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Sample records for cardiac motion analysis

  1. Analysis of cardiac interventricular septum motion in different respiratory states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, Lennart; Feng, Li; Otazo, Ricardo; Hennemuth, Anja; Axel, Leon

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the left and right heart ventricles (LV and RV) depends on load and pressure conditions that are affected by cardiac contraction and respiration cycles. A novel MRI sequence, XD-GRASP, allows the acquisition of multi-dimensional, respiration-sorted and cardiac-synchronized free-breathing image data. In these data, effects of the cardiac and respiratory cycles on the LV/RV interaction can be observed independently. To enable the analysis of such data, we developed a semi-automatic exploration workflow. After tracking a cross-sectional line positioned over the heart, over all motion states, the septum and heart wall border locations are detected by analyzing the grey-value profile under the lines. These data are used to quantify septum motion, both in absolute units and as a fraction of the heart size, to compare values for different subjects. In addition to conventional visualization techniques, we used color maps for intuitive exploration of the variable values for this multi-dimensional data set. We acquired short-axis image data of nine healthy volunteers, to analyze the position and the motion of the interventricular septum in different breathing states and different cardiac cycle phases. The results indicate a consistent range of normal septum motion values, and also suggest that respiratory phase-dependent septum motion is greatest near end-diastolic phases. These new methods are a promising tool to assess LV/RV ventricle interaction and the effects of respiration on this interaction.

  2. Cardiac Motion Analysis Using High-Speed Video Images in a Rat Model for Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Idaku; Okuda, Toshikazu; Nie, Yuman; Takaki, Takeshi; Orito, Kensuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    In this study, we performed a cardiac motion analysis by using 1000-frames per second (fps) stereo images to capture the three-dimensional motion of small color markers in a rat heart. This method of recording cardiac motion could quantify the rate of change in the myocardial area, which indicated localized myocardial activity of rhythmic expansion and contraction. We analyzed the three-dimensional motion distributions in a rat model for myocardial infarction, in which the heart rate was 4 times/s or more. In the analysis, we spatiotemporally quantified the characteristic cardiac motion in ischemic heart diseases and found that infarction due to ischemia in the rat heart was spread around the left ventricle.

  3. Analysis of left atrial respiratory and cardiac motion for cardiac ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Holmes, D. R.; Johnson, S. B.; Lehmann, H. I.; Robb, R. A.; Packer, D. L.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac ablation therapy is often guided by models built from preoperative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. One of the challenges in guiding a procedure from a preoperative model is properly synching the preoperative models with cardiac and respiratory motion through computational motion models. In this paper, we describe a methodology for evaluating cardiac and respiratory motion in the left atrium and pulmonary veins of a beating canine heart. Cardiac catheters were used to place metal clips within and near the pulmonary veins and left atrial appendage under fluoroscopic and ultrasound guidance and a contrast-enhanced, 64-slice multidetector CT scan was collected with the clips in place. Each clip was segmented from the CT scan at each of the five phases of the cardiac cycle at both end-inspiration and end-expiration. The centroid of each segmented clip was computed and used to evaluate both cardiac and respiratory motion of the left atrium. A total of three canine studies were completed, with 4 clips analyzed in the first study, 5 clips in the second study, and 2 clips in the third study. Mean respiratory displacement was 0.2+/-1.8 mm in the medial/lateral direction, 4.7+/-4.4 mm in the anterior/posterior direction (moving anterior on inspiration), and 9.0+/-5.0 mm superior/inferior (moving inferior with inspiration). At end inspiration, the mean left atrial cardiac motion at the clip locations was 1.5+/-1.3 mm in the medial/lateral direction, and 2.1+/-2.0 mm in the anterior/posterior and 1.3+/-1.2 mm superior/inferior directions. At end expiration, the mean left atrial cardiac motion at the clip locations was 2.0+/-1.5mm in the medial/lateral direction, 3.0+/-1.8mm in the anterior/posterior direction, and 1.5+/-1.5 mm in the superior/inferior directions.

  4. Combination of principal component analysis and optical-flow motion compensation for improved cardiac MR thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toupin, S.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Ozenne, V.; Bour, P.; Lepetit-Coiffe, M.; Boissenin, M.; Jais, P.; Quesson, B.

    2017-02-01

    The use of magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry for the monitoring of thermal ablation is rapidly expanding. However, this technique remains challenging for the monitoring of the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia by radiofrequency ablation due to the heart displacement with respiration and contraction. Recent studies have addressed this problem by compensating in-plane motion in real-time with optical-flow based tracking technique. However, these algorithms are sensitive to local variation of signal intensity on magnitude images associated with tissue heating. In this study, an optical-flow algorithm was combined with a principal component analysis method to reduce the impact of such effects. The proposed method was integrated to a fully automatic cardiac MR thermometry pipeline, compatible with a future clinical workflow. It was evaluated on nine healthy volunteers under free breathing conditions, on a phantom and in vivo on the left ventricle of a sheep. The results showed that local intensity changes in magnitude images had lower impact on motion estimation with the proposed method. Using this strategy, the temperature mapping accuracy was significantly improved.

  5. Interventional heart wall motion analysis with cardiac C-arm CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Kerstin; Maier, Andreas K.; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Lauritsch, Günter; Schwemmer, Chris; Rohkohl, Christopher; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-05-01

    Today, quantitative analysis of three-dimensional (3D) dynamics of the left ventricle (LV) cannot be performed directly in the catheter lab using a current angiographic C-arm system, which is the workhorse imaging modality for cardiac interventions. Therefore, myocardial wall analysis is completely based on the 2D angiographic images or pre-interventional 3D/4D imaging. In this paper, we present a complete framework to study the ventricular wall motion in 4D (3D+t) directly in the catheter lab. From the acquired 2D projection images, a dynamic 3D surface model of the LV is generated, which is then used to detect ventricular dyssynchrony. Different quantitative features to evaluate LV dynamics known from other modalities (ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging) are transferred to the C-arm CT data. We use the ejection fraction, the systolic dyssynchrony index a 3D fractional shortening and the phase to maximal contraction (ϕi, max) to determine an indicator of LV dyssynchrony and to discriminate regionally pathological from normal myocardium. The proposed analysis tool was evaluated on simulated phantom LV data with and without pathological wall dysfunctions. The LV data used is publicly available online at https://conrad.stanford.edu/data/heart. In addition, the presented framework was tested on eight clinical patient data sets. The first clinical results demonstrate promising performance of the proposed analysis tool and encourage the application of the presented framework to a larger study in clinical practice.

  6. Analysis of Pulmonary Vein Antrums Motion with Cardiac Contraction Using Dual-Source Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    de Guise, Jacques; Vu, Toni; Chartrand-Lefebvre, Carl; Blais, Danis; Lebeau, Martin; Nguyen, Nhu-Tram; Roberge, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine the extent of displacement of the pulmonary vein antrums resulting from the intrinsic motion of the heart using 4D cardiac dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). Methods: Ten consecutive female patients were enrolled in this prospective planning study. In breath-hold, a contrast-injected cardiac 4-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) synchronized to the electrocardiogram was obtained using a prospective sequential acquisition method including the extreme phases of systole and diastole. Right and left atrial fibrillation target volumes (CTVR and CTVL) were defined, with each target volume containing the antral regions of the superior and inferior pulmonary veins. Four points of interest were used as surrogates for the right superior and inferior pulmonary vein antrum (RSPVA and RIPVA) and the left superior and inferior pulmonary vein antrum (LSPVA and LIPVA). On our 4D post-processing workstation (MIM Maestro™, MIM Software Inc.), maximum displacement of each point of interest from diastole to systole was measured in the mediolateral (ML), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior (SI) directions. Results: Median age of the enrolled patients was 60 years (range, 56-71 years). Within the CTVR, the mean displacements of the superior and inferior surrogates were 3 mm vs. 1 mm (p=0.002), 2 mm vs. 0 mm (p= 0.001), and 3 mm vs. 0 mm (p=0.00001), in the ML, AP, and SI directions, respectively. On the left, mean absolute displacements of the LSPVA vs. LIPVA were similar at 4 mm vs. 1 mm (p=0.0008), 2 mm vs. 0 mm (p= 0.001), and 3 mm vs. 1 mm (p=0.00001) in the ML, AP, and SI directions. Conclusion: When isolated from breathing, cardiac contraction is associated with minimal inferior pulmonary veins motion and modest (1-6 mm) motion of the superior veins. Target deformation was thus of a magnitude similar or greater than target motion, limiting the potential gains of cardiac tracking. Optimal strategies for cardiac

  7. Analysis of four-dimensional cardiac ventricular magnetic resonance images using statistical models of ventricular shape and cardiac motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Honghai; Walker, Nicholas; Mitchell, Steven C.; Thomas, Matthew; Wahle, Andreas; Scholz, Thomas; Sonka, Milan

    2006-03-01

    Conventional analysis of cardiac ventricular magnetic resonance images is performed using short axis images and does not guarantee completeness and consistency of the ventricle coverage. In this paper, a four-dimensional (4D, 3D+time) left and right ventricle statistical shape model was generated from the combination of the long axis and short axis images. Iterative mutual intensity registration and interpolation were used to merge the long axis and short axis images into isotropic 4D images and simultaneously correct existing breathing artifact. Distance-based shape interpolation and approximation were used to generate complete ventricle shapes from the long axis and short axis manual segmentations. Landmarks were automatically generated and propagated to 4D data samples using rigid alignment, distance-based merging, and B-spline transform. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used in model creation and analysis. The two strongest modes of the shape model captured the most important shape feature of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) patients, right ventricle enlargement. Classification of cardiac images into classes of normal and TOF subjects performed on 3D and 4D models showed 100% classification correctness rates for both normal and TOF subjects using k-Nearest Neighbor (k=1 or 3) classifier and the two strongest shape modes.

  8. Investigating Cardiac Motion Patterns Using Synthetic High-Resolution 3D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Images and Statistical Shape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Biffi, Benedetta; Bruse, Jan L.; Zuluaga, Maria A.; Ntsinjana, Hopewell N.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Schievano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease is more and more based on medical imaging, which allows investigation of abnormal cardiac morphology and correlated abnormal function. Although analysis of 2D images represents the clinical standard, novel tools performing automatic processing of 3D images are becoming available, providing more detailed and comprehensive information than simple 2D morphometry. Among these, statistical shape analysis (SSA) allows a consistent and quantitative description of a population of complex shapes, as a way to detect novel biomarkers, ultimately improving diagnosis and pathology understanding. The aim of this study is to describe the implementation of a SSA method for the investigation of 3D left ventricular shape and motion patterns and to test it on a small sample of 4 congenital repaired aortic stenosis patients and 4 age-matched healthy volunteers to demonstrate its potential. The advantage of this method is the capability of analyzing subject-specific motion patterns separately from the individual morphology, visually and quantitatively, as a way to identify functional abnormalities related to both dynamics and shape. Specifically, we combined 3D, high-resolution whole heart data with 2D, temporal information provided by cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, and we used an SSA approach to analyze 3D motion per se. Preliminary results of this pilot study showed that using this method, some differences in end-diastolic and end-systolic ventricular shapes could be captured, but it was not possible to clearly separate the two cohorts based on shape information alone. However, further analyses on ventricular motion allowed to qualitatively identify differences between the two populations. Moreover, by describing shape and motion with a small number of principal components, this method offers a fully automated process to obtain visually intuitive and numerical information on cardiac shape and motion

  9. A bi-ventricular cardiac atlas built from 1000+ high resolution MR images of healthy subjects and an analysis of shape and motion.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenjia; Shi, Wenzhe; de Marvao, Antonio; Dawes, Timothy J W; O'Regan, Declan P; Cook, Stuart A; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Atlases encode valuable anatomical and functional information from a population. In this work, a bi-ventricular cardiac atlas was built from a unique data set, which consists of high resolution cardiac MR images of 1000+ normal subjects. Based on the atlas, statistical methods were used to study the variation of cardiac shapes and the distribution of cardiac motion across the spatio-temporal domain. We have shown how statistical parametric mapping (SPM) can be combined with a general linear model to study the impact of gender and age on regional myocardial wall thickness. Finally, we have also investigated the influence of the population size on atlas construction and atlas-based analysis. The high resolution atlas, the statistical models and the SPM method will benefit more studies on cardiac anatomy and function analysis in the future.

  10. Position Control of Motion Compensation Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Kesner, Samuel B.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic catheters have the potential to revolutionize cardiac surgery by enabling minimally invasive structural repairs within the beating heart. This paper presents an actuated catheter system that compensates for the fast motion of cardiac tissue using 3D ultrasound image guidance. We describe the design and operation of the mechanical drive system and catheter module and analyze the catheter performance limitations of friction and backlash in detail. To mitigate these limitations, we propose and evaluate mechanical and control system compensation methods, including inverse and model-based backlash compensation, to improve the system performance. Finally, in vivo results are presented that demonstrate that the catheter can track the cardiac tissue motion with less than 1 mm RMS error. The ultimate goal of this research is to create a fast and dexterous robotic catheter system that can perform surgery on the delicate structures inside of the beating heart. PMID:21874124

  11. Cardiac and respiratory motion correction for simultaneous cardiac PET-MR.

    PubMed

    Kolbitsch, Christoph; Ahlman, Mark A; Davies-Venn, Cynthia; Evers, Robert; Hansen, Michael; Peressutti, Devis; Marsden, Paul; Kellman, Peter; Bluemke, David A; Schaeffter, Tobias

    2017-02-09

    Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a versatile imaging technique providing important diagnostic information about ischemic heart diseases. Respiratory and cardiac motion of the heart can strongly impair image quality and therefore diagnostic accuracy of cardiac PET scans. The aim of this study is to investigate a new cardiac PET-Magnetic Resonance (MR) approach providing respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated MR and PET images in less than five minutes. Methods: Free-breathing 3D MR data was acquired and retrospectively binned into multiple respiratory and cardiac motion states. 3D cardiac and respiratory motion fields were obtained with a non-rigid registration algorithm and utilized in motion-compensated MR and PET reconstructions to improve image quality. The improvement in image quality and diagnostic accuracy of the technique was assessed in simultaneous fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-MR scans of a canine model of myocardial infarct and was demonstrated in a human subject. Results: MR motion fields were successfully used to compensate for in-vivo cardiac motion, leading to improvements in full-width-at-half-maximum of the canine myocardium of 13±5% similar to cardiac gating but with a 90±57% higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between myocardium and blood. Motion correction led to an improvement in MR image quality in all subjects, with an increase in sharpness of the canine coronary arteries of 85±72%. A functional assessment showed very good agreement with standard MR cine scans with a difference in ejection fraction of -23%. MR-based respiratory and cardiac motion information was utilized to improve the PET image quality of a human in-vivo scan. Conclusion: The MR technique presented here provides both diagnostic and motion information which can be used to improve MR and PET image quality. Reliable respiratory and cardiac motion correction could make cardiac PET results more reproducible.

  12. Towards estimating cardiac motion using low-rank representation and topology preservation for ultrafast ultrasound data.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Angelica I; Widlak, Thomas; Casals, Alicia; Ammari, Habib

    2016-08-01

    Estimation of the cardiac motion is very important in order to detect heart diseases. This work presents a cardiac motion estimation approach using ultrafast ultrasound data. We optimize a variational framework which has the benefits of combining low-rank data representation with topology preservation. We show through the analysis of experimental results that this combination offers a radical reduction in computational time and noise while ensuring preservation of the anatomical structure of the heart under complex deformations. Although in this work we use the heart as a study case, our solution is promising to analyze other organs experiencing motion.

  13. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 01: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Induced Cardiac Intrafraction Motion in Left-sided Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Patrick, J; Yu, E; Gaede, S

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: Long-term cardiac side effects in left-sided breast cancer patients (BREL) after post-operative radiotherapy has become one of the most debated issues in radiation oncology. Through breathing-adapted radiotherapy the volume of the heart exposed to radiation can be significantly reduced by delivering the radiation only at the end of inspiration phase of the respiratory cycle, this is referred to as inspiration gating (IG). The purpose of this study is to quantify the potential reduction in cardiac exposure during IG compared to conventional BREL radiotherapy and to assess the dosimetric impact of cardiac motion due to natural breathing. Methods: 24 BREL patients treated with tangential parallel opposed photon beams were included in this study. All patients received a standard fast helical planning CT (FH-CT) and a 4D-CT. Treatment plans were created on the FH-CT using a clinical treatment planning system. The original treatment plan was then superimposed onto the end of inspiration CT and all 10 phases of the 4D-CT to quantify the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion and IG through 4D dose accumulation. Results: Through IG the mean dose to the heart, left ventricle, and left anterior descending artery (LAD) can be reduced in comparison to the clinical standard BREL treatment by as much as 8.39%, 10.11%, and 13.71% respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Failure to account for respiratory motion can lead to under or overestimation in the calculated DVH for the heart, and it's sub-structures. IG can reduce cardiac exposure especially to the LAD during BREL radiotherapy.

  14. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  15. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P.; Rimoldi, O. E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  16. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohamed A. A.; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  17. New approach for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion correction in cardiac PET (NAMC-CPET).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed A A; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2015-10-07

    Respiratory and cardiac motions are inevitable during the relatively long acquisition time of cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan. The correction of the resultant motion blur has become a significant challenge due to recent spatial resolution improvement of the PET scanners. The majority of current motion compensation algorithms are based on gating as a primary step. A new approach based on temporal basis functions is developed to correct respiratory and cardiac motion simultaneously in cardiac PET within the normal scanning time (NAMC-CPET). Simulation and experimental studies are conducted to evaluate and validate the final outputs in comparison to the existing gating methods. A dynamic digital phantom is used to simulate realistic human thorax and abdomen with respiratory and cardiac motions. GATE simulation was run at China National Grid Center to obtain realistic PET data in a reasonable time. Moreover, Tibet minipig experiments were conducted using a preclinical small animal PET scanner developed at HUST to validate the performance of the NAMC-CPET in real data. The results reveal that NAMC-CPET outperformed the existing gating methods (respiratory, cardiac, and dual) in cardiac imaging in term of noise reduction and contrast, especially in short acquisition duration. NAMC-CPET obtained better results in the conducted experiments in terms of contrast and the visibility of the heart. In contrast, the dual gating failed to obtain valuable images in the normal scan time due to the low 18F-FDG uptake. NAMC-CPET is advantageous in the low-statistic situation. The results are promising with great potential implications in cardiac PET imaging in terms of the radioactive dose and scan time reduction.

  18. Patterns of spiral tip motion in cardiac tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dave T.; Kwan, Yvonne; Lee, John J.; Ikeda, Takanori; Uchida, Takumi; Kamjoo, Kamyar; Kim, Young-Hoon; Ong, James J. C.; Athill, Charles A.; Wu, Tsu-Juey; Czer, Lawrence; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S.; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    1998-03-01

    In support of the spiral wave theory of reentry, simulation studies and animal models have been utilized to show various patterns of spiral wave tip motion such as meandering and drifting. However, the demonstration of these or any other patterns in cardiac tissues have been limited. Whether such patterns of spiral tip motion are commonly observed in fibrillating cardiac tissues is unknown, and whether such patterns form the basis of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation remain debatable. Using a computerized dynamic activation display, 108 episodes of atrial and ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation in isolated and intact canine cardiac tissues, as well as in vitro swine and myopathic human cardiac tissues, were analyzed for patterns of nonstationary, spiral wave tip motion. Among them, 46 episodes were from normal animal myocardium without pharmacological perturbations, 50 samples were from normal animal myocardium, either treated with drugs or had chemical ablation of the subendocardium, and 12 samples were from diseased human hearts. Among the total episodes, 11 of them had obvious nonstationary spiral tip motion with a life span of >2 cycles and with consecutive reentrant paths distinct from each other. Four patterns were observed: (1) meandering with an inward petal flower in 2; (2) meandering with outward petals in 5; (3) irregularly concentric in 3 (core moving about a common center); and (4) drift in 1 (linear core movement). The life span of a single nonstationary spiral wave lasted no more than 7 complete cycles with a mean of 4.6±4.3, and a median of 4.5 cycles in our samples. Conclusion: (1) Patently evident nonstationary spiral waves with long life spans were uncommon in our sample of mostly normal cardiac tissues, thus making a single meandering spiral wave an unlikely major mechanism of fibrillation in normal ventricular myocardium. (2) A tendency toward four patterns of nonstationary spiral tip motion was observed.

  19. Data analysis in cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Pedrón-Torecilla, Jorge; Hernández, Ismael; Liberos, Alejandro; Climent, Andreu M; Guillem, María S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are an increasingly present in developed countries and represent a major health and economic burden. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is closely linked to the electrical function of the heart. Consequently, the analysis of the electrical signal generated by the heart tissue, either recorded invasively or noninvasively, provides valuable information for the study of cardiac arrhythmias. In this chapter, novel cardiac signal analysis techniques that allow the study and diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias are described, with emphasis on cardiac mapping which allows for spatiotemporal analysis of cardiac signals.Cardiac mapping can serve as a diagnostic tool by recording cardiac signals either in close contact to the heart tissue or noninvasively from the body surface, and allows the identification of cardiac sites responsible of the development or maintenance of arrhythmias. Cardiac mapping can also be used for research in cardiac arrhythmias in order to understand their mechanisms. For this purpose, both synthetic signals generated by computer simulations and animal experimental models allow for more controlled physiological conditions and complete access to the organ.

  20. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  1. Effects of cardiac motion on right coronary artery hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dehong; Ding, Zhaohua; Friedman, Morton H; Ethier, C Ross

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of physiologically realistic cardiac-induced motion on hemodynamics in human right coronary arteries. The blood flow patterns were numerically simulated in a modeled right coronary artery (RCA) having a uniform circular cross section of 2.48 mm diam. Arterial motion was specified based on biplane cineangiograms, and incorporated physiologically realistic bending and torsion. Simulations were carried out with steady and pulsatile inflow conditions (mean ReD=233, alpha=1.82) in both fixed and moving RCA models, to evaluate the relative importance of RCA motion, flow pulsation, and the interaction between motion and flow pulsation. RCA motion with a steady inlet flow rate caused variations in wall shear stress (WSS) magnitude up to 150% of the inlet Poiseuille value. There was significant spatial variability in the magnitude of this motion-induced WSS variation. However, the time-averaged WSS distribution was similar to that predicted in a static model representing the time-averaged geometry. Furthermore, the effects of flow pulsatility dominated RCA motion-induced effects; specifically, there were only modest differences in the WSS history between simulations conducted in fixed and moving RCA models with pulsatile inflow. RCA motion has little effect on time-averaged WSS patterns. It has a larger effect on the temporal variation of WSS, but even this effect is overshadowed by the variations in WSS due to flow pulsation. The hemodynamic effects of RCA motion can, therefore, be ignored as a first approximation in modeling studies.

  2. Human torso phantom for imaging of heart with realistic modes of cardiac and respiratory motion

    DOEpatents

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Balakrishnan, Karthikayan; Gullberg, Grant T; O& #x27; Neil, James P

    2013-09-17

    A human torso phantom and its construction, wherein the phantom mimics respiratory and cardiac cycles in a human allowing acquisition of medical imaging data under conditions simulating patient cardiac and respiratory motion.

  3. Robust cardiac motion estimation using ultrafast ultrasound data: a low-rank-topology-preserving approach.

    PubMed

    Aviles, Angelica I; Widlak, Thomas; Casals, Alicia; Nillesen, Maartje; Ammari, Habib

    2017-03-24

    Cardiac motion estimation is an important diagnostic tool to detect heart diseases and it has been explored with modalities such as MRI and conventional ultrasound (US) sequences. US cardiac motion estimation still presents challenges because of the complex motion patterns and the presence of noise. In this work, we propose a novel approach to estimate the cardiac motion using ultrafast ultrasound data. -- Our solution is based on a variational formulation characterized by the L2-regularized class. The displacement is represented by a lattice of b-splines and we ensure robustness by applying a maximum likelihood type estimator. While this is an important part of our solution, the main highlight of this work is to combine a low-rank data representation with topology preservation. Low-rank data representation (achieved by finding the k-dominant singular values of a Casorati Matrix arranged from the data sequence) speeds up the global solution and achieves noise reduction. On the other hand, topology preservation (achieved by monitoring the Jacobian determinant) allows to radically rule out distortions while carefully controlling the size of allowed expansions and contractions. Our variational approach is carried out on a realistic dataset as well as on a simulated one. We demonstrate how our proposed variational solution deals with complex deformations through careful numerical experiments. While maintaining the accuracy of the solution, the low-rank preprocessing is shown to speed up the convergence of the variational problem. Beyond cardiac motion estimation, our approach is promising for the analysis of other organs that experience motion.

  4. Temporally diffeomorphic cardiac motion estimation from three-dimensional echocardiography by minimization of intensity consistency error

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijun; Ashraf, Muhammad; Sahn, David J.; Song, Xubo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative analysis of cardiac motion is important for evaluation of heart function. Three dimensional (3D) echocardiography is among the most frequently used imaging modalities for motion estimation because it is convenient, real-time, low-cost, and nonionizing. However, motion estimation from 3D echocardiographic sequences is still a challenging problem due to low image quality and image corruption by noise and artifacts. Methods: The authors have developed a temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation approach in which the velocity field instead of the displacement field was optimized. The optimal velocity field optimizes a novel similarity function, which we call the intensity consistency error, defined as multiple consecutive frames evolving to each time point. The optimization problem is solved by using the steepest descent method. Results: Experiments with simulated datasets, images of an ex vivo rabbit phantom, images of in vivo open-chest pig hearts, and healthy human images were used to validate the authors’ method. Simulated and real cardiac sequences tests showed that results in the authors’ method are more accurate than other competing temporal diffeomorphic methods. Tests with sonomicrometry showed that the tracked crystal positions have good agreement with ground truth and the authors’ method has higher accuracy than the temporal diffeomorphic free-form deformation (TDFFD) method. Validation with an open-access human cardiac dataset showed that the authors’ method has smaller feature tracking errors than both TDFFD and frame-to-frame methods. Conclusions: The authors proposed a diffeomorphic motion estimation method with temporal smoothness by constraining the velocity field to have maximum local intensity consistency within multiple consecutive frames. The estimated motion using the authors’ method has good temporal consistency and is more accurate than other temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation methods. PMID:24784402

  5. Motion analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.

    1985-01-01

    Human motion analysis is the task of converting actual human movements into computer readable data. Such movement information may be obtained though active or passive sensing methods. Active methods include physical measuring devices such as goniometers on joints of the body, force plates, and manually operated sensors such as a Cybex dynamometer. Passive sensing de-couples the position measuring device from actual human contact. Passive sensors include Selspot scanning systems (since there is no mechanical connection between the subject's attached LEDs and the infrared sensing cameras), sonic (spark-based) three-dimensional digitizers, Polhemus six-dimensional tracking systems, and image processing systems based on multiple views and photogrammetric calculations.

  6. Curvature Analysis of Cardiac Excitation Wavefronts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    computational cardiac-cell network accurately reproduces a particular kind of cardiac arrhythmia , such as ventricular fibrillation. Curvature Analysis of Cardiac...network accurately reproduces a particular kind of cardiac arrhythmia , such as ventricular fibrillation. Index Terms Cardiac excitation waves...isopotentials, Bézier curves, curvature, cardiac arrhythmia and fibrillation Ç 1 INTRODUCTION AN estimated 81,000,000 American adults, more than onein three

  7. MR-Based Cardiac and Respiratory Motion-Compensation Techniques for PET-MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Camila; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Reader, Andrew J; Marsden, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion cause image quality degradation in PET imaging, affecting diagnostic accuracy of the images. Whole-body simultaneous PET-MR scanners allow for using motion information estimated from MR images to correct PET data and produce motion-compensated PET images. This article reviews methods that have been proposed to estimate motion from MR images and different techniques to include this information in PET reconstruction, in order to overcome the problem of cardiac and respiratory motion in PET-MR imaging. MR-based motion correction techniques significantly increase lesion detectability and contrast, and also improve accuracy of uptake values in PET images.

  8. Image-based motion estimation for cardiac CT via image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammin, J.; Taguchi, K.

    2010-03-01

    Images reconstructed from tomographic projection data are subject to motion artifacts from organs that move during the duration of the scan. The effect can be reduced by taking the motion into account in the reconstruction algorithm if an estimate of the deformation exists. This paper presents the estimation of the three-dimensional cardiac motion by registering reconstructed images from cardiac quiet phases as a first step towards motion-compensated cardiac image reconstruction. The non-rigid deformations of the heart are parametrized on a coarse grid on the image volume and are interpolated with cubic b-splines. The optimization problem of finding b-spline coefficients that best describe the observed deformations is ill-posed due to the large number of parameters and the resulting motion vector field is sensitive to the choice of initial parameters. Particularly challenging is the task to capture the twisting motion of the heart. The motion vector field from a dynamic computer phantom of the human heart is used to initialize the transformation parameters for the optimization process with realistic starting values. The results are evaluated by comparing the registered images and the obtained motion vector field to the case when the registration is performed without using prior knowledge about the expected cardiac motion. We find that the registered images are similar for both approaches, but the motion vector field obtained from motion estimation initialized with the phantom describes the cardiac contraction and twisting motion more accurately.

  9. Compensation for respiratory motion in cardiac PET - A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, T.F.; Klein, G.J.; Reed, J.H. |

    1996-05-01

    We characterize respiration-induced motion in the canine myocardium and present preliminary efforts to compensate for the motion in gated PET. An anesthetized dog was injected with 23 mCi FDG-18 and placed in a CTI/Siemens ECAT EXACT HR scanner. The animal was mechanically held at peak inspiration and peak expiration positions for alternate eight-second time periods. Data from each eight-second interval were stored separately, resulting in a total of 32 interleaved volume datasets for each study; half of which represented data during peak inspiration, half represented data during peak expiration. Data from each position were summed and separately reconstructed. The above protocol was repeated four times. Ungated transmission data were acquired while the animal was ventilated normally and were used to correct for the effects of attenuation. Images from each reconstruction were aligned using a cross-correlation technique, which gives the rigid-body transformation necessary to register the two volumes. Over the four sets of data a 10.8 {plus_minus} 0.7 mm magnitude translation and a 6.3 {plus_minus} 0.5 degree rotation were required to align the inspiration data with the expiration data. Consistent registration of the gated data allows summing of the data to improve statistics. Obviously, if one sums the images without regard to misregistration, blurring occurs proportional to the amount of movement over the respiratory cycle. The blurring is markedly decreased by first registering the gated datasets in image space, and then summing according to the transformation parameters. Though cardiac gating was not used in this preliminary study, it indicates that rigid body transformation followed by summation can compensate for a large portion of the image degradations due to respiratory motion. Gated acquisition of PET data using respiratory status signals via a pneumatic bellows will allow separate stages of the respiratory cycle to be collected on the ECAT EXACT HR.

  10. Human motion analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prussing, Keith; Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and supported the development of a physiologically-based human motion model. Subsequently this model aided the derivation and analysis of motion-based observables, particularly changes in the motion of various body components resulting from load variations. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, development of the human motion model, and use of the model in the observable analysis. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and modeling results will also be presented.

  11. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  12. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  13. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Petibon, Yoann; Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Reese, Timothy G.; Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  14. Estimation of cardiac motion in cine-MRI sequences by correlation transform optical flow of monogenic features distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Liu, Wanyu; Wang, Liang; Liu, Zhengjun; Croisille, Pierre; Delachartre, Philippe; Clarysse, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    Cine-MRI is widely used for the analysis of cardiac function in clinical routine, because of its high soft tissue contrast and relatively short acquisition time in comparison with other cardiac MRI techniques. The gray level distribution in cardiac cine-MRI is relatively homogenous within the myocardium, and can therefore make motion quantification difficult. To ensure that the motion estimation problem is well posed, more image features have to be considered. This work is inspired by a method previously developed for color image processing. The monogenic signal provides a framework to estimate the local phase, orientation, and amplitude, of an image, three features which locally characterize the 2D intensity profile. The independent monogenic features are combined into a 3D matrix for motion estimation. To improve motion estimation accuracy, we chose the zero-mean normalized cross-correlation as a matching measure, and implemented a bilateral filter for denoising and edge-preservation. The monogenic features distance is used in lieu of the color space distance in the bilateral filter. Results obtained from four realistic simulated sequences outperformed two other state of the art methods even in the presence of noise. The motion estimation errors (end point error) using our proposed method were reduced by about 20% in comparison with those obtained by the other tested methods. The new methodology was evaluated on four clinical sequences from patients presenting with cardiac motion dysfunctions and one healthy volunteer. The derived strain fields were analyzed favorably in their ability to identify myocardial regions with impaired motion.

  15. Human motion analysis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathcart, J. Michael; Prussing, Keith; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. Both aspects are needed to support the development of personnel detection and tracking algorithms. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and the derivation of motionbased observables, and changes in these fundamental properties arising from load variations. Analyses were conducted to characterize the motion properties of various body components such as leg swing, arm swing, head motion, and full body motion. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, extraction of motion characteristics, and analysis of these data. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and analysis results will also be presented.

  16. Spatiotemporal non-rigid image registration for 3D ultrasound cardiac motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeckx, D.; Ector, J.; Maes, F.; D'hooge, J.; Vandermeulen, D.; Voigt, J.-U.; Heidbüchel, H.; Suetens, P.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new method to evaluate 4D (3D + time) cardiac ultrasound data sets by nonrigid spatio-temporal image registration. First, a frame-to-frame registration is performed that yields a dense deformation field. The deformation field is used to calculate local spatiotemporal properties of the myocardium, such as the velocity, strain and strain rate. The field is also used to propagate particular points and surfaces, representing e.g. the endo-cardial surface over the different frames. As such, the 4D path of these point is obtained, which can be used to calculate the velocity by which the wall moves and the evolution of the local surface area over time. The wall velocity is not angle-dependent as in classical Doppler imaging, since the 4D data allows calculating the true 3D motion. Similarly, all 3D myocardium strain components can be estimated. Combined they result in local surface area or volume changes which van be color-coded as a measure of local contractability. A diagnostic method that strongly benefits from this technique is cardiac motion and deformation analysis, which is an important aid to quantify the mechanical properties of the myocardium.

  17. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, Paul; Lodge, Martin; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-03-02

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the measurement of EF. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimation of the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction is shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  18. A New Parameter for Cardiac Efficiency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman; Rajan, Navaneetha Krishnan; Song, Zeying; Hoffmann, Kenneth; MacMahon, Eileen; Belohlavek, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Detecting and evaluating a heart with suboptimal pumping efficiency is a significant clinical goal. However, the routine parameters such as ejection fraction, quantified with current non-invasive techniques are not predictive of heart disease prognosis. Furthermore, they only represent left-ventricular (LV) ejection function and not the efficiency, which might be affected before apparent changes in the function. We propose a new parameter, called the hemodynamic efficiency (H-efficiency) and defined as the ratio of the useful to total power, for cardiac efficiency analysis. Our results indicate that the change in the shape/motion of the LV will change the pumping efficiency of the LV even if the ejection fraction is kept constant at 55% (normal value), i.e., H-efficiency can be used for suboptimal cardiac performance diagnosis. To apply H-efficiency on a patient-specific basis, we are developing a system that combines echocardiography (echo) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to provide the 3D pressure and velocity field to directly calculate the H-efficiency parameter. Because the method is based on clinically used 2D echo, which has faster acquisition time and lower cost relative to other imaging techniques, it can have a significant impact on a large number of patients. This work is partly supported by the American Heart Association.

  19. Automated classification of LV regional wall motion based on spatio-temporal profiles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2013-11-01

    Assessment of the cardiac Left Ventricle (LV) wall motion is generally based on visual inspection or quantitative analysis of 2D+t sequences acquired in short-axis cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Most often, cardiac dynamic is globally analized from two particular phases of the cardiac cycle. In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify regional wall motion in LV function based on spatio-temporal pro les and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This approach allows to obtain a binary classi cation between normal and abnormal motion, without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images of the cardiac cycle. In each short- axis MRI slice level (basal, median, and apical), the spatio-temporal pro les are extracted from the selection of a subset of diametrical lines crossing opposites LV segments. Initialized at end-diastole phase, the pro les are concatenated with their corresponding projections into the succesive temporal phases of the cardiac cycle. These pro les are associated to di erent types of information that derive from the image (gray levels), Fourier, Wavelet or Curvelet domains. The approach has been tested on a set of 14 abnormal and 6 healthy patients by using a leave-one-out cross validation and two kernel functions for SVM classi er. The best classi cation performance is yielded by using four-level db4 wavelet transform and SVM with a linear kernel. At each slice level the results provided a classi cation rate of 87.14% in apical level, 95.48% in median level and 93.65% in basal level.

  20. A motion-compensated scheme for helical cone-beam reconstruction in cardiac CT angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Stevendaal, U. van; Berg, J. von; Lorenz, C.; Grass, M.

    2008-07-15

    Since coronary heart disease is one of the main causes of death all over the world, cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging is an application of very high interest in order to verify indications timely. Due to the cardiac motion, electrocardiogram (ECG) gating has to be implemented into the reconstruction of the measured projection data. However, the temporal and spatial resolution is limited due to the mechanical movement of the gantry and due to the fact that a finite angular span of projections has to be acquired for the reconstruction of each voxel. In this article, a motion-compensated reconstruction method for cardiac CT is described, which can be used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio or to suppress motion blurring. Alternatively, it can be translated into an improvement of the temporal and spatial resolution. It can be applied to the entire heart in common and to high contrast objects moving with the heart in particular, such as calcified plaques or devices like stents. The method is based on three subsequent steps: As a first step, the projection data acquired in low pitch helical acquisition mode together with the ECG are reconstructed at multiple phase points. As a second step, the motion-vector field is calculated from the reconstructed images in relation to the image in a reference phase. Finally, a motion-compensated reconstruction is carried out for the reference phase using those projections, which cover the cardiac phases for which the motion-vector field has been determined.

  1. Fractals analysis of cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammed

    2005-09-06

    Heart rhythms are generated by complex self-regulating systems governed by the laws of chaos. Consequently, heart rhythms have fractal organization, characterized by self-similar dynamics with long-range order operating over multiple time scales. This allows for the self-organization and adaptability of heart rhythms under stress. Breakdown of this fractal organization into excessive order or uncorrelated randomness leads to a less-adaptable system, characteristic of aging and disease. With the tools of nonlinear dynamics, this fractal breakdown can be quantified with potential applications to diagnostic and prognostic clinical assessment. In this paper, I review the methodologies for fractal analysis of cardiac rhythms and the current literature on their applications in the clinical context. A brief overview of the basic mathematics of fractals is also included. Furthermore, I illustrate the usefulness of these powerful tools to clinical medicine by describing a novel noninvasive technique to monitor drug therapy in atrial fibrillation.

  2. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum

  3. Using motion correction to improve real-time cardiac MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgazyev, E.; Uyanik, I.; Unan, M.; Shah, Dipan; Tsekos, Nikolaos V.; Leiss, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac gating or breath-hold MRI acquisition is challenging. In particular, data collected in a short amount of time might be insufficient for the diagnosis of patients with impaired breath-holding capabilities and/or arrhythmia. A major challenge in cardiac MRI is the motion of the heart itself, the pulsate blood flow, and the respiratory motion. Furthermore, the motion of the diaphragm in the chest moving up and down gets translated to the heart when a patient breathes. Therefore, artifacts arise due to the changes in signal intensity or phase as a function of time, resulting in blurry images. This paper describes a novel reconstruction strategy for real time cardiac MRI without requiring the use of an electro-cardiogram or of breath holding. In this research we focused on automation and evaluation of the performance of our proposed method in real time MRI data to ensure a good basis for the signal extraction. Hence, it assists in the reconstruction. The proposed method enables one to extract cardiac beating waveforms directly from real-time cardiac MRI series collected from freely breathing patients and without cardiac gating. Our method only requires minimal user involvement as initialization step. Thereafter, the method follows the registered area in every frame and updates itself.

  4. A dynamic thorax phantom for the assessment of cardiac and respiratory motion correction in PET/MRI: A preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieseler, Michael; Kugel, Harald; Gigengack, Fabian; Kösters, Thomas; Büther, Florian; Quick, Harald H.; Faber, Cornelius; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Schäfers, Klaus P.

    2013-02-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion are a known source of image degradation and quantification impairment in positron emission tomography (PET). In this study we use near-realistic PET/MRI data acquired using a custom-built human torso phantom capable of simulating respiratory and cardiac motion. We demonstrate that a significant reduction in motion-induced artifacts in PET data is possible using MR-derived motion estimates.

  5. Motion Analysis From Television Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberberg, George G.; Keller, Patrick N.

    1982-02-01

    The Department of Defense ranges have relied on photographic instrumentation for gathering data of firings for all types of ordnance. A large inventory of cameras are available on the market that can be used for these tasks. A new set of optical instrumentation is beginning to appear which, in many cases, can directly replace photographic cameras for a great deal of the work being performed now. These are television cameras modified so they can stop motion, see in the dark, perform under hostile environments, and provide real time information. This paper discusses techniques for modifying television cameras so they can be used for motion analysis.

  6. Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance images using tag motion constraints and multi-level b-splines interpolation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Yan, Meng; Song, Enmin; Wang, Jie; Wang, Qian; Jin, Renchao; Jin, Lianghai; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance (TCMR) images is of great significance in clinical diagnosis and the treatment of heart disease. Currently, the harmonic phase analysis method (HARP) and the local sine-wave modeling method (SinMod) have been proven as two state-of-the-art motion estimation methods for TCMR images, since they can directly obtain the inter-frame motion displacement vector field (MDVF) with high accuracy and fast speed. By comparison, SinMod has better performance over HARP in terms of displacement detection, noise and artifacts reduction. However, the SinMod method has some drawbacks: 1) it is unable to estimate local displacements larger than half of the tag spacing; 2) it has observable errors in tracking of tag motion; and 3) the estimated MDVF usually has large local errors. To overcome these problems, we present a novel motion estimation method in this study. The proposed method tracks the motion of tags and then estimates the dense MDVF by using the interpolation. In this new method, a parameter estimation procedure for global motion is applied to match tag intersections between different frames, ensuring specific kinds of large displacements being correctly estimated. In addition, a strategy of tag motion constraints is applied to eliminate most of errors produced by inter-frame tracking of tags and the multi-level b-splines approximation algorithm is utilized, so as to enhance the local continuity and accuracy of the final MDVF. In the estimation of the motion displacement, our proposed method can obtain a more accurate MDVF compared with the SinMod method and our method can overcome the drawbacks of the SinMod method. However, the motion estimation accuracy of our method depends on the accuracy of tag lines detection and our method has a higher time complexity.

  7. Pattern recognition of abnormal left ventricle wall motion in cardiac MR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingli; Radau, Perry; Connelly, Kim; Dick, Alexander; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    There are four main problems that limit application of pattern recognition techniques for recognition of abnormal cardiac left ventricle (LV) wall motion: (1) Normalization of the LV's size, shape, intensity level and position; (2) defining a spatial correspondence between phases and subjects; (3) extracting features; (4) and discriminating abnormal from normal wall motion. Solving these four problems is required for application of pattern recognition techniques to classify the normal and abnormal LV wall motion. In this work, we introduce a normalization scheme to solve the first and second problems. With this scheme, LVs are normalized to the same position, size, and intensity level. Using the normalized images, we proposed an intra-segment classification criterion based on a correlation measure to solve the third and fourth problems. Application of the method to recognition of abnormal cardiac MR LV wall motion showed promising results.

  8. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  9. Cardiac motion correction based on partial angle reconstructed images in x-ray CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seungeon; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Cardiac x-ray CT imaging is still challenging due to heart motion, which cannot be ignored even with the current rotation speed of the equipment. In response, many algorithms have been developed to compensate remaining motion artifacts by estimating the motion using projection data or reconstructed images. In these algorithms, accurate motion estimation is critical to the compensated image quality. In addition, since the scan range is directly related to the radiation dose, it is preferable to minimize the scan range in motion estimation. In this paper, the authors propose a novel motion estimation and compensation algorithm using a sinogram with a rotation angle of less than 360°. The algorithm estimates the motion of the whole heart area using two opposite 3D partial angle reconstructed (PAR) images and compensates the motion in the reconstruction process. Methods: A CT system scans the thoracic area including the heart over an angular range of 180° + α + β, where α and β denote the detector fan angle and an additional partial angle, respectively. The obtained cone-beam projection data are converted into cone-parallel geometry via row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning. Two conjugate 3D PAR images, whose center projection angles are separated by 180°, are then reconstructed with an angular range of β, which is considerably smaller than a short scan range of 180° + α. Although these images include limited view angle artifacts that disturb accurate motion estimation, they have considerably better temporal resolution than a short scan image. Hence, after preprocessing these artifacts, the authors estimate a motion model during a half rotation for a whole field of view via nonrigid registration between the images. Finally, motion-compensated image reconstruction is performed at a target phase by incorporating the estimated motion model. The target phase is selected as that corresponding to a view angle that is orthogonal to the center view angles of

  10. Beam hardening and motion artifacts in cardiac CT: evaluation and iterative correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zeyang; Lee, Okkyun; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    For myocardial perfusion CT exams, beam hardening (BH) artifacts may degrade the accuracy of myocardial perfusion defect detection. Meanwhile, cardiac motion may make BH process inconsistent, which makes conventional BH correction (BHC) methods ineffective. The aims of this study were to assess the severity of BH artifacts and motion artifacts and propose a projection-based iterative BHC method which has a potential to handle the motion-induced inconsistency better than conventional methods. In this study, four sets of forward projection data were first acquired using both cylindrical phantoms and cardiac images as objects: (1) with monochromatic x-rays without motion; (2) with polychromatic x-rays without motion; (3) with monochromatic x-rays with motion; and (4) with polychromatic x-rays with motion. From each dataset, images were reconstructed using filtered back projection; for datasets 2 and 4, one of the following BHC methods was also performed: (A) no BHC; (B) BHC that concerns water only; and (C) BHC that takes both water and iodine into account, which is an iterative method we developed in this work. Biases of images were quantified by the mean absolute difference (MAD). The MAD of images with BH artifacts alone (dataset 2, without BHC) was comparable or larger than that of images with motion artifacts alone (dataset 3): In the study of cardiac image, BH artifacts account for over 80% of the total artifacts. The use of BHC was effective: with dataset 4, MAD values were 170 HU with no BHC, 54 HU with water BHC, and 42 HU with the proposed BHC. Qualitative improvements in image quality were also noticeable in reconstructed images.

  11. Towards production-level cardiac image analysis with grids.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Ketan; Glatard, Tristan; Schaerer, Joël; Delhay, Bertrand; Camarasu-Pop, Sorina; Clarysse, Patrick; Montagnat, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Production exploitation of cardiac image analysis tools is hampered by the lack of proper IT infrastructure in health institutions, the non trivial integration of heterogeneous codes in coherent analysis procedures, and the need to achieve complete automation of these methods. HealthGrids are promising technologies to address these difficulties. This paper details how they can be complemented by high level problem solving environments such as workflow managers to improve the performance of applications both in terms of execution time and robustness of results. Two of the most important important cardiac image analysis tasks are considered, namely myocardium segmentation and motion estimation in a 4D sequence. Results are shown on the corresponding pipelines, using two different execution environments on the EGEE grid production infrastructure.

  12. Gravity Compensation Method for Combined Accelerometer and Gyro Sensors Used in Cardiac Motion Measurements.

    PubMed

    Krogh, Magnus Reinsfelt; Nghiem, Giang M; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Elle, Ole Jakob; Grymyr, Ole-Johannes; Hoff, Lars; Remme, Espen W

    2017-01-23

    A miniaturized accelerometer fixed to the heart can be used for monitoring of cardiac function. However, an accelerometer cannot differentiate between acceleration caused by motion and acceleration due to gravity. The accuracy of motion measurements is therefore dependent on how well the gravity component can be estimated and filtered from the measured signal. In this study we propose a new method for estimating the gravity, based on strapdown inertial navigation, using a combined accelerometer and gyro. The gyro was used to estimate the orientation of the gravity field and thereby remove it. We compared this method with two previously proposed gravity filtering methods in three experimental models using: (1) in silico computer simulated heart motion; (2) robot mimicked heart motion; and (3) in vivo measured motion on the heart in an animal model. The new method correlated excellently with the reference (r (2) > 0.93) and had a deviation from reference peak systolic displacement (6.3 ± 3.9 mm) below 0.2 ± 0.5 mm for the robot experiment model. The new method performed significantly better than the two previously proposed methods (p < 0.001). The results show that the proposed method using gyro can measure cardiac motion with high accuracy and performs better than existing methods for filtering the gravity component from the accelerometer signal.

  13. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21 mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  14. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1990-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body, a wide variety of technologies was developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development coupled with recent advances in video technology have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System to develop data on shirt-sleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The system is described.

  15. A B-spline approach to phase unwrapping in tagged cardiac MRI for motion tracking.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Patricia; Cai, Yiyu; Mak, Koon Hou; Zheng, Jianmin

    2013-05-01

    A novel B-Spline based approach to phase unwrapping in tagged magnetic resonance images is proposed for cardiac motion tracking. A bicubic B-spline surface is used to model the absolute phase. The phase unwrapping problem is formulated as a mixed integer optimization problem that minimizes the sum of the difference between the spatial gradients of absolute and wrapped phases, and the difference between the rewrapped and wrapped phases. In contrast to the existing techniques for motion tracking, the proposed approach can overcome the limitation of interframe half-tag displacement and increase the robustness of motion tracking. The article further presents a hybrid harmonic phase imaging-B-spline method to take the advantage of the harmonic phase imaging method for small motion and the efficiency of the B-Spline approach for large motion. The proposed approach has been successively applied to a full set of cardiac MRI scans in both long and short axis slices with superior performance when compared with the harmonic phase imaging and quality guided path-following methods.

  16. Motion adaptive patch-based low-rank approach for compressed sensing cardiac cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Huisu; Kim, Kyung Sang; Kim, Daniel; Bresler, Yoram; Ye, Jong Chul

    2014-11-01

    One of the technical challenges in cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to reduce the acquisition time to enable the high spatio-temporal resolution imaging of a cardiac volume within a short scan time. Recently, compressed sensing approaches have been investigated extensively for highly accelerated cine MRI by exploiting transform domain sparsity using linear transforms such as wavelets, and Fourier. However, in cardiac cine imaging, the cardiac volume changes significantly between frames, and there often exist abrupt pixel value changes along time. In order to effectively sparsify such temporal variations, it is necessary to exploit temporal redundancy along motion trajectories. This paper introduces a novel patch-based reconstruction method to exploit geometric similarities in the spatio-temporal domain. In particular, we use a low rank constraint for similar patches along motion, based on the observation that rank structures are relatively less sensitive to global intensity changes, but make it easier to capture moving edges. A Nash equilibrium formulation with relaxation is employed to guarantee convergence. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm clearly reconstructs important anatomical structures in cardiac cine image and provides improved image quality compared to existing state-of-the-art methods such as k-t FOCUSS, k-t SLR, and MASTeR.

  17. Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauluis, Olivier M.; Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent potential temperature, one can compute an isentropic mass transport that filters out reversible oscillatory motions such as gravity waves. This novel approach emphasizes the fact that the vertical energy and entropy transports by convection are due to the combination of ascending air parcels with high energy and entropy and subsiding air parcels with lower energy and entropy. Such conditional averaging can be extended to other dynamic and thermodynamic variables such as vertical velocity, temperature, or relative humidity to obtain a comprehensive description of convective motions. It is also shown how this approach can be used to determine the mean diabatic tendencies from the three-dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic fields. A two-stream approximation that partitions the isentropic circulation into a mean updraft and a mean downdraft is also introduced. This offers a straightforward way to identify the mean properties of rising and subsiding air parcels. The results from the two-stream approximation are compared with two other definitions of the cloud mass flux. It is argued that the isentropic analysis offers a robust definition of the convective mass transport that is not tainted by the need to arbitrarily distinguish between convection and its environment, and that separates the irreversible convective overturning fromoscillations associated with gravity waves.

  18. Automated cardiac motion compensation in PET/CT for accurate reconstruction of PET myocardial perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Khawar; McGough, Robert J.; Berger, Kevin

    2008-10-01

    Error-free reconstruction of PET data with a registered CT attenuation map is essential for accurate quantification and interpretation of cardiac perfusion. Misalignment of the CT and PET data can produce an erroneous attenuation map that projects lung attenuation parameters onto the heart wall, thereby underestimating the attenuation and creating artifactual areas of hypoperfusion that can be misinterpreted as myocardial ischemia or infarction. The major causes of misregistration between CT and PET images are the respiratory motion, cardiac motion and gross physical motion of the patient. The misalignment artifact problem is overcome with automated cardiac registration software that minimizes the alignment error between the two modalities. Results show that the automated registration process works equally well for any respiratory phase in which the CT scan is acquired. Further evaluation of this procedure on 50 patients demonstrates that the automated registration software consistently aligns the two modalities, eliminating artifactual hypoperfusion in reconstructed PET images due to PET/CT misregistration. With this registration software, only one CT scan is required for PET/CT imaging, which reduces the radiation dose required for CT-based attenuation correction and improves the clinical workflow for PET/CT.

  19. Nonrigid registration-based coronary artery motion correction for cardiac computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagalia, Roshni; Pack, Jed D.; Miller, James V.; Iatrou, Maria

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the modality of choice to noninvasively monitor and diagnose heart disease with coronary artery health and stenosis detection being of particular interest. Reliable, clinically relevant coronary artery imaging mandates high spatiotemporal resolution. However, advances in intrinsic scanner spatial resolution (CT scanners are available which combine nearly 900 detector columns with focal spot oversampling) can be tempered by motion blurring, particularly in patients with unstable heartbeats. As a result, recently numerous methods have been devised to improve coronary CTA imaging. Solutions involving hardware, multisector algorithms, or {beta}-blockers are limited by cost, oversimplifying assumptions about cardiac motion, and populations showing contraindications to drugs, respectively. This work introduces an inexpensive algorithmic solution that retrospectively improves the temporal resolution of coronary CTA without significantly affecting spatial resolution. Methods: Given the goal of ruling out coronary stenosis, the method focuses on 'deblurring' the coronary arteries. The approach makes no assumptions about cardiac motion, can be used on exams acquired at high heart rates (even over 75 beats/min), and draws on a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) nonrigid bidirectional labeled point matching approach to estimate the trajectories of the coronary arteries during image acquisition. Motion compensation is achieved by employing a 3D warping of a series of partial reconstructions based on the estimated motion fields. Each of these partial reconstructions is created from data acquired over a short time interval. For brevity, the algorithm 'Subphasic Warp and Add' (SWA) reconstruction. Results: The performance of the new motion estimation-compensation approach was evaluated by a systematic observer study conducted using nine human cardiac CTA exams acquired over a range of average heart rates between 68 and

  20. Residual motion compensation in ECG-gated interventional cardiac vasculature reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwemmer, C.; Rohkohl, C.; Lauritsch, G.; Müller, K.; Hornegger, J.

    2013-06-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of cardiac vasculature from angiographic C-arm CT (rotational angiography) data is a major challenge. Motion artefacts corrupt image quality, reducing usability for diagnosis and guidance. Many state-of-the-art approaches depend on retrospective ECG-gating of projection data for image reconstruction. A trade-off has to be made regarding the size of the ECG-gating window. A large temporal window is desirable to avoid undersampling. However, residual motion will occur in a large window, causing motion artefacts. We present an algorithm to correct for residual motion. Our approach is based on a deformable 2D-2D registration between the forward projection of an initial, ECG-gated reconstruction, and the original projection data. The approach is fully automatic and does not require any complex segmentation of vasculature, or landmarks. The estimated motion is compensated for during the backprojection step of a subsequent reconstruction. We evaluated the method using the publicly available CAVAREV platform and on six human clinical datasets. We found a better visibility of structure, reduced motion artefacts, and increased sharpness of the vessels in the compensated reconstructions compared to the initial reconstructions. At the time of writing, our algorithm outperforms the leading result of the CAVAREV ranking list. For the clinical datasets, we found an average reduction of motion artefacts by 13 ± 6%. Vessel sharpness was improved by 25 ± 12% on average.

  1. Manual and semi-automatic registration vs retrospective ECG gating for correction of cardiac motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Aaron; Adam, Vincent; Acharya, Kishor; Pan, Tin-Su; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2003-05-01

    A manual and a semi-automatic image registration method were compared with retrospective ECG (rECG) gating to correct for cardiac motion in myocardial perfusion (MBF) measurement. 5 beagles were used in 11 experiments. For each experiment a 30 s cine CT scan of the heart was acquired after contrast injection. For the manual method, a reference end-diastole (ED) image was selected from the first cardiac cycle. ED images in subsequent cardiac cycles were manually selected to match the shape of the reference ED image. For each cardiac cycle in the semi-automatic method, the image with the maximum area and the most similar shape to the selected image of the previous cardiac cycle was chosen as ED image. MBFs were calculated from the images registered by the three methods and compared. The averages of the difference of MBFmanual and MBFsemi-auto and MBFrECG in the lateral free wall of LV were 3.6 and 3.4 ml/min/100g respectively. The corresponding standard deviations from the mean were 9.1 and 28.3 ml/min/100g respectively. We concluded from these preliminary results that image registration methods were better than rECG gating for correcting heart, which should facilitate more precise measurement of MBF.

  2. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1993-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body a wide variety of technologies has been developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development, coupled with recent advances in video technology, have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS) to develop data on shirtsleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on-orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. APAS is a fully integrated system of hardware and software for biomechanics and the analysis of human performance and generalized motion measurement. Major components of the complete system include the video system, the AT compatible computer, and the proprietary software.

  3. Evaluation of Rigid-Body Motion Compensation in Cardiac Perfusion SPECT Employing Polar-Map Quantification.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, P Hendrik; Johnson, Karen L; King, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    We have recently been successful in the development and testing of rigid-body motion tracking, estimation and compensation for cardiac perfusion SPECT based on a visual tracking system (VTS). The goal of this study was to evaluate in patients the effectiveness of our rigid-body motion compensation strategy. Sixty-four patient volunteers were asked to remain motionless or execute some predefined body motion during an additional second stress perfusion acquisition. Acquisitions were performed using the standard clinical protocol with 64 projections acquired through 180 degrees. All data were reconstructed with an ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) algorithm using 4 projections per subset and 5 iterations. All physical degradation factors were addressed (attenuation, scatter, and distance dependent resolution), while a 3-dimensional Gaussian rotator was used during reconstruction to correct for six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) rigid-body motion estimated by the VTS. Polar map quantification was employed to evaluate compensation techniques. In 54.7% of the uncorrected second stress studies there was a statistically significant difference in the polar maps, and in 45.3% this made a difference in the interpretation of segmental perfusion. Motion correction reduced the impact of motion such that with it 32.8 % of the polar maps were statistically significantly different, and in 14.1% this difference changed the interpretation of segmental perfusion. The improvement shown in polar map quantitation translated to visually improved uniformity of the SPECT slices.

