout of p40(phox) and p47(phox) dramatically reduced (approximately 65%) ROS production and cells started to die. The transcriptional regulation of p40(phox) and p47(phox) expressions involves HBP1. p40(phox) was prephosphorylated in resting cells. PMA stimulation induced p40(phox) swift dephosphorylation (within 1 minute) in parallel with the start of p47(phox) phosphorylation. p40(phox) was then rephosphorylated, and this was accompanied with an increase in ROS production. Depletion of p40(phox) resulted in approximately 67% loss in agonist-induced ROS production despite the presence of p47(phox). These were further supported by experiments on mouse aortas stimulated with angiotensin II. p40(phox) is prephosphorylated in resting endothelial cells and can compensate p47(phox) in keeping basal ROS production. Dephosphorylation of p40(phox) is a prerequisite for agonist-induced p47(phox) phosphorylation, and p40(phox) through its dynamic dephosphorylation and rephosphorylation is involved in the regulation of agonist-induced ROS production.

  2. Knockout of p47phox Uncovers a Critical Role of p40phox in Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lampson M.; Teng, Lei; Li, Jian-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Objective p40phox is an important regulatory subunit of NADPH oxidase, but its role in endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production remains unknown. Methods and Results Using coronary microvascular endothelial cells isolated from wild-type and p47phox knockout mice, we found that knockout of p47phox increased the level of p40phox expression, whereas depletion of p40phox in wild-type cells increased p47phox expression. In both cases, the basal ROS production (without agonist stimulation) was well preserved. Double knockout of p40phox and p47phox dramatically reduced (≈65%) ROS production and cells started to die. The transcriptional regulation of p40phox and p47phox expressions involves HBP1. p40phox was prephosphorylated in resting cells. PMA stimulation induced p40phox swift dephosphorylation (within 1 minute) in parallel with the start of p47phox phosphorylation. p40phox was then rephosphorylated, and this was accompanied with an increase in ROS production. Depletion of p40phox resulted in ≈67% loss in agonist-induced ROS production despite the presence of p47phox. These were further supported by experiments on mouse aortas stimulated with angiotensin II. Conclusion p40phox is prephosphorylated in resting endothelial cells and can compensate p47phox in keeping basal ROS production. Dephosphorylation of p40phox is a prerequisite for agonist-induced p47phox phosphorylation, and p40phox through its dynamic dephosphorylation and rephosphorylation is involved in the regulation of agonist-induced ROS production. PMID:19608974

  3. Talin1 is required for cardiac Z-disk stabilization and endothelial integrity in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing; Zhang, Jiaojiao; Koh, Wonshill; Yu, Qingming; Zhu, Xiaojun; Amsterdam, Adam; Davis, George E.; Arnaout, M. Amin; Xiong, Jing-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Talin (tln) binds and activates integrins to couple extracellular matrix–bound integrins to the cytoskeleton; however, its role in heart development is not well characterized. We identified the defective gene and the resulting cardiovascular phenotypes in zebrafish tln1fl02k mutants. The ethylnitrosourea-induced fl02k mutant showed heart failure, brain hemorrhage, and diminished cardiac and vessel lumens at 52 h post fertilization. Positional cloning revealed a nonsense mutation of tln1 in this mutant. tln1, but neither tln2 nor -2a, was dominantly expressed in the heart and vessels. Unlike tln1 and -2 in the mouse heart, the unique tln1 expression in the heart enabled us, for the first time, to determine the critical roles of Tln1 in the maintenance of cardiac sarcomeric Z-disks and endothelial/endocardial cell integrity, partly through regulating F-actin networks in zebrafish. The similar expression profiles of tln1 and integrin β1b (itgb1b) and synergistic function of the 2 genes revealed that itgb1b is a potential partner for tln1 in the stabilization of cardiac Z-disks and vessel lumens. Taken together, the results of this work suggest that Tln1-mediated Itgβ1b plays a crucial role in maintaining cardiac sarcomeric Z-disks and endothelial/endocardial cell integrity in zebrafish and may also help to gain molecular insights into congenital heart diseases.—Wu, Q., Zhang, J., Koh, W., Yu, Q., Zhu, X., Amsterdam, A., Davis, G. E., Arnaout, M. A., Xiong, J.-W. Talin1 is required for cardiac Z-disk stabilization and endothelial integrity in zebrafish. PMID:26310270

  4. Regulatory role of membrane-bound form interleukin-15 on human uterine microvascular endothelial cells in circulating CD16(-) natural killer cell extravasation into human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Kitaya, Kotaro; Yasuo, Tadahiro

    2013-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 plays a major role in accumulation of unique CD16(-) natural killer (NK) cells in the human endometrium, partly via selective extravasation of peripheral blood (PB) counterparts from local microvascular circulation. While IL-15 exhibits a chemotactic activity for PB CD16(-) NK cells, IL-15 attenuates their binding capacity to dermatan sulfate, the major CD62L ligand expressed on human uterine microvascular endothelial cells (HUtMVECs). These findings suggest that premature action of IL-15 interferes with CD62L-dependent tethering/rolling of PB CD16(-) NK cells on HUtMVECs, which is an early critical process of leukocyte extravasation. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the IL-15 regulation in the initial CD62L-dependent contact between PB CD16(-) NK cells and HUtMVECs. Unlike other candidate molecules, recombinant IL-15 downregulated CD62L expression on freshly isolated PB CD16(-) NK cells. IL-12 and IL-10, the two known upregulators of CD62L on CD16(-) NK cells, were not detectable in HUtMVECs and endometrial perivascular stromal cells. Binding to immobilized dermatan sulfate increased surface IL-15 receptor-alpha chain expression on CD16(-) NK cells. Under ovarian steroid stimulation, IL-15 was detectable on the surface, but not in the supernatant, of cultured HUtMVECs. Ovarian steroid-induced IL-15 expression on HUtMVECs was not attenuated by chondroitinase ABC (which degrades chondroitin sulfate-A and -C and dermatan sulfate) or sodium acetate buffer (which dissociates cytokines from their cognate receptors). These results suggest that HUtMVECs secrete a less soluble form of IL-15 into local microcirculation. Instead, HUtMVECs bear a membrane-bound form IL-15 under the influence of ovarian steroids, which may be favorable for preventing downregulation of CD62L on PB CD16(-) NK cells and facilitating their initial contact with HUtMVECs.

  5. Immunoglobulin M-enriched human intravenous immunoglobulins reduce leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions and attenuate microvascular perfusion failure in normotensive endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Johannes N; Fertmann, Jan M; Vollmar, Brigitte; Laschke, Matthias W; Jauch, Karl W; Menger, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate potential differences in the efficacy of immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations in patients with sepsis. A recent meta-analysis showed improved survival rates with IgM-enriched Igs. It was the objective of the present study to characterize microcirculatory actions of different clinically used Ig preparations in a rodent endotoxin model by intravital microscopy. Male Syrian golden hamsters 6 to 8 weeks old with a body weight of 60 to 80 g were investigated by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Endotoxemia was induced by administration of 2 mg/kg (i.v.) endotoxin (LPS, Escherichia coli). Two different Ig preparations containing IgM, IgA, and IgG (intravenous IgM group; n = 6; 5 mL Pentaglobin/kg body weight, i.v.) or exclusively IgG (intravenous IgG group; n = 5; 5 mL Flebogamma/kg body weight, i.v.) were applied 5 min before LPS. Saline-treated endotoxemic animals served as controls (control; n = 8). In controls, LPS induced massive leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions, pronounced microvascular leakage, a decrease of systemic platelet count, and distinct capillary perfusion failure (P < 0.05). Both intravenous IgM and IgG reduced venular leakage (P< 0.05) and ameliorated the decrease in platelet count (P < 0.05). Of interest, intravenous IgM was capable of significantly (P< 0.05) reducing leukocyte adhesion in venules. This was associated with normalization of capillary perfusion at 24 h of endotoxemia, whereas intravenous IgG could not prevent LPS-mediated microvascular perfusion failure. We demonstrate that IgM-enriched Igs are superior to IgG alone in attenuating LPS-induced leukocytic inflammation and microcirculatory dysfunction. Our findings can explain better efficacy of IgM-enriched Igs in patients with severe sepsis.

  6. Endothelial p53 deletion improves angiogenesis and prevents cardiac fibrosis and heart failure induced by pressure overload in mice.

    PubMed

    Gogiraju, Rajinikanth; Xu, Xingbo; Bochenek, Magdalena L; Steinbrecher, Julia H; Lehnart, Stephan E; Wenzel, Philip; Kessel, Michael; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M; Dobbelstein, Matthias; Schäfer, Katrin

    2015-02-24

    Cardiac dysfunction developing in response to chronic pressure overload is associated with apoptotic cell death and myocardial vessel rarefaction. We examined whether deletion of tumor suppressor p53 in endothelial cells may prevent the transition from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure. Mice with endothelial-specific deletion of p53 (End.p53-KO) were generated by crossing p53fl/fl mice with mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of an inducible Tie2 promoter. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by transverse aortic constriction. Serial echocardiography measurements revealed improved cardiac function in End.p53-KO mice that also exhibited better survival. Cardiac hypertrophy was associated with increased p53 levels in End.p53-WT controls, whereas banded hearts of End.p53-KO mice exhibited lower numbers of apoptotic endothelial and non-endothelial cells and altered mRNA levels of genes regulating cell cycle progression (p21), apoptosis (Puma), or proliferation (Pcna). A higher cardiac capillary density and improved myocardial perfusion was observed, and pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of p53 also promoted endothelial sprouting in vitro and new vessel formation following hindlimb ischemia in vivo. Hearts of End.p53-KO mice exhibited markedly less fibrosis compared with End.p53-WT controls, and lower mRNA levels of p53-regulated genes involved in extracellular matrix production and turnover (eg, Bmp-7, Ctgf, or Pai-1), or of transcription factors involved in controlling mesenchymal differentiation were observed. Our analyses reveal that accumulation of p53 in endothelial cells contributes to blood vessel rarefaction and fibrosis during chronic cardiac pressure overload and suggest that endothelial cells may be a therapeutic target for preserving cardiac function during hypertrophy. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  7. Collagen-targeting vascular endothelial growth factor improves cardiac performance after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ding, Liang; Zhao, Yannan; Sun, Wenjie; Chen, Bing; Lin, Hang; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Lujie; Xu, Biao; Dai, Jianwu

    2009-04-07

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important active protein for the induction of angiogenesis and improvement in cardiac function after myocardial ischemia; however, the lack of a delivery system targeted to the injured myocardium reduces the local therapeutic efficacy of VEGF and increases its possible adverse effects. We produced a fusion protein (CBD-VEGF) consisting of VEGF and a collagen-binding domain (CBD). The fusion protein specifically bound to type I collagen in vitro. In addition, CBD-VEGF promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation after binding to collagen, which indicates that it retained both growth factor activity and collagen-binding ability. When implanted subcutaneously in rats, collagen membranes loaded with CBD-VEGF were significantly vascularized. After it was injected into rats with acute myocardial infarction, CBD-VEGF was largely retained in the cardiac extracellular matrix, in which collagen I was rich. Four weeks after VEGF or CBD-VEGF was injected into the infarct border zone, cardiac function detected by echocardiography and hemodynamics was preserved in the CBD-VEGF group. Administration of CBD-VEGF also induced reduction of scar size, whereas native VEGF did not have these effects. In addition, a significant increase in the number of capillary vessels in infarcted hearts was found in the CBD-VEGF group. The injection of CBD-VEGF improved cardiac function in rats with induced acute myocardial infarction. This could potentially provide a new treatment option for myocardial infarction.

  8. Exosomes from iPSCs Delivering siRNA Attenuate Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Neutrophils Adhesion in Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zhihai; Ma, Jinhui; Wang, Chen; Yu, Jie; Qiao, Yeru; Hei, Feilong

    2017-04-01

    The pro-inflammatory activation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells resulting in continuous expression of cellular adhesion molecules, and subsequently recruiting primed neutrophils to form a firm neutrophils-endothelium (PMN-EC) adhesion, has been examined and found to play a vital role in acute lung injury (ALI). RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular process through harnessing a natural pathway silencing target gene based on recognition and subsequent degradation of specific mRNA sequences. It opens a promising approach for precision medicine. However, this application was hampered by many obstacles, such as immunogenicity, instability, toxicity problems, and difficulty in across the biological membrane. In this study, we reprogrammed urine exfoliated renal epithelial cells into human induced pluripotent stem cells (huiPSCs) and purified the exosomes (Exo) from huiPSCs as RNAi delivery system. Through choosing the episomal system to deliver transcription factors, we obtained a non-integrating huiPSCs. Experiments in both vitro and vivo demonstrated that these huiPSCs possess the pluripotent properties. The exosomes of huiPSCs isolated by differential centrifugation were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing a typical exosomal appearance with an average diameter of 122 nm. Immunoblotting confirmed the presence of the typical exosomal markers, including CD63, TSG 101, and Alix. Co-cultured PKH26-labeled exosomes with human primary pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) confirmed that they could be internalized by recipient cells at a time-dependent manner. Then, electroporation was used to introduce siRNA against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) into exosomes to form an Exo/siRNA compound. The Exo/siRNA compound efficiently delivered the target siRNA into HMVECs causing selective gene silencing, inhibiting the ICAM-1 protein expression, and PMN-EC adhesion induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These data suggest

  9. Evidence for a discrete UTP receptor in cardiac endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, S.; Buxton, I. L.; Probert, C. B.; Talbot, J. N.; Bradley, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of various purine and pyrimidine nucleotides upon cells cultured from guinea-pig cardiac endothelium (CEC), and find the P2Y-agonist 2-methylthioadenosine triphosphate (2MeSATP) to be a potent (EC50 = 85 +/- 10.2 nM) stimulator of increase in intracellular calcium concentrations, while uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) are less potent but equipotent with one another (EC50s = 2.1 +/- 0.3 and 1.8 +/- 0.2 microM, respectively). 2. While the P2Y receptor exhibited rapid homologous desensitization, this had no effect upon subsequent responsiveness of CEC to either ATP or UTP. Effects of maximal concentrations of ATP and UTP were not only additive, but did not cross-desensitize. Responses to UTP (but not to ATP or 2MeSATP) were blocked by treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX); all three nucleotides appeared to liberate calcium from an intracellular pool. 3. Suramin (30 microM) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the EC50 for ATP-dependent increases in intracellular calcium (5.3 +/- 2.2 microM vs. 2.0 +/- 0.9 microM in the absence of suramin), while it completely blocked the response to 2MeSATP. Suramin had no effect upon responses to UTP at concentrations of 100 microM. 4. We conclude that in addition to the P2Y and P2U subtypes of the ATP receptor, an additional receptor responsive to UTP but exhibiting no affinity for purine nucleotides is present in CEC; this "pyrimidine receptor' liberates intracellular calcium via a G-protein, and may partly mediate the contractile response to UTP in the coronary vasculature. PMID:8730756

  10. Human C-kit+CD45- cardiac stem cells are heterogeneous and display both cardiac and endothelial commitment by single-cell qPCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandstedt, Joakim; Jonsson, Marianne; Dellgren, Göran; Lindahl, Anders; Jeppsson, Anders; Asp, Julia

    2014-01-03

    C-kit expressing cardiac stem cells have been described as multipotent. We have previously identified human cardiac C-kit+CD45- cells, but only found evidence of endothelial commitment. A small cardiac committed subpopulation within the C-kit+CD45- population might however be present. To investigate this at single-cell level, right and left atrial biopsies were dissociated and analyzed by FACS. Only right atrial biopsies contained a clearly distinguishable C-kit+CD45- population, which was single-cell sorted for qPCR. A minor portion of the sorted cells (1.1%) expressed early cardiac gene NKX2.5 while most of the cells (81%) expressed late endothelial gene VWF. VWF- cells were analyzed for a wider panel of genes. One group of these cells expressed endothelial genes (FLK-1, CD31) while another group expressed late cardiac genes (TNNT2, ACTC1). In conclusion, human C-kit+CD45- cells were predominantly localized to the right atrium. While most of these cells expressed endothelial genes, a minor portion expressed cardiac genes.

  11. Endothelial p53 Deletion Improves Angiogenesis and Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis and Heart Failure Induced by Pressure Overload in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gogiraju, Rajinikanth; Xu, Xingbo; Bochenek, Magdalena L.; Steinbrecher, Julia H.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Wenzel, Philip; Kessel, Michael; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M.; Dobbelstein, Matthias; Schäfer, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction developing in response to chronic pressure overload is associated with apoptotic cell death and myocardial vessel rarefaction. We examined whether deletion of tumor suppressor p53 in endothelial cells may prevent the transition from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure. Methods and Results Mice with endothelial‐specific deletion of p53 (End.p53‐KO) were generated by crossing p53fl/fl mice with mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of an inducible Tie2 promoter. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by transverse aortic constriction. Serial echocardiography measurements revealed improved cardiac function in End.p53‐KO mice that also exhibited better survival. Cardiac hypertrophy was associated with increased p53 levels in End.p53‐WT controls, whereas banded hearts of End.p53‐KO mice exhibited lower numbers of apoptotic endothelial and non‐endothelial cells and altered mRNA levels of genes regulating cell cycle progression (p21), apoptosis (Puma), or proliferation (Pcna). A higher cardiac capillary density and improved myocardial perfusion was observed, and pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of p53 also promoted endothelial sprouting in vitro and new vessel formation following hindlimb ischemia in vivo. Hearts of End.p53‐KO mice exhibited markedly less fibrosis compared with End.p53‐WT controls, and lower mRNA levels of p53‐regulated genes involved in extracellular matrix production and turnover (eg, Bmp‐7, Ctgf, or Pai‐1), or of transcription factors involved in controlling mesenchymal differentiation were observed. Conclusions Our analyses reveal that accumulation of p53 in endothelial cells contributes to blood vessel rarefaction and fibrosis during chronic cardiac pressure overload and suggest that endothelial cells may be a therapeutic target for preserving cardiac function during hypertrophy. PMID:25713289

  12. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Katt, Moriah E; Xu, Zinnia S; Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2-4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research.

  13. Deep Sequencing Reveals Predominant Expression of miR-21 Amongst the Small Non-Coding RNAs in Retinal Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; O'Connor, Anna; Cullen, Angela; Harwood, Laura; Medina, Reinhold J; O'Neill, Christina L; Stitt, Alan W; Curtis, Tim M; Simpson, David A

    2012-01-01

    The retinal vascular endothelium is essential for angiogenesis and is involved in maintaining barrier selectivity and vascular tone. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify microRNAs and other small regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) which may regulate these crucial functions. Primary bovine retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) provide a well-characterized in vitro system for studying angiogenesis. RNA extracted from RMECs was used to prepare a small RNA library for deep sequencing (Illumina Genome Analyzer). A total of 6.8 million reads were mapped to 250 known microRNAs in miRBase (release 16). In many cases, the most frequent isomiR differed from the sequence reported in miRBase. In addition, five novel microRNAs, 13 novel bovine orthologs of known human microRNAs and multiple new members of the miR-2284/2285 family were detected. Several ∼30 nucleotide sno-miRNAs were identified, with the most highly expressed being derived from snoRNA U78. Highly expressed microRNAs previously associated with endothelial cells included miR-126 and miR-378, but the most highly expressed was miR-21, comprising more than one-third of all mapped reads. Inhibition of miR-21 with an LNA inhibitor significantly reduced proliferation, migration, and tube-forming capacity of RMECs. The independence from prior sequence knowledge provided by deep sequencing facilitates analysis of novel microRNAs and other small RNAs. This approach also enables quantitative evaluation of microRNA expression, which has highlighted the predominance of a small number of microRNAs in RMECs. Knockdown of miR-21 suggests a role for this microRNA in regulation of angiogenesis in the retinal microvasculature. J. Cell. Biochem. 113: 2098–2111, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22298343

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Injury via Rho/Rho-kinase Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Qian, Chen; Wang, Ning; Lin, Chenyu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Guangyun; Piao, Xinxin

    2017-05-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, also known as Ligustrazine), which is isolated from Chinese Herb Medicine Ligustium wollichii Franchat (Chuan Xiong), has been widely used in China for the treatment of ischemic stroke by Chinese herbalists. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are the integral parts of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting BMECs against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) which is important for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the protective mechanisms of TMP, focusing on OGD-injured BMECs and the Rho/Rho-kinase (Rho-associated kinases, ROCK) signaling pathway. The model of OGD-injured BMECs was established in this study. BMECs were identified by von Willebrand factor III staining and exposed to fasudil, or TMP at different concentrations (14.3, 28.6, 57.3 µM) for 2 h before 24 h of OGD injury. The effect of each treatment was examined by cell viability assays, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and transendothelial electric resistance and western blot analysis (caspase-3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), RhoA, Rac1). Our results show that TMP significantly attenuated apoptosis and the permeability of BMECs induced by OGD. In addition, TMP could notably down-regulate the characteristic proteins in Rho/ROCK signaling pathway such as RhoA and Rac1, which triggered abnormal changes of eNOS and ROS, respectively. Altogether, our results show that TMP has a strong protective effect against OGD-induced BMECs injury and suggest that the mechanism might be related to the inhibition of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway.