  4. Cardiac Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold: Implications for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Pan Tinsu; Pinnix, Chelsea; Zhang, Sean X.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sun, Tzouh Liang; Gladish, Gregory; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Hoffman, Karen E.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Many patients with left-sided breast cancer receive adjuvant radiotherapy during deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to minimize radiation exposure to the heart. We measured the displacement of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and heart owing to cardiac motion during DIBH, relative to the standard tangential fields for left breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients who had undergone computed tomography-based coronary angiography with retrospective electrocardiographic gating were randomly selected for the present study. The patients underwent scanning during DIBH to control the influence of respiration on cardiac motion. Standard medial and lateral tangential fields were placed, and the LADs were contoured on the systolic- and diastolic-phase computed tomography data sets by the clinicians. Displacement of the LAD during cardiac contractions was calculated in three directions: toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, left-right, and anteroposterior. Displacement of the entire heart was measured on the maximal and minimal intensity projection computed tomography images. Results: The mean displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction without the influence of respiration for 20 patients was 2.3 mm (range, 0.7-3.8) toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, 2.6 mm (range, 1.0-6.8) in the left-right direction, and 2.3 mm (range, 0.6-6.5) in the anteroposterior direction. At least 30% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in any direction in 2 patients (10%), and <10% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in 10 patients (50%). The extent of displacement of the heart periphery during cardiac motion was negligible near the treatment fields. Conclusions: Displacement of the heart periphery near the treatment fields was negligible during DIBH; however, displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction varied substantially between and within patients. We recommend maintaining {>=}5 mm of distance between

  5. New techniques for motion-artifact-free in vivo cardiac microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Intravital imaging microscopy (i.e., imaging in live animals at microscopic resolution) has become an indispensable tool for studying the cellular micro-dynamics in cancer, immunology and neurobiology. High spatial and temporal resolution, combined with large penetration depth and multi-reporter visualization capability make fluorescence intravital microscopy compelling for heart imaging. However, tissue motion caused by cardiac contraction and respiration critically limits its use. As a result, in vitro cell preparations or non-contracting explanted heart models are more commonly employed. Unfortunately, these approaches fall short of understanding the more complex host physiology that may be dynamic and occur over longer periods of time. In this review, we report on novel technologies, which have been recently developed by our group and others, aimed at overcoming motion-induced artifacts and capable of providing in vivo subcellular resolution imaging in the beating mouse heart. The methods are based on mechanical stabilization, image processing algorithms, gated/triggered acquisition schemes or a combination of both. We expect that in the immediate future all these methodologies will have considerable applications in expanding our understanding of the cardiac biology, elucidating cardiomyocyte function and interactions within the organism in vivo, and ultimately improving the treatment of cardiac diseases. PMID:26029116

  6. Image artefact propagation in motion estimation and reconstruction in interventional cardiac C-arm CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Maier, A. K.; Schwemmer, C.; Lauritsch, G.; De Buck, S.; Wielandts, J.-Y.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of data for cardiac imaging using a C-arm computed tomography system requires several seconds and multiple heartbeats. Hence, incorporation of motion correction in the reconstruction step may improve the resulting image quality. Cardiac motion can be estimated by deformable three-dimensional (3D)/3D registration performed on initial 3D images of different heart phases. This motion information can be used for a motion-compensated reconstruction allowing the use of all acquired data for image reconstruction. However, the result of the registration procedure and hence the estimated deformations are influenced by the quality of the initial 3D images. In this paper, the sensitivity of the 3D/3D registration step to the image quality of the initial images is studied. Different reconstruction algorithms are evaluated for a recently proposed cardiac C-arm CT acquisition protocol. The initial 3D images are all based on retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated data. ECG-gating of data from a single C-arm rotation provides only a few projections per heart phase for image reconstruction. This view sparsity leads to prominent streak artefacts and a poor signal to noise ratio. Five different initial image reconstructions are evaluated: (1) cone beam filtered-backprojection (FDK), (2) cone beam filtered-backprojection and an additional bilateral filter (FFDK), (3) removal of the shadow of dense objects (catheter, pacing electrode, etc) before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection (cathFDK), (4) removal of the shadow of dense objects before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection and a bilateral filter (cathFFDK). The last method (5) is an iterative few-view reconstruction (FV), the prior image constrained compressed sensing combined with the improved total variation algorithm. All reconstructions are investigated with respect to the final motion-compensated reconstruction quality. The algorithms were tested on a mathematical

  7. Minimizing artifacts resulting from respiratory and cardiac motion by optimization of the transmission scan in cardiac PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, Jonathon A.; Esteves, Fabio; Votaw, John R.

    2007-06-15

    of PET cardiac tissue in the CT lung field was significantly lower (p<0.03) for the slow CT protocol in both the rest and stress emission studies. Phantom studies showed that an overlaying volume greater than 2.6 mL would produce significant artificial defects as determined by a quantitative software package that employs a normal database. The percentage of patient studies with overlaying volume greater than 2.6 mL was reduced from 71% with the normal CT protocol to 28% with the slow CT protocol. The remaining 28% exhibited artifacts consistent with heart drift and patient motion that could not be corrected by adjusting the CT acquisition protocol. The low pitch of the slow CT protocol provided the best match to the emission study and is recommended for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT studies. Further reduction in artifacts arising from cardiac drift is required and warrants an image registration solution.

  8. Effects of eating on vection-induced motion sickness, cardiac vagal tone, and gastric myoelectric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uijtdehaage, S. H.; Stern, R. M.; Koch, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of food ingestion on motion sickness severity and its physiological mechanisms. Forty-six fasted subjects were assigned either to a meal group or to a no-meal group. Electrogastrographic (EGG) indices (normal 3 cpm activity and abnormal 4-9 cpm tachyarrhythmia) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) were measured before and after a meal and during a subsequent exposure to a rotating drum in which illusory self-motion was induced. The results indicated that food intake enhanced cardiac parasympathetic tone (RSA) and increased gastric 3 cpm activity. Postprandial effects on motion sickness severity remain equivocal due to group differences in RSA baseline levels. During drum rotation, dysrhythmic activity of the stomach (tachyarrhythmia) and vagal withdrawal were observed. Furthermore, high levels of vagal tone prior to drum rotation predicted a low incidence of motion sickness symptoms, and were associated positively with gastric 3 cpm activity and negatively with tachyarrhythmia. These data suggest that enhanced levels of parasympathetic activity can alleviate motion sickness symptoms by suppressing, in part, its dysrhythmic gastric underpinnings.

  9. Motion detection and amelioration in a dedicated cardiac solid-state CZT SPECT device.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, John A; William Strauss, H

    2017-04-01

    A solid-state cadmium zinc tellurium (CZT) dedicated multipinhole cardiac camera which acquires all views simultaneously has been introduced for myocardial SPECT acquisition. We report a method to detect and ameliorate patient motion artifacts in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies recorded with this device. To detect motion, a myocardial phantom study was recorded, and at mid-scan, the phantom was moved stepwise along each of 6 orthogonal directions, causing MPI artifacts. Using QPS software (Cedars-Sinai) and an in-house normal database, displacements giving artifactual perfusion defects (total perfusion deficit score, TPD, >5 %) were all 1.5 cm or greater (11.2 ± 1.3 % for 1.5 cm). List mode data were reframed into 10-s steps, and the norm of the changes in center of mass among the 19 projections (32 × 32 matrix, pixel size 2.46 mm) was used as a motion index. Rejection of misregistered data gave artifact-free reconstructions (TPD = 1.0 ± 0.8 %) in phantom scans and reduced blur in a rest/stress clinical study. Blur on the patient's stress scan was consistent with increased motion compared to rest (motion index of 4.4 vs. 3.0 pixels, respectively). For CZT cameras that acquire data from multiple views simultaneously, motion during MPI can cause clinically significant artifacts. Reframing acquisitions into discrete time intervals enables the detection of motion and its amelioration, improving diagnostic accuracy.

  10. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore–Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  11. Respiratory motion correction in gated cardiac SPECT using quaternion-based, rigid-body registration.

    PubMed

    Parker, Jason G; Mair, Bernard A; Gilland, David R

    2009-10-01

    In this article, a new method is introduced for estimating the motion of the heart due to respiration in gated cardiac SPECT using a rigid-body model with rotation parametrized by a unit quaternion. The method is based on minimizing the sum of squared errors between the reference and the deformed frames resulting from the usual optical flow constraint by using an optimized conjugate gradient routine. This method does not require any user-defined parameters or penalty terms, which simplifies its use in a clinical setting. Using a mathematical phantom, the method was quantitatively compared to the principal axis method, as well as an iterative method in which the rotation matrix was represented by Euler angles. The quaternion-based method was shown to be substantially more accurate and robust across a wide range of extramyocardial activity levels than the principal axis method. Compared with the Euler angle representation, the quaternion-based method resulted in similar accuracy but a significant reduction in computation times. Finally, the quaternion-based method was investigated using a respiratory-gated cardiac SPECT acquisition of a human subject. The motion-corrected image has increased sharpness and myocardial uniformity compared to the uncorrected image.

  12. Two-Photon Imaging within the Murine Thorax without Respiratory and Cardiac Motion Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Presson, Robert G.; Brown, Mary Beth; Fisher, Amanda J.; Sandoval, Ruben M.; Dunn, Kenneth W.; Lorenz, Kevin S.; Delp, Edward J.; Salama, Paul; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Petrache, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Intravital microscopy has been recognized for its ability to make physiological measurements at cellular and subcellular levels while maintaining the complex natural microenvironment. Two-photon microscopy (TPM), using longer wavelengths than single-photon excitation, has extended intravital imaging deeper into tissues, with minimal phototoxicity. However, due to a relatively slow acquisition rate, TPM is especially sensitive to motion artifact, which presents a challenge when imaging tissues subject to respiratory and cardiac movement. Thoracoabdominal organs that cannot be exteriorized or immobilized during TPM have generally required the use of isolated, pump-perfused preparations. However, this approach entails significant alteration of normal physiology, such as a lack of neural inputs, increased vascular resistance, and leukocyte activation. We adapted techniques of intravital microscopy that permitted TPM of organs maintained within the thoracoabdominal cavity of living, breathing rats or mice. We obtained extended intravital TPM imaging of the intact lung, arguably the organ most susceptible to both respiratory and cardiac motion. Intravital TPM detected the development of lung microvascular endothelial activation manifested as increased leukocyte adhesion and plasma extravasation in response to oxidative stress inducers PMA or soluble cigarette smoke extract. The pulmonary microvasculature and alveoli in the intact animal were imaged with comparable detail and fidelity to those in pump-perfused animals, opening the possibility for TPM of other thoracoabdominal organs under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:21703395

  13. Respiratory motion correction in gated cardiac SPECT using quaternion-based, rigid-body registration

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jason G.; Mair, Bernard A.; Gilland, David R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, a new method is introduced for estimating the motion of the heart due to respiration in gated cardiac SPECT using a rigid-body model with rotation parametrized by a unit quaternion. The method is based on minimizing the sum of squared errors between the reference and the deformed frames resulting from the usual optical flow constraint by using an optimized conjugate gradient routine. This method does not require any user-defined parameters or penalty terms, which simplifies its use in a clinical setting. Using a mathematical phantom, the method was quantitatively compared to the principal axis method, as well as an iterative method in which the rotation matrix was represented by Euler angles. The quaternion-based method was shown to be substantially more accurate and robust across a wide range of extramyocardial activity levels than the principal axis method. Compared with the Euler angle representation, the quaternion-based method resulted in similar accuracy but a significant reduction in computation times. Finally, the quaternion-based method was investigated using a respiratory-gated cardiac SPECT acquisition of a human subject. The motion-corrected image has increased sharpness and myocardial uniformity compared to the uncorrected image. PMID:19928105

  14. The eigenmode analysis of human motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Juyong; Lee, Deok-Sun; González, Marta C.

    2010-11-01

    Rapid advances in modern communication technology are enabling the accumulation of large-scale, high-resolution observational data of the spatiotemporal movements of humans. Classification and prediction of human mobility based on the analysis of such data has great potential in applications such as urban planning in addition to being a subject of theoretical interest. A robust theoretical framework is therefore required to study and properly understand human motion. Here we perform the eigenmode analysis of human motion data gathered from mobile communication records, which allows us to explore the scaling properties and characteristics of human motion.

  15. Laser speckle analysis synchronised with cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Pavel; Scheffold, Frank; Weber, Bruno

    2015-07-01

    We present an improved Laser speckle imaging approach to investigate the cerebral blood flow response following function stimulation of a single vibrissa. By synchronising speckle analysis with the cardiac cycle we are able to obtain robust averaging of the correlation signals while at the same time removing the contributions due to the pulsation of blood flow and associated tissue adaptation. With our inter-pulse correlation analysis we can follow second-scale dynamics of the cortical vascular system in response to functional brain activation. We find evidence for two temporally separated processes in the blood flow pattern following stimulation we tentatively attribute to vasodilation and vasoconstriction phases, respectively.

  16. Pulse pressure monitoring through non-contact cardiac motion detection using 2.45 GHz microwave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aditya; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    The use of a Continuous Wave (CW) quadrature Doppler radar is proposed here for continuous non-invasive Pulse Pressure monitoring. A correspondence between the variation in systemic pulse and variation in the displacement of the chest due to heart is demonstrated, establishing feasibility for the approach. Arctangent demodulation technique was used to process baseband data from radar measurements on two test subjects, in order to determine the absolute cardiac motion. An Omron digital Blood pressure cuff was used to measure the systolic and diastolic blood pressures from which the pulse pressure was calculated. Correlation between pulse pressure and cardiac motion was observed through changes induced due to different postures of the body.

  17. Motion Analysis: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, J. K.

    The subject of motion has been the center of interdisciplinary studies since the time when Zeno posed his paradox circa 500BC. However, computer vision, the use of a camera and a computer to recognize objects, people and/or events automatically, is a relatively young field of research. Its development began in the early 1960s; however, it has matured fairly quickly. Today, it is contributing to the solutions of some of the most serious societal problems. Motion analysis of a sequence of images is an important part of computer vision. This chapter briefly presents the contributions to motion analysis from other fields followed by the computer vision-based analysis of motion from a sequence of images. Analysis and understanding of images based on both feature tracking and optical flow estimation are presented. Early works focused on the computation of structure from motion of objects from a sequence of images via point features. This was followed by the computation of optical flow to characterize motion. Applications today focus on the monitoring of traffic, providing guidance to a motorist in terms of his/her position relative to traffic lanes and traffic ahead, and inspection of complicated three-dimensional industrial parts, to mention a few. Research focus has shifted from inanimate objects to people, for example monitoring people and their activities in public places or monitoring activities from an unmanned aerial vehicle. These applications are dominating the research scene through the belief that computer vision/motion analysis can contribute to the solution of societal surveillance and biometric problems. The chapter ends with a discussion of the future directions of research in motion analysis and possible applications.

  18. 3D cardiac motion reconstruction from CT data and tagged MRI.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Mihalef, Viorel; Qian, Zhen; Voros, Szilard; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for left ventricle (LV) endocardium motion reconstruction using high resolution CT data and tagged MRI. High resolution CT data provide anatomic details on the LV endocardial surface, such as the papillary muscle and trabeculae carneae. Tagged MRI provides better time resolution. The combination of these two imaging techniques can give us better understanding on left ventricle motion. The high resolution CT images are segmented with mean shift method and generate the LV endocardium mesh. The meshless deformable model built with high resolution endocardium surface from CT data fit to the tagged MRI of the same phase. 3D deformation of the myocardium is computed with the Lagrangian dynamics and local Laplacian deformation. The segmented inner surface of left ventricle is compared with the heart inner surface picture and show high agreement. The papillary muscles are attached to the inner surface with roots. The free wall of the left ventricle inner surface is covered with trabeculae carneae. The deformation of the heart wall and the papillary muscle in the first half of the cardiac cycle is presented. The motion reconstruction results are very close to the live heart video.

  19. Development of a cardiac evaluation method using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system: a feasibility study using a cardiac motion phantom.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Tsujioka, Katsumi; Matsui, Takeshi; Takata, Tadanori; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of cardiac evaluation with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD), based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. To investigate the feasibility of cardiac evaluation with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD), based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. Sequential radiographs of a cardiac motion phantom and water-equivalent material step were obtained with an FPD system. Various combinations of cardiac output and heart rate were evaluated with and without contrast medium. The ventricular area and summation of pixel values in the ventricles were measured. The ejection fraction (EF) was calculated based on the rate of changes and then compared to EF obtained from computed tomography images. In addition, slight changes in pixel values were visualized by use of inter-frame subtraction and color-mapping. The result of a clinical case was examined according to cardiac physiology. There were strong correlations between EF and our results. There was no significant difference between the findings with and without contrast medium. When the heart rate was greater than 60 bpm, EF obtained with our method were underestimated. It is necessary for a patient to be examined at an imaging rate between 7.5 and 10 fps at least. In addition, a +/-1.2% change in pixel value was equivalent to a +/-10 mm change in the thickness of water. Color-mapping images were supported by cardiac physiology. Evaluating changes in pixel values on dynamic chest radiography with FPD has the potential to demonstrate cardiac function without contrast medium. Inter-frame subtraction and color-mapping are very useful for interpreting changes in pixel value as velocities of blood flow.

  20. Development of an automated processing method to detect still timing of cardiac motion for coronary magnetic resonance angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asou, Hiroya; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Imada, Naoyuki; Masuda, Takanori; Satou, Tomoyasu

    2011-03-01

    Whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography (WH-MRA) is useful noninvasive examination. Its signal acquisition is performed during very short still timing in each cardiac motion cycle, and therefore the adequate still timing selection is important to obtain the better image quality. However, since the current available selection method is only manual one using visual comparison of cine MRI images with different phases, the selected timings are often incorrect and their reproducibility is not sufficient. We developed an automated selection method to detect the best still timing for the WH-MRA and compared the automated method with conventional manual one. Cine MRI images were used for the analysis. In order to extract the high-speed cardiac cine image, each phase directional pixel set at each pixel position in all cine images were processed by a high-pass filtering using the Fourie transform. After this process, the cine images with low speed timing became dark, and the optimal timing could be determined by a threshold processing. We took ten volunteers' WH-MRA with the manually and automatically selected timings, and visually assessed image quality of each image on a 5-point scale (1=excellent, 2=very good, 3=good, 4=fair, 5=poor). The mean scores of the manual and automatic methods for right coronary arteries (RCA), LDA left anterior descending arteries (LAD) and LCX left circumflex arteries (LCX) were 4.2+/-0.38, 4.1+/-0.44, 3.9+/-0.52 and 4.1+/-0.42, 4.1+/-0.24, 3.2+/-0.35 respectively. The score were increased by our method in the RCA and LCX, and the LCX was significant (p<0.05). As the results, it was indicated that our automated method could determine the optimal cardiac phase more accurately than or equally to the conventional manual method.

  1. Dependence of Brain Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Perfusion Parameters on the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Federau, Christian; Hagmann, Patric; Maeder, Philippe; Müller, Markus; Meuli, Reto; Stuber, Matthias; O’Brien, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of microvascular perfusion with Intravoxel Incoherent Motion (IVIM) MRI is gaining interest. Yet, the physiological influences on the IVIM perfusion parameters (“pseudo-diffusion” coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and flow related parameter fD*) remain insufficiently characterized. In this article, we hypothesize that D* and fD*, which depend on blood speed, should vary during the cardiac cycle. We extended the IVIM model to include time dependence of D* = D*(t), and demonstrate in the healthy human brain that both parameters D* and fD* are significantly larger during systole than diastole, while the diffusion coefficient D and f do not vary significantly. The results non-invasively demonstrate the pulsatility of the brain’s microvasculature. PMID:24023649

  2. SVM-based classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI with the assessment of STE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify normal/abnormal wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), taking as reference, strain information obtained from 2D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE). Without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images acquired during a cardiac cycle, spatio-temporal profiles are extracted from a subset of radial lines from the ventricle centroid to points outside the epicardial border. Classical Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to classify features extracted from gray levels of the spatio-temporal profile as well as their representations in the Wavelet domain under the assumption that the data may be sparse in that domain. Based on information obtained from radial strain curves in 2D-STE studies, we label all the spatio-temporal profiles that belong to a particular segment as normal if the peak systolic radial strain curve of this segment presents normal kinesis, or abnormal if the peak systolic radial strain curve presents hypokinesis or akinesis. For this study, short-axis cine- MR images are collected from 9 patients with cardiac dyssynchrony for which we have the radial strain tracings at the mid-papilary muscle obtained by 2D STE; and from one control group formed by 9 healthy subjects. The best classification performance is obtained with the gray level information of the spatio-temporal profiles using a RBF kernel with 91.88% of accuracy, 92.75% of sensitivity and 91.52% of specificity.

  3. Cardiac video analysis using Hodge-Helmholtz field decomposition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qinghong; Mandal, Mrinal K; Liu, Gang; Kavanagh, Katherine M

    2006-01-01

    The critical points (also known as phase singularities) in the heart reflect the pathological change of the heart tissue, and hence can be used to describe and analyze the dynamics of the cardiac electrical activity. As a result, the detection of these critical points can lead to correct understanding and effective therapy of the tachycardia. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to address this problem. The proposed approach includes four stages: image smoothing, motion estimation, motion decomposition, and detection of the critical points. In the image smoothing stage, the noisy cardiac optical data are smoothed using anisotropic diffusion equation. The conduction velocity fields of the cardiac electrical patterns can then be estimated from two consecutive smoothed images. Using the recently developed discrete Hodge-Helmholtz motion decomposition technique, the curl-free and divergence-free potential surfaces of an estimated velocity field are extracted. Finally, hierarchically searching the minima and maxima on the potential surfaces, the sources, sinks, and rotational centers are located with high accuracy. Experimental results with four real cardiac videos show that the proposed approach performs satisfactorily, especially for the cardiac electrical patterns with simple propagations.

  4. A statistical method for retrospective cardiac and respiratory motion gating of interventional cardiac x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Panayiotou, Maria King, Andrew P.; Housden, R. James; Ma, YingLiang; Rhode, Kawal S.; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Image-guided cardiac interventions involve the use of fluoroscopic images to guide the insertion and movement of interventional devices. Cardiorespiratory gating can be useful for 3D reconstruction from multiple x-ray views and for reducing misalignments between 3D anatomical models overlaid onto fluoroscopy. Methods: The authors propose a novel and potentially clinically useful retrospective cardiorespiratory gating technique. The principal component analysis (PCA) statistical method is used in combination with other image processing operations to make our proposed masked-PCA technique suitable for cardiorespiratory gating. Unlike many previously proposed techniques, our technique is robust to varying image-content, thus it does not require specific catheters or any other optically opaque structures to be visible. Therefore, it works without any knowledge of catheter geometry. The authors demonstrate the application of our technique for the purposes of retrospective cardiorespiratory gating of normal and very low dose x-ray fluoroscopy images. Results: For normal dose x-ray images, the algorithm was validated using 28 clinical electrophysiology x-ray fluoroscopy sequences (2168 frames), from patients who underwent radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and cardiac resynchronization therapy procedures for heart failure. The authors established end-systole, end-expiration, and end-inspiration success rates of 97.0%, 97.9%, and 97.0%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was tested on ten x-ray sequences from the RFA procedures with added noise at signal to noise ratio (SNR) values of√(5)0, √(1)0, √(8), √(6), √(5), √(2), and √(1) to simulate the image quality of increasingly lower dose x-ray images. Even at the low SNR value of √(2), representing a dose reduction of more than 25 times, gating success rates of 89.1%, 88.8%, and 86.8% were established. Conclusions: The proposed

  5. Wavelet Analysis of Protein Motion

    PubMed Central

    BENSON, NOAH C.

    2014-01-01

    As high-throughput molecular dynamics simulations of proteins become more common and the databases housing the results become larger and more prevalent, more sophisticated methods to quickly and accurately mine large numbers of trajectories for relevant information will have to be developed. One such method, which is only recently gaining popularity in molecular biology, is the continuous wavelet transform, which is especially well-suited for time course data such as molecular dynamics simulations. We describe techniques for the calculation and analysis of wavelet transforms of molecular dynamics trajectories in detail and present examples of how these techniques can be useful in data mining. We demonstrate that wavelets are sensitive to structural rearrangements in proteins and that they can be used to quickly detect physically relevant events. Finally, as an example of the use of this approach, we show how wavelet data mining has led to a novel hypothesis related to the mechanism of the protein γδ resolvase. PMID:25484480

  6. Lunar motion analysis and laser data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Work completed in lunar motion analysis and laser data management during the period July 1, 1971 - September 30, 1975 was reported. In this context, analysis refers to theoretical or numerical studies involving real or potential applications of such observations to improvement of the physical model, and data management refers to the process by which observed photon events are turned into observations and are made available to potential users. The data analysis work included: (1) bringing to operational status of computer programs for the numerical integration of the lunar orbit motion and for the application of lunar laser time delays for the improvement of the parameters of the physical model, (2) program improvement and program integrity, (3) three-dimensional ephemeris, and (4) miscellaneous independent studies. The data management work included: (1) data identification, (2) observatory interfaces, and (3) data distribution.

  7. Motion Analysis System for Instruction of Nihon Buyo using Motion Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Yukitaka; Murakami, Shingo; Watanabe, Yuta; Mito, Yuki; Watanuma, Reishi; Marumo, Mieko

    The passing on and preserving of advanced technical skills has become an important issue in a variety of fields, and motion analysis using motion capture has recently become popular in the research of advanced physical skills. This research aims to construct a system having a high on-site instructional effect on dancers learning Nihon Buyo, a traditional dance in Japan, and to classify Nihon Buyo dancing according to style, school, and dancer's proficiency by motion analysis. We have been able to study motion analysis systems for teaching Nihon Buyo now that body-motion data can be digitized and stored by motion capture systems using high-performance computers. Thus, with the aim of developing a user-friendly instruction-support system, we have constructed a motion analysis system that displays a dancer's time series of body motions and center of gravity for instructional purposes. In this paper, we outline this instructional motion analysis system based on three-dimensional position data obtained by motion capture. We also describe motion analysis that we performed based on center-of-gravity data obtained by this system and motion analysis focusing on school and age group using this system.

  8. Respiratory motion compensated overlay of surface models from cardiac MR on interventional x-ray fluoroscopy for guidance of cardiac resynchronization therapy procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzke, R.; Bornstedt, A.; Lutz, A.; Schenderlein, M.; Hombach, V.; Binner, L.; Rasche, V.

    2010-02-01

    Various multi-center trials have shown that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective procedure for patients with end-stage drug invariable heart failure (HF). Despite the encouraging results of CRT, at least 30% of patients do not respond to the treatment. Detailed knowledge of the cardiac anatomy (coronary venous tree, left ventricle), functional parameters (i.e. ventricular synchronicity) is supposed to improve CRT patient selection and interventional lead placement for reduction of the number of non-responders. As a pre-interventional imaging modality, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging has the potential to provide all relevant information. With functional information from CMR optimal implantation target sites may be better identified. Pre-operative CMR could also help to determine whether useful vein target segments are available for lead placement. Fused with X-ray, the mainstay interventional modality, improved interventional guidance for lead-placement could further help to increase procedure outcome. In this contribution, we present novel and practicable methods for a) pre-operative functional and anatomical imaging of relevant cardiac structures to CRT using CMR, b) 2D-3D registration of CMR anatomy and functional meshes with X-ray vein angiograms and c) real-time capable breathing motion compensation for improved fluoroscopy mesh overlay during the intervention based on right ventricular pacer lead tracking. With these methods, enhanced interventional guidance for left ventricular lead placement is provided.

  9. Global Methods for Image Motion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    including the time for reviewing instructions , searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing...thanks go to Pankaj who inspired me in research , to Prasad from whom I have learned so much, and to Ronie and Laureen, the memories of whose company...of images to determine egomotion and to extract information from the scene. Research in motion analysis has been focussed on the problems of

  10. Medical applications of shortwave FM radar: Remote monitoring of cardiac and respiratory motion

    PubMed Central

    Mostov, K.; Liptsen, E.; Boutchko, R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article introduces the use of low power continuous wave frequency modulated radar for medical applications, specifically for remote monitoring of vital signs in patients. Methods: Gigahertz frequency radar measures the electromagnetic wave signal reflected from the surface of a human body and from tissue boundaries. Time series analysis of the measured signal provides simultaneous information on range, size, and reflective properties of multiple targets in the field of view of the radar. This information is used to extract the respiratory and cardiac rates of the patient in real time. Results: The results from several preliminary human subject experiments are provided. The heart and respiration rate frequencies extracted from the radar signal match those measured independently for all the experiments, including a case when additional targets are simultaneously resolved in the field of view and a case when only the patient’s extremity is visible to the radar antennas. Conclusions: Micropower continuous wave FM radar is a reliable, robust, inexpensive, and harmless tool for real-time monitoring of the cardiac and respiratory rates. Additionally, it opens a range of new and exciting opportunities in diagnostic and critical care medicine. Differences between the presented approach and other types of radars used for biomedical applications are discussed. PMID:20384270

  11. Temporal resolution and motion artifacts in single-source and dual-source cardiac CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schoendube, Harald; Allmendinger, Thomas; Stierstorfer, Karl; Bruder, Herbert; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The temporal resolution of a given image in cardiac computed tomography (CT) has so far mostly been determined from the amount of CT data employed for the reconstruction of that image. The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of such measures to the newly introduced modality of dual-source CT as well as to methods aiming to provide improved temporal resolution by means of an advanced image reconstruction algorithm. Methods: To provide a solid base for the examinations described in this paper, an extensive review of temporal resolution in conventional single-source CT is given first. Two different measures for assessing temporal resolution with respect to the amount of data involved are introduced, namely, either taking the full width at half maximum of the respective data weighting function (FWHM-TR) or the total width of the weighting function (total TR) as a base of the assessment. Image reconstruction using both a direct fan-beam filtered backprojection with Parker weighting as well as using a parallel-beam rebinning step are considered. The theory of assessing temporal resolution by means of the data involved is then extended to dual-source CT. Finally, three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods that all use the same input data are compared with respect to the resulting motion artifact level. For brevity and simplicity, the examinations are limited to two-dimensional data acquisition and reconstruction. However, all results and conclusions presented in this paper are also directly applicable to both circular and helical cone-beam CT. Results: While the concept of total TR can directly be applied to dual-source CT, the definition of the FWHM of a weighting function needs to be slightly extended to be applicable to this modality. The three different advanced iterative reconstruction methods examined in this paper result in significantly different images with respect to their motion artifact level, despite exactly the same

  12. Influence of heart motion on cardiac output estimation by means of electrical impedance tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Rapin, Michael; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Bohm, Stephan H; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can measure cardiac-related intra-thoracic impedance changes. EIT-based cardiac output estimation relies on the assumption that the amplitude of the impedance change in the ventricular region is representative of stroke volume (SV). However, other factors such as heart motion can significantly affect this ventricular impedance change. In the present case study, a magnetic resonance imaging-based dynamic bio-impedance model fitting the morphology of a single male subject was built. Simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of heart motion and its influence on EIT-based SV estimation. Myocardial deformation was found to be the main contributor to the ventricular impedance change (56%). However, motion-induced impedance changes showed a strong correlation (r = 0.978) with left ventricular volume. We explained this by the quasi-incompressibility of blood and myocardium. As a result, EIT achieved excellent accuracy in estimating a wide range of simulated SV values (error distribution of 0.57 ± 2.19 ml (1.02 ± 2.62%) and correlation of r = 0.996 after a two-point calibration was applied to convert impedance values to millilitres). As the model was based on one single subject, the strong correlation found between motion-induced changes and ventricular volume remains to be verified in larger datasets.

  13. A Potential Echocardiographic Classification for Constrictive Pericarditis Based on Analysis of Abnormal Septal Motion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Michael; Lin, Zaw; Celemajer, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon condition that could be easily confused with congestive heart failure. In symptomatic patients, septal "wobble" on echocardiography may be an important sign of constrictive physiology. This study was planned to investigate the effects of constriction on septal motion as identified by echocardiography. Methods In this retrospective observational study, nine consecutive patients with constriction underwent careful echocardiographic analysis of the interventricular septum (IVS) with slow motion 2-dimensional echocardiography and inspiratory manoeuvres. Six patients who had undergone cardiac magnetic resonance imaging underwent similar analysis. Findings were correlated with haemodynamic data in five patients who had undergone cardiac catheterisation studies. Results In mild cases of constriction a single wobble of the IVS was seen during normal respiration. In more moderate cases a double motion of the septum (termed "double wobble") was seen where the septum bowed initially into the left ventricle (LV) cavity in diastole then relaxed to the middle only to deviate again into the LV cavity late in diastole after atrial contraction. In severe cases, the septum bowed into the LV cavity for the full duration of diastole (pan-diastolic motion). We describe how inspiration also helped to characterize the severity of constriction especially in mild to moderate cases. Conclusion Echocardiography appears a simple tool to help diagnose constriction and grade its severity. Larger studies are needed to confirm whether the type of wobble motions helps to grade the severity of constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26448822

  14. Analysis Of Rearfoot Motion In Running Shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Les

    1986-12-01

    In order to produce better shoes that cushion athletes from the high impact forces of running and still provide stability to the foot it is essential to have a method of quickly and reliably evaluating the performance of prototype shoes. The analysis of rear-foot motion requires the use of film or video recordings of test subjects running on a treadmill. Specific points on the subject are tracked to give a measure of inversion or eversion of the heel. This paper describes the testing procedure and its application to running shoe design. A comparison of film and video systems is also discussed.

  15. Image-based view-angle independent cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus catheter tracking for x-ray-guided cardiac electrophysiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Maria; Rhode, Kawal S; King, Andrew P; Ma, Yingliang; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C A; Housden, R James

    2015-10-21

    Determination of the cardiorespiratory phase of the heart has numerous applications during cardiac imaging. In this article we propose a novel view-angle independent near-real time cardiorespiratory motion gating and coronary sinus (CS) catheter tracking technique for x-ray fluoroscopy images that are used to guide cardiac electrophysiology procedures. The method is based on learning CS catheter motion using principal component analysis and then applying the derived motion model to unseen images taken at arbitrary projections, using the epipolar constraint. This method is also able to track the CS catheter throughout the x-ray images in any arbitrary subsequent view. We also demonstrate the clinical application of our model on rotational angiography sequences. We validated our technique in normal and very low dose phantom and clinical datasets. For the normal dose clinical images we established average systole, end-expiration and end-inspiration gating success rates of 100%, 85.7%, and 92.3%, respectively. For very low dose applications, the technique was able to track the CS catheter with median errors not exceeding 1 mm for all tracked electrodes. Average gating success rates of 80.3%, 71.4%, and 69.2% were established for the application of the technique on clinical datasets, even with a dose reduction of more than 10 times. In rotational sequences at normal dose, CS tracking median errors were within 1.2 mm for all electrodes, and the gating success rate was 100%, for view angles from RAO 90° to LAO 90°. This view-angle independent technique can extract clinically useful cardiorespiratory motion information using x-ray doses significantly lower than those currently used in clinical practice.

  16. Toward time resolved 4D cardiac CT imaging with patient dose reduction: estimating the global heart motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Segars, W. Paul; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2006-03-01

    Coronary artery imaging with multi-slice helical computed tomography is a promising noninvasive imaging technique. The current major issues include the insufficient temporal resolution and large patient dose. We propose an image reconstruction method which provides a solution to both of the problems. The method uses an iterative approach repeating the following four steps until the difference between the two projection data sets falls below a certain criteria in step-4: 1) estimating or updating the cardiac motion vectors, 2) reconstructing the time-resolved 4D dynamic volume images using the motion vectors, 3) calculating the projection data from the current 4D images, 4) comparing them with the measured ones. In this study, we obtain the first estimate of the motion vector. We use the 4D NCAT phantom, a realistic computer model for the human anatomy and cardiac motions, to generate the dynamic fan-beam projection data sets as well to provide a known truth for the motion. Then, the halfscan reconstruction with the sliding time-window technique is used to generate cine images: f(t, r r). Here, we use one heart beat for each position r so that the time information is retained. Next, the magnitude of the first derivative of f(t, r r) with respect to time, i.e., |df/dt|, is calculated and summed over a region-of-interest (ROI), which is called the mean-absolute difference (MAD). The initial estimation of the vector field are obtained using MAD for each ROI. Results of the preliminary study are presented.

  17. Biomechanics and motion analysis applied to sports.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N; Barrentine, S W

    2000-05-01

    The development of motion analysis and the application of biomechanical analysis techniques to sports has paralleled the exponential growth of computational and videographic technology. Technological developments have provided for advances in the investigation of the human body and the action of the human body during sports believed to be unobtainable a few years ago. Technological advancements have brought biomechanical applications into a wide range of fields from orthopedics to entertainment. An area that has made tremendous gains using biomechanics is sports science. Coaches, therapists, and physicians are using biomechanics to improve performance, rehabilitation, and the prevention of sports related injuries. Functional analyses of athletic movements that were impossible a few years ago are available and used today. With new advancements, the possibilities for investigating the way a human interacts and reacts to environmental conditions are ever expanding.

  18. Two-character motion analysis and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taesoo; Cho, Young-Sang; Park, Sang Il; Shin, Sung Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we deal with the problem of synthesizing novel motions of standing-up martial arts such as Kickboxing, Karate, and Taekwondo performed by a pair of human-like characters while reflecting their interactions. Adopting an example-based paradigm, we address three non-trivial issues embedded in this problem: motion modeling, interaction modeling, and motion synthesis. For the first issue, we present a semi-automatic motion labeling scheme based on force-based motion segmentation and learning-based action classification. We also construct a pair of motion transition graphs each of which represents an individual motion stream. For the second issue, we propose a scheme for capturing the interactions between two players. A dynamic Bayesian network is adopted to build a motion transition model on top of the coupled motion transition graph that is constructed from an example motion stream. For the last issue, we provide a scheme for synthesizing a novel sequence of coupled motions, guided by the motion transition model. Although the focus of the present work is on martial arts, we believe that the framework of the proposed approach can be conveyed to other two-player motions as well.

  19. Evaluation of interpolation methods for surface-based motion compensated tomographic reconstruction for cardiac angiographic C-arm data

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Kerstin; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Zheng Yefeng; Wang Yang; Lauritsch, Guenter; Rohkohl, Christopher; Maier, Andreas K.; Schultz, Carl; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: For interventional cardiac procedures, anatomical and functional information about the cardiac chambers is of major interest. With the technology of angiographic C-arm systems it is possible to reconstruct intraprocedural three-dimensional (3D) images from 2D rotational angiographic projection data (C-arm CT). However, 3D reconstruction of a dynamic object is a fundamental problem in C-arm CT reconstruction. The 2D projections are acquired over a scan time of several seconds, thus the projection data show different states of the heart. A standard FDK reconstruction algorithm would use all acquired data for a filtered backprojection and result in a motion-blurred image. In this approach, a motion compensated reconstruction algorithm requiring knowledge of the 3D heart motion is used. The motion is estimated from a previously presented 3D dynamic surface model. This dynamic surface model results in a sparse motion vector field (MVF) defined at control points. In order to perform a motion compensated reconstruction, a dense motion vector field is required. The dense MVF is generated by interpolation of the sparse MVF. Therefore, the influence of different motion interpolation methods on the reconstructed image quality is evaluated. Methods: Four different interpolation methods, thin-plate splines (TPS), Shepard's method, a smoothed weighting function, and a simple averaging, were evaluated. The reconstruction quality was measured on phantom data, a porcine model as well as on in vivo clinical data sets. As a quality index, the 2D overlap of the forward projected motion compensated reconstructed ventricle and the segmented 2D ventricle blood pool was quantitatively measured with the Dice similarity coefficient and the mean deviation between extracted ventricle contours. For the phantom data set, the normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) and the universal quality index (UQI) were also evaluated in 3D image space. Results: The quantitative evaluation of all

  20. [A clinical analysis of 10 cases with cardiac lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Li, Y H; Shi, C Y; Duan, F Q; Pang, Y; Li, H B; Zhang, L Q; Liu, Z H; Ouyang, L; Yue, C Y; Xie, M C; Jiang, Z J; Xiao, Y

    2017-02-14

    Objective: To analyze the morbidity, clinical characteristics, therapeutic outcomes and prognosis of cardiac lymphoma. Methods: Individual patient data were obtained from pathology defined 10 cases of cardiac lymphoma from Jan 2000 to Jun 2016. The patient's general information, clinical manifestation, pathological diagnosis, laboratory examination, cardiac involvement feature, cardiac complications, treatment, therapeutic effect and prognosis were analyzed. Results: Of 3 918 cases of lymphoma patients, 10 cases of cardiac involvement were identified, including primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) in 1 case, secondary cardiac lymphoma (SCL) in 9 cases. Of the 10 patients in our analysis, the male-to-female ratio was 3∶2, with a median age of 55 (19-88) years old. The most presenting complaints were dyspnea in 7 cases, followed by chest pain in 5 cases, fatigue in 2 patients and edema in 2 cases. Pathological types included diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in 7 cases, T cell lymphoma (T-LBL) in 1 case, Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in 1 case, and Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in 1 case. The sites of the heart affected by lymphoma in the PCL patient were right and left atriums with multiple nodules; and for SCL, the sites were mainly pericardium associated with a pericardial effusion in 5 cases, a pericardial mass in 2 cases. Congestive heart failure affects 7 patients and cardiac arrhythmias were identified in 4 cases mainly sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation and atrioventricular block. Except one untreated because of old age and poor performance, the rest of 9 patients were treated by either chemotherapy in 4 cases or chemotherapy combined radiotherapy (including the extracardiac sites) in 5 patients. With the median follow-up of 9 months, the one PCL patient achieved partial response (PR) , progress free survival (PFS) for 6 months and the overall survival (OS) for 21 months; in the cohort of 6 SCL patients cardiac involved at diagnosis, complete response (CR) was achieved

  1. Image Reconstruction in Higher Dimensions: Myocardial Perfusion Imaging of Tracer Dynamics with Cardiac Motion Due to Deformation and Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. These results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. However, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images. PMID:26450115

  2. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    DOE PAGES

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; ...

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variationmore » of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.« less

  3. Image reconstruction in higher dimensions: myocardial perfusion imaging of tracer dynamics with cardiac motion due to deformation and respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Uttam M.; Seo, Youngho; Botvinick, Elias H.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-10-09

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using slow rotating large field of view cameras requires spatiotemporal reconstruction of dynamically acquired data to capture the time variation of the radiotracer concentration. In vivo, MPI contains additional degrees of freedom involving unavoidable motion of the heart due to quasiperiodic beating and the effects of respiration, which can severely degrade the quality of the images. This work develops a technique for a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) that reconstructs the distribution of the radiotracer concentration in the myocardium using a tensor product of different sets of basis functions that approximately describe the spatiotemporal variation of the radiotracer concentration and the motion of the heart. In this study the temporal B-spline basis functions are chosen to reflect the dynamics of the radiotracer, while the intrinsic deformation and the extrinsic motion of the heart are described by a product of a discrete set of Gaussian basis functions. Reconstruction results are presented showing the dynamics of the tracer in the myocardium as it deforms due to cardiac beating, and is displaced due to respiratory motion. We find these results are compared with the conventional 4D-spatiotemporal reconstruction method that models only the temporal changes of the tracer activity. The higher dimensional reconstruction method proposed here improves bias, yet the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases slightly due to redistribution of the counts over the cardiac-respiratory gates. Additionally, there is a trade-off between the number of gates and the number of projections per gate to achieve high contrast images.

  4. Analysis of myocardial motion using generalized spline models and tagged magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Rose, Stephen E.; Wilson, Stephen J.; Veidt, Martin; Bennett, Cameron J.; Doddrell, David M.

    2000-06-01

    Heart wall motion abnormalities are the very sensitive indicators of common heart diseases, such as myocardial infarction and ischemia. Regional strain analysis is especially important in diagnosing local abnormalities and mechanical changes in the myocardium. In this work, we present a complete method for the analysis of cardiac motion and the evaluation of regional strain in the left ventricular wall. The method is based on the generalized spline models and tagged magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the left ventricle. The whole method combines dynamical tracking of tag deformation, simulating cardiac movement and accurately computing the regional strain distribution. More specifically, the analysis of cardiac motion is performed in three stages. Firstly, material points within the myocardium are tracked over time using a semi-automated snake-based tag tracking algorithm developed for this purpose. This procedure is repeated in three orthogonal axes so as to generate a set of one-dimensional sample measurements of the displacement field. The 3D-displacement field is then reconstructed from this sample set by using a generalized vector spline model. The spline reconstruction of the displacement field is explicitly expressed as a linear combination of a spline kernel function associated with each sample point and a polynomial term. Finally, the strain tensor (linear or nonlinear) with three direct components and three shear components is calculated by applying a differential operator directly to the displacement function. The proposed method is computationally effective and easy to perform on tagged MR images. The preliminary study has shown potential advantages of using this method for the analysis of myocardial motion and the quantification of regional strain.

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cell intervention rescues ventricular wall motion disparity, achieving biological cardiac resynchronization post-infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Kane, Garvan C; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Terzic, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Dyssynchronous myocardial motion aggravates cardiac pump function. Cardiac resynchronization using pacing devices is a standard-of-care in the management of heart failure. Post-infarction, however, scar tissue formation impedes the efficacy of device-based therapy. The present study tests a regenerative approach aimed at targeting the origin of abnormal motion to prevent dyssynchronous organ failure. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells harbour a reparative potential, and were here bioengineered from somatic fibroblasts reprogrammed with the stemness factors OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. In a murine infarction model, within 30 min of coronary ligation, iPS cells were delivered to mapped infarcted areas. Focal deformation and dysfunction underlying progressive heart failure was resolved prospectively using speckle-tracking imaging. Tracked at high temporal and spatial resolution, regional iPS cell transplantation restored, within 10 days post-infarction, the contractility of targeted infarcted foci and nullified conduction delay in adjacent non-infarcted regions. Local iPS cell therapy, but not delivery of parental fibroblasts or vehicle, prevented or normalized abnormal strain patterns correcting the decrease in peak strain, disparity of time-to-peak strain, and pathological systolic stretch. Focal benefit of iPS cell intervention translated into improved left ventricular conduction and contractility, reduced scar, and reversal of structural remodelling, protecting from organ decompensation. Thus, in ischaemic cardiomyopathy, targeted iPS cell transplantation synchronized failing ventricles, offering a regenerative strategy to achieve biological resynchronization. PMID:23568891

  6. INS integrated motion analysis for autonomous vehicle navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry; Bazakos, Mike

    1991-01-01

    The use of inertial navigation system (INS) measurements to enhance the quality and robustness of motion analysis techniques used for obstacle detection is discussed with particular reference to autonomous vehicle navigation. The approach to obstacle detection used here employs motion analysis of imagery generated by a passive sensor. Motion analysis of imagery obtained during vehicle travel is used to generate range measurements to points within the field of view of the sensor, which can then be used to provide obstacle detection. Results obtained with an INS integrated motion analysis approach are reviewed.

  7. SU-E-T-622: Planning Technique for Passively-Scattered Involved-Node Proton Therapy of Mediastinal Lymphoma with Consideration of Cardiac Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Flampouri, S; Li, Z; Hoppe, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning method for passively-scattered involved-node proton therapy of mediastinal lymphoma robust to breathing and cardiac motions. Methods: Beam-specific planning treatment volumes (bsPTV) are calculated for each proton field to incorporate pertinent uncertainties. Geometric margins are added laterally to each beam while margins for range uncertainty due to setup errors, breathing, and calibration curve uncertainties are added along each beam. The calculation of breathing motion and deformation effects on proton range includes all 4DCT phases. The anisotropic water equivalent margins are translated to distances on average 4DCT. Treatment plans are designed so each beam adequately covers the corresponding bsPTV. For targets close to the heart, cardiac motion effects on dosemaps are estimated by using a library of anonymous ECG-gated cardiac CTs (cCT). The cCT, originally contrast-enhanced, are partially overridden to allow meaningful proton dose calculations. Targets similar to the treatment targets are drawn on one or more cCT sets matching the anatomy of the patient. Plans based on the average cCT are calculated on individual phases, then deformed to the average and accumulated. When clinically significant dose discrepancies occur between planned and accumulated doses, the patient plan is modified to reduce the cardiac motion effects. Results: We found that bsPTVs as planning targets create dose distributions similar to the conventional proton planning distributions, while they are a valuable tool for visualization of the uncertainties. For large targets with variability in motion and depth, integral dose was reduced because of the anisotropic margins. In most cases, heart motion has a clinically insignificant effect on target coverage. Conclusion: A treatment planning method was developed and used for proton therapy of mediastinal lymphoma. The technique incorporates bsPTVs compensating for all common sources of uncertainties

  8. Analysis of motion in speed skating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Yuzo; Nishimura, Tetsu; Watanabe, Naoki; Okamoto, Kousuke; Wada, Yuhei

    1997-03-01

    A motion on sports has been studied by many researchers from the view of the medical, psychological and mechanical fields. Here, we try to analyze a speed skating motion dynamically for an aim of performing the best record. As an official competition of speed skating is performed on the round rink, the skating motion must be studied on the three phases, that is, starting phase, straight and curved course skating phase. It is indispensable to have a visual data of a skating motion in order to analyze kinematically. So we took a several subject's skating motion by 8 mm video cameras in order to obtain three dimensional data. As the first step, the movement of the center of gravity of skater (abbreviate to C. G.) is discussed in this paper, because a skating motion is very complicated. The movement of C. G. will give an information of the reaction force to a skate blade from the surface of ice. We discuss the discrepancy of several skating motion by studied subjects. Our final goal is to suggest the best skating form for getting the finest record.

  9. Assessment of Liver Fibrosis Using Fast Strain-Encoded (FSENC) MRI Driven by Inherent Cardiac Motion

    PubMed Central

    Harouni, Ahmed A.; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Osman, Nael F.; Morse, Caryn; Heller, Theo; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An external driver-free MRI method for assessment of liver fibrosis offers a promising non-invasive tool for diagnosis and monitoring of liver disease. Lately, the heart’s intrinsic motion and MR tagging have been utilized for the quantification of liver strain. However, MR tagging requires multiple breath-hold acquisitions and substantial post-processing. This work proposes a fast strain-encoded (FSENC) MRI methodology to measure the peak strain (Sp) in the liver’s left lobe, which is in close proximity and caudal to the heart. Additionally, a new method is introduced to measure heart-induced shear wave velocity (SWV) inside the liver. Methods Phantom and in-vivo experiments (11 healthy subjects, and 11 patients with liver fibrosis) were conducted. Reproducibility experiments were performed in seven healthy subjects. Results Peak liver strain Sp significantly decreased in fibrotic liver compared healthy liver (6.46%±2.27% vs. 12.49%±1.76%, P<0.05). Heart-induced SWV significantly increased in patients compared to healthy subjects (0.15±0.04 m/s vs. 0.63±0.32 m/s, P<0.05). Reproducibility analysis yielded no significant difference in Sp (P=0.47) or SWV (P=0.56). Conclusion Accelerated external driver-free noninvasive assessment of left liver lobe strain and shear wave velocity is feasible using strain-encoded MRI. The two measures significantly separate healthy subjects from patients with fibrotic liver. PMID:25081734

  10. The development and initial evaluation of a realistic simulated SPECT dataset with simultaneous respiratory and cardiac motion for gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-02-01

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modeled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24  ×  48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of 99mTc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into ungated, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion

  11. The Development and Initial Evaluation of a Realistic Simulated SPECT Dataset with Simultaneous Respiratory and Cardiac Motion for Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taek-Soo; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a realistic simulation dataset for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac (R&C) gated SPECT/CT using the 4D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) Phantom and Monte Carlo simulation methods, and evaluated it for a sample application study. The 4D NCAT phantom included realistic respiratory motion and beating heart motion based on respiratory gated CT and cardiac tagged MRI data of normal human subjects. To model the respiratory motion, a set of 24 separate 3D NCAT phantoms excluding the heart was generated over a respiratory cycle. The beating heart motion was modelled separately with 48 frames per cardiac cycle for each of the 24 respiratory phases. The resultant set of 24×48 3D NCAT phantoms provides a realistic model of a normal human subject at different phases of combined R&C motions. An almost noise-free SPECT projection dataset for each of the 1,152 3D NCAT phantoms was generated using Monte Carlo simulation techniques and the radioactivity uptake distribution of 99mTc sestamibi in different organs. By grouping and summing the separate projection datasets, separate or simultaneous R&C gated acquired data with different gating schemes could be simulated. In the initial evaluation, we combined the projection datasets into no gating, 6 respiratory-gates only, 8 cardiac-gates only, and combined 6 respiratory-gates & 8 cardiac-gates projection datasets. Each dataset was reconstructed using 3D OS-EM without and with attenuation correction using the averaged and respiratory-gated attenuation maps, and the resulting reconstructed images were compared. These results were used to demonstrate the effects of R&C motions and the reduction of image artifact due to R&C motions by gating and attenuation corrections. We concluded that the realistic 4D NCAT phantom and Monte Carlo simulated SPECT projection datasets with R&C motions are powerful tools in the study of the effects of R&C motions, as well as in the development of R&C gating schemes and motion correction

  12. Computer synthesis of human motion as a part of an adequate motion analysis experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexandre A.; Sholukha, Victor A.; Zinkovsky, Anatoly V.

    1999-05-01

    The role of problem of computer synthesis of a human motion for a traditional problem of control generalized and muscular forces determination is discussed. It is emphasized significance of computer model choice for adequate analysis kinematic and dynamic experimental data. On the basis of an imitation computer model influence of model's parameters values is demonstrated. With help of non-stationary constraints we can simulate human motions that satisfy to the most significant parameters of the concerned class of motion. Some results of simulation are discussed. We arrive at a conclusion that for correct interpretation of an experiment mixed problem of bodies system dynamics must be solved.

  13. Time motion analysis of international kickboxing competition.

    PubMed

    Ouergui, Ibrahim; Hssin, Nizar; Haddad, Monoem; Franchini, Emerson; Behm, David; Wong, Del P; Gmada, Nabil; Bouhlel, Ezzedine

    2014-06-17

    The objective of the study was to analyze the time structure of high-level kickboxing matches. A total of 45 combats from two male World Championships were monitored using a time motion analysis system. The combat time structure (i.e., high-intensity activity: HIA; low-intensity activity: LIA; and referee breaks or pauses) during competition and weight divisions was determined and compared. Results indicated that the time structures were HIA: 2.2± 1.2 s; LIA: 2.3± 0.8 s; pauses: 5.4± 4.3 s; and 3.4±1.2 s between two subsequent HIA. The fighting to non-fighting ratio was found to be 1:1. Moreover, the number of HIA and LIA and the time of LIA decreased in latter rounds (e.g., the average number of HIA were 27.1±7.1, 25.1±6.6 and 24.9±6.1 respectively for round1, 2 and 3), meanwhile the time and number of pauses increased (e.g., the average pause times were 12.8±11.4, 22.3±22.6 and 24.6±23.3s respectively for round1, 2 and 3). The activity times did not differ among weight categories. The present results confirm the intermittent nature of kickboxing competition and provide coaches with more information on how to structure training sessions to mimic the physical demands in competition.

  14. Large-deflection statics analysis of active cardiac catheters through co-rotational modelling.

    PubMed

    Peng Qi; Chen Qiu; Mehndiratta, Aadarsh; I-Ming Chen; Haoyong Yu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a co-rotational concept for large-deflection formulation of cardiac catheters. Using this approach, the catheter is first discretized with a number of equal length beam elements and nodes, and the rigid body motions of an individual beam element are separated from its deformations. Therefore, it is adequate for modelling arbitrarily large deflections of a catheter with linear elastic analysis at the local element level. A novel design of active cardiac catheter of 9 Fr in diameter at the beginning of the paper is proposed, which is based on the contra-rotating double helix patterns and is improved from the previous prototypes. The modelling section is followed by MATLAB simulations of various deflections when the catheter is exerted different types of loads. This proves the feasibility of the presented modelling approach. To the best knowledge of the authors, it is the first to utilize this methodology for large-deflection static analysis of the catheter, which will enable more accurate control of robot-assisted cardiac catheterization procedures. Future work would include further experimental validations.

  15. Computational Modeling of Open-Irrigated Electrodes for Radiofrequency Cardiac Ablation Including Blood Motion-Saline Flow Interaction

    PubMed Central

    González-Suárez, Ana; Berjano, Enrique; Guerra, Jose M.; Gerardo-Giorda, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a routine treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. During RFCA, the electrode-tissue interface temperature should be kept below 80°C to avoid thrombus formation. Open-irrigated electrodes facilitate power delivery while keeping low temperatures around the catheter. No computational model of an open-irrigated electrode in endocardial RFCA accounting for both the saline irrigation flow and the blood motion in the cardiac chamber has been proposed yet. We present the first computational model including both effects at once. The model has been validated against existing experimental results. Computational results showed that the surface lesion width and blood temperature are affected by both the electrode design and the irrigation flow rate. Smaller surface lesion widths and blood temperatures are obtained with higher irrigation flow rate, while the lesion depth is not affected by changing the irrigation flow rate. Larger lesions are obtained with increasing power and the electrode-tissue contact. Also, larger lesions are obtained when electrode is placed horizontally. Overall, the computational findings are in close agreement with previous experimental results providing an excellent tool for future catheter research. PMID:26938638

  16. Kinematic analysis of human body motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yuhei; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Tetsu; Itoh, Masaru; Watanabe, Naoki; Yanagi, Shigeru

    1997-03-01

    The knowledge of analyzing a human motion can contribute to the treatment and the prevention of sports injuries or the investigation of welfare equipment. It is important to know the human motion by not only the medical field but the mechanical knowledge. The mechanical knowledge is expected to prevent the sports injuries or to design such as an artificial equipment. Here, we suggest a basic procedure to analyze a human motion from the view of the dynamical knowledge. Although the human body is composed of a lot of element and joint, if the slight movement on the joint such as dislocation and distortion is neglected, the human body can be replaced by a mechanical links system. On this assumption, we analyze an actual simple human motion. We take a picture of a simple arm motion from video cameras. And at the same time, we directly measure the vertical acceleration of the hand by an accelerometer. From the video image, we get the vertical acceleration of the hand with assuming the arm as two-links system. On the process of resolving the vertical acceleration of the hand, we introduce the Fourier series for filtering. Finally, we confirm the propriety of our suggested procedure by comparing the calculated acceleration of hand with the directly measured acceleration.

  17. Analysis of accelerated motion in the theory of relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional treatments of accelerated motion in the theory of relativity have led to certain difficulties of interpretation. Certain reversals in the apparent gravitational field of an accelerated body may be avoided by simpler analysis based on the use of restricted conformal transformations. In the conformal theory the velocity of light remains constant even for experimenters in accelerated motion. The problem considered is that of rectilinear motion with a variable velocity. The motion takes place along the x or x' axis of two coordinate systems.

  18. Motion Picture and Videotape Analysis of Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Geoffrey C.; Duvall, David

    1983-01-01

    Use of motion pictures and videotape recordings to analyze animal behavior is described. Indicates that accuracy/amount of data available is greatly increased and that simultaneous behaviors of different animals can be studied or individual behavior patterns increased/decreased, providing observers with temporal perceptions similar to the animals…

  19. Inertial navigation sensor integrated motion analysis for autonomous vehicle navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry; Bhanu, Bir

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on INS integrated motion analysis is described. Results were obtained with a maximally passive system of obstacle detection (OD) for ground-based vehicles and rotorcraft. The OD approach involves motion analysis of imagery acquired by a passive sensor in the course of vehicle travel to generate range measurements to world points within the sensor FOV. INS data and scene analysis results are used to enhance interest point selection, the matching of the interest points, and the subsequent motion-based computations, tracking, and OD. The most important lesson learned from the research described here is that the incorporation of inertial data into the motion analysis program greatly improves the analysis and makes the process more robust.

  20. Mechanical testing for three-dimensional motion analysis reliability.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily; Kaufman, Kenton; Kingsbury, Trevor; Wolf, Erik; Wilken, Jason; Wyatt, Marilynn

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to use simple mechanical tests to evaluate the reliability of three-dimensional motion analysis systems and biomechanical models. Three different tests were conducted at four motion analysis laboratories where clinical care and research studies are routinely performed. The laboratories had different motion capture systems, different types and number of cameras, different types and numbers of force plates and different biomechanical models. These mechanical tests evaluated the accuracy of the motion capture system, the integration of the force plate and the motion capture system, and the strength of the biomechanical model used to calculate rotational kinematics. Results of motion capture system accuracy tests showed that, for all labs, the error between the measured and calculated distances between markers was less than 2mm and 1° for marker separations which ranged from 24mm to 500mm. Results from the force plate integration tests demonstrated errors in center of pressure calculation of less than 4mm across all labs, despite varied force plate and motion system configurations. Finally, errors across labs for single joint rotations and for combined rotations at the hip and knee were less than 2° at the hip and less than 10° at the knee. These results demonstrate that system accuracy and reliability can be obtained allowing the collection of comparable data across different motion analysis laboratories with varying configurations and equipment. This testing is particularly important when multi-center studies are planned in order to assure data consistency across labs.

  1. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU, a novel analysis of cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Tong, Suiyang; Ren, Xiaofeng; Xia, Hao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that mammalian hearts maintain the capacity for cardiac regeneration. Rapid and sensitive identification of cardiac cellular proliferation is prerequisite for understanding the underlying mechanisms and strategies of cardiac regeneration. The following immunologically related markers of cardiac cells were analyzed: cardiac transcription factors Nkx2.5 and Gata 4; specific marker of cardiomyocytes TnT; endothelial cell marker CD31; vascular smooth muscle marker smooth muscle myosin IgG; cardiac resident stem cells markers IsL1, Tbx18, and Wt1. Markers were co-localized in cardiac tissues of embryonic, neonatal, adult, and pathological samples by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining. EdU was also used to label isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes in vitro. EdU robustly labeled proliferating cells in vitro and in vivo, co-immunostaining with different cardiac cells markers. EdU can rapidly and sensitively label proliferating cardiac cells in developmental and pathological states. Cardiac cell proliferation assessed by EdU is a novel analytical tool for investigating the mechanism and strategies of cardiac regeneration in response to injury.

  2. Cardiac-induced localized thoracic motion detected by a fiber optic sensing scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, Thomas; Lloyd, Glynn; Bhamber, Ranjeet S.; Hadzievski, Ljupco; Halliday, Michael; Webb, David J.; Bennion, Ian

    2014-11-01

    The cardiovascular health of the human population is a major concern for medical clinicians, with cardiovascular diseases responsible for 48% of all deaths worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. The development of new diagnostic tools that are practicable and economical to scrutinize the cardiovascular health of humans is a major driver for clinicians. We offer a new technique to obtain seismocardiographic signals up to 54 Hz covering both ballistocardiography (below 20 Hz) and audible heart sounds (20 Hz upward), using a system based on curvature sensors formed from fiber optic long period gratings. This system can visualize the real-time three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical motion of the heart by using the data from the sensing array in conjunction with a bespoke 3-D shape reconstruction algorithm. Visualization is demonstrated by adhering three to four sensors on the outside of the thorax and in close proximity to the apex of the heart; the sensing scheme revealed a complex motion of the heart wall next to the apex region of the heart. The detection scheme is low-cost, portable, easily operated and has the potential for ambulatory applications.

  3. Vagal control of cardiac electrical activity and wall motion during ventricular fibrillation in large animals.

    PubMed

    Naggar, Isaac; Nakase, Ko; Lazar, Jason; Salciccioli, Louis; Selesnick, Ivan; Stewart, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Vagal inputs control pacemaking and conduction systems in the heart. Anatomical evidence suggests a direct ventricular action, but functional evidence that separates direct and indirect (via the conduction system) vagal actions is less well established. We studied vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) during sinus rhythm and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in pigs and sheep to determine: 1) the range of unilateral and bilateral actions (inotropic and chronotropic) and 2) whether VNS alters left ventricular motion and/or electrical activity during VF, a model of abnormal electrical conduction of the left ventricle that excludes sinus and atrioventricular nodal function. Adult pigs (N=8) and sheep (N=10) were anesthetized with urethane and mechanically ventilated. VNS was performed in animals at 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100Hz for 20s. VF was induced with direct current to the ventricles or occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. In 4 pigs and 3 sheep, left ventricular wall motion was assessed from endocardial excursion in epicardial echocardiography. In sheep and pigs, the best frequency among those tested for VNS during sinus rhythm to produce sustained electrical and mechanical ventricular standstill was 50Hz for unilateral or bilateral stimulation. When applied during VF, bilateral VNS increased the variability of the dominant VF frequency, indicating a direct impact on the excitability of ventricular myocytes, and decreased endocardial excursion by more than 50% during VF. We conclude that the vagus nerve directly modulates left ventricular function independently from its effects on the conduction system.

  4. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  5. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  6. Analysis and Modelling of Muscles Motion during Whole Body Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesarelli, M.; Fratini, A.; Bifulco, P.; La Gatta, A.; Romano, M.; Pasquariello, G.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study is to characterize the local muscles motion in individuals undergoing whole body mechanical stimulation. In this study we aim also to evaluate how subject positioning modifies vibration dumping, altering local mechanical stimulus. Vibrations were delivered to subjects by the use of a vibrating platform, while stimulation frequency was increased linearly from 15 to 60 Hz. Two different subject postures were here analysed. Platform and muscles motion were monitored using tiny MEMS accelerometers; a contra lateral analysis was also presented. Muscle motion analysis revealed typical displacement trajectories: motion components were found not to be purely sinusoidal neither in phase to each other. Results also revealed a mechanical resonant-like behaviour at some muscles, similar to a second-order system response. Resonance frequencies and dumping factors depended on subject and his positioning. Proper mechanical stimulation can maximize muscle spindle solicitation, which may produce a more effective muscle activation.

  7. Computational modeling and analysis for left ventricle motion using CT/Echo image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Kang, Nahyup; Lee, Hyoung-Euk; Kim, James D. K.

    2014-03-01

    In order to diagnose heart disease such as myocardial infarction, 2D strain through the speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) or the tagged MRI is often used. However out-of-plane strain measurement using STE or tagged MRI is inaccurate. Therefore, strain for whole organ which are analyzed by simulation of 3D cardiac model can be applied in clinical diagnosis. To simulate cardiac contraction in a cycle, cardiac physical properties should be reflected in cardiac model. The myocardial wall in left ventricle is represented as a transversely orthotropic hyperelastic material, with the fiber orientation varying sequentially from the epicardial surface, through about 0° at the midwall, to the endocardial surface. A time-varying elastance model is simulated to contract myocardial fiber, and physiological intraventricular systolic pressure curves are employed for the cardiac dynamics simulation in a cycle. And an exact description of the cardiac motion should be acquired in order that essential boundary conditions for cardiac simulation are obtained effectively. Real time cardiac motion can be acquired by using echocardiography and exact cardiac geometrical 3D model can be reconstructed using 3D CT data. In this research, image fusion technology from CT and echocardiography is employed in order to consider patient-specific left ventricle movement. Finally, longitudinal strain from speckle tracking echocardiography which is known to fit actual left ventricle deformation relatively well is used to verify these results.

  8. Approximate analysis of balloting motion of railgun projectiles. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, S.H.

    1991-07-01

    This is the final of three reports dealing with the in-bore balloting motion of a projectile fired from an electromagnetic railgun. Knowledge of projectile in-bore motion is important to its design and the design of the railgun. It is a complicated problem since many parameters are involved and it is not easy to determine the interacting relationships between them. To make the problem easier to understand it was analyzed on several levels. Beginning from the basic simple model which computed only the axial motion, more complicated models were introduced in upper levels that included the more significant lateral forces and gun tube vibration effects. This report deals with the approximate analysis of balloting motion. This model considers the effects of the propulsion force, the friction force of the projectile package (projectile and armature), air resistance, gravity, the elastic forces, and the projectile/barrel clearance. To simplify the modeling, a plane motion configuration is assumed. Though the projectile is moving with a varying yaw angle, the axes of the barrel and the projectile package, and the projectile center of gravity are always considered in a plane containing the centerlines of the rails. Equations of motion are derived and solved. A sample computation is performed and the results plotted to give a clearer understanding of projectile in-bore motion.

  9. Dynamics of respiratory and cardiac CSF motion revealed with real-time simultaneous multi-slice EPI velocity phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyong; Beckett, Alexander; Verma, Ajay; Feinberg, David A

    2015-11-15

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics have been mostly studied with cardiac-gated phase contrast MRI combining signal from many cardiac cycles to create cine-phase sampling of one time-averaged cardiac cycle. The relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement are not well understood. There is possible respiration-driven movement of CSF in ventricles, cisterns, and subarachnoid spaces which has not been characterized with velocity measurements. To date, commonly used cine-phase contrast techniques of velocity imaging inherently cannot detect respiratory velocity changes since cardiac-gated data acquired over several minutes randomizes respiratory phase contributions. We have developed an extremely fast, real-time, and quantitative MRI technique to image CSF velocity in simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) echo planar imaging (EPI) acquisitions of 3 or 6 slice levels simultaneously over 30s and observe 3D spatial distributions of CSF velocity. Measurements were made in 10 subjects utilizing a respiratory belt to record respiratory phases and visual cues to instruct subjects on breathing rates. A protocol is able to measure velocity within regions of brain and basal cisterns covered with 24 axial slices in 4 minutes, repeated for 3 velocity directions. These measurements were performed throughout the whole brain, rather than in selected line regions so that a global view of CSF dynamics could be visualized. Observations of cardiac and breathing-driven CSF dynamics show bidirectional respiratory motion occurs primarily along the central axis through the basal cisterns and intraventricular passageways and to a lesser extent in the peripheral Sylvian fissure with little CSF motion present in subarachnoid spaces. During inspiration phase, there is upward (inferior to superior) CSF movement into the cranial cavity and lateral ventricles and a reversal of direction in expiration phase.

  10. Numerical analysis of slender vortex motion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.

    1996-02-01

    Several numerical methods for slender vortex motion (the local induction equation, the Klein-Majda equation, and the Klein-Knio equation) are compared on the specific example of sideband instability of Kelvin waves on a vortex. Numerical experiments on this model problem indicate that all these methods yield qualitatively similar behavior, and this behavior is different from the behavior of a non-slender vortex with variable cross-section. It is found that the boundaries between stable, recurrent, and chaotic regimes in the parameter space of the model problem depend on the method used. The boundaries of these domains in the parameter space for the Klein-Majda equation and for the Klein-Knio equation are closely related to the core size. When the core size is large enough, the Klein-Majda equation always exhibits stable solutions for our model problem. Various conclusions are drawn; in particular, the behavior of turbulent vortices cannot be captured by these local approximations, and probably cannot be captured by any slender vortex model with constant vortex cross-section. Speculations about the differences between classical and superfluid hydrodynamics are also offered.

  11. Ground Motion in Central Mexico: A Comprehensive Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Guzman, L.; Juarez, A.; Rábade, S.; Aguirre, J.; Bielak, J.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents a detailed analysis of the ground motion in Central Mexico based on numerical simulations, as well as broadband and strong ground motion records. We describe and evaluate a velocity model for Central Mexico derived from noise and regional earthquake cross-correlations, which is used throughout this research to estimate the ground motion in the region. The 3D crustal model includes a geotechnical structure of the Valley of Mexico (VM), subduction zone geometry, and 3D velocity distributions. The latter are based on more than 200 low magnitude (Mw < 4.5) earthquakes and two years of noise recordings. We emphasize the analysis on the ground motion in the Valley of Mexico originating from intra-slab deep events and temblors located along the Pacific coast. Also, we quantify the effects Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and the low-velocity deposits on the ground motion. The 3D octree-based finite element wave propagation computations, valid up to 1 Hz, reveal that the inclusion of a basin with a structure as complex as the Valley of Mexico dramatically enhances the regional effects induced by the TMVB. Moreover, the basin not only produces ground motion amplification and anomalous duration, but it also favors the energy focusing into zones of Mexico City where structures typically undergo high levels of damage.

  12. Effects of self-motion on auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hirohito M; Pressnitzer, Daniel; Toshima, Iwaki; Kashino, Makio

    2012-04-24

    Auditory scene analysis requires the listener to parse the incoming flow of acoustic information into perceptual "streams," such as sentences from a single talker in the midst of background noise. Behavioral and neural data show that the formation of streams is not instantaneous; rather, streaming builds up over time and can be reset by sudden changes in the acoustics of the scene. Here, we investigated the effect of changes induced by voluntary head motion on streaming. We used a telepresence robot in a virtual reality setup to disentangle all potential consequences of head motion: changes in acoustic cues at the ears, changes in apparent source location, and changes in motor or attentional processes. The results showed that self-motion influenced streaming in at least two ways. Right after the onset of movement, self-motion always induced some resetting of perceptual organization to one stream, even when the acoustic scene itself had not changed. Then, after the motion, the prevalent organization was rapidly biased by the binaural cues discovered through motion. Auditory scene analysis thus appears to be a dynamic process that is affected by the active sensing of the environment.

  13. Quantitative analysis of 3D stent reconstruction from a limited number of views in cardiac rotational angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrenot, Béatrice; Vaillant, Régis; Prost, Rémy; Finet, Gérard; Douek, Philippe; Peyrin, Françoise

    2007-03-01

    Percutaneous coronary angioplasty consists in conducting a guidewire carrying a balloon and a stent through the lesion and deploying the stent by balloon inflation. A stent is a small 3D complex mesh hardly visible in X-ray images : the control of stent deployment is difficult although it is important to avoid post intervention complications. In a previous work, we proposed a method to reconstruct 3D stent images from a set of 2D cone-beam projections acquired in rotational acquisition mode. The process involves a motion compensation procedure based on the position of two markers located on the guidewire in the 2D radiographic sequence. Under the hypothesis that the stent and markers motions are identical, the method was shown to generate a negligible error. If this hypothesis is not fulfilled, a solution could be to use only the images where motion is weakest, at the detriment of having a limiter number of views. In this paper, we propose a simulation based study of the impact of a limited number of views in our context. The chain image involved in the acquisition of X-ray sequences is first modeled to simulate realistic noisy projections of stent animated by a motion close to cardiac motion. Then, the 3D stent images are reconstructed using the proposed motion compensation method from gated projections. Two gating strategies are examined to select projection in the sequences. A quantitative analysis is carried out to assess reconstruction quality as a function of noise and acquisition strategy.

  14. A shockwave approach for web-based clinical motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Advances in Internet connectivity and personal multimedia computing have created opportunities for integrating simple motion analysis into clinical practice. The Macromedia Shockwave environment provides tools for creating media-rich software that runs within a Web browser. For this project, clinical motion analysis software was created using Shockwave that can load digital video clips of a client's motion, step/shuttle/play through the clip, superimpose a grid over the video image, measure relative joint angles, scale to a linear factor, measure distances, and measure average velocities. After installing the Shockwave and Quicktime video plug-ins, the Motion Analysis Tools-Shockwave program runs directly from a Web page hyperlink. Program testing involved comparing angle measurements, linear distances, stride length, and walking speed among six video clips. The first three clips were of a transtibial prosthesis being carried through the field of view (640 x 480, 320 x 240, 320 x 240 enlarged to 640 x 480). The second set of three clips was of a metal square carried through the field of view. Average root mean square errors were 2.0 degrees for angle measures and 1.2 cm for length measures. Stride length standard deviation was 4.6 cm (mean length = 212.1 cm). Average walking speed standard deviation was 0.015 m/s (mean speed = 1.15 m/s). The test results were consistent with video motion analysis results and within an acceptable range for clinical design-making. This Web-based motion analysis approach provides a useful tool for ubiquitous, quantitative, clinical gait analysis.

  15. Human Factors Vehicle Displacement Analysis: Engineering In Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, Laura Ashley; Reynolds, David; Robertson, Clay

    2010-01-01

    While positioned on the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center, tall stacked launch vehicles are exposed to the natural environment. Varying directional winds and vortex shedding causes the vehicle to sway in an oscillating motion. The Human Factors team recognizes that vehicle sway may hinder ground crew operation, impact the ground system designs, and ultimately affect launch availability . The objective of this study is to physically simulate predicted oscillation envelopes identified by analysis. and conduct a Human Factors Analysis to assess the ability to carry out essential Upper Stage (US) ground operator tasks based on predicted vehicle motion.

  16. Recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis of human motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josiński, Henryk; Michalczuk, Agnieszka; Świtoński, Adam; Szczesna, Agnieszka; Wojciechowski, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    The authors present exemplary application of recurrence plots, cross recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis for the purpose of exploration of experimental time series describing selected aspects of human motion. Time series were extracted from treadmill gait sequences which were recorded in the Human Motion Laboratory (HML) of the Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology in Bytom, Poland by means of the Vicon system. Analysis was focused on the time series representing movements of hip, knee, ankle and wrist joints in the sagittal plane.

  17. Bifurcation analysis of aircraft pitching motions near the stability boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1984-01-01

    Bifuraction theory is used to analyze the nonlinear dynamic stability characteristics of an aircraft subject to single degree of freedom pitching-motion perturbations about a large mean angle of attack. The requisite aerodynamic information in the equations of motion is represented in a form equivalent to the response to finite-amplitude pitching oscillations about the mean angle of attack. This information is deduced from the case of infinitesimal-amplitude oscillations. The bifurcation theory analysis reveals that when the mean angle of attack is increased beyond a critical value at which the aerodynamic damping vanishes, new solutions representing finite-amplitude periodic motions bifurcate from the previously stable steady motion. The sign of a simple criterion, cast in terms of aerodynamic properties, determines whether the bifurcating solutions are stable (supercritical) or unstable (subcritical). For flat-plate airfoils flying at supersonic/hypersonic speed, the bifurcation is subcritical, implying either that exchanges of stability between steady and periodic motion are accompanied by hysteresis phenomena, or that potentially large aperiodic departures from steady motion may develop.

  18. AMAB: automated measurement and analysis of body motion.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Ronald; Van Der Zee, Sophie; Heylen, Dirk K J; Taylor, Paul J

    2014-09-01

    Technologies that measure human nonverbal behavior have existed for some time, and their use in the analysis of social behavior has become more popular following the development of sensor technologies that record full-body movement. However, a standardized methodology to efficiently represent and analyze full-body motion is absent. In this article, we present automated measurement and analysis of body motion (AMAB), a methodology for examining individual and interpersonal nonverbal behavior from the output of full-body motion tracking systems. We address the recording, screening, and normalization of the data, providing methods for standardizing the data across recording condition and across subject body sizes. We then propose a series of dependent measures to operationalize common research questions in psychological research. We present practical examples from several application areas to demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed method for full-body measurements and comparisons across time, space, body parts, and subjects.

  19. Comparison of Total Variation with a Motion Estimation Based Compressed Sensing Approach for Self-Gated Cardiac Cine MRI in Small Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Marinetto, Eugenio; Pascau, Javier; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Compressed sensing (CS) has been widely applied to prospective cardiac cine MRI. The aim of this work is to study the benefits obtained by including motion estimation in the CS framework for small-animal retrospective cardiac cine. Methods We propose a novel B-spline-based compressed sensing method (SPLICS) that includes motion estimation and generalizes previous spatiotemporal total variation (ST-TV) methods by taking into account motion between frames. In addition, we assess the effect of an optimum weighting between spatial and temporal sparsity to further improve results. Both methods were implemented using the efficient Split Bregman methodology and were evaluated on rat data comparing animals with myocardial infarction with controls for several acceleration factors. Results ST-TV with optimum selection of the weighting sparsity parameter led to results similar to those of SPLICS; ST-TV with large relative temporal sparsity led to temporal blurring effects. However, SPLICS always properly corrected temporal blurring, independently of the weighting parameter. At acceleration factors of 15, SPLICS did not distort temporal intensity information but led to some artefacts and slight over-smoothing. At an acceleration factor of 7, images were reconstructed without significant loss of quality. Conclusion We have validated SPLICS for retrospective cardiac cine in small animal, achieving high acceleration factors. In addition, we have shown that motion modelling may not be essential for retrospective cine and that similar results can be obtained by using ST-TV provided that an optimum selection of the spatiotemporal sparsity weighting parameter is performed. PMID:25350290

  20. Non-actual motion: phenomenological analysis and linguistic evidence.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Johan; Zlatev, Jordan

    2015-09-01

    Sentences with motion verbs describing static situations have been seen as evidence that language and cognition are geared toward dynamism and change (Talmy in Toward a cognitive semantics, MIT Press, Cambridge, 2000; Langacker in Concept, image, and symbol: the cognitive basis of grammar, Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin and New York, 1990). Different concepts have been used in the literature, e.g., fictive motion, subjective motion and abstract motion to denote this. Based on phenomenological analysis, we reinterpret such concepts as reflecting different motivations for the use of such constructions (Blomberg and Zlatev in Phenom Cogn Sci 13(3):395-418, 2014). To highlight the multifaceted character of the phenomenon, we propose the concept non-actual motion (NAM), which we argue is more compatible with the situated cognition approach than explanations such as "mental simulation" (e.g., Matlock in Studies in linguistic motivation, Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, 2004). We investigate the expression of NAM by means of a picture-based elicitation task with speakers of Swedish, French and Thai. Pictures represented figures that either afford human motion or not (±afford); crossed with this, the figure extended either across the picture from a third-person perspective (3 pp) or from a first-person perspective (1 pp). All picture types elicited NAM-sentences with the combination [+afford, 1 pp] producing most NAM-sentences in all three languages. NAM-descriptions also conformed to language-specific patterns for the expression of actual motion. We conclude that NAM shows interaction between pre-linguistic motivations and language-specific conventions.

  1. Analysis of unbounded operators and random motion

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Palle E. T.

    2009-11-15

    We study infinite weighted graphs with view to 'limits at infinity' or boundaries at infinity. Examples of such weighted graphs arise in infinite (in practice, that means 'very' large) networks of resistors or in statistical mechanics models for classical or quantum systems. However, more generally, our analysis includes reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces and associated operators on them. If X is some infinite set of vertices or nodes, in applications the essential ingredient going into the definition is a reproducing kernel Hilbert space; it measures the differences of functions on X evaluated on pairs of points in X. Moreover, the Hilbert norm-squared in H(X) will represent a suitable measure of energy. Associated unbounded operators will define a notion or dissipation, it can be a graph Laplacian or a more abstract unbounded Hermitian operator defined from the reproducing kernel Hilbert space under study. We prove that there are two closed subspaces in reproducing kernel Hilbert space H(X) that measure quantitative notions of limits at infinity in X: one generalizes finite-energy harmonic functions in H(X) and the other a deficiency index of a natural operator in H(X) associated directly with the diffusion. We establish these results in the abstract, and we offer examples and applications. Our results are related to, but different from, potential theoretic notions of 'boundaries' in more standard random walk models. Comparisons are made.

  2. Probabilistic seismic demand analysis using advanced ground motion intensity measures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tothong, P.; Luco, N.

    2007-01-01

    One of the objectives in performance-based earthquake engineering is to quantify the seismic reliability of a structure at a site. For that purpose, probabilistic seismic demand analysis (PSDA) is used as a tool to estimate the mean annual frequency of exceeding a specified value of a structural demand parameter (e.g. interstorey drift). This paper compares and contrasts the use, in PSDA, of certain advanced scalar versus vector and conventional scalar ground motion intensity measures (IMs). One of the benefits of using a well-chosen IM is that more accurate evaluations of seismic performance are achieved without the need to perform detailed ground motion record selection for the nonlinear dynamic structural analyses involved in PSDA (e.g. record selection with respect to seismic parameters such as earthquake magnitude, source-to-site distance, and ground motion epsilon). For structural demands that are dominated by a first mode of vibration, using inelastic spectral displacement (Sdi) can be advantageous relative to the conventionally used elastic spectral acceleration (Sa) and the vector IM consisting of Sa and epsilon (??). This paper demonstrates that this is true for ordinary and for near-source pulse-like earthquake records. The latter ground motions cannot be adequately characterized by either Sa alone or the vector of Sa and ??. For structural demands with significant higher-mode contributions (under either of the two types of ground motions), even Sdi (alone) is not sufficient, so an advanced scalar IM that additionally incorporates higher modes is used.

  3. Motion sequence analysis in the presence of figural cues

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Pawan; Vaina, Lucia M.

    2015-01-01

    The perception of 3D structure in dynamic sequences is believed to be subserved primarily through the use of motion cues. However, real-world sequences contain many figural shape cues besides the dynamic ones. We hypothesize that if figural cues are perceptually significant during sequence analysis, then inconsistencies in these cues over time would lead to percepts of non-rigidity in sequences showing physically rigid objects in motion. We develop an experimental paradigm to test this hypothesis and present results with two patients with impairments in motion perception due to focal neurological damage, as well as two control subjects. Consistent with our hypothesis, the data suggest that figural cues strongly influence the perception of structure in motion sequences, even to the extent of inducing non-rigid percepts in sequences where motion information alone would yield rigid structures. Beyond helping to probe the issue of shape perception, our experimental paradigm might also serve as a possible perceptual assessment tool in a clinical setting. PMID:26028822

  4. Robust and sensitive video motion detection for sleep analysis.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Adrienne; Geng, Di; Znamenskiy, Dmitry; Vink, Jelte Peter; de Haan, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a camera-based system combining video motion detection, motion estimation, and texture analysis with machine learning for sleep analysis. The system is robust to time-varying illumination conditions while using standard camera and infrared illumination hardware. We tested the system for periodic limb movement (PLM) detection during sleep, using EMG signals as a reference. We evaluated the motion detection performance both per frame and with respect to movement event classification relevant for PLM detection. The Matthews correlation coefficient improved by a factor of 2, compared to a state-of-the-art motion detection method, while sensitivity and specificity increased with 45% and 15%, respectively. Movement event classification improved by a factor of 6 and 3 in constant and highly varying lighting conditions, respectively. On 11 PLM patient test sequences, the proposed system achieved a 100% accurate PLM index (PLMI) score with a slight temporal misalignment of the starting time (<1 s) regarding one movement. We conclude that camera-based PLM detection during sleep is feasible and can give an indication of the PLMI score.

  5. SU-E-I-80: Quantification of Respiratory and Cardiac Motion Effect in SPECT Acquisitions Using Anthropomorphic Models: A Monte Carlo Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitroulas, P; Kostou, T; Kagadis, G; Loudos, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify, evaluate the impact of cardiac and respiratory motion on clinical nuclear imaging protocols. Common SPECT and scintigraphic scans are studied using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, comparing the resulted images with and without motion. Methods: Realistic simulations were executed using the GATE toolkit and the XCAT anthropomorphic phantom as a reference model for human anatomy. Three different radiopharmaceuticals based on 99mTc were studied, namely 99mTc-MDP, 99mTc—N—DBODC and 99mTc—DTPA-aerosol for bone, myocardium and lung scanning respectively. The resolution of the phantom was set to 3.5 mm{sup 3}. The impact of the motion on spatial resolution was quantified using a sphere with 3.5 mm diameter and 10 separate time frames, in the ECAM modeled SPECT scanner. Finally, respiratory motion impact on resolution and imaging of lung lesions was investigated. The MLEM algorithm was used for data reconstruction, while the literature derived biodistributions of the pharmaceuticals were used as activity maps in the simulations. Results: FWHM was extracted for a static and a moving sphere which was ∼23 cm away from the entrance of the SPECT head. The difference in the FWHM was 20% between the two simulations. Profiles in thorax were compared in the case of bone scintigraphy, showing displacement and blurring of the bones when respiratory motion was inserted in the simulation. Large discrepancies were noticed in the case of myocardium imaging when cardiac motion was incorporated during the SPECT acquisition. Finally the borders of the lungs are blurred when respiratory motion is included resulting to a dislocation of ∼2.5 cm. Conclusion: As we move to individualized imaging and therapy procedures, quantitative and qualitative imaging is of high importance in nuclear diagnosis. MC simulations combined with anthropomorphic digital phantoms can provide an accurate tool for applications like motion correction

  6. Analysis of unstructured video based on camera motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahian, Golnaz; Delp, Edward J.

    2007-01-01

    Although considerable work has been done in management of "structured" video such as movies, sports, and television programs that has known scene structures, "unstructured" video analysis is still a challenging problem due to its unrestricted nature. The purpose of this paper is to address issues in the analysis of unstructured video and in particular video shot by a typical unprofessional user (i.e home video). We describe how one can make use of camera motion information for unstructured video analysis. A new concept, "camera viewing direction," is introduced as the building block of home video analysis. Motion displacement vectors are employed to temporally segment the video based on this concept. We then find the correspondence between the camera behavior with respect to the subjective importance of the information in each segment and describe how different patterns in the camera motion can indicate levels of interest in a particular object or scene. By extracting these patterns, the most representative frames, keyframes, for the scenes are determined and aggregated to summarize the video sequence.

  7. Estimates of Running Ground Reaction Force Parameters from Motion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pavei, Gaspare; Seminati, Elena; Storniolo, Jorge L L; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo A

    2017-02-01

    We compared running mechanics parameters determined from ground reaction force (GRF) measurements with estimated forces obtained from double differentiation of kinematic (K) data from motion analysis in a broad spectrum of running speeds (1.94-5.56 m⋅s(-1)). Data were collected through a force-instrumented treadmill and compared at different sampling frequencies (900 and 300 Hz for GRF, 300 and 100 Hz for K). Vertical force peak, shape, and impulse were similar between K methods and GRF. Contact time, flight time, and vertical stiffness (kvert) obtained from K showed the same trend as GRF with differences < 5%, whereas leg stiffness (kleg) was not correctly computed by kinematics. The results revealed that the main vertical GRF parameters can be computed by the double differentiation of the body center of mass properly calculated by motion analysis. The present model provides an alternative accessible method for determining temporal and kinetic parameters of running without an instrumented treadmill.

  8. Energy flow: image correspondence approximation for motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangliang; Li, Ruifeng; Fang, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    We propose a correspondence approximation approach between temporally adjacent frames for motion analysis. First, energy map is established to represent image spatial features on multiple scales using Gaussian convolution. On this basis, energy flow at each layer is estimated using Gauss-Seidel iteration according to the energy invariance constraint. More specifically, at the core of energy invariance constraint is "energy conservation law" assuming that the spatial energy distribution of an image does not change significantly with time. Finally, energy flow field at different layers is reconstructed by considering different smoothness degrees. Due to the multiresolution origin and energy-based implementation, our algorithm is able to quickly address correspondence searching issues in spite of background noise or illumination variation. We apply our correspondence approximation method to motion analysis, and experimental results demonstrate its applicability.

  9. Video motion analysis with automated tracking: an insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftab Usman, Bilal; Alam, Junaid; Sabieh Anwar, Muhammad

    2015-11-01

    The article describes the use of elementary techniques in computer vision and motion photography for the analysis of well known experiments in interactive instructional physics laboratories. We describe a method for the automated tracking of the kinematics of physical objects which involves the subtraction of orthogonal colors in color space. The aim is to expose undergraduate students to image processing and its applications in video motion analysis. The straightforward technique is simple, results in computational speedup compared to an existing method, removes the need for a laborious repetitive and manual tagging of frames and is generally robust against color variations. Insight is also presented into the process of thresholding and selecting the correct region out of the several choice presented in the post-threshold frames. Finally, the approach is illustrated through a selection of well known mechanics experiments.

  10. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  11. Quantitative analysis of motion control in long term microgravity.

    PubMed

    Baroni, G; Ferrigno, G; Anolli, A; Andreoni, G; Pedotti, A

    1998-01-01

    In the frame of the 179-days EUROMIR '95 space mission, two in-flight experiments have foreseen quantitative three-dimensional human movement analysis in microgravity. For this aim, a space qualified opto-electronic motion analyser based on passive markers has been installed onboard the Russian Space Station MIR and 8 in flight sessions have been performed. Techhology and method for the collection of kinematics data are described, evaluating the accuracy in three-dimensional marker localisation. Results confirm the suitability of opto-electronic technology for quantitative human motion analysis on orbital modules and raise a set of "lessons learned", leading to the improvement of motion analyser performance with a contemporary swiftness of the on-board operations. Among the experimental program of T4, results of three voluntary posture perturbation protocols are described. The analysis suggests that a short term reinterpretation of proprioceptive information and re-calibration of sensorimotor mechanisms seem to end within the first weeks of flight, while a continuous long term adaptation process allows the refinement of motor performance, in the frame of never abandoned terrestrial strategies.

  12. Epinephrine in cardiac arrest: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Cané, Ignacio; Valverde-León, María Del Rocío; Rodríguez-Borrego, María Aurora

    2016-01-01

    abstract Objective: evaluate the effectiveness of epinephrine used during cardiac arrest and its effect on the survival rates and neurological condition. Method: systematic review of scientific literature with meta-analysis, using a random effects model. The following databases were used to research clinical trials and observational studies: Medline, Embase and Cochrane, from 2005 to 2015. Results: when the Return of Spontaneous Circulation (ROSC) with administration of epinephrine was compared with ROSC without administration, increased rates were found with administration (OR 2.02. 95% CI 1.49 to 2.75; I2 = 95%). Meta-analysis showed an increase in survival to discharge or 30 days after administration of epinephrine (OR 1.23; 95% IC 1.05-1.44; I2=83%). Stratification by shockable and non-shockable rhythms showed an increase in survival for non-shockable rhythm (OR 1.52; 95% IC 1.29-1.78; I2=42%). When compared with delayed administration, the administration of epinephrine within 10 minutes showed an increased survival rate (OR 2.03; 95% IC 1.77-2.32; I2=0%). Conclusion: administration of epinephrine appears to increase the rate of ROSC, but when compared with other therapies, no positive effect was found on survival rates of patients with favorable neurological status. PMID:27982306

  13. Retrieval analysis of motion preserving spinal devices and periprosthetic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Steinbeck, Marla; Ianuzzi, Allyson; van Ooij, André; Punt, Ilona M.; Isaza, Jorge; Ross, E.R.S.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews certain practical aspects of retrieval analysis for motion preserving spinal implants and periprosthetic tissues as an essential component of the overall revision strategy for these implants. At our institution, we established an international repository for motion-preserving spine implants in 2004. Our repository is currently open to all spine surgeons, and is intended to be inclusive of all cervical and lumbar implant designs such as artificial discs and posterior dynamic stabilization devices. Although a wide range of alternative materials is being investigated for nonfusion spine implants, many of the examples in this review are drawn from our existing repository of metal-on-polyethylene, metal-on-metal lumbar total disc replacements (TDRs), and polyurethane-based dynamic motion preservation devices. These devices are already approved or nearing approval for use in the United States, and hence are the most clinically relevant at the present time. This article summarizes the current literature on the retrieval analysis of these implants and concludes with recommendations for the development of new test methods that are based on the current state of knowledge of in vivo wear and damage mechanisms. Furthermore, the relevance and need to evaluate the surrounding tissue to obtain a complete understanding of the biological reaction to implant component corrosion and wear is reviewed. PMID:25802641

  14. Motion Simulation Analysis of Rail Weld CNC Fine Milling Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Huajie; Shu, Min; Li, Chao; Zhang, Baojun

    CNC fine milling machine is a new advanced equipment of rail weld precision machining with high precision, high efficiency, low environmental pollution and other technical advantages. The motion performance of this machine directly affects its machining accuracy and stability, which makes it an important consideration for its design. Based on the design drawings, this article completed 3D modeling of 60mm/kg rail weld CNC fine milling machine by using Solidworks. After that, the geometry was imported into Adams to finish the motion simulation analysis. The displacement, velocity, angular velocity and some other kinematical parameters curves of the main components were obtained in the post-processing and these are the scientific basis for the design and development for this machine.

  15. Time series analysis of collective motions in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakent, Burak; Doruker, Pemra; ćamurdan, Mehmet C.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamics of α-amylase inhibitor tendamistat around its native state is investigated using time series analysis of the principal components of the Cα atomic displacements obtained from molecular dynamics trajectories. Collective motion along a principal component is modeled as a homogeneous nonstationary process, which is the result of the damped oscillations in local minima superimposed on a random walk. The motion in local minima is described by a stationary autoregressive moving average model, consisting of the frequency, damping factor, moving average parameters and random shock terms. Frequencies for the first 50 principal components are found to be in the 3-25 cm-1 range, which are well correlated with the principal component indices and also with atomistic normal mode analysis results. Damping factors, though their correlation is less pronounced, decrease as principal component indices increase, indicating that low frequency motions are less affected by friction. The existence of a positive moving average parameter indicates that the stochastic force term is likely to disturb the mode in opposite directions for two successive sampling times, showing the modes tendency to stay close to minimum. All these four parameters affect the mean square fluctuations of a principal mode within a single minimum. The inter-minima transitions are described by a random walk model, which is driven by a random shock term considerably smaller than that for the intra-minimum motion. The principal modes are classified into three subspaces based on their dynamics: essential, semiconstrained, and constrained, at least in partial consistency with previous studies. The Gaussian-type distributions of the intermediate modes, called "semiconstrained" modes, are explained by asserting that this random walk behavior is not completely free but between energy barriers.

  16. Acoustic cardiac signals analysis: a Kalman filter-based approach.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Sheik Hussain; Hussain, Hadrina Sheik; Swee, Tan Tian; Ting, Chee-Ming; Noor, Alias Mohd; Pipatsart, Surasak; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-01-01

    Auscultation of the heart is accompanied by both electrical activity and sound. Heart auscultation provides clues to diagnose many cardiac abnormalities. Unfortunately, detection of relevant symptoms and diagnosis based on heart sound through a stethoscope is difficult. The reason GPs find this difficult is that the heart sounds are of short duration and separated from one another by less than 30 ms. In addition, the cost of false positives constitutes wasted time and emotional anxiety for both patient and GP. Many heart diseases cause changes in heart sound, waveform, and additional murmurs before other signs and symptoms appear. Heart-sound auscultation is the primary test conducted by GPs. These sounds are generated primarily by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. Analysis of heart sounds requires a quiet environment with minimum ambient noise. In order to address such issues, the technique of denoising and estimating the biomedical heart signal is proposed in this investigation. Normally, the performance of the filter naturally depends on prior information related to the statistical properties of the signal and the background noise. This paper proposes Kalman filtering for denoising statistical heart sound. The cycles of heart sounds are certain to follow first-order Gauss-Markov process. These cycles are observed with additional noise for the given measurement. The model is formulated into state-space form to enable use of a Kalman filter to estimate the clean cycles of heart sounds. The estimates obtained by Kalman filtering are optimal in mean squared sense.

  17. ICMA: an integrated cardiac modeling and analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    Hussan, Jagir R.; Hunter, Peter J.; Gladding, Patrick A.; Greenberg, Neil; Christie, Richard; Wu, Alan; Sorby, Hugh; Thomas, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: ICMA, a software framework to create 3D finite element models of the left ventricle from cardiac ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, has been made available as an open-source code. The framework is hardware vendor independent and uses speckle tracking (endocardial border detection) on ultrasound (MRI) imaging data in the form of DICOM. Standard American Heart Association segment-based strain analysis can be performed using a browser-based interface. The speckle tracking, border detection and model fitting methods are implemented in C++ using open-source tools. They are wrapped as web services and orchestrated via a JBOSS-based application server. Availability and implementation: The source code for ICMA is freely available under MPL 1.1 or GPL 2.0 or LGPL 2.1 license at https://github.com/ABI-Software-Laboratory/ICMA and a standalone virtual machine at http://goo.gl/M4lJKH for download. Contact: r.jagir@auckland.ac.nz Supplementary information: Supplementary materials are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25481009

  18. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  19. Analysis of agreement between cardiac risk stratification protocols applied to participants of a center for cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana A. S.; Silva, Anne K. F.; Vanderlei, Franciele M.; Christofaro, Diego G. D.; Gonçalves, Aline F. L.; Vanderlei, Luiz C. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Cardiac risk stratification is related to the risk of the occurrence of events induced by exercise. Despite the existence of several protocols to calculate risk stratification, studies indicating that there is similarity between these protocols are still unknown. Objective To evaluate the agreement between the existing protocols on cardiac risk rating in cardiac patients. Method The records of 50 patients from a cardiac rehabilitation program were analyzed, from which the following information was extracted: age, sex, weight, height, clinical diagnosis, medical history, risk factors, associated diseases, and the results from the most recent laboratory and complementary tests performed. This information was used for risk stratification of the patients in the protocols of the American College of Sports Medicine, the Brazilian Society of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the protocol designed by Frederic J. Pashkow, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, the Société Française de Cardiologie, and the Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the analysis of agreement between the protocols was calculated using the Kappa coefficient. Differences were considered with a significance level of 5%. Results Of the 21 analyses of agreement, 12 were considered significant between the protocols used for risk classification, with nine classified as moderate and three as low. No agreements were classified as excellent. Different proportions were observed in each risk category, with significant differences between the protocols for all risk categories. Conclusion The agreements between the protocols were considered low and moderate and the risk proportions differed between protocols. PMID:27556385

  20. Imminent Cardiac Risk Assessment via Optical Intravascular Biochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Wetzel, L; Wetzel, M; Lodder, R

    2009-01-01

    Heart disease is by far the biggest killer in the United States, and type II diabetes, which affects 8% of the U.S. population, is on the rise. In many cases, the acute coronary syndrome and/or sudden cardiac death occurs without warning. Atherosclerosis has known behavioral, genetic and dietary risk factors. However, our laboratory studies with animal models and human post-mortem tissue using FT-IR microspectroscopy reveal the chemical microstructure within arteries and in the arterial walls themselves. These include spectra obtained from the aortas of ApoE-/- knockout mice on sucrose and normal diets showing lipid deposition in the former case. Also pre-aneurysm chemical images of knockout mouse aorta walls, and spectra of plaque excised from a living human patient are shown for comparison. In keeping with the theme of the SPEC 2008 conference Spectroscopic Diagnosis of Disease this paper describes the background and potential value of a new catheter-based system to provide in vivo biochemical analysis of plaque in human coronary arteries. We report the following: (1) results of FT-IR microspectroscopy on animal models of vascular disease to illustrate the localized chemical distinctions between pathological and normal tissue, (2) current diagnostic techniques used for risk assessment of patients with potential unstable coronary syndromes, and (3) the advantages and limitations of each of these techniques illustrated with patent care histories, related in the first person, by the physician coauthors. Note that the physician comments clarify the contribution of each diagnostic technique to imminent cardiac risk assessment in a clinical setting, leading to the appreciation of what localized intravascular chemical analysis can contribute as an add-on diagnostic tool. The quality of medical imaging has improved dramatically since the turn of the century. Among clinical non-invasive diagnostic tools, laboratory tests of body fluids, EKG, and physical examination are

  1. An automated time and hand motion analysis based on planar motion capture extended to a virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, Hector A.; Ovalle, Alex M.; Vargas, Carlos A.; Cardona, María J.

    2015-03-01

    In the context of industrial engineering, the predetermined time systems (PTS) play an important role in workplaces because inefficiencies are found in assembly processes that require manual manipulations. In this study, an approach is proposed with the aim to analyze time and motions in a manual process using a capture motion system embedded to a virtual environment. Capture motion system tracks IR passive markers located on the hands to take the positions of each one. For our purpose, a real workplace is virtually represented by domains to create a virtual workplace based on basic geometries. Motion captured data are combined with the virtual workplace to simulate operations carried out on it, and a time and motion analysis is completed by means of an algorithm. To test the methodology of analysis, a case study was intentionally designed using and violating the principles of motion economy. In the results, it was possible to observe where the hands never crossed as well as where the hands passed by the same place. In addition, the activities done in each zone were observed and some known deficiencies were identified in the distribution of the workplace by computational analysis. Using a frequency analysis of hand velocities, errors in the chosen assembly method were revealed showing differences in the hand velocities. An opportunity is seen to classify some quantifiable aspects that are not identified easily in a traditional time and motion analysis. The automated analysis is considered as the main contribution in this study. In the industrial context, a great application is perceived in terms of monitoring the workplace to analyze repeatability, PTS, workplace and labor activities redistribution using the proposed methodology.

  2. Coherence Motion Perception in Developmental Dyslexia: A Meta-Analysis of Behavioral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benassi, Mariagrazia; Simonelli, Letizia; Giovagnoli, Sara; Bolzani, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The magnitude of the association between developmental dyslexia (DD) and motion sensitivity is evaluated in 35 studies, which investigated coherence motion perception in DD. A first analysis is conducted on the differences between DD groups and age-matched control (C) groups. In a second analysis, the relationship between motion coherence…

  3. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  4. Cardiac amyloidosis in a heart transplant patient - A case report and retrospective analysis of amyloidosis evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kintsler, Svetlana; Jäkel, Jörg; Brandenburg, Vincent; Kersten, Katrin; Knuechel, Ruth; Röcken, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cardiac amyloidosis is a very rare cause of heart failure in heart transplant recipients but an important differential diagnosis in cases of progressive cardiac failure. We report a 72-year-old male patient with the diagnosis of senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA) in a transplanted heart 15 years after transplantation by the initial diagnosis of the dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally performed immunohistochemical analysis with anti-transthyretin antibody of the cardiac biopsies of the last 15 years enabled the possibility to show the evolution of this disease with characteristic biphasic pattern. PMID:25674390

  5. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  6. Arctic Sea Ice Motion from Wavelet Analysis of Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Zhao, Yunhe

    1998-01-01

    Wavelet analysis of DMSP SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) 85 GHz and 37 GHz radiance data, SMMR (Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer) 37 GHz, and NSCAT (NASA Scatterometer) 13.9 GHZ data can be used to obtain daily sea ice drift information for both the northern and southern polar regions. The derived maps of sea ice drift provide both improved spatial coverage over the existing array of Arctic Ocean buoys and better temporal resolution over techniques utilizing data from satellite synthetic aperture radars (SAR). Examples of derived ice-drift maps in the Arctic illustrate large-scale circulation reversals within a period of a couple weeks. Comparisons with ice displacements derived from buoys show good quantitative agreement. NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) 13.9 GHZ data have been also used for wavelet analysis to derive sea-ice drift. First, the 40' incidence-angle, sigma-zero (surface roughness) daily map of whole Arctic region with 25 km of pixel size from satellite's 600 km swath has been constructed. Then, the similar wavelet transform procedure to SSM/I data can be applied. Various scales of wavelet transform and threshold have been tested. By overlaying , neighbor filtering, and block-averaging the results of multiscale wavelet transforms, the final sea ice drift vectors are much smooth and representative to the sea ice motion. This wavelet analysis procedure is robust and can make a major contribution to the understanding of ice motion over large areas at relatively high temporal resolutions. The results of wavelet analysis of SSM/I and NSCAT images and buoy data can be merged by some data fusion techniques and will help to improve our current knowledge of sea ice drift and related processes through the data assimilation of ocean-ice numerical model.

  7. Role of Quantitative Wall Motion Analysis in Patients with Acute Chest Pain at Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jin-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background Evaluation of acute chest pain in emergency department (ED), using limited resource and time, is still very difficult despite recent development of many diagnostic tools. In this study, we tried to determine the applicability of new semi-automated cardiac function analysis tool, velocity vector imaging (VVI), in the evaluation of the patients with acute chest pain in ED. Methods We prospectively enrolled 48 patients, who visited ED with acute chest pain, and store images to analyze VVI from July 2005 to July 2007. Results In 677 of 768 segments (88%), the analysis by VVI was feasible among 48 patients. Peak systolic radial velocity (Vpeak) and strain significantly decreased according to visual regional wall motion abnormality (Vpeak, 3.50 ± 1.34 cm/s for normal vs. 3.46 ± 1.52 cm/s for hypokinesia, 2.51 ± 1.26 for akinesia, p < 0.01; peak systolic radial strain -31.74 ± 9.15% fornormal, -24.33 ± 6.28% for hypokinesia, -20.30 ± 7.78% for akinesia, p < 0.01). However, the velocity vectors at the time of mitral valve opening (MVO) were directed outward in the visually normal myocardium, inward velocity vectors were revealed in the visually akinetic area (VMVO, -0.85 ± 1.65 cm/s for normal vs. 0.10 ± 1.46 cm/s for akinesia, p < 0.001). At coronary angiography, VMVO clearly increased in the ischemic area (VMVO, -0.88+1.56 cm/s for normal vs. 0.70 + 2.04 cm/s for ischemic area, p < 0.01). Conclusion Regional wall motion assessment using VVI showed could be used to detect significant ischemia in the patient with acute chest pain at ED.

  8. Fetal cardiac activity analysis during twin pregnancy using a multi-channel SQUID system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Monteiro, E.; Schleussner, E.; Kausch, S.; Grimm, B.; Schneider, A.; Hall Barbosa, C.; Haueisen, J.

    2001-05-01

    The use of SQUID magnetometers for non-invasive in utero assessment of cardiac electrical disturbances has already been shown to be a valuable clinical tool. In this way, its applicability also for the complicated case of twin pregnancy, in which the proximity of the cardiac magnetic source of each fetus can hamper the individual analysis of cardiac electrical activity, is of clinical interest. In this paper, we present fetal magnetocardiography performed on a mother pregnant of twins with 26 weeks gestational age, measured inside a magnetically shielded room, by using two identical 31-channel low- Tc SQUID magnetometer systems. Each sensor array has been positioned over one of the fetuses, according to its heart position previously assessed with the aid of ultrasound measurements. The raw data is initially averaged in time and, afterwards, analyzed by means of time plots and isofield maps. The time recordings allow the study of the morphology of each fetus’ cardiac signal and the cardiac time intervals. The resultant equivalent dipole obtained from the isofield maps indicates the position and orientation of each fetus heart. The results agree with the ultrasound analysis performed immediately before the measurements and used to obtain the approximate location of the fetuses’ hearts. Since a distinct analysis of the cardiac electrical activity of each fetus could be achieved, the results indicate the potential of the fetal magnetocardiography in the individual antenatal diagnosis of each one of the fetuses of a twin pregnancy.

  9. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  10. Head Motion Modeling for Human Behavior Analysis in Dyadic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Georgiou, Panayiotis; Baucom, Brian; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of head motion in human interaction, notably of its role in conveying interlocutors’ behavioral characteristics. Head motion is physically complex and carries rich information; current modeling approaches based on visual signals, however, are still limited in their ability to adequately capture these important properties. Guided by the methodology of kinesics, we propose a data driven approach to identify typical head motion patterns. The approach follows the steps of first segmenting motion events, then parametrically representing the motion by linear predictive features, and finally generalizing the motion types using Gaussian mixture models. The proposed approach is experimentally validated using video recordings of communication sessions from real couples involved in a couples therapy study. In particular we use the head motion model to classify binarized expert judgments of the interactants’ specific behavioral characteristics where entrainment in head motion is hypothesized to play a role: Acceptance, Blame, Positive, and Negative behavior. We achieve accuracies in the range of 60% to 70% for the various experimental settings and conditions. In addition, we describe a measure of motion similarity between the interaction partners based on the proposed model. We show that the relative change of head motion similarity during the interaction significantly correlates with the expert judgments of the interactants’ behavioral characteristics. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed head motion model, and underscore the promise of analyzing human behavioral characteristics through signal processing methods. PMID:26557047

  11. Stochastic analysis of the motion of DNA nanomechanical bipeds.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Iddo; Boushaba, Khalid; Matzavinos, Anastasios; Roitershtein, Alexander

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we formulate and analyze a Markov process modeling the motion of DNA nanomechanical walking devices.We consider a molecular biped restricted to a well-defined one-dimensional track and study its asymptotic behavior.Our analysis allows for the biped legs to be of different molecular composition, and thus to contribute differently to the dynamics. Our main result is a functional central limit theorem for the biped with an explicit formula for the effective diffusivity coefficient in terms of the parameters of the model. A law of large numbers, a recurrence/transience characterization and large deviations estimates are also obtained.Our approach is applicable to a variety of other biological motors such as myosin and motor proteins on polymer filaments.

  12. Coherence analysis for movement disorder motion captured by six degree-of-freedom inertial sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teskey, Wesley J. E.; Elhabiby, Mohamed; El-Sheimy, Naser; MacIntosh, Brian

    2012-06-01

    The use of inertial sensors (accelerometer and gyroscopes) for evaluation of movement disorder motion, including essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD), is becoming prevalent. This paper uses a novel combination of six degree-of-freedom motion analysis and coherence based processing methodologies to uncover differences in the signature of motion for the ET and PD movement disorders. This is the first analysis of such motions utilizing the novel methodology outlined, and it displays a distinct motion profile differentiating between these two groups. Such an analysis can be used to assist medical professionals in diagnosing movement disorders given a currently high error rate of diagnosis. As well, the Kalman smoothing analysis performed in this paper can be quite useful for any application when tracking of human motion is required. Another contribution of the work is the use of wavelets in zero phase lag filtering, which helped in preparing the data for analysis by removing unwanted frequencies without introducing distortions into the data.

  13. Analysis of shape and motion of the mitral annulus in subjects with and without cardiomyopathy by echocardiographic 3-dimensional reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flachskampf, F. A.; Chandra, S.; Gaddipatti, A.; Levine, R. A.; Weyman, A. E.; Ameling, W.; Hanrath, P.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The shape and dynamics of the mitral annulus of 10 patients without heart disease (controls), 3 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 5 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and normal systolic function were analyzed by transesophageal echocardiography and 3-dimensional reconstruction. Mitral annular orifice area, apico-basal motion of the annulus, and nonplanarity were calculated over time. Annular area was largest in end diastole and smallest in end systole. Mean areas were 11.8 +/- 2.5 cm(2) (controls), 15.2 +/- 4.2 cm(2) (dilated cardiomyopathy), and 10.2 +/- 2.4 cm(2) (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) (P = not significant). After correction for body surface, annuli from patients with normal left ventricular function were smaller than annuli from patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (5.9 +/- 1.2 cm(2)/m(2) vs 7.7 +/- 1.0 cm(2)/m(2); P <.02). The change in area during the cardiac cycle showed significant differences: 23.8% +/- 5.1% (controls), 13.2% +/- 2.3% (dilated cardiomyopathy), and 32.4% +/- 7.6% (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) (P <.001). Apico-basal motion was highest in controls, followed by those with hypertrophic obstructive and dilated cardiomyopathy (1.0 +/- 0.3 cm, 0.8 +/- 0.2 cm, 0.3 +/- 0.2 cm, respectively; P <.01). Visual inspection and Fourier analysis showed a consistent pattern of anteroseptal and posterolateral elevations of the annulus toward the left atrium. In conclusion, although area changes and apico-basal motion of the mitral annulus strongly depend on left ventricular systolic function, nonplanarity is a structural feature preserved throughout the cardiac cycle in all three groups.

  14. Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in Beach Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David

    2010-01-01

    Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five beach soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that beach soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. Beach soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in beach soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. Beach soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax. PMID:24149392

  15. Automated classification of wall motion abnormalities by principal component analysis of endocardial shape motion patterns in echocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Johan G.; Nijland, Francisca; Mitchell, Steven C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Kamp, Otto; Sonka, Milan; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2003-05-01

    Principal Component Analysis of sets of temporal shape sequences renders eigenvariations of shape/motion, including typical normal and pathological endocardial contraction patterns. A previously developed Active Appearance Model for time sequences (AAMM) was employed to derive AAMM shape coefficients (ASCs) and we hypothesized these would allow classification of wall motion abnormalities (WMA). A set of stress echocardiograms (single-beat 4-chamber and 2-chamber sequences with expert-verified endocardial contours) of 129 infarct patients was split randomly into training (n=65) and testing (n=64) sets. AAMMs were generated from the training set and for all sequences ASCs were extracted and statistically related to regional/global Visual Wall Motion Scoring (VWMS) and clinical infarct severity and volumetric parameters. Linear regression showed clear correlations between ASCs and VWMS. Infarct severity measures correlated poorly to both ASCs and VWMS. Discriminant analysis showed good prediction from low #ASCs of both segmental (85% correctness) and global WMA (90% correctness). Volumetric parameters correlated poorly to regional VWMS. Conclusions: 1)ASCs show promising accuracy for automated WMA classification. 2)VWMS and endocardial border motion are closely related; with accurate automated border detection, automated WMA classification should be feasible. 3)ASC shape analysis allows contour set evaluation by direct comparison to clinical parameters.

  16. Fetal cardiac time intervals estimated on fetal magnetocardiograms: single cycle analysis versus average beat inspection.

    PubMed

    Comani, Silvia; Alleva, Giovanna

    2007-01-01

    Fetal cardiac time intervals (fCTI) are dependent on fetal growth and development, and may reveal useful information for fetuses affected by growth retardation, structural cardiac defects or long QT syndrome. Fetal cardiac signals with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of at least 15 dB were retrieved from fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) datasets with a system based on independent component analysis (ICA). An automatic method was used to detect the onset and offset of the cardiac waves on single cardiac cycles of each signal, and the fCTI were quantified for each heartbeat; long rhythm strips were used to calculate average fCTI and their variability for single fetal cardiac signals. The aim of this work was to compare the outcomes of this system with the estimates of fCTI obtained with a classical method based on the visual inspection of averaged beats. No fCTI variability can be measured from averaged beats. A total of 25 fMCG datasets (fetal age from 22 to 37 weeks) were evaluated, and 1768 cardiac cycles were used to compute fCTI. The real differences between the values obtained with a single cycle analysis and visual inspection of averaged beats were very small for all fCTI. They were comparable with signal resolution (+/-1 ms) for QRS complex and QT interval, and always <5 ms for the PR interval, ST segment and T wave. The coefficients of determination between the fCTI estimated with the two methods ranged between 0.743 and 0.917. Conversely, inter-observer differences were larger, and the related coefficients of determination ranged between 0.463 and 0.807, assessing the high performance of the automated single cycle analysis, which is also rapid and unaffected by observer-dependent bias.

  17. Untypical Undergraduate Research: Player Motion Analysis in Sports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loerke, Dinah

    There is significant concern about the degree of attrition in STEM disciplines from the start of K-12 through to the end of higher education, and the analysis of the `leaky pipeline' from the various institutions has identified a critical decline - which may be as high as 60 percent - between the fraction of students who identify as having an interest in a science or engineering major at the start of college/university, and the fraction of students who ultimately graduate with a STEM degree. It has been shown that this decline is even more dramatic for women and underrepresented minorities (Blickenstaff 2005, Metcalf 2010). One intervention which has been proven to be effective for retention of potential STEM students is early research experience, particularly if it facilitates the students' integration into a STEM learning community (Graham et al. 2013, Toven-Lindsey et al. 2015). In other words, to retain students in STEM majors, we would like to encourage them to `think of themselves as scientists', and simultaneously promote supportive peer networks. The University of Denver (DU) already has a strong undergraduate research program. However, while the current program provides valuable training for many students, it likely comes too late to be effective for student retention in STEM, because it primarily serves older students who have already finished the basic coursework in their discipline; within physics, we know that the introductory physics courses already serve as gatekeeper courses that cause many gifted but `non-typical' students to lose interest in pursuing a STEM major (Tobias 1990). To address this issue, my lab is developing a small research spinoff program in which we apply spatiotemporal motion analysis to the motion trajectories of players in sports, using video recordings of DU Pioneer hockey games. This project aims to fulfill a dual purpose: The research is framed in a way that we think is attractive and accessible for beginning students who

  18. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  19. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman; Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (vts) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the vts derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  20. An analysis of human motion detection systems use during elder exercise routines.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Havens, Timothy C; Rantz, Marilyn; Keller, James; Casanova Abbott, Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Human motion analysis provides motion pattern and body pose estimations. This study integrates computer-vision techniques and explores a markerless human motion analysis system. Using human-computer interaction (HCI) methods and goals, researchers use a computer interface to provide feedback about range of motion to users. A total of 35 adults aged 65 and older perform three exercises in a public gym while human motion capture methods are used. Following exercises, participants are shown processed human motion images captured during exercises on a customized interface. Standardized questionnaires are used to elicit responses from users during interactions with the interface. A matrix of HCI goals (effectiveness, efficiency, and user satisfaction) and emerging themes are used to describe interactions. Sixteen users state the interface would be useful, but not necessarily for safety purposes. Users want better image quality, when expectations are matched satisfaction increases, and unclear meaning of motion measures decreases satisfaction.

  1. Proteomic analysis of cardiac response to thermal acclimation in the eurythermal goby fish Gillichthys mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Tomanek, Lars; Dowd, W Wesley; Somero, George N

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac function is thought to play a central role in determining thermal optima and tolerance limits in teleost fishes. Investigating proteomic responses to temperature in cardiac tissues may provide insights into mechanisms supporting the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Here, we utilized a global proteomic analysis to investigate changes in cardiac protein abundance in response to temperature acclimation (transfer from 13°C to 9, 19 and 26°C) in a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis. Proteomic data revealed 122 differentially expressed proteins across acclimation groups, 37 of which were identified using tandem mass-spectrometry. These 37 proteins are involved in energy metabolism, mitochondrial regulation, iron homeostasis, cytoprotection against hypoxia, and cytoskeletal organization. Compared with the 9 and 26°C groups, proteins involved in energy metabolism increased in 19°C-acclimated fish, indicating an overall increase in the capacity for ATP production. Creatine kinase abundance increased in 9°C-acclimated fish, suggesting an important role for the phosphocreatine energy shuttle in cold-acclimated hearts. Both 9 and 26°C fish also increased abundance of hexosaminidase, a protein directly involved in post-hypoxia stress cytoprotection of cardiac tissues. Cytoskeletal restructuring appears to occur in all acclimation groups; however, the most prominent effect was detected in 26°C-acclimated fish, which exhibited significantly increased actin levels. Overall, proteomic analysis of cardiac tissue suggests that the capacity to adjust ATP-generating processes is crucial to the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Furthermore, G. mirabilis may optimize cellular functions at temperatures near 19°C, which lies within the species' preferred temperature range.