  15. Sevoflurane prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced barrier dysfunction in human lung microvascular endothelial cells: Rho-mediated alterations of VE-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiran; Tan, Qindong; Chen, Rui; Cao, Biao; Li, Wenhong

    Acute lung injury (ALI) mainly occurs as increased permeability of lung tissue and pleural effusion. Inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane has been demonstrated to alleviate lung permeability by upregulating junction proteins after ischemia-reperfusion. However, the exact mechanisms of its protective effect on reperfusion injury remain elusive. The aim of this study was to assess possible preconditioning with sevoflurane in an in vitro model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced barrier dysfunction in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-Ls). In this study, HMVEC-Ls were exposed to minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane for 2 h. LPS significantly increased the permeability of HMVEC-L. Moreover, the distribution of junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, in cell-cell junction area and the total expression in HMVEC-Ls were significantly decreased by LPS treatment. However, the abnormal distribution and decreased expression of VE-cadherin and hyperpermeability of HMVEC-Ls were significantly reversed by pretreatment with sevoflurane. Furthermore, LPS-induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was significantly inhibited with sevoflurane. Such activation, abnormal distribution and decreased expression of VE-cadherin and hyperpermeability of HMVEC-Ls were significantly inhibited with sevoflurane pretreatment or knockdown of RhoA or ROCK-2. In conclusion, sevoflurane prevented LPS-induced rupture of HMVEC-L monolayers by suppressing the RhoA/ROCK-mediated VE-cadherin signaling pathway. Our results may explain, at least in part, some beneficial effects of sevoflurane on pulmonary dysfunction such as ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  16. Activation of melatonin receptor (MT1/2) promotes P-gp transporter in methamphetamine-induced toxicity on primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jumnongprakhon, Pichaya; Sivasinprasasn, Sivanan; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Tocharus, Chainarong; Tocharus, Jiraporn

    2017-02-20

    Melatonin has been known as a neuroprotective agent for the central nervous system (CNS) and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is the primary structure that comes into contact with several neurotoxins including methamphetamine (METH). Previous studies have reported that the activation of melatonin receptors (MT1/2) by melatonin could protect against METH-induced toxicity in brain endothelial cells via several mechanisms. However, its effects on the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter, the active efflux pump involved in cell homeostasis, are still unclear. Thus, this study investigated the role of melatonin and its receptors on the METH-impaired P-gp transporter in primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs). The results showed that METH impaired the function of the P-gp transporter, significantly decreasing the efflux of Rho123 and P-gp expression, which caused a significant increase in the intracellular accumulation of Rho123, and these responses were reversed by the interaction of melatonin with its receptors. Blockade of the P-gp transporter by verapamil caused oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cell integrity impairment after METH treatment, and these effects could be reversed by melatonin. Our results, together with previous findings, suggest that the interaction of melatonin with its receptors protects against the effects of the METH-impaired P-gp transporter and that the protective role in METH-induced toxicity was at least partially mediated by the regulation of the P-gp transporter. Thus, melatonin and its receptors (MT1/2) are essential for protecting against BBB impairment caused by METH.

  17. Beta-Adrenoceptor Activation Reduces Both Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cell Migration via a cAMP-Dependent Mechanism and Wound Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Andrew P; Fox, James M; Pullar, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process during tissue regeneration; however, the amount of angiogenesis directly correlates with the level of wound scarring. Angiogenesis is lower in scar-free foetal wounds while angiogenesis is raised and abnormal in pathophysiological scarring such as hypertrophic scars and keloids. Delineating the mechanisms that modulate angiogenesis and could reduce scarring would be clinically useful. Beta-adrenoceptors (β-AR) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on all skin cell-types. They play a role in wound repair but their specific role in angiogenesis is unknown. In this study, a range of in vitro assays (single cell migration, scratch wound healing, ELISAs for angiogenic growth factors and tubule formation) were performed with human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) to investigate and dissect mechanisms underpinning β-AR-mediated modulation of angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) and murine excisional skin wounds. β-AR activation reduced HDMEC migration via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent and protein kinase A (PKA)-independent mechanisms as demonstrated through use of an EPAC agonist that auto-inhibited the cAMP-mediated β-AR transduced reduction in HDMEC motility; a PKA inhibitor was, conversely, ineffective. ELISA studies demonstrated that β-AR activation reduced pro-angiogenic growth factor secretion from HDMECs (fibroblast growth factor 2) and keratinocytes (vascular endothelial growth factor A) revealing possible β-AR-mediated autocrine and paracrine anti-angiogenic mechanisms. In more complex environments, β-AR activation delayed HDMEC tubule formation and decreased angiogenesis both in the CAM assay and in murine excisional skin wounds in vivo. β-AR activation reduced HDMEC function in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo; therefore, β-AR agonists could be promising anti-angiogenic modulators in skin. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 356–365, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal

  18. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-ßI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shao, Beili; Bayraktutan, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM) significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2 (•-) generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-a, PKC-ß or PKC-ßI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2 (•-) by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-ßI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2 (•-) production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-ßI and NADPH oxidase.

  19. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-ßI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Beili; Bayraktutan, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM) significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2•- generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-a, PKC-ß or PKC-ßI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2•- by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-ßI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2•- production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-ßI and NADPH oxidase. PMID:24936444

  20. Human blood-brain barrier receptors for Alzheimer's amyloid-beta 1- 40. Asymmetrical binding, endocytosis, and transcytosis at the apical side of brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer.

    PubMed Central

    Mackic, J B; Stins, M; McComb, J G; Calero, M; Ghiso, J; Kim, K S; Yan, S D; Stern, D; Schmidt, A M; Frangione, B; Zlokovic, B V

    1998-01-01

    A soluble monomeric form of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta (1-40) peptide (sAbeta1-40) is present in the circulation and could contribute to neurotoxicity if it crosses the brain capillary endothelium, which comprises the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vivo. This study characterizes endothelial binding and transcytosis of a synthetic peptide homologous to human sAbeta1-40 using an in vitro model of human BBB. 125I-sAbeta1-40 binding to the brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer was time dependent, polarized to the apical side, and saturable with high- and low-affinity dissociation constants of 7.8+/-1.2 and 52.8+/-6.2 nM, respectively. Binding of 125I-sAbeta1-40 was inhibited by anti-RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation end products) antibody (63%) and by acetylated low density lipoproteins (33%). Consistent with these data, transfected cultured cells overexpressing RAGE or macrophage scavenger receptor (SR), type A, displayed binding and internalization of 125I-sAbeta1-40. The internalized peptide remains intact > 94%. Transcytosis of 125I-sAbeta1-40 was time and temperature dependent, asymmetrical from the apical to basolateral side, saturable with a Michaelis constant of 45+/-9 nM, and partially sensitive to RAGE blockade (36%) but not to SR blockade. We conclude that RAGE and SR mediate binding of sAbeta1-40 at the apical side of human BBB, and that RAGE is also involved in sAbeta1-40 transcytosis. PMID:9710442

  1. Beta-Adrenoceptor Activation Reduces Both Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cell Migration via a cAMP-Dependent Mechanism and Wound Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Andrew P; Fox, James M; Pullar, Christine E

    2015-02-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process during tissue regeneration; however, the amount of angiogenesis directly correlates with the level of wound scarring. Angiogenesis is lower in scar-free foetal wounds while angiogenesis is raised and abnormal in pathophysiological scarring such as hypertrophic scars and keloids. Delineating the mechanisms that modulate angiogenesis and could reduce scarring would be clinically useful. Beta-adrenoceptors (β-AR) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on all skin cell-types. They play a role in wound repair but their specific role in angiogenesis is unknown. In this study, a range of in vitro assays (single cell migration, scratch wound healing, ELISAs for angiogenic growth factors and tubule formation) were performed with human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) to investigate and dissect mechanisms underpinning β-AR-mediated modulation of angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) and murine excisional skin wounds. β-AR activation reduced HDMEC migration via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent and protein kinase A (PKA)-independent mechanisms as demonstrated through use of an EPAC agonist that auto-inhibited the cAMP-mediated β-AR transduced reduction in HDMEC motility; a PKA inhibitor was, conversely, ineffective. ELISA studies demonstrated that β-AR activation reduced pro-angiogenic growth factor secretion from HDMECs (fibroblast growth factor 2) and keratinocytes (vascular endothelial growth factor A) revealing possible β-AR-mediated autocrine and paracrine anti-angiogenic mechanisms. In more complex environments, β-AR activation delayed HDMEC tubule formation and decreased angiogenesis both in the CAM assay and in murine excisional skin wounds in vivo. β-AR activation reduced HDMEC function in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo; therefore, β-AR agonists could be promising anti-angiogenic modulators in skin. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by

  2. Shear stress and 17beta-estradiol modulate cerebral microvascular endothelial Na-K-Cl cotransporter and Na/H exchanger protein levels.

    PubMed

    Chang, Elaine; O'Donnell, Martha E; Barakat, Abdul I

    2008-01-01

    Ion transporters of blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells play an important role in regulating the movement of ions between the blood and brain. During ischemic stroke, reduction in cerebral blood flow is accompanied by transport of Na and Cl from the blood into the brain, with consequent brain edema formation. We have shown previously that a BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC) participates in ischemia-induced brain Na and water uptake and that a BBB Na/H exchanger (NHE) may also participate. While the abrupt reduction of blood flow is a prominent component of ischemia, the effects of flow on BBB NKCC and NHE are not known. In the present study, we examined the effects of changes in shear stress on NKCC and NHE protein levels in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs). We have shown previously that estradiol attenuates both ischemia-induced cerebral edema and CMEC NKCC activity. Thus, in the present study, we also examined the effects of estradiol on NKCC and NHE protein levels in CMECs. Exposing CMECs to steady shear stress (19 dyn/cm(2)) increased the abundance of both NKCC and NHE. Estradiol abolished the shear stress-induced increase in NHE but not NKCC. Abrupt reduction of shear stress did not alter NKCC or NHE abundance in the absence of estradiol, but it decreased NKCC abundance in estradiol-treated cells. Our results indicate that changes in shear stress modulate BBB NKCC and NHE protein levels. They also support the hypothesis that estradiol attenuates edema formation in ischemic stroke in part by reducing the abundance of BBB NKCC protein.

  3. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from the BC1 iPS Cell Line Exhibit a Blood-Brain Barrier Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gerecht, Sharon; Searson, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells that form capillaries in the brain are highly specialized, with tight junctions that minimize paracellular transport and an array of broad-spectrum efflux pumps that make drug delivery to the brain extremely challenging. One of the major limitations in blood-brain barrier research and the development of drugs to treat central nervous system diseases is the lack of appropriate cell lines. Recent reports indicate that the derivation of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a solution to this problem. Here we demonstrate the derivation of hBMECs extended to two new human iPSC lines: BC1 and GFP-labeled BC1. These hBMECs highly express adherens and tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-5. The addition of retinoic acid upregulates VE-cadherin expression, and results in a significant increase in transendothelial electrical resistance to physiological values. The permeabilities of tacrine, rhodamine 123, and Lucifer yellow are similar to values obtained for MDCK cells. The efflux ratio for rhodamine 123 across hBMECs is in the range 2–4 indicating polarization of efflux transporters. Using the rod assay to assess cell organization in small vessels and capillaries, we show that hBMECs resist elongation with decreasing diameter but show progressive axial alignment. The derivation of hBMECs with a blood-brain barrier phenotype from the BC1 cell line highlights that the protocol is robust. The expression of GFP in hBMECs derived from the BC1-GFP cell line provides an important new resource for BBB research. PMID:27070801

  4. Thymosin Beta4 Regulates Cardiac Valve Formation Via Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transformation in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sun-Hye; Lee, Sangkyu; Bae, Jong-Sup; Jee, Jun-Goo; Cha, Hee-Jae; Lee, You Mie

    2014-01-01

    Thymosin beta4 (TB4) has multiple functions in cellular response in processes as diverse as embryonic organ development and the pathogeneses of disease, especially those associated with cardiac coronary vessels. However, the specific roles played by TB4 during heart valve development in vertebrates are largely unknown. Here, we identified a novel function of TB4 in endothelialmesenchymal transformation (EMT) in cardiac valve endocardial cushions in zebrafish. The expressions of thymosin family members in developing zebrafish embryos were determined by whole mount in situ hybridization. Of the thymosin family members only zTB4 was expressed in the developing heart region. Cardiac valve development at 48 h post fertilization was defected in zebrafish TB4 (zTB4) morpholino-injected embryos (morphants). In zTB4 morphants, abnormal linear heart tube development was observed. The expressions of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4, notch1b, and hyaluronic acid synthase (HAS) 2 genes were also markedly reduced in atrio-ventricular canal (AVC). Endocardial cells in the AVC region were stained with anti-Zn5 antibody reactive against Dm-grasp (an EMT marker) to observe EMT in developing cardiac valves in zTB4 morphants. EMT marker expression in valve endothelial cells was confirmed after transfection with TB4 siRNA in the presence of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) by RT-PCR and immunofluorescent assay. Zn5-positive endocardial AVC cells were not observed in zTB4 morphants, and knockdown of TB4 suppressed TGF-β-induced EMT in ovine valve endothelial cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TB4 plays a pivotal role in cardiac valve formation by increasing EMT. PMID:24732964

  5. The TGFβ type II receptor plays a critical role in the endothelial cells during cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Robson, Andrew; Allinson, Kathleen R; Anderson, Robert H; Henderson, Deborah J; Arthur, Helen M

    2010-09-01

    TGFβ signalling is required for normal cardiac development. To investigate which cell types are involved, we used mice carrying a floxed Type II TGFβ receptor (Tgfbr2fl) allele and Cre-lox genetics to deplete this receptor in different regions of the heart. The three target tissues and corresponding Cre transgenic lines were atrioventricular myocardium (using cGata6-Cre), ventricular myocardium (using Mlc2v-Cre), and vascular endothelium (using tamoxifen-activated Cdh5(PAC)-CreERT2). Spatio-temporal Cre activity in each case was tracked via lacZ activation from the Rosa26R locus. Atrioventricular-myocardial-specific Tgfbr2 knockout (KO) embryos had short septal leaflets of the tricuspid valve, whereas ventricular myocardial-specific KO embryos mainly exhibited a normal cardiac phenotype. Inactivation of Tgfbr2 in endothelial cells from E11.5 resulted in deficient ventricular septation, accompanied by haemorrhage from cerebral blood vessels. We conclude that TGFβ signalling through the Tgfbr2 receptor, in endothelial cells, plays an important role in cardiac development, and is essential for cerebral vascular integrity.

  6. Photodynamic efficacy of liposome-delivered hypocrellin B in microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and chicken combs in vivo: a potential photosensitizer for port wine stain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. X.; Yang, Z. F.; Zou, X. B.; Zhu, J. G.; Deng, H.; Zhao, J. Q.; Gu, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been proved a successful method for port wine stain (PWS), but the prolonged skin photosensitivity induced by the photosensitizers used currently seriously limits the clinical application of PDT. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of hypocrellin B (HB), a promising second-generation photosensitizer for the treatment of PWS. The photodynamic effect of liposome-delivered HB was evaluated in vitro with microvascular endothelial cells (MEC) and in vivo with chicken combs. The dark cytotoxicity and photocytotoxicity of liposomal HB in MEC were evaluated using the MTT assay. Gross and histological examinations were performed to investigate the selective occlusion of the superficial dermal microvasculature in the chicken comb. The result showed that photocytotoxicity of liposomal HB was dependent on both light dose and drug concentration. PDT with HB (0.5-1 mg kg-1) and a light dose of 120 J cm-2 showed selective destruction of the superficial dermal microvasculature of the chicken comb, leaving the overlying epidermis intact. This is the first study to investigate the potential efficacy of HB-PDT as a novel modality for the treatment of PWS. These findings suggest that liposomal HB is a safe and effective photosensitizer for PWS.

  7. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Marta S; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  8. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Marta S; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol–gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior. PMID:27877662

  9. Effects of cinnamaldehyde on PGE2 release and TRPV4 expression in mouse cerebral microvascular endothelial cells induced by interleukin-1beta.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue-Ying; Huo, Hai-Ru; Li, Cang-Hai; Zhao, Bao-Sheng; Li, Lan-Fang; Sui, Feng; Guo, Shu-Ying; Jiang, Ting-Liang

    2008-03-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a principle compound isolated from Guizhi-Tang (GZT), which is a famous traditional Chinese medical formula used to treat influenza, common cold and other pyretic conditions. Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4) is expressed in the anterior hypothalamus and may act as thermosensor. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of cinnamaldehyde on the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the expression of TRPV4 in mouse cerebral microvascular endothelial cell strain (b.End3). In the research work, the b.End3 cells were cultured in DMEM medium containing interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in the presence or absence of ruthenium red (RR), a kind of known TRPV4 inhibitor, or different concentrations of cinnamaldehyde. The results suggested that IL-1beta significantly increase production of PGE2 and cinnamaldehyde evidently decrease IL-1beta-induced PGE2 production, while RR showed no inhibitory effect on PGE2 production. Moreover, it was identified that TRPV4 was expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in b.End3 cells. IL-1beta could up-regulate the expression of TRPV4, RR and cinnamaldehyde could down-regulate the high expression of mRNA and protein of TRPV4 by IL-1beta induced in b.End3 cells. In conclusion, cinnamaldehyde decreased the production of PGE2 and the expression of TRPV4 in b.End3 cells induced by IL-1beta.

  10. Comparative study on glucose transporters expression and activity between stem cell-derived brain microvascular endothelial cells and hCMEC/D3 cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Alahmad, Abraham J

    2017-08-09

    Glucose constitutes the major source of energy of mammalian brains. Glucose uptake at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) occurs through a facilitated glucose transport, through glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), although other isoforms have been described at the BBB. Mutations in GLUT1 is associated with the GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS), yet none of the current in vitro models of the human BBB maybe suited for modelling such disorder. In this study, we investigated the expression of glucose transporters and glucose diffusion across the human BBB using brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) derived from healthy patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We investigated the expression of different glucose transporters at the BBB using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry and measured glucose uptake and diffusion across BMEC monolayers obtained from two iPSC lines and from hCMEC/D3 cells. BMECs monolayers showed expression of several glucose transporters, in particular GLUT1, GLUT3 and GLUT4. Diffusion of glucose across the monolayers were mediated via a saturable transcellular mechanism and partially inhibited by pharmacological inhibitors. Taken together, our study suggests the presence of several glucose transporters isoforms at the human BBB and demonstrate the feasibility of modelling glucose across the BBB using patient-derived stem cells. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology.

  11. In vitro model of cerebral ischemia by using brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2017-04-29

    Brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which play a central role in blood brain barrier (BBB), can be used for the evaluation of drug transport into the brain. Although human BMEC cell lines have already been reported, they lack original properties such as barrier integrity. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be used for various applications such as regenerative therapy, drug screening, and pathological study. In the recent study, an induction method of BMECs from PSCs has been established, making it possible to more precisely study the in vitro human BBB function. Here, using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived BMECs, we examined the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and OGD/reoxygenation (OGD/R) on BBB permeability. OGD disrupted the barrier function, and the dysfunction was rapidly restored by re-supply of the oxygen and glucose. Interestingly, TNF-α, which is known to be secreted from astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral ischemia, prevented the restoration of OGD-induced barrier dysfunction in an apoptosis-independent manner. Thus, we could establish the in vitro BBB disease model that mimics the cerebral ischemia by using iPS cell-derived BMECs.

  12. Oxidative Stress Induced by Cigarette Smoke Extracts in Human Brain Cells (T98G) and Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HBMEC) in Mono- and Co-Culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Hyeong; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Kwang-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to examine oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in human brain cells (T98G) and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) in mono- and co-culture systems. Cell viability of T98G cells exposed to CSC (0.05-4 mg/ml) was significantly decreased compared to CSE (0.025-20%). There were no marked differences between quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by either CSE (2, 4, and 10%) or CSC (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/ml) treatment compared to control. However, a significant effect was noted in ROS generation following CSC incubation at 4mg/ml. Cellular integrity of HBMEC decreased to 74 and 64% within 120 h of exposure at the IC50 value of CSE and CSC, respectively. This study suggests that chronic exposure to cigarette smoking might initiate damage to the blood-brain barrier.