  2. Measurement Performance of a Computer Assisted Vertebral Motion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Reginald J.; Lee, David C.; Cheng, Boyle

    2015-01-01

    Background Segmental instability of the lumbar spine is a significant cost within the US health care system; however current thresholds for indication of radiographic instability are not well defined. Purpose To determine the performance measurements of sagittal lumbar intervertebral measurements using computerassisted measurements of the lumbar spine using motion sequences from a video-fluoroscopic technique. Study design Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, prevalence, and test-retest reliability evaluation of digitized manual versus computer-assisted measurements of the lumbar spine. Patient sample A total of 2239 intervertebral levels from 509 symptomatic patients, and 287 intervertebral levels from 73 asymptomatic participants were retrospectively evaluated. Outcome measures Specificity, sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), diagnostic accuracy, and prevalence between the two measurement techniques; Measurements of Coefficient of repeatability (CR), limits of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC; type 3,1), and standard error of measurement for both measurement techniques. Methods Asymptomatic individuals and symptomatic patients were all evaluated using both the Vertebral Motion Analysis (VMA) system and fluoroscopic flexion extension static radiographs (FE). The analysis was compared to known thresholds of 15% intervertebral translation (IVT, equivalent to 5.3mm assuming a 35mm vertebral body depth) and 25° intervertebral rotation (IVR). Results The VMA measurements demonstrated greater specificity, % change in sensitivity, NPV, prevalence, and reliability compared with FE for radiographic evidence of instability. Specificity was 99.4% and 99.1% in the VMA compared to 98.3% and 98.2% in the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. Sensitivity in this study was 41.2% and 44.6% greater in the VMA compared to the FE for IVR and IVT, respectively. NPV was 91% and 88% in the VMA compared to 62% and 66% in the FE for IVR and IVT

  3. Simulation calculation and characteristics analysis of coil motion noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yang; Peng, Cong; Fu, MingYe; Lu, Yiming; Yu, Zining; Zhu, Kaiguang

    2017-01-01

    Coil motion noise is one of the largest noises in airborne electromagnetic exploration, which results from the variations of magnetic flux in the Earth's magnetic accompanied by the receiver coil's movement during the flight. On the assumption of attitude measurements, coil motion noise is calculated according to roll, pitch and yaw of the receiver coils. Therefore, the characteristics of coil motion noise are analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time-frequency domain. And the Gaussianity of coil motion noise is also discussed using the histogram of data and its estimated Gaussian function, and another method termed normal probability paper. All of these are to lay the foundation for removal of coil motion noise in airborne electromagnetic detection.

  4. Analysis of cardiac tissue by gold cluster ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosiova, M.; Chorvatova, A.; Chorvat, D.; Biro, Cs.; Velic, D.

    2006-07-01

    Specific molecules in cardiac tissue of spontaneously hypertensive rats are studied by using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The investigation determines phospholipids, cholesterol, fatty acids and their fragments in the cardiac tissue, with special focus on cardiolipin. Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid typical for cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membrane and its decrease is involved in pathologic conditions. In the positive polarity, the fragments of phosphatydilcholine are observed in the mass region of 700-850 u. Peaks over mass 1400 u correspond to intact and cationized molecules of cardiolipin. In animal tissue, cardiolipin contains of almost exclusively 18 carbon fatty acids, mostly linoleic acid. Linoleic acid at 279 u, other fatty acids, and phosphatidylglycerol fragments, as precursors of cardiolipin synthesis, are identified in the negative polarity. These data demonstrate that SIMS technique along with Au 3+ cluster primary ion beam is a good tool for detection of higher mass biomolecules providing approximately 10 times higher yield in comparison with Au +.

  5. Real-Time Cardiac Arrhythmia Detection Using WOLA Filterbank Analysis of EGM Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikhzadeh, Hamid; Brennan, Robert L.; So, Simon

    2007-12-01

    Novel methods of cardiac rhythm detection are proposed that are based on time-frequency analysis by a weighted overlap-add (WOLA) oversampled filterbank. Cardiac signals are obtained from intracardiac electrograms and decomposed into the time-frequency domain and analyzed by parallel peak detectors in selected frequency subbands. The coherence (synchrony) of the subband peaks is analyzed and employed to detect an optimal peak sequence representing the beat locations. By further analysis of the synchrony of the subband beats and the periodicity and regularity of the optimal beat, various possible cardiac events (including fibrillation, flutter, and tachycardia) are detected. The Ann Arbor Electrogram Library is used to evaluate the proposed detection method in clean and in additive noise. The evaluation results show that the method never misses any episode of fibrillation or flutter in clean or in noise and is robust to far-field R-wave interference. Furthermore, all other misclassification errors were within the acceptable limits.

  6. Motion as perturbation. II. Development of the method for dosimetric analysis of motion effects with fixed-gantry IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, Benjamin E.; Opp, Daniel; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2014-06-15

    s, with the resulting average motion speed of 1.45 cm/s. The motion-perturbed high resolution (2 mm voxel) volumetric dose grids on the MC2 phantom were generated for each beam. From each grid, a coronal dose plane at the detector level was extracted and compared to the corresponding moving MC2 measurement, using gamma analysis with both global (G) and local (L) dose-error normalization. Results: Using the TG-119 criteria of (3%G/3 mm), per beam average gamma analysis passing rates exceeded 95% in all cases. No individual beam had a passing rate below 91%. LDVE correction eliminated systematic disagreement patterns at the beams’ aperture edges. In a representative example, application of LDVE correction improved (2%L/2 mm) gamma analysis passing rate for an IMRT beam from 74% to 98%. Conclusions: The effect of motion on the moving region-of-interest IMRT dose can be estimated with a standard, static phantom QA measurement, provided the motion characteristics are independently known from 4D CT or otherwise. The motion-perturbed absolute dose estimates were validated by the direct planar diode array measurements, and were found to reliably agree with them in a homogeneous phantom.

  7. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac valve plane displacement in healthy adults: age-stratified normal values by cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Marco M; Fritz, Thomas; André, Florian; Riffel, Johannes; Mereles, Derliz; Müller-Hennessen, Matthias; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Katus, Hugo A; Friedrich, Matthias G; Buss, Sebastian J

    2017-01-21

    Cardiac valve plane displacement (CVPD) reflects longitudinal LV function. The purpose of the present study was to determine regional heterogeneity of CVPD in healthy adults to provide normal values by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). We measured the anterior aortic plane systolic excursion (AAPSE); the anterior, anterolateral, inferolateral, inferior, and inferoseptal mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE); and the lateral tricuspid annulus plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). Systolic excursion was measured as the distance from peak end-diastolic to peak end-sysstolic annular position (peak-to-peak) in cine images acquired in 2-, 3- and 4-chamber views. Echocardiographic measurements of CVPD were performed in M-Mode as previously described. We retrospectively analyzed 209 healthy Caucasians (57% men), who participated in the Heidelberg normal cohort between March 2009 and September 2014. The analysis was possible in all participants. Mean values were: AAPSE = 14 ± 3 mm (8-20); MAPSEanterior = 14 ± 3 mm (8-20); MAPSEanterolateral = 16 ± 3 mm (10-22); MAPSEinferolateral = 16 ± 3 mm (10-22); MAPSEinferior = 17 ± 3 mm (11-23); MAPSEinferoseptal = 13 ± 3 mm (7-19) and TAPSE = 26 ± 4 mm (18-34) respectively. MAPSE was significantly elevated in lateral compared to septal regions (p = 0.0001). Sex-differences for CVPD were not found. Age-dependency of CVPD revealed distinct regional differences. AAPSE decreased the most with age (B=-0.48; p = 0.0001), whereas MAPSEinferior was the least age-dependent site (B=-0.17; p = 0.01). AAPSE revealed favorable intra-/interobserver reproducibility and interstudy agreement. Intermethod-comparison of CMR and M-Mode echocardiography showed good agreement between both measurements of CVPD. Age-stratified normal values of regional CVPD are provided. AAPSE revealed the most pronounced age-related decrease and provided favorable reproducibility

  8. On selection and scaling of ground motions for analysis of seismically isolated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Deepak R.; Maharjan, Manika

    2016-12-01

    A broader consensus on the number of ground motions to be used and the method of scaling to be adopted for nonlinear response history analysis (RHA) of structures is yet to be reached. Therefore, in this study, the effects of selection and scaling of ground motions on the response of seismically isolated structures, which are routinely designed using nonlinear RHA, are investigated. For this purpose, isolation systems with a range of properties subjected to bidirectional excitation are considered. Benchmark response of the isolation systems is established using large sets of unscaled ground motions systematically categorized into pulse-like, non-pulse-like, and mixed set of motions. Different subsets of seven to 14 ground motions are selected from these large sets using (a) random selection and (b) selection based on the best match of the shape of the response spectrum of ground motions to the target spectrum. Consequences of weighted scaling (also commonly referred to as amplitude scaling or linear scaling) as well as spectral matching are investigated. The ground motion selection and scaling procedures are evaluated from the viewpoint of their accuracy, efficiency, and consistency in predicting the benchmark response. It is confirmed that seven time histories are sufficient for a reliable prediction of isolation system displacement demands, for all ground motion subsets, selection and scaling procedures, and isolation systems considered. If ground motions are selected based on their best match to the shape of the target response spectrum (which should be preferred over randomly selected motions), weighted scaling should be used if pulse-like motions are considered, either of weighted scaling or spectral matching can be used if non-pulse-like motions are considered, and an average of responses from weighted-scaled and spectrum-matched ground motions should be used for a mixed set of motions. On the other hand, the importance of randomly selected motions in

  9. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  10. Spherical navigator registration using harmonic analysis for prospective motion correction.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, C L; Ari, N; Kraft, R A

    2005-01-01

    Spherical navigators are an attractive approach to motion compensation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Because they can be acquired quickly, spherical navigators have the potential to measure and correct for rigid motion during image acquisition (prospectively as opposed to retrospectively). A limiting factor to prospective use of navigators is the time required to estimate the motion parameters. This estimation problem can be separated into a rotational and translational component. Recovery of the rotational motion can be cast as a registration of functions defined on a sphere. Previous methods for solving this registration problem are based on optimization strategies that are iterative and require k-space interpolation. Such approaches have undesirable convergence behavior for prospective use since the estimation complexity depends on both the number of samples and the amount of rotation. We propose and demonstrate an efficient algorithm for recovery of rotational motion using spherical navigators. We decompose the navigator magnitude using the spherical harmonic transform. In this framework, rigid rotations can be recovered from an over-constrained system of equations, leading to a computationally efficient algorithm for prospective motion compensation. The resulting algorithm is compared to existing approaches in simulated and actual navigator data. These results show that the spherical harmonic based estimation algorithm is significantly faster than existing methods and so is suited for prospective motion correction.

  11. Application Of Image Processing To Human Motion Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baca, Arnold

    1989-10-01

    A novel method is presented for the determination of position and orientation of interconnected human body segments relative to a spatial coordinate system. The development of this new method was prompted by the inadequacy of the techniques currently in use for recorded images. In these techniques, markers are fixed to certain points on the skin of the subject. However, due to skin movement relative to the skeleton and various other factors, the configurational coordinates derived from digitized marker positions may be grossly erroneous with disastrous consequences for the subsequent motion analysis. The new method is based on body-segment shape recognition in the video-image domain. During the recording session, the subject carries special, tight-fitting clothing which permits the unambiguous recognition of segmental shapes and boundaries from the recorded video images. The recognition is performed by means of an edge detection algorithm followed by the computation of the positions and orientations relative to the spatial axes system of all segments of the body model. The new method is implemented on an advanced, special high speed graphic system (Impuls, System 2400) based on transputer chips. The parallel processing capability of this system permits the simultaneous computation of the configurational characteristics for all segments visible in the image. After processing one complete image frame, the video digitizer is instructed to automatically proceed to the next frame, thereby enabling the user to automatically evaluate large amounts of successive frames.

  12. Analysis of motion during the breast clamping phase of mammography

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, Mark F; Mercer, Claire; Kelly, Judith; Millington, Sara; Hogg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To measure paddle motion during the clamping phase of a breast phantom for a range of machine/paddle combinations. Methods: A deformable breast phantom was used to simulate a female breast. 12 mammography machines from three manufacturers with 22 flexible and 20 fixed paddles were evaluated. Vertical motion at the paddle was measured using two calibrated linear potentiometers. For each paddle, the motion in millimetres was recorded every 0.5 s for 40 s, while the phantom was compressed with 80 N. Independent t-tests were used to determine differences in paddle motion between flexible and fixed, small and large, GE Senographe Essential (General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) and Hologic Selenia Dimensions paddles (Hologic, Bedford, MA). Paddle tilt in the medial–lateral plane for each machine/paddle combination was calculated. Results: All machine/paddle combinations demonstrate highest levels of motion during the first 10 s of the clamping phase. The least motion is 0.17 ± 0.05 mm/10 s (n = 20) and the most motion is 0.51 ± 0.15 mm/10 s (n = 80). There is a statistical difference in paddle motion between fixed and flexible (p < 0.001), GE Senographe Essential and Hologic Selenia Dimensions paddles (p < 0.001). Paddle tilt in the medial–lateral plane is independent of time and varied from 0.04 ° to 0.69 °. Conclusion: All machine/paddle combinations exhibited motion and tilting, and the extent varied with machine and paddle sizes and types. Advances in knowledge: This research suggests that image blurring will likely be clinically insignificant 4 s or more after the clamping phase commences. PMID:26739577

  13. Compensation of intra-frame head motion in PET data with motion corrected independent component analysis (MCICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Martin J.; Gadala, Marwa; Abu-Gharbieh, Rafeef

    2005-04-01

    Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has proved a powerful exploratory analysis method for fMRI. In the ICA model, the fMRI data at a given time point are modeled as the linear superposition of spatially independent (and spatially stationary) component maps. The ICA model has been recently applied to positron emission tomography (PET) data with some success (Human Brain Mapping 18:284-295(2003), IEEE Trans. BME, Naganawa et al, in press). However, in PET imaging each frame is, in fact, activity integrated over a relatively long period of time, making the assumption that the underlying component maps are spatially stationary (and hence no head movement has taken place during the frame collection) very tenuous. Here we extend the application of the ICA model to 11C-methylphenidate PET data by assuming that each frame is actually composed of the superposition of rigidly transformed underlying spatial components. We first determine the "noisy" initial spatially independent components of a data set under the erroneous assumption of no intra or inter-frame motion. Aspects of the initial components that reliably track spatial perturbations of the data are then determined to produce the motion-compensated components. Initial components included ring-like spatial distributions, indicating that movement corrupts the statistical properties of the data. The final intra-frame motion-compensated components included more plausible symmetric and robust activity in the striatum as would be expected compared to the raw data and the initial components. We conclude that 1) intra-frame motion is a serious confound in PET imaging which affects the statistical properties of the data and 2) our proposed procedure ameliorates such motion effects.

  14. Analysis of rotational motion measurement based on HS algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nong, Hua-Kang; Guo, Bai-Wei

    2017-01-01

    In micro aircraft design and testing, as well as motor and rotational motion monitoring, it will need to achieve a noncontact detection for rotational motion. HS (Horn and Schunck) algorithm is deduced under the premise that adjacent image intervals and the little change of image gray. HS algorithm is an optical flow calculation method that based on the image in the global smooth constraint. This paper propose an indicator that is used to characterize the optical flow field, and analyze the feasibility of the HS algorithm for the rotational motion measurement.

  15. On fractal analysis of cardiac interbeat time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Vargas, L.; Calleja-Quevedo, E.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2003-09-01

    In recent years the complexity of a cardiac beat-to-beat time series has been taken as an auxiliary tool to identify the health status of human hearts. Several methods has been employed to characterize the time series complexity. In this work we calculate the fractal dimension of interbeat time series arising from three groups: 10 young healthy persons, 8 elderly healthy persons and 10 patients with congestive heart failures. Our numerical results reflect evident differences in the dynamic behavior corresponding to each group. We discuss these results within the context of the neuroautonomic control of heart rate dynamics. We also propose a numerical simulation which reproduce aging effects of heart rate behavior.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of the GNSS derived Victoria plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolinário, João; Fernandes, Rui; Bos, Machiel

    2014-05-01

    estimated trend (Williams 2003, Langbein 2012). Finally, our preferable angular velocity estimation is used to evaluate the consequences on the kinematics of the Victoria block, namely the magnitude and azimuth of the relative motions with respect to the Nubia and Somalia plates and their tectonic implications. References Agnew, D. C. (2013). Realistic simulations of geodetic network data: The Fakenet package, Seismol. Res. Lett., 84 , 426-432, doi:10.1785/0220120185. Blewitt, G. & Lavallee, D., (2002). Effect of annual signals on geodetic velocity, J. geophys. Res., 107(B7), doi:10.1029/2001JB000570. Bos, M.S., R.M.S. Fernandes, S. Williams, L. Bastos (2012) Fast Error Analysis of Continuous GNSS Observations with Missing Data, Journal of Geodesy, doi: 10.1007/s00190-012-0605-0. Bos, M.S., L. Bastos, R.M.S. Fernandes, (2009). The influence of seasonal signals on the estimation of the tectonic motion in short continuous GPS time-series, J. of Geodynamics, j.jog.2009.10.005. Fernandes, R.M.S., J. M. Miranda, D. Delvaux, D. S. Stamps and E. Saria (2013). Re-evaluation of the kinematics of Victoria Block using continuous GNSS data, Geophysical Journal International, doi:10.1093/gji/ggs071. Langbein, J. (2012). Estimating rate uncertainty with maximum likelihood: differences between power-law and flicker-random-walk models, Journal of Geodesy, Volume 86, Issue 9, pp 775-783, Williams, S. D. P. (2003). Offsets in Global Positioning System time series, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 2310, doi:10.1029/2002JB002156, B6.

  17. Applying Model Analysis to a Resource-Based Analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Trevor I.; Wittmann, Michael C.; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we analyzed the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation in terms of a resources-based model that allows for clustering of questions so as to provide useful information on how students correctly or incorrectly reason about physics. In this paper, we apply model analysis to show that the associated model plots provide more information…

  18. Circular motion analysis of time-varying bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, B; Louarroudi, E; Rutkove, S B; Pintelon, R

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a step forward towards the analysis of a linear periodically time-varying (PTV) bioimpedance ZPTV(jw, t), which is an important subclass of a linear time-varying (LTV) bioimpedance. Similarly to the Fourier coefficients of a periodic signal, a PTV impedance can be decomposed into frequency dependent impedance phasors, [Formula: see text], that are rotating with an angular speed of wr = 2πr/TZ. The vector length of these impedance phasors corresponds to the amplitude of the rth-order harmonic impedance |Zr( jw)| and the initial phase is given by Φr(w, t0) = [Symbol: see text]Zr( jw) + 2πrt0/TZ, with t0∈[0, T] being a time instant within the measurement time T. The impedance period TZ stands for the cycle length of the bio-system under investigation; for example, the elapsed time between two consecutive R-waves in the electrocardiogram or the breathing periodicity in case of the heart or lungs, respectively. First, it is demonstrated that the harmonic impedance phasor [Formula: see text], at a particular measured frequency k, can be represented by a rotating phasor, leading to the so-called circular motion analysis technique. Next, the two dimensional (2D) representation of the harmonic impedance phasors is then extended to a three-dimensional (3D) coordinate system by taking into account the frequency dependence. Finally, we introduce a new visualizing tool to summarize the frequency response behavior of ZPTV( jw, t) into a single 3D plot using the local Frenet-Serret frame. This novel 3D impedance representation is then compared with the 3D Nyquist representation of a PTV impedance. The concepts are illustrated through real measurements conducted on a PTV RC-circuit.

  19. A Study of Motion Sickness: Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    levels of motion sick- ness experienced by a test subject during the course of an experiment (21:97; 25:59; 27:84). In 1987, Drylie, Fix, and Gaudreault ...pro- cedures. Drylie and Gaudreault reported additional conclusions concerning motion sickness trends (11; 17). Fix developed a new equation for...and Gaudreault also noted low frequency EEG signals in the 0.1 Hz range (17:28). However, only one of their subjects had EEG signals with an amplitude

  20. Cost-benefit analysis of screening for esophageal and gastric cardiac cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen-Qiang; Yang, Chun-Xia; Lu, Si-Han; Yang, Juan; Li, Bian-Yun; Lian, Shi-Yong; Qiao, You-Lin

    2011-03-01

    In 2005, a program named "Early Detection and Early Treatment of Esophageal and Cardiac Cancer" (EDETEC) was initiated in China. A total of 8279 residents aged 40-69 years old were recruited into the EDETEC program in Linzhou of Henan Province between 2005 and 2008. Howerer, the cost-benefit of the EDETEC program is not very clear yet. We conducted herein a cost-benefit analysis of screening for esophageal and cardiac cancer. The assessed costs of the EDETEC program included screening costs for each subject, as well as direct and indirect treatment costs for esophageal and cardiac severe dysplasia and cancer detected by screening. The assessed benefits of this program included the saved treatment costs, both direct and indirect, on esophageal and cardiac cancer, as well as the value of prolonged life due to screening, as determined by the human capital approach. The results showed the screening cost of finding esophageal and cardiac severe dysplasia or cancer ranged from RMB 2707 to RMB 4512, and the total cost on screening and treatment was RMB 13 115-14 920. The cost benefit was RMB 58 944-155 110 (the saved treatment cost, RMB 17 730, plus the value of prolonged life, RMB 41 214-137 380). The ratio of benefit-to-cost (BCR) was 3.95-11.83. Our results suggest that EDETEC has a high benefit-to-cost ratio in China and could be instituted into high risk areas of China.

  1. Additive Effect on Survival of Anaesthetic Cardiac Protection and Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Cardiac Surgery: A Bayesian Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zangrillo, Alberto; Musu, Mario; Greco, Teresa; Di Prima, Ambra Licia; Matteazzi, Andrea; Testa, Valentina; Nardelli, Pasquale; Febres, Daniela; Monaco, Fabrizio; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Ma, Jun; Finco, Gabriele; Landoni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cardioprotective properties of volatile agents and of remote ischemic preconditioning have survival effects in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We performed a Bayesian network meta-analysis to confirm the beneficial effects of these strategies on survival in cardiac surgery, to evaluate which is the best strategy and if these strategies have additive or competitive effects. Methods Pertinent studies were independently searched in BioMedCentral, MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register (updated November 2013). A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed. Four groups of patients were compared: total intravenous anesthesia (with or without remote ischemic preconditioning) and an anesthesia plan including volatile agents (with or without remote ischemic preconditioning). Mortality was the main investigated outcome. Results We identified 55 randomized trials published between 1991 and 2013 and including 6,921 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The use of volatile agents (posterior mean of odds ratio = 0.50, 95% CrI 0.28–0.91) and the combination of volatile agents with remote preconditioning (posterior mean of odds ratio = 0.15, 95% CrI 0.04–0.55) were associated with a reduction in mortality when compared to total intravenous anesthesia. Posterior distribution of the probability of each treatment to be the best one, showed that the association of volatile anesthetic and remote ischemic preconditioning is the best treatment to improve short- and long-term survival after cardiac surgery, suggesting an additive effect of these two strategies. Conclusions In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, the use of volatile anesthetics and the combination of volatile agents with remote preconditioning reduce mortality when compared to TIVA and have additive effects. It is necessary to confirm these results with large, multicenter, randomized, double-blinded trials comparing these different strategies in cardiac and non-cardiac surgery, to

  2. Cardiac Imaging in Heart Failure with Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chiew; Chen, Sylvia; Iyngkaran, Pupalan

    2017-01-01

    Imaging modalities stand at the frontiers for progress in congestive heart failure (CHF) screening, risk stratification and monitoring. Advancements in echocardiography (ECHO) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have allowed for improved tissue characterizations, cardiac motion analysis, and cardiac performance analysis under stress. Common cardiac comorbidities such as hypertension, metabolic syndromes and chronic renal failure contribute to cardiac remodeling, sharing similar pathophysiological mechanisms starting with interstitial changes, structural changes and finally clinical CHF. These imaging techniques can potentially detect changes earlier. Such information could have clinical benefits for screening, planning preventive therapies and risk stratifying patients. Imaging reports have often focused on traditional measures without factoring these novel parameters. This review is aimed at providing a synopsis on how we can use this information to assess and monitor improvements for CHF with comorbidities.

  3. A novel CT acquisition and analysis technique for breathing motion modeling

    PubMed Central

    Low, Daniel A.; White, Benjamin M.; Lee, Percy P.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Jani, Shyam S.; Wu, Xiao; Lamb, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report on a novel technique for providing artifact-free quantitative 4DCT image datasets for breathing motion modeling. Methods Commercial clinical four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) methods have trouble managing irregular breathing. The resulting images contain motion-induced artifacts that can distort structures and inaccurately characterize breathing motion. We have developed a novel scanning and analysis method for motion-correlated CT that utilizes standard repeated fast helical acquisitions, a simultaneous breathing surrogate measurement, deformable image registration, and a published breathing motion model. Results The motion model differs from the CT-measured motion by an average of 0.72 mm, indicating the precision of the motion model. The integral of the divergence of one of the motion model parameters is predicted to be a constant 1.11 and is found in this case to be 1.09, indicating the accuracy of the motion model. Conclusions The proposed technique shows promise for providing motion-artifact free images at user-selected breathing phases, accurate Hounsfield units, and noise characteristics similar to non-4D CT techniques, at a patient dose similar to or less than current 4DCT techniques. PMID:23640212

  4. Thermodynamic analysis questions claims of improved cardiac efficiency by dietary fish oil

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Eden; Chapman, Brian; Hickey, Anthony J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in the literature describe the ability of dietary supplementation by omega-3 fish oil to increase the pumping efficiency of the left ventricle. Here we attempt to reconcile such studies with our own null results. We undertake a quantitative analysis of the improvement that could be expected theoretically, subject to physiological constraints, by posing the following question: By how much could efficiency be expected to increase if inefficiencies could be eliminated? Our approach utilizes thermodynamic analyses to investigate the contributions, both singly and collectively, of the major components of cardiac energetics to total cardiac efficiency. We conclude that it is unlikely that fish oils could achieve the required diminution of inefficiencies without greatly compromising cardiac performance. PMID:27574288

  5. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals MicroRNAs Regulating Biological Pathways in Exercise-Induced Cardiac Physiological Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiahong; Liu, Yang; Xie, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy is generally considered to be a type of adaptive change after exercise training and is beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. This study aims at investigating exercise-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and their potential biological pathways. Here, we collected 23 miRNAs from 8 published studies. MirPath v.3 from the DIANA tools website was used to execute the analysis, and TargetScan was used to predict the target genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Various miRNA targets and molecular pathways, such as Fatty acid elongation, Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and ECM-receptor interaction, were identified. This study could prompt the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:28286759

  6. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals MicroRNAs Regulating Biological Pathways in Exercise-Induced Cardiac Physiological Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiahong; Liu, Yang; Xie, Yuan; Zhao, Cuimei; Wang, Hongbao

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy is generally considered to be a type of adaptive change after exercise training and is beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. This study aims at investigating exercise-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and their potential biological pathways. Here, we collected 23 miRNAs from 8 published studies. MirPath v.3 from the DIANA tools website was used to execute the analysis, and TargetScan was used to predict the target genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Various miRNA targets and molecular pathways, such as Fatty acid elongation, Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and ECM-receptor interaction, were identified. This study could prompt the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy.

  7. Discriminative analysis of lip motion features for speaker identification and speech-reading.

    PubMed

    Cetingül, H Ertan; Yemez, Yücel; Erzin, Engin; Tekalp, A Murat

    2006-10-01

    There have been several studies that jointly use audio, lip intensity, and lip geometry information for speaker identification and speech-reading applications. This paper proposes using explicit lip motion information, instead of or in addition to lip intensity and/or geometry information, for speaker identification and speech-reading within a unified feature selection and discrimination analysis framework, and addresses two important issues: 1) Is using explicit lip motion information useful, and, 2) if so, what are the best lip motion features for these two applications? The best lip motion features for speaker identification are considered to be those that result in the highest discrimination of individual speakers in a population, whereas for speech-reading, the best features are those providing the highest phoneme/word/phrase recognition rate. Several lip motion feature candidates have been considered including dense motion features within a bounding box about the lip, lip contour motion features, and combination of these with lip shape features. Furthermore, a novel two-stage, spatial, and temporal discrimination analysis is introduced to select the best lip motion features for speaker identification and speech-reading applications. Experimental results using an hidden-Markov-model-based recognition system indicate that using explicit lip motion information provides additional performance gains in both applications, and lip motion features prove more valuable in the case of speech-reading application.

  8. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, John Kyle P; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Lind, Randall F; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2011-01-01

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  9. Challenges of cardiac image analysis in large-scale population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Cowan, Brett R; Suinesiaputra, Avan; Young, Alistair A

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale population-based imaging studies of preclinical and clinical heart disease are becoming possible due to the advent of standardized robust non-invasive imaging methods and infrastructure for big data analysis. This gives an exciting opportunity to gain new information about the development and progression of heart disease across population groups. However, the large amount of image data and prohibitive time required for image analysis present challenges for obtaining useful derived data from the images. Automated analysis tools for cardiac image analysis are only now becoming available. This paper reviews the challenges and possible solutions to the analysis of big imaging data in population studies. We also highlight the potential of recent large epidemiological studies using cardiac imaging to discover new knowledge on heart health and well-being.

  10. Time-motion analysis of elite male kickboxing competition.

    PubMed

    Ouergui, Ibrahim; Hssin, Nizar; Haddad, Monoem; Franchini, Emerson; Behm, David G; Wong, Del P; Gmada, Nabil; Bouhlel, Ezzedine

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the time structure of high-level kickboxing matches. A total of 45 combats from 2 male World Championships were monitored using a time-motion analysis system. The combat time structure (i.e., high-intensity activity [HIA], low-intensity activity [LIA], and referee breaks or pauses) during competition and weight divisions was determined and compared. Results indicated that the time structures were HIA: 2.2 ± 1.2 seconds; LIA: 2.3 ± 0.8 seconds; pauses: 5.4 ± 4.3 seconds; and 3.4 ± 1.2 seconds between 2 subsequent HIA. The fighting to nonfighting ratio was found to be 1:1. Moreover, the number of HIA and LIA and the time of LIA decreased in latter rounds (e.g., the average number of HIA was 27.1 ± 7.1, 25.1 ± 6.6, and 24.9 ± 6.1, respectively, for rounds 1, 2, and 3), meanwhile the time and number of pauses increased (e.g., the average pause times were 12.8 ± 11.4, 22.3 ± 22.6, and 24.6 ± 23.3 seconds, respectively, for rounds 1, 2, and 3). The activity times did not differ among weight categories. The present results confirm the intermittent nature of kickboxing competition and provide coaches with more information on how to structure training sessions to mimic the physical demands in competition.

  11. Analysis of glacial and periglacial processes using structure from motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, L.; Carturan, L.; de Blasi, F.; Tarolli, P.; Dalla Fontana, G.; Vettore, A.; Pfeifer, N.

    2015-11-01

    Close-range photo-based surface reconstruction from the ground is rapidly emerging as an alternative to lidar (light detection and ranging), which today represents the main survey technique in many fields of geoscience. The recent evolution of photogrammetry, incorporating computer vision algorithms such as Structure from Motion (SfM) and dense image matching such as Multi-View Stereo (MVS), allows the reconstruction of dense 3-D point clouds for the photographed object from a sequence of overlapping images taken with a digital consumer camera. The objective of our work was to test the accuracy of the ground-based SfM-MVS approach in calculating the geodetic mass balance of a 2.1 km2 glacier in the Ortles-Cevedale Group, Eastern Italian Alps. In addition, we investigated the feasibility of using the image-based approach for the detection of the surface displacement rate of a neighbouring active rock glacier. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data were used as benchmarks to estimate the accuracy of the photogrammetric DTMs and the reliability of the method in this specific application. The glacial and periglacial analyses were performed using both range and image-based surveying techniques, and the results were then compared. The results were encouraging because the SfM-MVS approach enables the reconstruction of high-quality DTMs which provided estimates of glacial and periglacial processes similar to those achievable by ALS. Different resolutions and accuracies were obtained for the glacier and the rock glacier, given the different survey geometries, surface characteristics and areal extents. The analysis of the SfM-MVS DTM quality allowed us to highlight the limitations of the adopted expeditious method in the studied alpine terrain and the potential of this method in the multitemporal study of glacial and periglacial areas.

  12. Inertial motion capture system for biomechanical analysis in pressure suits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Massimiliano

    A non-invasive system has been developed at the University of Maryland Space System Laboratory with the goal of providing a new capability for quantifying the motion of the human inside a space suit. Based on an array of six microprocessors and eighteen microelectromechanical (MEMS) inertial measurement units (IMUs), the Body Pose Measurement System (BPMS) allows the monitoring of the kinematics of the suit occupant in an unobtrusive, self-contained, lightweight and compact fashion, without requiring any external equipment such as those necessary with modern optical motion capture systems. BPMS measures and stores the accelerations, angular rates and magnetic fields acting upon each IMU, which are mounted on the head, torso, and each segment of each limb. In order to convert the raw data into a more useful form, such as a set of body segment angles quantifying pose and motion, a series of geometrical models and a non-linear complimentary filter were implemented. The first portion of this works focuses on assessing system performance, which was measured by comparing the BPMS filtered data against rigid body angles measured through an external VICON optical motion capture system. This type of system is the industry standard, and is used here for independent measurement of body pose angles. By comparing the two sets of data, performance metrics such as BPMS system operational conditions, accuracy, and drift were evaluated and correlated against VICON data. After the system and models were verified and their capabilities and limitations assessed, a series of pressure suit evaluations were conducted. Three different pressure suits were used to identify the relationship between usable range of motion and internal suit pressure. In addition to addressing range of motion, a series of exploration tasks were also performed, recorded, and analysed in order to identify different motion patterns and trajectories as suit pressure is increased and overall suit mobility is reduced

  13. Cost-utility analysis of cardiac rehabilitation after conventional heart valve surgery versus usual care.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tina Birgitte; Zwisler, Ann Dorthe; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Kjellberg, Jakob; Doherty, Patrick; Oldridge, Neil; Søgaard, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    Background While cardiac rehabilitation in patients with ischaemic heart disease and heart failure is considered cost-effective, this evidence may not be transferable to heart valve surgery patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation following heart valve surgery. Design We conducted a cost-utility analysis based on a randomised controlled trial of 147 patients who had undergone heart valve surgery and were followed for 6 months. Methods Patients were randomised to cardiac rehabilitation consisting of 12 weeks of physical exercise training and monthly psycho-educational consultations or to usual care. Costs were measured from a societal perspective and quality-adjusted life years were based on the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D). Estimates were presented as means and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on bootstrapping. Costs and effect differences were presented in a cost-effectiveness plane and were transformed into net benefit and presented in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Results No statistically significant differences were found in total societal costs (-1609 Euros; 95% CI: -6162 to 2942 Euros) or in quality-adjusted life years (-0.000; 95% CI -0.021 to 0.020) between groups. However, approximately 70% of the cost and effect differences were located below the x-axis in the cost-effectiveness plane, and the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves showed that the probability for cost- effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation compared to usual care is at minimum 75%, driven by a tendency towards costs savings. Conclusions Cardiac rehabilitation after heart valve surgery may not have improved health-related quality of life in this study, but is likely to be cost-effective for society, outweighing the extra costs of cardiac rehabilitation.

  14. Analysis of achievable disturbance attenuation in a precision magnetically-suspended motion control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander V.; Holmes, Michael L.; Behrouzjou, Roxana; Trumper, David L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the achievable disturbance attenuation to get an Angstrom motion control resolution and macroscopic travel in a precision magnetically-suspended motion control system are presented in this paper. Noise sources in the transducers, electronics, and mechanical vibrations are used to develop the control design.

  15. Clinical applications of a quantitative analysis of regional lift ventricular wall motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, R. F.; Rich, J. M.; Pollack, M. E.; Altieri, P. I.

    1975-01-01

    Observations were summarized which may have clinical application. These were obtained from a quantitative analysis of wall motion that was used to detect both hypokinesis and tardokinesis in left ventricular cineangiograms. The method was based on statistical comparisons with normal values for regional wall motion derived from the cineangiograms of patients who were found not to have heart disease.

  16. An Analysis of the Historical Development of Ideas about Motion and Its Implications for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    The persistence of students' misconceptions about motion illustrates the enormous difficulty that teachers face in their attempts to overcome these with traditional physics instruction. An understanding of students' ideas about motion and ways to incorporate them into successful instructional approaches can be obtained from an analysis of…

  17. Low-cost human motion capture system for postural analysis onboard ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocerino, Erica; Ackermann, Sebastiano; Del Pizzo, Silvio; Menna, Fabio; Troisi, Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    The study of human equilibrium, also known as postural stability, concerns different research sectors (medicine, kinesiology, biomechanics, robotics, sport) and is usually performed employing motion analysis techniques for recording human movements and posture. A wide range of techniques and methodologies has been developed, but the choice of instrumentations and sensors depends on the requirement of the specific application. Postural stability is a topic of great interest for the maritime community, since ship motions can make demanding and difficult the maintenance of the upright stance with hazardous consequences for the safety of people onboard. The need of capturing the motion of an individual standing on a ship during its daily service does not permit to employ optical systems commonly used for human motion analysis. These sensors are not designed for operating in disadvantageous environmental conditions (water, wetness, saltiness) and with not optimal lighting. The solution proposed in this study consists in a motion acquisition system that could be easily usable onboard ships. It makes use of two different methodologies: (I) motion capture with videogrammetry and (II) motion measurement with Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The developed image-based motion capture system, made up of three low-cost, light and compact video cameras, was validated against a commercial optical system and then used for testing the reliability of the inertial sensors. In this paper, the whole process of planning, designing, calibrating, and assessing the accuracy of the motion capture system is reported and discussed. Results from the laboratory tests and preliminary campaigns in the field are presented.

  18. Analysis of electric field stimulation of single cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, L; Borderies, J R

    1992-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of cardiac cells by imposed extracellular electric fields results in a transmembrane potential which is highly nonuniform, with one end of the cell depolarized and the other end hyperpolarized along the field direction. To date, the implications of the close proximity of oppositely polarized membranes on excitability have not been explored. In this work we compare the biophysical basis for field stimulation of cells at rest with that for intracellular current injection, using three Luo-Rudy type membrane patches coupled together as a lumped model to represent the cell membrane. Our model shows that cell excitation is a function of the temporal and spatial distribution of ionic currents and transmembrane potential. The extracellular and intracellular forms of stimulation were compared in greater detail for monophasic and symmetric biphasic rectangular pulses, with duration ranging from 0.5 to 10 ms. Strength-duration curves derived for field stimulation show that over a wide range of pulse durations, biphasic waveforms can recruit and activate membrane patches about as effectively as can monophasic waveforms having the same total pulse duration. We find that excitation with biphasic stimulation results from a synergistic, temporal summation of inward currents through the sodium channel in membrane patches at opposite ends of the cell. Furthermore, with both waveform types, a net inward current through the inwardly rectifying potassium channel contributes to initial membrane depolarization. In contrast, models of stimulation by intracellular current injection do not account for the nonuniformity of transmembrane potential and produce substantially different (even contradictory) results for the case of stimulation from rest. PMID:1420884

  19. Motion synthesis and force distribution analysis for a biped robot.

    PubMed

    Trojnacki, Maciej T; Zielińska, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the method of generating biped robot motion using recorded human gait is presented. The recorded data were modified taking into account the velocity available for robot drives. Data includes only selected joint angles, therefore the missing values were obtained considering the dynamic postural stability of the robot, which means obtaining an adequate motion trajectory of the so-called Zero Moment Point (ZMT). Also, the method of determining the ground reaction forces' distribution during the biped robot's dynamic stable walk is described. The method was developed by the authors. Following the description of equations characterizing the dynamics of robot's motion, the values of the components of ground reaction forces were symbolically determined as well as the coordinates of the points of robot's feet contact with the ground. The theoretical considerations have been supported by computer simulation and animation of the robot's motion. This was done using Matlab/Simulink package and Simulink 3D Animation Toolbox, and it has proved the proposed method.

  20. Motion Analysis of a Rocket-Propelled Truck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitt, Darren L.; Lowe, Mary L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an experiment to study the motion of a rocket-propelled vehicle over the entire duration of the engine burn using a video system with a frame-by-frame playback and a Sonic Ranger for ultrasonic position movements. Enables students to study the impulse-momentum principle and the effects of a time-varying force. (JRH)

  1. Physiological model of motion analysis for machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Richard A.; Lesperance, Ronald M.

    1993-09-01

    We studied the spatio-temporal shape of `receptive fields' of simple cells in the monkey visual cortex. Receptive fields are maps of the regions in space and time that affect a cell's electrical responses. Fields with no change in shape over time responded to all directions of motion; fields with changing shape over time responded to only some directions of motion. A Gaussian Derivative (GD) model fit these fields well, in a transformed variable space that aligned the centers and principal axes of the field and model in space-time. The model accounts for fields that vary in orientation, location, spatial scale, motion properties, and number of lobes. The model requires only ten parameters (the minimum possible) to describe fields in two dimensions of space and one of time. A difference-of-offset-Gaussians (DOOG) provides a plausible physiological means to form GD model fields. Because of its simplicity, the GD model improves the efficiency of machine vision systems for analyzing motion. An implementation produced robust local estimates of the direction and speed of moving objects in real scenes.

  2. A novel spinal kinematic analysis using X-ray imaging and vicon motion analysis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong K; Lee, Nam G; You, Joshua H

    2014-01-01

    This study highlights a novel spinal kinematic analysis method and the feasibility of X-ray imaging measurements to accurately assess thoracic spine motion. The advanced X-ray Nash-Moe method and analysis were used to compute the segmental range of motion in thoracic vertebra pedicles in vivo. This Nash-Moe X-ray imaging method was compared with a standardized method using the Vicon 3-dimensional motion capture system. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent and significant correlation between the two methods (R2 = 0.99, p < 0.05), suggesting that the analysis of spinal segmental range of motion using X-ray imaging measurements was accurate and comparable to the conventional 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Clinically, this novel finding is compelling evidence demonstrating that measurements with X-ray imaging are useful to accurately decipher pathological spinal alignment and movement impairments in idiopathic scoliosis (IS).

  3. Can one angle be simply subtracted from another to determine range of motion in three-dimensional motion analysis?

    PubMed

    Michaud, Benjamin; Jackson, Monique I; Prince, François; Begon, Mickaël S

    2014-04-01

    To determine the range of motion of a joint between an initial orientation and a final orientation, it is convenient to subtract initial joint angles from final joint angles, a method referred to as the vectorial approach. However, for three-dimensional movements, the vectorial approach is not mathematically correct. To determine the joint range of motion, the rotation matrix between the two orientations should be calculated, and angles describing the range of motion should be extracted from this matrix, a method referred to as the matrical approach. As the matrical approach is less straightforward to implement, it is of interest to identify situations in which the vectorial approach leads to insubstantial errors. In this study, the vectorial approach was compared to the matrical approach, and theoretical justification was given for situations in which the vectorial approach can reasonably be used. The main findings are that the vectorial approach can be used if (1) the motion is planar (Woltring HJ. 1994. 3-D attitude representation of human joints: a standardization proposal. J Biomech 27(12): 1399-1414), (2) the angles between the final and the initial orientation are small (Woltring HJ. 1991. Representation and calculation of 3-D joint movement. Hum Mov Sci 10(5): 603-616), (3) the angles between the initial orientation of the distal segment and the proximal segment are small and finally (4) when only one large angle occurs between the initial orientation of the distal segment and the proximal segment and the angle sequence is chosen in such a way that this large angle occurs on the first axis of rotation. These findings provide specific criteria to consider when choosing the angle sequence to use for movement analysis.

  4. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  5. Mechanical analysis of arterial plaques in native geometry with OCT wall motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Claire; Heidari, Andrew E.; Chen, Zhongping; George, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of an atherosclerotic plaque may encode information about the type, composition, and vulnerability to rupture. Human arterial segments with varying plaque burden were analyzed ex vivo with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to determine plaque type and to determine compliance during pulsatile inflation in their native geometry. Calcifications and lipid filled plaques showed markedly different compliance when analyzed with OCT wall motion analysis. There was also a trend towards increased circumferential variation in arterial compliance with increasing plaque burden. PMID:24388166

  6. The Influence of Perioperative Dexmedetomidine on Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jun; Qian, Ju; Cheng, Hao; Ji, Fuhai; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of dexmedetomidine may have benefits on the clinical outcomes of cardiac surgery. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine versus other perioperative medications to determine the influence of perioperative dexmedetomidine on cardiac surgery patients. Methods Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing outcomes in patients who underwent cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine, another medication, or a placebo were retrieved from EMBASE, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Science Citation Index. Results A total of 1702 patients in 14 studies met the selection criteria among 1,535 studies that fit the research strategy. Compared to other medications, dexmedetomidine has combined risk ratios of 0.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15, 0.55, P = 0.0002) for ventricular tachycardia, 0.35 (95% CI 0.20, 0.62, P = 0.0004) for postoperative delirium, 0.76 (95% CI 0.55, 1.06, P = 0.11) for atrial fibrillation, 1.08 (95% CI 0.74, 1.57, P = 0.69) for hypotension, and 2.23 (95% CI 1.36, 3.67, P = 0.001) for bradycardia. In addition, dexmedetomidine may reduce the length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay. Conclusions This meta-analysis revealed that the perioperative use of dexmedetomidine in patients undergoing cardiac surgery can reduce the risk of postoperative ventricular tachycardia and delirium, but may increase the risk of bradycardia. The estimates showed a decreased risk of atrial fibrillation, shorter length of ICU stay and hospitalization, and increased risk of hypotension with dexmedetomidine. PMID:27049318

  7. Time series analysis as input for clinical predictive modeling: Modeling cardiac arrest in a pediatric ICU

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thousands of children experience cardiac arrest events every year in pediatric intensive care units. Most of these children die. Cardiac arrest prediction tools are used as part of medical emergency team evaluations to identify patients in standard hospital beds that are at high risk for cardiac arrest. There are no models to predict cardiac arrest in pediatric intensive care units though, where the risk of an arrest is 10 times higher than for standard hospital beds. Current tools are based on a multivariable approach that does not characterize deterioration, which often precedes cardiac arrests. Characterizing deterioration requires a time series approach. The purpose of this study is to propose a method that will allow for time series data to be used in clinical prediction models. Successful implementation of these methods has the potential to bring arrest prediction to the pediatric intensive care environment, possibly allowing for interventions that can save lives and prevent disabilities. Methods We reviewed prediction models from nonclinical domains that employ time series data, and identified the steps that are necessary for building predictive models using time series clinical data. We illustrate the method by applying it to the specific case of building a predictive model for cardiac arrest in a pediatric intensive care unit. Results Time course analysis studies from genomic analysis provided a modeling template that was compatible with the steps required to develop a model from clinical time series data. The steps include: 1) selecting candidate variables; 2) specifying measurement parameters; 3) defining data format; 4) defining time window duration and resolution; 5) calculating latent variables for candidate variables not directly measured; 6) calculating time series features as latent variables; 7) creating data subsets to measure model performance effects attributable to various classes of candidate variables; 8) reducing the number of

  8. The stability analysis of rolling motion of hypersonic vehicles and its validations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, YouDa; Zhao, ZhongLiang; Tian, Hao; Zhang, XianFeng

    2014-12-01

    The stability of the rolling motion of near space hypersonic vehicles with rudder control is studied using method of qualitative analysis of nonlinear differential equations, and the stability criteria of the deflected rolling motions are improved. The outcomes can serve as the basis for further study regarding the influence of pitching and lateral motion on the stability of rolling motion. To validate the theoretical results, numerical simulations were done for the rolling motion of two hypersonic vehicles with typical configurations. Also, wind tunnel experiments for four aircraft models with typical configurations have been done. The results show that: 1) there exist two dynamic patterns of the rolling motion under statically stable condition. The first one is point attractor, for which the motion of aircraft returns to the original state. The second is periodic attractor, for which the aircraft rolls periodically. 2) Under statically unstable condition, there exist three dynamic patterns of rolling motion, namely, the point attractor, periodic attractor around deflected state of rolling motion, and double periodic attractors or chaotic attractors.

  9. The carbohydrate moieties of the beta-subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase: their lateral motions and proximity to the cardiac glycoside site.

    PubMed Central

    Amler, E; Abbott, A; Malak, H; Lakowicz, J; Ball, W J

    1996-01-01

    The beta-subunit associated with the catalytic (alpha) subunit of the mammalian Na+, K(+) -ATPase is a transmembrane glycoprotein with three extracellularly located N-glycosylation sites. Although beta appears to be essential for a functional enzyme, the role of beta and its sugars remains unknown. In these studies, steady-state and dynamic fluorescence measurements of the fluorophore lucifer yellow (LY) covalently linked to the carbohydrate chains of beta have demonstrated that the bound probes are highly solvent exposed but restricted in their diffusional motions. Furthermore, the probes' environments on beta were not altered by Na+ or K+ or ouabain-induced enzyme conformational changes, but both divalent cation and oligomycin addition evoked modest changes in LY fluorescence. Frequency domain measurements reflecting the Förster fluorescence energy transfer (FET) occurring between anthroylouabain (AO) bound to the cardiac glycoside receptor site on alpha and the carbohydrate-linked LY demonstrated their close proximity (18 A). Additional FET determinations made between LY as donor and erythrosin-5-isothiocyanate, covalently bound at the enzyme's putative ATP binding site domain, indicated that a distance of about 85 A separates these two regions and that this distance is reduced upon divalent cation binding and increased upon the Na+E1-->K+E2 conformational transition. These data suggest a model for the localization of the terminal moieties of the oligosaccharides that places them, on average, about 18 A from the AO binding site and this distance or less from the extracellular membrane surface. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:8770197

  10. Reliability of 3D upper limb motion analysis in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Judy; Malone, Ailish; Kiernan, Damien; Meldrum, Dara

    2017-03-01

    Kinematics, measured by 3D upper limb motion analysis (3D-ULMA), can potentially increase understanding of movement patterns by quantifying individual joint contributions. Reliability in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) has not been established.

  11. Directivity in NGA earthquake ground motions: Analysis using isochrone theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, P.; Chiou, B.S.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present correction factors that may be applied to the ground motion prediction relations of Abrahamson and Silva, Boore and Atkinson, Campbell and Bozorgnia, and Chiou and Youngs (all in this volume) to model the azimuthally varying distribution of the GMRotI50 component of ground motion (commonly called 'directivity') around earthquakes. Our correction factors may be used for planar or nonplanar faults having any dip or slip rake (faulting mechanism). Our correction factors predict directivity-induced variations of spectral acceleration that are roughly half of the strike-slip variations predicted by Somerville et al. (1997), and use of our factors reduces record-to-record sigma by about 2-20% at 5 sec or greater period. ?? 2008, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  12. Statistical analysis of motion contrast in optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuxuan; Guo, Li; Pan, Cong; Lu, Tongtong; Hong, Tianyu; Ding, Zhihua; Li, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (Angio-OCT), mainly based on the temporal dynamics of OCT scattering signals, has found a range of potential applications in clinical and scientific research. Based on the model of random phasor sums, temporal statistics of the complex-valued OCT signals are mathematically described. Statistical distributions of the amplitude differential and complex differential Angio-OCT signals are derived. The theories are validated through the flow phantom and live animal experiments. Using the model developed, the origin of the motion contrast in Angio-OCT is mathematically explained, and the implications in the improvement of motion contrast are further discussed, including threshold determination and its residual classification error, averaging method, and scanning protocol. The proposed mathematical model of Angio-OCT signals can aid in the optimal design of the system and associated algorithms.

  13. Analysis of River Ice Motion Near a Breaking Front

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    bank toward the camera at a speed of about 1 m/ s . Note the pressure ridge across the river and the ice rubble - front (white) farther upstream. The ice...volume S , scalar product of polynomial Pi with itself St hydraulic gradient of the river I global time for the ice motion in a river reach 7 local time...dynamic breakup has the front. Conversely, in what we call "strength- been noted by several authors (e.g., Beltaos and dominateddynamicbreakup

  14. GOCI Level-2 Processing Improvements and Cloud Motion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The Ocean Biology Processing Group has been working with the Korean Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) to process geosynchronous ocean color data from the GOCI (Geostationary Ocean Color Instrument) aboard the COMS (Communications, Ocean and Meteorological Satellite). The level-2 processing program, l2gen has GOCI processing as an option. Improvements made to that processing are discussed here as well as a discussion about cloud motion effects.

  15. Systems analysis of the mechanisms of cardiac diastolic function changes after microgravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Richard; Coleman, Thomas; Steven, Platts; Martin, David

    Detailed information concerning cardiac function was collected by two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography at 10 days before flight and 3h after landing in astronauts returning from shuttle missions. A comparative analysis of this data suggests that cardiac diastolic function is reduced after microgravity exposure with little or no change in systolic function as measured by ejection fraction However, the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations have not been determined. In this study, an integrative computer model of human physiology that forms the framework for the Digital Astronaut Project (Guyton/Coleman/Summers Model) was used in a systems analysis of the echocardiographic data in the context of general cardiovascular physiologic functioning. The physiologic mechanisms involved in the observed changes were then determined by a dissection of model interrelationships. The systems analysis of possible physiologic mechanisms involved reveals that a loss of fluid from the myocardial interstitial space may lead to a stiffening of the myocardium and could potentially result in some of the cardiac diastolic dysfunction seen postflight. The cardiovascular dynamics may be different during spaceflight.

  16. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  17. Real-time marker-free motion capture system using blob feature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Joon; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Hong-Seok; Lee, In-Ho

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a real-time marker-free motion capture system which can reconstruct 3-dimensional human motions. The virtual character of the proposed system mimics the motion of an actor in real-time. The proposed system captures human motions by using three synchronized CCD cameras and detects the root and end-effectors of an actor such as a head, hands, and feet by exploiting the blob feature analysis. And then, the 3-dimensional positions of end-effectors are restored and tracked by using Kalman filter. At last, the positions of the intermediate joint are reconstructed by using anatomically constrained inverse kinematics algorithm. The proposed system was implemented under general lighting conditions and we confirmed that the proposed system could reconstruct motions of a lot of people wearing various clothes in real-time stably.

  18. One hybrid model combining singular spectrum analysis and LS + ARMA for polar motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Guo, Jinyun; Liu, Xin; Wei, Xiaobei; Li, Wudong

    2017-01-01

    Accurate real-time polar motion parameters play an important role in satellite navigation and positioning and spacecraft tracking. To meet the needs for real-time and high-accuracy polar motion prediction, a hybrid model that integrated singular spectrum analysis (SSA), least-squares (LS) extrapolation and an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model was proposed. SSA was applied to separate the trend, the annual and the Chandler components from a given polar motion time series. LS extrapolation models were constructed for the separated trend, annual and Chandler components. An ARMA model was established for a synthetic sequence that contained the remaining SSA component and the residual series of LS fitting. In applying this hybrid model, multiple sets of polar motion predictions with lead times of 360 days were made based on an IERS 08 C04 series. The results showed that the proposed method could effectively predict the polar motion parameters.

  19. A new analysis methodology for the motion of self-propelled particles and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Young-Moo; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    The self-propelled particle (SPP) on the microscale in the solution is a growing field of study, which has a potential to be used for nanomedicine and nanorobots. However, little detailed quantitative analysis on the motion of the SPP has been performed so far because its self-propelled motion is strongly coupled to Brownian motion, which makes the extraction of intrinsic propulsion mechanisms problematic, leading to inconsistent conclusions. Here, we present a novel way to decompose the motion of the SPP into self-propelled and Brownian components; accurate values for self-propulsion speed and diffusion coefficients of the SPP are obtained for the first time. Then, we apply our analysis methodology to ostensible chemotaxis of SPP, and reveal the actual (non-chemotactic) mechanism of the phenomenon, demonstrating that our analysis methodology is a powerful and reliable tool.

  20. CMA-HT: a crowd motion analysis framework based on heat-transfer analog model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Melvin, William; Sritharan, Subramania I.; Fernandes, Shane; Barker, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    Crowd motion analysis covers the detection, tracking, recognition, and behavior interpretation of target group from persistent surveillance video data. This project is dedicated to investigating a crowd motion analysis system based on a heat-transfer-analog model (denoted as CMA-HT for simplicity), and a generic modeling and simulation framework describing crowd motion behavior. CMA-HT is formulated by coupling the statistical analysis of crowd's historical behavior at a given location, geographic information system, and crowd motion dynamics. The mathematical derivation of the CMA-HT model and the innovative methods involved in the framework's implementation will be discussed in detail. Using the sample video data collected by Central Florida University as benchmark, CMA-HT is employed to measure and identify anomalous personnel or group responses in the video.

  1. Non-linear analysis of stick/slip motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, T. K.; Williams, R.

    1981-02-01

    The steady state relative motion of two masses with dry (Coulomb) friction contact is investigated. The bodies are assumed to have the same mass and stiffness and are subjected to harmonic excitation. By means of a combined analytical—numerical procedure, results are obtained for arbitrary values of Coulomb friction, excitation frequency, and natural frequencies of the bodies. For certain values of these parameters, multiple lockups per cycle are possible. In this respect, the problem investigated here is a natural extension of the one considered by Den Hartog, who in obtaining his closed form solution assumed a maximum of two lockups per cycle.

  2. Analysis of star pair latitudes. [for polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graber, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    Star pair latitude observations form the basis for the pole positions reported by the International Polar Motion Service (IMPS). The IPMS processes these observations to produce a mean pole position. However, the time series of observations contains high-frequency information which is lost in the calculation of the mean pole. In this study, 2931 star pair observations are analyzed. A possible large excitation at one cycle per solar day is observed. The average power level in the frequency band of the tesseral tides is seen to be high, although the peaks cannot be conclusively identified as tidal phenomena.

  3. Implementation of a markerless motion analysis method to quantify hyperkinesis in males with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Joan A; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro A; Khan, Hassan; Hall, Deborah A; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Wimmer, Markus A

    2014-02-01

    Hyperactive behavior - and implicitly, motion - in Fragile X syndrome (FXS) has been historically described using behavioral rating scales. While rating scales are the current standard outcome measures used in clinical research, they have limitations including their qualitative nature and subjectivity. The advent of new motion capture technologies has provided the opportunity to develop quantitative methods for measuring hyperactive motion. The hypotheses for this study were that a novel markerless motion analysis method (1) can quantitatively measure kinematic parameters, (2) can differentiate the level of hyperkinesis between control and FXS populations, and (3) will correlate with blind-reviewer synchronous video-capture methods and behavioral rating scale scores. Twenty young males (7-control, 13-FXS; ages 9-32) were studied using a standardized protocol in a markerless motion analysis suite. Behavioral scale questionnaires were filled out by parents and those scores were correlated with motion parameters (frequency and total traveled distance) of body segments during 30s of story listening while standing in the observation space. The markerless system was able to track subjects and the two populations displayed significantly different quantities of motion, with larger amounts of motion in the FXS group (p < 0.05). Pearson's correlation coefficients between frequency counts obtained from the markerless system and rater-based video capture were between 0.969 and 0.996 (p < 0.001). Significant correlations between rating scale scores and motion parameters ranged from 0.462 ≤ r ≤ 0.568 (p ≤ 0.040). These results suggest feasibility and validity of a markerless system as a non-invasive method able to quantify motion in individuals with hyperkinesis.

  4. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeuwer, Marcel M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Quist, Marcel J.

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the myocardium (the heart muscle) from MR images, using contrast-enhanced ECG-triggered MRI. We have developed an automatic quantitative analysis method, which works as follows. First, image registration is used to compensate for translation and rotation of the myocardium over time. Next, the boundaries of the myocardium are detected and for each position within the myocardium a time-intensity profile is constructed. The time interval during which the contrast agent passes for the first time through the left ventricle and the myocardium is detected and various parameters are measured from the time-intensity profiles in this interval. The measured parameters are visualized as color overlays on the original images. Analysis results are stored, so that they can later on be compared for different stress levels of the heart. The method is described in detail in this paper and preliminary validation results are presented.