  13. Differentially expressed genes of human microvascular endothelial cells in response to anti-dengue virus NS1 antibodies by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yue; Jiang, Lan; Fang, Danyun; Jiang, Lifang; Zhou, Junmei

    2013-06-01

    It has been previously shown that anti-dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein NS1 antibodies could act as autoantibodies that direct against one or more of the host's own proteins, which has potential implications for dengue hemorrhagic fever pathogenesis. In the present study, we have employed suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify the differentially expressed genes from human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) in response to anti-dengue virus type 2 NS1 antibodies (anti-DENV2 NS1 Abs). A total of 35 clones from the SSH cDNA library were randomly selected for further analysis using bioinformatics tools after vector screening. After searching for sequence homology in NCBI GenBank database with BLASTN and BLASTX programs, 23 obtained sequences with significant matches (E-values <1×10(-4)) in the SSH library. The predicted genes in the subtracted library include immune response molecules (CD59 antigen preproprotein preproprotein, MURR1), signal transduction molecules (Nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1), calcium-binding proteins (S100A6, Annexin A2 isoform 1/2), and cell-membrane component (Yip1 domain family). From these clones, 5 upregulated genes were selected for differential expression profiling by real-time RT-PCR to confirm their upregulated status. The results confirmed their differential upregulation, and thus verified the success of SSHs and the likely involvement of these genes in dengue pathogenesis.

  14. Nitric oxide from brain microvascular endothelial cells may initiate the compensatory response to mild hypoxia of astrocytes in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qinghai; Liu, Xin; Wang, Ning; Zheng, Xinchuan; Fu, Jianfeng; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The physiological level of nitric oxide (NO) released by brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) at normoxia can block the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in astrocytes and initiate the compensatory response to hypoxia. However, it is unclear whether this occurs at mild hypoxia. This study was to investigate the expression of HIF-1α, VEGF and LDHA and the lactic acid production in astrocytes with or without co-culture with BMECs after mild hypoxia exposure. During mild hypoxia (5% O2), exogenous NO blocked the degradation of HIF-1α in astrocytes but up-regulated the transcription of VEGF and LDHA, accompanied by elevated expression of VEGF protein and increased production of lactic acid. This was further confirmed by silencing of HIF-1α expression in astrocytes. In astrocytes co-cultured with primary rat BMEC under mild hypoxia, NO was released by the BMECs and prevented the degradation of HIF-1α in astrocytes, leading to the up-regulated mRNA expression of VEGF and LDHA, elevated VEGF protein expression and increased production of lactic acid. In BMECs, NO was derived from intracellular eNOS. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that, under mild hypoxia, even though astrocytes do not respond to hypoxia, NO produced by BMECs may transmit a hypoxia signal to astrocytes, triggering their adaptive response via HIF-1α. PMID:27904676

  15. Co-transplantation of hippocampal neural stem cells and astrocytes and microvascular endothelial cells improve the memory in ischemic stroke rat

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Chen, Zhibiao; Song, Ping; Wu, Liquan; Wang, Long; Deng, Gang; Liu, Baohui; Chen, Qianxue

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neural stem cells (NSCs) are promising for ischemia stroke because they can replace damaged or lost cells. However, the adult central nervous system (CNS) does not provide an optimal microenvironment for exogenous NSCs to survive, proliferation and differentiation. We established a co-transplantation system with NSCs and astrocyte and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) to explore whether it can improve the memory ability in ischemic stroke rat. Methods: After building the ischemic stroke in 50 rats by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion (MCAO/R), transplantation of NSCs and astrocyte and BMECs were performed with different combination. Results: Laser doppler flowmetry and MRI were used to detect the ischemia of the model and 42 rats survived for the Morris water-maze test. The test shows that co-transplantation with the three different cells together can improve memory deficits in MCAO/R rat and it is the most effect group. Grafting with two cells have more effect in memory improving than one cell while transplanting NSC alone has no obvious effect on memory improving. Conclusions: In NSC niche, astrocytes and BMECs are the most important cells to regulate and interaction with NSCs. Co-transplantation NSCs with astrocyte and BMECs can improve the memory ability in ischemia rat, which maybe the result of microenvironment improve by the astrocyte and BMECs. PMID:26550233

  16. Soluble mediators produced by the crosstalk between microvascular endothelial cells and dengue-infected primary dermal fibroblasts inhibit dengue virus replication and increase leukocyte transmigration.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Arriaga, José; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K; Lopez-Gonzalez, Moises; García-Cordero, Julio; Juárez-Delgado, Francisco J; Gromowski, Gregory D; Méndez-Cruz, René A; Fairhurst, Rick M; Whitehead, Stephen S; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia

    2016-04-01

    When dengue virus (DENV)-infected mosquitoes use their proboscis to probe into human skin during blood feeding, both saliva and virus are released. During this process, cells from the epidermis and dermis layers of the skin, along with small blood vessels, may get exposed to or infected with DENV. In these microenvironments of the skin, the presence of DENV initiates a complex interplay among the DENV-infected and non-infected neighboring cells at the initial bite site. Previous studies suggested that DENV-infected human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) participate in the immune response against DENV by secreting soluble mediators of innate immunity. In the present study, we investigated whether DENV-infected HDFs activate human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) in co-cultures. Our results suggest that co-cultures of DENV-infected HDFs and HDMECs elicit soluble mediators that are sufficient to reduce viral replication, activate HDMECs, and induce leukocyte migration through HDMEC monolayers. These effects were partly dependent on HDF donor and DENV serotype, which may provide novel insights into the natural variation in host susceptibility to DENV disease.

  17. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  18. Perforin Mediates Endothelial Cell Death and Resultant Transplant Vascular Disease in Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jonathan C.; Kerjner, Alexandra; Wong, Brian W.; McManus, Bruce M.; Granville, David J.

    2004-01-01

    T cell-induced endothelial injury is an important event in the development of transplant vascular disease (TVD), the leading expression of chronic rejection of vascularized organ transplants. However, the precise contribution of perforin to vascular damage in allografts and resultant TVD has not been addressed in vivo. Minor histocompatability antigen mismatched mouse heterotopic cardiac transplants were performed from 129J donors into C57Bl/6 (wild-type (WT)) or perforin knockout (PKO) recipients. Perforin was abundant in immune infiltrates in the myocardium and vasculature of transplanted hearts in WT mice. Allograft coronary arteries in both WT and PKO mice had considerable vasculitis. There was also marked endothelial disruption, as well as TUNEL-positivity in the endothelial region, in coronary arteries of hearts transplanted into WT mice that was not evident in PKO recipients (P = 0.05). At 30 days post-transplantation, intimal thickening was assessed on elastic Van Gieson-stained ventricular sections. There was an average of 54.2 ± 6.7% luminal narrowing of coronary arteries in allografts from WT mice as compared to 13.4 ± 5.1% luminal narrowing in PKO counterparts (P < 0.00002). In summary, perforin plays a primary role in endothelial damage and the resultant onset and progression of TVD. PMID:15215168

  19. Fibronectin biosynthesis and cell-surface expression by cardiac and non-cardiac endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. M.; Helgeson, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    We examined the biosynthesis and surface expression of fibronectin, an adhesive glycoprotein, in several types of cultured porcine endothelial cells: pulmonary artery, thoracic aorta, coronary artery, aortic valve, and mitral valve. We used immunocytochemical staining to compare the levels of fibronectin present in these same tissues in vivo. Using endogenous radiolabeling, we found that all cell types except aortic valve endothelial cells synthesized and released into the culture media substantial quantities of fibronectin. Using radioiodination of intact cells, we found that, whereas both thoracic aorta and pulmonary artery cells had measurable fibronectin on the surface, aortic valve, mitral valve, and coronary artery cells had little cell-surface fibronectin present. Immunocytochemical staining showed that all endothelial regions except aortic valve had substantial quantities of immunoreactive fibronectin in vivo. These data suggest that the aortic valve endothelium may be distinct from other endothelia. Such differences could be important for the pathogenesis of valvular disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8494044

  20. The NRF2 knockout rat: a new animal model to study endothelial dysfunction, oxidant stress, and microvascular rarefaction

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, Jessica R. C.; Kautenburg, Katie E.; Casati, Marc C.; Endres, Bradley T.; Geurts, Aron M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like-2 (NRF2) is a master antioxidant and cell protective transcription factor that upregulates antioxidant defenses. In this study we developed a strain of Nrf2 null mutant rats to evaluate the role of reduced NRF2-regulated antioxidant defenses in contributing to endothelial dysfunction and impaired angiogenic responses during salt-induced ANG II suppression. Nrf2−/− mutant rats were developed using transcription activator-like effector nuclease technology in the Sprague-Dawley genetic background, and exhibited a 41-bp deletion that included the start codon for Nrf2 and an absence of immunohistochemically detectable NRF2 protein. Expression of mRNA for the NRF2-regulated indicator enzymes heme oxygenase-1, catalase, superoxide dismutase 1, superoxide dismutase 2, and glutathione reductase was significantly lower in livers of Nrf2−/− mutant rats fed high salt (HS; 4% NaCl) for 2 wk compared with wild-type controls. Endothelium-dependent dilation to acetylcholine was similar in isolated middle cerebral arteries (MCA) of Nrf2−/− mutant rats and wild-type littermates fed low-salt (0.4% NaCl) diet, and was eliminated by short-term (3 days) HS diet in both strains. Low-dose ANG II infusion (100 ng/kg sc) reversed salt-induced endothelial dysfunction in MCA and prevented microvessel rarefaction in wild-type rats fed HS diet, but not in Nrf2−/− mutant rats. The results of this study indicate that suppression of NRF2 antioxidant defenses plays an essential role in the development of salt-induced oxidant stress, endothelial dysfunction, and microvessel rarefaction in normotensive rats and emphasize the potential therapeutic benefits of directly upregulating NRF2-mediated antioxidant defenses to ameliorate vascular oxidant stress in humans. PMID:26637559

  1. Morphology of microvascular changes and endothelial regeneration in experimental ozone-induced parathyroiditis. III. Some pathologic considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Atwal, O.S.; Pemsingh, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    Proliferation of the vascular endothelium of the parathyroid glands of dogs exposed to ozone inhalation was studied. Direct observation of mitoses in the endothelial cells were made. Focal hemorrhages in the form of the presence of erythrocytes, clotting, and fibrin deposition in the extravascular spaces were seen. Ultrastructural analysis of transverse section of blood vessels showed intravascular platelet aggregation. Lymphoid cells were observed in the lumen of the blood vessels as well as in the perivascular areas as infiltrates. The possibility is discussed that present vascular reactions signify the morphologic equivalent of an immunologic response.