  5. Tongue Motion Patterns in Post-Glossectomy and Typical Speakers: A Principal Components Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Maureen; Langguth, Julie M.; Woo, Jonghye; Chen, Hegang; Prince, Jerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined changes in tongue motion caused by glossectomy surgery. A speech task that involved subtle changes in tongue-tip positioning (the motion from /i/ to /s/) was measured. The hypothesis was that patients would have limited motion on the tumor (resected) side and would compensate with greater motion on the nontumor side in order to elevate the tongue tip and blade for /s/. Method Velocity fields were extracted from tagged magnetic resonance images in the left, middle, and right tongue of 3 patients and 10 controls. Principal components (PCs) analysis quantified motion differences and distinguished between the subject groups. Results PCs 1 and 2 represented variance in (a) size and independence of the tongue tip, and (b) direction of motion of the tip, body, or both. Patients and controls were correctly separated by a small number of PCs. Conclusions Motion of the tumor slice was different between patients and controls, but the nontumor side of the patients’ tongues did not show excessive or adaptive motion. Both groups contained apical and laminal /s/ users, and 1 patient created apical /s/ in a highly unusual manner. PMID:24023377

  6. A model for quantitative correction of coronary calcium scores on multidetector, dual source, and electron beam computed tomography for influences of linear motion, calcification density, and temporal resolution: A cardiac phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Greuter, M. J. W.; Groen, J. M.; Nicolai, L. J.; Dijkstra, H.; Oudkerk, M.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to quantify the influence of linear motion, calcification density, and temporal resolution on coronary calcium determination using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), dual source CT (DSCT), and electron beam tomography (EBT) and to find a quantitative method which corrects for the influences of these parameters using a linear moving cardiac phantom. Methods: On a robotic arm with artificial arteries with four calcifications of increasing density, a linear movement was applied between 0 and 120 mm/s (step of 10 mm/s). The phantom was scanned five times on 64-slice MDCT, DSCT, and EBT using a standard acquisition protocol. The average Agatston, volume, and mass scores were determined for each velocity, calcification, and scanner. Susceptibility to motion was quantified using a cardiac motion susceptibility (CMS) index. Resemblance to EBT and physical volume and mass was quantified using a {Delta} index. Results: Increasing motion artifacts were observed at increasing velocities on all scanners, with increasing severity from EBT to DSCT to 64-slice MDCT. The calcium score showed a linear dependency on motion from which a correction factor could be derived. This correction factor showed a linear dependency on the mean calcification density with a good fit for all three scoring methods and all three scanners (0.73{<=}R{sup 2}{<=}0.95). The slope and offset of this correction factor showed a linear dependency on temporal resolution with a good fit for all three scoring methods and all three scanners (0.83{<=}R{sup 2}{<=}0.98). CMS was minimal for EBT and increasing values were observed for DSCT and highest values for 64-slice MDCT. CMS was minimal for mass score and increasing values were observed for volume score and highest values for Agatston score. For all densities and scoring methods DSCT showed on average the closest resemblance to EBT calcium scores. When using the correction factor, CMS index decreased on average by

  7. A meta-analysis of platelet gel for prevention of sternal wound infections following cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kirmani, Bilal H.; Jones, Siôn G.; Datta, Subir; McLaughlin, Edward K.; Hoschtitzky, Andreas J.

    2017-01-01

    Deep sternal wound infection and bleeding are devastating complications following cardiac surgery, which may be reduced by topical application of autologous platelet gel. Systematic review identified seven comparative studies involving 4,692 patients. Meta-analysis showed significant reductions in all sternal wound infections (odds ratio 3.48 [1.08–11.23], p=0.04) and mediastinitis (odds ratio 2.69 [1.20–6.06], p=0.02) but not bleeding. No adverse events relating to the use of topical platelet-rich plasma were reported. The use of autologous platelet gel in cardiac surgery appears to provide significant reductions in serious sternal wound infections, and its use is unlikely to be associated with significant risk. PMID:27177403

  8. Dipyridamole cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Askenase, A.; Segal, B.L.; Auerbach, N.

    1988-02-01

    Dipyridamole cardiac imaging is a useful alternative technique to exercise stress testing in the evaluation of patients with ischemic heart disease. Intravenous dipyridamole is still in the investigational phase, while oral dipyridamole is widely available. The hemodynamic effects of dipyridamole include an increase in coronary blood flow (due to coronary vasodilation) which is in excess of the increase in myocardial oxygen consumption and cardiac output. The disparity in the increase in coronary blood flow relative to the cardiac output results in an increase in myocardial thallium activity and an increase in the myocardial/background activity ratio. The quality of the thallium images is better or similar to that of exercise thallium images. The optimal dose of intravenous dipyridamole is 0.56 mg/kg, and of the oral dose it is 300 to 400 mg, although higher doses may be necessary in some patients. Analysis of the thallium images has been to a large extent based on visual inspection of the planar images. Delayed images are helpful to establish the nature of the perfusion abnormalities (transient or fixed). The process of redistribution is based on disparate rates of washout from the normal and abnormal zones. The sensitivity and specificity of dipyridamole thallium imaging, whether intravenous or oral, have been shown in a number of studies to be quite adequate and comparable to that achieved during exercise thallium imaging. Dipyridamole two-dimensional echocardiography has also been used in the detection of coronary artery disease; transient (new or worsening of preexisting) wall motion abnormalities have been found to be a specific marker of coronary artery disease. Transmural as well as regional coronary steal phenomena have been postulated as the mechanism for dipyridamole-induced regional wall motion abnormalities. 65 references.

  9. 4-D Cardiac MR Image Analysis: Left and Right Ventricular Morphology and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wahle, Andreas; Johnson, Ryan K.; Scholz, Thomas D.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a combination of active shape model (ASM) and active appearance model (AAM) was used to segment the left and right ventricles of normal and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) hearts on 4-D (3-D+time) MR images. For each ventricle, a 4-D model was first used to achieve robust preliminary segmentation on all cardiac phases simultaneously and a 3-D model was then applied to each phase to improve local accuracy while maintaining the overall robustness of the 4-D segmentation. On 25 normal and 25 TOF hearts, in comparison to the expert traced independent standard, our comprehensive performance assessment showed subvoxel segmentation accuracy, high overlap ratios, good ventricular volume correlations, and small percent volume differences. Following 4-D segmentation, novel quantitative shape and motion features were extracted using shape information, volume-time and dV/dt curves, analyzed and used for disease status classification. Automated discrimination between normal/TOF subjects achieved 90%–100% sensitivity and specificity. The features obtained from TOF hearts show higher variability compared to normal subjects, suggesting their potential use as disease progression indicators. The abnormal shape and motion variations of the TOF hearts were accurately captured by both the segmentation and feature characterization. PMID:19709962

  10. Automatic functional analysis of left ventricle in cardiac cine MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying-Li; Connelly, Kim A.; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and objectives A fully automated left ventricle segmentation method for the functional analysis of cine short axis (SAX) magnetic resonance (MR) images was developed, and its performance evaluated with 133 studies of subjects with diverse pathology: ischemic heart failure (n=34), non-ischemic heart failure (n=30), hypertrophy (n=32), and healthy (n=37). Materials and methods The proposed automatic method locates the left ventricle (LV), then for each image detects the contours of the endocardium, epicardium, papillary muscles and trabeculations. Manually and automatically determined contours and functional parameters were compared quantitatively. Results There was no significant difference between automatically and manually determined end systolic volume (ESV), end diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and left ventricular mass (LVM) for each of the four groups (paired sample t-test, α=0.05). The automatically determined functional parameters showed high correlations with those derived from manual contours, and the Bland-Altman analysis biases were small (1.51 mL, 1.69 mL, –0.02%, –0.66 g for ESV, EDV, EF and LVM, respectively). Conclusions The proposed technique automatically and rapidly detects endocardial, epicardial, papillary muscles’ and trabeculations’ contours providing accurate and reproducible quantitative MRI parameters, including LV mass and EF. PMID:24040616

  11. Effect of epinephrine on survival after cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Patanwala, A E; Slack, M K; Martin, J R; Basken, R L; Nolan, P E

    2014-07-01

    The use of epinephrine is currently recommended as a treatment option for patients with cardiac arrest. The primary objective of this systematic review was to determine if epinephrine use during cardiac arrest is associated with improved survival to hospital discharge. MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Web of Science, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Biological Abstracts (BIOSIS Previews), and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews. Studies involving patients with cardiac arrest that compared epinephrine to no epinephrine (or placebo) with regard to survival to hospital discharge or 30-day survival. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies were included. The results were stratified into three groups: 1) RCTs, 2) observational studies with unadjusted data (observational-U), and 3) observational studies with adjusted data using multivariate analysis (observational-A). There were a total of 10 studies included in the systematic review and nine studies were included in the meta-analysis. The association between epinephrine use and survival to hospital discharge, grouped by study type was not significant for RCTs (OR 2.33, 95% CI 0.85 to 6.40; p=0.10; I2=0.00%) or observational-U studies (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.67 to 2.07; p=0.58; I2=76.68%). But epinephrine was associated with decreased survival in observational-A studies (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.48; P<0.01; I2=0.00%). Epinephrine use during cardiac arrest is not associated with improved survival to hospital discharge. Observational studies with a lower-risk for bias suggest that it may be associated with decreased survival.

  12. Current Practice and Utility of Chromosome Microarray Analysis in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jason R.; Kavarana, Minoo N.; Chowdhury, Shahryar M.; Scheurer, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Traditionally, karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were used for cytogenetic testing of infants with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac surgery at our institution. Recently, chromosome microarray analysis (CMA) has been performed in lieu of the traditional tests. A standardized approach to cytogenetic testing does not exist in this population. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of CMA based on our current ordering practice. Design We reviewed the records of all infants (< 1 year old) who underwent cardiac surgery at our institution from January 2010 to June 2013. Data included results of all cytogenetic testing performed. Diagnostic yield was calculated as the percentage of significant abnormal results obtained by each test modality. Patients were grouped by classification of congenital heart disease (CHD). Results Two hundred and seventy-five (51%) of 535 infants who underwent cardiac surgery had cytogenetic testing. Of those tested, 154 (56%) had multiple tests performed and at least 18% were redundant or overlapping. The utilization of CMA has increased each year since its implementation. The diagnostic yield for karyotype, FISH and CMA was 10%, 12% and 14% respectively. CMA yield was significantly higher in patients with septal defects (33%, p = 0.01) compared to all other CHD classes. CMA detected abnormalities of unknown clinical significance in 13% of infants tested. Conclusions In our center, redundant cytogenetic testing is frequently performed in infants undergoing cardiac surgery. The utilization of chromosome microarray analysis has increased over time and abnormalities of unknown clinical significance are detected in an important subset of patients. A screening algorithm that risk-stratifies based on classification of CHD and clinical suspicion may provide a practical, data-driven approach to genetic testing in this population and limit unnecessary resource utilization. PMID:25494910

  13. Analysis of preflutter and postflutter characteristics with motion-matched aerodynamic forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the equations of dynamic equilibrium for a lifting surface from Lagrange's equation is reviewed and restated for general exponential growing and decaying oscillatory motion. Aerodynamic forces for this motion are obtained from the three-dimensional supersonic kernel function that is newly generalized to complex reduced frequencies. Illustrative calculations were made for two flutter models at supersonic Mach numbers. Preflutter and postflutter motion isodecrement curves were obtained. This type of analysis can be used to predict preflutter behavior during flutter testing and to predict postflutter behavior for use in the design of flutter suppression systems.

  14. Heart rate monitoring from wrist-type PPG based on singular spectrum analysis with motion decision.

    PubMed

    Yang Wang; Zhiwen Liu; Bin Dong

    2016-08-01

    Heart rate (HR) monitoring is necessary for daily healthcare. Wrist-type photoplethsmography (PPG) is a convenient and non-invasive technique for HR monitoring. However, motion artifacts (MA) caused by subjects' movements can extremely interfere the results of HR monitoring. In this paper, we propose a high accuracy method using motion decision, singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and spectral peak searching for daily HR estimation. The proposed approach was evaluated on 8 subjects under a series of different motion states. Compared with electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded simultaneously, the experimental results indicated that the averaged absolute estimation error was 2.33 beats per minute (BPM).

  15. Digital resolver for helicopter model blade motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, T. S.; Berry, J. D.; Park, S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports the development and initial testing of a digital resolver to replace existing analog signal processing instrumentation. Radiometers, mounted directly on one of the fully articulated blades, are electrically connected through a slip ring to analog signal processing circuitry. The measured signals are periodic with azimuth angle and are resolved into harmonic components, with 0 deg over the tail. The periodic nature of the helicopter blade motion restricts the frequency content of each flapping and yaw signal to the fundamental and harmonics of the rotor rotational frequency. A minicomputer is employed to collect these data and then plot them graphically in real time. With this and other information generated by the instrumentation, a helicopter test pilot can then adjust the helicopter model's controls to achieve the desired aerodynamic test conditions.

  16. Analysis for the stick-slip motion of differential power screw actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-bo; Yao, Ping; Zhang, Xue-jun; Tang, Jin-long; Zhang, Yu-dong

    2011-08-01

    The model for differential power screw transmission is established, and the mathematical expression of the stick-slip motion is derived based on the friction, in addition, influences of parameters of differential power screw transmission on the stick-slip motion are analyzed qualitatively. Based on dynamical equations of the analysis, the precision and stability of the designed differential power screw actuator is obtained, and the result is compared to it with software SIMULINK to verify.

  17. Focal spot motion of linear accelerators and its effect on portal image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Brand, Bob; van Herk, Marcel

    2003-06-01

    The focal spot of a linear accelerator is often considered to have a fully stable position. In practice, however, the beam control loop of a linear accelerator needs to stabilize after the beam is turned on. As a result, some motion of the focal spot might occur during the start-up phase of irradiation. When acquiring portal images, this motion will affect the projected position of anatomy and field edges, especially when low exposures are used. In this paper, the motion of the focal spot and the effect of this motion on portal image analysis are quantified. A slightly tilted narrow slit phantom was placed at the isocenter of several linear accelerators and images were acquired (3.5 frames per second) by means of an amorphous silicon flat panel imager positioned approximately 0.7 m below the isocenter. The motion of the focal spot was determined by converting the tilted slit images to subpixel accurate line spread functions. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motionwas estimated by a subtraction of the relative displacement of the projected slit from the relative displacement of the field edges. It was found that the motion of the focal spot depends on the control system and design of the accelerator. The shift of the focal spot at the start of irradiation ranges between 0.05-0.7 mm in the gun-target (GT) direction. In the left-right (AB) direction the shift is generally smaller. The resulting error in portal image analysis due to focal spotmotion ranges between 0.05-1.1 mm for a dose corresponding to two monitor units (MUs). For 20 MUs, the effect of the focal spot motion reduces to 0.01-0.3 mm. The error in portal image analysis due to focal spot motion can be reduced by reducing the applied dose rate.

  18. Meta-analysis for outcomes of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qiankun; Hong, Liang; Mu, Xinwei; Zhang, Cui; Chen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery by the meta-analysis. Electronic databases PubMed and Embase were searched for relative studies from December 2008 to June 2015. For eligible studies, the R software was conducted to meta-analyze outcomes of AKI patients (AKI group) and none-AKI patients after cardiac surgery (NO AKI group). The chi-square-based Q test and I2 statistic were used for heterogeneity analysis. P < 0.1 or I2 > 50% revealed significant heterogeneity among studies, and then a random effects model was used; otherwise a fixed effect model was performed. Egger's test was performed for publication bias assessment. Subgroup analysis was performed by stratifying AKI definitions and study type. Totally 17 studies with 9656 subjects (2331 in the AKI group and 7325 in the NO AKI group) were enrolled. Significantly higher renal replacement therapy (RRT) (OR=23.67, 95%CI: 12.58–44.55), mortality (OR = 6.27, 95%CI: 3.58–11.00), serum creatinine (SMD = 1.42, 95%CI: 1.01–1.83), and hospital length of stay (LOS) (SMD = 0.45, 95%CI: 0.02–0.88) were shown in the AKI group compared with patients in the NO AKI group. Subgroup analysis showed that results of only 3 subgroups were reversed indicating that the definition of AKI did not affect its outcomes. Publication bias was only found among studies involving mortality and serum creatinine, but the 2 outcomes were not reversed after correction. This meta-analysis confirmed the worse outcomes of AKI in patients after cardiac surgery, including higher RRT rates, mortality, and longer hospital LOS than those of NO AKI patients. PMID:27930561

  19. A finite state model for respiratory motion analysis in image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanmei; Sharp, Gregory C.; Salzberg, Betty; Kaeli, David; Shirato, Hiroki; Jiang, Steve B.

    2004-12-01

    Effective image guided radiation treatment of a moving tumour requires adequate information on respiratory motion characteristics. For margin expansion, beam tracking and respiratory gating, the tumour motion must be quantified for pretreatment planning and monitored on-line. We propose a finite state model for respiratory motion analysis that captures our natural understanding of breathing stages. In this model, a regular breathing cycle is represented by three line segments, exhale, end-of-exhale and inhale, while abnormal breathing is represented by an irregular breathing state. In addition, we describe an on-line implementation of this model in one dimension. We found this model can accurately characterize a wide variety of patient breathing patterns. This model was used to describe the respiratory motion for 23 patients with peak-to-peak motion greater than 7 mm. The average root mean square error over all patients was less than 1 mm and no patient has an error worse than 1.5 mm. Our model provides a convenient tool to quantify respiratory motion characteristics, such as patterns of frequency changes and amplitude changes, and can be applied to internal or external motion, including internal tumour position, abdominal surface, diaphragm, spirometry and other surrogates.

  20. Optimizing 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sampling for Respiratory Motion Analysis of Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H.N.; Senneville, Baudouin D. de

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimum sampling strategy for retrospective reconstruction of 4-dimensional (4D) MR data for nonrigid motion characterization of tumor and organs at risk for radiation therapy purposes. Methods and Materials: For optimization, we compared 2 surrogate signals (external respiratory bellows and internal MRI navigators) and 2 MR sampling strategies (Cartesian and radial) in terms of image quality and robustness. Using the optimized protocol, 6 pancreatic cancer patients were scanned to calculate the 4D motion. Region of interest analysis was performed to characterize the respiratory-induced motion of the tumor and organs at risk simultaneously. Results: The MRI navigator was found to be a more reliable surrogate for pancreatic motion than the respiratory bellows signal. Radial sampling is most benign for undersampling artifacts and intraview motion. Motion characterization revealed interorgan and interpatient variation, as well as heterogeneity within the tumor. Conclusions: A robust 4D-MRI method, based on clinically available protocols, is presented and successfully applied to characterize the abdominal motion in a small number of pancreatic cancer patients.

  1. Joint motion pattern classification by cluster analysis of kinematic, demographic, and subjective variables.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jaejin; Shin, Hyunjung; Jung, Myung-Chul

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify joint motion patterns by classifying the full range of motion (ROM) into several sections. Forty participants were stratified by age and gender and they performed 18 full-swing motions at a self-selected speed. Joint angle, angular velocity, angular acceleration, and subjective discomfort rating were collected for each motion. K-means cluster analyses were used to classify joint motion patterns and ROM sections. The results showed that two or three clusters were mainly determined by the kinematic variables of angular velocity and acceleration. The motions of three clusters showed that the ROM sections of low and moderate velocity with moderate and high accelerations occurred in the initial (negative) and terminal (positive) phases, respectively, whereas those of high velocity with low acceleration were shown in the mid (neutral) phase. The motions of two clusters revealed that while the patterns of high velocity and high acceleration were found on the positive side of the ROM, those of low velocity and low acceleration were on the negative and neutral sides. The ROM sections close to both ends of the ROM may have a larger physical load than the others. This study provides information that could be useful for developing postural analysis tools for dynamic work.

  2. Ground motion issues for seismic analysis of tall buildings: A status report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bozorgnia, Y.; Campbell, K.W.; Luco, N.; Moehle, J.P.; Naeim, F.; Somerville, P.; Yang, T.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) is coordinating a major multidisciplinary programme, the Tall Buildings Initiative (TBI), to address critical technical issues related to the design and analysis of new tall buildings located in coastal California. The authors of this paper, listed alphabetically, are involved in various research studies related to ground motion modelling, selection, modification and simulation for analysis of tall buildings. This paper summarizes the scope and progress of ongoing activities related to ground motion issues for response history analysis of tall buildings.

  3. Stem cells and cardiac repair: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, Jonathan H; Dib, Nabil

    2008-03-01

    Utilizing stem cells to repair the damaged heart has seen an intense amount of activity over the last 5 years or so. There are currently multiple clinical studies in progress to test the efficacy of various different cell therapy approaches for the repair of damaged myocardium that were only just beginning to be tested in preclinical animal studies a few years earlier. This rapid transition from preclinical to clinical testing is striking and is not typical of the customary timeframe for the progress of a therapy from bench-to-bedside. Doubtless, there will be many more trials to follow in the upcoming years. With the plethora of trials and cell alternatives, there has come not only great enthusiasm for the potential of the therapy, but also great confusion about what has been achieved. Cell therapy has the potential to do what no drug can: regenerate and replace damaged tissue with healthy tissue. Drugs may be effective at slowing the progression of heart failure, but none can stop or reverse the process. However, tissue repair is not a simple process, although the idea on its surface is quite simple. Understanding cells, the signals that they respond to, and the keys to appropriate survival and tissue formation are orders of magnitude more complicated than understanding the pathways targeted by most drugs. Drugs and their metabolites can be monitored, quantified, and their effects correlated to circulating levels in the body. Not so for most cell therapies. It is quite difficult to measure cell survival except through ex vivo techniques like histological analysis of the target organ. This makes the emphasis on preclinical research all the more important because it is only in the animal studies that research has the opportunity to readily harvest the target tissues and perform the detailed analyses of what has happened with the cells. This need for detailed and usually time-intensive research in animal studies stands in contrast to the rapidity with which

  4. Analysis of outcomes for congenital cardiac disease: can we do better?

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Wernovsky, Gil; Elliott, Martin J

    2007-09-01

    This review discusses the historical aspects, current state of the art, and potential future advances in the areas of nomenclature and databases for the analysis of outcomes of treatments for patients with congenitally malformed hearts. We will consider the current state of analysis of outcomes, lay out some principles which might make it possible to achieve life-long monitoring and follow-up using our databases, and describe the next steps those involved in the care of these patients need to take in order to achieve these objectives. In order to perform meaningful multi-institutional analyses, we suggest that any database must incorporate the following six essential elements: use of a common language and nomenclature, use of an established uniform core dataset for collection of information, incorporation of a mechanism of evaluating case complexity, availability of a mechanism to assure and verify the completeness and accuracy of the data collected, collaboration between medical and surgical subspecialties, and standardised protocols for life-long follow-up. During the 1990s, both The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons created databases to assess the outcomes of congenital cardiac surgery. Beginning in 1998, these two organizations collaborated to create the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project. By 2000, a common nomenclature, along with a common core minimal dataset, were adopted by The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery. In 2000, The International Nomenclature Committee for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease was established. This committee eventually evolved into the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease. The working component of this international nomenclature society has been The International Working Group for Mapping and Coding

  5. Using Time Series Analysis to Predict Cardiac Arrest in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Curtis E; Aoki, Noriaki; Mariscalco, Michele; Turley, James P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To build and test cardiac arrest prediction models in a pediatric intensive care unit, using time series analysis as input, and to measure changes in prediction accuracy attributable to different classes of time series data. Methods A retrospective cohort study of pediatric intensive care patients over a 30 month study period. All subjects identified by code documentation sheets with matches in hospital physiologic and laboratory data repositories and who underwent chest compressions for two minutes were included as arrest cases. Controls were randomly selected from patients that did not experience arrest and who survived to discharge. Modeling data was based on twelve hours of data preceding the arrest (reference time for controls). Measurements and Main Results 103 cases of cardiac arrest and 109 control cases were used to prepare a baseline data set that consisted of 1025 variables in four data classes: multivariate, raw time series, clinical calculations, and time series trend analysis. We trained 20 arrest prediction models using a matrix of five feature sets (combinations of data classes) with four modeling algorithms: linear regression, decision tree, neural network and support vector machine. The reference model (multivariate data with regression algorithm) had an accuracy of 78% and 87% area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The best model (multivariate + trend analysis data with support vector machine algorithm) had an accuracy of 94% and 98% AUROC. Conclusions Cardiac arrest predictions based on a traditional model built with multivariate data and a regression algorithm misclassified cases 3.7 times more frequently than predictions that included time series trend analysis and built with a support vector machine algorithm. Although the final model lacks the specificity necessary for clinical application, we have demonstrated how information from time series data can be used to increase the accuracy of clinical

  6. Correcting waveform bias using principal component analysis: Applications in multicentre motion analysis studies.

    PubMed

    Clouthier, Allison L; Bohm, Eric R; Rudan, John F; Shay, Barbara L; Rainbow, Michael J; Deluzio, Kevin J

    2017-01-01

    Multicentre studies are rare in three dimensional motion analyses due to challenges associated with combining waveform data from different centres. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a statistical technique that can be used to quantify variability in waveform data and identify group differences. A correction technique based on PCA is proposed that can be used in post processing to remove nuisance variation introduced by the differences between centres. Using this technique, the waveform bias that exists between the two datasets is corrected such that the means agree. No information is lost in the individual datasets, but the overall variability in the combined data is reduced. The correction is demonstrated on gait kinematics with synthesized crosstalk and on gait data from knee arthroplasty patients collected in two centres. The induced crosstalk was successfully removed from the knee joint angle data. In the second example, the removal of the nuisance variation due to the multicentre data collection allowed significant differences in implant type to be identified. This PCA-based technique can be used to correct for differences between waveform datasets in post processing and has the potential to enable multicentre motion analysis studies.

  7. Continuum Mechanical Analysis of Collective Motion of Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itami, Teturo

    Group of robots that works mainly in macroscopic systems is considered as a continuum. We need not mount specific sensors for mutual information among these robots. Increasing number of the robots makes it difficult to predict collective motion of the robots. To give a well organized strategy of designing the task, we describe these robots as that like fluid in continuum mechanics, where number density f_1 (\\vec{x},\\vec{p}; t) of the robots located at around \\vec{x} with momentum around \\vec{p} at time t is a main variable. Also we propose methods to move these robots by external potential energy V(\\vec{x};t). To specify a concept, we take a transportation system by group of robots. The objects located at \\vec{X}(t) that do not feel a potential V(\\vec{X}(t);t) can be transported by a collision with the robots moving aimlessly under the potential force -\\frac{\\partial V(\\vec{x};t)}{\\partial \\vec{x}}. The new scheme of a design based on continuum mechanics is validated by direct method of dynamical development of the system in time.

  8. 3D motion analysis of keratin filaments in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberich, Gerlind; Windoffer, Reinhard; Leube, Rudolf; Aach, Til

    2010-03-01

    We present a novel and efficient approach for 3D motion estimation of keratin intermediate filaments in vitro. Keratin filaments are elastic cables forming a complex scaffolding within epithelial cells. To understand the mechanisms of filament formation and network organisation under physiological and pathological conditions, quantitative measurements of dynamic network alterations are essential. Therefore we acquired time-lapse series of 3D images using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Based on these image series, we show that a dense vector field can be computed such that the displacements from one frame to the next can be determined. Our method is based on a two-step registration process: First, a rigid pre-registration is applied in order to compensate for possible global cell movement. This step enables the subsequent nonrigid registration to capture only the sought local deformations of the filaments. As the transformation model of the deformable registration algorithm is based on Free Form Deformations, it is well suited for modeling filament network dynamics. The optimization is performed using efficient linear programming techniques such that the huge amount of image data of a time series can be efficiently processed. The evaluation of our results illustrates the potential of our approach.

  9. Motion Analysis of 100 Mediastinal Lymph Nodes: Potential Pitfalls in Treatment Planning and Adaptive Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Pantarotto, Jason R.; Piet, Anna H.M.; Vincent, Andrew; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Senan, Suresh

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: The motion of mediastinal lymph nodes may undermine local control with involved-field radiotherapy. We studied patterns of nodal and tumor motion in 41 patients with lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography planning scans were retrospectively evaluated to identify patients with clearly visible mediastinal lymph nodes. One hundred nodes from 14 patients with Stage I and 27 patients with Stage III were manually contoured in all 4D computed tomography respiratory phases. Motion was derived from changes in the nodal center-of-mass position. Primary tumors were also delineated in all phases for 16 patients with Stage III disease. Statistical analysis included a multivariate mixed-effects model of grouped data. Results: Average 3D nodal motion during quiet breathing was 0.68 cm (range, 0.17-1.64 cm); 77% moved greater than 0.5 cm, and 10% moved greater than 1.0 cm. Motion was greatest in the lower mediastinum (p = 0.002), and nodes measuring 2 cm or greater in diameter showed motion similar to that in smaller nodes. In 11 of 16 patients studied, at least one node moved more than the corresponding primary tumor. No association between 3D primary tumor motion and nodal motion was observed. For mobile primary tumors, phase offsets between the primary tumor and nodes of two or more and three or more phases were observed for 33% and 12% of nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Mediastinal nodal motion is common, with phase offsets seen between the primary tumor and different nodes in the same patient. Patient-specific information is needed to ensure geometric coverage, and adaptive strategies based solely on the primary tumor may be misleading.

  10. The 100 most-cited original articles in cardiac computed tomography: A bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Michael E; Hanna, Tarek N; Holmes, Davis; Marais, Olivia; Mohammed, Mohammed F; Clark, Sheldon; McLaughlin, Patrick; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Bibliometric analysis is the application of statistical methods to analyze quantitative data about scientific publications. It can evaluate research performance, author productivity, and manuscript impact. To the best of our knowledge, no bibliometric analysis has focused on cardiac computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper was to compile a list of the 100 most-cited articles related to cardiac CT literature using Scopus and Web of Science (WOS). A list of the 100 most-cited articles was compiled by order of citation frequency, as well a list of the top 10 most-cited guideline and review articles and the 20 most-cited articles of the years 2014-2015. The database of 100 most-cited articles was analyzed to identify characteristics of highly cited publications. For each manuscript, the number of authors, study design, size of patient cohort and departmental affiliations were cataloged. The 100 most-cited articles were published from 1990 to 2012, with the majority (53) published between 2005 and 2009. The total number of citations varied from 3354 to 196, and the number of citations per year varied from 9.5 to 129.0 with a median and mean of 30.9 and 38.7, respectively. The majority of publications had a study patients sample size of 200 patients or less. The USA and Germany were the nations with the highest number of frequently cited publications. This bibliometric analysis provides insights on the most-cited articles published on the subject of cardiac CT and calcium volume, thus helping to characterize the field and guide future research.

  11. Wavelet transform analysis to assess oscillations in pial artery pulsation at the human cardiac frequency.

    PubMed

    Winklewski, P J; Gruszecki, M; Wolf, J; Swierblewska, E; Kunicka, K; Wszedybyl-Winklewska, M; Guminski, W; Zabulewicz, J; Frydrychowski, A F; Bieniaszewski, L; Narkiewicz, K

    2015-05-01

    Pial artery adjustments to changes in blood pressure (BP) may last only seconds in humans. Using a novel method called near-infrared transillumination backscattering sounding (NIR-T/BSS) that allows for the non-invasive measurement of pial artery pulsation (cc-TQ) in humans, we aimed to assess the relationship between spontaneous oscillations in BP and cc-TQ at frequencies between 0.5 Hz and 5 Hz. We hypothesized that analysis of very short data segments would enable the estimation of changes in the cardiac contribution to the BP vs. cc-TQ relationship during very rapid pial artery adjustments to external stimuli. BP and pial artery oscillations during baseline (70s and 10s signals) and the response to maximal breath-hold apnea were studied in eighteen healthy subjects. The cc-TQ was measured using NIR-T/BSS; cerebral blood flow velocity, the pulsatility index and the resistive index were measured using Doppler ultrasound of the left internal carotid artery; heart rate and beat-to-beat systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded using a Finometer; end-tidal CO2 was measured using a medical gas analyzer. Wavelet transform analysis was used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations. The recordings lasting 10s and representing 10 cycles with a frequency of ~1 Hz provided sufficient accuracy with respect to wavelet coherence and wavelet phase coherence values and yielded similar results to those obtained from approximately 70cycles (70s). A slight but significant decrease in wavelet coherence between augmented BP and cc-TQ oscillations was observed by the end of apnea. Wavelet transform analysis can be used to assess the relationship between BP and cc-TQ oscillations at cardiac frequency using signals intervals as short as 10s. Apnea slightly decreases the contribution of cardiac activity to BP and cc-TQ oscillations.

  12. Large scale track analysis for wide area motion imagery surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, C. J.; van Huis, J. R.; Baan, J.

    2016-10-01

    Wide Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) enables image based surveillance of areas that can cover multiple square kilometers. Interpreting and analyzing information from such sources, becomes increasingly time consuming as more data is added from newly developed methods for information extraction. Captured from a moving Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), the high-resolution images allow detection and tracking of moving vehicles, but this is a highly challenging task. By using a chain of computer vision detectors and machine learning techniques, we are capable of producing high quality track information of more than 40 thousand vehicles per five minutes. When faced with such a vast number of vehicular tracks, it is useful for analysts to be able to quickly query information based on region of interest, color, maneuvers or other high-level types of information, to gain insight and find relevant activities in the flood of information. In this paper we propose a set of tools, combined in a graphical user interface, which allows data analysts to survey vehicles in a large observed area. In order to retrieve (parts of) images from the high-resolution data, we developed a multi-scale tile-based video file format that allows to quickly obtain only a part, or a sub-sampling of the original high resolution image. By storing tiles of a still image according to a predefined order, we can quickly retrieve a particular region of the image at any relevant scale, by skipping to the correct frames and reconstructing the image. Location based queries allow a user to select tracks around a particular region of interest such as landmark, building or street. By using an integrated search engine, users can quickly select tracks that are in the vicinity of locations of interest. Another time-reducing method when searching for a particular vehicle, is to filter on color or color intensity. Automatic maneuver detection adds information to the tracks that can be used to find vehicles based on their

  13. Motion coordination and performance analysis of multiple vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vikrant

    In this dissertation, issues related to multiple vehicle systems are studied. First, the issue of vehicular congestion is addressed and its effect on the performance of some systems studied. Motion coordination algorithms for some systems of interest are also developed. The issue of vehicular congestion is addressed by characterizing the effect of increasing the number of vehicles, in a bounded region, on the speed of the vehicles. A multiple vehicle routing problem is considered where vehicles are required to stay velocity-dependent distance away from each other to avoid physical collisions. Optimal solutions to the minimum time routing are characterized and are found to increase with the square root of the number of vehicles in the environment, for different distributions of the sources and destinations of the vehicles. The second issue addressed is that of the effect of vehicular congestion on the delay associated with data delivery in wireless networks where vehicles are used to transport data to increase the wireless capacity of the network. Tight bounds on the associated delay are derived. The next problem addressed is that of covering an arbitrary path-connected two dimensional region, using multiple unmanned aerial vehicles, in minimum time. A constant-factor optimal algorithm is presented for any given initial positions of the vehicles inside the environment. The last problem addressed is that of the deployment of an environment monitoring network of mobile sensors to improve the network lifetime and sensing quality. A distributed algorithm is presented that improves the system's performance starting from an initial deployment.

  14. Analysis of prosthetic cardiac devices: a guide for the practising pathologist

    PubMed Central

    Butany, J; Collins, M J

    2005-01-01

    Pathologists all over the world increasingly encounter prosthetic cardiac devices. A good evaluation of these devices is a valuable source of information, which can contribute to patient care and the appreciation and understanding of the pathobiology involved in the changes occurring between the host and the implanted prosthetic device. This article summarises the considerations underlying the analysis of prosthetic devices (particularly prosthetic heart valves), including the identification of the devices, the major morphological features of the devices, their modes of failure, and some technical details about evaluation and pitfalls. PMID:15677529

  15. Analysis of Cardiac Myocyte Maturation Using CASAAV, A Platform for Rapid Dissection of Cardiac Myocyte Gene Function In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuxuan; VanDusen, Nathan J; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Weiliang; Sethi, Isha; Guatimosim, Silvia; Ma, Qing; Jardin, Blake D; Ai, Yulan; Zhang, Donghui; Chen, Biyi; Guo, Ang; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Song, Long-Sheng; Pu, William T

    2017-03-29

    Rationale: Loss-of-function studies in cardiac myocytes (CMs) are currently limited by the need for appropriate conditional knockout alleles. The factors that regulate CM maturation are poorly understood. Prior studies on CM maturation have been confounded by heart dysfunction caused by whole organ gene inactivation. Objective: To develop a new technical platform to rapidly characterize cell-autonomous gene function in postnatal murine CMs and apply it to identify genes that regulate T-tubules, a hallmark of mature cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results: We developed CASAAV (CRISPR/Cas9-AAV9-based somatic mutagenesis), a platform in which AAV9 delivers tandem guide RNAs targeting a gene of interest and cardiac troponin T promoter (cTNT)-driven Cre to Rosa(Cas9GFP/Cas9GFP) neonatal mice. When directed against junctophilin-2 (Jph2), a gene previously implicated in T-tubule maturation, we achieved efficient, rapid, and CM-specific JPH2 depletion. High-dose AAV9 ablated JPH2 in 64% CMs and caused lethal heart failure, whereas low-dose AAV9 ablated JPH2 in 22% CMs and preserved normal heart function. In the context of preserved heart function, CMs lacking JPH2 developed T-tubules that were nearly morphologically normal, indicating that JPH2 does not have a major, cell-autonomous role in T-tubule maturation. However, in hearts with severe dysfunction, both AAV-transduced and non-transduced CMs exhibited T-tubule disruption, which was more severe in the transduced subset. These data indicate that cardiac dysfunction disrupts T-tubule structure, and that JPH2 protects T-tubules in this context. We then used CASAAV to screen 8 additional genes for required, cell-autonomous roles in T-tubule formation. We identified ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) as a novel, cell-autonomously required T-tubule maturation factor. Conclusions: CASAAV is a powerful tool to study cell-autonomous gene functions. Genetic mosaics are invaluable to accurately define cell-autonomous gene function. JPH2

  16. Coherence motion perception in developmental dyslexia: a meta-analysis of behavioral studies.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Mariagrazia; Simonelli, Letizia; Giovagnoli, Sara; Bolzani, Roberto

    2010-11-01

    The magnitude of the association between developmental dyslexia (DD) and motion sensitivity is evaluated in 35 studies, which investigated coherence motion perception in DD. A first analysis is conducted on the differences between DD groups and age-matched control (C) groups. In a second analysis, the relationship between motion coherence threshold and reading ability is considered. Globally, the mean effect size (ES) is moderate (d = 0.675, 2334 subjects) with a large value (d = 0.747) for the between-groups differences in motion perception and a smaller mean ES (d = 0.178) for the correlational studies. The influence on ES of the stimuli parameters and subjects age is analyzed. The number of dots, the age of the subjects, and the type of analysis (i.e. between-group or correlational) are significantly related to the ES. Looking at the ES values, a smaller number of dots constituting the stimuli are associated with larger ES and, interestingly, the children studies are associated with lower ES in comparison with the researches evaluating adults. The large ES value supports the importance of studying motion perception deficits in DD groups, consistently with the claim that dorsal impairment/noise-exclusion deficit could be one of the risk factor of reading difficulties.

  17. Robust object tracking techniques for vision-based 3D motion analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, Vladimir A.; Zheltov, Sergey Y.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.

    2016-04-01

    Automated and accurate spatial motion capturing of an object is necessary for a wide variety of applications including industry and science, virtual reality and movie, medicine and sports. For the most part of applications a reliability and an accuracy of the data obtained as well as convenience for a user are the main characteristics defining the quality of the motion capture system. Among the existing systems for 3D data acquisition, based on different physical principles (accelerometry, magnetometry, time-of-flight, vision-based), optical motion capture systems have a set of advantages such as high speed of acquisition, potential for high accuracy and automation based on advanced image processing algorithms. For vision-based motion capture accurate and robust object features detecting and tracking through the video sequence are the key elements along with a level of automation of capturing process. So for providing high accuracy of obtained spatial data the developed vision-based motion capture system "Mosca" is based on photogrammetric principles of 3D measurements and supports high speed image acquisition in synchronized mode. It includes from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for capturing video sequences of object motion. The original camera calibration and external orientation procedures provide the basis for high accuracy of 3D measurements. A set of algorithms as for detecting, identifying and tracking of similar targets, so for marker-less object motion capture is developed and tested. The results of algorithms' evaluation show high robustness and high reliability for various motion analysis tasks in technical and biomechanics applications.

  18. High-Speed Video Analysis of Damped Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poonyawatpornkul, J.; Wattanakasiwich, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we acquire and analyse high-speed videos of a spring-mass system oscillating in glycerin at different temperatures. Three cases of damped harmonic oscillation are investigated and analysed by using high-speed video at a rate of 120 frames s[superscript -1] and Tracker Video Analysis (Tracker) software. We present empirical data for…

  19. Analysis of means of improving the uncontrolled lateral motions of personal airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, Marion O , Jr

    1951-01-01

    A theoretical analysis has been made of means of improving the uncontrolled motions of personal airplanes. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether such airplanes could be made to fly uncontrolled for an indefinite period of time without getting into dangerous attitudes and for a reasonable period of time (1 to 3 min) without deviating excessively from their original course. The results of this analysis indicated that the uncontrolled motions of a personal airplane could be made safe as regards spiral tendencies and could be greatly improved as regards maintenance of course without resort to an autopilot. The only way to make the uncontrolled motions completely satisfactory as regards continuous maintenance of course, however, is to use a conventional type of autopilot.

  20. A realistic computed tomography simulator for small motion analysis of cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Shima; Zouaoui, Karim; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a realistic simulator for the Computed Tomography (CT) scan process for motion analysis. In fact, we are currently developing a new framework to find small motion from the CT scan. In order to prove the fidelity of this framework, or potentially any other algorithm, we present in this paper a simulator to simulate the whole CT acquisition process with a priori known parameters. In other words, it is a digital phantom for the motion analysis that can be used to compare the results of any related algorithm with the ground-truth realistic analytical model. Such a simulator can be used by the community to test different algorithms in the biomedical imaging domain. The most important features of this simulator are its different considerations to simulate the best the real acquisition process and its generality.

  1. Discomfort Evaluation of Truck Ingress/Egress Motions Based on Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nam-Chul; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a quantitative discomfort evaluation method based on biomechanical analysis results for human body movement, as well as its application to an assessment of the discomfort for truck ingress and egress. In this study, the motions of a human subject entering and exiting truck cabins with different types, numbers, and heights of footsteps were first measured using an optical motion capture system and load sensors. Next, the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) ratios of the muscles were calculated through a biomechanical analysis of the musculoskeletal human model for the captured motion. Finally, the objective discomfort was evaluated using the proposed discomfort model based on the MVC ratios. To validate this new discomfort assessment method, human subject experiments were performed to investigate the subjective discomfort levels through a questionnaire for comparison with the objective discomfort levels. The validation results showed that the correlation between the objective and subjective discomforts was significant and could be described by a linear regression model. PMID:26067194

  2. Development of walking analysis system consisting of mobile force plate and motion sensor.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Wataru; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Aikawa, Masataka; Shiojima, Kouzou; Tsuchiya, Youtaro; Inoue, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    In walking analysis, which is one useful method for efficient physical rehabilitation, the ground reaction force, the center of pressure, and the body orientation data are measured during walking. In the past, these data were measured by a 3D motion analysis system consisting of high-speed cameras and force plates, which must be installed in the floor. However, a conventional 3D motion analysis system can measure the ground reaction force and the center of pressure just on force plates during a few steps. In addition, the subjects' stride lengths are limited because they have to walk on the center of the force plate. These problems can be resolved by converting conventional devices into wearable devices. We used a measuring device consisting of portable force plates and motion sensors. We developed a walking analysis system that calculates the ground reaction force, the center of pressure, and the body orientations and measured a walking subject to estimate this system. We simultaneously used a conventional 3D motion analysis system to compare with our development system and showed its validity for measurements of ground reaction force and the center of pressure.

  3. AN E-TEXTILE SYSTEM FOR MOTION ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    EDMISON, Josh; JONES, Mark; LOCKHART, Thurmon; MARTIN, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Electronic textiles (e-textiles) offer the promise of home health care devices that integrate seamlessly into the wearer’s everyday lifestyle while providing a higher level of functionality than current devices. Existing gait analysis systems are cumbersome laboratory-based systems that, while providing valuable information, would be difficult or impossible to deploy in the home. Yet gait analysis systems offer the promise of preventing and/or mitigating the serious effects of falls in the elderly population. This paper proposes an e-textile solution to this problem along with a design approach for realizing a solution that is inexpensive and usable across the elderly population. Preliminary results are given to demonstrate the promise of the proposed system. PMID:15718659

  4. Wearable inertial sensors in swimming motion analysis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    de Magalhaes, Fabricio Anicio; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Gatta, Giorgio; Fantozzi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The use of contemporary technology is widely recognised as a key tool for enhancing competitive performance in swimming. Video analysis is traditionally used by coaches to acquire reliable biomechanical data about swimming performance; however, this approach requires a huge computational effort, thus introducing a delay in providing quantitative information. Inertial and magnetic sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetometers, have been recently introduced to assess the biomechanics of swimming performance. Research in this field has attracted a great deal of interest in the last decade due to the gradual improvement of the performance of sensors and the decreasing cost of miniaturised wearable devices. With the aim of describing the state of the art of current developments in this area, a systematic review of the existing methods was performed using the following databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, IEEE Xplore, Google Scholar, Scopus and Science Direct. Twenty-seven articles published in indexed journals and conference proceedings, focusing on the biomechanical analysis of swimming by means of inertial sensors were reviewed. The articles were categorised according to sensor's specification, anatomical sites where the sensors were attached, experimental design and applications for the analysis of swimming performance. Results indicate that inertial sensors are reliable tools for swimming biomechanical analyses.

  5. Transcriptome and Metabolite analysis reveal candidate genes of the cardiac glycoside biosynthetic pathway from Calotropis procera

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Akansha; Swarnkar, Vishakha; Pandey, Tushar; Srivastava, Piush; Kanojiya, Sanjeev; Mishra, Dipak Kumar; Tripathi, Vineeta

    2016-01-01

    Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant of immense importance due to its pharmaceutical active components, especially cardiac glycosides (CG). As genomic resources for this plant are limited, the genes involved in CG biosynthetic pathway remain largely unknown till date. Our study on stage and tissue specific metabolite accumulation showed that CG’s were maximally accumulated in stems of 3 month old seedlings. De novo transcriptome sequencing of same was done using high throughput Illumina HiSeq platform generating 44074 unigenes with average mean length of 1785 base pair. Around 66.6% of unigenes were annotated by using various public databases and 5324 unigenes showed significant match in the KEGG database involved in 133 different pathways of plant metabolism. Further KEGG analysis resulted in identification of 336 unigenes involved in cardenolide biosynthesis. Tissue specific expression analysis of 30 putative transcripts involved in terpenoid, steroid and cardenolide pathways showed a positive correlation between metabolite and transcript accumulation. Wound stress elevated CG levels as well the levels of the putative transcripts involved in its biosynthetic pathways. This result further validated the involvement of identified transcripts in CGs biosynthesis. The identified transcripts will lay a substantial foundation for further research on metabolic engineering and regulation of cardiac glycosides biosynthesis pathway genes. PMID:27703261

  6. Integrated glycoprotein immobilization method for glycopeptide and glycan analysis of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Mishra, Sumita; Chen, Lijun; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chan, Daniel W; Chatterjee, Subroto; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-06

    Post-translational modifications of proteins can have a major role in disease initiation and progression. Incredible efforts have recently been made to study the regulation of glycoproteins for disease prognosis and diagnosis. It is essential to elucidate glycans and intact glycoproteins to understand the role of glycosylation in diseases. Sialylated N-glycans play crucial roles in physiological and pathological processes; however, it is laborious to study sialylated glycoproteins due to the labile nature of sialic acid residues. In this study, an integrated platform is developed for the analysis of intact glycoproteins and glycans using a chemoenzymatic approach for immobilization and derivatization of sialic acids. N-Glycans, deglycosylated proteins, and intact glycoproteins from heart tissues of wild type (WT) and transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse models were analyzed. We identified 291 unique glycopeptides from 195 glycoproteins; the comparative studies between WT and TAC mice indicate the overexpression of extracellular proteins for heart matrix remodeling and the down-regulation of proteins associated with energy metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. The integrated platform is a powerful tool for the analysis of glycans and glycoproteins in the discovery of potential cardiac hypertrophy biomarkers.

  7. The adaptation of GDL motion recognition system to sport and rehabilitation techniques analysis.

    PubMed

    Hachaj, Tomasz; Ogiela, Marek R

    2016-06-01

    The main novelty of this paper is presenting the adaptation of Gesture Description Language (GDL) methodology to sport and rehabilitation data analysis and classification. In this paper we showed that Lua language can be successfully used for adaptation of the GDL classifier to those tasks. The newly applied scripting language allows easily extension and integration of classifier with other software technologies and applications. The obtained execution speed allows using the methodology in the real-time motion capture data processing where capturing frequency differs from 100 Hz to even 500 Hz depending on number of features or classes to be calculated and recognized. Due to this fact the proposed methodology can be used to the high-end motion capture system. We anticipate that using novel, efficient and effective method will highly help both sport trainers and physiotherapist in they practice. The proposed approach can be directly applied to motion capture data kinematics analysis (evaluation of motion without regard to the forces that cause that motion). The ability to apply pattern recognition methods for GDL description can be utilized in virtual reality environment and used for sport training or rehabilitation treatment.

  8. Robust motion tracking based on adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis of OCT signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuewen; Wang, Yahui; Akansu, Ali; Belfield, Kevin D; Hubbi, Basil; Liu, Xuan

    2015-11-01

    Speckle decorrelation analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal has been used in motion tracking. In our previous study, we demonstrated that cross-correlation coefficient (XCC) between Ascans had an explicit functional dependency on the magnitude of lateral displacement (δx). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of speckle motion tracking using the derivative of function XCC(δx) on variable δx. We demonstrated the magnitude of the derivative can be maximized. In other words, the sensitivity of OCT speckle tracking can be optimized by using signals with appropriate amount of decorrelation for XCC calculation. Based on this finding, we developed an adaptive speckle decorrelation analysis strategy to achieve motion tracking with optimized sensitivity. Briefly, we used subsequently acquired Ascans and Ascans obtained with larger time intervals to obtain multiple values of XCC and chose the XCC value that maximized motion tracking sensitivity for displacement calculation. Instantaneous motion speed can be calculated by dividing the obtained displacement with time interval between Ascans involved in XCC calculation. We implemented the above-described algorithm in real-time using graphic processing unit (GPU) and demonstrated its effectiveness in reconstructing distortion-free OCT images using data obtained from a manually scanned OCT probe. The adaptive speckle tracking method was validated in manually scanned OCT imaging, on phantom as well as in vivo skin tissue.

  9. ANALYSIS OF THE MOTION OF AN EXTRASOLAR PLANET IN A BINARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Plávalová, Eva; Solovaya, Nina A. E-mail: solov@sai.msu.ru

    2013-11-01

    More than 10% of extra-solar planets (EPs) orbit in a binary or multiple stellar system. We investigated the motion of planets revolving in binary systems in the case of the three-body problem. We carried out an analysis of the motion of an EP revolving in a binary system with the following conditions: (1) a planet in a binary system revolves around one of the components (parent star); (2) the distance between the star's components is greater than that between the parent star and the orbiting planet (ratio of the semi-major axes is a small parameter); and (3) the mass of the planet is smaller than the mass of the stars, but is not negligible. The Hamiltonian of the system without short periodic terms was used. We expanded the Hamiltonian in terms of the Legendre polynomial and truncated after the second-order term, depending on only one angular variable. In this case, the solution of the system was obtained and the qualitative analysis of the motion was produced. We have applied this theory to real EPs and compared to the numerical integration. Analyses of the possible regions of motion are presented. It is shown that stable and unstable motions of EPs are possible. We applied our calculations to two binary systems hosting an EP and calculated the possible values for their unknown orbital elements.

  10. Contextual variables and time-motion analysis in soccer.

    PubMed

    Castellano, J; Blanco-Villaseñor, A; Alvarez, D

    2011-06-01

    Using a multi-camera computerised tracking system the present study aimed to provide a detailed analysis of the work-rate profile of a team of elite soccer players during official matches of the Spanish Premier League. Observation-based performance measures were obtained from 434 individual samples. 6 physical parameters involving the distance covered by players were analysed: standing intensity (0-11 km·h (-1)), low-intensity running (11.1-14 km·h (-1)), moderate-intensity running (14.1-17 km·h (-1)), high-intensity running (17.1-21 km·h (-1)), very high-intensity running (21.1-24 km·h (-1)) and sprinting (>24 km·h (-1)). These intensity thresholds were considered with respect to 4 contextual variables: MATCH STATUS, MATCH LOCATION, OPPONENT LEVEL and MATCH HALF, which were analysed in relation to the EFFECTIVE PLAYING TIME. A descriptive analysis and a multivariate mixed model were employed for the analysis of change processes in soccer. The distance total covered (m) by players at different work intensities during the EFFECTIVE PLAYING TIME was greater when playing at HOME (3 931 vs. 3 887 AWAY), when the reference team was LOSING (3 975 vs. 3 837 DRAWING and 3 921 WINNING) and when the level of the opposing team was HIGHER (4 032 vs. 3 938 MEDIUM and 3 736 BOTTOM). By contrast, their physical performance decreased during the 2NDHALF of matches (3 822 vs. 3 985 1ST HALF).

  11. An analysis of implantable cardiac device reliability. The case for improved postmarketing risk assessment and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Laskey, Warren; Awad, Khaled; Lum, Jeremy; Skodacek, Ken; Zimmerman, Barbara; Selzman, Kimberly; Zuckerman, Bram

    2012-07-01

    Implantable cardiac devices have become the mainstay of the treatment of patients with heart disease. However, data regarding their reliability and, inferentially, safety have been called into question. We reviewed annual reports submitted to the Food and Drug Administration Office of Device Evaluation by device manufacturers from 2003 to 2007. The annual number of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) implants, explants, and returned devices were tabulated along with the cumulative (Cum) number of implants for each device. We derived an annual explantation rate (AER) defined as the ratio of the annual number of explants less the number of normal battery depletions/Cum (×1000). From 2003 to 2007, 256,392 CRT-D and 459,300 ICD devices were implanted in the United States. The overall mean (±SD) AERs for ICD and CRT-D devices were, respectively, 49.5 (15.6) per 1000 ICD devices and 82.6 (35.5) per 1000 CRT-D devices. The AER for each device type significantly decreased over the study period (P for trend <0.001) although the AER for CRT-D devices was 38% higher than that for ICD devices (P < 0.001). On average, 20.3% of CRT-D devices and 22.6% of ICD devices were returned to the manufacturer for analysis after explantation. The rates of explanted CRT-D and ICD devices decreased from 2003 to 2007. Notwithstanding this favorable trend, the AER for CRT-D devices was higher than that for ICD devices. Improved methods for tracking individual device histories are needed for more precise estimates of the risk of device explantation for suspected malfunction. The proportion of devices returned to the manufacturer is suboptimal and needs to be improved to better understand the mechanisms of device malfunction.

  12. Cultural meanings of nature: an analysis of contemporary motion pictures.

    PubMed

    Pollio, Howard R; Anderson, John; Levasseur, Priscilla; Thweatt, Michael

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate current cultural meanings of nature, the authors asked 65 undergraduate students to "list 3 movies in which nature was an important aspect of the film." They also were asked to specify the natural element that stood out to them and describe "how it related to the overall theme of the movie." Two independent groups of raters skilled in interpretive analysis developed thematic meanings from these responses. Following this, in a 2nd study, a different group of participants rated the 18 most frequently mentioned natural elements on thematic scales derived from the initial interpretive analysis. Participants in the 1st study mentioned 33 different movies at least twice and 5 themes that captured the meaning of nature in these films. Correlational results derived from the 2nd study indicated that rating scales reflecting these 5 themes formed 2 distinct groups; the first group described settings in which nature is experienced as adversarial and plays a significant role in dramatic action, and the second group defined settings in which nature is viewed either as a place of refuge or simply as a locale in which ongoing narrative action occurs. The general conclusion reached in both studies concerns the often noted but not always appreciated fact that movies--similar to everyday events and actions--always take place in specific settings and that neither life events nor dramatic narratives can be understood apart from specific settings.

  13. Applying a Resources Framework to Analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Trevor I.; Wittman, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    We suggest one redefinition of common clusters of questions used to analyze student responses on the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation. Our goal is to propose a methodology that moves beyond an analysis of student learning defined by correct responses, either on the overall test or on clusters of questions defined solely by content. We use…

  14. Safety analysis forseismic motion of control rods accounting for rod misalignment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmin, W.L.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of three safety analyses performed by the SRL Safety Analysis Group (SAG) to assess the safety impact of control rod motion induced by a Design Basis Earthquake (DBE).

  15. SMART USE OF COMPUTER-AIDED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA) TO CHARACTERIZE SPERM MOTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) has evolved over the past fifteen years to provide an objective, practical means of measuring and characterizing the velocity and parttern of sperm motion. CASA instruments use video frame-grabber boards to capture multiple images of spermato...

  16. Cabergoline therapy and the risk of cardiac valve regurgitation in patients with hyperprolactinemia: a meta-analysis from clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Bogazzi, F; Manetti, L; Raffaelli, V; Lombardi, M; Rossi, G; Martino, E

    2008-12-01

    Dopamine agonists have been associated with increased risk of cardiac valve regurgitation in patients with Parkinson's disease. Whether these drugs might be harmful for patients with hyperprolactinemia is still unsettled. Occasional case reports and 7 studies on the relationship between cabergoline and cardiac valve regurgitation have been published so far. Overall, cabergoline has been considered a safe therapy, although some studies suggested an increased prevalence of cardiac valve regurgitation. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the effects of cabergoline on cardiac valve regurgitation. Eligible studies were all trials using cabergoline in patients with either tumor or non-tumor hyperprolactinemia. Our search was updated to October 2008. Pooled data from the 6 selected studies showed that treatment with cabergoline was associated with increased risk of tricuspid valve regurgitation (fixed effects: prevalence ratio=1.40; 95% confidence interval: 1.17-1.67); on the contrary, patients treated with cabergoline and control subjects did not differ in prevalence of aortic or mitral valve regurgitation. This meta-analysis shows that patients with hyperprolactinemia treated with cabergoline are at increased risk of regurgitation of the tricuspid valve. However, regurgitation was only an echocardiographic finding since no patient had symptoms of valvular disease. This meta-analysis underscores that echocardiography is recommended in all patients with hyperprolactinemia who are candidate to be treated with or are under cabergoline therapy; monitoring cardiac valves is also recommended although precise follow- up for these patients will be likely provided by future longitudinal studies.

  17. Time-correlation analysis of simulated water motion in flexible and rigid gramicidin channels.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, S W; Jakobsson, E; Subramaniam, S; McCammon, J A

    1991-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been done on a system consisting of the polypeptide membrane channel former gramicidin, plus water molecules in the channel and caps of waters at the two ends of the channel. In the absence of explicit simulation of the surrounding membrane, the helical form of the channel was maintained by artificial restraints on the peptide motion. The characteristic time constant of the artificial restraint was varied to assess the effect of the restraints on the channel structure and water motions. Time-correlation analysis was done on the motions of individual channel waters and on the motions of the center of mass of the channel waters. It is found that individual water molecules confined in the channel execute higher frequency motions than bulk water, for all degrees of channel peptide restraint. The center-of-mass motion of the chain of channel waters (which is the motion that is critical for transmembrane transport, due to the mandatory single filing of water in the channel) does not exhibit these higher frequency motions. The mobility of the water chain is dramatically reduced by holding the channel rigid. Thus permeation through the channel is not like flow through a rigid pipe; rather permeation is facilitated by peptide motion. For the looser restraints we used, the mobility of the water chain was not very much affected by the degree of restraint. Depending on which set of experiments is considered, the computed mobility of our water chain in the flexible channel is four to twenty times too high to account for the experimentally measured resistance of the gramicidin channel to water flow. From this result it appears likely that the peptide motions of an actual gramicidin channel embedded in a lipid membrane may be more restrained than in our flexible channel model, and that these restraints may be a significant modulator of channel permeability. For the completely rigid channel model the "trapping" of the water molecules in

  18. The Accuracy of Screw Axis Analysis Using Position Data from Anatomical Motion Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-05

    Hip Motion ........ . 57 7-2 Screw Axis Analysis for the Sacro -iliac Joint. 57 viii " LIST OF FIGURES Figure Title Page 2-1 Systems Anthropometry Data...analyzed are the hip, and the sacro -iliac joint. The bone movements analyzed are the femur moving relative to the left inominate for hip motion, and the...sacrum moving relative to the inominate for the sacro -iliac joint. The cadaver used was a Caucasian male who was 80 years old. The primary cause of

  19. Piping benchmark problems. Volume 1. Dynamic analysis uniform support motion response spectrum method

    SciTech Connect

    Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.; Reich, M.

    1980-08-01

    A set of benchmark problems and solutions have been developed for verifying the adequacy of computer programs used for dynamic analysis and design of nuclear piping systems by the Response Spectrum Method. The problems range from simple to complex configurations which are assumed to experience linear elastic behavior. The dynamic loading is represented by uniform support motion, assumed to be induced by seismic excitation in three spatial directions. The solutions consist of frequencies, participation factors, nodal displacement components and internal force and moment components. Solutions to associated anchor point motion static problems are not included.