  2. The Beneficial Effects of Cardiac Rehabilitation on the Function and Levels of Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuan; Ledesma, Robert Andre; Peng, Ran; Liu, Qiong; Xu, Danyan

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a comprehensive program, which mainly focusses on exercise training, disease evaluation, cardiovascular risk factors control, medication therapy, psychosocial intervention, and patient education. Although the beneficial properties of CR have been widely evidenced, its mechanism is still not completely clarified. To date, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been explored by emerging studies, and evidence has suggested that CR, especially exercise training, significantly increases the function and levels of EPCs, which is likely to elucidate the profiting mechanism of CR. Thus, this review summarises the potential relationship between CR and EPCs with an aim of providing novel directions for future CR research. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. LDL-Lipids from patients with hypercholesterolaemia and Alzheimer’s disease are inflammatory to microvascular endothelial cells: Mitigation by statin intervention

    PubMed Central

    Dias, H. K. I.; Brown, C. L. R.; Polidori, M. C.; Lip, G.Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated LDL concentration in mid-life increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in later life. Increased oxidative modification (oxLDL) and nitration is observed during dementia and hypercholesterolemia. We investigated the hypothesis that statin intervention in mid-life mitigates the inflammatory effects of oxLDL on the microvasculature. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) were maintained on transwells to mimic the microvasculature and exposed to patient and control LDL. Blood was obtained from statin-naïve, normo- and hyperlipidaemic subjects, AD with vascular dementia (AD-plus) and AD subjects (n=10/group) at baseline. Only hyperlipidaemic subjects with normal cognitive function received 40mg simvastatin intervention/day for three months. Blood was re-analysed from normo- and hyper-lipidaemic subjects after three months. LDL isolated from statin-naïve hyperlipidaemic, AD and AD-plus subjects was more oxidised (agarose gel electrophoretic mobility, protein carbonyl content and 8-isoprostane F2α) compared to control subjects. Statin intervention decreased protein carbonyls (2.5±0.4 Vs 3.95±0.2nmol/mg; P<0.001) and 8-isoprostane F2α (30.4±4.0 pg/ml Vs 43.5±8.42 pg/ml; P<0.05). HMVEC treatment with LDL-lipids from hyperlipidaemic, AD and AD-plus subjects impaired endothelial tight junction expression and decreased total glutathione levels (AD; 18.61±1.3, AD-plus; 16.5±0.7nmol/mg protein) compared to untreated cells (23.8±1.2 vs nmol/mg protein). Basolateral IL-6 secretion was increased by LDL-lipids from hyperlipidaemic (78.4±1.9 pg/ml), AD (63.2±5.9 pg/ml) and AD-plus (80.8±0.9 pg/ml) groups compared to healthy subject lipids (18.6±3.6 pg/ml). LDL-Lipids isolated after statin intervention did not affect endothelial function. In summary, LDL-lipids from hypercholesterolaemic, AD and AD-plus patients are inflammatory to HMVEC. In vivo intervention with statins reduces the damaging effects of LDL-lipids on HMVEC. PMID

  4. p130Cas Scaffolds the Signalosome To Direct Adaptor-Effector Cross Talk during Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Trafficking in Human Microvascular Dermal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules

  5. p130Cas scaffolds the signalosome to direct adaptor-effector cross talk during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus trafficking in human microvascular dermal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Chirosree; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Dutta, Sujoy; Chandran, Bala

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) interacts with cell surface receptors, such as heparan sulfate, integrins (α3β1, αVβ3, and αVβ5), and EphrinA2 (EphA2), and activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), c-Cbl, and RhoA GTPase signal molecules early during lipid raft (LR)-dependent productive macropinocytic entry into human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our recent studies have identified CIB1 as a signal amplifier facilitating EphA2 phosphorylation and subsequent cytoskeletal cross talk during KSHV macropinocytosis. Although CIB1 lacks an enzymatic activity and traditional adaptor domain or known interacting sequence, it associated with the KSHV entry signal complex and the CIB1-KSHV association was sustained over 30 min postinfection. To identify factors scaffolding the EphA2-CIB1 signal axis, the role of major cellular scaffold protein p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate of Src) was investigated. Inhibitor and small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies demonstrated that KSHV induced p130Cas in an EphA2-, CIB1-, and Src-dependent manner. p130Cas and Crk were associated with KSHV, LRs, EphA2, and CIB1 early during infection. Live-cell microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated that p130Cas knockdown did not affect KSHV entry but significantly reduced productive nuclear trafficking of viral DNA and routed KSHV to lysosomal degradation. p130Cas aided in scaffolding adaptor Crk to downstream guanine nucleotide exchange factor phospho-C3G possibly to coordinate GTPase signaling during KSHV trafficking. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that p130Cas acts as a bridging molecule between the KSHV-induced entry signal complex and the downstream trafficking signalosome in endothelial cells and suggest that simultaneous targeting of KSHV entry receptors with p130Cas would be an attractive potential avenue for therapeutic intervention in KSHV infection. Eukaryotic cell adaptor molecules, without any intrinsic

  6. Repeatability of the evaluation of systemic microvascular endothelial function using laser doppler perfusion monitoring: clinical and statistical implications.

    PubMed

    Tibiriçá, Eduardo; Matheus, Alessandra S M; Nunes, Bruno; Sperandei, Sandro; Gomes, Marilia B

    2011-01-01

    An awareness of the repeatability of biological measures is required to properly design and calculate sample sizes for longitudinal interventional studies. We investigated the day-to-day repeatability of measures of systemic microvascular reactivity using laser Doppler perfusion monitoring. We performed laser Doppler perfusion monitoring in combination with skin iontophoresis using acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside as well as post-occlusive reactive and thermal hyperemia twice within two weeks. The repeatability was assessed by calculating the within-subject standard deviations, limits of agreement, typical errors and intra-class correlation coefficients between days 1 and 2. The ratio of the within-subject standard deviation to the mean values obtained on days 1 and 2 (within-subject standard deviation/GM) was used to determine the condition with the best repeatability. Twenty-four healthy subjects, aged 24.6 ± 3.8 years, were recruited. The area under the curve of the vasodilatory response to post-occlusive reactivity showed marked variability (within-subject standard deviation/GM = 0.83), while the area under the curve for acetylcholine exhibited less variability (within-subject standard deviation/ GM = 0.52) and was comparable to the responses to sodium nitroprusside and thermal treatment (within-subject standard deviations/GM of 0.67 and 0.56, respectively). The area under the blood flow/time curve for vasodilation during acetylcholine administration required the smallest sample sizes, the area under the blood flow/time curve during post-occlusive reactivity required the largest sample sizes, and the area under the blood flow/time curves of vasodilation induced by sodium nitroprusside and thermal treatment required intermediate sizes. In view of the importance of random error related to the day-to-day repeatability of laser Doppler perfusion monitoring, we propose an original and robust statistical methodology for use in designing prospective clinical

  7. Endothelial Cell Death, Angiogenesis, and Microvascular Function after Castration in an Androgen-Dependent Tumor: Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Safabakhsh, Nina; Sckell, Axel; Chen, Yi; Jiang, Ping; Benjamin, Laura; Yuan, Fan; Keshet, Eli

    1998-09-01

    The sequence of events that leads to tumor vessel regression and the functional characteristics of these vessels during hormone--ablation therapy are not known. This is because of the lack of an appropriate animal model and monitoring technology. By using in vivo microscopy and in situ molecular analysis of the androgen-dependent Shionogi carcinoma grown in severe combined immunodeficient mice, we show that castration of these mice leads to tumor regression and a concomitant decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Androgen withdrawal is known to induce apoptosis in Shionogi tumor cells. Surprisingly, tumor endothelial cells begin to undergo apoptosis before neoplastic cells, and rarefaction of tumor vessels precedes the decrease in tumor size. The regressing vessels begin to exhibit normal phenotype, i.e., lower diameter, tortuosity, vascular permeability, and leukocyte adhesion. Two weeks after castration, a second wave of angiogenesis and tumor growth begins with a concomitant increase in VEGF expression. Because human tumors often relapse following hormone--ablation therapy, our data suggest that these patients may benefit from combined anti-VEGF therapy.

  8. Three-dimensional cardiac microtissues composed of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells co-differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    van Meer, Berend J.; Tertoolen, Leon G. J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells in the heart are in close proximity and in constant dialogue. Endothelium regulates the size of the heart, supplies oxygen to the myocardium and secretes factors that support cardiomyocyte function. Robust and predictive cardiac disease models that faithfully recapitulate native human physiology in vitro would therefore ideally incorporate this cardiomyocyte-endothelium crosstalk. Here, we have generated and characterized human cardiac microtissues in vitro that integrate both cell types in complex 3D structures. We established conditions for simultaneous differentiation of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells from human pluripotent stem cells following initial cardiac mesoderm induction. The endothelial cells expressed cardiac markers that were also present in primary cardiac microvasculature, suggesting cardiac endothelium identity. These cell populations were further enriched based on surface markers expression, then recombined allowing development of beating 3D structures termed cardiac microtissues. This in vitro model was robustly reproducible in both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. It thus represents an advanced human stem cell-based platform for cardiovascular disease modelling and testing of relevant drugs. PMID:28279973

  9. Endothelial Nogo-B regulates sphingolipid biosynthesis to promote pathological cardiac hypertrophy during chronic pressure overload

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Azevedo, Paula S.; Siragusa, Mauro; Bielawski, Jacek; Giordano, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    We recently discovered that endothelial Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the ER, regulates vascular function by inhibiting the rate-limiting enzyme, serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), in de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. Here, we show that endothelium-derived sphingolipids, particularly sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), protect the heart from inflammation, fibrosis, and dysfunction following pressure overload and that Nogo-B regulates this paracrine process. SPT activity is upregulated in banded hearts in vivo as well as in TNF-α–activated endothelium in vitro, and loss of Nogo removes the brake on SPT, increasing local S1P production. Hence, mice lacking Nogo-B, systemically or specifically in the endothelium, are resistant to the onset of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of SPT with myriocin restores permeability, inflammation, and heart dysfunction in Nogo-A/B–deficient mice to WT levels, whereas SEW2871, an S1P1 receptor agonist, prevents myocardial permeability, inflammation, and dysfunction in WT banded mice. Our study identifies a critical role of endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis and its regulation by Nogo-B in the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and proposes a potential therapeutic target for the attenuation or reversal of this clinical condition. PMID:27158676

  10. Salsalate Attenuates Free Fatty Acid–Induced Microvascular and Metabolic Insulin Resistance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Weidong; Liu, Jia; Jahn, Linda A.; Fowler, Dale E.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin recruits muscle microvasculature, thereby increasing endothelial exchange surface area. Free fatty acids (FFAs) cause insulin resistance by activating inhibitor of κB kinase β. Elevating plasma FFAs impairs insulin’s microvascular and metabolic actions in vivo. Whether salsalate, an anti-inflammatory agent, prevents FFA-induced microvascular and/or metabolic insulin resistance in humans is unknown. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eleven healthy, young adults were studied three times in random order. After an overnight fast, on two occasions each subject received a 5-h systemic infusion of Intralipid ± salsalate pretreatment (50 mg/kg/day for 4 days). On the third occasion, saline replaced Intralipid. A 1 mU/kg/min euglycemic insulin clamp was superimposed over the last 2-h of each study. Skeletal and cardiac muscle microvascular blood volume (MBV), microvascular flow velocity (MFV), and microvascular blood flow (MBF) were determined before and after insulin infusion. Whole body glucose disposal rates were calculated from glucose infusion rates. RESULTS Insulin significantly increased skeletal and cardiac muscle MBV and MBF without affecting MFV. Lipid infusion abolished insulin-mediated microvascular recruitment in both skeletal and cardiac muscle and lowered insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal (P < 0.001). Salsalate treatment rescued insulin’s actions to recruit muscle microvasculature and improved insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal in the presence of high plasma FFAs. CONCLUSIONS High plasma concentrations of FFAs cause both microvascular and metabolic insulin resistance, which can be prevented or attenuated by salsalate treatment. Our data suggest that treatments aimed at inhibition of inflammatory response might help alleviate vascular insulin resistance and improve metabolic control in patients with diabetes. PMID:21617098

  11. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Function predict Major Adverse Cardiac Events and Early Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Magdy, Abdel Hamid; Bakhoum, Sameh; Sharaf, Yasser; Sabry, Dina; El-Gengehe, Ahmed T; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are mobilized from the bone marrow and increase in the early phase after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic significance of CECs and indices of endothelial dysfunction in patients with STEMI. In 78 patients with acute STEMI, characterization of CD34+/VEGFR2+ CECs, and indices of endothelial damage/dysfunction such as brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD) were determined. Blood samples for CECs assessment and quantification were obtained within 24 hours of admission and FMD was assessed during the index hospitalization. At 30 days follow up, the primary composite end point of major cardiac adverse events (MACE) consisting of all-cause mortality, recurrent non-fatal MI, or heart failure and the secondary endpoint of early adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling were analyzed. The 17 patients (22%) who developed MACE had significantly higher CEC level (P = 0.004), vWF level (P =0.028), and significantly lower FMD (P = 0.006) compared to the remaining patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that CECs level and LV ejection fraction were independent predictors of MACE. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) for CEC level, FMD, and the logistic model with both markers were 0.73, 0.75, and 0.82 respectively for prediction of the MACE. The 16 patients who developed the secondary endpoint had significantly higher CEC level compared to remaining patients (p =0.038). In conclusion, increased circulating endothelial cells and endothelial dysfunction predicted the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events and adverse cardiac remodeling in patients with STEMI. PMID:26864952

  12. Hcp family proteins secreted via the type VI secretion system coordinately regulate Escherichia coli K1 interaction with human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Tao, Jing; Yu, Hao; Ni, Jinjing; Zeng, Lingbing; Teng, Qihui; Kim, Kwang Sik; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Guo, Xiaokui; Yao, Yufeng

    2012-03-01

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are involved in the pathogenicity of several gram-negative bacteria. Based on sequence analysis, we found that a cluster of Escherichia coli virulence factors (EVF) encoding a putative T6SS exists in the genome of the meningitis-causing E. coli K1 strain RS218. The T6SS-associated deletion mutants exhibited significant defects in binding to and invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) compared with the parent strain. Hcp family proteins (the hallmark of T6SS), including Hcp1 and Hcp2, were localized in the bacterial outer membrane, but the involvements of Hcp1 and Hcp2 have been shown to differ in E. coli-HBMEC interaction. The deletion mutant of hcp2 showed defects in the bacterial binding to and invasion of HBMEC, while Hcp1 was secreted in a T6SS-dependent manner and induced actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, apoptosis, and the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 in HBMEC. These findings demonstrate that the T6SS is functional in E. coli K1, and two Hcp family proteins participate in different steps of E. coli interaction with HBMEC in a coordinate manner, e.g., binding to and invasion of HBMEC, the cytokine and chemokine release followed by cytoskeleton rearrangement, and apoptosis in HBMEC. This is the first demonstration of the role of T6SS in meningitis-causing E. coli K1, and T6SS-associated Hcp family proteins are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of E. coli meningitis.

  13. Development and Validation of an In-Cell Western for Quantifying P-Glycoprotein Expression in Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial (hCMEC/D3) Cells.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Mitchell P; Pan, Yijun; Short, Jennifer L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2017-01-05

    An in-cell western (ICW) protocol detecting the relative expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human cerebro-microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) was developed and optimized, with the intention of improving throughput relative to western blotting (WB). For validation of the ICW protocol, hCMEC/D3 cells were incubated with known P-gp upregulators (10 μM rifampicin and 5 μM SR12813) and treated with siRNA targeted against MDR1, before measuring changes in P-gp expression, using both ICW and WB in parallel. To confirm a relationship between the detected P-gp expression and function, the uptake of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 was assessed following SR12813 treatment. Rifampicin and SR12813 significantly upregulated P-gp expression (1.5-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively) compared to control, as assessed by the ICW protocol. WB analysis of the same treatments revealed 1.4-fold and 1.5-fold upregulations. MDR1 siRNA reduced P-gp abundance by 20% and 35% when assessed by ICW and WB, respectively. SR12813 treatment reduced rhodamine-123 uptake by 18%, indicating that the observed changes in P-gp expression by ICW were associated with comparable functional changes. The correlation of P-gp upregulation by WB, rhodamine-123 uptake, and the ICW protocol provide validation of a new ICW method as an alternative method for quantification of P-gp in hCMEC/D3 cells.

  14. TRPV4 calcium entry and surface expression attenuated by inhibition of myosin light chain kinase in rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, James C; Hashizumi, Masahiro; Kelly, Sarah V; Francis, Michael; Mouner, Marc; Meyer, Angela L; Townsley, Mary I; Wu, Songwei; Cioffi, Donna L; Taylor, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    In previous studies, blockade or gene deletion of either myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) or the mechanogated transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel attenuated mechanical lung injury. To determine their effects on calcium entry, rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (RPMVEC) were labeled with fluo-4 and calcium entry initiated with the TRPV4 agonist, 4α-phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (4αPDD). Mean calcium transients peaked at ∼25 sec and persisted ∼500 sec. The 4αPDD response was essentially abolished in calcium-free media, or after pretreatment with the MLCK inhibitor, ML-7. ML-7 also attenuated the 4αPDD-induced inward calcium current measured directly using whole-cell patch clamp. Pretreatment with dynasore, an inhibitor of dynamin produced an initial calcium transient followed by a 4αPDD transient of unchanged peak intensity. Automated averaging of areas under the curve (AUC) of calcium transients in individual cells indicated total calcium activity with a relationship between treatment groups of ML-7 + 4αPDD < 4αPDD only < dynasore + 4αPDD. Measurement of biotinylated surface TRPV4 protein indicated a significant reduction after ML-7 pretreatment, but no significant change with dynasore treatment. RPMVEC monolayer electrical resistances were decreased by only 3% with 10 μmol/L 4αPDD and the response was dose-related. Dynasore alone produced a 29% decrease in resistance, but neither ML-7 nor dynasore affected the subsequent 4αPDD resistance response. These studies suggest that MLCK may inhibit mechanogated calcium responses through reduced surface expression of stretch activated TRPV4 channels in the plasma membrane. PMID:24303188

  15. Mast cells positive to tryptase, endothelial cells positive to protease-activated receptor-2, and microvascular density correlate among themselves in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who have undergone surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Piardi, Tullio; Zuccalà, Valeria; Patruno, Rosa; Zullo, Alessandra; Zizzo, Nicola; Nardo, Bruno; Marech, Ilaria; Crovace, Alberto; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Pessaux, Patrick; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    Background Mast cells (MCs) can stimulate angiogenesis, releasing several proangiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. In particular MCs can release tryptase, a potent in vivo and in vitro proangiogenic factor via proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Nevertheless, no data are available concerning the relationship between MC density positive to tryptase (MCDPT), endothelial cells positive to PAR-2 forming microvascular density (PAR-2-MVD), and classical MVD (C-MVD) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) angiogenesis. This study analyzed the correlation between MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD, each correlated to the others and to the main clinicopathological features, in early HCC patients who underwent surgery. Methods A series of 53 HCC patients with early stage (stage 0 according to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Staging Classification) were selected and then underwent surgery. Tumor tissue samples were evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods in terms of number of MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD. Results A significant correlation between MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD groups, each correlated to the others, was found by Pearson t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.67 to 0.81; P-value ranged from 0.01 to 0.03). No other significant correlation was found. Conclusion Our in vivo pilot data suggest that MCDPT and PAR-2-MVD may play a role in HCC angiogenesis and could be further evaluated as a target of antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:27499640

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor is Necessary to Protect Fetal Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Hyperoxic Injury: Mechanistic Roles of Antioxidant Enzymes and RelB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Chu, Chun; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E.; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) protects adult and newborn mice against hyperoxic lung injury by mediating increases in the expression of phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A) and phase II (NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)) antioxidant enzymes (AOE). AhR positively regulates the expression of RelB, a component of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) protein that contributes to anti-inflammatory processes in adult animals. Whether AhR regulates the expression of AOE and RelB, and protects fetal primary human lung cells against hyperoxic injury is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that AhR-deficient fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) will have decreased RelB activation and AOE, which will in turn predispose them to increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC upon exposure to hyperoxia. AhR-deficient HPMEC showed increased hyperoxia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and cell death compared to AhR-sufficient HPMEC. Additionally, AhR-deficient cell culture supernatants displayed increased macrophage inflammatory protein 1α and 1β, indicating a heightened inflammatory state. Interestingly, loss of AhR was associated with a significantly attenuated CYP1A1, NQO1, superoxide dismutase 1(SOD1), and nuclear RelB protein expression. These findings support the hypothesis that decreased RelB activation and AOE in AhR-deficient cells is associated with increased hyperoxic injury compared to AhR-sufficient cells. PMID:25831079

  17. The expression levels of Notch-related signaling molecules in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in bleomycin-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Wang, Weihua; Cui, Guangbin; Nan, Haiyan; Yan, Linfeng; Zhang, Wenhu; Zhang, Song; Wei, Jingguo

    2017-05-04

    Previous studies have suggested that the Notch signaling pathway plays a very important role in the proliferation and differentiation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs). Therefore, we aimed to investigate the expression level of Notch-related signaling molecules in PMVECs in bleomycin (BLM)-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and real-time PCR were used to analyze the differences in protein and mRNA expression levels of Notch-related signaling molecules, i.e. Notch1, Jagged1, Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4), and hairy and enhancer of split homolog 1 (Hes1), between a control group treated with intratracheal instillation of saline and a study group treated with intratracheal instillation of BLM solution. Expression levels of the receptor Notch1 and one of its ligands, Jagged1, were upregulated, while the expression levels of the ligand Dll4 and the target molecule of the Notch signaling pathway, Hes1, were downregulated. The differences in protein and mRNA expression levels between the control and study groups were significant (p<0.001). The Jagged1/Notch1 signaling pathway is activated in the pathogenesis of BLM-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis, while the Dll4/Notch1 signaling pathway is inhibited, which inhibits the suppressive effect of Dll4/Notch1 signaling on PMVEC overproliferation, further causing PMVEC dysfunction in cell sprouting and maturation as well as abnormal differentiation of the cell phenotype. Conversely, the down-expression of Hes1 indicates that the Jagged1/Notch1 signaling pathway could be a non-canonical Notch signaling pathway independent of Hes1 activation, which differs from the canonical Dll4/Notch1 signaling pathway.