  20. SinoCor: motion correction in SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Debasis; Eiland, Daniel; Abdallah, Mahmoud; Bouthcko, Rostyslav; Gullberg, Grant T.; Schechtmann, Norberto

    2012-02-01

    Motion is a serious artifact in Cardiac nuclear imaging because the scanning operation takes a long time. Since reconstruction algorithms assume consistent or stationary data the quality of resulting image is affected by motion, sometimes significantly. Even after adoption of the gold standard MoCo(R) algorithm from Cedars-Sinai by most vendors, heart motion remains a significant challenge. Also, any serious study in quantitative analysis necessitates correction for motion artifacts. It is generally recognized that human eye is a very sensitive tool for detecting motion. However, two reasons prevent such manual correction: (1) it is costly in terms of specialist's time, and (2) no such tool for manual correction is available currently. Previously, at SPIE-MIC'11, we presented a simple tool (SinoCor) that allows sinograms to be corrected manually or automatically. SinoCor performs correction of sinograms containing inter-frame patient or respiratory motions using rigid-body dynamics. The software is capable of detecting the patient motion and estimating the body-motion vector using scanning geometry parameters. SinoCor applies appropriate geometrical correction to all the frames subsequent to the frame when the movement has occurred in a manual or automated mode. For respiratory motion, it is capable of automatically smoothing small oscillatory (frame-wise local) movements. Lower order image moments are used to represent a frame and the required rigid body movement compensation is computed accordingly. Our current focus is on enhancement of SinoCor with the capability to automatically detect and compensate for intra-frame motion that causes motion blur on the respective frame. Intra-frame movements are expected in both patient and respiratory motions. For a controlled study we also have developed a motion simulator. A stable version of SinoCor is available under license from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  1. Combined survival analysis of cardiac patients by a Cox PH model and a Markov chain.

    PubMed

    Shauly, Michal; Rabinowitz, Gad; Gilutz, Harel; Parmet, Yisrael

    2011-10-01

    The control and treatment of dyslipidemia is a major public health challenge, particularly for patients with coronary heart diseases. In this paper we propose a framework for survival analysis of patients who had a major cardiac event, focusing on assessment of the effect of changing LDL-cholesterol level and statins consumption on survival. This framework includes a Cox PH model and a Markov chain, and combines their results into reinforced conclusions regarding the factors that affect survival time. We prospectively studied 2,277 cardiac patients, and the results show high congruence between the Markov model and the PH model; both evidence that diabetes, history of stroke, peripheral vascular disease and smoking significantly increase hazard rate and reduce survival time. On the other hand, statin consumption is correlated with a lower hazard rate and longer survival time in both models. The role of such a framework in understanding the therapeutic behavior of patients and implementing effective secondary and primary prevention of heart diseases is discussed here.

  2. Segmented independent component analysis for improved separation of fetal cardiac signals from nonstationary fetal magnetocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Murta, Luiz O.; Guzo, Mauro G.; Moraes, Eder R.; Baffa, Oswaldo; Wakai, Ronald T.; Comani, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetocardiograms (fMCGs) have been successfully processed with independent component analysis (ICA) to separate the fetal cardiac signals, but ICA effectiveness can be limited by signal nonstation-arities due to fetal movements. We propose an ICA-based method to improve the quality of fetal signals separated from fMCG affected by fetal movements. This technique (SegICA) includes a procedure to detect signal nonstationarities, according to which the fMCG recordings are divided in stationary segments that are then processed with ICA. The first and second statistical moments and the signal polarity reversal were used at different threshold levels to detect signal transients. SegICA effectiveness was assessed in two fMCG datasets (with and without fetal movements) by comparing the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the signals extracted with ICA and with SegICA. Results showed that the SNR of fetal signals affected by fetal movements improved with SegICA, whereas the SNR gain was negligible elsewhere. The best measure to detect signal nonstationarities of physiological origin was signal polarity reversal at threshold level 0.9. The first statistical moment also provided good results at threshold level 0.6. SegICA seems a promising method to separate fetal cardiac signals of improved quality from nonstationary fMCG recordings affected by fetal movements. PMID:25781658

  3. A time motion analysis of bouldering style competitive rock climbing.

    PubMed

    White, Dominic J; Olsen, Peter D

    2010-05-01

    Limited research has been performed on competitive bouldering. The aim of this study was to quantify the movement dynamics of elite boulder climbers. Six climbers were filmed during a national competition consisting of 5 novel climbing problems or routes. Two problems were randomly selected and film footage was analyzed using Kandle Swinger Pro software to determine type and duration (seconds) of bouldering movements. All subjects provided consent, and the study had ethical approval. The mean +/- SD were determined for number of attempts per problem, duration of attempt, time on hold, and time to reach between holds. Exercise:recovery ratios were also calculated. On average, climbers attempted a problem 3.0 +/- 0.5 times, with an attempt lasting 28.9 +/- 10.8 seconds and rest periods of 114 +/- 31 seconds between attempts. Average time gripping holds was 7.9 +/- 1.3 seconds, with approximately 0.5 +/- 0.1 seconds recovery between reaching for holds. The exercise-to-recovery ratio was approximately 1:4 for attempting a problem and approximately 13:1 for forearm muscles during climbing. The exercise-to-recovery ratios allow sufficient time for recovery during and after a problem. However, the prolonged contraction of forearm muscles indicates the importance of strength and endurance in these muscles. Video analysis was found to be a useful tool for the quantification of movement characteristics of competitive elite boulders. Data collected could be utilized in the design of sport-specific tests and training programs. Future research could examine a larger number of athletes and problems and help develop performance tests and training interventions for bouldering.

  4. Analysis of intracranial aneurysm wall motion and its effects on hemodynamic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubel, Estanislao; De Craene, Mathieu; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2007-03-01

    Hemodynamics, and in particular Wall Shear Stress (WSS), is thought to play a critical role in the progression and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Wall motion is related to local biomechanical properties of the aneurysm, which in turn are associated with the amount of damage undergone by the tissue. The underlying hypothesis in this work is that injured regions show differential motion with respect to normal ones, allowing a connection between local wall biomechanics and a potential mechanism of wall injury such as elevated WSS. In a previous work, a novel method was presented combining wall motion estimation using image registration techniques with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations in order to provide realistic intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. It was shown that, when compared to compliant vessels, rigid models tend to overestimate WSS and produce smaller areas of elevated WSS and force concentration, being the observed differences related to the magnitude of the displacements. This work aims to further study the relationships between wall motion, flow patterns and risk of rupture in aneurysms. To this end, four studies containing both 3DRA and DSA studies were analyzed, and an improved version of the method developed previously was applied to cases showing wall motion. A quantification and analysis of the displacement fields and their relationships to flow patterns are presented. This relationship may play an important role in understanding interaction mechanisms between hemodynamics, wall biomechanics, and the effect on aneurysm evolution mechanisms.

  5. Reliability and Validity of Quantitative Video Analysis of Baseball Pitching Motion.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Sakiko; Sosa, Araceli; Campbell, Rebekah; Correa, Alexandra

    2017-02-01

    Video recordings are used to quantitatively analyze pitchers' techniques. However, reliability and validity of such analysis is unknown. The purpose of the study was to investigate the reliability and validity of joint and segment angles identified during a pitching motion using video analysis. Thirty high school baseball pitchers participated. The pitching motion was captured using 2 high-speed video cameras and a motion capture system. Two raters reviewed the videos to digitize the body segments to calculate 2-dimensional angles. The corresponding 3-dimensional angles were calculated from the motion capture data. Intrarater reliability, interrater reliability, and validity of the 2-dimensional angles were determined. The intrarater and interrater reliability of the 2-dimensional angles were high for most variables. The trunk contralateral flexion at maximum external rotation was the only variable with high validity. Trunk contralateral flexion at ball release, trunk forward flexion at foot contact and ball release, shoulder elevation angle at foot contact, and maximum shoulder external rotation had moderate validity. Two-dimensional angles at the shoulder, elbow, and trunk could be measured with high reliability. However, the angles are not necessarily anatomically correct, and thus use of quantitative video analysis should be limited to angles that can be measured with good validity.

  6. Advances in cardiac processing software.

    PubMed

    Gordon DePuey, Ernest

    2014-07-01

    New software methods that incorporate iterative reconstruction, resolution recovery, and noise compensation now provide the ability to maintain or improve myocardial perfusion SPECT image quality with conventional sodium iodide cameras. Despite lower image counting statistics associated with significantly decreased injected radiopharmaceutical doses or shortened acquisition times or both, image quality is preserved or even improved compared with conventional processing methods. The ability to prescribe a desired myocardial count density by preselecting a SPECT acquisition time now avoids additional patient radiation exposure associated with "weight-based" dosing. More recent advancements, including temporal correlation among the gated perfusion frames and higher resolution SPECT acquisitions, hold promise to further improve image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Phase analysis of gated perfusion SPECT provides the ability to assess cardiac dyssynchrony and to select those patients who will most benefit from resynchronization therapy. In combination with the higher counting statistics afforded by the new solid-state dedicated cardiac cameras, these software advancements allow for even further decreased patient radiation doses or acquisition times or both. List-mode software allows for refinement of myocardial perfusion SPECT by interrogating particular data from selected cardiac cycles. Rejection of frames degraded by arrhythmic cardiac cycles or excessive extracardiac uptake can be excluded for reconstruction. Respiratory gating, which diminishes cardiac motion and potentially decreases diaphragmatic attenuation, has been demonstrated to improve diagnostic specificity. With high-count first-pass list-mode acquisitions at rest and during pharmacologic vasodilatation, it may be possible to measure global and regional myocardial perfusion reserve to more accurately diagnose coronary artery disease and avoid false-negative studies owing to balanced ischemia.

  7. Dimensionality of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in cardiac patients: comparison of Mokken scale analysis and factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Emons, Wilco H M; Sijtsma, Klaas; Pedersen, Susanne S

    2012-09-01

    The hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) measures anxiety and depressive symptoms and is widely used in clinical and nonclinical populations. However, there is some debate about the number of dimensions represented by the HADS. In a sample of 534 Dutch cardiac patients, this study examined (a) the dimensionality of the HADS using Mokken scale analysis and factor analysis and (b) the scale properties of the HADS. Mokken scale analysis and factor analysis suggested that three dimensions adequately capture the structure of the HADS. Of the three corresponding scales, two scales of five items each were found to be structurally sound and reliable. These scales covered the two key attributes of anxiety and (anhedonic) depression. The findings suggest that the HADS may be reduced to a 10-item questionnaire comprising two 5-item scales measuring anxiety and depressive symptoms.

  8. Analysis of Tubular Membrane Networks in Cardiac Myocytes from Atria and Ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Tobias; Lehnart, Stephan E.

    2014-01-01

    In cardiac myocytes a complex network of membrane tubules - the transverse-axial tubule system (TATS) - controls deep intracellular signaling functions. While the outer surface membrane and associated TATS membrane components appear to be continuous, there are substantial differences in lipid and protein content. In ventricular myocytes (VMs), certain TATS components are highly abundant contributing to rectilinear tubule networks and regular branching 3D architectures. It is thought that peripheral TATS components propagate action potentials from the cell surface to thousands of remote intracellular sarcoendoplasmic reticulum (SER) membrane contact domains, thereby activating intracellular Ca2+ release units (CRUs). In contrast to VMs, the organization and functional role of TATS membranes in atrial myocytes (AMs) is significantly different and much less understood. Taken together, quantitative structural characterization of TATS membrane networks in healthy and diseased myocytes is an essential prerequisite towards better understanding of functional plasticity and pathophysiological reorganization. Here, we present a strategic combination of protocols for direct quantitative analysis of TATS membrane networks in living VMs and AMs. For this, we accompany primary cell isolations of mouse VMs and/or AMs with critical quality control steps and direct membrane staining protocols for fluorescence imaging of TATS membranes. Using an optimized workflow for confocal or superresolution TATS image processing, binarized and skeletonized data are generated for quantitative analysis of the TATS network and its components. Unlike previously published indirect regional aggregate image analysis strategies, our protocols enable direct characterization of specific components and derive complex physiological properties of TATS membrane networks in living myocytes with high throughput and open access software tools. In summary, the combined protocol strategy can be readily applied

  9. ΔΔPT: a comprehensive toolbox for the analysis of protein motion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Normal Mode Analysis is one of the most successful techniques for studying motions in proteins and macromolecules. It can provide information on the mechanism of protein functions, used to aid crystallography and NMR data reconstruction, and calculate protein free energies. Results ΔΔPT is a toolbox allowing calculation of elastic network models and principle component analysis. It allows the analysis of pdb files or trajectories taken from; Gromacs, Amber, and DL_POLY. As well as calculation of the normal modes it also allows comparison of the modes with experimental protein motion, variation of modes with mutation or ligand binding, and calculation of molecular dynamic entropies. Conclusions This toolbox makes the respective tools available to a wide community of potential NMA users, and allows them unrivalled ability to analyse normal modes using a variety of techniques and current software. PMID:23758746

  10. Earth orientation from lunar laser ranging and an error analysis of polar motion services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. O.; Newhall, X. X.; Williams, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Lunar laser ranging (LLR) data are obtained on the basis of the timing of laser pulses travelling from observatories on earth to retroreflectors placed on the moon's surface during the Apollo program. The modeling and analysis of the LLR data can provide valuable insights into earth's dynamics. The feasibility to model accurately the lunar orbit over the full 13-year observation span makes it possible to conduct relatively long-term studies of variations in the earth's rotation. A description is provided of general analysis techniques, and the calculation of universal time (UT1) from LLR is discussed. Attention is also given to a summary of intercomparisons with different techniques, polar motion results and intercomparisons, and a polar motion error analysis.

  11. Dynamic motion analysis of dart throwers motion visualized through computerized tomography and calculation of the axis of rotation.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, Y; Troupis, J M; Patel, M; Smith, J; Crossett, M

    2014-05-01

    We used a dynamic three-dimensional (3D) mapping method to model the wrist in dynamic unrestricted dart throwers motion in three men and four women. With the aid of precision landmark identification, a 3D coordinate system was applied to the distal radius and the movement of the carpus was described. Subsequently, with dynamic 3D reconstructions and freedom to position the camera viewpoint anywhere in space, we observed the motion pathways of all carpal bones in dart throwers motion and calculated its axis of rotation. This was calculated to lie in 27° of anteversion from the coronal plane and 44° of varus angulation relative to the transverse plane. This technique is a safe and a feasible carpal imaging method to gain key information for decision making in future hand surgical and rehabilitative practices.

  12. Statistical analysis of surrogate signals to incorporate respiratory motion variability into radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, Matthias; Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, René; Marx, Mirko; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory motion and its variability lead to location uncertainties in radiation therapy (RT) of thoracic and abdominal tumors. Current approaches for motion compensation in RT are usually driven by respiratory surrogate signals, e.g., spirometry. In this contribution, we present an approach for statistical analysis, modeling and subsequent simulation of surrogate signals on a cycle-by-cycle basis. The simulated signals represent typical patient-specific variations of, e.g., breathing amplitude and cycle period. For the underlying statistical analysis, all breathing cycles of an observed signal are consistently parameterized using approximating B-spline curves. Statistics on breathing cycles are then performed by using the parameters of the B-spline approximations. Assuming that these parameters follow a multivariate Gaussian distribution, realistic time-continuous surrogate signals of arbitrary length can be generated and used to simulate the internal motion of tumors and organs based on a patient-specific diffeomorphic correspondence model. As an example, we show how this approach can be employed in RT treatment planning to calculate tumor appearance probabilities and to statistically assess the impact of respiratory motion and its variability on planned dose distributions.

  13. Hilbert-Huang transform analysis of dynamic and earthquake motion recordings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, R.R.; Ma, S.; Safak, E.; Hartzell, S.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the rationale of Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) for analyzing dynamic and earthquake motion recordings in studies of seismology and engineering. In particular, this paper first provides the fundamentals of the HHT method, which consist of the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and the Hilbert spectral analysis. It then uses the HHT to analyze recordings of hypothetical and real wave motion, the results of which are compared with the results obtained by the Fourier data processing technique. The analysis of the two recordings indicates that the HHT method is able to extract some motion characteristics useful in studies of seismology and engineering, which might not be exposed effectively and efficiently by Fourier data processing technique. Specifically, the study indicates that the decomposed components in EMD of HHT, namely, the intrinsic mode function (IMF) components, contain observable, physical information inherent to the original data. It also shows that the grouped IMF components, namely, the EMD-based low- and high-frequency components, can faithfully capture low-frequency pulse-like as well as high-frequency wave signals. Finally, the study illustrates that the HHT-based Hilbert spectra are able to reveal the temporal-frequency energy distribution for motion recordings precisely and clearly.

  14. Multi-level model for 2D human motion analysis and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foures, Thomas; Joly, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the proposition of a model for human motion analysis in a video. Its main caracteristic is to adapt itself automatically to the current resolution, the actual quality of the picture, or the level of precision required by a given application, due to its possible decomposition into several hierarchical levels. The model is region-based to address some analysis processing needs. The top level of the model is only defined with 5 ribbons, which can be cut into sub-ribbons regarding to a given (or an expected) level of details. Matching process between model and current picture consists in the comparison of extracted subject shape with a graphical rendering of the model built on the base of some computed parameters. The comparison is processed by using a chamfer matching algorithm. In our developments, we intend to realize a platform of interaction between a dancer and tools synthetizing abstract motion pictures and music in the conditions of a real-time dialogue between a human and a computer. In consequence, we use this model in a perspective of motion description instead of motion recognition: no a priori gestures are supposed to be recognized as far as no a priori application is specially targeted. The resulting description will be made following a Description Scheme compliant with the movement notation called "Labanotation".

  15. SU-E-J-194: Continuous Patient Surface Monitoring and Motion Analysis During Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E; Rioux, A; Benedict, S; Yamamoto, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Continuous monitoring of the SBRT lung patient motion during delivery is critical for ensuring adequate target volume margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). This work assesses the deviation of the patient surface motion using a real-time surface tracking system throughout treatment delivery. Methods: Our SBRT protocol employs abdominal compression to reduce the diaphragm movement to within 1 cm, and this is confirmed daily with fluoroscopy. Most patients are prescribed 3–5 fractions, and on treatment day a repeat motion analysis with fluoroscopy is performed, followed by a kV CBCT is aligned with the original planning CT image for 3D setup confirmation. During this entire process a patient surface data restricted to whole chest or the sternum at the middle of the breathing cycle was captured using AlignRT optical surface tracking system and defined as a reference surface. For 10 patients, the deviation of the patient position from the reference surface was recorded during the SBRT delivery in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction at 3–6 measurements per second. Results: On average, the patient position deviated from the reference surface more than 4 mm, 3 mm and 2 mm in the AP direction for 0.95%, 3.7% and 11.1% of the total treatment time, respectively. Only one of the 10 patients showed that the maximum deviation of the patient surface during the SBRT delivery was greater than 1 cm. The average deviation of the patient surface from the reference surface during the SBRT delivery was not greater than 1.6 mm for any patient. Conclusion: This investigation indicates that AP motion can be significant even though the frequency is low. Continuous monitoring during SBRT has demonstrated value in monitoring patient motion ensuring that margins selected for SBRT are appropriate, and the use of non-ionizing and high-frequency imaging can provide useful indicators of motion during treatment.

  16. Electromagnetic interference of cardiac rhythmic monitoring devices to radio frequency identification: analytical analysis and mitigation methodology.

    PubMed

    Ogirala, Ajay; Stachel, Joshua R; Mickle, Marlin H

    2011-11-01

    Increasing density of wireless communication and development of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in particular have increased the susceptibility of patients equipped with cardiac rhythmic monitoring devices (CRMD) to environmental electro magnetic interference (EMI). Several organizations reported observing CRMD EMI from different sources. This paper focuses on mathematically analyzing the energy as perceived by the implanted device, i.e., voltage. Radio frequency (RF) energy transmitted by RFID interrogators is considered as an example. A simplified front-end equivalent circuit of a CRMD sensing circuitry is proposed for the analysis following extensive black-box testing of several commercial pacemakers and implantable defibrillators. After careful understanding of the mechanics of the CRMD signal processing in identifying the QRS complex of the heart-beat, a mitigation technique is proposed. The mitigation methodology introduced in this paper is logical in approach, simple to implement and is therefore applicable to all wireless communication protocols.

  17. Material modeling of cardiac valve tissue: Experiments, constitutive analysis and numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Heyden, Stefanie; Nagler, Andreas; Bertoglio, Cristóbal; Biehler, Jonas; Gee, Michael W; Wall, Wolfgang A; Ortiz, Michael

    2015-12-16

    A key element of the cardiac cycle of the human heart is the opening and closing of the four valves. However, the material properties of the leaflet tissues, which fundamentally contribute to determine the mechanical response of the valves, are still an open field of research. The main contribution of the present study is to provide a complete experimental data set for porcine heart valve samples spanning all valve and leaflet types under tensile loading. The tests show a fair degree of reproducibility and are clearly indicative of a number of fundamental tissue properties, including a progressively stiffening response with increasing elongation. We then propose a simple anisotropic constitutive model, which is fitted to the experimental data set, showing a reasonable interspecimen variability. Furthermore, we present a dynamic finite element analysis of the aortic valve to show the direct usability of the obtained material parameters in computational simulations.

  18. Depth information in natural environments derived from optic flow by insect motion detection system: a model analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwegmann, Alexander; Lindemann, Jens P; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the depth structure of the environment is crucial for moving animals in many behavioral contexts, such as collision avoidance, targeting objects, or spatial navigation. An important source of depth information is motion parallax. This powerful cue is generated on the eyes during translatory self-motion with the retinal images of nearby objects moving faster than those of distant ones. To investigate how the visual motion pathway represents motion-based depth information we analyzed its responses to image sequences recorded in natural cluttered environments with a wide range of depth structures. The analysis was done on the basis of an experimentally validated model of the visual motion pathway of insects, with its core elements being correlation-type elementary motion detectors (EMDs). It is the key result of our analysis that the absolute EMD responses, i.e., the motion energy profile, represent the contrast-weighted nearness of environmental structures during translatory self-motion at a roughly constant velocity. In other words, the output of the EMD array highlights contours of nearby objects. This conclusion is largely independent of the scale over which EMDs are spatially pooled and was corroborated by scrutinizing the motion energy profile after eliminating the depth structure from the natural image sequences. Hence, the well-established dependence of correlation-type EMDs on both velocity and textural properties of motion stimuli appears to be advantageous for representing behaviorally relevant information about the environment in a computationally parsimonious way.

  19. Equipment review: New techniques for cardiac output measurement – oesophageal Doppler, Fick principle using carbon dioxide, and pulse contour analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berton, Christine; Cholley, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Measuring cardiac output is of paramount importance in the management of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit and of 'high risk' surgical patients in the operating room. Alternatives to thermodilution are now available and are gaining acceptance among practitioners who have been trained almost exclusively in the use of the pulmonary artery catheter. The present review focuses on the principles, advantages and limitations of oesophageal Doppler, Fick principle applied to carbon dioxide, and pulse contour analysis. No single method stands out or renders the others obsolete. By making cardiac output easily measurable, however, these techniques should all contribute to improvement in haemodynamic management. PMID:12133181

  20. Analysis of Human's Motions Based on Local Mean Decomposition in Through-wall Radar Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Liu, Cai; Zeng, Zhaofa; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-04-01

    Observation of human motions through a wall is an important issue in security applications and search-and rescue. Radar has advantages in looking through walls where other sensors give low performance or cannot be used at all. Ultrawideband (UWB) radar has high spatial resolution as a result of employment of ultranarrow pulses. It has abilities to distinguish the closely positioned targets and provide time-lapse information of targets. Moreover, the UWB radar shows good performance in wall penetration when the inherently short pulses spread their energy over a broad frequency range. Human's motions show periodic features including respiration, swing arms and legs, fluctuations of the torso. Detection of human targets is based on the fact that there is always periodic motion due to breathing or other body movements like walking. The radar can gain the reflections from each human body parts and add the reflections at each time sample. The periodic movements will cause micro-Doppler modulation in the reflected radar signals. Time-frequency analysis methods are consider as the effective tools to analysis and extract micro-Doppler effects caused by the periodic movements in the reflected radar signal, such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), wavelet transform (WT), and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT).The local mean decomposition (LMD), initially developed by Smith (2005), is to decomposed amplitude and frequency modulated signals into a small set of product functions (PFs), each of which is the product of an envelope signal and a frequency modulated signal from which a time-vary instantaneous phase and instantaneous frequency can be derived. As bypassing the Hilbert transform, the LMD has no demodulation error coming from window effect and involves no negative frequency without physical sense. Also, the instantaneous attributes obtained by LMD are more stable and precise than those obtained by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) because LMD uses smoothed local

  1. Therapeutic hypothermia increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmia for perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine whether therapeutic hypothermia after hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in neonates increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmia during intervention. Design A meta-analysis was conducted using a fixed-effect model. Risk ratios, risk differences, and 95% confidence intervals, were measured. Data sources Studies identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, previous reviews, and abstracts from onset to August, 2016. Review methods Reports that compared therapeutic hypothermia with normal care for neonates with HIE and that included data on safety or cardiac arrhythmia, which is of interest to patients and clinicians, were selected. Results We found seven trials, encompassing 1322 infants that included information on safety or cardiac arrhythmia during intervention. Therapeutic hypothermia considerably increased the combined rate of cardiac arrhythmia in the seven trials (risk ratio 2.42, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 4.76. p = 0.01; risk difference 0.02, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.04) during intervention. Conclusions In infants with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, therapeutic hypothermia is associated with a consistent increase in cardiac arrhythmia during intervention. PMID:28273115

  2. Prognostic significance of elevated troponin in non-cardiac hospitalized patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Amna N; Blonde, Ken; Hackam, Daniel; Iansavichene, Alla; Mrkobrada, Marko

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac biomarker troponin can be elevated in patients without a primary cardiac diagnosis and may have prognostic value. We conducted a systematic review to estimate the prevalence and prognostic significance of elevated troponin levels in patients admitted to hospital without a primary cardiac diagnosis. Literature search was done using MEDLINE (1946 to November 2012), EMBASE (1974 to Week 45, 2012), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (November 2012). Two independent investigators reviewed full-text studies for final inclusion. We included studies of patients admitted without a primary cardiac diagnosis. Eligible studies compared adverse outcomes in patients with normal versus elevated troponin levels. Twenty-seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Elevated troponin was associated with increased in-hospital and 30-day mortality (25 studies, 7255 patients, OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.90-5.19, P < 0.0001). Elevated troponin was also associated with increased risk of long-term mortality at 6 months (9 studies, 5368 patients, OR 4.21, 95% CI 1.84-9.64, P < 0.00001). Troponin is an independent predictor of short-term mortality with a pooled adjusted OR of 2.36, 95% CI 1.47-3.76, P < 0.0003. In conclusion, elevated troponin in non-cardiac patients is independently associated with increased mortality.

  3. Summary of transformation equations and equations of motion used in free flight and wind tunnel data reduction and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainer, T. G.; Hoffman, S.

    1972-01-01

    Basic formulations for developing coordinate transformations and motion equations used with free-flight and wind-tunnel data reduction are presented. The general forms presented include axes transformations that enable transfer back and forth between any of the five axes systems that are encountered in aerodynamic analysis. Equations of motion are presented that enable calculation of motions anywhere in the vicinity of the earth. A bibliography of publications on methods of analyzing flight data is included.

  4. Clinical evaluation of motion and position sense in the upper extremities of the elderly using motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuan-yi; Wu, Yi-hui

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure kinesthetic accuracy in healthy older adults by using arm position and motion matching tests. We investigated the effect of task type, joint angle, and matching arm results on kinesthetic accuracy in the upper extremities of 17 healthy right-handed older adults. Blinded subjects were asked to match positions and motions at four reference joint angles: 1) shoulder flexion, 0°-60°; 2) elbow flexion, 90°-135°; 3) wrist extension, 0°-50° in the sagittal plane; and 4) shoulder abduction, 0°-60° in the frontal plane. The absolute difference in angular displacement between the reference and matching arms was calculated to determine kinesthetic accuracy. Results showed that subjects were more accurate at matching motion than position tasks (P=0.03). Shoulder and elbow joints were more sensitive than wrist joints in perceiving passive positions and motions (P<0.05). The effect of the matching arm was found only when matching the joint angles of shoulder abduction and wrist extension (P<0.01). These results are comparable to findings of other studies that used machine-generated kinesthetic stimuli. The manual measurement of kinesthetic accuracy could be effective as a preliminary screening tool for therapists in clinical settings.

  5. Motion of a Moving Elastic Beam Carrying a Moving MASS—ANALYSIS and Experimental Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PARK, S.; YOUM, Y.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, vibrational motion of an elastic beam fixed on a moving cart and carrying a moving mass is investigated. The equations of motion of the beam-mass-cart system are derived and the coupled dynamic equations are solved by the unconstrained modal analysis. In modal analysis, the exact normal mode solutions corresponding to the eigenfrequencies for each position of the moving mass and the ratios of the weight of the beam-mass-cart system are used. Proper transformation of time solutions between the normal modes for a position and those for the next position of the moving mass is also considered. Numerical simulations are carried out to obtain open-loop responses of the system in tracking pre-designed paths of the moving mass. The simulation results show that the model predicts the dynamic behavior of the beam-mass-cart system well. Experiments are carried out to show the validity of the proposed analytical method.

  6. Analysis of wave packet motion in frequency and time domain: oxazine 1.

    PubMed

    Braun, Markus; Sobotta, Constanze; Dürr, Regina; Pulvermacher, Horst; Malkmus, Stephan

    2006-08-17

    Wave packet motion in the laser dye oxazine 1 in methanol is investigated by spectrally resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The spectral range of 600-690 nm was accessible by amplified broadband probe pulses covering the overlap region of ground-state bleach and stimulated emission signal. The influence of vibrational wave packets on the optical signal is analyzed in the frequency domain and the time domain. For the analysis in the frequency domain an algorithm is presented that accounts for interference effects of neighbored vibrational modes. By this method amplitude, phase and decay time of vibrational modes are retrieved as a function of probe wavelength and distortions due to neighbored modes are reduced. The analysis of the data in the time domain yields complementary information on the intensity, central wavelength, and spectral width of the optical bleach spectrum due to wave packet motion.

  7. Gait motion analysis in the unrestrained condition of trans-femoral amputee with a prosthetic limb.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Uno, Ryuji; Matsuda, Yasushi; Tsuchiya, Youtaro; Inoue, Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Trans-femoral amputees must regain moving pattern by refined rehabilitation program using ground reaction forces, joint angles and joint moments applied on a prosthetic limb. On the other hand, understanding those loads and kinematic variables is indispensable for gait analysis based on the biomechanical consideration of trans-femoral amputees. However, conventional prosthetic gait training systems cannot measure long continuous walking motions. In this paper, ground reaction forces and kinematic parameters applied on trans-femoral prosthesis are measured by the prosthetic gait motion analysis system using mobile force plate and attitude sensor for the unrestrained gait measurement. As a result of the experiments, the patterns of antero-posterior axis ground reaction forces and joint moments about the medio-lateral axis are remarkably different among the five activities. Finally, the effectiveness of the developed prosthetic gait training system to consider biomechanics and kinematics in trans-femoral prosthesis is validated.

  8. Tracking and Motion Analysis of Crack Propagations in Crystals for Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Duchaineau, M; Goldgof, D B

    2001-05-14

    This paper presents a quantitative analysis for a discovery in molecular dynamics. Recent simulations have shown that velocities of crack propagations in crystals under certain conditions can become supersonic, which is contrary to classical physics. In this research, they present a framework for tracking and motion analysis of crack propagations in crystals. It includes line segment extraction based on Canny edge maps, feature selection based on physical properties, and subsequent tracking of primary and secondary wavefronts. This tracking is completely automated; it runs in real time on three 834-image sequences using forty 250 MHZ processors. Results supporting physical observations are presented in terms of both feature tracking and velocity analysis.

  9. Inertial sensor-based two feet motion tracking for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tran Nhat; Suh, Young Soo

    2013-04-29

    Two feet motion is estimated for gait analysis. An inertial sensor is attached on each shoe and an inertial navigation algorithm is used to estimate the movement of both feet. To correct inter-shoe position error, a camera is installed on the right shoe and infrared LEDs are installed on the left shoe. The proposed system gives key gait analysis parameters such as step length, stride length, foot angle and walking speed. Also it gives three dimensional trajectories of two feet for gait analysis.

  10. Three-dimensional shape, deformation, and motion analysis of mitral annuli using transesophageal echocardiographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddipatti, Ajeetkumar; Chandra, Shalabh; Flachskampf, Frank A.; Powell, Kimerly; Thomas, James D.

    1998-07-01

    Deformation and motion of the Mitral Annulus (MA) is closely related to the left ventricular function. Measurement and visualization of the characteristic parameters in 3D will help in understanding the relationship. Data for this study was acquired from patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiographic examination with the transducer aligned along the axis roughly perpendicular to the annuli, and rotated automatically to cover 360 degrees. ECG gated images were acquired at 24 angles for each phase of the cardiac cycle. The annuli hinge points were identified from each echo image and the annuli reconstructed. The parameters measured to characterize the annuli were: (1) area of projection, (2) non- planarity, (3) excursion of annulus centroid, (4) change in the annulus orientation. We validated the method using a wire loop shaped in the form of a saddle and a planar rubber ring imaged in a water bath at different orientations. Four MAs were reconstructed using this method. Two were patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and two were patients with normal ventricular function. The change in parameters was measured from systole to diastole. Percentage change in area (29% vs. 16%) and excursion (8 mm vs. 3 mm) were much larger for normals than for patients. While, changes in non-planarity (20%) and orientation (6 deg) were similar. These preliminary results show that MA parameters do reflect the abnormality, and could be used for diagnosis and prognosis of patients with bad ventricles.

  11. Thermal Property Analysis of Axle Load Sensors for Weighing Vehicles in Weigh-in-Motion System

    PubMed Central

    Burnos, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Systems which permit the weighing of vehicles in motion are called dynamic Weigh-in-Motion scales. In such systems, axle load sensors are embedded in the pavement. Among the influencing factors that negatively affect weighing accuracy is the pavement temperature. This paper presents a detailed analysis of this phenomenon and describes the properties of polymer, quartz and bending plate load sensors. The studies were conducted in two ways: at roadside Weigh-in-Motion sites and at a laboratory using a climate chamber. For accuracy assessment of roadside systems, the reference vehicle method was used. The pavement temperature influence on the weighing error was experimentally investigated as well as a non-uniform temperature distribution along and across the Weigh-in-Motion site. Tests carried out in the climatic chamber allowed the influence of temperature on the sensor intrinsic error to be determined. The results presented clearly show that all kinds of sensors are temperature sensitive. This is a new finding, as up to now the quartz and bending plate sensors were considered insensitive to this factor. PMID:27983704

  12. Transfer Function Analysis of the Longitudinal Motion of the Common Carotid Artery Wall

    PubMed Central

    Yli-Ollila, Heikki; Tarvainen, Mika P.; Laitinen, Tomi P.; Laitinen, Tiina M.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal motion of the carotid wall is a potential new measure of arterial stiffness. Despite the over decade long research on the subject, the driving force and the specific longitudinal kinetics of the carotid wall has remained unclear. In this study, a transfer function analysis with 20 healthy subjects is presented to derive how the energy from the blood pressure moves the innermost arterial wall longitudinally and how the kinetic energy is then transferred to the outermost arterial layer. The power spectrums display that the main kinetic energy of the longitudinal motion is on band 0–3 Hz with a peak on the 1.1 Hz frequency. There is a large variation among the individuals, how the energy from the blood pressure transfers into the longitudinal motion of the arterial wall since the main direction of the longitudinal motion varies individually and because early arterial stiffening potentially has an effect on the time characteristics of the energy transfer. The energy transfer from the innermost to the outermost wall layer is more straightforward: on average, a 17% of the longitudinal amplitude is lost and an 18.9 ms delay is visible on the 1.0 Hz frequency. PMID:28082917

  13. Chaotic Phenomena and Analysis of Natural Circulation Flow Instability under Rolling Motion Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. C.; Gao, P. Z.

    2010-03-01

    Experimental study on natural circulation flow instability under rolling motion is carried out and the results show that the complex flow oscillations are formed due to the overlapped effect of the rolling motion (trough instability) and density wave oscillation. The system becomes more instable because of the occurrence of complex flow oscillations. Complex flow oscillations only occur in the case of high subcooling and may be divided into two types: regular and irregular complex flow oscillations. Under the same thermo hydraulic conditions, the marginal stability boundary (MSB) of regular complex oscillations is similar to that of density wave oscillation without rolling motion. And the influences of rolling amplitude and rolling period on its MSB are slight. Chaotic characteristics are found in irregular complex oscillation flow under rolling motion condition. Based on the experimental data and G-P method, correlation dimension and Kolmogorov entropy are gotten with time series analysis. The results show that complex oscillation has fractal dimension and positive Kolmogorov entropy and is typical chaotic time series.

  14. Unsteady Aerodynamic and Dynamic Analysis of the Meridian UAS in a Rolling-Yawing Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykins, Ryan

    The nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamic effects of operating the Meridian unmanned aerial system (UAS) in crosswinds and at high angular rates is investigated in this work. The Meridian UAS is a large autonomous aircraft, with a V-tail configuration, operated in Polar Regions for the purpose of remotely measuring ice sheet thickness. The inherent nonlinear coupling produced by the V-tail, along with the strong atmospheric disturbances, has made classical model identification methods inadequate for proper model development. As such, a powerful tool known as Fuzzy Logic Modeling (FLM) was implemented to generate time-dependent, nonlinear, and unsteady aerodynamic models using flight test data collected in Greenland in 2011. Prior to performing FLM, compatibility analysis is performed on the data, for the purpose of systematic bias removal and airflow angle estimation. As one of the advantages of FLM is the ability to model unsteady aerodynamics, the reduced frequency for both longitudinal and lateral-directional motions is determined from the unbiased data, using Theodorsen's theory of unsteadiness, which serves as an input parameter in modeling. These models have been used in this work to identify pilot induced oscillations, unsteady coupling motions, unsteady motion due to the slipstream and cross wind interaction, and destabilizing motions and orientations. This work also assesses the accuracy of preliminary aircraft dynamic models developed using engineering level software, and addresses the autopilot Extended Kalman Filter state estimations.

  15. Generalized analysis of thermally activated domain-wall motion in Co/Pt multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emori, Satoru; Umachi, Chinedum K.; Bono, David C.; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Thermally activated domain-wall (DW) motion driven by magnetic field and electric current is investigated experimentally in out-of-plane magnetized Pt(Co/Pt)3 multilayers. We directly extract the thermal activation energy barrier for DW motion and observe the dynamic regimes of creep, depinning, and viscous flow. Further analysis reveals that the activation energy must be corrected with a factor dependent on the Curie temperature, and we derive a generalized Arrhenius-like equation governing thermally activated motion. By using this generalized equation, we quantify the efficiency of current-induced spin torque in assisting DW motion. Current produces no effect aside from Joule heating in the multilayer with 7-Å thick Co layers, whereas it generates a finite spin torque on DWs in the multilayer with atomically thin 3-Å Co layers. These findings suggest that conventional spin-transfer torques from in-plane spin-polarized current do not drive DWs in ultrathin Co/Pt multilayers.

  16. An Analysis of Potential Predictive Parameters of Motion Sickness Using a Computerized Biophysical Data Acquisition System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    goggles reverses the visual scene while another . -’.. 4 5 type inverts it. Both types produce motion sickness by sending visual signals to the brain...Further, the non- susceptible subjects showed a pattern of symptom appearance, followed by symptom abatement , and then reappearance. This . ,. -..81...as possible to 109 %" 6i F baseline values to measure symptom abatement . Data Analsi. Computer analysis programs must be • .developed or purchased for

  17. Turbulent Fluid Motion 5: Fourier Analysis, the Spectral Form of the Continuum Equations, and Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Background material on Fourier analysis and on the spectral form of the continuum equations, both averaged and unaveraged, are given. The equations are applied to a number of cases of homogeneous turbulence with and without mean gradients. Spectral transfer of turbulent activity between scales of motion is studied in some detail. The effects of mean shear, heat transfer, normal strain, and buoyancy are included in the analyses.

  18. NPS State Vector Analysis and Relative Motion Plotting Software for STS-51. Appendix C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California AD-A282 910 ,: ,.TIC ELECTE THESIS NPS STATE VECTOR ANALYSIS AND RELATIVE MOTION PLOTTING SOFTWARE FOR...STS-51 APPENDIX C by Lieutenant Lee A. Barker March, 1994 Thesis Advisor: Dr. Rudolf Panholzer "Approved -for public releas; distribution is...buffer, then process "* all the valid samples. */ if (this- > ring-full YES) I samples = this- > ringmax; begin-time - this->begintme = this-> ring

  19. Surface Chest Motion Decomposition for Cardiovascular Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Ghufran; Veluvolu, Kalyana C.

    2014-01-01

    Surface chest motion can be easily monitored with a wide variety of sensors such as pressure belts, fiber Bragg gratings and inertial sensors, etc. The current applications of these sensors are mainly restricted to respiratory motion monitoring/analysis due to the technical challenges involved in separation of the cardiac motion from the dominant respiratory motion. The contribution of heart to the surface chest motion is relatively very small as compared to the respiratory motion. Further, the heart motion spectrally overlaps with the respiratory harmonics and their separation becomes even more challenging. In this paper, we approach this source separation problem with independent component analysis (ICA) framework. ICA with reference (ICA-R) yields only desired component with improved separation, but the method is highly sensitive to the reference generation. Several reference generation approaches are developed to solve the problem. Experimental validation of these proposed approaches is performed with chest displacement data and ECG obtained from healthy subjects under normal breathing and post-exercise conditions. The extracted component morphologically matches well with the collected ECG. Results show that the proposed methods perform better than conventional band pass filtering. PMID:24865183

  20. Probing the time course of head-motion cues integration during auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hirohito M; Toshima, Iwaki; Pressnitzer, Daniel; Kashino, Makio

    2014-01-01

    The perceptual organization of auditory scenes is a hard but important problem to solve for human listeners. It is thus likely that cues from several modalities are pooled for auditory scene analysis, including sensory-motor cues related to the active exploration of the scene. We previously reported a strong effect of head motion on auditory streaming. Streaming refers to an experimental paradigm where listeners hear sequences of pure tones, and rate their perception of one or more subjective sources called streams. To disentangle the effects of head motion (changes in acoustic cues at the ear, subjective location cues, and motor cues), we used a robotic telepresence system, Telehead. We found that head motion induced perceptual reorganization even when the acoustic scene had not changed. Here we reanalyzed the same data to probe the time course of sensory-motor integration. We show that motor cues had a different time course compared to acoustic or subjective location cues: motor cues impacted perceptual organization earlier and for a shorter time than other cues, with successive positive and negative contributions to streaming. An additional experiment controlled for the effects of volitional anticipatory components, and found that arm or leg movements did not have any impact on scene analysis. These data provide a first investigation of the time course of the complex integration of sensory-motor cues in an auditory scene analysis task, and they suggest a loose temporal coupling between the different mechanisms involved.

  1. Cost-Utility Analysis of a Cardiac Telerehabilitation Program: The Teledialog Project

    PubMed Central

    Kidholm, Kristian; Rasmussen, Maja Kjær; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Hansen, John; Nielsen, Gitte; Spindler, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cardiac rehabilitation can reduce mortality of patients with cardiovascular disease, but a frequently low participation rate in rehabilitation programs has been found globally. The objective of the Teledialog study was to assess the cost-utility (CU) of a cardiac telerehabilitation (CTR) program. The aim of the intervention was to increase the patients' participation in the CTR program. At discharge, an individualized 3-month rehabilitation plan was formulated for each patient. At home, the patients measured their own blood pressure, pulse, weight, and steps taken for 3 months. Materials and Methods: The analysis was carried out together with a randomized controlled trial with 151 patients during 2012–2014. Costs of the intervention were estimated with a health sector perspective following international guidelines for CU. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Results: The rehabilitation activities were approximately the same in the two groups, but the number of contacts with the physiotherapist was higher among the intervention group. The mean total cost per patient was €1,700 higher in the intervention group. The quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gain was higher in the intervention group, but the difference was not statistically significant. The incremental CU ratio was more than €400,000 per QALY gained. Conclusions: Even though the rehabilitation activities increased, the program does not appear to be cost-effective. The intervention itself was not costly (less than €500), and increasing the number of patients may show reduced costs of the devices and make the CTR more cost-effective. Telerehabilitation can increase participation, but the intervention, in its current form, does not appear to be cost-effective. PMID:26713491

  2. Fish Oil and Atrial Fibrillation after Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Wei; Wei, Wei; Lin, Zhiqin; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Hongxia; Zhang, Tao; Li, Bin; Mi, Shuhua

    2013-01-01

    Background Influence of fish oil supplementation on postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) was inconsistent according to published clinical trials. The aim of the meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of perioperative fish oil supplementation on the incidence of POAF after cardiac surgery. Methods Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing perioperative fish oil supplementation for patients undergoing cardiac surgery were identified. Data concerning study design, patient characteristics, and outcomes were extracted. Risk ratio (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) were calculated using fixed or random effects models. Results Eight RCTs involving 2687 patients were included. Perioperative supplementation of fish oil did not significantly reduce the incidence of POAF (RR = 0.86, 95%CI 0.71 to 1.03, p = 0.11) or length of hospitalization after surgery (WMD = 0.10 days, 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.67 days, p = 0.75). Fish oil supplementation also did not affect the perioperative mortality, incidence of major bleeding or the length of stay in the intensive care unit. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses indicated mean DHA dose in the supplements may be a potential modifier for the effects of fish oil for POAF. For supplements with DHA >1 g/d, fish oil significantly reduced the incidence of POAF; while it did not for the supplements with a lower dose of DHA. Conclusions Current evidence did not support a preventative role of fish oil for POAF. However, relative amounts of DHA and EPA in fish oil may be important for the prevention of POAF. PMID:24039820

  3. A comparative analysis of modal motions for the gyroscopic and non-gyroscopic two degree-of-freedom conservative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; An, Hua-Zhen; Qian, Ying-Jing; Zhang, Wei; Melnik, Roderick V. N.

    2016-12-01

    The synchronous in-unison motions in vibrational mechanics and the non-synchronous out-of-unison motions are the most frequently found periodic motions in every fields of science and everywhere in the universe. In contrast to the in-unison normal modes, the out-of-unison complex modes feature a π/2 phase difference. By the complex mode analysis we classify the out-of-unison planar motion into two types, gyroscopic motions and elliptic motions. It is found that the gyroscopic and elliptic motions have different characteristics for a two degree-of-freedom (2DOF) system. The gyroscopic motion involves two distinct frequencies with, respectively, two corresponding complex modes. However, the elliptic motion the nonlinear non-gyroscopic 2DOF system with repeated frequencies involves only single frequency with corresponding two complex modes. The study of the differences and similarities of the gyroscopic and elliptic modes sheds new light on the in-depth mechanism of the planar motions in the universe and the man-made engineering systems.

  4. Utilisation of Blood Components in Cardiac Surgery: A Single-Centre Retrospective Analysis with Regard to Diagnosis-Related Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Raoul Georg; Rotering, Heinrich; Buddendick, Hubert; Franz, Dominik; Bunzemeier, Holger; Roeder, Norbert; Kwiecien, Robert; Sibrowski, Walter; Scheld, Hans H.; Martens, Sven; Schlenke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background More blood components are required in cardiac surgery than in most other medical disciplines. The overall blood demand may increase as a function of the total number of cardiothoracic and vascular surgical interventions and their level of complexity, and also when considering the demographic ageing. Awareness has grown with respect to adverse events, such as transfusion-related immunomodulation by allogeneic blood supply, which can contribute to morbidity and mortality. Therefore, programmes of patient blood management (PBM) have been implemented to avoid unnecessary blood transfusions and to standardise the indication of blood transfusions more strictly with aim to improve patients' overall outcomes. Methods A comprehensive retrospective analysis of the utilisation of blood components in the Department of Cardiac Surgery at the University Hospital of Münster (UKM) was performed over a 4-year period. Based on a medical reporting system of all medical disciplines, which was established as part of a PBM initiative, all transfused patients in cardiac surgery and their blood components were identified in a diagnosis- and medical procedure-related system, which allows the precise allocation of blood consumption to interventional procedures in cardiac surgery, such as coronary or valve surgery. Results This retrospective single centre study included all in-patients in cardiac surgery at the UKM from 2009 to 2012, corresponding to a total of 1,405-1,644 cases per year. A blood supply was provided for 55.6-61.9% of the cardiac surgery patients, whereas approximately 9% of all in-patients at the UKM required blood transfusions. Most of the blood units were applied during cardiac valve surgery and during coronary surgery. Further surgical activities with considerable use of blood components included thoracic surgery, aortic surgery, heart transplantations and the use of artificial hearts. Under the measures of PBM in 2012 a noticeable decrease in the number of

  5. A computer program for an analysis of the relative motion of a space station and a free flying experiment module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the relative motion of a free flying experiment module in the vicinity of a space station under the perturbative effects of drag and earth oblateness was made. A listing of a computer program developed for determining the relative motion of a module utilizing the Cowell procedure is presented, as well as instructions for its use.

  6. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  7. A simple force-motion relation for migrating cells revealed by multipole analysis of traction stress.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Sano, Masaki

    2014-01-07

    For biophysical understanding of cell motility, the relationship between mechanical force and cell migration must be uncovered, but it remains elusive. Since cells migrate at small scale in dissipative circumstances, the inertia force is negligible and all forces should cancel out. This implies that one must quantify the spatial pattern of the force instead of just the summation to elucidate the force-motion relation. Here, we introduced multipole analysis to quantify the traction stress dynamics of migrating cells. We measured the traction stress of Dictyostelium discoideum cells and investigated the lowest two moments, the force dipole and quadrupole moments, which reflect rotational and front-rear asymmetries of the stress field. We derived a simple force-motion relation in which cells migrate along the force dipole axis with a direction determined by the force quadrupole. Furthermore, as a complementary approach, we also investigated fine structures in the stress field that show front-rear asymmetric kinetics consistent with the multipole analysis. The tight force-motion relation enables us to predict cell migration only from the traction stress patterns.

  8. Motion based markerless gait analysis using standard events of gait and ensemble Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, Nalini; Mitra, Anish; Duric, Zoran; Gerber, Naomi Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to gait analysis using ensemble Kalman filtering which permits markerless determination of segmental movement. We use image flow analysis to reliably compute temporal and kinematic measures including the translational velocity of the torso and rotational velocities of the lower leg segments. Detecting the instances where velocity changes direction also determines the standard events of a gait cycle (double-support, toe-off, mid-swing and heel-strike). In order to determine the kinematics of lower limbs, we model the synergies between the lower limb motions (thigh-shank, shank-foot) by building a nonlinear dynamical system using CMUs 3D motion capture database. This information is fed into the ensemble Kalman Filter framework to estimate the unobserved limb (upper leg and foot) motion from the measured lower leg rotational velocity. Our approach does not require calibrated cameras or special markers to capture movement. We have tested our method on different gait sequences collected from the sagttal plane and presented the estimated kinematics overlaid on the original image frames. We have also validated our approach by manually labeling the videos and comparing our results against them.

  9. Image segmentation and registration for the analysis of joint motion from 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.; Fassbind, Michael; Rohr, Eric; Ledoux, William

    2006-03-01

    We report an image segmentation and registration method for studying joint morphology and kinematics from in vivo MRI scans and its application to the analysis of ankle joint motion. Using an MR-compatible loading device, a foot was scanned in a single neutral and seven dynamic positions including maximal flexion, rotation and inversion/eversion. A segmentation method combining graph cuts and level sets was developed which allows a user to interactively delineate 14 bones in the neutral position volume in less than 30 minutes total, including less than 10 minutes of user interaction. In the subsequent registration step, a separate rigid body transformation for each bone is obtained by registering the neutral position dataset to each of the dynamic ones, which produces an accurate description of the motion between them. We have processed six datasets, including 3 normal and 3 pathological feet. For validation our results were compared with those obtained from 3DViewnix, a semi-automatic segmentation program, and achieved good agreement in volume overlap ratios (mean: 91.57%, standard deviation: 3.58%) for all bones. Our tool requires only 1/50 and 1/150 of the user interaction time required by 3DViewnix and NIH Image Plus, respectively, an improvement that has the potential to make joint motion analysis from MRI practical in research and clinical applications.

  10. Comparative abilities of Microsoft Kinect and Vicon 3D motion capture for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Alexandra; West, Alexandre M; Bronner, Shaw; Noah, Jack Adam

    2014-07-01

    Biomechanical analysis is a powerful tool in the evaluation of movement dysfunction in orthopaedic and neurologic populations. Three-dimensional (3D) motion capture systems are widely used, accurate systems, but are costly and not available in many clinical settings. The Microsoft Kinect™ has the potential to be used as an alternative low-cost motion analysis tool. The purpose of this study was to assess concurrent validity of the Kinect™ with Brekel Kinect software in comparison to Vicon Nexus during sagittal plane gait kinematics. Twenty healthy adults (nine male, 11 female) were tracked while walking and jogging at three velocities on a treadmill. Concurrent hip and knee peak flexion and extension and stride timing measurements were compared between Vicon and Kinect™. Although Kinect measurements were representative of normal gait, the Kinect™ generally under-estimated joint flexion and over-estimated extension. Kinect™ and Vicon hip angular displacement correlation was very low and error was large. Kinect™ knee measurements were somewhat better than hip, but were not consistent enough for clinical assessment. Correlation between Kinect™ and Vicon stride timing was high and error was fairly small. Variability in Kinect™ measurements was smallest at the slowest velocity. The Kinect™ has basic motion capture capabilities and with some minor adjustments will be an acceptable tool to measure stride timing, but sophisticated advances in software and hardware are necessary to improve Kinect™ sensitivity before it can be implemented for clinical use.

  11. An Elastic Analysis of a Plated Bone to Determine Fracture Gap Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, F. W.; Vannah, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    An elastic analysis to determine fracture gap motions occurring in the osteotomized and plated canine femur was performed using the finite element program NASTRAN. The femur was idealized as a hollow right cylinder, and transverse anisotropy was assumed for the elastic properties of the bone. A 3-D 360 degree model consisting of 224 isoparametric quadrilateral hexahedral and 11 beam elements was created. A range of plate stiffnesses was tested by varying the modulus of elasticity of the plate from 207 GPa to 1 GPA. Moments were applied in the plane of the plate, about the axis of the plate, and in the plane of the screws. Results showed that, for plates of typical geometry and elastic modulus under 10 GPa, the contribution to fracture gap motion occurring due to deformation in the bone was negligible compared to that contribution from deformation in the plate.

  12. Representation of the Physiological Factors Contributing to Postflight Changes in Functional Performance Using Motion Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2010-01-01

    Astronauts experience changes in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. To understand how changes in physiological function influence functional performance, a testing procedure has been developed that evaluates both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. Astronauts complete seven functional and physiological tests. The objective of this project is to use motion tracking and digitizing software to visually display the postflight decrement in the functional performance of the astronauts. The motion analysis software will be used to digitize astronaut data videos into stick figure videos to represent the astronauts as they perform the Functional Tasks Tests. This project will benefit NASA by allowing NASA scientists to present data of their neurological studies without revealing the identities of the astronauts.

  13. Tissue motion tracking at the edges of a radiation treatment field using local optical flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, P. T.; Pistorius, S.

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and accuracy of tracking the motion of an intruding organ-at-risk (OAR) at the edges of a treatment field using a local optical flow analysis of electronic portal images. An intruding OAR was simulated by modifying the portal images obtained by irradiating a programmable phantom's lung tumour. A rectangular treatment aperture was assumed and the edges of the beam's eye view (BEV) were partitioned into clusters/grids according to the width of the multi-leaf collimators (MLC). The optical flow velocities were calculated and the motion accuracy in these clusters was analysed. A velocity error of 0.4 ± 1.4 mm/s with a linearity of 1.04 for tracking an object intruding at 10mm/s (max) was obtained.

  14. Evaluation of skin and muscular deformations in a non-rigid motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffredo, Michela; Carli, Marco; Conforto, Silvia; Bibbo, Daniele; Neri, Alessandro; D'Alessio, Tommaso

    2005-04-01

    During contraction and stretching, muscles change shape and size, and produce a deformation of skin tissues and a modification of the body segment shape. In human motion analysis, it is indispensable to take into account this phenomenon and thus approximating body limbs to rigid structures appears as restrictive. The present work aims at evaluating skin and muscular deformation, and at modeling body segment elastic behavior by analysing video sequences that capture a sport gesture. The soft tissue modeling is accomplished by using triangular meshes that automatically adapt to the body segment during the execution of a static muscle contraction. The adaptive triangular mesh is built on reference points whose motion is estimated by using the technique based on Gauss Laguerre Expansion. Promising results have been obtained by applying the proposed method to a video sequence, where an upper arm isometric contraction was present.

  15. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M. L.; Marins, João C. B.; Silvatti, Amanda P.

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems. PMID:27513846

  16. Action Sport Cameras as an Instrument to Perform a 3D Underwater Motion Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernardina, Gustavo R D; Cerveri, Pietro; Barros, Ricardo M L; Marins, João C B; Silvatti, Amanda P

    2016-01-01

    Action sport cameras (ASC) are currently adopted mainly for entertainment purposes but their uninterrupted technical improvements, in correspondence of cost decreases, are going to disclose them for three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis in sport gesture study and athletic performance evaluation quantitatively. Extending this technology to sport analysis however still requires a methodologic step-forward to making ASC a metric system, encompassing ad-hoc camera setup, image processing, feature tracking, calibration and 3D reconstruction. Despite traditional laboratory analysis, such requirements become an issue when coping with both indoor and outdoor motion acquisitions of athletes. In swimming analysis for example, the camera setup and the calibration protocol are particularly demanding since land and underwater cameras are mandatory. In particular, the underwater camera calibration can be an issue affecting the reconstruction accuracy. In this paper, the aim is to evaluate the feasibility of ASC for 3D underwater analysis by focusing on camera setup and data acquisition protocols. Two GoPro Hero3+ Black (frequency: 60Hz; image resolutions: 1280×720/1920×1080 pixels) were located underwater into a swimming pool, surveying a working volume of about 6m3. A two-step custom calibration procedure, consisting in the acquisition of one static triad and one moving wand, carrying nine and one spherical passive markers, respectively, was implemented. After assessing camera parameters, a rigid bar, carrying two markers at known distance, was acquired in several positions within the working volume. The average error upon the reconstructed inter-marker distances was less than 2.5mm (1280×720) and 1.5mm (1920×1080). The results of this study demonstrate that the calibration of underwater ASC is feasible enabling quantitative kinematic measurements with accuracy comparable to traditional motion capture systems.

  17. Parameter sensitivity analysis of stochastic models provides insights into cardiac calcium sparks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Seon; Liu, Ona Z; Hwang, Hyun Seok; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Sobie, Eric A

    2013-03-05

    We present a parameter sensitivity analysis method that is appropriate for stochastic models, and we demonstrate how this analysis generates experimentally testable predictions about the factors that influence local Ca(2+) release in heart cells. The method involves randomly varying all parameters, running a single simulation with each set of parameters, running simulations with hundreds of model variants, then statistically relating the parameters to the simulation results using regression methods. We tested this method on a stochastic model, containing 18 parameters, of the cardiac Ca(2+) spark. Results show that multivariable linear regression can successfully relate parameters to continuous model outputs such as Ca(2+) spark amplitude and duration, and multivariable logistic regression can provide insight into how parameters affect Ca(2+) spark triggering (a probabilistic process that is all-or-none in a single simulation). Benchmark studies demonstrate that this method is less computationally intensive than standard methods by a factor of 16. Importantly, predictions were tested experimentally by measuring Ca(2+) sparks in mice with knockout of the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein triadin. These mice exhibit multiple changes in Ca(2+) release unit structures, and the regression model both accurately predicts changes in Ca(2+) spark amplitude (30% decrease in model, 29% decrease in experiments) and provides an intuitive and quantitative understanding of how much each alteration contributes to the result. This approach is therefore an effective, efficient, and predictive method for analyzing stochastic mathematical models to gain biological insight.