  18. Effect of full flavor and denicotinized cigarettes exposure on the brain microvascular endothelium: a microarray-based gene expression study using a human immortalized BBB endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Naik, Pooja; Sajja, Ravi K; Prasad, Shikha; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-06-23

    Tobacco smoke (TS) toxicity to the brain microvasculature is still an understudied area till date. NF-E2 related factor (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor responsible for activating the antioxidant response element (ARE) genes following an oxidative insult. Till date, several studies targeting the blood brain barrier (BBB) have shown some protective role of Nrf2 in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, however, its functional role in chronic smokers subjected to a life-long oxidative stress has never been addressed. This is of crucial importance since smokers have a much higher risk for cerebrovascular stroke and tobacco smoke exposure has been clearly shown to enhance BBB damage following an ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, the goal of our study was to investigate the defense pathways activated at the BBB endothelial level by TS exposure. Specifically we focused on Nrf2 and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B signaling response (NF-κβ) as the central protective mechanisms related to oxidative insult. With the exception of Nicotine, both full flavor (3R4F) and decotinized (ULN) cigarettes activated Nrf2 and NFκβ pathways in hCMEC/D3 endothelial cells. Several detoxification and anti-oxidant genes including downstream products were also activated including NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 (NQO-1), heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1), catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), solute carrier-SLC7A11). Gene expression levels of cytochrome P450s (CYP2S1 and CYP51A1) and efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multi-drug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) were also enhanced. Increase of P-gp functional activity and depletion of GSH were also observed. Strikingly, toxicity of denicotinized ("reduced exposure") cigarettes was equivalent to 3R4F (or worse). This study provides a detailed analysis of Nrf2-related cytoprotective mechanisms activated in response to 3R4F and ULN-derived TS exposure correlating the results with their

  19. Brain Invasion by Mouse Hepatitis Virus Depends on Impairment of Tight Junctions and Beta Interferon Production in Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bleau, Christian; Filliol, Aveline; Samson, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coronaviruses (CoVs) have shown neuroinvasive properties in humans and animals secondary to replication in peripheral organs, but the mechanism of neuroinvasion is unknown. The major aim of our work was to evaluate the ability of CoVs to enter the central nervous system (CNS) through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Using the highly hepatotropic mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3), its attenuated variant, 51.6-MHV3, which shows low tropism for endothelial cells, and the weakly hepatotropic MHV-A59 strain from the murine coronavirus group, we investigated the virus-induced dysfunctions of BBB in vivo and in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) in vitro. We report here a MHV strain-specific ability to cross the BBB during acute infection according to their virulence for liver. Brain invasion was observed only in MHV3-infected mice and correlated with enhanced BBB permeability associated with decreased expression of zona occludens protein 1 (ZO-1), VE-cadherin, and occludin, but not claudin-5, in the brain or in cultured BMECs. BBB breakdown in MHV3 infection was not related to production of barrier-dysregulating inflammatory cytokines or chemokines by infected BMECs but rather to a downregulation of barrier protective beta interferon (IFN-β) production. Our findings highlight the importance of IFN-β production by infected BMECs in preserving BBB function and preventing access of blood-borne infectious viruses to the brain. IMPORTANCE Coronaviruses (CoVs) infect several mammals, including humans, and are associated with respiratory, gastrointestinal, and/or neurological diseases. There is some evidence that suggest that human respiratory CoVs may show neuroinvasive properties. Indeed, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), causing severe acute respiratory syndrome, and the CoVs OC43 and 229E were found in the brains of SARS patients and multiple sclerosis patients, respectively. These findings suggest that hematogenously spread

  20. The Interaction between Circulating Complement Proteins and Cutaneous Microvascular Endothelial Cells in the Development of Childhood Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yao-Hsu; Tsai, I-Jung; Chang, Chun-Jung; Chuang, Ya-Hui; Hsu, Hui-Yao; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2015-01-01

    Objective In addition to IgA, the deposition of complement (C)3 in dermal vessels is commonly found in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of circulating complement proteins in the pathogenesis of childhood HSP. Methods Plasma levels of C3a, C4a, C5a, and Bb in 30 HSP patients and 30 healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The expression of C3a receptor (C3aR), C5a receptor (CD88), E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), C3, C5, interleukin (IL)-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and RANTES by human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d) was evaluated either by flow cytometry or by ELISA. Results At the acute stage, HSP patients had higher plasma levels of C3a (359.5 ± 115.3 vs. 183.3 ± 94.1 ng/ml, p < 0.0001), C5a (181.4 ± 86.1 vs. 33.7 ± 26.3 ng/ml, p < 0.0001), and Bb (3.7 ± 2.6 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 μg/ml, p < 0.0001), but not C4a than healthy controls. Although HSP patient-derived acute phase plasma did not alter the presentation of C3aR and CD88 on HMVEC-d, it enhanced the production of endothelial C3 and C5. Moreover, C5a was shown in vitro to up-regulate the expression of IL-8, MCP-1, E-selectin, and ICAM-1 by HMVEC-d with a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion In HSP, the activation of the complement system in part through the alternative pathway may have resulted in increased plasma levels of C3a and C5a, which, especially C5a, may play a role in the disease pathogenesis by activating endothelium of cutaneous small vessels. PMID:25760949

  1. Cold Pressor Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Myocardial Flow Reserve Is Not Useful for Detection of Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Women with Signs and Symptoms of Ischemia and No Obstructive CAD

    PubMed Central

    Landes, Sofy; Dela Cruz, Sherwin; Wei, Janet; AlBadri, Ahmed; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Mehta, Puja; Thomson, Louise E.; Diniz, Marcio A.; Zhang, Xiao; Petersen, John W.; Anderson, R. David; Pepine, Carl J.; Berman, Daniel S.; Bairey Merz, C. Noel

    2017-01-01

    Background Coronary endothelial function testing using acetylcholine is not routinely available, while non-pharmacological cold pressor testing (CPT) is considered an endothelial stressor. Noninvasive cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) can detect coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD). We evaluated if CPT stress CMRI MPRI could detect invasive coronary endothelial dysfunction. Methods Coronary reactivity testing was performed in 189 women with symptoms and signs of ischemic but no obstructive coronary artery disease as previously described plus CPT stress. Subjects also underwent pharmacologic and CPT stress during CMRI (1.5 T). Statistical analysis comparing CPT MPRI between groups was performed by Welch`s t-test and Mann-Whitney where appropriate. Anderson-Darling test and Levene test were considered to verify the normality and homogeneity of variances assumptions. Correlation analyses between CPT MPRI and both invasive and noninvasive measures of CMD were performed using Spearman correlation. Results While CPT MPRI correlated with pharmacological stress MPRI, it did not correlate with invasive measures of CMD including invasively measured responses to intracoronary (IC) adenosine, IC acetylcholine, CPT, or IC nitroglycerin. Additionally CPT MPRI was not significantly different between subjects with normal compared to abnormal pharm stress MPRI or normal compared to abnormal invasive CMD parameters. Conclusion Despite correlation with pharmacological stress MPRI, non-invasive CPT MPRI does not appear to be useful for detecting CMD in symptomatic women. PMID:28081214

  2. Cold Pressor Stress Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Myocardial Flow Reserve Is Not Useful for Detection of Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Women with Signs and Symptoms of Ischemia and No Obstructive CAD.

    PubMed

    Landes, Sofy; Dela Cruz, Sherwin; Wei, Janet; AlBadri, Ahmed; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Mehta, Puja; Thomson, Louise E; Diniz, Marcio A; Zhang, Xiao; Petersen, John W; Anderson, R David; Pepine, Carl J; Berman, Daniel S; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2017-01-01

    Coronary endothelial function testing using acetylcholine is not routinely available, while non-pharmacological cold pressor testing (CPT) is considered an endothelial stressor. Noninvasive cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) can detect coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD). We evaluated if CPT stress CMRI MPRI could detect invasive coronary endothelial dysfunction. Coronary reactivity testing was performed in 189 women with symptoms and signs of ischemic but no obstructive coronary artery disease as previously described plus CPT stress. Subjects also underwent pharmacologic and CPT stress during CMRI (1.5 T). Statistical analysis comparing CPT MPRI between groups was performed by Welch`s t-test and Mann-Whitney where appropriate. Anderson-Darling test and Levene test were considered to verify the normality and homogeneity of variances assumptions. Correlation analyses between CPT MPRI and both invasive and noninvasive measures of CMD were performed using Spearman correlation. While CPT MPRI correlated with pharmacological stress MPRI, it did not correlate with invasive measures of CMD including invasively measured responses to intracoronary (IC) adenosine, IC acetylcholine, CPT, or IC nitroglycerin. Additionally CPT MPRI was not significantly different between subjects with normal compared to abnormal pharm stress MPRI or normal compared to abnormal invasive CMD parameters. Despite correlation with pharmacological stress MPRI, non-invasive CPT MPRI does not appear to be useful for detecting CMD in symptomatic women.

  3. Regulation of human cerebro-microvascular endothelial baso-lateral adhesion and barrier function by S1P through dual involvement of S1P1 and S1P2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Rachael; Nelson, Vicky; Kho, Dan Ting; Angel, Catherine E; O'Carroll, Simon J; Graham, E Scott

    2016-01-27

    Herein we show that S1P rapidly and acutely reduces the foc