  18. Automated analysis of background EEG and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Lehembre, Rémy; Lugo, Zulay Del Rosario; Lesenfants, Damien; Luxen, André; Laureys, Steven; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2014-01-01

    Visual analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) background and reactivity during therapeutic hypothermia provides important outcome information, but is time-consuming and not always consistent between reviewers. Automated EEG analysis may help quantify the brain damage. Forty-six comatose patients in therapeutic hypothermia, after cardiac arrest, were included in the study. EEG background was quantified with burst-suppression ratio (BSR) and approximate entropy, both used to monitor anesthesia. Reactivity was detected through change in the power spectrum of signal before and after stimulation. Automatic results obtained almost perfect agreement (discontinuity) to substantial agreement (background reactivity) with a visual score from EEG-certified neurologists. Burst-suppression ratio was more suited to distinguish continuous EEG background from burst-suppression than approximate entropy in this specific population. Automatic EEG background and reactivity measures were significantly related to good and poor outcome. We conclude that quantitative EEG measurements can provide promising information regarding current state of the patient and clinical outcome, but further work is needed before routine application in a clinical setting.

  19. 4D motion animation of coronary arteries from rotational angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Wolfgang; Rohkohl, Christopher; Schuldhaus, Dominik; Prümmer, Marcus; Lauritsch, Günter; Hornegger, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Time-resolved 3-D imaging of the heart is a major research topic in the medical imaging community. Recent advances in the interventional cardiac 3-D imaging from rotational angiography (C-arm CT) are now also making 4-D imaging feasible during procedures in the catheter laboratory. State-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms try to estimate the cardiac motion and utilize the motion field to enhance the reconstruction of a stable cardiac phase (diastole). The available data offers a handful of opportunities during interventional procedures, e.g. the ECG-synchronized dynamic roadmapping or the computation and analysis of functional parameters. In this paper we will demonstrate that the motion vector field (MVF) that is output by motion compensated image reconstruction algorithms is in general not directly usable for animation and motion analysis. Dependent on the algorithm different defects are investigated. A primary issue is that the MVF needs to be inverted, i.e. the wrong direction of motion is provided. A second major issue is the non-periodicity of cardiac motion. In algorithms which compute a non-periodic motion field from a single rotation the in depth motion information along viewing direction is missing, since this cannot be measured in the projections. As a result, while the MVF improves reconstruction quality, it is insufficient for motion animation and analysis. We propose an algorithm to solve both problems, i.e. inversion and missing in-depth information in a unified framework. A periodic version of the MVF is approximated. The task is formulated as a linear optimization problem where a parametric smooth motion model based on B-splines is estimated from the MVF. It is shown that the problem can be solved using a sparse QR factorization within a clinical feasible time of less than one minute. In a phantom experiment using the publicly available CAVAREV platform, the average quality of a non-periodic animation could be increased by 39% by applying the

  20. Atomic resolution structure of prokaryotic phospholipase A2: analysis of internal motion and implication for a catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Matoba, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2003-05-15

    We have found a secreted phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2), EC 3.1.1.4) from Streptomyces violaceoruber A-2688, which is the first PLA(2) identified in prokaryote, and determined its tertiary structure by NMR and X-ray analyses. In this study, we collected the X-ray diffraction data of the bacterial PLA(2) at room temperature (297 K) using conventional MoK(alpha) radiation and refined the structure at a 1.05 A resolution. The atomic resolution analysis led us to introduce disordered conformations and hydrogen atoms into a full anisotropic model. The molecular motion, which is expressed as the sum of rigid-body motion and internal motion of protein, is roughly estimated as the thermal motion when the X-ray diffraction data are collected at room temperature. In this study, we applied a TLS (rigid-body motion in terms of translation, libration, and screw motions) model to analyze the rigid-body motion of the bacterial PLA(2) and calculated the internal motion by subtracting the estimate of the rigid-body motion from the observed anisotropic temperature factor. We also subjected the TLS model to estimate the internal motion of the bovine pancreatic PLA(2) using the anisotropic temperature factor deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Both results indicate that the localization of regions exhibiting larger internal motion in the bacterial PLA(2) is almost the same as that in the bovine pancreatic PLA(2), suggesting that although the tertiary structure of the bacterial PLA(2) is strikingly different from that of the bovine pancreatic PLA(2), the internal motion, which is associated with the calcium(II) ion-binding, phospholipid-binding, and allosteric interfacial activation, is commonly observed in both PLA(2)s.

  1. The efficacy of smoking cessation therapies in cardiac patients: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Mark J; Blum, Lisa M; Filion, Kristian B; Rinfret, Stephane; Pilote, Louise; Paradis, Gilles; Joseph, Lawrence; Gervais, André; O’Loughlin, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Several meta-analyses have examined the efficacy of smoking cessation therapies in the general population. However, little is known about the efficacy of these therapies in cardiac patients. Therefore, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to determine the efficacy of behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation in cardiac patients. METHODS: The medical literature was systematically reviewed to identify smoking cessation RCTs in cardiac patients. Only RCTs that reported smoking abstinence at six or 12 months were included. Smoking abstinence was examined based on the ‘most rigorous criterion’, defined as the most conservative outcome reported in any given RCT. RESULTS: Eleven behavioural therapy RCTs that enrolled 2105 patients and four pharmacotherapy RCTs that enrolled 1542 patients were identified. RCTs differed in the type of behavioural therapy administered as well as the total length and duration of the intervention. RCTs differed in the type of pharmacotherapy administered (one nicotine patch RCT, one nicotine gum RCT and two bupropion RCTs). Behavioural therapy was associated with a significantly higher proportion of smoking abstinence than usual care (OR 1.97 [95% CI 1.37 to 2.85]). Pharmacotherapies were more efficacious than placebo (pooled OR 1.72 [95% CI 1.15 to 2.57]). CONCLUSIONS: Both behavioural therapy and pharmacotherapy are more efficacious than usual care for smoking cessation in cardiac patients. The present meta-analysis highlights the need for head-to-head RCTs to identify which smoking cessation therapy is preferred in cardiac patients as well as RCTs examining the efficacy of combined behavioural and pharmacotherapies. PMID:20151052

  2. Global transcriptomic analysis of induced cardiomyocytes predicts novel regulators for direct cardiac reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Talkhabi, Mahmood; Razavi, Seyed Morteza; Salari, Ali

    2017-04-04

    Heart diseases are the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. De novo generated cardiomyocytes (CMs) are a great cellular source for cell-based therapy and other potential applications. Direct cardiac reprogramming is the newest method to produce CMs, known as induced cardiomyocytes (iCMs). During a direct cardiac reprogramming, also known as transdifferentiation, non-cardiac differentiated adult cells are reprogrammed to cardiac identity by forced expression of cardiac-specific transcription factors (TFs) or microRNAs. To this end, many different combinations of TFs (±microRNAs) have been reported for direct reprogramming of mouse or human fibroblasts to iCMs, although their efficiencies remain very low. It seems that the investigated TFs and microRNAs are not sufficient for efficient direct cardiac reprogramming and other cardiac specific factors may be required for increasing iCM production efficiency, as well as the quality of iCMs. Here, we analyzed gene expression data of cardiac fibroblast (CFs), iCMs and adult cardiomyocytes (aCMs). The up-regulated and down-regulated genes in CMs (aCMs and iCMs) were determined as CM and CF specific genes, respectively. Among CM specific genes, we found 153 transcriptional activators including some cardiac and non-cardiac TFs that potentially activate the expression of CM specific genes. We also identified that 85 protein kinases such as protein kinase D1 (PKD1), protein kinase A (PRKA), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK), protein kinase C (PRKC), and insulin like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) that are strongly involved in establishing CM identity. CM gene regulatory network constructed using protein kinases, transcriptional activators and intermediate proteins predicted some new transcriptional activators such as myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1A), which may be required for qualitatively and

  3. Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training on Aerobic Capacity in Cardiac Patients: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bin; Yan, Xianfeng

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high-intensity interval training (INTERVAL) and moderate-intensity continuous training (CONTINUOUS) on aerobic capacity in cardiac patients. Methods. A meta-analysis identified by searching the PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases from inception through December 2016 compared the effects of INTERVAL and CONTINUOUS among cardiac patients. Results. Twenty-one studies involving 736 participants with cardiac diseases were included. Compared with CONTINUOUS, INTERVAL was associated with greater improvement in peak VO2 (mean difference 1.76 mL/kg/min, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 2.46 mL/kg/min, p < 0.001) and VO2 at AT (mean difference 0.90 mL/kg/min, 95% confidence interval 0.0 to 1.72 mL/kg/min, p = 0.03). No significant difference between the INTERVAL and CONTINUOUS groups was observed in terms of peak heart rate, peak minute ventilation, VE/VCO2 slope and respiratory exchange ratio, body mass, systolic or diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride or low- or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, flow-mediated dilation, or left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions. This study showed that INTERVAL improves aerobic capacity more effectively than does CONTINUOUS in cardiac patients. Further studies with larger samples are needed to confirm our observations. PMID:28386556

  4. Kinematic analysis of wrist motion during simulated colonoscopy in first-year gastroenterology fellows

    PubMed Central

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Ruff, Kevin C; Ramirez, Francisco C; Wu, Qing; Mohankumar, Deepika; Santello, Marco; Fleischer, David E

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastroenterology trainees acquire skill and proficiency in performing colonoscopies at different rates. The cause for heterogeneous competency among the trainees is unclear. Kinematic analysis of the wrist joint while performing colonoscopy can objectively assess the variation in wrist motion. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that the time spent by the trainees in extreme ranges of wrist motion will decrease as the trainees advance through the fellowship year. Subjects and methods: Five first-year gastroenterology fellows were prospectively studied at four intervals while performing simulated colonoscopies. The setting was an endoscopy simulation laboratory at a tertiary care center. Kinematic assessment of wrist motion was done using a magnetic position/orientation tracker held in place by a custom-made arm sleeve and hand glove. The main outcome measure was time spent performing each of four ranges of wrist motion (mid, center, extreme, and out) for each wrist degree of freedom (pronation/supination, flexion/extension, and adduction/abduction). Results: There were no statistically significant differences in the time spent for wrist movements across the three degrees of freedom throughout the study period. However, fellows spent significantly less time in extreme range (1.47 ± 0.34 min vs. 2.44 ± 0.34 min, P = 0.004) and center range (1.02 ± 0.34 min vs 1.9 ± 0.34 min, P = 0.01) at the end of the study compared to the baseline evaluation. The study was limited by the small number of subjects and performance of colonoscopies on a simulator rather than live patients. Conclusions: Gastroenterology trainees alter the time spent at the extreme range of wrist motion as they advance through training. Endoscopy training during the first 10 months of fellowship may have beneficial effects on learning ergonomically correct motion patterns. PMID:26716123

  5. Reliability and validity of the WATSMART three-dimensional optoelectric motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Scholz, J P

    1989-08-01

    Reliability and validity of the WATSMART (Waterloo Spatial Motion Analysis Recording Technique) system was evaluated under static and dynamic conditions. In experiment 1, infrared light-emitting diodes (IREDs) were placed at the axis and along the arms of a clinical goniometer. Twelve angles in 5-degree increments were each recorded 10 times at each of three spatial locations. Reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and analysis-of-variance procedures to determine within-trial variability. The ICCs for all spatial locations exceeded .99. The 95% confidence interval for each angle was less than 0.5 degree in all cases. Criterion-referenced instrument validity was assessed with regression analysis. Slopes of the regression of reconstructed angle on reference angle were close to unity for each spatial location. A systematic error, however, that increased as the goniometer was rotated 45 degrees away from the cameras was evident. In experiment 2, a robotic arm was fitted with four IREDs and made to repeat a defined movement trajectory 10 times at each of three spatial locations. The ICCs for portions of each trajectory ranged from .20 to .99. The results show that reliable and valid results can be obtained from this motion analysis system if adequate precautions are taken to reduce unwanted light reflections. Reliability and validity decreased somewhat as the object was rotated further away from the plane in which the cameras were mounted.

  6. Calibration of a Hall effect displacement measurement system for complex motion analysis using a neural network.

    PubMed

    Northey, G W; Oliver, M L; Rittenhouse, D M

    2006-01-01

    Biomechanics studies often require the analysis of position and orientation. Although a variety of transducer and camera systems can be utilized, a common inexpensive alternative is the Hall effect sensor. Hall effect sensors have been used extensively for one-dimensional position analysis but their non-linear behavior and cross-talk effects make them difficult to calibrate for effective and accurate two- and three-dimensional position and orientation analysis. The aim of this study was to develop and calibrate a displacement measurement system for a hydraulic-actuation joystick used for repetitive motion analysis of heavy equipment operators. The system utilizes an array of four Hall effect sensors that are all active during any joystick movement. This built-in redundancy allows the calibration to utilize fully connected feed forward neural networks in conjunction with a Microscribe 3D digitizer. A fully connected feed forward neural network with one hidden layer containing five neurons was developed. Results indicate that the ability of the neural network to accurately predict the x, y and z coordinates of the joystick handle was good with r(2) values of 0.98 and higher. The calibration technique was found to be equally as accurate when used on data collected 5 days after the initial calibration, indicating the system is robust and stable enough to not require calibration every time the joystick is used. This calibration system allowed an infinite number of joystick orientations and positions to be found within the range of joystick motion.

  7. Receiver Function Analysis of Strong-motion Stations in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Che-Min; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Kuo, Chun-Hsiang; Huang, Jyun-Yan

    2016-04-01

    The Kaohsiung City and Pingtung County are located in southern Taiwan and bounded on the west side by several active faults. The shallow velocity structure of thick alluvium basin in this area should be delineated to understand the seismic site effect of strong ground motion. Receiver Function (RF) is a conventional technique for studying the structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the seismometer. But, the RF analysis of high-frequency acceleration seismograms is also proved to be feasible for estimating shallow structures recently. This study applied the RF technique on the Strong-motion records of almost one-hundred TSMIP stations in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area to estimate the shallow shear-wave velocity structures. The averaged RFs of all stations exhibit the obvious variation because of the different geologies and site conditions. After the forward modeling of RFs based on the Genetic Algorithms (GA) searching, the shallow shear-wave velocity structures beneath all the strong-motion stations in the Kaohsiung-Pingtung area were estimated to delineate the iso-depth contour maps of the main formation interfaces and a preliminary shallow 3D velocity model.

  8. Motion analysis and trials of the deep sea hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan-hui; Wu, Zhi-liang; Wang, Shu-xin

    2017-03-01

    A hybrid underwater glider Petrel-II has been developed and field tested. It is equipped with an active buoyancy unit and a compact propeller unit. Its working modes have been expanded to buoyancy driven gliding and propeller driven level-flight, which can make the glider work in strong currents, as well as many other complicated ocean environments. Its maximal gliding speed reaches 1 knot and the propelling speed is up to 3 knots. In this paper, a 3D dynamic model of Petrel-II is derived using linear momentum and angular momentum equations. According to the dynamic model, the spiral motion in the underwater space is simulated for the gliding mode. Similarly the cycle motion on water surface and the depth-keeping motion underwater are simulated for the level-flight mode. These simulations are important to the performance analysis and parameter optimization for the Petrel-II underwater glider. The simulation results show a good agreement with field trials.

  9. Motion analysis of a motorcycle taking into account the rider's effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaopeng; Murakami, Shintaroh; Nishimura, Hidekazu

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, to analyse the rider's effects on the motion of a motorcycle, we model a rider-motorcycle system by taking into account the leaning motion of the rider's upper torso and his/her arm connection with the handlebars. The nonlinearity of the tyre force is introduced by utilising hyperbolic tangent functions to approximate a Magic Formula tyre model. On the basis of a derived nonlinear state-space model, we analyse the effects of not only the rider's arms but also his/her postures during steady turning by simulations. The rider's postures including lean-with, lean-in and lean-out are realised by adding the lean torque to the rider's upper torso. The motorcycle motion and the rider's effects are analysed in the case where the friction coefficient of the road surface changes severely during steady turning. In addition, a linearised state-space model is derived during steady turning, and a stability analysis of the rider-motorcycle system is performed.

  10. Evaluating the Reproducibility of Motion Analysis Scanning of the Spine during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Gipsman, Aaron; Rauschert, Lisa; Daneshvar, Michael; Knott, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Formetric 4D dynamic system (Diers International GmbH, Schlangenbad, Germany) is a rasterstereography based imaging system designed to evaluate spinal deformity, providing radiation-free imaging of the position, rotation, and shape of the spine during the gait cycle. Purpose. This study was designed to evaluate whether repeated measurements with the Formetric 4D dynamic system would be reproducible with a standard deviation of less than +/− 3 degrees. This study looked at real-time segmental motion, measuring kyphosis, lordosis, trunk length, pelvic, and T4 and L1 vertebral body rotation. Methods. Twenty healthy volunteers each underwent 3 consecutive scans. Measurements for kyphosis, lordosis, trunk length, and rotations of T4, L1, and the pelvis were recorded for each trial. Results. The average standard deviations of same-day repeat measurements were within +/− 3 degrees with a range of 0.51 degrees to 2.3 degrees. Conclusions. The surface topography system calculated reproducible measurements with error ranges comparable to the current gold standard in dynamic spinal motion analysis. Therefore, this technique should be considered of high clinical value for reliably evaluating segmental motion and spinal curvatures and should further be evaluated in the setting of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:26556423

  11. Live cell microscopy analysis of radiation-induced DNA double-strand break motion

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, B.; Splinter, J.; Durante, M.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the spatiotemporal organization of DNA damage processing by live cell microscopy analysis in human cells. In unirradiated U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cancer cells, a fast confined and Brownian-like motion of DNA repair protein foci was observed, which was not altered by radiation. By analyzing the motional activity of GFP-53BP1 foci in live cells up to 12-h after irradiation, we detected an additional slower mobility of damaged chromatin sites showing a mean square displacement of ≈0.6 μm2/h after exposure to densely- or sparsely-ionizing radiation, most likely driven by normal diffusion of chromatin. Only occasionally, larger translational motion connected to morphological changes of the whole nucleus could be observed. In addition, there was no general tendency to form repair clusters in the irradiated cells. We conclude that long-range displacements of damaged chromatin domains do not generally occur during DNA double-strand break repair after introduction of multiple damaged sites by charged particles. The occasional and in part transient appearance of cluster formation of radiation-induced foci may represent a higher mobility of chromatin along the ion trajectory. These observations support the hypothesis that spatial proximity of DNA breaks is required for the formation of radiation-induced chromosomal exchanges. PMID:19221031

  12. Biomechanics Analysis of Combat Sport (Silat) By Using Motion Capture System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhilmi Kaharuddin, Muhammad; Badriah Khairu Razak, Siti; Ikram Kushairi, Muhammad; Syawal Abd. Rahman, Mohamed; An, Wee Chang; Ngali, Z.; Siswanto, W. A.; Salleh, S. M.; Yusup, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    ‘Silat’ is a Malay traditional martial art that is practiced in both amateur and in professional levels. The intensity of the motion spurs the scientific research in biomechanics. The main purpose of this abstract is to present the biomechanics method used in the study of ‘silat’. By using the 3D Depth Camera motion capture system, two subjects are to perform ‘Jurus Satu’ in three repetitions each. One subject is set as the benchmark for the research. The videos are captured and its data is processed using the 3D Depth Camera server system in the form of 16 3D body joint coordinates which then will be transformed into displacement, velocity and acceleration components by using Microsoft excel for data calculation and Matlab software for simulation of the body. The translated data obtained serves as an input to differentiate both subjects’ execution of the ‘Jurus Satu’. Nine primary movements with the addition of five secondary movements are observed visually frame by frame from the simulation obtained to get the exact frame that the movement takes place. Further analysis involves the differentiation of both subjects’ execution by referring to the average mean and standard deviation of joints for each parameter stated. The findings provide useful data for joints kinematic parameters as well as to improve the execution of ‘Jurus Satu’ and to exhibit the process of learning a movement that is relatively unknown by the use of a motion capture system.

  13. Temporal change of photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis investigated through motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Tamaki, Shun; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2017-01-01

    The adaptation to a strong light is one of the essential characteristics of green algae, yet lacking relatively the information about the photophobic responses of Eukaryotic microalgae. We investigated the photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis over a time course of several hours with alternated repetition of blue-light pulse illumination and spatially patterned blue-light illumination. Four distinctive photophobic motions in response to strong blue light were identified in a trace image analysis, namely on-site rotation, running and tumbling, continuous circular swimming, and unaffected straightforward swimming. The cells cultured in autotrophic conditions under weak light showed mainly the on-site rotation response at the beginning of blue-light illumination, but they acquired more blue-light tolerant responses of running and tumbling, circular swimming, or straightforward swimming. The efficiency of escaping from a blue-light illuminated area improved markedly with the development of these photophobic motions. Time constant of 3.0 h was deduced for the evolution of photophobic responses of E. gracilis. The nutrient-rich metabolic status of the cells resulting from photosynthesis during the experiments, i.e., the accumulation of photosynthesized nutrient products in balance between formation and consumption, was the main factor responsible for the development of photophobic responses. The reduction-oxidation status in and around E. gracilis cells did not affect their photophobic responses significantly, unlike the case of photophobic responses and phototaxis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. This study shows that the evolution of photophobic motion type of E. gracilis is dominated mainly by the nutrient metabolic status of the cells. The fact suggests that the nutrient-rich cells have a higher threshold for switching the flagellar motion from straightforward swimming to rotation under a strong light.

  14. Temporal change of photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis investigated through motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Won, June; Song, Simon; Tamaki, Shun; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Mizuo

    2017-01-01

    The adaptation to a strong light is one of the essential characteristics of green algae, yet lacking relatively the information about the photophobic responses of Eukaryotic microalgae. We investigated the photophobic step-up responses of Euglena gracilis over a time course of several hours with alternated repetition of blue-light pulse illumination and spatially patterned blue-light illumination. Four distinctive photophobic motions in response to strong blue light were identified in a trace image analysis, namely on-site rotation, running and tumbling, continuous circular swimming, and unaffected straightforward swimming. The cells cultured in autotrophic conditions under weak light showed mainly the on-site rotation response at the beginning of blue-light illumination, but they acquired more blue-light tolerant responses of running and tumbling, circular swimming, or straightforward swimming. The efficiency of escaping from a blue-light illuminated area improved markedly with the development of these photophobic motions. Time constant of 3.0 h was deduced for the evolution of photophobic responses of E. gracilis. The nutrient-rich metabolic status of the cells resulting from photosynthesis during the experiments, i.e., the accumulation of photosynthesized nutrient products in balance between formation and consumption, was the main factor responsible for the development of photophobic responses. The reduction-oxidation status in and around E. gracilis cells did not affect their photophobic responses significantly, unlike the case of photophobic responses and phototaxis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. This study shows that the evolution of photophobic motion type of E. gracilis is dominated mainly by the nutrient metabolic status of the cells. The fact suggests that the nutrient-rich cells have a higher threshold for switching the flagellar motion from straightforward swimming to rotation under a strong light. PMID:28234984

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation programme after transcatheter aortic valve implantation versus surgical aortic valve replacement: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Gustavo S; Melo, Rosangela D; Deresz, Luís F; Dal Lago, Pedro; Pontes, Mauro Rn; Karsten, Marlus

    2017-05-01

    Background Aortic stenosis is a valvular heart disease characterised by fixed obstruction of the left ventricular outflow. It can be managed by surgical aortic valve replacement (sAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This review aimed to describe the evidence supporting a cardiac rehabilitation programme on functional capacity and quality of life in aortic stenosis patients after sAVR or TAVI. Methods The search was conducted on multiple databases from January to March 2016. All studies were eligible that evaluated the effects of a post-interventional cardiac rehabilitation programme in aortic stenosis patients. The methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis was performed separately by procedure and between procedures. The walked distance during the six-minute walk test (6MWD) and Barthel index were evaluated. The analysis was conducted in Review Manager. Results Five studies were included (292 TAVI and 570 sAVR patients). The meta-analysis showed that a cardiac rehabilitation programme was associated with a significant improvement in 6MWD (0.69 (0.47, 0.91); P < 0.001) and Barthel index (0.80 (0.29, 1.30); P = 0.002) after TAVI and 6MWD (0.79 (0.43, 1.15); P < 0.001) and Barthel index (0.93 (0.67, 1.18); P < 0.001) after sAVR. In addition, the meta-analysis showed that the cardiac rehabilitation programme promoted a similar gain in 6MWD (4.28% (-12.73, 21.29); P = 0.62) and Barthel index (-1.52 points (-4.81, 1.76); P = 0.36) after sAVR or TAVI. Conclusions The cardiac rehabilitation programme improved the functional capacity and quality of life in aortic stenosis patients. Patients who underwent TAVI benefitted with a cardiac rehabilitation programme similar to sAVR patients.

  16. Correlations between the Signal Complexity of Cerebral and Cardiac Electrical Activity: A Multiscale Entropy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Feng; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tsao, Jenho; Chang, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun

    2014-01-01

    The heart begins to beat before the brain is formed. Whether conventional hierarchical central commands sent by the brain to the heart alone explain all the interplay between these two organs should be reconsidered. Here, we demonstrate correlations between the signal complexity of brain and cardiac activity. Eighty-seven geriatric outpatients with healthy hearts and varied cognitive abilities each provided a 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) and a 19-channel eye-closed routine electroencephalography (EEG). Multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis was applied to three epochs (resting-awake state, photic stimulation of fast frequencies (fast-PS), and photic stimulation of slow frequencies (slow-PS)) of EEG in the 1–58 Hz frequency range, and three RR interval (RRI) time series (awake-state, sleep and that concomitant with the EEG) for each subject. The low-to-high frequency power (LF/HF) ratio of RRI was calculated to represent sympatho-vagal balance. With statistics after Bonferroni corrections, we found that: (a) the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the awake RRI (scales 11–20, RRI-MSE-coarse) were inversely correlated with the summed MSE value on coarse scales of the resting-awake EEG (scales 6–20, EEG-MSE-coarse) at Fp2, C4, T6 and T4; (b) the awake RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the fast-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at O1, O2 and C4; (c) the sleep RRI-MSE-coarse was inversely correlated with the slow-PS EEG-MSE-coarse at Fp2; (d) the RRI-MSE-coarse and LF/HF ratio of the awake RRI were correlated positively to each other; (e) the EEG-MSE-coarse at F8 was proportional to the cognitive test score; (f) the results conform to the cholinergic hypothesis which states that cognitive impairment causes reduction in vagal cardiac modulation; (g) fast-PS significantly lowered the EEG-MSE-coarse globally. Whether these heart-brain correlations could be fully explained by the central autonomic network is unknown and needs further exploration. PMID:24498375

  17. Regulation of energy consumption in cardiac muscle: analysis of isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Landesberg, A; Sideman, S

    1999-03-01

    The well-known linear relationship between oxygen consumption and force-length area or the force-time integral is analyzed here for isometric contractions. The analysis, which is based on a biochemical model that couples calcium kinetics with cross-bridge cycling, indicates that the change in the number of force-generating cross bridges with the change in the sarcomere length depends on the force generated by the cross bridges. This positive-feedback phenomenon is consistent with our reported cooperativity mechanism, whereby the affinity of the troponin for calcium and, hence, cross-bridge recruitment depends on the number of force-generating cross bridges. Moreover, it is demonstrated that a model that does not include a feedback mechanism cannot describe the dependence of energy consumption on the loading conditions. The cooperativity mechanism, which has been shown to determine the force-length relationship and the related Frank-Starling law, is shown here to provide the basis for the regulation of energy consumption in the cardiac muscle.

  18. Detrended fluctuation analysis of non-stationary cardiac beat-to-beat interval of sick infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Massaro, An N.; Al-Shargabi, Tareq; Niforatos Andescavage, Nickie; Chang, Taeun; Glass, Penny; du Plessis, Adre J.

    2014-11-01

    We performed detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) of cardiac beat-to-beat intervals (RRis) collected from sick newborn infants over 1-4 day periods. We calculated four different metrics from the DFA fluctuation function: the DFA exponents αL (>40 beats up to one-fourth of the record length), αs (15-30 beats), root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuation on a short-time scale (20-50 beats), and RMS fluctuation on a long-time scale (110-150 beats). Except αL , all metrics clearly distinguished two groups of newborn infants (favourable vs. adverse) with well-characterized outcomes. However, the RMS fluctuations distinguished the two groups more consistently over time compared to αS . Furthermore, RMS distinguished the RRi of the two groups earlier compared to the DFA exponent. In all the three measures, the favourable outcome group displayed higher values, indicating a higher magnitude of (auto-)correlation and variability, thus normal physiology, compared to the adverse outcome group.

  19. Atropine unmasks bed-rest effect - A spectral analysis of cardiac interbeat intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Goldwater, Danielle; Bhargava, Valmik

    1986-01-01

    Heart rate spectral data obtained for 10 male subjects between 35-49 years following orthostatic tolerance testing with lower body negative pressure prebed rest and after 7-10 days of bed rest, while on placebo and after intravenous atropine are analyzed. Comparison of the spectral atropine rms for subjects prebed rest and after bed rest reveal a decrease from 63 + or - 24 ms to 40 + or - 23 ms. It is observed that heart rate interval variability for subjects after bed rest and with atropine is reduced; the heart rate at bed rest with atropine is increased from 70.4 + or - 12.4 beats/min prebed rest to 83.7 + or - 18.9 beats/min; and the exercise tolerance time for subjects in the atropine prebed-rest phase (658 + or - 352 s) is higher than the bed-rest phase (505 + or - 252 s). It is noted that bed rest impairs the cardiovascular capacity to adaptively modulate physiological responses, atropine exposes bed-rest deconditioning effects, and spectral analysis is useful for studying the effects of bed-rest deconditioning on cardiac dynamics.

  20. Analysis of Damped Oscillations during Reentry: A New Approach to Evaluate Cardiac Restitution☆

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, Adelina; Kondratyev, Aleksandar A.; Kucera, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reentry is a mechanism underlying numerous cardiac arrhythmias. During reentry, head-tail interactions of the action potential can cause cycle length (CL) oscillations and affect the stability of reentry. We developed a method based on a difference-delay equation to determine the slopes of the action potential duration and conduction velocity restitution functions, known to be major determinants of reentrant arrhythmogenesis, from the spatial period P and the decay length D of damped CL oscillations. Using this approach, we analyzed CL oscillations after the induction of reentry and the resetting of reentry with electrical stimuli in rings of cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes grown on microelectrode arrays and in corresponding simulations with the Luo-Rudy model. In the experiments, P was larger and D was smaller after resetting impulses compared to the induction of reentry, indicating that reentry became more stable. Both restitution slopes were smaller. Consistent with the experimental findings, resetting of simulated reentry caused oscillations with gradually increasing P, decreasing D, and decreasing restitution slopes. However, these parameters remained constant when ion concentrations were clamped, revealing that intracellular ion accumulation stabilizes reentry. Thus, the analysis of CL oscillations during reentry opens new perspectives to gain quantitative insight into action potential restitution. PMID:17921218

  1. Application of frequency-domain quantitative analysis in the diagnosis of cardiac diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Li, Xinliang; Liao, Mengyang; Dong, Zhang; Wang, Xinfang; Wang, Jia-en; Xie, Mingxing

    1995-05-01

    Cardiac B-mode ultrasonic tissue characterization is designed to use the fluctuations in acoustic signals from the myocardium to differentiate normal from morbid tissues due to their characteristic texture attenuation. In our paper, we suggest a new way that is based on frequency-domain texture analysis to quantify tissue characterization. The results of our experiments indicate that three of the power spectrum features PSE, PSM and LT can describe the characterization of myocardiac tissue very well either in normal or in diseased condition. We select these three features together with another feature PSER derived by combining two PSE values to construct a multilayered neural network based on BP algorithm which acts as a classifier to diagnose automatically input image samples of various diseases after being trained with known samples. The performance of the classifier is very satisfactory. In short, our system opens a new way for the quantitative diagnostic detection of diverse diseases including coronary heart disease myocardial infarction (CHD-MI) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DC).

  2. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  3. Proper motion survey and kinematic analysis of the ρ Ophiuchi embedded cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducourant, C.; Teixeira, R.; Krone-Martins, A.; Bontemps, S.; Despois, D.; Galli, P. A. B.; Bouy, H.; Le Campion, J. F.; Rapaport, M.; Cuillandre, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The ρ Ophiuchi molecular complex and in particular the Lynds L1688 dark cloud is unique in its proximity ( 130 pc), in its richness in young stars and protostars, and in its youth (0.5 Myr). It is certainly one of the best targets currently accessible from the ground to study the early phases of star-formation. Proper motion analysis is a very efficient tool for separating members of clusters from field stars, but very few proper motions are available in the ρ Ophiuchi region since most of the young sources are deeply embedded in dust and gas. Aims: We aim at performing a kinematic census of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the ρ Ophiuchi F core and partially in the E core of the L1688 dark cloud. Methods: We run a proper motion program at the ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT) with the Son of ISAAC (SOFI) instrument over nine years in the near-infrared. We complemented these observations with various public image databases to enlarge the time base of observations and the field of investigation to 0.5° × 0.5°. We derived positions and proper motions for 2213 objects. From these, 607 proper motions were derived from SOFI observations with a 1.8 mas/yr accuracy while the remaining objects were measured only from auxiliary data with a mean precision of about 3 mas/yr. Results: We performed a kinematic analysis of the most accurate proper motions derived in this work, which allowed us to separate cluster members from field stars and to derive the mean properties of the cluster. From the kinematic analysis we derived a list of 68 members and 14 candidate members, comprising 26 new objects with a high membership probability. These new members are generally fainter than the known ones. We measured a mean proper motion of (μαcosδ, μδ) = (-8.2,-24.3) ± 0.8 mas/yr for the L1688 dark cloud. A supervised classification was applied to photometric data of members to allocate a spectral energy distribution (SED) classification to the unclassified members

  4. Tongue Motion Patterns in Post-Glossectomy and Typical Speakers: A Principal Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Maureen; Langguth, Julie M.; Woo, Jonghye; Chen, Hegang; Prince, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined changes in tongue motion caused by glossectomy surgery. A speech task that involved subtle changes in tongue-tip positioning (the motion from /i/ to /s/) was measured. The hypothesis was that patients would have limited motion on the tumor (resected) side and would compensate with greater motion on the…

  5. Microarray analysis of active cardiac remodeling genes in a familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model rescued by a phospholamban knockout

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudarsan; Pena, James R.; Jegga, Anil G.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wolska, Beata M.

    2013-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a disease characterized by ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and aberrant systolic and/or diastolic function. Our laboratories have previously developed two mouse models that affect cardiac performance. One mouse model encodes an FHC-associated mutation in α-tropomyosin: Glu → Gly at amino acid 180, designated as Tm180. These mice display a phenotype that is characteristic of FHC, including severe cardiac hypertrophy with fibrosis and impaired physiological performance. The other model was a gene knockout of phospholamban (PLN KO), a regulator of calcium uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes; these hearts exhibit hypercontractility with no pathological abnormalities. Previous work in our laboratories shows that when mice were genetically crossed between the PLN KO and Tm180, the progeny (PLN KO/Tm180) display a rescued hypertrophic phenotype with improved morphology and cardiac function. To understand the changes in gene expression that occur in these models undergoing cardiac remodeling (Tm180, PLN KO, PLN KO/Tm180, and nontransgenic control mice), we conducted microarray analyses of left ventricular tissue at 4 and 12 mo of age. Expression profiling reveals that 1,187 genes changed expression in direct response to the three genetic models. With these 1,187 genes, 11 clusters emerged showing normalization of transcript expression in the PLN KO/Tm180 hearts. In addition, 62 transcripts are highly involved in suppression of the hypertrophic phenotype. Confirmation of the microarray analysis was conducted by quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide insight into genes that alter expression during cardiac remodeling and are active during modulation of the cardiomyopathic phenotype. PMID:23800848

  6. Rainbows, water droplets, and seeing--slow motion analysis of experiments in atmospheric optics.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-10-01

    Many physics processes underlying phenomena in atmospheric optics happen on a rather short time scale such that neither the human eye nor video cameras are able to analyze the details. We report applications of high-speed imaging of laboratory experiments in atmospheric optics with subsequent slow motion analysis. The potential to study respective transient effects is investigated in general and for a few phenomena in detail, in particular for rainbow scattering due to single oscillating droplets during free fall, and for light propagation effects through atmospheric paths with turbulences, leading, e.g., to scintillation of stars or shimmering of mirage images.

  7. Model-Based Nonrigid Motion Analysis Using Natural Feature Adaptive Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Goldgof, D.B.; Sarkar, S.; Tsap, L.V.

    2000-04-25

    The success of nonrigid motion analysis using physical finite element model is dependent on the mesh that characterizes the object's geometric structure. We suggest a deformable mesh adapted to the natural features of images. The adaptive mesh requires much fewer number of nodes than the fixed mesh which was used in our previous work. We demonstrate the higher efficiency of the adaptive mesh in the context of estimating burn scar elasticity relative to normal skin elasticity using the observed 2D image sequence. Our results show that the scar assessment method based on the physical model using natural feature adaptive mesh can be applied to images which do not have artificial markers.

  8. SEMI-AUTOMATED VECTORIAL ANALYSIS OF ANORECTAL MOTION BY MAGNETIC RESONANCE DEFECOGRAPHY IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS AND FECAL INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    Noelting, Jessica; Bharucha, Adil E.; Lake, David S.; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J.G.; Riederer, Stephen J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inter-observer variability limits the reproducibility of pelvic floor motion measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our aim was to develop a semi-automated program measuring pelvic floor motion in a reproducible and refined manner. Methods Pelvic floor anatomy and motion during voluntary contraction (squeeze) and rectal evacuation were assessed by MRI in 64 women with fecal incontinence (FI) and 64 age-matched controls. A radiologist measured anorectal angles and anorectal junction motion. A semi-automated program did the same and also dissected anorectal motion into perpendicular vectors representing the puborectalis and other pelvic floor muscles, assessed the pubococcygeal angle, and evaluated pelvic rotation. Key Results Manual and semi-automated measurements of anorectal junction motion (r = 0.70; p < 0.0001) during squeeze and evacuation were correlated, as were anorectal angles at rest, squeeze, and evacuation; angle change during squeeze or evacuation were less so. Semi-automated measurements of anorectal and pelvic bony motion were also reproducible within subjects. During squeeze, puborectalis injury was associated (p ≤ 0.01) with smaller puborectalis but not pelvic floor motion vectors, reflecting impaired puborectalis function. The pubococcygeal angle, reflecting posterior pelvic floor motion, was smaller during squeeze and larger during evacuation. However, pubococcygeal angles and pelvic rotation during squeeze and evacuation did not differ significantly between FI and controls. Conclusion & Inferences This semi-automated program provides a reproducible, efficient and refined analysis of pelvic floor motion by MRI. Puborectalis injury is independently associated with impaired motion of puborectalis, not other pelvic floor muscles in controls and women with FI. PMID:22765510

  9. Analysis of Turbulent Scales of Motion in Premixed Flames Using Structure Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlington, Peter; Whitman, Samuel; Towery, Colin; Poludnenko, Alexei

    2016-11-01

    Recently, multiscale turbulence-flame interactions in premixed reacting flows have been examined using both physical space and spectral approaches. However, there remains relatively little understanding of how turbulent scales of motion vary through the internal structure of the flame itself (i.e., through premixed flamelets). Such an analysis is made difficult by the inhomogeneity, small scale, and spatial locality of many premixed flames, particularly at high Damköhler and low Karlovitz numbers. Conditional structure functions provide a possible solution to this analysis challenge, and in this talk we present results from the calculation of structure functions using data from highly-resolved direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent premixed flames. The high resolution of the DNS allows structure functions to be calculated normally and tangentially to the local flame surface, revealing the specific effects of the flame on turbulent scales of motion near the scale of the local flame width. Moreover, the conditional nature of the analysis allows the effects of different flame regions (e.g., the preheat and reaction zones) on turbulence to be isolated. The implications of these results for the theory and modeling of turbulent flame physics are outlined.

  10. Motion capability analysis of a quadruped robot as a parallel manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jingjun; Lu, Dengfeng; Zhang, Zhongxiang; Pei, Xu

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the forward and inverse displacement analysis of a quadruped robot MANA as a parallel manipulator in quadruple stance phase, which is used to obtain the workspace and control the motion of the body. The robot MANA designed on the basis of the structure of quadruped mammal is able to not only walk and turn in the uneven terrain, but also accomplish various manipulating tasks as a parallel manipulator in quadruple stance phase. The latter will be the focus of this paper, however. For this purpose, the leg kinematics is primarily analyzed, which lays the foundation on the gait planning in terms of locomotion and body kinematics analysis as a parallel manipulator. When all four feet of the robot contact on the ground, by assuming there is no slipping at the feet, each contacting point is treated as a passive spherical joint and the kinematic model of parallel manipulator is established. The method for choosing six non-redundant actuated joints for the parallel manipulator from all twelve optional joints is elaborated. The inverse and forward displacement analysis of the parallel manipulator is carried out using the method of coordinate transformation. Finally, based on the inverse and forward kinematic model, two issues on obtaining the reachable workspace of parallel manipulator and planning the motion of the body are implemented and verified by ADAMS simulation.

  11. Wave motion analysis in arch structures via wavelet finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Yongying; Miao, Huihui; He, Zhengjia

    2014-01-01

    The application of B-spline wavelet on interval (BSWI) finite element method for wave motion analysis in arch structures is presented in this paper. Instead of traditional polynomial interpolation, scaling functions at certain scales have been adopted to form the shape functions and construct wavelet-based elements. Different from other wavelet numerical methods adding wavelets directly, the element displacement field represented by the coefficients of wavelets expansions is transformed from wavelet space to physical space via the corresponding transformation matrix. The energy functional of the arch is obtained by the generalized shell theory, and the finite element model for wave motion analysis is constructed according to Hamilton's principle and the central difference method in time domain. Taking the practical application into account, damaged arch waveguides are also investigated. Proper analysis of the responses from structure damages allows one to indicate the location very precisely. This paper mainly focuses on the crack in structures. Based on Castigliano's theorem and the Pairs equation, the local flexibility of crack is formulated for BSWI element. Numerical experiments are performed to study the effect of wave propagations in arch waveguides, that is, frequency dispersion and mode spilt in the arch. The responses of the arch with cracks are simulated under the broad-band, narrow-band and chirp excitations. In order to estimate the spatial, time and frequency concentrations of responses, the reciprocal length, time-frequency transform and correlation coefficient are introduced in this investigation.

  12. Extended aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotors with prescribed hub motion and blade appended penduluum vibration absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The mathematical development for the expanded capabilities of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis was examined. The G400PA expanded analysis simulates the dynamics of all conventional rotors, blade pendulum vibration absorbers, and the higher harmonic excitations resulting from prescribed vibratory hub motions and higher harmonic blade pitch control. The methodology for modeling the unsteady stalled airloads of two dimensional airfoils is discussed. Formulations for calculating the rotor impedance matrix appropriate to the higher harmonic blade excitations are outlined. This impedance matrix, and the associated vibratory hub loads, are the rotor dynamic characteristic elements for use in the simplified coupled rotor/fuselage vibration analysis (SIMVIB). Updates to the development of the original G400 theory, program documentation, user instructions and information are presented.

  13. Stability analysis of a nonlinear vehicle model in plane motion using the concept of Lyapunov exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Sobhan; Wu, Christine

    2013-06-01

    For the first time, this paper investigates the application of the concept of Lyapunov exponents to the stability analysis of the nonlinear vehicle model in plane motion with two degrees of freedom. The nonlinearity of the model comes from the third-order polynomial expression between the lateral forces on the tyres and the tyre slip angles. Comprehensive studies on both system and structural stability analyses of the vehicle model are presented. The system stability analysis includes the stability, lateral stability region, and effects of driving conditions on the lateral stability region of the vehicle model in the state space. In the structural stability analysis, the ranges of driving conditions in which the stability of the vehicle model is guaranteed are given. Moreover, through examples, the largest Lyapunov exponent is suggested as an indicator of the convergence rate in which the disturbed vehicle model returns to its stable fixed point.

  14. Radar signal analysis of ballistic missile with micro-motion based on time-frequency distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianming; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Hua

    2015-12-01

    The micro-motion of ballistic missile targets induces micro-Doppler modulation on the radar return signal, which is a unique feature for the warhead discrimination during flight. In order to extract the micro-Doppler feature of ballistic missile targets, time-frequency analysis is employed to process the micro-Doppler modulated time-varying radar signal. The images of time-frequency distribution (TFD) reveal the micro-Doppler modulation characteristic very well. However, there are many existing time-frequency analysis methods to generate the time-frequency distribution images, including the short-time Fourier transform (STFT), Wigner distribution (WD) and Cohen class distribution, etc. Under the background of ballistic missile defence, the paper aims at working out an effective time-frequency analysis method for ballistic missile warhead discrimination from the decoys.

  15. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between acid–base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid–base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis. The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960–0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146–0.627; P = 0.001). pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population. PMID:27336894

  16. Cardiac monitoring for detection of atrial fibrillation after TIA: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Korompoki, Eleni; Del Giudice, Angela; Hillmann, Steffi; Malzahn, Uwe; Gladstone, David J; Heuschmann, Peter; Veltkamp, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose The detection rate of atrial fibrillation has not been studied specifically in transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients although extrapolation from ischemic stroke may be inadequate. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the rate of newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation using different methods of ECG monitoring in TIA. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed following a pre-specified protocol the PRISMA statement. Prospective observational studies and randomized controlled trials were considered that included TIA patients who underwent cardiac monitoring for >12 h. Primary outcome was frequency of detection of atrial fibrillation ≥30 s. Analyses of subgroups and of duration and type of monitoring were performed. Results Seventeen studies enrolling 1163 patients were included. The pooled atrial fibrillation detection rate for all methods was 4% (95% CI: 2-7%). Yield of monitoring was higher in selected (higher age, more extensive testing for arrhythmias before enrolment, or presumed cardioembolic/cryptogenic cause) than in unselected cohorts (7% vs 3%). Pooled mean atrial fibrillation detection rates rose with duration of monitoring: 4% (24 h), 5% (24 h to 7 days) and 6% (>7 days), respectively. Yield of non-invasive was significantly lower than that of invasive monitoring (4% vs. 11%). Significant heterogeneity was observed among studies (I(2)=60.61%). Conclusion This first meta-analysis of atrial fibrillation detection in TIA patients finds a lower atrial fibrillation detection rate in TIA than reported for IS and TIA cohorts in previous meta-analyses. Prospective studies are needed to determine actual prevalence of atrial fibrillation and optimal diagnostic procedure for atrial fibrillation detection in TIA.

  17. Statistical analysis of target motion in gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Li, Xiang; Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M.

    2011-03-01

    An external surrogate-based respiratory gating technique is a useful method to reduce target margins for the treatment of a moving lung tumor. The success of this technique relies on a good correlation between the motion of the external markers and the internal tumor as well as the repeatability of the respiratory motion. In gated lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the treatment time for each fraction could exceed 30 min due to large fractional dose. Tumor motion may experience pattern changes such as baseline shift during such extended treatment time. The purpose of this study is to analyze tumor motion traces in actual treatment situations and to evaluate the effect of the target baseline shift in gated lung SBRT treatment. Real-time motion data for both the external markers and tumors from 51 lung SBRT treatments with Cyberknife Synchrony technology were analyzed in this study. The treatment time is typically greater than 30 min. The baseline shift was calculated with a rolling average window equivalent to ~20 s and subtracted from that at the beginning. The magnitude of the baseline shift and its relationship with treatment time were investigated. Phase gating simulation was retrospectively performed on 12 carefully selected treatments with respiratory amplitude larger than 5 mm and regular phases. A customized gating window was defined for each individual treatment. It was found that the baseline shifts are specific to each patient and each fraction. Statistical analysis revealed that more than 69% treatments exhibited increased baseline shifts with the lapse of treatment time. The magnitude of the baseline shift could reach 5.3 mm during a 30 min treatment. Gating simulation showed that tumor excursion was caused mainly by the uncertainties in phase gating simulation and baseline shift, the latter being the primary factor. With a 5 mm gating window, 2 out of 12 treatments in the study group showed significant tumor excursion. Baseline shifts

  18. Thermal analysis of HGFQ using FIDAP(trademark): Solidification front motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbury, Keith A.

    1996-01-01

    The High Gradient Furnace with Quench (HGFQ) is being designed by NASA/MSFC for flight on the International Space Station. The furnace is being designed specifically for solidification experiments in metal and metallic alloy systems. The HGFQ Product development Team (PDT) has been active since January 1994 and their effort is now in early Phase B. Thermal models have been developed both by NASA and Sverdrup (support contractor) to assist in the HGFQ design effort. Both these models use SINDA as a solution engine, but the NASA model was developed using PATRAN and includes more detail than the Sverdrup model. These models have been used to guide design decisions and have been validated through experimentation on a prototypical 'Breadboard' furnace at MSFC. One facet of the furnace operation of interest to the designers is the sensitivity of the solidification interface location to changes in the furnace setpoint. Specifically of interest is the motion (position and velocity) of the solidification front due to a small perturbation in the furnace temperature. FIDAP(TM) is a commercially available finite element program for analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow processes. Its strength is in solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow, but among its capabilities is the analysis of transient processes involving radiation and solidification. The models presently available from NASA and Sverdrup are steady-state models and are incapable of computing the motion of the solidification front. The objective of this investigation is to use FIDAP(TM) to compute the motion of the solidification interface due to a perturbation in the furnace setpoint.

  19. Comparisons: Technical-Tactical and Time-Motion Analysis of Mixed Martial Arts by Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Miarka, Bianca; Vecchio, Fabrício B D; Camey, Suzi; Amtmann, John A

    2016-07-01

    Miarka, B, Vecchio, FBD, Camey, S, and Amtmann, JA. Comparisons: technical-tactical and time-motion analysis of mixed martial arts by outcomes. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1975-1984, 2016-The aim of this study was to compare time-motion and technical-tactical analysis between paired outcomes and rounds of mixed martial arts (MMA) matches. The sample consisted of 645 rounds of MMA competition paired by outcomes (first round, winners n = 215 and losers n = 215; second round, winners n = 215 and losers n = 215; third round, winners n = 215 and losers n = 215). The time-motion variables were categorized into low-intensity or high-intensity, stand-up or groundwork situations. Stand-up techniques were analyzed by observing total strikes to the head and body, and takedowns. The actions on the ground were analyzed by observing submission activity, including successful choking and joint locking actions, and also positional improvements, including advances to the mount, half guard, and side and back positions. Chi-squared and Wilcoxon tests were conducted with a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results showed that winners had higher values for total strikes and submissions in all rounds, and also positional improvements, over losers. The standing combat with low-intensity comparisons presented differences between the rounds first, with a median of 2:33.5 (P25-P75%: 1:20-3:56) minute, second, with 2:37 (1:24-3:59) minute, and third, with 2:07 (1:06-3:39.2) minute. These data suggest a focus on the intermittent demand presented in combat phases with a special attention to the strike and ground technical-tactical skills; strength and conditioning coaches could emphasize the effort pause ratios for both standing and ground combat that mimic the requirements of MMA, especially during the third round.

  20. Analytic signal phase-based myocardial motion estimation in tagged MRI sequences by a bilinear model and motion compensation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Basarab, Adrian; Girard, Patrick R; Croisille, Pierre; Clarysse, Patrick; Delachartre, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Different mathematical tools, such as multidimensional analytic signals, allow for the calculation of 2D spatial phases of real-value images. The motion estimation method proposed in this paper is based on two spatial phases of the 2D analytic signal applied to cardiac sequences. By combining the information of these phases issued from analytic signals of two successive frames, we propose an analytical estimator for 2D local displacements. To improve the accuracy of the motion estimation, a local bilinear deformation model is used within an iterative estimation scheme. The main advantages of our method are: (1) The phase-based method allows the displacement to be estimated with subpixel accuracy and is robust to image intensity variation in time; (2) Preliminary filtering is not required due to the bilinear model. The proposed algorithm, integrating phase-based optical flow motion estimation and the combination of global motion compensation with local bilinear transform, allows spatio-temporal cardiac motion analysis, e.g. strain and dense trajectory estimation over the cardiac cycle. Results from 7 realistic simulated tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences show that our method is more accurate compared with state-of-the-art method for cardiac motion analysis and with another differential approach from the literature. The motion estimation errors (end point error) of the proposed method are reduced by about 33% compared with that of the two methods. In our work, the frame-to-frame displacements are further accumulated in time, to allow for the calculation of myocardial Lagrangian cardiac strains and point trajectories. Indeed, from the estimated trajectories in time on 11 in vivo data sets (9 patients and 2 healthy volunteers), the shape of myocardial point trajectories belonging to pathological regions are clearly reduced in magnitude compared with the ones from normal regions. Myocardial point trajectories, estimated from our phase-based analytic

  1. Robust spectral analysis of thoraco-abdominal motion and oxymetry in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Nino, Cesar L; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Gutierrez, Maria J; Singareddi, Ravi; Nino, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) relies on polysomnography (PSG), a multidimensional biosignal recording that is conducted in sleep laboratories. Standard PSG montage involves the use of nasal-oral airflow sensors to visualize cyclic episodes of upper airflow interruption, which are considered diagnostic of sleep apnea. Given the high-cost and discomfort associated with in-laboratory PSG, there is an emergent need for novel technology that simplifies OSA screening and diagnosis with less expensive methods. The main goal of this project was to identify novel OSA signatures based on the spectral analysis of thoraco-abdominal motion channels. Our main hypothesis was that proper spectral analysis can detect OSA cycles in adults using simultaneous recording of oxygen saturation (SaO2) and either, chest or abdominal motion. A sample study on 35 individuals was conducted with statistically significant results that suggest a strong relationship between airflow-independent signals and oxygen saturation. The impact of this new approach is that it may allow the design of more comfortable and reliable portable devices for screening, diagnosis and monitoring of OSA, functioning only with oximetry and airflow-independent (abdominal or chest) breathing sensors.

  2. Evaluation of ground motion scaling methods for analysis of structural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, A. P.; Beltsar, O.A.; Kurama, Y.C.; Kalkan, E.; Taflanidis, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Ground motion selection and scaling comprises undoubtedly the most important component of any seismic risk assessment study that involves time-history analysis. Ironically, this is also the single parameter with the least guidance provided in current building codes, resulting in the use of mostly subjective choices in design. The relevant research to date has been primarily on single-degree-of-freedom systems, with only a few studies using multi-degree-of-freedom systems. Furthermore, the previous research is based solely on numerical simulations with no experimental data available for the validation of the results. By contrast, the research effort described in this paper focuses on an experimental evaluation of selected ground motion scaling methods based on small-scale shake-table experiments of re-configurable linearelastic and nonlinear multi-story building frame structure models. Ultimately, the experimental results will lead to the development of guidelines and procedures to achieve reliable demand estimates from nonlinear response history analysis in seismic design. In this paper, an overview of this research effort is discussed and preliminary results based on linear-elastic dynamic response are presented. ?? ASCE 2011.

  3. MOTION AND DISORDER IN CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS: Measuring and Distinguishing Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, H. B.

    2000-10-01

    Dynamic processes in crystalline solids are reflected in the atomic displacement amplitudes determined, together with the atomic coordinates, by crystal structure analysis. The interpretation of such amplitudes poses two severe problems: (a) The relative phases of the atomic displacements are lost; and (b) the amplitudes may reflect disorder in the structure and systematic error in the diffraction experiment in addition to motion, but the three contributions cannot be separated on the basis of measurements at a single temperature. Several approximate ways to solve these problems, e.g. rigid-body and segmented-rigid-body analysis, are reviewed together with their limitations. A more recent approach that represents a significant advance with respect to both difficulties is also described: Crystal structures are determined over a range of temperatures; the mean square amplitude quantities are interpreted by taking explicit account of their temperature dependence, i.e. by exploiting the difference in behavior of a microscopic oscillator in the low-temperature, quantum regime and in the high-temperature, classical regime. A distinction between low-frequency and high-frequency motion, disorder, and systematic error becomes possible with this model; this is illustrated with the help of case studies.

  4. Bringing Javanesse Traditional Dance into Basic Physics Class: Exemplifying Projectile Motion through Video Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handayani, Langlang; Prasetya Aji, Mahardika; Susilo; Marwoto, Putut

    2016-08-01

    An alternative approach of an arts-based instruction for Basic Physics class has been developed through the implementation of video analysis of a Javanesse traditional dance: Bambangan Cakil. A particular movement of the dance -weapon throwing- was analyzed by employing the LoggerPro software package to exemplify projectile motion. The results of analysis indicated that the movement of the thrown weapon in Bambangan Cakil dance provides some helping explanations of several physics concepts of projectile motion: object's path, velocity, and acceleration, in a form of picture, graph and also table. Such kind of weapon path and velocity can be shown via a picture or graph, while such concepts of decreasing velocity in y direction (weapon moving downward and upward) due to acceleration g can be represented through the use of a table. It was concluded that in a Javanesse traditional dance there are many physics concepts which can be explored. The study recommends to bring the traditional dance into a science class which will enable students to get more understanding of both physics concepts and Indonesia cultural heritage.

  5. Individualisation of time-motion analysis: a method comparison and case report series.

    PubMed

    Hunter, F; Bray, J; Towlson, C; Smith, M; Barrett, S; Madden, J; Abt, G; Lovell, R

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the intensity distribution of time-motion analysis data, when speed zones were categorized by different methods. 12 U18 players undertook a routine battery of laboratory- and field-based assessments to determine their running speed corresponding to the respiratory compensation threshold (RCT), maximal aerobic speed (MAS), maximal oxygen consumption (vV˙O2max) and maximal sprint speed (MSS). Players match-demands were tracked using 5 Hz GPS units in 22 fixtures (50 eligible match observations). The percentage of total distance covered running at high-speed (%HSR), very-high speed (%VHSR) and sprinting were determined using the following speed thresholds: (1) arbitrary; (2) individualised (IND) using RCT, vV˙O2max and MSS; (3) individualised via MAS per se; (4) individualised via MSS per se; and (5) individualised using MAS and MSS as measures of locomotor capacities (LOCO). Using MSS in isolation resulted in 61% and 39% of player's % HSR and % VHSR, respectively, being incorrectly interpreted, when compared to the IND technique. Estimating the RCT from fractional values of MAS resulted in erroneous interpretations of % HSR in 50% of cases. The present results suggest that practitioners and researchers should avoid using singular fitness characteristics to individualise the intensity distribution of time-motion analysis data. A combination of players' anaerobic threshold, MAS, and MSS characteristics are recommended to individualise player-tracking data.

  6. Scientific rotoscoping: a morphology-based method of 3-D motion analysis and visualization.

    PubMed

    Gatesy, Stephen M; Baier, David B; Jenkins, Farish A; Dial, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional skeletal movement is often impossible to accurately quantify from external markers. X-ray imaging more directly visualizes moving bones, but extracting 3-D kinematic data is notoriously difficult from a single perspective. Stereophotogrammetry is extremely powerful if bi-planar fluoroscopy is available, yet implantation of three radio-opaque markers in each segment of interest may be impractical. Herein we introduce scientific rotoscoping (SR), a new method of motion analysis that uses articulated bone models to simultaneously animate and quantify moving skeletons without markers. The three-step process is described using examples from our work on pigeon flight and alligator walking. First, the experimental scene is reconstructed in 3-D using commercial animation software so that frames of undistorted fluoroscopic and standard video can be viewed in their correct spatial context through calibrated virtual cameras. Second, polygonal models of relevant bones are created from CT or laser scans and rearticulated into a hierarchical marionette controlled by virtual joints. Third, the marionette is registered to video images by adjusting each of its degrees of freedom over a sequence of frames. SR outputs high-resolution 3-D kinematic data for multiple, unmarked bones and anatomically accurate animations that can be rendered from any perspective. Rather than generating moving stick figures abstracted from the coordinates of independent surface points, SR is a morphology-based method of motion analysis deeply rooted in osteological and arthrological data.

  7. Interacting with target tracking algorithms in a gaze-enhanced motion video analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, Jutta; Krüger, Wolfgang; Heinze, Norbert; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Motion video analysis is a challenging task, particularly if real-time analysis is required. It is therefore an important issue how to provide suitable assistance for the human operator. Given that the use of customized video analysis systems is more and more established, one supporting measure is to provide system functions which perform subtasks of the analysis. Recent progress in the development of automated image exploitation algorithms allow, e.g., real-time moving target tracking. Another supporting measure is to provide a user interface which strives to reduce the perceptual, cognitive and motor load of the human operator for example by incorporating the operator's visual focus of attention. A gaze-enhanced user interface is able to help here. This work extends prior work on automated target recognition, segmentation, and tracking algorithms as well as about the benefits of a gaze-enhanced user interface for interaction with moving targets. We also propose a prototypical system design aiming to combine both the qualities of the human observer's perception and the automated algorithms in order to improve the overall performance of a real-time video analysis system. In this contribution, we address two novel issues analyzing gaze-based interaction with target tracking algorithms. The first issue extends the gaze-based triggering of a target tracking process, e.g., investigating how to best relaunch in the case of track loss. The second issue addresses the initialization of tracking algorithms without motion segmentation where the operator has to provide the system with the object's image region in order to start the tracking algorithm.

  8. Successful implementation of a perioperative glycemic control protocol in cardiac surgery: barrier analysis and intervention using lean six sigma.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elizabeth A; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F; Grogan, Kelly L; Khalifeh, Katherine W; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2011-01-01

    Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200 mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200 mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period.

  9. Successful Implementation of a Perioperative Glycemic Control Protocol in Cardiac Surgery: Barrier Analysis and Intervention Using Lean Six Sigma

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Elizabeth A.; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F.; Grogan, Kelly L.; Khalifeh, Katherine W.; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E.; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U.

    2011-01-01

    Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200 mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200 mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period. PMID:22091218

  10. An analysis of cardiac defects and surgical interventions in 84 cases with full trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Deborah A; Martinez, Alyssa

    2016-02-01

    Trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) is the second most common autosomal trisomy after trisomy 21. Medical issues commonly include cardiac defects, such as ventricular septal defect (VSD) and atrial septal defect (ASD). If untreated, these conditions can contribute to the associated infant mortality. The objective of the study was review parent-reported information on 84 cases with full trisomy 18 focusing on prenatal and postnatal assessment and confirmation of cardiac defects and on subsequent treatment with cardiac surgery and post-surgery outcomes. At birth, 65 parent responses indicated the presence of VSD (77.4%), 38 ASD (45.2%), and 50 patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (59.5%). The presence of multiple cardiac defects was also analyzed including 25 cases with VSD, ASD, and PDA at birth. The total reduced to 18 at survey completion. Twenty-four cases had one or more cardiac defects repaired for a total of 34 corrective surgeries. Age at surgery varied from 2 weeks to 41 months of age with most performed under 1 year of age. Twenty-one cases were still living at the time of survey completion (87.5%). From these date we provide recommendations and implications.

  11. Analysis of steps adapted protocol in cardiac rehabilitation in the hospital phase

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Dallazen, Fernanda; Bronzatti, Angela Beerbaum Steinke; Lorenzoni, Juliara Cristina Werner; Windmöller, Pollyana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze a cardiac rehabilitation adapted protocol in physical therapy during the postoperative hospital phase of cardiac surgery in a service of high complexity, in aspects regarded to complications and mortality prevalence and hospitalization days. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional, retrospective and analytical study performed by investigating 99 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass graft, heart valve replacement or a combination of both. Step program adapted for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery was analyzed under the command of the physiotherapy professional team. Results In average, a patient stays for two days in the Intensive Care Unit and three to four days in the hospital room, totalizing six days of hospitalization. Fatalities occurred in a higher percentage during hospitalization (5.1%) and up to two years period (8.6%) when compared to 30 days after hospital discharge (1.1%). Among the postoperative complications, the hemodynamic (63.4%) and respiratory (42.6%) were the most prevalent. 36-42% of complications occurred between the immediate postoperative period and the second postoperative day. The hospital discharge started from the fifth postoperative day. We can observe that in each following day, the patients are evolving in achieving the Steps, where Step 3 was the most used during the rehabilitation phase I. Conclusion This evolution program by steps can to guide the physical rehabilitation at the hospital in patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:25859866

  12. The incidence of delirium after cardiac surgery in the elderly: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yulin; Flaherty, Joseph H; Yue, Jirong; Wang, Yanyan; Deng, Chuanyao; Chen, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Delirium is one of the most common complications after cardiac surgery in the elderly. Future studies aimed at preventing postoperative delirium will need an accurate estimate of incidence. However, there are no available systematic reviews on the incidence, and reports of incidence of postoperative delirium after a cardiac operation vary widely with significant heterogeneity. Therefore, we aim to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the most accurate incidence possible of postoperative delirium in individuals aged >65 years after cardiac surgery. Methods and analyses We will undertake a comprehensive literature search among PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, PsycINFO and CINAHL, from their inception to January 2017. Prospective cohort and cross sectional studies that described the incidence of delirium will be eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome will be the incidence of delirium. Risk of bias and methodological quality for the included studies will be assessed using a risk of bias tool for prevalence studies and the Cochrane guidelines. Heterogeneity of the estimates across studies will be assessed. Incidence data will be pooled by selective or emergency surgery. This systematic review will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Ethics and dissemination This proposed systematic review and meta-analysis is based on published data, and thus there is no requirement for ethics approval. The study will provide an up to date and accurate incidence of postoperative delirium among the older population after cardiac surgery, which is necessary for future research in this area. The findings of this study will be presented at conferences and disseminated through publication in a peer reviewed journal. Trial registration number CRD42016047773. PMID:28360251

  13. Electron diffraction analysis for the molecules with degenerate large amplitude motions: Intramolecular dynamics in arsenic pentafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochikov, Igor V.; Kovtun, Dmitry M.; Tarasov, Yury I.

    2017-03-01

    There exists a noticeable disagreement in the difference of axial and equatorial bond lengths in D3h symmetry arsenic and phosphorus pentafluorides between the GED data and high level quantum chemical results. In order to resolve this disagreement, a new structural analysis of the original experiment of (Clippard & Bartell, Inorg. Chem., 9 (1970) 805-811) was undertaken on the basis of modern approach incorporating spectroscopic evidence and quantum chemical information and allowing for intramolecular large-amplitude motion. The results of the analysis prove the internal insufficiency of the experimental material in the description of the accurate positions of the peaks on the radial distribution function. Additional experimental investigation of pentahalide molecules, especially at high temperatures, is of interest.

  14. Entry trajectory, entry environment, and analysis of spacecraft motion for the RAM C-3 flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, W. L.; Bowen, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The RAM C-3 flight experiment was launched to study the problem of radiofrequency blackout at an entry velocity of 24,300 ft/sec. The flight is described, and data for the entry trajectory and environment, which include the effects of actual temperature measured the day of launch, are presented. An analysis of entry spacecraft motions was performed. This analysis included the determination of wind angles from measured accelerations and estimates of wind angles at high altitudes from gyro-measured rotation rates. The maximum wind angles were found to be less than 5 deg to the point of pitch-roll resonance where the total wind angle increased to 8.5 deg and the roll rate started decreasing. A plausible cause for the decrease in roll rate was shown to be a combination of trim angle and an offset center of gravity.

  15. Estimation of spatial-temporal gait parameters using a low-cost ultrasonic motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, a low-cost motion analysis system using a wireless ultrasonic sensor network is proposed and investigated. A methodology has been developed to extract spatial-temporal gait parameters including stride length, stride duration, stride velocity, stride cadence, and stride symmetry from 3D foot displacements estimated by the combination of spherical positioning technique and unscented Kalman filter. The performance of this system is validated against a camera-based system in the laboratory with 10 healthy volunteers. Numerical results show the feasibility of the proposed system with average error of 2.7% for all the estimated gait parameters. The influence of walking speed on the measurement accuracy of proposed system is also evaluated. Statistical analysis demonstrates its capability of being used as a gait assessment tool for some medical applications.

  16. Estimation of Spatial-Temporal Gait Parameters Using a Low-Cost Ultrasonic Motion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a low-cost motion analysis system using a wireless ultrasonic sensor network is proposed and investigated. A methodology has been developed to extract spatial-temporal gait parameters including stride length, stride duration, stride velocity, stride cadence, and stride symmetry from 3D foot displacements estimated by the combination of spherical positioning technique and unscented Kalman filter. The performance of this system is validated against a camera-based system in the laboratory with 10 healthy volunteers. Numerical results show the feasibility of the proposed system with average error of 2.7% for all the estimated gait parameters. The influence of walking speed on the measurement accuracy of proposed system is also evaluated. Statistical analysis demonstrates its capability of being used as a gait assessment tool for some medical applications. PMID:25140636

  17. Analysis of conformational motions and related key residue interactions responsible for a specific function of proteins with elastic network model.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji Guo; Han, Xiao Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Hou, Yan Xue; Zhu, Jian Zhuo; Wu, Yi Dong

    2016-01-01

    Protein collective motions play a critical role in many biochemical processes. How to predict the functional motions and the related key residue interactions in proteins is important for our understanding in the mechanism of the biochemical processes. Normal mode analysis (NMA) of the elastic network model (ENM) is one of the effective approaches to investigate the structure-encoded motions in proteins. However, the motion modes revealed by the conventional NMA approach do not necessarily correspond to a specific function of protein. In the present work, a new analysis method was proposed to identify the motion modes responsible for a specific function of proteins and then predict the key residue interactions involved in the functional motions by using a perturbation approach. In our method, an internal coordinate that accounts for the specific function was introduced, and the Cartesian coordinate space was transformed into the internal/Cartesian space by using linear approximation, where the introduced internal coordinate serves as one of the axes of the coordinate space. NMA of ENM in this internal/Cartesian space was performed and the function-relevant motion modes were identified according to their contributions to the specific function of proteins. Then the key residue interactions important for the functional motions of the protein were predicted as the interactions whose perturbation largely influences the fluctuation along the internal coordinate. Using our proposed methods, the maltose transporter (MalFGK2) from E. Coli was studied. The functional motions and the key residue interactions that are related to the channel-gating function of this protein were successfully identified.

  18. Transcriptome-wide co-expression analysis identifies LRRC2 as a novel mediator of mitochondrial and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Leleu, Marion; Rowe, Glenn C.; Palygin, Oleg; Bukowy, John D.; Kuo, Judy; Rech, Monika; Hermans-Beijnsberger, Steffie; Schaefer, Sebastian; Adami, Eleonora; Creemers, Esther E.; Heinig, Matthias; Schroen, Blanche; Arany, Zoltan; Petretto, Enrico; Geurts, Aron M.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to myriad monogenic and complex pathologies. To understand the underlying mechanisms, it is essential to define the full complement of proteins that modulate mitochondrial function. To identify such proteins, we performed a meta-analysis of publicly available gene expression data. Gene co-expression analysis of a large and heterogeneous compendium of microarray data nominated a sub-population of transcripts that whilst highly correlated with known mitochondrial protein-encoding transcripts (MPETs), are not themselves recognized as generating proteins either localized to the mitochondrion or pertinent to functions therein. To focus the analysis on a medically-important condition with a strong yet incompletely understood mitochondrial component, candidates were cross-referenced with an MPET-enriched module independently generated via genome-wide co-expression network analysis of a human heart failure gene expression dataset. The strongest uncharacterized candidate in the analysis was Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 2 (LRRC2). LRRC2 was found to be localized to the mitochondria in human cells and transcriptionally-regulated by the mitochondrial master regulator Pgc-1α. We report that Lrrc2 transcript abundance correlates with that of β-MHC, a canonical marker of cardiac hypertrophy in humans and experimentally demonstrated an elevation in Lrrc2 transcript in in vitro and in vivo rodent models of cardiac hypertrophy as well as in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. RNAi-mediated Lrrc2 knockdown in a rat-derived cardiomyocyte cell line resulted in enhanced expression of canonical hypertrophic biomarkers as well as increased mitochondrial mass in the context of increased Pgc-1α expression. In conclusion, our meta-analysis represents a simple yet powerful springboard for the nomination of putative mitochondrially-pertinent proteins relevant to cardiac function and enabled the identification of LRRC2 as a novel mitochondrially

  19. Individual patient data network meta-analysis of mortality effects of implantable cardiac devices

    PubMed Central

    Woods, B; Hawkins, N; Mealing, S; Sutton, A; Abraham, W T; Beshai, J F; Klein, H; Sculpher, M; Plummer, C J; Cowie, M R

    2015-01-01

    Objective Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronisation therapy pacemakers (CRT-P) and the combination therapy (CRT-D) have been shown to reduce all-cause mortality compared with medical therapy alone in patients with heart failure and reduced EF. Our aim was to synthesise data from major randomised controlled trials to estimate the comparative mortality effects of these devices and how these vary according to patients’ characteristics. Methods Data from 13 randomised trials (12 638 patients) were provided by medical technology companies. Individual patient data were synthesised using network meta-analysis. Results Unadjusted analyses found CRT-D to be the most effective treatment (reduction in rate of death vs medical therapy: 42% (95% credible interval: 32–50%), followed by ICD (29% (20–37%)) and CRT-P (28% (15–40%)). CRT-D reduced mortality compared with CRT-P (19% (1–33%)) and ICD (18% (7–28%)). QRS duration, left bundle branch block (LBBB) morphology, age and gender were included as predictors of benefit in the final adjusted model. In this model, CRT-D reduced mortality in all subgroups (range: 53% (34–66%) to 28% (−1% to 49%)). Patients with QRS duration ≥150 ms, LBBB morphology and female gender benefited more from CRT-P and CRT-D. Men and those <60 years benefited more from ICD. Conclusions These data provide estimates for the mortality benefits of device therapy conditional upon multiple patient characteristics. They can be used to estimate an individual patient's expected relative benefit and thus inform shared decision making. Clinical guidelines should discuss age and gender as predictors of device benefits. PMID:26269413

  20. Motion-mode energy method for vehicle dynamics analysis and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nong; Wang, Lifu; Du, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle motion and vibration control is a fundamental motivation for the development of advanced vehicle suspension systems. In a vehicle-fixed coordinate system, the relative motions of the vehicle between body and wheel can be classified into several dynamic stages based on energy intensity, and can be decomposed into sets of uncoupled motion-modes according to modal parameters. Vehicle motions are coupled, but motion-modes are orthogonal. By detecting and controlling the predominating vehicle motion-mode, the system cost and energy consumption of active suspensions could be reduced. A motion-mode energy method (MEM) is presented in this paper to quantify the energy contribution of each motion-mode to vehicle dynamics in real time. The control of motion-modes is prioritised according to the level of motion-mode energy. Simulation results on a 10 degree-of-freedom nonlinear full-car model with the magic-formula tyre model illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed MEM. The contribution of each motion-mode to the vehicle's dynamic behaviour is analysed under different excitation inputs from road irregularities, directional manoeuvres and braking. With the identified dominant motion-mode, novel cost-effective suspension systems, such as active reconfigurable hydraulically interconnected suspension, can possibly be used to control full-car motions with reduced energy consumption. Finally, discussion, conclusions and suggestions for future work are provided.

  1. Slow dynamics in protein fluctuations revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis: The case of domain motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2011-02-01

    Protein dynamics on a long time scale was investigated using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA). We selected the lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO) as a target protein and focused on its domain motions in the open state. A MD simulation of the LAO in explicit water was performed for 600 ns, in which slow and large-amplitude domain motions of the LAO were observed. After extracting domain motions by rigid-body domain analysis, the tICA was applied to the obtained rigid-body trajectory, yielding slow modes of the LAO's domain motions in order of decreasing time scale. The slowest mode detected by the tICA represented not a closure motion described by a largest-amplitude mode determined by the principal component analysis but a twist motion with a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. The slow dynamics of the LAO were well described by only the slowest mode and were characterized by transitions between two basins. The results show that tICA is promising for describing and analyzing slow dynamics of proteins.

  2. Detection of Counter-Changing Contrast: Second-Order Apparent Motion Without Postrectification Motion-Energy Analysis or Salience Mapping/Feature Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Lee A.; Hock, Howard S.

    2004-01-01

    The perception of 2nd-order, texture-contrast-defined motion was studied for apparent-motion stimuli composed of a pair of spatially displaced, simultaneously visible checkerboards. It was found that background-relative, counter-changing contrast provided the informational basis for the perception of 2nd-order apparent motion; motion began where…

  3. A common framework for the analysis of complex motion? Standstill and capture illusions

    PubMed Central

    Dürsteler, Max R.

    2014-01-01

    A series of illusions was created by presenting stimuli, which consisted of two overlapping surfaces each defined by textures of independent visual features (i.e., modulation of luminance, color, depth, etc.). When presented concurrently with a stationary 2-D luminance texture, observers often fail to perceive the motion of an overlapping stereoscopically defined depth-texture. This illusory motion standstill arises due to a failure to represent two independent surfaces (one for luminance and one for depth textures) and motion transparency (the ability to perceive motion of both surfaces simultaneously). Instead the stimulus is represented as a single non-transparent surface taking on the stationary nature of the luminance-defined texture. By contrast, if it is the 2D-luminance defined texture that is in motion, observers often perceive the stationary depth texture as also moving. In this latter case, the failure to represent the motion transparency of the two textures gives rise to illusionary motion capture. Our past work demonstrated that the illusions of motion standstill and motion capture can occur for depth-textures that are rotating, or expanding / contracting, or else spiraling. Here I extend these findings to include stereo-shearing. More importantly, it is the motion (or lack thereof) of the luminance texture that determines how the motion of the depth will be perceived. This observation is strongly in favor of a single pathway for complex motion that operates on luminance-defines texture motion signals only. In addition, these complex motion illusions arise with chromatically-defined textures with smooth transitions between their colors. This suggests that in respect to color motion perception the complex motions' pathway is only able to accurately process signals from isoluminant colored textures with sharp transitions between colors, and/or moving at high speeds, which is conceivable if it relies on inputs from a hypothetical dual opponent color

  4. Analysis and Simulations of Near-Field Ground Motion from Source Physics Experiments (spe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, O.; Xu, H.; Lomov, I.; Herbold, E. B.; Glenn, L. A.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    This work is focused on analysis of near-field measurements (up to 50-70 m from the source) recorded during Source Physics Experiments SPE1, SPE2 and SPE3 in a granitic formation (the Climax Stock) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The explosive source used in these experiments is a sensitized heavy ANFO (SHANFO) with a well characterized equation of state. The first event, SPE1, had a yield of 0.1 ton, and was detonated at a 55 m depth of burial in a spherical cavity of about 0.3 m radius. SPE2 and SPE3 had an explosive yield of 1 ton, and they were both detonated in the same cavity at a depth of burial of 45 meters. One of the main goals of these experiments was to investigate the possible mechanisms of shear wave generation in the nonlinear source region. Another objective, relating specifically to the SPE2-SPE3 sequence, was to investigate the effect of damage from one explosion on the response of the medium to a second explosion of the same yield and at the same location as the first explosion. Comparison of the results from SPE2 and SPE3 show some interesting trends. . At the shot level, and at deeper locations, the data from SPE3 seem to agree quite well with SPE2 data, indicating that damage from SPE2 had little to no effect on the response of the medium at these locations. On the other hand, SPE3 data consistently show delay in arrival times as well as reduced wave amplitudes both at 50 ft (16 m) depth and at the ground surface, indicating that above the shot horizon damage from SPE2 had a perceptible effect on the SPE3 near field motions. The quality of the near field data at some gages from the SPE1 and SPE2 events is somewhat questionable, with orientation uncertainties making it difficult to ascertain with confidence the extent to which shear wave generation in the source region affected near field motions. New gages were strategically added to the SPE3 test bed to provide the data needed to address this issue and verify previous

  5. A finite element approach for large motion dynamic analysis of multibody structures in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Che-Wei

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element formulation for modeling the transient dynamics of constrained multibody space sructures with truss-like configurations is presented. Convected coordinate systems are used to define rigid-body motion of individual elements in the system. These systems are located at one end of each element and are oriented such that one axis passes through the other end of the element. Deformation of each element, relative to its convected coordinate system, is defined by cubic flexural shape functions as used in finite element methods of structural analysis. The formulation is oriented toward joint dominated structures and places the generalized coordinates at the joint. A transformation matrix is derived to integrate joint degree-of-freedom into the equations of motion of the element. Based on the derivation, a general-purpose code LATDYN (Large Angle Transient DYNamics) was developed. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of the code. For the spin-up of a flexible beam, results are compared with existing solutions available in the literature. For the deployment of one bay of a deployable space truss (the Minimast), results are verified by the geometric knowledge of the system and converged solution of a successively refined model.

  6. Contribution to a marker-free system for human motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calais, Elodie F.; Legrand, Louis; Voisin, Yvon; Diou, Alan

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to human gait analysis using a marker-free system. The devised acquisition system is composed of three synchronized and calibrated charge coupled device cameras. The aim of this work is to recognize in gray level image sequences the leg of a walking human and to reconstruct it in the three-dimensional space. An articulated three- dimensional (3D) model of the human body, based on the use of tapered superquadric curves, is first introduced. A motion-based segmentation, using morphological operators, is then applied to the image sequences in order to extract the boundaries of the leg in motion. A reconstruction process, based on the use of a least median of squares regression is next performed, to determine the location of the human body in the 3D space. Finally, a spatial coherence is imposed on the reconstructed curves in order to better fit the anatomy of the leg and to take into account the articulated model. Each stage of the proposed methodology has been tested both on synthetic images and on real world images of walking humans. The obtained results suggest that this approach is quite promising and should be useful in the study of the gait.

  7. Effects of light refraction on the accuracy of camera calibration and reconstruction in underwater motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Hoo; Casebolt, Jeffrey B

    2006-01-01

    One of the most serious obstacles to accurate quantification of the underwater motion of a swimmer's body is image deformation caused by refraction. Refraction occurs at the water-air interface plane (glass) owing to the density difference. Camera calibration-reconstruction algorithms commonly used in aquatic research do not have the capability to correct this refraction-induced nonlinear image deformation and produce large reconstruction errors. The aim of this paper is to provide a through review of: the nature of the refraction-induced image deformation and its behaviour in underwater object-space plane reconstruction; the intrinsic shortcomings of the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) method in underwater motion analysis; experimental conditions that interact with refraction; and alternative algorithms and strategies that can be used to improve the calibration-reconstruction accuracy. Although it is impossible to remove the refraction error completely in conventional camera calibration-reconstruction methods, it is possible to improve the accuracy to some extent by manipulating experimental conditions or calibration frame characteristics. Alternative algorithms, such as the localized DLT and the double-plane method are also available for error reduction. The ultimate solution for the refraction problem is to develop underwater camera calibration and reconstruction algorithms that have the capability to correct refraction.

  8. Effects of light refraction on the accuracy of camera calibration and reconstruction in underwater motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Hoo; Casebolt, Jeffrey B

    2006-07-01

    One of the most serious obstacles to accurate quantification of the underwater motion of a swimmer's body is image deformation caused by refraction. Refraction occurs at the water-air interface plane (glass) owing to the density difference. Camera calibration-reconstruction algorithms commonly used in aquatic research do not have the capability to correct this refraction-induced nonlinear image deformation and produce large reconstruction errors. The aim of this paper is to provide a thorough review of: the nature of the refraction-induced image deformation and its behaviour in underwater object-space plane reconstruction; the intrinsic shortcomings of the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) method in underwater motion analysis; experimental conditions that interact with refraction; and alternative algorithms and strategies that can be used to improve the calibration-reconstruction accuracy. Although it is impossible to remove the refraction error completely in conventional camera calibration-reconstruction methods, it is possible to improve the accuracy to some extent by manipulating experimental conditions or calibration frame characteristics. Alternative algorithms, such as the localized DLT and the double-plane method are also available for error reduction. The ultimate solution for the refraction problem is to develop underwater camera calibration and reconstruction algorithms that have the capability to correct refraction.

  9. Amniotic fluid stem cells morph into a cardiovascular lineage: analysis of a chemically induced cardiac and vascular commitment.

    PubMed

    Maioli, Margherita; Contini, Giovanni; Santaniello, Sara; Bandiera, Pasquale; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Sanna, Raimonda; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Delitala, Alessandro P; Montella, Andrea; Bagella, Luigi; Ventura, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells were previously observed along with mesenchymal stem cells from different sources, after being treated with a mixed ester of hyaluronan with butyric and retinoic acids, to show a significant increase in the yield of cardiogenic and vascular differentiated elements. The aim of the present study was to determine if stem cells derived from primitive fetal cells present in human amniotic fluid (hAFSCs) and cultured in the presence of a mixture of hyaluronic (HA), butyric (BU), and retinoic (RA) acids show a higher yield of differentiation toward the cardiovascular phenotype as compared with untreated cells. During the differentiation process elicited by exposure to HA + BU + RA, genes controlling pluripotency and plasticity of stem cells, such as Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4, were significantly downregulated at the transcriptional level. At this point, a significant increase in expression of genes controlling the appearance of cardiogenic and vascular lineages in HA + BU + RA-treated cells was observed. The protein expression levels typical of cardiac and vascular phenotypes, evaluated by Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry, were higher in hAFSCs cultured in the presence of HA + BU + RA, as compared with untreated control cells. Appearance of the cardiac phenotype was further inferred by ultrastructural analysis using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. These results demonstrate that a mixture of HA + BU + RA significantly increased the yield of elements committed toward cardiac and vascular phenotypes, confirming what we have previously observed in other cellular types.

  10. Do depressive symptoms "blunt" effort? An analysis of cardiac engagement and withdrawal for an increasingly difficult task.

    PubMed

    Silvia, Paul J; Mironovová, Zuzana; McHone, Ashley N; Sperry, Sarah H; Harper, Kelly L; Kwapil, Thomas R; Eddington, Kari M

    2016-07-01

    Research on depression and effort has suggested "depressive blunting"-lower cardiovascular reactivity in response to challenges and stressors. Many studies, however, find null effects or higher reactivity. The present research draws upon motivational intensity theory, a broad model of effort that predicts cases in which depressive symptoms should increase or decrease effort. Because depressive symptoms can influence task-difficulty appraisals-people see tasks as subjectively harder-people high in depressive symptoms should engage higher effort at objectively easier levels of difficulty but also quit sooner. A sample of adults completed a mental effort challenge with four levels of difficulty, from very easy to difficult-but-feasible. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the CESD and DASS; effort-related cardiac activity was assessed via markers of contractility (e.g., the cardiac pre-ejection period [PEP]) obtained with impedance cardiography. The findings supported the theory's predictions. When the task was relatively easier, people high in depressive symptoms showed higher contractility (shorter PEP), consistent with greater effort. When the task was relatively harder, people high in depressive symptoms showed diminished contractility, consistent with quitting. The results suggest that past research has been observing a small part of a larger trajectory of trying and quitting, and they illustrate the value of a theoretically grounded analysis of depressive symptoms and effort-related cardiac activity.

  11. Heart Rate Variability and Cardiac Vagal Tone in Psychophysiological Research – Recommendations for Experiment Planning, Data Analysis, and Data Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Laborde, Sylvain; Mosley, Emma; Thayer, Julian F.

    2017-01-01

    Psychophysiological research integrating heart rate variability (HRV) has increased during the last two decades, particularly given the fact that HRV is able to index cardiac vagal tone. Cardiac vagal tone, which represents the contribution of the parasympathetic nervous system to cardiac regulation, is acknowledged to be linked with many phenomena relevant for psychophysiological research, including self-regulation at the cognitive, emotional, social, and health levels. The ease of HRV collection and measurement coupled with the fact it is relatively affordable, non-invasive and pain free makes it widely accessible to many researchers. This ease of access should not obscure the difficulty of interpretation of HRV findings that can be easily misconstrued, however, this can be controlled to some extent through correct methodological processes. Standards of measurement were developed two decades ago by a Task Force within HRV research, and recent reviews updated several aspects of the Task Force paper. However, many methodological aspects related to HRV in psychophysiological research have to be considered if one aims to be able to draw sound conclusions, which makes it difficult to interpret findings and to compare results across laboratories. Those methodological issues have mainly been discussed in separate outlets, making difficult to get a grasp on them, and thus this paper aims to address this issue. It will help to provide psychophysiological researchers with recommendations and practical advice concerning experimental designs, data analysis, and data reporting. This will ensure that researchers starting a project with HRV and cardiac vagal tone are well informed regarding methodological considerations in order for their findings to contribute to knowledge advancement in their field. PMID:28265249

  12. Coarse analysis of multiscale systems: Diffuser flows, charged particle motion, and connections to averaging theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jimmy

    We describe a technique for the efficient computation of the dominant-scale dynamics of a fluid system when only a high-fidelity simulation is available. Such a technique is desirable when governing equations for the dominant scales are unavailable, when model reduction is impractical, or when the original high-fidelity computation is expensive. We adopt the coarse analysis framework proposed by I. G. Kevrekidis (Comm. Math. Sci. 2003), where a computational superstructure is designed to use short-time, high-fidelity simulations to extract the dominant features for a multiscale system. We apply this technique to compute the dominant features of the compressible flow through a planar diffuser. We apply the proper orthogonal decomposition to classify the dominant and subdominant scales of diffuser flows. We derive a coarse projective Adams-Bashforth time integration routine and compute averaged diffuser flows. The results include accurate tracking of the dominant-scale dynamics for a range of parameter values for the computational superstructure. These results demonstrate that coarse analysis methods are useful for solving fluid flow problems of a multiscale nature. In order to elucidate the behavior of coarse analysis techniques, we make comparisons to averaging theory. To this end, we derive governing equations for the average motion of charged particles in a magnetic field in a number of different settings. First, we apply a novel procedure, inspired by WKB theory and Whitham averaging, to average the variational principle. The resulting equations are equivalent to the guiding center equations for charged particle motion; this marks an instance where averaging and variational principles commute. Secondly, we apply Lagrangian averaging techniques, previously applied in fluid mechanics, to derive averaged equations. Making comparisons to the WKB/Whitham derivation allows for the necessary closure of the Lagrangian averaging formulation. We also discuss the

  13. Crystallographic analysis of the thermal motion of the inclusion complex of cyclomaltoheptaose (beta-cyclodextrin) with hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Harata, Kazuaki

    2003-02-07

    The crystal structure of the inclusion complex of cyclomaltoheptaose (beta-cyclodextrin) with hexamethylenetetramine was determined at temperatures of 123, 173, 223, and 293 K. The rigid-body motion of the host and guest molecules was evaluated by means of the TLS method that represents the molecular motion in terms of translation, libration, and screw motion. In increasing the temperature from 123 to 293 K, the amplitude of the rigid body vibration of the host molecule was increased from 1.0 to 1.3 degrees in the rotational motion and from 0.16 to 0.17 A in the translational motion. The cyclomaltoheptaose molecule has the flexibility in seven alpha-(1-->4)-linkages, and each glucose unit was in the rotational vibration around an axis through two glycosidic oxygen atoms. As a result, the rigid-body parameters of cyclomaltoheptaose were considered to be overestimated because of including the contribution from the local motion of glucose units. In contrast, for the guest molecule having no structural flexibility, the TLS analysis demonstrated that the atomic thermal vibration was mostly derived from the rigid body motion. The rotational amplitude of hexamethylenetetramine was changed from 5.2 to 6.6 degrees in increasing the temperature from 123 to 293 K, while the change of the translational amplitude was from 0.20 to 0.23 A. The translational motion of the guest molecule was hindered by the inside wall of the host cavity. The molecular motion was characterized by the rotational vibration around the axis through two nitrogen atoms that were involved in the hydrogen-bond formation.

  14. Predicting Motion Sickness During Parabolic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2002-01-01

    Background: There are large individual differences in susceptibility to motion sickness. Attempts to predict who will become motion sick have had limited success. In the present study we examined gender differences in resting levels of salivary amylase and total protein, cardiac interbeat intervals (R-R intervals), and a sympathovagal index and evaluated their potential to correctly classify individuals into two motion sickness severity groups. Methods: Sixteen subjects (10 men and 6 women) flew 4 sets of 10 parabolas aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Saliva samples for amylase and total protein were collected preflight on the day of the flight and motion sickness symptoms were recorded during each parabola. Cardiovascular parameters were collected in the supine position 1-5 days prior to the flight. Results: There were no significant gender differences in sickness severity or any of the other variables mentioned above. Discriminant analysis using salivary amylase, R-R intervals and the sympathovagal index produced a significant Wilks' lambda coefficient of 0.36, p= 0.006. The analysis correctly classified 87% of the subjects into the none-mild sickness or the moderate-severe sickness group. Conclusions: The linear combination of resting levels of salivary amylase, high frequency R-R interval levels, and a sympathovagal index may be useful in predicting motion sickness severity.

  15. Predicting motion sickness during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are large individual differences in susceptibility to motion sickness. Attempts to predict who will become motion sick have had limited success. In the present study, we examined gender differences in resting levels of salivary amylase and total protein, cardiac interbeat intervals (R-R intervals), and a sympathovagal index and evaluated their potential to correctly classify individuals into two motion sickness severity groups. METHODS: Sixteen subjects (10 men and 6 women) flew four sets of 10 parabolas aboard NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Saliva samples for amylase and total protein were collected preflight on the day of the flight and motion sickness symptoms were recorded during each parabola. Cardiovascular parameters were collected in the supine position 1-5 days before the flight. RESULTS: There were no significant gender differences in sickness severity or any of the other variables mentioned above. Discriminant analysis using salivary amylase, R-R intervals and the sympathovagal index produced a significant Wilks' lambda coefficient of 0.36, p=0.006. The analysis correctly classified 87% of the subjects into the none-mild sickness or the moderate-severe sickness group. CONCLUSIONS: The linear combination of resting levels of salivary amylase, high-frequency R-R interval levels, and a sympathovagal index may be useful in predicting motion sickness severity.

  16. An epigenome-wide association analysis of cardiac autonomic responses among a population of welders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinming; Liu, Zhonghua; Umukoro, Peter E.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Fang, Shona C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Lin, Xihong; Mittleman, Murray A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA methylation is one of the potential epigenetic mechanisms associated with various adverse cardiovascular effects; however, its association with cardiac autonomic dysfunction, in particular, is unknown. In the current study, we aimed to identify epigenetic variants associated with alterations in cardiac autonomic responses. Cardiac autonomic responses were measured with two novel markers: acceleration capacity (AC) and deceleration capacity (DC). We examined DNA methylation levels at more than 472,506 CpG probes through the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip assay. We conducted separate linear mixed models to examine associations of DNA methylation levels at each CpG with AC and DC. One CpG (cg26829071) located in the GPR133 gene was negatively associated with DC values after multiple testing corrections through false discovery rate. Our study suggests the potential functional importance of methylation in cardiac autonomic responses. Findings from the current study need to be replicated in future studies in a larger population. PMID:28075199

  17. The pioneering use of systems analysis to study cardiac output regulation.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E

    2004-11-01

    This essay examines the historical significance of an APS classic paper that is freely available online: Guyton AC, Lindsey AW, and Kaufmann BN. Effect of mean circulatory filling pressure and other peripheral circulatory factors on cardiac output. Am J Physiol 180: 463-468, 1955 (http://ajplegacy.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/180/3/463).

  18. Analysis of knowledge of the general population and health professionals on organ donation after cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Bedenko, Ramon Correa; Nisihara, Renato; Yokoi, Douglas Shun; Candido, Vinícius de Mello; Galina, Ismael; Moriguchi, Rafael Massayuki; Ceulemans, Nico; Salvalaggio, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the knowledge and acceptance of the public and professionals working in intensive care units regarding organ donation after cardiac death. Methods The three hospitals with the most brain death notifications in Curitiba were selected, and two groups of respondents were established for application of the same questionnaire: the general public (i.e., visitors of patients in intensive care units) and health professionals working in the same intensive care unit. The questionnaire contained questions concerning demographics, intention to donate organs and knowledge of current legislation regarding brain death and donation after cardiac death. Results In total, 543 questionnaires were collected, including 442 from family members and 101 from health professionals. There was a predominance of women and Catholics in both groups. More females intended to donate. Health professionals performed better in the knowledge comparison. The intention to donate organs was significantly higher in the health professionals group (p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in the intention to donate in terms of education level or income. There was a greater acceptance of donation after uncontrolled cardiac death among Catholics than among evangelicals (p < 0.001). Conclusion Most of the general population intended to donate, with greater intentions expressed by females. Education and income did not affect the decision. The type of transplant that used a donation after uncontrolled cardiac death was not well accepted in the study population, indicating the need for more clarification for its use in our setting. PMID:27626950

  19. A study of the nonlinear aerodynamics of bodies in nonplanar motion. Ph.D. Thesis - Stanford Univ., Calif.; [numerical analysis of aerodynamic force and moment systems during large amplitude, arbitrary motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiff, L. B.

    1974-01-01

    Concepts from the theory of functionals are used to develop nonlinear formulations of the aerodynamic force and moment systems acting on bodies in large-amplitude, arbitrary motions. The analysis, which proceeds formally once the functional dependence of the aerodynamic reactions upon the motion variables is established, ensures the inclusion, within the resulting formulation, of pertinent aerodynamic terms that normally are excluded in the classical treatment. Applied to the large-amplitude, slowly varying, nonplanar motion of a body, the formulation suggests that the aerodynamic moment can be compounded of the moments acting on the body in four basic motions: steady angle of attack, pitch oscillations, either roll or yaw oscillations, and coning motion. Coning, where the nose of the body describes a circle around the velocity vector, characterizes the nonplanar nature of the general motion.

  20. A Theoretical Analysis of the Effects of Fuel Motion on Airplane Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, Albert A

    1952-01-01

    The general equations of motion for an airplane with a number of spherical fuel tanks are derived. The motion of the fuel is approximated by the motion of solid pendulums. The same type of derivation and equations are shown to apply to any type of fuel tank where the motion of the fuel may be represented in terms of undamped harmonic oscillators. Motions are calculated for a present-day high-speed airplane and a free-flying airplane model with two spherical tanks in the symmetry plane.

  1. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  2. Regional-specific Stochastic Simulation of Spatially-distributed Ground-motion Time Histories using Wavelet Packet Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; Wang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic simulation of spatially distributed ground-motion time histories is important for performance-based earthquake design of geographically distributed systems. In this study, we develop a novel technique to stochastically simulate regionalized ground-motion time histories using wavelet packet analysis. First, a transient acceleration time history is characterized by wavelet-packet parameters proposed by Yamamoto and Baker (2013). The wavelet-packet parameters fully characterize ground-motion time histories in terms of energy content, time- frequency-domain characteristics and time-frequency nonstationarity. This study further investigates the spatial cross-correlations of wavelet-packet parameters based on geostatistical analysis of 1500 regionalized ground motion data from eight well-recorded earthquakes in California, Mexico, Japan and Taiwan. The linear model of coregionalization (LMC) is used to develop a permissible spatial cross-correlation model for each parameter group. The geostatistical analysis of ground-motion data from different regions reveals significant dependence of the LMC structure on regional site conditions, which can be characterized by the correlation range of Vs30 in each region. In general, the spatial correlation and cross-correlation of wavelet-packet parameters are stronger if the site condition is more homogeneous. Using the regional-specific spatial cross-correlation model and cokriging technique, wavelet packet parameters at unmeasured locations can be best estimated, and regionalized ground-motion time histories can be synthesized. Case studies and blind tests demonstrated that the simulated ground motions generally agree well with the actual recorded data, if the influence of regional-site conditions is considered. The developed method has great potential to be used in computational-based seismic analysis and loss estimation in a regional scale.

  3. [First Results of Analysis of Russian Part of the European Register on Cardiac Rehabilitation EuroCaReD (European Cardiac Rehabilitation Database)].

    PubMed

    Pogosova, N V; Sokolova, O Iu; Iufereva, Iu M; Osipova, I V; Riamzina, I N

    2015-01-01

    The joint European Registry of patients with cardiovascular diseases participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs (European Cardiac Rehabilitation Database, EuroCaReD) is conducted in collaboration between the ESC and EACPR). It's main goals were to improve the routine use of cardiac rehabilitation, to develop joint standards for cardiac rehabilitation in all European countries and evidence based rehabilitation programs and to monitor any changes. In the EuroCaReD registry participated a total of 44 centers from 13 countries, including 3 centers from Russia, which enrolled 151 patients during 2010-2012. This paper is comparing the baseline demographics, clinical data and risk factors in Russian patients versus the rest of Europe. It was shown that cardiac rehabilitation patients in Russia, as in the whole cohort, are predominantly male. Elderly patients from Russia were 3 times less likely to be referred for rehabilitation than in Europe. Unlike the whole cohort Russian patients were almost never sent to rehabilitation because of heart failure or stable angina. Likewise the whole Europe Russian patients had an average of 3 cardiovascular risk factors before rehabilitation, but with some national differences in their prevalence and severity.

  4. Importance of re-calibration time on pulse contour analysis agreement with thermodilution measurements of cardiac output: a retrospective analysis of intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Gomatam, Shanti; Forrest, Shawn; Strauss, David G

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the effect of re-calibration time on cardiac output estimation and trending performance in a retrospective analysis of an intensive care unit patient population using error grid analyses. Paired thermodilution and arterial blood pressure waveform measurements (N = 2141) from 222 patient records were extracted from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. Pulse contour analysis was performed by implementing a previously reported algorithm at calibration times of 1, 2, 8 and 24 h. Cardiac output estimation agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman and error grid analyses. Trending was assessed by concordance and a 4-Quadrant error grid analysis. Error between pulse contour and thermodilution increased with longer calibration times. Limits of agreement were -1.85 to 1.66 L/min for 1 h maximum calibration time compared to -2.70 to 2.41 L/min for 24 h. Error grid analysis resulted in 74.2 % of points bounded by 20 % error limits of thermodilution measurements for 1 h calibration time compared to 65 % for 24 h. 4-Quadrant error grid analysis showed <75 % of changes in pulse contour estimates to be within ±80 % of the change in the thermodilution measurement at any calibration time. Shorter calibration times improved the agreement of cardiac output pulse contour estimates with thermodilution. Use of minimally invasive pulse contour methods in intensive care monitoring could benefit from prospective studies evaluating calibration protocols. The applied pulse contour analysis method and thermodilution showed poor agreement to monitor changes in cardiac output.

  5. X-ray analysis of the proper motion and PWN for PSR J1741-2054

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchettl, Katie

    2014-11-01

    We report on the X-ray analysis of PSR J1741-2054 carried out as a part of the Chandra XVP program (6 ACIS-S observations, totalling ~300 ks over 5 months). By registering this new epoch of observations using X-ray point sources in the field of view to an archival observation taken 3.2 years earlier, we are able to measure the proper motion of the pulsar with > 3 σ significance. We also investigate the spatial and spectral properties of the pulsar, its compact nebula and extended tail. We find that the compact nebula can be well described with an absorbed power-law with photon index of Γ=1.6+/-0.2, while the tail shows no evidence of variation in the spectral index with the distance from the pulsar. We have also investigated the X-ray spectrum of the neutron star.

  6. Disk or halo white dwarfs?. Kinematic analysis of high proper motion surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagna, A.; Carollo, D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Bucciarelli, B.

    2004-12-01

    We present an alternative method for the kinematic analysis of high proper motion surveys and discuss its application to the survey of Oppenheimer et al. (2001) for the selection of reliable halo white dwarfs (WDs). The local WD space density we estimate is ρWD ≃ 1/2 × 10-5 M⊙ pc-3, which is about an order of magnitude smaller than the value derived in Oppenheimer et al. (2001), and is consistent with the values obtained from recent reanalyses of the same data. Our result, which corresponds to a fraction of 0.1% / 0.2% of the local dark matter, does not support the scenario suggested by microlensing experiments that ancient cool WDs could contribute significantly to the dark halo of the Milky Way.

  7. Further results from PIXE analysis of inks in Galileo's notes on motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Carmine, P.; Giuntini, L.; Hooper, W.; Lucarelli, F.; Mandò, P. A.

    1996-06-01

    We have recently analysed the inks in some of the folios of Vol. 72 of Manoscritti galileiani, kept at the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze, which contains a collection of loose handwritten sheets containing undated notes, data from experiments and propositions on the problems of motion from different periods of Galileo's life. This paper reports specific results obtained from the analysis of some of these propositions, which allowed to make a contribution to their chronological attribution and therefore to the solution of some historical controversies. Even in the case where the "absolute" chronological attributions could not be made on the basis of comparison with dated documents, the PIXE results provided useful information to deny or confirm the hypothesis that different propositions were written in the same or in different periods.

  8. Three-dimensional motion analysis in the elbow joint position sense in children

    PubMed Central

    Hong, So-Young; Song, Chiang-Soon; Hong, Ki-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in elbow joint position sense in children. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen healthy children volunteered as subjects for this study. Joint position sense was assessed by asking the children to flex their elbows between 30° to 110° while blindfolded. The error range of elbow movement was analyzed with Compact Measuring System 10 for three-dimensional motion. To analyze data, descriptive statistics and paired t-test analysis were performed by using IBM SPSS Statistics 20.0. [Results] A significantly lower error was found in 30° right elbow flexion than 110° right elbow flexion (p<0.05). No significant difference was found between 30° and 110° left elbow flexion. [Conclusion] These results indicate that in children, joint position sense errors decrease as joint angles approach 30° flexion. PMID:28174442

  9. Pattern recognition analysis of satellite data for tropical cyclone motion and intensity forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Herbert; Nunez, Edwin; Barker, Llyle; Rodgers, ED

    1986-01-01

    An objective empirical analysis technique is employed to investigate the extent to which satellite-obtained measurements (GOES IR and TOVS data) of a tropical cyclone and its environment can be used to predict cyclone motion. The paper describes the procedure used to process the satellite derived data in order to optimize their possible predictive value, the technique used in developing the regression algorithms, and the results of testing these algorithms using the Lachenbrach and Mickey (1968) procedure. The data were examined alone and in conjunction with available nonsatellite climatological and persistence variables for each storm. These predictors are similar to those used in the National Hurricane Center (NHC) CLIPPER model. The performances obtained using the Nichols Research Corporation CLIPPER model and the NHC CLIPPER model are compared, using homogeneous data sets for the comparisons. Major differences in results were found to be related to differences in the models.

  10. Analysis of Parallelogram Mechanism used to Preserve Remote Center of Motion for Surgical Telemanipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trochimczuk, R.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a parallelogram mechanism commonly used to provide a kinematic remote center of motion in surgical telemanipulators. Selected types of parallel manipulator designs, encountered in commercial and laboratory-made designs described in the medical robotics literature, will serve as the research material. Among other things, computer simulations in the ANSYS 13.0 CAD/CAE software environment, employing the finite element method, will be used. The kinematics of the solution of manipulator with the parallelogram mechanism will be determined in order to provide a more complete description. These results will form the basis for the decision regarding the possibility of applying a parallelogram mechanism in an original prototype of a telemanipulator arm.

  11. Pilot study of the impact sacroiliac joint manipulation has on walking kinematics using motion analysis technology

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John S.; Coats, Jesse; Sorrels, Kenneth; Walters, Mathew; Williams, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of engaging in a series of larger studies measuring the effect of sacroiliac joint manipulation on walking kinematics using motion analysis technology. Methods Twelve college students engaged in a baseline 90-second gait analysis at 1.5 mph using infrared VICON cameras. Following this, they underwent a prone heel comparison test for functional leg length inequality. Upon examination, participants were then classified as follows: left short leg, right short leg, or no short leg. Participants in each of the 2 short leg branches of this study were then randomized to receive either chiropractic manipulative therapy to the posterior superior iliac spine on the short limb side or no manipulation. Recruitment was ongoing for this pilot study until 1 participant was recruited in each of the following 5 comparative study groups: left short leg—manipulation, left short leg—no manipulation (control 1), right short leg—manipulation, right short leg—no manipulation (control 2), and no short leg (control 3). All participants then underwent another 90-second gait analysis. Data were then grouped and submitted to a blinded biomechanist to determine if there were any unique biomechanical differences between the groups. Results No statistically significant differences were measured because of this being a pilot study with a small sample size. Conclusions The data from this study indicate that a series of larger studies with this design is feasible. PMID:24396314

  12. Quantitative Analysis Of Sperm Motion Kinematics From Real-Time Video-Edge Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Russell O...; Katz, David F.

    1988-02-01

    A new model of sperm swimming kinematics, which uses signal processing methods and multivariate statistical techniques to identify individual cell-motion parameters and unique cell populations, is presented. Swimming paths of individual cells are obtained using real-time, video-edge digitization. Raw paths are adaptively filtered to identify average paths, and measurements of space-time oscillations about average paths are made. Time-dependent frequency information is extracted from spatial variations about average paths using harmonic analysis. Raw-path and average-path measures such as curvature, curve length, and straight-line length, and measures of oscillations about average paths such as time-dependent amplitude and frequency variations, are used in a multivariate, cluster analysis to identify unique cell populations. The entire process, including digitization of sperm video images, is computer-automated. Preliminary results indicate that this method of tracking, digitization, and kinematic analysis accurately identifies unique cell subpopulations, including: the relative numbers of cells in each subpopulation, how subpopulations differ, and the extent and significance of such differences. With appropriate work, this approach may be useful for clinical discrimination between normal and abnormal semen specimens.

  13. Preoperative Antihypertensive Medication in Relation to Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ai-Guo; Chen, An-ji; Zhang, Xiong-fei; Deng, Hui-wei

    2017-01-01

    Background. We undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of preoperative hypertension and preoperative antihypertensive medication to postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library (from inception to March 2016) for eligible studies. The outcomes were the effects of preoperative hypertension, preoperative calcium antagonists regimen, preoperative ACE inhibitors regimen, and preoperative beta blocking agents regimen with POAF. We calculated pooled risk ratios (OR) and 95% CIs using random- or fixed-effects models. Results. Twenty-five trials involving 130087 patients were listed. Meta-analysis showed that the number of preoperative hypertension patients in POAF group was significantly higher (P < 0.05), while we found that there are no significant differences between two groups in Asia patients by subgroup analysis, which is in contrast to other outcomes. Compared with the Non-POAF group, the number of patients who used calcium antagonists and ACE inhibitors preoperatively in POAF group was significantly higher (P < 0.05). And we found that there were no significant differences between two groups of preoperative beta blocking agents used (P = 0.08). Conclusions. Preoperative hypertension and preoperative antihypertensive medication in patients undergoing cardiac operations seem to be associated with higher risk of POAF. PMID:28286753

  14. Home based versus centre based cardiac rehabilitation: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Anna; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Taylor, Rod S

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect of home based and supervised centre based cardiac rehabilitation on mortality and morbidity, health related quality of life, and modifiable cardiac risk factors in patients with coronary heart disease. Design Systematic review. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, without language restriction, searched from 2001 to January 2008. Review methods Reference lists checked and advice sought from authors. Included randomised controlled trials that compared centre based cardiac rehabilitation with home based programmes in adults with acute myocardial infarction, angina, or heart failure or who had undergone coronary revascularisation. Two reviewers independently assessed the eligibility of the identified trials and extracted data independently. Authors were contacted when possible to obtain missing information. Results 12 studies (1938 participants) were included. Most studies recruited patients with a low risk of further events after myocardial infarction or revascularisation. No difference was seen between home based and centre based cardiac rehabilitation in terms of mortality (relative risk 1.31, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 2.66), cardiac events, exercise capacity (standardised mean difference −0.11, −0.35 to 0.13), modifiable risk factors (weighted mean difference systolic blood pressure (0.58 mm Hg, −3.29 mm Hg to 4.44 mm Hg), total cholesterol (−0.13 mmol/l, −0.31 mmol/l to 0.05 mmol/l), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.15 mmol/l, −0.31 mmol/l to 0.01 mmol/l), or relative risk for proportion of smokers at follow-up (0.98, 0.73 to 1.31)), or health related quality of life, with the exception of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (−0.06, −0.11 to −0.02) mmol/l). In the home based participants, there was evidence of superior adherence. No consistent difference was seen in the healthcare costs of the two forms

  15. Actuarial analysis of the risk of undergoing repeat cardiac valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, R; Applebaum, R E; Kim, J B; Engler, M B; Engler, M M

    1984-09-01

    One thousand five hundred ninety-eight patients who underwent cardiac valve replacement were reviewed. One hundred fifty-two patients (10 percent) required a second valve replacement. The indications for repeat valve replacement were prosthetic valve dysfunction in 53 patients (35 percent), development of a new valvular lesion in 46 patients (30 percent), simple closure of a perivalvular leak in 14 patients (9 percent), change of the valve poppet in 13 patients (8 percent), severe hemolysis or emboli in 21 patients (14 percent), and prosthetic valve endocarditis in 5 patients (3 percent). The mean preoperative New York Health Association functional class improved from 3 to 1.5 in the nonreoperated patients and from 2.9 to 1.8 in patients who underwent a second valve replacement. Similarly, the mean cardiac index improved from 2.5 to 2.9 and from 2.5 to 2.8 in nonreoperated and reoperated patients, respectively. The operative mortality rate was 14 percent in the nonreoperated patients and 16 percent at second operation in the reoperated patients. Using actuarial techniques, the risk of repeat valve replacement was 1 to 4 percent per year. Long-term survival was compared between groups. Using actuarial techniques, the estimated survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were 89 percent, 69 percent, and 52 percent, respectively in nonreoperated patients and 87 percent, 60 percent, and 37 percent in reoperated patients. This study has documented the excellent improvement in functional and hemodynamic state after second cardiac valve replacement. The operative mortality and long-term survival rates were similar to those of the nonreoperated patients. Patients having repeat cardiac valve replacement can expect good improvement in length and quality of life.

  16. Detection of First and Second Cardiac Sounds Based on Time Frequency Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    derived from the closing/opening of heart valves [3][4][6]. It will be shown that the proposed method results in a very precise timing of PCG signals...important cardiac sounds, S1 and S2, are generated by sudden distention of the valves leaflets or by acceleration of blood mass in the moment of...aortic insufficiency (AI), aortic stenoses (AS) and mitral insufficiency (MI). From the 19 volunteers, 756 cycles were used to evaluate the performance of

  17. Dynamic mass redistribution analysis of endogenous β-adrenergic receptor signaling in neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rhonda L; Grisanti, Laurel A; Yu, Justine E; Repas, Ashley A; Woodall, Meryl; Ibetti, Jessica; Koch, Walter J; Jacobson, Marlene A; Tilley, Douglas G

    2014-02-01

    Label-free systems for the agnostic assessment of cellular responses to receptor stimulation have been shown to provide a sensitive method to dissect receptor signaling. β-adenergic receptors (βAR) are important regulators of normal and pathologic cardiac function and are expressed in cardiomyocytes as well as cardiac fibroblasts, where relatively fewer studies have explored their signaling responses. Using label-free whole cell dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays we investigated the response patterns to stimulation of endogenous βAR in primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NRCF). Catecholamine stimulation of the cells induced a negative DMR deflection resulting in a concentration-dependent pharmacological response that was competitively blocked by βAR blockade and non-competitively blocked by irreversible uncoupling of Gs proteins. Pharmacological profiling of subtype-selective βAR agonists and antagonists revealed a dominant role of β2AR in mediating the DMR responses, consistent with the relative expression levels of β2AR and β1AR in NRCF. Additionally, βAR-mediated cAMP generation was assessed via a fluorescence biosensor, revealing similar kinetics between DMR responses and cAMP generation. As such, βAR-dependent DMR responses were enhanced via inhibition of cAMP degradation, as well as dynamin-mediated receptor internalization. Finally, we assessed G protein-independent βAR signaling through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While inhibition of EGFR reduced the DMR response to βAR stimulation, our results demonstrate that G protein-dependent signaling produces a majority of the biological response to βAR stimulation in NRCF. Altogether, measurement of DMR responses in primary cardiac fibroblasts provides a sensitive readout for investigating endogenous βAR signaling via both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways.

  18. Accuracy and repeatability of an optical motion analysis system for measuring small deformations of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Helen; Holt, Cathy; Evans, Sam

    2007-01-01

    Optical motion analysis techniques have been widely used in biomechanics for measuring large-scale motions such as gait, but have not yet been significantly explored for measuring smaller movements such as the tooth displacements under load. In principle, very accurate measurements could be possible and this could provide a valuable tool in many engineering applications. The aim of this study was to evaluate accuracy and repeatability of the Qualisys ProReflex-MCU120 system when measuring small displacements, as a step towards measuring tooth displacements to characterise the properties of the periodontal ligament. Accuracy and repeatability of the system was evaluated using a wedge comparator with a resolution of 0.25 microm to provide measured marker displacements in three orthogonal directions. The marker was moved in ten steps in each direction, for each of seven step sizes (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, and 20 microm), repeated five times. Spherical and diamond markers were tested. The system accuracy (i.e. percentage of maximum absolute error in range/measurement range), in the 20-200 microm ranges, was +/-1.17%, +/-1.67% and +/-1.31% for the diamond marker in x, y and z directions, while the system accuracy for the spherical marker was +/-1.81%, +/-2.37% and +/-1.39%. The system repeatability (i.e. maximum standard deviation in the measurement range) measured under the different days, light intensity and temperatures for five times, carried out step up and then step down measurements for the same step size, was +/-1.7, +/-2.3 and +/-1.9 microm for the diamond marker, and +/-2.6, +/-3.9 and +/-1.9 microm for the spherical marker in x, y and z directions, respectively. These results demonstrate that the system suffices accuracy for measuring tooth displacements and could potentially be useful in many other applications.

  19. Acute Mesenteric Ischemia after Cardiac Surgery: An Analysis of 52 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gucu, Arif; Toktas, Faruk; Erdolu, Burak; Ozyazıcıoglu, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a rare but serious complication after cardiac surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence, outcome, and perioperative risk factors of AMI in the patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods. From January 2005 to May 2013, all patients who underwent cardiac surgery were screened for participation, and patients with registered gastrointestinal complications were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed. Results. The study included 6013 patients, of which 52 (0.86%) patients suffered from AMI, 35 (67%) of whom died. The control group (150 patients) was randomly chosen from among cases undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Preoperative parameters including age (P = 0.03), renal insufficiency (P = 0.004), peripheral vascular disease (P = 0.04), preoperative inotropic support (P < 0.001), poor left ventricular ejection fraction (P = 0.002), cardiogenic shock (P = 0.003), and preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support (P = 0.05) revealed significantly higher levels in the AMI group. Among intra- and postoperative parameters, CPB time (P < 0.001), dialysis (P = 0.04), inotropic support (P = 0.007), prolonged ventilator time (P < 0.001), and IABP support (P = 0.007) appeared significantly higher in the AMI group than the control group. Conclusions. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment should be initiated as early as possible in any patient suspected of AMI, leading to dramatic reduction in the mortality rate. PMID:24288499

  20. ZebraBeat: a flexible platform for the analysis of the cardiac rate in zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Elisa; Zaccaria, Gian Maria; Hadhoud, Marwa; Rizzo, Giovanna; Ponzini, Raffaele; Morbiducci, Umberto; Santoro, Massimo Mattia

    2014-01-01

    Heartbeat measurement is important in assesssing cardiac function because variations in heart rhythm can be the cause as well as an effect of hidden pathological heart conditions. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as one of the most useful model organisms for cardiac research. Indeed, the zebrafish heart is easily accessible for optical analyses without conducting invasive procedures and shows anatomical similarity to the human heart. In this study, we present a non-invasive, simple, cost-effective process to quantify the heartbeat in embryonic zebrafish. To achieve reproducibility, high throughput and flexibility (i.e., adaptability to any existing confocal microscope system and with a user-friendly interface that can be easily used by researchers), we implemented this method within a software program. We show here that this platform, called ZebraBeat, can successfully detect heart rate variations in embryonic zebrafish at various developmental stages, and it can record cardiac rate fluctuations induced by factors such as temperature and genetic- and chemical-induced alterations. Applications of this methodology may include the screening of chemical libraries affecting heart rhythm and the identification of heart rhythm variations in mutants from large-scale forward genetic screens.

  1. Cardiac CT for myocardial ischaemia detection and characterization—comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, A M; De Cecco, C N; Wang, R; Meinel, F G; Binukrishnan, S R; Spearman, J V; Vogl, T J; Ruzsics, B

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of myocardial ischaemia remains one of the most common and challenging clinical scenarios faced by physicians. Current imaging modalities are capable of three-dimensional, functional and anatomical views of the heart and as such offer a unique contribution to understanding and managing the pathology involved. Evidence has accumulated that visual anatomical coronary evaluation does not adequately predict haemodynamic relevance and should be complemented by physiological evaluation, highlighting the importance of functional assessment. Technical advances in CT technology over the past decade have progressively moved cardiac CT imaging into the clinical workflow. In addition to anatomical evaluation, cardiac CT is capable of providing myocardial perfusion parameters. A variety of CT techniques can be used to assess the myocardial perfusion. The single energy first-pass CT and dual energy first-pass CT allow static assessment of myocardial blood pool. Dynamic cardiac CT imaging allows quantification of myocardial perfusion through time-resolved attenuation data. CT-based myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is showing promising diagnostic accuracy compared with the current reference modalities. The aim of this review is to present currently available myocardial perfusion techniques with a focus on CT imaging in light of recent clinical investigations. This article provides a comprehensive overview of currently available CT approaches of static and dynamic MPI and presents the results of